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  1. A century of pathology at Yale: personal reflections.

    PubMed Central

    Yesner, R.

    1998-01-01

    This history is largely about the players on the stage of the Yale Pathology Department acting out their roles as observed by the author in over a half century as a member of the department and as associate dean of the medical school. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10527367

  2. PubMed Central

    Frenette, Gilles

    1978-01-01

    The implantation of an upper limb is probably better than the best prostheses available today, provided the patient gains some sensitivity. This is quite separate from the psychological advantage. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 3 PMID:21304806

  3. Durability of ceramic and novel man-made mineral fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, I C; Brown, R C; Jubb, G A; Pickering, P; Hoskins, J A

    1994-01-01

    In vitro solubility testing is an important means of assessing the likely behavior of fibers that are respired and accumulate in the lung. The problem has been that such tests often do not mirror the dissolution and removal mechanisms seen in vivo. Comparison of iron and silica solubility values of various types of mineral fiber showed no obvious correlation. Treating a mineral fiber containing high levels of calcium with normal balanced salt solutions produces a precipitate of calcium phosphate on the fiber surface. This deposit was not seen in fibers isolated from the lung of exposed animals. New solutions have been developed and with variations in the methods of exposing fibers, results similar to those seen in vivo have been obtained. Suitable fluid phases have been examined in static and flow-through systems. The relationship of solubility to biological activity is discussed. Images Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 6. Figure 6. Figure 6. PMID:7882958

  4. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  5. Some connective tissue disorders of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Warwick, M.

    1988-01-01

    Many connective tissue disorders involve the lungs. The same clinical syndrome may be associated with several distinctive types of pathology in different patients. Fibrosing alveolitis is a common feature of a number of different syndromes. An hypothesis is set out in schematic form which may help to account for some of these differences and emphasizes the potential importance of the pulmonary vasculature in pathogenesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:3074281

  6. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Yale: the first one hundred fifty years, from Nathan Smith to Lee Buxton.

    PubMed Central

    Kohorn, E. I.

    1993-01-01

    The persons who directed the academic teaching of women's health at Yale Medical School are presented by biographical sketches recounting their achievements and some of the difficulties they encountered. Three who provided particular catalysis were Nathan Smith, Herbert Thoms, and Lee Buxton. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:8303913

  7. Missed cervical spine fracture-dislocations prior to manipulation: A review of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Nykoliation, J. W.; Cassidy, J. D.; Dupuis, P.; Yong-Hing, K.; Crnec, M.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of patients with fracture-dislocations of their cervical spines following forced flexion injuries are presented. All received cervical manipulation without proper clinical and radiographic evaluation. These cases stress the importance of a thorough examination prior to the application of manipulative therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13

  8. Interim-Night Integrated Goggle Head Tracking System (I-Nights). Volume 1. Ground Test Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    3 Figure 2. Honeywell I-NIGHTS System Drawing . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 3. Kaiser I-NIGHTS System Drawing . . . . . . . . . . 5 Figure 4. Spinal ...thoracolumbar spinal fracture during ejection seat use. The USAF use of the DRI to evaluate ejection seats is embodied in Military Specification: Seat Systems...probability of spinal injury. But, what WT/CG/force combinations are reasonably acceptable during ejection? The I-NIGHTS program helped establish an interim

  9. Endovascular extraction techniques for pacemaker and ICD lead extraction

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, F.A.; Meijer, A.; van Gelder, B.

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, comprehensive endovascular techniques have been developed to extract chronically implanted pacemaker and defibrillator leads. It is important that referring physician have knowledge of the advantages and limitations of the different techniques. In this paper we discuss the techniques and results of the currently used endovascular extraction techniques. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696690

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Central Nervous System—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael; Norman, David; Newton, T. Hans; Kucharczyk, Walter

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has developed rapidly and now has superior ability to detect and to characterize disease in the central nervous system without any significant biologic hazard. It is becoming the screening method of choice in the diagnosis of neoplasm, ischemia, hemorrhage, infection and degenerative and demyelinating diseases involving the central nervous system. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:3976220

  11. Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in the First Two Weeks of Life

    PubMed Central

    Bessolo, Rodney J.; Vincent, William R.

    1969-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of congenital heart disease which presents cyanosis or respiratory distress, or both, in the first two weeks of life, is difficult. Close correlation of clinical features, electrocardiogram and chest roentgenogram is most helpful. The diagnosis of congenital heart disease should lead to immediate cardiac catheterization, angiocardiography and appropriate therapy. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:5773478

  12. Life-Threatening Dermatoses

    PubMed Central

    Cram, David L.

    1973-01-01

    Four life-threatening dermatoses—Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Kaposi's varicelliform eruption and purpura fulminans—are unique in their abrupt onset and rapid progress to death, but prompt diagnosis and proper therapy can often cure the condition or prevent undesirable sequelae. Since two of the four conditions can follow the use of a variety of drugs and all may be secondary to an infectious agent, any physician may encounter them in practice and should be aware of their seriousness. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:4701711

  13. Transcholecystic operative cholangiography: an alternative technique.

    PubMed Central

    Tinckler, L.

    1991-01-01

    The current standard methods of carrying out operative cholangiography by cannulating the cystic duct or by direct puncture of the common bile duct are not without practical difficulties and potential hazards. An alternative method of introducing contrast material into the bile ducts for intra-operative imaging is described which is easy to perform, effective and safe. The technique consists of injecting contrast material into the previously emptied gallbladder and then propelling the contrast into the bile ducts by squeezing the viscus before taking X-ray films. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1996863

  14. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  15. A biophysical model for defibrillation of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, J P; Panfilov, A V

    1996-01-01

    We propose a new model for electrical activity of cardiac tissue that incorporates the effects of cellular microstructure. As such, this model provides insight into the mechanism of direct stimulation and defibrillation of cardiac tissue after injection of large currents. To illustrate the usefulness of the model, numerical stimulations are used to show the difference between successful and unsuccessful defibrillation of large pieces of tissue. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:8874007

  16. Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder in a Beluga Whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, D.; Lagacé, A.; Massé, R.; Morin, M.; Béland, P.

    1985-01-01

    A transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder was found in a beluga whale stranded in the St. Lawrence middle estuary. Various organs of this animal were submitted to high resolution gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. High frequency of urinary bladder cancer in the human population of the same area and the presence of carcinogenic compounds in the marine environment of this animal are discussed. Concurrent isolation of Edwardsiella tarda from various organs of this whale is also reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:17422578

  17. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Mathias, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues. All health-care workers, including physicians and dental personnel, may be instrumental in recognizing risk factors associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Oral signs and symptoms of HIV infection may be the first presentation of the disease or may develop during the course of the disease and require management. Knowledge of the signs, symptoms and associated infections and tumours is needed to assist in recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13 PMID:21253078

  18. A review of alternative approaches in the management of iatrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, G. J.; Ray, S. A.; Lewis, J. S.; Lopez, A. J.; Powell, B. W.; Moss, A. H.; Dormandy, J. A.; Belli, A. M.; Buckenham, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    The management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms (IPAs) demands close co-operation between radiologist, vascular surgeon and plastic surgeon. Ideally, each patient should be reviewed employing a team approach. Many IPAs require only observation; those with a volume greater than 6 cm3 will require treatment as spontaneous thrombosis is uncommon. Radiological treatment options include ultrasound guided compression repair (UGCR), embolisation, and covered stenting. Occasionally, these are unsuccessful or contra-indicated, and the vascular surgical approach is discussed in detail. Finally, the role of the plastic surgeon in dealing with skin ischaemia is detailed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10615187

  19. Nerves on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1989-01-01

    Nerves are often visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the soft tissues on the chest and shoulder girdle. To learn the reasons for the contrast between the nerves and adjacent tissues, the authors obtained a fresh specimen containing part of the brachial plexus nerves from the left axilla and compared MRI with x-ray projections and photomicrographs of histologic sections. The results suggest that the high signals from the nerves stand out in contrast to the low signals from their rich vascular supply. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A Figure 6B Figure 7 PMID:2733051

  20. Neurofibromatosis clinical presentations: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Robert G; Waddell, Brad M; Willson, Robert D

    1987-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NFT) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Several distinctive clinical features may be discovered in the presence of the disease, including ècafé au laité spots, cutaneous neurofibromas, axillary freckling, Lisch nodules, and a positive familial history. Chiropractic management of this condition should include early recognition, appropriate supportive referral and symptomatic treatment of accompanying biomechanical dysfunctions. Early diagnosis will not only permit appropriate assessment, but will allow for vital genetic counselling. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

  1. ’Seams’ Of Inefficiency and Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    9 3. Figure 3: Operation Mayan Jaguar……………………..………… 14 4. Figure 4: Proposed JIATF East JOA …………………………….. 18 5. Figure 5...military forces from engaging in any civil law enforcement activities. By modifying the Act, President Reagan formally directed U.S. intelligence...kicked off operation MAYAN JAGUAR (See Figure 3). Combined CD Operations OP Mayan Jaguar with Guatemala, Feb 2002 92˚ West - JIATF East coordinated

  2. TREATMENT OF DIFFICULT AND INVOLVED COLLES' FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Francis J.; Meier, August W.

    1951-01-01

    Of 105 cases of Colles' fracture, 86 were treated by closed reduction and plaster immobilization alone; 19 cases in which the fractures were more severe were treated by fixed skeletal traction using an external skeletal traction splint. Despite the greater severity of the lesions, the end results, both anatomic and functional, were generally better in those cases in which skeletal traction was used than in those treated by closed reduction. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:14801716

  3. Diagnosis of equine stifle joint disorders: three cases

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Marc R.; Hurtig, Mark B.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, arthrographic, arthroscopic, and pathological findings of three horses with femorotibial joint injuries are presented. Overall diagnostic accuracy is improved when clinical signs, arthrography, and arthroscopy are combined. Treatment of these injuries remains limited. One horse was euthanized, and two were treated by stall rest after diagnosis. Of the two surviving horses, one became a successful breeding animal, and the other was unable to perform as a pleasure horse. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17423858

  4. Fusobacteremia in a Calf with Necrotic Stomatitis, Enteritis and Granulocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmo-Wilkie, Judith S.; Radostits, O. M.

    1981-01-01

    This case of fusobacteremia appears to be identical to an interesting and unusual syndrome previously reported. We wish to bring the syndrome to the attention of others who may be able to elucidate the etiology further. Because hematological examinations are frequently not done on calves, this condition may be more common than reports suggest. Perhaps others who observe this syndrome in calves may be able to investigate the role of other agents such as viruses or mycotoxins. Experimental work may be able to establish whether or not the exotoxins of Fusobacterium necrophorum can suppress granulopoiesis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7248893

  5. Induction of maturation of human B-cell lymphomas in vitro. Morphologic changes in relation to immunoglobulin and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Beiske, K.; Ruud, E.; Drack, A.; Marton, P. F.; Godal, T.

    1984-01-01

    In vitro stimulation of cells from 8 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas comprising several histologic types with a tumor promotor (TPA) and with or without anti-immunoglobulins directed against the surface immunoglobulin of the tumor cells is reported. Morphologic transformation to immunoblastic and plasmablastic cells, but not to plasma cells, and induction of Ig and DNA synthesis were observed. A comparative analysis, including flow cytofluorometry, light microscopy combined with immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy, suggests that the three events may not always be associated phenomena at the single-cell level even in monoclonal cell populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6375389

  6. Vortex shedding as a precursor of turbulent electrical activity in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, C; Pertsov, A M; Davidenko, J M; Baxter, W T; Gray, R A; Jalife, J

    1996-01-01

    In cardiac tissue, during partial blockade of the membrane sodium channels, or at high frequencies of excitation, inexcitable obstacles with sharp edges may destabilize the propagation of electrical excitation waves, causing the formation of self-sustained vortices and turbulent cardiac electrical activity. The formation of such vortices, which visually resembles vortex shedding in hydrodynamic turbulent flows, was observed in sheep epicardial tissue using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with video-imaging techniques. Vortex shedding is a potential mechanism leading to the spontaneous initiation of uncontrolled high-frequency excitation of the heart. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785270

  7. Localization of fibronectin within the renal glomerulus and its production by cultured glomerular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oberley, T. D.; Mosher, D. F.; Mills, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Fibronectin was shown in the kidney glomerulus by the use of the peroxidase-labeled antibody technique. At the ultrastructural level, fibronectin was present in greatest quantities along those cell surfaces that abut the capillary basement membrane, especially along the capillary epithelial cell foot process. Intracellular staining was also seen in the glomerulus, most notably in the mesangial cell. Fibronectin was present extracellularly in large amounts in glomerular cell culture and was also demonstrated on the cell membrane and intracellularly. Images Figure 5 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 PMID:382867

  8. Effect of an antimitotic agent colchicine on thioacetamide hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Mangipudy, R S; Rao, P S; Mehendale, H M

    1996-01-01

    studies explained this dichotomy. Antimitotic intervention with CLC resulted in a significantly diminished repair response leading to unrestrained progression of injury and lethality even from nonlethal doses. This model demonstrates the critical role of tissue repair response in determining the final outcome of toxicity. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 4. Figure 6. PMID:8841760

  9. Formation of virus-like particles when the polyprotein gene (segment A) of infectious bursal disease virus is expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kibenge, F S; Qian, B; Nagy, E; Cleghorn, J R; Wadowska, D

    1999-01-01

    The baculovirus expression vector system was used to examine the expression of the full-length infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) segment A cDNA, which encodes the structural proteins in a polyprotein precursor that is autocatalytically cleaved to VPX, VP3, and VP4. No VP2 was observed in lysates of recombinant baculovirus infected cells indicating the lack of processing of VPX to VP2 in this system. Virus-like particles (VLP) were purified from the infected insect cells, and on negative staining electron microscopy, looked very similar to authentic IBDV particles in shape and size, suggesting that processing of VPX to VP2 is not necessary for capsid assembly. Images Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. PMID:9918334

  10. A proposal for a standardized system of reporting human lymph node morphology in relation to immunological function

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, H.; Turk, J.; Sobin, L.

    1972-01-01

    This Memorandum proposes a standardized system of reporting the histology of human lymph nodes based on commonly used simple staining techniques. The purpose is to provide a uniform, internationally acceptable system by which the histological structure of lymph nodes can be correlated with other parameters of immunological status. The proposed protocols are intended to provide information that is not available in conventional written reports, that use such terms as “hyperplasia” or “nonspecific lymphadenitis”. ImagesFigure 22Figure 13Figure 5Figure 4Figure 3Figure 14Figure 15Figure 9Figure 21Figure 8Figure 12Figure 17Figure 16Figure 2Figure 7Figure 6Figure 20Figure 19Figure 11Figure 10Figure 18 PMID:4539822

  11. Ultrasonographic scan in knee pain in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Regine, R; Carrillo, F; Minelli, S; Beaconsfield, T

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-two knees were examined using real-time high-definition ultrasonography with a 7.5 MHz probe. The extra-articular structures were easily visualized and diagnosis of patellar tendon lesions and Baker's cysts formulated. While the meniscal cartilages were shown as a homogeneous triangular structure between the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau, no lesions were detected. Deeper intra-articular structures, such as the cruciate ligaments, were not shown by the scan, thus their evaluation was not possible. Given its low cost, wide availability, non-invasiveness and patients' acceptability of the technique, ultrasonography may play an important role in the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions in and around the knee joint. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1623366

  12. Paralympics--Barcelona 1992.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J; Stirk, A; Thomas, A; Geary, F

    1994-01-01

    The British Team at the 9th Paralympic Games in September 1992 in Barcelona comprised 151 men and 54 women athletes in a total of 15 sports. They were supported by a staff of 86 including a 12-strong medical team. The athletes were selected from the National Championships of the five disability organizations: British Wheelchair Sports Federation; British Blind Sport; Cerebral Palsy Sport; British Amputee Sports Association; and the British Les Autres Sports Association. This article outlines the organization and experience of the medical support team. The injury/illness profile was similar to those in able bodied sport. The team went on to achieve 40 gold, 47 silver and 41 bronze medals, maintaining third place on the medal table as achieved in Seoul in 1988. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8044485

  13. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  14. The Clinical and Morphological Characteristics of the Uterus of the Goat during the Period of Involution

    PubMed Central

    Tielgy, A. H.; Fathalla, M.; Omar, M. A.; Al-Dahash, S.

    1982-01-01

    Two goats were slaughtered at zero, 24, 62 hours and five, seven, nine, 12, 15, 18, 21, 25, 28, 32 and 36 days after kidding in order to study the involutionary changes of the uterus. Uterine and vaginal discharges were varied in volume and nature and ceased before the end of day 5 postpartum. Uterine contents were found in greater volumes on days 7 to 9, in lesser volumes thereafter until no longer present on days 12 to 15 postpartum. Dimensions and weights of the genital tracts were returned to their initial nonpregnant state within a period of 28 days after kidding. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:17422134

  15. Occupational exposure to polychlorinated dioxins, polychlorinated furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, and biphenylenes after an electrical panel and transformer accident in an office building in Binghamton, NY.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A; Tiernan, T

    1985-01-01

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and tri- and tetrachlorinated benzene-containing electrical transformer was involved in an explosion and fire in a modern office building in Binghamton, New York, on February 5, 1981. Because of an unusual system of air shafts the entire building and adjacent garage became contaminated with toxic chemicals. Polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and biphenylenes were formed as pyrolytic by-products. Before the extent of the chemical contamination was appreciated workers were exposed to these chemicals. Four years after the explosion and after the expenditure of over $22 million for cleaning and other expenses, the building remains closed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:3928358

  16. SPLENOPORTAGRAPHY IN PORTAL HYPERTENSION—Its Value in Selecting the Operative Procedure of Choice

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, William P.; Pattison, Arthur C.

    1957-01-01

    Splenoportagraphy has become an almost indispensable adjunct to the surgical management of portal hypertension. In many instances it will provide the basis for the selection of the operative procedure. Certain instances of intrahepatic portal hypertension due to cirrhosis that might better be managed by splenorenal shunt rather than by the generally preferred method of direct end-to-side portacaval shunt may be determined by this procedure. The procedure finds its greatest application in the accurate delineation of the three major types of extrahepatic portal hypertension, each of which demands a different surgical approach. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13.Figure 14. PMID:13413692

  17. Feline Muscular Dystrophy with Dystrophin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, James L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Romanul, Flaviu C. A.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Rosales, Remedios K.; Ma, Nancy S. F.; Dasbach, James J.; Rae, John F.; Moore, Frances M.; McAfee, Mary B.; Pearce, Laurie K.

    1989-01-01

    This is the first description of a dystrophin-Deficient muscular dystrophy in domestic cats. The disorder appears to be of X-linked inheritance because it affected both males of a litter of four kittens. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescent detection of dystrophin showed dystrophin present in control cat muscle but no detectable dystrophin in either affected cat. The feline muscular dystrophy was progressive and histopathologically resembled human Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy except for the lack of fat infiltration and the presence of prominent hypertrophy of both muscle fibers and muscles groups in the feline disorder. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:2683799

  18. Studies on the Nature and Management of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.

    1971-01-01

    Prevalence of psoriasis in Caucasians is estimated as 2 to 3 percent. Sound epidemiologic studies on a worldwide basis are needed to secure accurate prevalence rates for comparative purposes. Utilizing Stanford's psoriasis life histories records, the genetics of psoriasis has been explored by various means: statistical census data, pedigree analysis, and twin studies. This research suggests a multifactorial pattern of inheritance for psoriasis, implying that both genetic and environmental components are responsible for the manifestation of the disease. At present it is not possible to point to any single causative factor. Some of the suggested areas for research include study of uninvolved skin, growth control in the psoriatic lesion, viral causes, immunological aspects, and lipid metabolism. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:5578103

  19. Viruses and virus-like particles detected during examination of feces from calves and piglets with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Peter J.K.; Hassard, Lori E.; Norman, G.R. (Bob); Yemen, Roberta L.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 763 fecal or intestinal samples from diarrheic calves and piglets were examined for viral content by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy or cell culture. Routine fluorescent antibody and cultural tests detected rotavirus (n=126), coronavirus (n=80) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=13). Electron microscopy detected rotaviruses (n=24) and coronaviruses (n=17) not identified by standard fluorescent antibody tests. Other viruses detected by electron microscopy included Breda virus-like particles (n=49), astroviruses (n=1), caliciviruses (n=1), rhabdoviruses (n=1), parvoviruses (n=2), enteroviruses (n=3), togavirus-like particles (n=2), and “chained” particles (n=5). Mixtures of several of the viruses were detected in a number of fecal samples. The survey emphasized the value of electron microscopy as a broad-spectrum diagnostic tool. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:17423455

  20. Neovascularization and tumor growth in the rabbit brain. A model for experimental studies of angiogenesis and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Zagzag, D.; Brem, S.; Robert, F.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the study of tumor angiogenesis within the rabbit brain is presented. Implantation of the VX2 carcinoma provides a reproducible tumor accompanied by angiogenesis. The authors report the sequential growth, histology, tumor neovascularization, and vascular permeability of this tumor following its intracerebral implantation. Tumor angiogenesis correlates with the rapid and logarithmic intracerebral tumor growth. The proliferation of blood vessels in the tumor and the organization of tumor cells around tumor vessels are described. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (detected by Evans blue leakage) starts in the early stages of tumor development and becomes prominent as the tumor vasculature and size increase. This model is useful for experimental studies of angiogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 15 PMID:2451889

  1. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  2. Musical Stimulation in the Developmentally Delayed Child: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nanelle Lavina; Molnar, Eva T.; Knasel, Anne L.

    1987-01-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2468780

  3. Effects of antithrombotic agents evaluated in a nonhuman primate vascular shunt model.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, R. G.; Wolf, R. H.; Zucker, W. H.; Shinoda, B. A.; Mohammad, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of aspirin, cyproheptadine, dextran, dipyridamole, and sulfinpyrazone on thrombus deposition were determined. These antithrombotic agents were evaluated in a nonhuman primate model for thrombus generation that employed test devices exposed to blood in an arteriovenous shunt. Thrombus deposition on test devices was quantitated gravimetrically. Of the antithrombotic agents tested, cyproheptadine was found to be the most effective, and aspirin, dextran, and dipyridamole were each somewhat less effective. Sulfinpyrazone had only a slight antithrombotic effect. Ultrastructual studies of thrombus deposited in test devices showed that the various antithrombotic agents tested did not prevent completely the formation of fibrin, aggregation of platelets, or adhesion and spreading of platelets and leukocytes. This model for thrombus generation is felt to be a more efficient means for evaluating antithrombotic agents than previously described nonhuman primate models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:820202

  4. Tonsillar mapping of determinants found on normal lymphoreticular (T,B,K, immature and macrophage) and myeloblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, E. M.; Stoneking, L.; Humphrey, G. B.; Rapacz, J.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal immunocytochemical method with 25 monoclonal antibodies was used to study the distribution in human tonsil of determinants expressed on T cells (mature and immature), Langerhans cells, B cells, killer/natural killer cells, macrophages, immature myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Many of the respective determinants were found to have a discrete topographic distribution in normal reactive tonsil. The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen and a determinant found on myeloblastic leukemia cells (My10) were not found in the specimens of the tonsil examined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2435159

  5. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  6. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  7. The Gow-Gates Technique for Mandibular Block Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kafalias, Michael C.; Gow-Gates, George A.E.; Saliba, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Reliable profound mandibular block anesthesia is questionable when depositing the anesthetic solution at the lingula. Complications can occur and the needle may impact a number of important anatomical structures by deep penetration. The Gow-Gates technique for mandibular anesthesia obviates these problems. In this paper the Gow-Gates technique is reinterpreted using a geometrical approach based on lines and planes and is proved mathematically. In so doing a simple yet concise method of reaching the injection site is presented with a definite relationship between the anatomical pathway of the needle and a formal geometrical and mathematical pattern. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:3481514

  8. The etiology of Balkan endemic nephropathy: still more questions than answers.

    PubMed Central

    Tatu, C A; Orem, W H; Finkelman, R B; Feder, G L

    1998-01-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) has attracted increasing attention as a possible environmental disease, and a significant amount of research from complementary scientific fields has been dedicated to its etiology. There are two actual competing theories attempting to explain the cause of this kidney disease: 1) the mycotoxin hypothesis, which considers that BEN is produced by ochratoxin A ingested intermittently in small amounts by the individuals in the endemic regions, and 2) the Pliocene lignite hypothesis, which proposes that the disease is caused by long-term exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other toxic organic compounds leaching into the well drinking water from low rank coals underlying or proximal to the endemic settlements. We outline the current developments and future prospects in the study of BEN and differentiate possible factors and cofactors in disease etiology. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9799184

  9. PubMed Central

    Higgins, R.; Paul, M.; Malo, R.; Picard, B.; Paquette, J. G.; Nadeau, D.

    1979-01-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis infection in a dairy cow in Quebec A case of infection by Dermatophilus congonlensis is described for the first time in the Province of Quebec, in a dairy cow. Dermatophilosis was diagnosed in the area of Saint-Hyacinthe in October 1978. It was not possible to find the source of the infection. The isolation of the microorganism was successful and the three techniques used are described. The death of the animal was attributed to complications following invasion by a secondary pathogen. All the other animals in the herd were free from clinical signs of infection. Moreover, no other case of infection by D. congolensis was found in other animal species or humans in the area. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 4.FIGURE 5.FIGURE 6.FIGURE 7. PMID:544005

  10. The history and evolution of surgical instruments. VI. The surgical blade: from finger nail to ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1995-01-01

    Elective surgery requires planned incisions and incisions require appropriate blades. In the prehistoric era, division of the umbilical cord and other minor procedures were probably undertaken with human teeth and nails, and later with plant, animal and mineral substitutes, as witnessed by studies of primitive societies still surviving or recently extinct. More efficient metallic blades appeared in historic times and ultimately generated five specific shapes which are analysed in detail. Today, as minimally invasive techniques, endoscopes, laser and ultrasound sources evolve, many hallowed incisions of surgical access diminish in length or disappear entirely. In historical terms, elective surgery of the twentieth century will be recalled as an interlude characterised by maximally invasive incisions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7486768

  11. Delay in growth and the development of nephritis in rats treated with interferon preparations in the neonatal period.

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, I.; Morel-Maroger, L.; Châtelet, F.; Maury, C.; Tovey, M.; Bandu, M. T.; Buywid, J.; Delauche, M.

    1979-01-01

    Suckling rats were injected for 14 to 17 days with potent rat-cell-culture interferon preparations or various heterologous interferon or control preparations. Only treatment with rat interferon resulted in a delay in growth and maturation of different organs and the subsequent development of an "immune complex" type nephritis. Thus, 38 of 43 rats treated with rat interferon developed a severe glomerulonephritis. Thus, 38 of 43 rats treated with rat interferon developed a severe glomerulonephritis, whereas only 3 of 99 rats in the various control groups had minimal renal lesions. Deposits of IgG and C3 along the glomerular basement membrane were only seen in interferon-treated rats. Images Figure 6 Figure 3 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 1 PMID:156503

  12. Orbital extension of choroidal melanoma: within a long posterior ciliary nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, J R

    1983-01-01

    Following enucleation, an epithelioid type of malignant choroidal melanoma involving the posterior pole was grossly and histologically found to exhibit direct extraocular extension along the emissary for the long posterior ciliary artery and nerve on the temporal side. In addition to a small tumor nodule on the outside of the sclera, melanoma extension was found up to the cut end in the otherwise well preserved ciliary nerve. After tenonectomy, additional extraocular melanoma extension in the core of this long posterior ciliary nerve was demonstrated for a total distance of 5 mm. As a result of the present findings, intraneural melanoma extension into the orbit by the way of a ciliary nerve has to be added to the other possible ways of direct extraocular melanoma extension. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:6676977

  13. PubMed Central

    Labrecque, Michel

    1987-01-01

    Vasectomy is done by a family physician at the family planning clinic of le Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval. The technique used combines an occlusion with metal clips and an excision of one to two centimetres of the vas deferens. The post-operative complications encountered with 304 vasectomies were hematomas (4%), infections of the scotal skin (1%), orchi-epididymitis (1%) and granulomas (1%). All these problems were treated on an out-patient basis, and no consultation with specialists was required. Of 151 patients who came back for a post-vasectomy semen examination, one had a test result showing motile spermatozoa. These figures are comparable to other results published. The family physician can easily incorporate this simple and safe procedure into his practice. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263976

  14. Morphological and morphometric study of atrial specific granules and other secretory components in dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, M. V.; Lana, M.; Leite, V. H.; Tafuri, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in blood volume can induce morphometric and morphological alterations in the secretory complex of the myoendocrine cells due to the stretching of atrial walls. These alterations were studied by electron microscopy, using dogs infected intraperitonially with Trypanosoma cruzi and necropsied during the acute phase of the infection when congestive heart failure was present. Several changes were observed in the myoendocrine cells of the heart: hypertrophy and hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, increase in telenuclear secretory complex, increase in fusion of type B atrial specific granules (ASG), decrease of the total number of ASG, enlargement of the maximum diameter of type A ASG and a relative increase in the number of type B ASG. These alterations suggest a larger secretory activity of the atrial myoendocrine cells with a larger secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7547444

  15. Differences in ligamenta flava among some mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Ponseti, I. V.

    1995-01-01

    The ligamenta flava of the thoracolumbar spine of mammals with great spinal mobility have a larger content of elastin than in animals with little spinal motion. The elastin content is also higher in the ligamenta flava of mammals with arched backs and prolonged sitting posture than in nonsitting mammals with the vertebral column in the shape of a flat bow. The ligamentum flavum appears to be important; a) in the control of intervertebra movements, b) in providing intrinsic stability to the spine in the sitting and standing postures and c) in maintaining a smooth surface in the posterior wall of the spinal canal and neural foraminae. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:7634024

  16. Past and current dermatological status of yusho patients.

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, H; Asahi, M

    1985-01-01

    Skin symptoms of yusho and their subsequent change were described. In the early stage, skin eruptions were the most prominent features of yusho. Acneform eruptions and pigmentation were most conspicuous. With the passage of time, these symptoms have improved considerably and most patients have very slight eruptions now, except for the severely intoxicated group. In the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) in the blood, the severely intoxicated group with intense skin symptoms showed pattern A--a typical yusho-specific pattern. The blood PCB patterns of each patient were stable, with no alteration after many years; on the other hand, the blood PCB concentrations have diminished year by year. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. PMID:3157566

  17. PubMed Central

    Teuscher, E.; Lamothe, P.; Tellier, P.; Lavallée, J. -C.

    1982-01-01

    A toxic nephrosis in calves treated with a drug containing tetracycline degradation products Tetracyclines may prove to be toxic, especially when they are administered in excessive quantity. Toxicity and high mortality were experienced in calves that had been given the recommended dose of a drug which accidentally contained tetracycline degradation products, namely: 4-epianhydrotetracycline, epitetracycline and anhydrotetracycline. Lesions of acute and subacute nephrosis were observed. In calves dying rapidly, an abnormal coloration of skeletal muscles, myocardium and brain was also noted on postmortem examination, and a degeneration of the liver was evident. As the calves were already sick when they received the drug, dehydration and other pathogenic factors might have worsened their condition. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:17422199

  18. The relationship of a serum protein, C1t, to a common nonfibrillar constituent of amyloid (P component) as revealed by immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.; Weicker-Thorne, J.; Painter, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    C1t, a serum protein isolated by affinity chromatography on Sepharose bears a remarkable ultrastructural and physiocochemical resemblance to P component, a common constituent of amyloid. This study provides further evidence for their similarity by the demonstration of immunologic identity and by the presence of C1t in amyloid deposits of various types using immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescent techniques. In addition, subcomponents of C1, as well as C3, C4, C5, and properdin, were demonstrated to a limited extent. The possible role of C1t/P component in amyloidogenesis is discussed in the light of recent advances in our knowledge of the nature of amyloid substance. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 PMID:329683

  19. Insects and Spiders: Infestations and Bites

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, E.W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Despite successful eradication techniques and specific effective therapies, insect bites and infestations remain a source of great human misery. The current scabies pandemic shows no signs of abating. Bed bugs, which through the ages have been second only to the malarial mosquito as an insect vector of fatal infection, have now been implicated in the transmission of Hepatitis B and possibly African acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The incidence of head- and pubic lice is on the rise, the latter paralleling, and often co-existing with, other sexually transmitted diseases. Black widow spiders are native to many populous areas in southern Canada, and the brown recluse spider's range now encompasses Canada, thanks to moving vans and central heating. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263961

  20. The epidemiology of prescribing in an urban general practice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The total prescribing in an urban general practice was recorded over a six-month period and classified according to the length of time that drugs were continued. The number of patients receiving any prescription rose with age, as did the total number of items per patient prescribed for; while the continued items rose with age, the number of items prescribed once only per patient remained constant in all age groups. The bulk of the total prescribing was for the elderly and this was mainly for continued items. The classification also shows that certain drug groups are liable to be continued whereas others are virtually always prescribed once only. The implications of these findings for self-audit of prescribing and the care of the elderly in general practice are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7452600

  1. Expression of the bcl-2 gene product in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gaulard, P.; d'Agay, M. F.; Peuchmaur, M.; Brousse, N.; Gisselbrecht, C.; Solal-Celigny, P.; Diebold, J.; Mason, D. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Expression of bcl-2 protein was analyzed in 140 cases of follicular lymphoma by immunohistologic staining of paraffin-embedded tissue; 85% of cases were positive, the frequency being related to histologic grade (100% for the small-cleaved cell type, 86% for the mixed cell type, and 76% for the large cell group). There was striking heterogeneity of bcl-2 content in a number of cases and the smaller neoplastic cells (i.e., centrocytes) were usually the most strongly labeled. In most cases, bcl-2 protein staining was much weaker in normal lymphoid cells than in the neoplastic cells. In several cases, staining for bcl-2 revealed patterns of neoplastic cell spread into adjacent tissue (e.g., normal follicles, lymphoid sinuses), and bcl-2 protein expression tended to be highest in these migratory cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1374590

  2. Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Hemrend, Bernard; Altuna, Gurkan; Tompson, Bryan

    1989-01-01

    The authors of this article offer an introduction to the field of orthodontics. They present the latest advances in orthodontic appliances and some of the possible consequences of orthodontic treatment. They discuss a number of cases and offer examples of some of the more common problems that the orthodontist is asked to treat. Such cases include severe Class II, division 1 malocclusion, surgical orthodontics, “long-face” syndrome, adult orthodontics-TMJ-periodontics, late adult growth, and post-retention changes. Practical information useful to the physician who encounters patient with these disorders is balanced with good research data to support the various claims. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:21249042

  3. Manipulative management of the temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Nykoliation, J. W.; Cassidy, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The temporomandibular pain-dysfunction syndrome (TMJ-PDS) is a frequent but often unappreciated cause of head, neck, and facial pain. Information regarding its etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment is fragmentary, and often reflects an approach influenced by the background specialty of the involved practitioner. Current treatment is often multidisciplinary, involving the use of various dental splints in conjunction with physiotherapy, psychotherapy, and analgesic medication. This paper suggests that chiropractic manipulation to the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) may be an effective approach to treatment of TJM-PDS. Illustrative cases are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9

  4. Office Ophthalmology: What is Urgent?

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The author describes eye problems in general practice, from problems appearing in neonates to those in the elderly. Refractive problems are most common. Visually threatening eye disease that requires urgent treatment or referral is important, despite its rarity. Early detection and treatment of amblyopia is important in children. In diabetic retinopathy, a potentially blinding disease, maculopathy and proliferative retinopathy require immediate referral. Chronic simple glaucoma and cataracts cause gradual loss of vision in the older adult. Sudden loss of vision can be caused by optic neuritis, which is occasionally the first sign of multiple sclerosis. Retinal artery and retinal vein thrombosis are more common in older individuals with vascular disease. One of the most common causes of gradual visual loss in the elderly is senile macular degeneration. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:21234021

  5. Cerebral scintigraphy--the phoenix rises again.

    PubMed Central

    Shepstone, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of cerebral scintigraphy from its early days of planar imaging with simple technetium-99m labelled compounds to the recent revival of the technique in the form of positron-emission and single-photon emission tomography. A short explanation of instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals is given as a prelude to a description of both techniques in normal and pathological situations. Particular emphasis is placed on the more readily-available single-photon emission-tomographic techniques using labelled amines in the functional investigation of disorders not readily diagnosed by computed tomography. Images Figure 2(a) Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3047720

  6. Experimental models of lymphoproliferative disease. The mouse as a model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mouse as an experimental immunopathologic model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias. Immunomorphologic evidence is presented that clearly demonstrates that B- and T-cell subtypes of mouse (murine) lymphoma/leukemia closely resemble and are analogous to B- and T-cell subtypes of human lymphoma/leukemia as defined by recently proposed immunomorphologic classifications. Further evidence is presented that favors the hypothesis that certain types of murine and human B-cell lymphoma develop out of prodromal, prelymphomatous states, which exhibit antecedent morphologic and immunologic abnormalities. The many experimental advantages of the murine systems are stressed, as well as the concept that the presently defined immunomorphologic approach should be effectively combined with molecular and cytogenetic parameters. Images Table 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Table 9 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6605691

  7. Bladder exstrophy from childhood into adult life.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, J; Docimo, S G; Jeffs, R D; Gearhart, J P

    1996-01-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is rare and the incidence of bladder exstrophy is calculated to be from 1 per 30,000 to 50,000 live births with male to female ratio ranging from 1.5-5 to 1(1-4). It was found that persistence or overgrowth of the cloacal membrane on the lower anterior abdominal area, prevents normal mesenchymal ingrowth. This causes divergence of the lower abdominal muscular structures and forces the genital ridges to fuse caudal to the cloacal membrane. The stage of ingrowth of the urorectal septum at the time of rupture determines whether one will produce an exstrophic urinary tract alone (classic bladder exstrophy or epispadias) or cloacal exstrophy with the hindgut interposed between the hemibladders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8709084

  8. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  9. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  10. Phagocytosis by cells of the pulmonary alveoli. Transformation of crystalline particles.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.

    1978-01-01

    The progressive transformation of illite crystals in alveolar macrophages has been studied with x-ray microanalysis and electron microdiffraction. Illite particles captured by macrophages undergo a series of progressive modifications which affect their ultrastructure, crystalline state, and chemical composition. Crystalline structure progressively disappears and certain elements are eliminated. At the end of the experiment, which lasted more than 6 months, the initial characteristics of the particles were greatly transformed. The constitutive elements of the illite particles were also found in structures other than macrophages: Type I pneumocytes, interstitium, and blood platelets. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 3 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 4 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:211849

  11. Malignant Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, B.; Petchenik, L.; Williams, M.; Thomas, C.; Luken, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman underwent a translabyrinthine resection of a right intracanulicular acoustic neuroma, which had been detected in the work-up of sudden hearing loss. At the time of surgery, the tumor was roughly twice as large as indicated by the magnetic resonance scan taken only 2 months previously. The tumor eroded the vertical and transverse crests and extended well into the cerebellopontine angle. It was impossible to distinguish the facial nerve proximal to the geniculate ganglion. All visible tumor was resected, along with the facial nerve. Histological evaluation showed a highly cellular tumor, with many mitoses and areas of necrosis, meeting the criteria for malignant schwannoma. The patient has no stigmata of neurofibromatosis, and has no known relatives with that condition. This case is only the fourth reported of a malignant vestibular schwannoma. The relationships between vestibular schwannoma, neurofibromatosis, and malignancy are discussed. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171176

  12. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  13. Lipid content in the liver of fatty metamorphosis of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, J. W.; Barker, E. A.; Smuckler, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Lipid analyses were performed on the liver of a patient who died during an episode of acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and on livers from normal subjects and from subjects suffering from nutritional fatty livers. Comparison of these data indicates that in fatty liver of pregnancy the increased hepatic lipids consist primarily of free fatty acids. The recognized toxicity of fatty acids suggests a pathogenic mechanism for the disease. Nutritional fatty liver is associated predominantly with an increase in triglyceride. These changes are not the result of postmortem change, and they confirm and extend the previous data concerning the fat accumulation in human hepatic illness. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 PMID:1239955

  14. Teaching electron diffraction and imaging of macromolecules.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, W; Schmid, M F; Prasad, B V

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopic analysis can be used to determine the three-dimensional structures of macromolecules at resolutions ranging between 3 and 30 A. It differs from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy or x-ray crystallography in that it allows an object's Coulomb potential functions to be determined directly from images and can be used to study relatively complex macromolecular assemblies in a crystalline or noncrystalline state. Electron imaging already has provided valuable structural information about various biological systems, including membrane proteins, protein-nucleic acid complexes, contractile and motile protein assemblies, viruses, and transport complexes for ions or macromolecules. This article, organized as a series of lectures, presents the biophysical principles of three-dimensional analysis of objects possessing different symmetries. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 PMID:8324196

  15. An analysis of the expression of cyclophilin C reveals tissue restriction and an intriguing pattern in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, J.; Weissman, I.; Friedman, J.; Alpert, S.

    1994-01-01

    Cyclophilin C (cyp C) is a cyclosporin A (CsA) binding protein originally isolated from a mouse bone marrow stromal cell line. We have compared the expression patterns of the mammalian cyclophilins A, B, and C in mouse tissues using in situ hybridization. These studies reveal that cyp C is expressed in a restricted subset of tissues including mouse ovary, testis, bone marrow, and kidney. Within the kidney, cyp C is highly expressed in a narrow zone in the outer medulla. Using monoclonal antibodies reactive against cyp C, we find that the kidney cells expressing cyp C correspond to the S3 segment of the nephron. The S3 segment has been shown to sustain histopathological damage from high dosages of CsA, raising the possibility that cyp C may be involved in mediating this damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8203464

  16. A historical perspective of thirteen unheralded contributors to medicodental progress.

    PubMed Central

    Dummett, C. O.

    1989-01-01

    Brief highlights of the careers of 13 Afro-American dentists have been presented. Their professional lives demonstrated both a commitment to the advancement of dentistry and a dedication to the betterment of humanity. Of the 13, three spent their professional lives exclusively in dental education, research, and public health. The remaining 10 were dental clinicians who served patients with competence, care, and concern. Additionally, they contributed to dentistry's image and progress by improving medicodental relations, pioneering in university dental education, engaging in philanthropy, qualifying for dental specialties, exerting leadership in dental professional organizations, integrating dentistry in hospital care, solving community health problems, and participating in all aspects of dental journalism. A sizable portion of their energies was expended in enhancing the quality of life in their communities and the nation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2651678

  17. Embryonic rationale for the primary correction of classical congenital clefts of the lip and palate.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Primary correction of congenital clefts of the lip and palate should be designed to carry the interrupted embryonic process to normal completion. This is best accomplished by maxillary alignment with presurgical orthodontics, stabilisation of the maxillary alignment, obliteration of the alveolar cleft and construction of the nasal floor with periosteoplasty. This allows early construction of the lip by rotation and advancement and correction of the nose with columella lengthening, alar cartilage positioning and alar base cinching. This can be accomplished before school age. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:8017808

  18. Ocular and orbital porcupine quills in the dog: a review and case series.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, B H; Szentimrey, D; Pharr, J W; Farrow, C S; Fowler, D

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective evaluation of 5 cases of orbital or intraocular porcupine quills in the dog and a literature review from MEDLINE (1983-1995) is presented. This paper reviews the diagnosis, therapy, and visual prognosis of ocular and orbital quills in the dog. Distinguishing penetration and perforation of the eye and intraocular structures is paramount in establishing a visual prognosis and appropriate therapy. Perforation of the cornea or sclera, lens, or the uvea and retina necessitates prompt specialized surgical therapy to save vision. The diagnosis of orbital quills can be readily confirmed with ultrasonography. The characteristic sonographic appearance of a double-banded, linear, hyperechoic object allows accurate localization of the quill, which aids surgical removal. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:7585434

  19. Remedial Investigation Report, Presidio Main Installation, Presidio of San Francisco. Volume 5: Figures 7-15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Composita ) LFISS01 I (Com/pasite,~ -~== -(, FILL SITEl 1N BOUNDARY - LFlTP03 JULIUS LF2SS03 DEPTH 3.0’ KAHN DEPTH 0.0 0 50 LL 2 LITHOLOGY FILL jRY...L.. ’ 4.-" I ’, -o,-". I - - S-’ " 4.. L FISS01 (Composite) LFISS01 ’/ I ( Composita ! FILL SITE 1 BOUNDARY LF 1TP03 S "lTP0 JULIUS DEPTH 3.0’ KAHN...0.120cU LF4SS01 ( Composita ) LANDFILL 4 DET 10.0’ Clrae < 0.088 DEPT -an Chodae - -- - - - --0- *% 6 / IE ,,,/,. LF4TP01 - OCETAIOSO FDPH1.0EPH, .’U

  20. PBPK modeling/Monte Carlo simulation of methylene chloride kinetic changes in mice in relation to age and acute, subchronic, and chronic inhalation exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R S; Yang, R S; Morgan, D G; Moorman, M P; Kermani, H R; Sloane, R A; O'Connor, R W; Adkins, B; Gargas, M L; Andersen, M E

    1996-01-01

    During a 2-year chronic inhalation study on methylene chloride (2000 or 0 ppm; 6 hr/day, 5 days/week), gas-uptake pharmacokinetic studies and tissue partition coefficient determinations were conducted on female B6C3F1, mice after 1 day, 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years of exposure. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling coupled with Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrap resampling for data analyses, a significant induction in the mixed function oxidase (MFO) rate constant (Vmaxc) was observed at the 1-day and 1-month exposure points when compared to concurrent control mice while decreases in glutathione S-transferase (GST) rate constant (Kfc) were observed in the 1-day and 1-month exposed mice. Within exposure groups, the apparent Vmaxc maintained significant increases in the 1-month and 2-year control groups. Although the same initial increase exists in the exposed group, the 2-year Vmaxc is significantly smaller than the 1-month group (p < 0.001). Within group differences in median Kfc values show a significant decrease in both 1-month and 2-year groups among control and exposed mice (p < 0.001). Although no changes in methylene chloride solubility as a result of prior exposure were observed in blood, muscle, liver, or lung, a marginal decrease in the fat:air partition coefficient was found in the exposed mice at p = 0.053. Age related solubility differences were found in muscle:air, liver:air, lung:air, and fat:air partition coefficients at p < 0.001, while the solubility of methylene chloride in blood was not affected by age (p = 0.461). As a result of this study, we conclude that age and prior exposure to methylene chloride can produce notable changes in disposition and metabolism and may represent important factors in the interpretation for toxicologic data and its application to risk assessment. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. PMID:8875160

  1. Assessment of regional cytochrome P450 activities in rat liver slices using resorufin substrates and fluorescence confocal laser cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, J T; Sidhu, J S; Reilly, M T; Farin, F M; Omiecinski, C J; Eaton, D L; Kavanagh, T J

    1996-01-01

    Characterizing constitutive activities and inducibility of various cytochrome P450 isozymes is important for elucidating species and individual differences in susceptibility to many toxicants. Although expression of certain P450s has been studied in homogenized tissues, the ability to assess functional enzyme activity without tissue disruption would further our understanding of interactive factors that modulate P450 activities. We used precision-cut, viable rat liver slices and confocal laser cytometry to determine the regional enzyme activities of P450 isozymes in situ. Livers from control and beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF)-treated rats were sectioned with a Krumdieck tissue slicer into 250-microns thick sections. A slice perfusion chamber that mounts on the cytometer stage was developed to allow for successive measurement of region-specific P450-dependent O-dealkylation of 7-ethoxy-, 7-pentoxy-, and 7-benzyloxyresorufin (EROD, PROD, and BROD activity, respectively) in the same liver slice. Images of the accumulated fluorescent resorufin product within the tissue were acquired using a confocal laser cytometer in confocal mode. As expected, slices isolated from beta NF-treated rats showed high levels of centrilobular EROD activity compared to slices from control rats, whereas PROD and BROD activities remained at control levels. These techniques should allow for the accurate quantification of regional and cell-specific P450 enzyme activity and, with subsequent analysis of the same slice, the ability to correlate specific P450 mRNAs or other factors with enzymatic activity. Moreover, these techniques should be amenable to examination of similar phenomena in other tissues such as lung and kidney, where marked heterogeneity in cellular P450 expression patterns is also known to occur. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8743442

  2. An Evaluation of the Compressive Properties of Helmet Pads Pre- and Post-Shock Wave Overpressure Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-14

    HELMET PADS HEAD (ANATOMY) TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY HELMETS SHOCK TUBES ACH(ADVANCED COMBAT HELMET) U.S...4 Figure 5. RED Head , manufactured by Humanetics and modified by UNL. ................................ 5 Figure 6...Surface pressure sensor locations on the RED Head . ..................................................... 5 Figure 7. External shock tube exit with RED

  3. Primary tumors of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B. B.; Ukah, F.; Tette, A.; Villaflor, S. G.; Koh, D.; Seton, P.

    1992-01-01

    Primary tumors of the liver that are of clinical significance are rare. Ninety-five percent of such lesions when encountered will be malignant and only 5% will be benign. Malignant primary hepatic lesions represent 2% to 3% of primary cancers encountered in the United States. Hepatocellular carcinoma constitutes 90% of malignant liver primaries in the adult. Seventy-five percent of cases are associated with cirrhosis of the liver and patients with hepatitis B infection have a 33- to 200-fold excess risk for this malignancy. Cholangiocarcinoma represents 5% to 10% of hepatic primary malignancies while hepatoblastoma is distinctly uncommon in adults. Treatment is primarily surgical, and resectability is limited by the presence of cirrhosis and spread of the tumor within and outside of the liver. Of the benign liver tumors, the liver cell adenoma seem to be associated with oral contraception and have a proclivity for intraperitoneal hemorrhage, especially during pregnancy. Focal nodular hyperplasia is a tumor-like condition that also may be associated with oral contraception. This article describes five cases, two of which had quite unique presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1602511

  4. Susceptible periods during embryogenesis of the heart and endocrine glands.

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, T W

    2000-01-01

    One of the original principles of teratology states that, "Susceptibility to teratogenesis varies with the developmental stage at the time of exposure to an adverse influence" [Wilson JG. Environment and Birth Defects. New York:Academic Press, 1973]. The time of greatest sensitivity encompasses the period of organ formation during weeks 3-8 following fertilization in human gestation. At this time, stem cell populations for each organ's morphogenesis are established and inductive events for the initiation of differentiation occur. Structural defects of the heart and endocrine system are no exception to this axiom and have their origins during this time frame. Although the function and maturation of these organs may be affected at later stages, structural defects and loss of cell types usually occur during these early phases of development. Thus, to determine critical windows for studying mechanisms of teratogenesis, it is essential to understand the developmental processes that establish these organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:10852854

  5. Analysis of the mitochondrial ATP synthase beta-subunit gene in Drosophilidae: structure, transcriptional regulatory features and developmental pattern of expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Peña, P; Ugalde, C; Calleja, M; Garesse, R

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned and determined the structure of the gene encoding the H(+)-ATP synthase beta subunit in two distantly related Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. virilis. The gene contains three exons that are extremely well conserved at the amino acid level, not only in the region encoding the mature protein but also in that encoding the leader peptide. Primer extension analysis indicates that the 5' untranslated region is extremely short, and reveals the presence of multiple initiation sites of transcription in both Drosophila species. The promoters of D. melanogaster and D. virilis H(+)-ATP synthase beta-subunit genes contain a conserved region surrounding the initiation transcription sites. Nucleotide sequence analysis has revealed the absence of canonical TATA and CCAAT boxes and the presence of several putative regulatory elements in both promoter regions, including GAGA, GATA and Ets binding sites. We have analysed the pattern of gene expression during D. melanogaster development. The mRNA is stored in oocytes, and activation of transcription takes place after 10 h of development. The expression of the nuclear-encoded H(+)-ATP synthase beta subunit is strictly coordinated with the expression of subunits 6 and 8 of the same complex that are encoded in the mitochondrial genome. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8554535

  6. Coronary atherosclerosis in transplanted mouse hearts. I. Time course and immunogenetic and immunopathological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, P. S.; Chase, C. M.; Winn, H. J.; Colvin, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental system is described in which coronary arteries of mouse hearts transplanted heterotopically develop obstructive lesions by 4 weeks. Transient immunosuppression permits graft survival. Donor/recipient antigenic differences may be either class I or class II major histocompatibility antigens (H-2) or non-H-2 antigens. An infiltrate including CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages concentrates early in the intima and adventitia of larger coronary arteries, with little in the myocardium. Subsequently, the intima expands with cells of donor origin and the infiltrate invades the media. Endothelial and intimal cells express ICAM-1, leukocytes LFA-1: Endothelium expresses class I, but not class II, antigens. As class II disparity alone suffices, the endothelium can apparently be an indirect target of immune injury. We propose that graft atherosclerosis is T cell initiated and elicited by heterogeneous antigens in the endothelium or media. It is separable from rejection of the myocardium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7906094

  7. Periocular xanthogranulomas associated with severe adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A; Mills, M D; Hidayat, A A; Dallow, R L; Townsend, D J; Brinker, E A; Charles, N C

    1993-01-01

    This article describes six patients who presented, usually bilaterally, with yellow-orange, elevated, indurated, and nonulcerated xanthomatous eyelid lesions, typically extending into the anterior orbital fat, and sometimes involving the extraocular muscles and the lacrimal gland. Because the eyelids remained intact and because the process did not reach the deep orbital and perioptic connective tissues, visual acuity was well preserved. There is cosmetic morbidity and occasionally motility restriction with advancing involvement of the extraocular muscles. All patients had variably severe adult-onset asthma that required treatment with systemic prednisone and inhalants. No evidence of Erdheim-Chester disease was found in any patient, but the appearance in one patient, after 25 years of follow-up, of a separate subcutaneous necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous lesion in the mandibular region with an associated paraproteinemia, suggests that at least some of our cases might be a mild form of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. For this reason, we would suggest repeated periodic serum protein immunoelectrophoretic studies as well as evaluation for lymphoma. Therapy probably should consist of low doses of periorbital radiotherapy coupled with high doses of corticosteroids. Should this not be successful, then systemic administration of corticosteroids with chemotherapeutic agents might be efficacious, as in necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:8140711

  8. The impact of imprinting: Prader-Willi syndrome resulting from chromosome translocation, recombination, and nondisjunction.

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Olson, S.; Gunter, K.; Quan, F.; Wolford, J.; Popovich, B. W.; Magenis, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is most often the result of a deletion of bands q11.2-q13 of the paternally derived chromosome 15, but it also occurs either because of maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of this region or, rarely, from a methylation imprinting defect. A significant number of cases are due to structural rearrangements of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15. We report two cases of PWS with UPD in which there was a meiosis I nondisjunction error involving an altered chromosome 15 produced by both a translocation event between the heteromorphic satellite regions of chromosomes 14 and 15 and recombination. In both cases, high-resolution banding of the long arm was normal, and FISH of probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3 indicated no loss of this material. Chromosome heteromorphism analysis showed that each patient had maternal heterodisomy of the chromosome 15 short arm, whereas PCR of microsatellites demonstrated allele-specific maternal isodisomy and heterodisomy of the long arm. SNRPN gene methylation analysis revealed only a maternal imprint in both patients. We suggest that the chromosome structural rearrangements, combined with recombination in these patients, disrupted normal segregation of an imprinted region, resulting in uniparental disomy and PWS. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8651261

  9. Isolation of circovirus from lesions of pigs with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J; Hassard, L; Clark, E; Harding, J; Allan, G; Willson, P; Strokappe, J; Martin, K; McNeilly, F; Meehan, B; Todd, D; Haines, D

    1998-01-01

    Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), an apparently new disease, has been recognized in swine herds in western Canada. Young pigs with this disease have progressive weight loss, tachypnea, dyspnea, and jaundice, accompanied by interstitial pneumonia, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and nephritis. We examined more than 400 pigs from more than 70 herds in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba with cases of PMWS. A small virus was isolated from a range of tissues from 8 of 8 affected pigs examined. The agent was identified as a circovirus-like virus using electron microscopy, immunohistochemical staining with porcine and rabbit immune serum, and in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemical examination of tissues from more than 100 affected pigs has revealed widespread viral antigen, often contained in circovirus-like inclusion bodies, in lesions from numerous organs. Although Koch's postulates remain to be fulfilled, these results demonstrate a high degree of association between the presence of the circovirus-like virus and PMWS in affected swine. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:9442952

  10. Immunopathology of early and clinically silent lupus nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, T.; Cameron, W. R.; Lapenas, D.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed immunopathologic studies of early or silent renal alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus have been sparse. The renal biopsies of 16 lupus patients with normal renal function, including 8 with hematuria and/or proteinuria of recent onset, and 8 without clinically detectable renal disease were investigated by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. Immunoglobulins, complement components, and electron-dense deposits were detected in glomeruli of all patients, regardless of morphologic appearance or lack of clinical evidence of renal involvement. Features of membranous glomerulonepritis were observed in 4 patients with substantial proteinuria. In the remaining 12 patients, including 3 with hematuria and 4 with slight proteinuria, either minimal glomerular alterations or features of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis were seen. Transformation of the original disease was demonstrated in 3 of 3 patients rebiopsied within 2 years. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to a) the spectrum of clinical and immunopathologic alterations in lupus nephritis and b) transformation of the original disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:322502

  11. Acute, lethal, natural killer cell-resistant myeloproliferative disease induced by polyomavirus in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Szomolanyi-Tsuda, E.; Dundon, P. L.; Joris, I.; Shultz, L. D.; Woda, B. A.; Welsh, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Infection of severe combined immunodeficient mice, which lack T and B lymphocytes, with polyomavirus (PyV) induced an acute hematological disorder leading to the death of the mice by 2 weeks postinfection. The disease was characterized by a dramatic decrease in megakaryocytes, multiple hemorrhages, anemia, thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, a massive myeloproliferation and splenic erythroproliferation with a defect in maturation of the myeloid elements similar to that in acute leukemia. This pathology in severe combined immunodeficient mice is very different from that of the well-characterized tumor profiles induced by PyV in normal newborn or nude mice. Viral T and capsid (VP1) antigens and viral genome were detected in some cells in the spleen, but not in the majority of the proliferating myeloid cells. This suggests that the myeloproliferation is induced by some indirect mechanism, such as secretion of growth factors or cytokines by virus-infected cells, rather than by direct transformation by PyV. Neither the spread of PyV, its replication in different organs, nor the pathogenesis or the time of death were altered by depleting natural killer cells in vivo by anti-natural killer cell antibodies. Analysis of the spleen leukocyte population indicated that the cells expressed high levels of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens and were resistant to lysis by activated natural killer cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8311119

  12. Characterisation of inorganic microparticles in pigment cells of human gut associated lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Ainley, C C; Harvey, R S; Mason, I M; Kendall, M D; Sankey, E A; Dhillon, A P; Thompson, R P

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages at the base of human gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), become loaded early in life with dark granular pigment that is rich in aluminium, silicon, and titanium. The molecular characteristics, intracellular distribution, and source of this pigment is described. Laser scanning and electron microscopy showed that pigmented macrophages were often closely related to collagen fibres and plasma cells in GALT of both small and large intestine and contained numerous phagolysosomes, previously described as granules, that are rich in electron dense submicron sized particles. Morphological assessment, x ray microanalysis, and image electron energy loss spectroscopy showed three distinct types of microparticle: type I - spheres of titanium dioxide, 100-200 nm diameter, characterised as the synthetic food-additive polymorph anatase; type II - aluminosilicates, < 100-400 nm in length, generally of flaky appearance, often with adsorbed surface iron, and mostly characteristic of the natural clay mineral kaolinite; and type III - mixed environmental silicates without aluminium, 100-700 nm in length and of variable morphology. Thus, this cellular pigment that is partly derived from food additives and partly from the environment is composed of inert inorganic microparticles and loaded into phagolysosomes of macrophages within the GALT of all human subjects. These observations suggest that the pathogenicity of this pigment should be further investigated since, in susceptible individuals, the same intracellular distribution of these three types of submicron particle causes chronic latent granulomatous inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8675092

  13. Effect of Macerase, Oxalic Acid, and EGTA on Deep Supercooling and Pit Membrane Structure of Xylem Parenchyma of Peach

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Michael; Davis, Glen; Arora, Rajeev

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if calcium cross-linking of pectin in the pit membrane of xylem parenchyma restricts water movement which results in deep supercooling. Current year shoots of `Loring' peach (Prunus persica) were infiltrated with oxalic acid or EGTA solutions for 24 or 48 hours and then either prepared for ultrastructural analysis or subjected to differential thermal analysis. The effect of 0.25 to 1.0% pectinase (weight/volume) on deep supercooling was also investigated. The use of 5 to 50 millimolar oxalic acid and pectinase resulted in a significant reduction (flattening) of the low temperature exotherm and a distinct swelling and partial degradation of the pit membrane. EGTA (10 millimolar) for 24 or 48 hours shifted the low temperature exotherm to warmer temperatures and effected the outermost layer of the pit membrane. A hypothesis is presented on pectin-mediated regulation of deep supercooling of xylem parenchyma. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668341

  14. Histogenesis of clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses. An electron-microscopic, biochemical, enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, M.; Torikata, C.; Iri, H.; Mikata, A.; Kawai, T.; Hanaoka, H.; Yakumaru, K.; Kageyama, K.

    1984-01-01

    For the purpose of clarifying the histogenesis of clear cell sarcoma of tendons and aponeuroses (CCS) as well as the problem of whether or not CCS is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, studies based on various methods were performed. Analysis of glycosaminoglycans gave the same results for amelanotic CCS and synovial sarcoma, and the DOPA reaction gave the same negative results for amelanotic CCS and synovial sarcoma. However, the DOPA reaction was also negative in an amelanotic recurrent tumor of a melanotic CCS, and electron-microscopic studies revealed a close resemblance between amelanotic CCS and melanotic CCS. Further, enzyme histochemical studies showed definite differences between synovial sarcoma and amelanotic CCS but gave identical results for amelanotic and melanotic CCS. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of S-100 protein in all CCS cases, both amelanotic and melanotic. These results indicate that CCS is not a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, and that both amelanotic and melanotic CCS are of neural crest origin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:6320649

  15. Intermediate filament proteins in choroid plexus and ependyma and their tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, M.; Clark, R.; Virtanen, I.

    1986-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein types of normal choroid plexus and ependymal tissue and their putative tumors were investigated. In normal human choroid plexus tissue, but not in ependyma, keratin could be demonstrated immunohistochemically. By immunoblotting, keratins 8, 18, and 19 were found, but glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was absent. In mouse and rat, choroid plexus epithelium and ependymal lining cells were keratin-positive. In addition, many ependymal cells were vimentin-positive. Keratin was immunohistochemically found in three of four choroid plexus papillomas, two of two choroid plexus carcinomas, and the lining cells of three neuroepithelial cysts. GFAP-positive cells were present in some choroid plexus tumors. In contrast, none of the eight ependymomas contained keratin, but all were strongly positive for GFAP. The results show that choroid plexus lining cells and choroid plexus tumors have true epithelial characteristics in their cytoskeleton, in contrast to ependymomas, which do not show keratin positivity but show glial filaments, as would be seen in astrocytic tumors. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:2422943

  16. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, N. A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Mewhinney, J. A.; Hahn, F. F.; Seiler, F. A.; Boecker, B. B.; McClellan, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 238PuO2. Initial deposition of 238PuO2 in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the 238Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to 238PuO2, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after 238Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that 238Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of 238Pu. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3142267

  17. A 10-bp deletion in the apolipoprotein epsilon gene causing apolipoprotein E deficiency and severe type III hyperlipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, G.; Dobmeyer, J.; Gröne, H. J.; Lohmer, S.; Wohlfeil, S.

    1996-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) is usually associated with homozygosity for apolipoprotein (apo) E2. We identified a 30-year-old male German of Hungarian ancestry with severe type III HLP and apo E deficiency. The disease was expressed in an extreme phenotype with multiple cutaneous xanthomas. Apo E was detectable only in trace amounts in plasma but not in the different lipoprotein fractions. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified segments of the apo epsilon gene identified a 10-bp deletion in exon 4 (bp 4037-4046 coding for amino acids 209-212 of the mature protein). The mutation is predictive for a reading frameshift introducing a premature stop codon (TGA) at amino acid 229. By western blot analysis, we found small amounts of a truncated apo E in the patient's plasma. Family analysis revealed that the proband was homozygous--and 10 of 24 relatives were heterozygous--for the mutation. Heterozygotes had, as compared to unaffected family members, significantly higher triglycerides (TG), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and a significantly higher VLDL cholesterol-to-serum TG ratio, which is indicative of a delayed remnant catabolism. We propose that the absence of a functionally active apo E is the cause of the severe type III HLP in the patient and that the mutation, even in a single dose in heterozygotes, predisposes in variable severity to the phenotypic expression of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8571954

  18. Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis-induced cutaneous leishmaniasis in Balb/c mice: pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, J. I.; Tani, E.; Orn, A.; Sánchez, C.; Goto, H.

    1993-01-01

    Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis infected Balb/c mice developed a progressive swelling in the injected footpad that grew to a tumour-like lesion from day 80 onwards. We did not observe any typical ulcera, necrosis or metastasis to other parts of the skin. Neither did we observe any histopathological changes in liver or spleen during the experiment. At the site of injection, we observed progressive changes ranging from a moderate, mixed inflammatory infiltrate with few leishmania amastigotes in the macrophages to an extensive inflammation composed of monomorphic vacuolated macrophages containing large numbers of parasites. A granulomatous pattern with presence of epithelioid cells and a few multinucleated giant cells was observed at the initial phase of the infection. During later stages, focal necrosis with polymorphonuclear neutrophils was seen. Lymph nodes presented granulomatous lesions in the subcapsular area, numerous plasma cells in the medullary cords and macrophages with leishmania organisms in dilated cortical sinuses at the 4th and the 6th months of infection. This Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis infected Balb/c mice seems to be a good model for continued studies of the pathogenesis of cutaneous leishmaniasis and also for drug trials in the development of new therapeutic tools. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8217783

  19. Aquatic-Based Rehabilitation and Training for the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Thein, Jill M.; Brody, Lori Thein

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To describe the application of aquatic rehabilitative exercise to injuries of the upper extremity. Background: Water has been used for centuries as a medium for rehabilitation, relaxation, and training. Athletes use the pool to rehabilitate specific injuries, as a training medium during injury recovery, and as an alternative training site. The pool can be used to rehabilitate a number of upper extremity impairments, as well as to restore functional movement patterns in a resistive medium. Description: Exercises can be modified to be performed in pools of varying size and depth. Well-chosen equipment will enhance the rehabilitative opportunities for the clinician and patient. Clinical Advantages: All aspects of the rehabilitation program, including passive stretching, resistive exercise, functional movement patterns, and cardiovascular training, can take place in the same location. The water's warmth and buoyancy enhance stretching, while the buoyancy allows initiation of resistive exercise at a low level. The water's viscosity provides resistance throughout a movement pattern in any plane. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:16558651

  20. Frameshift deletions of exons 3-7 and revertant fibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: mechanisms of dystrophin production.

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, A V; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W; Florence, J; Burghes, A H

    1995-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with mutations that disrupt the translational reading frame produce little or no dystrophin. Two exceptions are the deletion of exons 3-7 and the occurrence of rare dystrophin-positive fibers (revertant fibers) in muscle of DMD patients. Antibodies directed against the amino-terminus and the 5' end of exon 8 did not detect dystrophin in muscle from patients who have a deletion of exons 3-7. However, in all cases, dystrophin was detected with an antibody directed against the 3' end of exon 8. The most likely method of dystrophin production in these cases is initiation at a new start codon in exon 8. We also studied two patients who have revertant fibers: one had an inherited duplication of exons 5-7, which, on immunostaining, showed two types of revertant fibers; and the second patient had a 2-bp nonsense mutation in exon 51, which creates a cryptic splice site. An in-frame mRNA that uses this splice site in exon 51 was detected. Immunostaining demonstrated the presence of the 3' end of exon 51, which is in agreement with the use of this mRNA in revertant fibers. The most likely method of dystrophin production in these fibers is a second mutation that restores the reading frame. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7825572

  1. Intracellular viral localization in murine coxsackievirus-B3 myocarditis. Ultrastructural study by electron microscopic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Ukimura, A.; Deguchi, H.; Kitaura, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Hirasawa, M.; Kawamura, K.; Hirai, K.

    1997-01-01

    Group B Coxsackieviruses are a common cause of myocarditis. To detect the viral genome and its localization in the myocardium, we examined C3H/He mice with Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis on days 5, 8, and 14 after inoculation by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by in situ hybridization. Sense and antisense CVB3 RNA were detected in the myocardium of all mice up to day 14 by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Light microscopic in situ hybridization with a cDNA probe for CVB3 showed clusters of positive signals in the areas of myocardial necrosis and cell infiltration. With electron microscopic in situ hybridization, CVB3 RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes, between the myofibrils, near the mitochondria, and in tubular or vesicular structures. Viral RNA was also detected in necrotic debris, in the cytoplasm of macrophages, and in the cytoplasm of interstitial fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CVB3 RNA is replicated in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes, transferred into tubular or vesicular structures, released into the interstitium, and phagocytosed by macrophages. Some positive signals were also detected in the cytoplasm of cardiocytes showing close contact with infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that the lymphocytes recognized virus-infected cardiocytes and caused cell-mediated immune cardiocyte damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:9176398

  2. Postmortem findings in four litters of dogs with familial canine dermatomyositis.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Prieur, D. J.; Haupt, K. H.; Collier, L. L.; Evermann, J. F.; Ladiges, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Postmortem evaluations were performed on 20 juvenile to young adult collie and collie-Labrador retriever crossbred dogs with dermatomyositis and 10 neonatal collies. Cutaneous, muscular, and vascular lesions were present in the juvenile and adult dogs and were most severe in areas of the head and distal extremities. In more severely affected dogs, lesions were more generalized, including myositis of esophageal muscle and arteritis of skin, muscle, bladder, and spermatic cord. Although viruses were not isolated from muscle, crystalline viral-like structures were present in cytoplasm of endothelial cells within skeletal muscle. The dogs with dermatitis and myositis consistently had lymphoid hyperplasia, especially of peripheral lymph nodes. More severely affected dogs were smaller than less severely affected littermates, and the more severely affected males had reduced weight of testicles and prostate glands, compared with body weight. The reduced weight of genital organs correlated positively with reduced fertility. A few lymphoid aggregates were present in or around thyroid glands of 6 of the 20 dogs. There was no histologic evidence of glomerular disease in any of the dogs. The neonatal collies had no evidence of dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3717301

  3. Functional expression of human mutant phosphofructokinase in yeast: genetic defects in French Canadian and Swiss patients with phosphofructokinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Raben, N; Exelbert, R; Spiegel, R; Sherman, J B; Nakajima, H; Plotz, P; Heinisch, J

    1995-01-01

    Human phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a tetrameric enzyme, encoded by muscle, liver, and platelet genes. Deficiency of muscle PFK (PFK-M), glycogenosis type VII (Tarui disease), is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an exertional myopathy and hemolytic syndrome. Several disease-causing mutations have been identified in the PFK-M gene in Japanese, Ashkenazi Jewish, and Italian patients. We describe the genetic defects in French Canadian and Swiss patients with the disease, and we use a genetically well-defined yeast system devoid of endogenous PFK for structure-function studies of the mutant PFKs. A G-to-A transition at codon 209-in exon 8 of the PFK-M gene, changing an encoded Gly to Asp, is responsible for the disease in a homozygous French Canadian patient. Gly-209-mutated protein is completely inactive in the yeast system. The Swiss patient is a genetic compound, carrying a G-to-A transition at codon 100 in exon 6 (Arg to Gln) and a G-to-A transition at codon 696 in exon 22 (Arg to His). The mutants expressed in yeast generate functional enzyme with modest changes in thermal stability. The advantages and limitations of the yeast system for expression of human mutant PFKs are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7825568

  4. Cortical and subcortical patterns of synaptophysinlike immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Masliah, E.; Terry, R. D.; Alford, M.; DeTeresa, R.; Hansen, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Quantification of synaptophysinlike immunoreactivity is a valuable method for studying the presynaptic terminals in the normal and damaged nervous system. The present report shows that in the control brain, the predominant pattern of synaptic immunostaining in the neocortex was that of an evenly distributed densely granular immunolabeling of the neuropil, while in the paleocortex and in subcortical areas of the brain most of the presynaptic terminals were distributed along the dendritic arborizations or around the neuronal somata. The immunochemical and the immunohistochemical analysis of the Alzheimer's disease tissue showed that the frontal and parietal cortex presented the most severe and widespread loss, with a 45% loss in synaptophysin immunoreactivity. These areas showed an average 35% loss of large neurons. The visual cortex, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, nucleus basalis of Meynert, and locus ceruleus displayed some degree of loss, but to a lesser extent. In addition to this loss, the basic patterns of organization of the presynaptic terminals were altered, with the presence of abundant, enlarged synaptophysin-labeled terminals. This study further supports the role of synaptic pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 PMID:1899001

  5. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  6. An ultrastructural analysis of endothelial change paralleling platelet aggregation in a light/dye model of microvascular insult.

    PubMed Central

    Povlishock, J. T.; Rosenblum, W. I.; Sholley, M. M.; Wei, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Those microvascular endothelial events that parallel the evolution of platelet aggregation were evaluated in a well-controlled animal model. Cat pial microvessels were observed through a cranial window while local platelet aggregation was produced by intravenous injection of sodium fluorescein and simultaneous exposure of the pial vessels to light from a filtered mercury lamp that excited the fluorescein. The vessels were fixed in situ when the in vivo observations of a preselected vessel indicated early, intermediate, or advanced aggregation in that vessel. The preselected vessel was then harvested for ultrastructural study together with adjacent vessels from the illuminated field. These vessels and appropriate controls were compared in semiserial thin sections. The onset of platelet aggregation in both venules and arterioles was accompanied by focal endothelial lucency, vacuole formation, luminal membrane rupture, and swelling of the nuclear envelope. These changes were not found in control material. With intermediate aggregation these changes were more common, while with advanced aggregation these abnormalities occurred together with focal endothelial denudation. Thus, in this model denudation occurred only with advanced aggregation and was not a prerequisite for aggregation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6824062

  7. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  8. Changing patterns of keratin expression during progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Smedts, F.; Ramaekers, F.; Robben, H.; Pruszczynski, M.; van Muijen, G.; Lane, B.; Leigh, I.; Vooijs, P.

    1990-01-01

    The expression of keratins in normal cervical epithelia, metaplastic epithelium, and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I, II, and III is investigated with a panel of keratin polypeptide-specific monoclonal antibodies. This approach allowed the detection of individual keratins 4, 7, 8, 10, 13, 14, 18, and 19 at the single-cell level. By using an antibody recognizing keratins 5 and 8 (RCK 102) and two antibodies specific for keratin 8 (CAM 5.2 and M 20), it was also possible to derive information on the distribution of keratin 5. Our results show that during immature squamous metaplasia there is an acquisition of keratins typical of squamous epithelium, ie, keratins 4, 5, 13, and 14. This process continues during further differentiation to mature squamous metaplasia. In premalignant lesions the expression pattern of the progenitor reserve cells and immature squamous metaplastic epithelium is partly conserved. However, in most cases an induction in the expression of the keratins 4, 13, and 14 was observed. Furthermore, CIN III shows a more extensive expression of keratins typical of simple epithelia, ie, keratins 8 and 18, as compared to CIN I and CIN II. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1690513

  9. Ultrastructural studies on the gastrocnemius tendon of selenium-deficient ducklings.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeny, P. R.; Brown, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrastructural study of the changes occurring in the gastrocnemius tendon of normal and selenium-deficient ducklings from 1 to 12 days of age. The study revealed that the normal 1--8-day-old duckling tendon contained 2 morphologically distinct cell types and a third occurring at Days 8--12. The location of these cells within the endotendineum and fiber bundles and their morphologic characteristics are presented. Most cells showed cytologic alterations as early as 4 days on the deficient diet with progressive deterioration to Day 12. The various cell types showed a differential response to the deficiency. Changes included altered endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus and eventual cell rupture. The significance of these observations and their possible relationship to the etiology of selenium-deficiency-induced dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:7234963

  10. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-01-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9435150

  11. Exposure to mercury alters early activation events in fish leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    MacDougal, K C; Johnson, M D; Burnett, K G

    1996-01-01

    Although fish in natural populations may carry high body burdens of both organic and inorganic mercury, the effects of this divalent metal on such lower vertebrates is poorly understood. In this report, inorganic mercury in the form of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is shown to produce both high-dose inhibition and low-dose activation of leukocytes in a marine teleost fish, Sciaenops ocellatus. Concentrations of inorganic mercury > or = 10 microM suppressed DNA synthesis and induced rapid influx of radiolabeled calcium, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins. Lower concentrations (0.1-1 microM) of HgCl2 that activated cell growth also induced a slow sustained rise in intracellular calcium in cells loaded with the calcium indicator dye fura-2, but did not produce detectable tyrosine phosphorylation of leukocyte proteins. These studies support the possibility that subtoxic doses of HgCl2 may inappropriately activate teleost leukocytes, potentially altering the processes that regulate the magnitude and specificity of the fish immune response to environmental pathogens. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8930553

  12. Familial canine dermatomyositis. Initial characterization of the cutaneous and muscular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Haupt, K. H.; Hegreberg, G. A.; Prieur, D. J.; Moore, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Familial canine dermatomyositis is a recently identified disease of collie dogs that resembles human juvenile dermatomyositis. The lesions in the skin and muscles obtained by biopsy from two litters of dogs were characterized for the purpose of determining the similarity of the lesions to those of human dermatomyositis. The cutaneous lesions began between 7 and 11 weeks of age and were present on the face, lips, ears, and skin over bony prominences of the limbs, feet, sternum, and tip of the tail. Histologically the cutaneous lesions frequently consisted of vesicles, pustules, and ulcers on the lips, face, and ears. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells, and macrophages were present throughout the dermis. Neutrophils and lymphocytes were also present in and around vessels. Between 13 and 19 weeks of age generalized muscle atrophy was noted. The muscle lesions consisted of interstitial lymphocyte, plasma cell, macrophage, and neutrophil accumulation; myofiber degeneration, regeneration, and atrophy; and fibrosis. Perivascular neutrophils, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were also seen. Histologically, the lesions resembled those present in human juvenile dermatomyositis; and these observations, coupled with clinical, immunologic, and clinical pathologic observations presented elsewhere, suggest that familial canine dermatomyositis is an appropriate and potentially useful model for human juvenile dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:6465285

  13. The environment and asthma in U.S. inner cities.

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, P A; Buckley, T J; Breysse, P N; Wills-Karp, M; Kleeberger, S R; Jaakkola, J J

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of asthma has increased in the last 20 years, and the greatest increase has been seen among children and young adults living in U.S. inner cities. The reasons for this increase are obviously complex, but include environmental exposures to allergens and pollutants, changing patterns of medication, and the psychosocial stresses of living in poor inner-city neighborhoods. This paper presents an overview of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. This overview can be used to provide a framework for designing an interdisciplinary research program to address the complexities of asthma etiology and exacerbation. The strongest epidemiologic association has been found between asthma morbidity and the exposure of immunologically sensitive asthmatic patients to airborne allergens. Our current understanding of the process of sensitization suggests that there is a strong genetic predisposition to form IgE to allergenic proteins on airborne particles. Much of this work has been conducted with animal models, but in a number of instances, specific confirmation has been reported in humans. Sensitized individuals respond to inhaled exposure with immediate mast-cell dependent inflammation that may be augmented by pollutant particles, especially diesel exhaust particles. Relatively little is known about the methods of assessing exposure to airborne pollutants, especially biologically active particulates. However, to examine the relationship of morbidity in genetically predisposed individuals, it will be important to determine the most relevant method of making this assessment. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10346992

  14. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  15. Fibronectin biosynthesis and cell-surface expression by cardiac and non-cardiac endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. M.; Helgeson, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the biosynthesis and surface expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein, in several types of cultured porcine endothelial cells: pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta, coronary artery, aortic valve, and mitral valve. We used immunocytochemical staining to compare the levels of fibronectin present in these same tissues in vivo. Using endogenous radiolabeling, we found that all cell types except aortic valve endothelial cells synthesized and released into the culture media substantial quantities of fibronectin. Using radioiodination of intact cells, we found that, whereas both thoracic aorta and pulmonary artery cells had measurable fibronectin on the surface, aortic valve, mitral valve, and coronary artery cells had little cell-surface fibronectin present. Immunocytochemical staining showed that all endothelial regions except aortic valve had substantial quantities of immunoreactive fibronectin in vivo. These data suggest that the aortic valve endothelium may be distinct from other endothelia. Such differences could be important for the pathogenesis of valvular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8494044

  16. Expression of growth factor and receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells following acute cutaneous injury.

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, H. N.; Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C. P.; Lynch, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report that acute injury induces the expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptors in the epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. In situ hybridization analysis of skin biopsy specimens obtained after cutaneous injury in swine demonstrated the induction of the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha, its receptor, epidermal growth factor-R, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor messenger RNAs in the skin epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. There was no significant expression in the epithelial cells of control, uninjured tissues. The expression levels were maximal during the period of active tissue repair (1 to 5 days after injury) and were totally suppressed upon the healing of the wounded tissues. In contrast, insulinlike growth factor-I, (IGF-I), IGF-I receptor, and IGF-II receptor messenger RNAs were expressed in the epithelial cells of both the control, uninjured tissues and in tissue specimens obtained after injury. There was no significant expression of IGF-II messenger RNA in the epithelial cells before or after injury. It seems that injury induces the coordinated expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptor genes whose products contribute to the regulation of the complex processes involved in tissue repair and remodeling. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8386442

  17. Non-muscle myosin II heavy chain has a cryptic cell-adhesion domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, F; Ho, C H

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered a cryptic cell-adhesion domain in non-muscle myosin II heavy chain. A 205 kDa cell-adhesion-promoting polypeptide (p205) was extracted from BHK cells by Nonidet P-40 or Dounce homogenization. Adhesion to p205 was specifically inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro, indicating a role for the Arg-Gly-Asp cell-adhesion motif. Purified p205 was identified as non-muscle myosin II heavy chain, based on sequence analysis and on the cross-reactivity of p205 with anti-(bovine trachea myosin) antibodies. Further experiments showed that the heavy chain of purified myosin II has cell-adhesion-promoting activity in a cell-blotting assay, and cross-reacted with anti-p205 antibodies. Finally, the adhesion domain was located in the tail portion of myosin II heavy chain, where an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing sequence can be found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626021

  18. Ecotoxicity in the Reconquista River, province of Buenos Aires, Argentina: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Herkovits, J; Perez-Coll, C S; Herkovits, F D

    1996-01-01

    The Reconquista River in Argentina is considered a "supercritical" river basin due to environmental degradation. Within its valley of 1.547 km2, there are more than 3 million inhabitants and 12,000 industries. Using early-life-stage toxicity tests with Bufo arenarum embryos (the most sensitive of three native species), we determined the water quality at six sampling stations of the river valley and expressed the results as acute and chronic toxicity units. Along most of the river, the toxicity was higher than the allowable level of whole industrial effluent toxicity recommended by U.S. EPA. In a tributary stream, Arroyo Moron, the water was about 10 times more toxic than the criteria maximum concentration (CMC) recommended by U.S. EPA for industrial effluents. Similar degradation of the water quality was found taking as a reference value an upstream sampling station. In all places where the water quality was worse than the CMC, no macroorganisms were found, and in one of these places, a large number of dead fishes was observed. Our study points out that amphibian early-life-stage toxicity tests could be appropriate for assessing water contamination and water quality, which is essential for diagnosis, protection of environmental services, monitoring, and restoration purposes. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8820587

  19. The morphology of gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Gastritis is a histopathologic diagnosis, which correlates poorly with both clinical symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia and endoscopic abnormalities. Worldwide, most cases of gastritis are due to Helicobacter pylori and are characterized by a diffuse superficial antral gastritis. Chronic inflammatory cells and lymphoid follicles are present in the lamina propria. Neutrophils are present in the surface and pit-lining epithelium. In North America and Western Europe, reactive gastropathy due to duodenal reflux or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents is also common. In this condition, there is no increase in inflammatory cells, but the pit-lining cells become hyperplastic, and the pits have a corkscrew appearance. Most examples of multifocal atrophic gastritis are the result of long standing Helicobacter gastritis, although there may be other causes as well. It is characterized by loss of glands in both pyloric and corpus mucosae with intestinal metaplasia of the surface epithelium. A subtype of intestinal metaplasia, in which sulphomucin (large bowel mucin) is present, has been associated with the development of distal gastric cancer. However, this association is relatively weak and is not considered useful for screening purposes. Gastric dysplasia may develop in areas of the stomach affected by intestinal metaplasia. High-grade dysplasia is a significant finding, with up to 60 percent of cases having coincident carcinoma and a further 25 percent of cases likely to develop an invasive malignancy within fifteen months. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9041689

  20. Electroporation-induced formation of individual calcium entry sites in the cell body and processes of adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, M N; Meyer, T

    1997-01-01

    Electroporation is a widely used method for introducing macromolecules into cells. We developed an electroporation device that requires only 1 microl of sample to load adherent cells in a 10-mm2 surface area while retaining greater than 90% cell survivability. To better understand this device, field-induced permeabilization of adherent rat basophilic leukemia and neocortical neuroblastoma cells was investigated by using fluorescent calcium and voltage indicators. Rectangular field pulses led to the formation of only a few calcium entry sites, preferentially in the hyperpolarized parts of the cell body and processes. Individual entry sites were formed at the same locations when field pulses were repeated. Before calcium entry, a partial breakdown of the membrane potential was observed in both polar regions. Based on our results, a model is proposed for the formation and closure of macromolecule entry sites in adherent cells. First, the rapid formation of a large number of small pores leads to a partial membrane potential breakdown in both polar regions of the cell. Second, over tens of milliseconds, a few entry sites for macromolecules are formed, preferentially in the hyperpolarized part of cell body and processes, at locations defined by the local membrane structure. These entry sites reseal on a time scale of 50 ms to several seconds, with residual small pores remaining open for several minutes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:9336174

  1. Endothelial adaptations in aortic stenosis. Correlation with flow parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Zand, T.; Nunnari, J. J.; Hoffman, A. H.; Savilonis, B. J.; MacWilliams, B.; Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1988-01-01

    A 69 +/- 5% stenosis was produced in the rat aorta, with the purpose of correlating endothelial changes with local flow patterns and with levels of shear stress; the hydrodynamic data were obtained from a scaled-up model of the stenosed aorta. In the throat of the stenosis, where shear stress values were 15-25 times normal, the endothelium was stripped off within 1 hour. It regenerated at half the rate of controls but modulated into a cell type that could withstand the increased shear stress. Adaptations included changes in cell orientation, number, length, width, thickness, stress fibers, and anchoring structures, as well as changes in the length, argyrophilia, and permeability of the junctions. Areas of either elongated or "polygonal" cells consistently developed at the same sites in relation to the stenosis, but the hydrodynamic data showed that they did not always correspond (as had been anticipated) to high and low shear, respectively. It is concluded that endothelial cell shape in the living artery must be determined by some other factor(s) in addition to shear stress. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3189514

  2. A brief history of historical scholarship in chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a cursory overview of attempts to discover, preserve and disseminate the history of the chiropractic profession, up to and including the organization of the Association for the History of Chiropractic (AHC). A surprisingly wide range of materials have been available for many decades, but sustained efforts at historical scholarship are more recent (past quarter century). The quality of these works has been uneven, but has improved with the emergence of chiropractic scholarly periodicals and interest from non-chiropractor investigators. Affiliates of the American-based AHC are located in Australia and Canada; organized historical scholarship in other regions of the world has yet to develop. Several substantial archival resources for historical investigations are available, and merit greater scrutiny and support within the profession. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25p136-ap136-bp136-cp136-dp136-e

  3. Molecular analysis of neurofibrillary degeneration in Alzheimer's disease. An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bondareff, W.; Wischik, C. M.; Novak, M.; Amos, W. B.; Klug, A.; Roth, M.

    1990-01-01

    Antibodies directed against three regions of tau, ubiquitin, and B-amyloid were used in a histologic study of neurofibrillary degeneration in Alzheimer's disease to distinguish two populations of neurofibrillary tangles. Intracellular tangles were immunolabeled exclusively by two antibodies raised against antigens in the fuzzy coat of the paired helical filament (PHF). Extracellular tangles were distinguished by selective immunolabeling with a monoclonal antibody raised against antigens in the PHF core. This was associated with removal of the fuzzy coat and exposure of PHF-core epitopes. In the transition from intracellular to extracellular compartments in vivo, tangles appeared to undergo changes similar to protease digestion in vitro. The transition was associated with the appearance of amyloid immunoreactivity. These findings suggest that tangle degradation occurs in a series of distinct stages, including ubiquitination of some unknown molecule, a change in tau immunoreactivity, and partial proteolysis of tangle-bound tau in extracellular tangles. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2169192

  4. Streptococcus mutans-induced nephritis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Albini, B.; Nisengard, R. J.; Glurich, I.; Neiders, M. E.; Stinson, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous administration of disrupted Streptococcus mutans into rabbits over 23-76 weeks led to severe nephritis involving glomeruli, tubules, and interstitium. Light-microscopic observation of glomeruli documented diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis accompanied often (65%) by epithelial crescents. Electron-microscopic observation revealed humps in glomeruli of 70% of kidney specimens. In the glomeruli of some rabbits, extensive fibrin deposits and sclerosis were evident. Immunofluorescence showed linear, granular, often ribbonlike or patchy immune deposits encompassing, in order of decreasing frequency, C3, IgG, streptococcal antigen, IgA, and IgM. The histopathologic and immunohistologic features of the nephritis seen in rabbits given S mutans thus shows many features of Streptococcus-associated nephritides in man, in particular, the diffuse glomerular nephritis encountered in subacute bacterial endocarditis. Further, analysis of nephritis induced by administration of S mutans may have implications for the evaluation and purification of dental caries vaccines. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3976844

  5. Characterization of the interaction of the human mineralocorticosteroid receptor with hormone response elements.

    PubMed Central

    Lombès, M; Binart, N; Oblin, M E; Joulin, V; Baulieu, E E

    1993-01-01

    Although the mineralocorticosteroid receptor (MR) belongs to the superfamily of hormone-dependent transcription factors, the molecular mechanism by which it regulates gene expression is poorly understood. Binding of the MR to target gene promoters has never been characterized, and specific mineralocorticosteroid response elements (MREs) remain to be identified. The human MR (hMR) was overexpressed in Sf21 insect cells using the baculovirus system. The high degree of similarity between the glucocorticosteroid receptor (GR) and the MR prompted us to examine the DNA-binding properties of the recombinant MR with glucocorticosteroid-regulated genes. Gel shift mobility assays demonstrated that the recombinant receptor interacted with oligonucleotides containing perfect and imperfect palindromic sequences of GRE. A monoclonal anti-hMR antibody (FD4) induced a supershift of protein-DNA complexes and identified the MR in Western blot analysis. In vitro DNAse I protection assays with the hormone-regulated murine mammary tumour virus promoter showed that recombinant hMR generated four footprints whose limits encompassed the GRE motifs. By means of these two complementary approaches, no difference between the interaction of free, agonist- or antagonist-bound MR and DNA was detected. We provide evidence that hMR functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8389140

  6. Photoelectron imaging of cells: photoconductivity extends the range of applicability.

    PubMed Central

    Habliston, D L; Hedberg, K K; Birrell, G B; Rempfer, G F; Griffith, O H

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron imaging is a sensitive surface technique in which photons are used to excite electron emission. This novel method has been applied successfully in studies of relatively flat cultured cells, viruses, and protein-DNA complexes. However, rounded-up cell types such as tumor cells frequently are more difficult to image. By comparing photoelectron images of uncoated and metal-coated MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells, it is shown that the problem is specimen charging rather than a fundamental limitation of the electron imaging process. This is confirmed by emission current measurements on uncoated monolayers of MCF-7 carcinoma cells and flatter, normal Wi-38 fibroblasts. We report here that sample charging in photoelectron microscopy can be eliminated in most specimens by simultaneous use of two light sources--the standard UV excitation source (e.g., 254 nm) and a longer wavelength light source (e.g., 325 nm). The reduction in sample charging results largely from enhanced photoconduction in the bulk sample and greatly extends the range of cells that can be examined by photoelectron imaging. The contributions of photoconductivity, the electric field of the imaging system, and the short escape depths of the photoelectrons combine to make photoelectron imaging a uniquely sensitive technique for the study of biological surfaces. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8534832

  7. Structural analysis of inositol phospholipids from Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms.

    PubMed Central

    Bertello, L E; Gonçalvez, M F; Colli, W; de Lederkremer, R M

    1995-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids (IPL) from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi have been investigated by metabolic labelling with [3H]palmitic acid and by GLC-MS analysis of the lipids obtained from non-labelled parasites. The IPL fraction was separated into phosphatidylinositol (PI) and inositol-phosphoceramide subfractions, the latter accounting for 80-85% of the total IPL. The neutral lipids released from the IPLs by PI-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis were analysed by silica-gel and reverse-phase TLC for the radioactive lipids and by GLC-MS for the non-radioactive samples. Ceramides containing dihydrosphingosine and sphingosine with C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids were identified. The main component in the [3H]palmitic acid-labelled ceramides was palmitoyldihydrospingosine, while in the non-labelled sample the ceramides contained mainly sphingosine. This could reflect partial uptake of phospholipid from the medium. The PI contain both alkylacyl- and diacyl-glycerol lipids, with the ether lipid being more abundant. The latter was identified as 1-O-hexadecylglycerol esterified by C18:2 and C18:1 fatty acids. Interestingly, the same lipid had been identified in the anchor of the 1G7 glycoprotein of T. cruzi metacyclic forms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:7646454

  8. Pulsed laser imaging of rapid Ca2+ gradients in excitable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Monck, J R; Robinson, I M; Escobar, A L; Vergara, J L; Fernandez, J M

    1994-01-01

    Excitable cells are thought to respond to action potentials by forming short lived and highly localized Ca2+ gradients near sites of Ca2+ entry or near the site of Ca2+ release by intracellular stores. However, conventional imaging techniques lack the spatial and temporal resolution to capture these gradients. Here we demonstrate the use of pulsed-laser microscopy to measure Ca2+ gradients with submicron spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution in two preparations where the Ca2+ signal is thought to be fast and highly localized: adrenal chromaffin cells, where the entry of Ca2+ through voltage dependent Ca2+ channels triggers exocytotic fusion; and skeletal muscle fibers, where intracellular Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum initiates contraction. In chromaffin cells, Ca2+ gradients developed over 10-100 ms and were initially restricted to discrete submembrane domains, or hot spots, before developing into complete rings of elevated Ca2+ concentration. In frog skeletal muscle large, short-lived (approximately 6 ms) Ca2+ gradients were observed within individual sarcomeres following induction of action potentials. The pulsed laser imaging approach permits, for the first time, the capture and critical examination of rapid Ca2+ signaling events such as those underlying excitation-secretion and excitation-contraction coupling. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7948669

  9. Characterization of the choroidal mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, W A

    1987-01-01

    The experimental studies performed on nonpigmented rat choroids and the review of the important literature covered in this thesis seem to justify the following statements: 1. Mast cells are present in the choroid in significant numbers. 2. Mast cell numbers vary considerably from one individual to another and from one location in the choroid to another. 3. The major concentration of mast cells in the uvea is in the posterior choroid. 4. The mast cells of the choroid have a preferential location along arterial vessels. 5. Choroidal mast cell population density apparently decreases with senescence. 6. Mast cell products are present in sufficient quantity to exert substantial effects on physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory responses in the choroid. 7. Choroidal mast cell products are released with appropriate stimulation and share some properties with the connective-tissue mast cell. 8. Choroidal mast cell demonstrate enough differences to suggest that a local differentiation may be present and may represent a locally controlled modulating effect for choroidal physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory reactions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 PMID:3328921

  10. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: a clinical study of 12 episodes in 11 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, H; Sandoval, L; Wainstein, A; Ribalta, J; Donoso, S; Smok, G; Rosenberg, H; Meneses, M

    1994-01-01

    Twelve episodes of acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) were diagnosed in 11 patients during the past 18 years in a general hospital in Santiago, Chile, with a prevalence of 1 per 15,900 deliveries. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy started between the 31st and 38th weeks of pregnancy, with malaise, vomiting, jaundice, and lethargy as the main clinical manifestations. Polydipsia (in nine episodes) and skin pruritus (in seven episodes) were unusual clinical findings. In two patients, pruritus started two and four weeks before AFLP, suggesting that an intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy preceded AFLP in those patients. Considering the current prevalence of both diseases in Chile, their association should be considered fortuitous. In another patient, two consecutive pregnancies were affected by AFLP, raising to three the number of reported patients with recurrent AFLP. In 11 episodes, liver biopsies supported the diagnosis of AFLP by showing small and midsized vacuolar cytoplasmic transformation as the most prominent histopathological feature. Positive intracellular fat staining was found in the four samples analysed. Studies by electron microscopy showed megamitochondria with paracrystalline inclusions in four samples. All the mothers survived, but fetal mortality was 58.3%. Several extrahepatic complications delayed maternal recovery for up to four weeks after delivery. This study confirms an improvement in maternal prognosis in AFLP, discusses the possibility of an epidemiological association with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and increases the number of patients reported with recurrent AFLP. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8307428

  11. Binding of normal human IgG to myelin sheaths, glia and neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Aarli, J A; Aparicio, S R; Lumsden, C E; Tönder, O

    1975-01-01

    The binding of normal human serum, purified IgG and IgG fragments to central nervous tissue was studied by the anti-globulin consumption (AGCT) and immunofluorescence (IF) techniques. In the AGCT, F(ab')2 fragments failed to react, whereas IgG and Fc fragments did so. In IF experiments, the binding was localized to myelin sheaths, glia and neurons; Fab monomers at a protein concentration of 1-3 mg/ml dod not react with the tissue, but purified Fc fragments at 0-0625 mg/ml did. The binding is neither tissue- nor species-specific. Lipid and protein extraction procedures indicated that the factor responsible for binding to myelin was basic protein. It was concluded that the binding of normal IgG to central nervous tissue is medicated by the Fc part of the molecule. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:803915

  12. Pathologic findings in adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency. II. Thymus, spleen, lymph node, and gastrointestinal tract lymphoid tissue alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Ratech, H.; Hirschhorn, R.; Greco, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Eight autopsies of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency disease (ADA-SCID) were reviewed with special emphasis on the lymphoid tissues. The thymus histology in five cases was remarkably uniform, whether or not prior ADA enzyme replacement or immunologic reconstitution therapy had been administered. Lymph nodes and spleens in all cases examined showed a residual nonlymphoid architectural framework corresponding to usual T and B cell zones found in normals. The development of an extranodal, monoclonal IgA lambda B cell immunoblastic lymphoma as a terminal event in one patient after several years of successful ADA enzyme replacement therapy through multiple red blood cell transfusions is described. In another patient with long-term ADA enzyme replacement, a terminal autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed. Autopsy revealed severe deposits of iron in the B cell zones of the lymph nodes, which is an unusual location. In addition, iron deposits outlined the splenic trabeculae, as well as the ring fibers and bridging fibers of the splenic sinuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2596574

  13. Major histocompatibility complex gene product expression on pancreatic beta cells in acutely diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed Central

    Issa-Chergui, B.; Yale, J. F.; Vigeant, C.; Seemayer, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus was induced in young, diabetes-prone BB rats by the passive transfer of concanavalin A-activated T lymphocytes from the spleens of acutely diabetic BB rats. The pancreas of the recipients was examined 1-2 days after the onset of glycosuria by immunocytochemistry by means of monoclonal antibodies for determining whether 1) Class I and/or II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products were expressed on beta cells and 2) the mononuclear cell infiltrates were represented by T cells. Marked expression of Class I MHC gene products was evident on beta cells. In contrast, Class II MHC gene products were not identified on normal-appearing beta cells. Dendritic cells dispersed throughout the acinar and interstitial pancreas were markedly increased in number. The mononuclear cell infiltrate contained few cells (1-15%) recognized by a pan-T cell marker. Although it is possible that this passive transfer model might differ considerably from the spontaneously occurring diabetic state in the rat, this study suggests that 1) Class I, rather than Class II, MHC gene expression may be pivotal to beta-cell injury in diabetic rats, and 2) non-T cells may constitute an effector cell population central to beta-cell necrosis in Type I diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3276208

  14. Alzheimer's disease. Beta-amyloid precursor protein expression in the nucleus basalis of Meynert.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, G. M.; Greenberg, B. D.; Ellis, W. G.; Forno, L. S.; Salamat, S. M.; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P. A.; Lowery, D. E.; Tinklenberg, J. R.; Eng, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) was examined using immunocytochemistry for beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) expression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In mild AD cases, light labeling of the cell body and proximal processes was observed, and small intracellular structures were labeled rarely. In the more severe cases, intense cytoplasmic beta APP labeling was seen, often along with small beta APP-positive structures. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated that in the more severe cases these small structures were also decorated by a neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) antiserum. Other neurons in the severe cases showed incorporation of beta APP into large inclusions, which were also labeled with the NFT antiserum. However, some large inclusions in the severe cases were labeled by the NFT antiserum but contained no beta APP. Extraneuronal NFTs did not show beta APP labeling and did not react with an antibody to the beta-amyloid peptide. These results suggest that increased expression of beta APP coincides with intracellular NFT formation in the nbM, but that the formation of extraneuronal NFTs results in a loss of beta APP immunoreactivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1386714

  15. Rabbit cardiomyopathy associated with a virus antigenically related to human coronavirus strain 229E.

    PubMed Central

    Small, J. D.; Aurelian, L.; Squire, R. A.; Strandberg, J. D.; Melby, E. C.; Turner, T. B.; Newman, B.

    1979-01-01

    A new disease of rabbits is described. Following an acute febrile course, animals die or recover by the 11th day postinoculation. The characteristic pathologic finding is multifocal myocardial degeneration and necrosis. The disease can be transmitted by various routes with tissue filtrates or with infectious sera diluted to 10(-6) and passed through 0.1 micron filters. Virus particles with morphologic features characteristic of a coronavirus are present in infectious but not in normal rabbit serums. The antigen(s) in the infectious serums cross-reacts with the 229E and the OC43 strains of human coronavirus. Antigen cross-reacting with the 229E virus is detectable by immunofluorescent staining in frozen sections of heart tissue from sick but not from healthy animals. Animals surviving infection seroconvert to coronavirus specificity, as demonstrated by the presence in convalescent serums of antibody capable of reacting with the 339E virus. Susceptibility to infection has not been demonstrated in mice, hamsters, or guinea pigs, and the virus was not adapted for growth in tissue culture. It is uncertain whether the agent is a natural pathogen of rabbits or a coronavirus contaminant from another species, possibly human. The name rabbit infectious cardiomyopathy is suggested for this disease. Images Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:222151

  16. Mature eosinophils stimulated to develop in human-cord blood mononuclear cell cultures supplemented with recombinant human interleukin-5. II. Vesicular transport of specific granule matrix peroxidase, a mechanism for effecting piecemeal degranulation.

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, A. M.; Ackerman, S. J.; Furitsu, T.; Estrella, P.; Letourneau, L.; Ishizaka, T.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of piecemeal degranulation by human eosinophils was investigated. Mature eosinophils that developed in rhIL-5-containing conditioned media from cultured human cord blood mononuclear cells were prepared for ultrastructural studies using a combined technique to image eosinophil peroxidase by cytochemistry in the same sections on which postembedding immunogold was used to demonstrate Charcot-Leyden crystal protein. Vesicular transport of eosinophil peroxidase from the specific granule matrix compartment to the cell surface was associated with piecemeal degranulation. This process involved budding of eosinophil peroxidase-loaded vesicles and tubules from specific granules. Some eosinophil peroxidase that was released from eosinophils remained bound to the cell surface; some was free among the cultured cells. Macrophages and basophils bound the released eosinophil peroxidase to their plasma membranes, internalized it in endocytotic vesicles, and stored it in their respective phagolysosomes and secretory granules. Charcot-Leyden crystal protein was diffusely present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of IL-5-stimulated mature eosinophils. Extensive amounts were generally present in granule-poor and subplasma membrane areas of the cytoplasm in contrast to eosinophil peroxidase, which was secreted and bound to the external surface of eosinophil plasma membranes. These studies establish vesicular transport as a mechanism for emptying the specific eosinophil granule matrix compartment during IL-5-associated piecemeal degranulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1562046

  17. A serial histologic study of the development and progression of acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, S. S.; Watt, I. A.; Donaldson, L. A.; Crocket, A.; Joffe, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    This study was undertaken for the purpose of a serial investigation of the development and progression of the light-microscopic changes of acute pancreatitis and histologic criteria for evaluating pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, similar to that found in man, was induced in rats with the use of a closed duodenal loop technique (n = 36). Control rats underwent a laparotomy with mobilization of the duodenum (n = 12). Animals were killed every 2 hours for 24 hours, and a detailed and independent histologic evaluation was made of each. Focal acinar necrosis proceeding to a vasculitis appeared within 2--4 hours before the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Thereafter, the extent of acinar necrosis closely reflected the vasculitis with the later development of the acute inflammation. By the sixteenth hour, these changes were graded as moderate pancreatitis, and by 24 hours the process represented severe hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Vascular changes and acinar necrosis preceded the inflammatory cell infiltrate. The pancreatitis has been quantitated into minimal, moderate, or severe by assessing the severity of edema, acute inflammatory infiltrate, and changes in the vessels, ducts, and acini. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7223862

  18. Induction of aneurysms in the rat by a stenosing cotton ligature around the inter-renal aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne-Pellegrin, M. J.; Coutard, M.; Poitevin, P.; Michel, J. B.; Levy, B. I.

    1994-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms have been induced in the rat by combining the chemotactic property of cotton for inflammatory cells and the resulting granuloma formation with the mechanical and haemodynamic stress of aortic coarctation. A stenosing cotton ligature was placed around the aorta, between the renal arteries, in male Wistar rats under standardized conditions. Three months later, 7 out of 12 rats (58%) had developed saccular aneurysms of the inter-renal aorta. The aneurysmal wall consisted of a collagenous shell with a few newly formed elastic fibrils on its luminal side. Detailed histological studies of the inter-renal aorta at different times after placing stenosing or non-stenosing cotton or nylon ligatures between the renal arteries, together with studies using anti-hypertensive therapy (cilazapril) and immunohistochemical studies using an anti-macrophage antibody (ED1) were performed to try to establish cellular events involved in this aneurysmal remodelling. We conclude that in this model aneurysm formation requires (i) deep mechanical injury to the aortic wall, (ii) the presence of hypertension upstream to the stenosis and (iii) an inflammatory response to the cotton ligature. The early inflammatory reaction was less in the case of nylon and although macrophages were present in both cases the most striking difference was the greater incidence of PMNs in the case of cotton. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8086315

  19. Ultrastructural organization of contractile proteins in rat glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Drenckhahn, D.; Schnittler, H.; Nobiling, R.; Kriz, W.

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells of the rat kidney contain actin, nonmuscle myosin, tropomyosin, and the muscular Z-line protein, alpha-actinin. This was shown for actin, myosin, and alpha-actinin by immunoblotting as well as by immunoelectron microscopy. Tropomyosin was localized in mesangial cells by immunofluorescence. In cultured mesangial cells, actin, myosin, and alpha-actinin constitute a considerable amount of the total cellular protein contents. In mesangial cells in situ actin, myosin and alpha-actinin were found to be colocalized within conspicuous microfilament bundles that traverse the cell body or major processes in various directions and project into either the tonguelike pericapillary processes, which run toward mesangial angles, or into the microvilluslike lateral extensions that abut on the perimesangial portion of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Thereby, the GBM of opposing mesangial angles as well as of opposing portions of the perimesangial GBM are regularly interconnected by filament bundles within mesangial cells that contain actin, myosin, and alpha-actinin. The authors suggest that the major function of actin-, myosin-, and alpha-actinin-containing filament bundles in mesangial cells is to create an isometric tension (or minute isotonic contractions) to counteract the distending forces of the rather high intracapillary hydraulic pressure and its resulting pressure gradients across the capillary wall and across the perimesangial GBM. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2260624

  20. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Causes Cystic Dilation of the Mammary Glands of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunhee S.; Bedoya, Adriana A.; Lee, Hyesun; Kim, Seokhyun; Housley, Regina M.; Aukerman, Sharon L.; Tarpley, John E.; Starnes, Charles; Yin, Songmei; Pierce, Glenn F.; Ulich, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a paracrine mediator of epithelial cell proliferation that has been reported to induce marked proliferation of mammary epithelium in rats. In this study, systemic administration of KGF into naive and oophorectomized mice causes mammary gland proliferation, as evidenced histologically by the appearance of cysts lined by a single layer of epithelium and by hyperplastic epithelium. Whole mount preparations of the mammary glands reveal that the histologically noted cysts are actually ducts that are dilated along much of their length. The histology of the mammary glands of KGF-treated mice is similar to the histology of fibrocystic disease in the buman female breast. The response in mice differs significantly from the appearance of the mammary glands in KGF-treated rats in which ductal epithelial proliferation is most prominent. Estrogen and progesterone when administered in combination but not alone cause the development of numerous endbuds in the mouse mammary gland. KGF in estrogen- and progesterone-pretreated mice causes the growth of dilated ducts, hyperplastic epithelium within ducts and endbuds, and a fibrous metamorphosis of periductal adipose tissue. The mammary epithelial hyperplasia caused by KGF is rapidly reversible in both mice and rats after cessation of KGF treatment. The spectrum of KGF-, estrogen-, and progesterone-induced mammary histopathology in mice provides a model for the study of fibrocystic and hyperplastic breast disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7977634

  1. Clinicopathologic features of young and old sphha/sphha mice. Mutants with congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Price, L.; Russell, R.; Wolf, N. S.; Alpers, C. E.; Engel, D.

    1988-01-01

    A colony of mice with congenital hemolytic anemia, sphha/sphha, were evaluated over a 3-year period. Prominent findings included decreased survivability, reticulocytosis, increased peripheral blood leukocytes, extramedullary hematopoiesis in liver and spleen, lymphoid hyperplasia and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Older (12 to 21 months) anemic animals had elevated serum levels of IgG1 and IgA. There was deposition of C3, IgG, IgM, and IgA in renal glomeruli of both control and anemic mice, but deposition of IgM and IgA was more prominent and widely distributed in anemic animals and correlated with mesangial expansion and the presence of electron dense deposits in the mesangium and in glomerular capillary walls. Prominent renal tubular hemosiderosis was noted in young and old anemic mice. The relation between the hemolytic anemia and glomerular disease is unclear but these mice may be an animal model useful for exploration of changes attendant with chronic hemolysis and evaluation of renal disease that accompanies hemolytic anemia. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3414779

  2. Fundus changes in Behcet's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, L N; Irvine, A R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the fundus findings in Behcet's Disease with emphasis on characteristic small white patches of retinitis. METHODS: Case study, utilizing review of clinical charts and fundus photographic files. RESULTS: Search of the University of California San Francisco ophthalmic photography files revealed 6 patients coded as Behcet's Disease between 1989 and 1996. Examination of the patients and their clinical records indicated that all 6 met the International Diagnostic Criteria for Behcet's Disease. The single most common fundus finding in these cases was the presence of transient, white patches of retinitis often with a small adjacent hemorrhage. Retinal vasculitis and optic neuritis were also seen, but neither with the frequency of the white patches. CONCLUSION: The presence of small patches of retinal whitening is the most characteristic finding in Behcet's Disease. These lesions are different from cotton wool spots, and their recognition can aid in the diagnosis of Behcet's Disease and of episodes of reactivation. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 1C FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 3 FIGURE 2D FIGURE 2E FIGURE 2F FIGURE 2G FIGURE 2H FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6A FIGURE 6B PMID:9440180

  3. Reassortment of lymphocytes in lymph from normal and allografted sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, H. R.; Adams, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution and nature of surface immunoglobulin-bearing (SIg) cells were studied in various sources of lymph from normal sheep and from sheep bearing renal autografts and renal allografts. In normal sheep, 12.2% +/- 1.5 of all mononuclear cells in peripheral lymph SIg and, of these, more than 50% were monocytes and macrophages. Less than 6% of the lymphocytes in peripheral lymph carried SIg. In contrast, 24.7% +/- 1.3 of the mononuclear cells in central lymph had SIg, and all of the labeled cells were lymphocytes. The frequencies of SIg cells in peripheral lymph issuing from renal autografts and from renal allografts were 6.7% +/- 1.3 and 6.9% +/- 0.8, respectively, and the labeled cells were predominantly lymphocytes. The proportion of SIg cells in central lymph from graft-bearing sheep was similar to that from normal sheep. The differences between central lymph and peripheral lymph from both normal and graft-bearing sheep are thought to reflect a restriction on the passage of SIg cells through capillary endothelium in nonlymphoid tissues. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:322506

  4. Subcellular localization and translocation of the receptor for N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sengeløv, H; Boulay, F; Kjeldsen, L; Borregaard, N

    1994-01-01

    The subcellular localization of N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) receptors in human neutrophils was investigated. The fMLP receptor was detected with a high-affinity, photoactivatable, radioiodinated derivative of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanyl-lysine (fMLFK). Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and fractionated on Percoll density gradients. fMLP receptors were located in the beta-band containing gelatinase and specific granules, and in the gamma-band containing plasma membrane and secretory vesicles. Plasma membranes and secretory vesicles were separated by high-voltage free-flow electrophoresis, and secretory vesicles were demonstrated to be highly enriched in fMLP receptors. The receptors found in secretory vesicles translocated fully to the plasma membrane upon stimulation with inflammatory mediators. The receptor translocation from the beta-band indicated that the receptor present there was mainly located in gelatinase granules. A 25 kDa fMLP-binding protein was found in the beta-band. Immunoprecipitation revealed that this protein was identical with NGAL (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin), a novel protein found in specific granules. In summary, we demonstrate that the compartment in human neutrophils that is mobilized most easily and fastest, the secretory vesicle, is a major reservoir of fMLP receptors. This explains the prompt and extensive upregulation of fMLP receptors on the neutrophil surface in response to inflammatory stimuli. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172608

  5. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brunicardi, F. Charles; Cotton, Ronald T.; Cole, George W.; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:17304963

  6. Malignant histiocytosis. A phenotypic and genotypic investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Cattoretti, G.; Villa, A.; Vezzoni, P.; Giardini, R.; Lombardi, L.; Rilke, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ten cases of malignant histiocytosis (MH) were evaluated for clinical and histopathologic features, phenotype, and rearrangement of T cell receptor (TCR) beta, gamma, and alpha and immunoglobulin (Ig) genes (7/10). All cases were HLA-DR+ and CD30-positive. Four cases had molecular evidence of T cell lineage such as TCR beta, gamma, and alpha rearrangements, and one additional case synthesized the cytoplasmic TCR beta chain. The remaining five cases did not show unequivocal T, B, natural killer (NK) cell, or macrophagic origin, and three of them had germline TCR and Ig genes. Ultrastructural analysis was not helpful for the definition of the cell lineage. Most myelomonocytic markers (MAC387, CD13, CD14, CD64, CD68) were either negative on the MH cells or were expressed on cells with rearranged TCR gene. Precursor (CD34, CD7) and NK (CD16, CD56, and CD57) cell markers were not found. The lineage of a number of cases of MH remains unresolved. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2349962

  7. P3 beta-amyloid peptide has a unique and potentially pathogenic immunohistochemical profile in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, L. S.; Murphy, G. M.; Forno, L. S.; Catalano, R.; Cordell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of beta-amyloid in brain tissue is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A naturally occurring derivative of the beta-amyloid peptide, p3, possesses all of the structural determinants required for fibril assembly and neurotoxicity. p3-specific antibodies were used to examine the distribution of this peptide in brain. p3 reactivity was absent or sparse in aged non-AD brains but was prevalent in selected areas of AD brain in diffuse deposits and in a subset of dystrophic neurites. p3-reactive dystrophic neurites were found both independent in the neuropil and associated with plaques. Little or no reactivity was observed to amyloid cores in classical plaques or to amyloid in the cerebral vasculature. The exclusive appearance of p3 reactivity in AD brain plus the selective localization of p3 reactivity to abnormal structures in the temporal lobe limbic system suggests that p3 may be a contributing factor to AD pathology. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8701997

  8. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  9. The left bundle branch block revised with novel imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, J.; Mannaerts, H.F.J.; Germans, T.; Hauer, H.A.; Knaapen, P.; Visser, C.A.; Kamp, O.

    2006-01-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is related to abnormal cardiac conduction and mechanical asynchrony and is associated with hypertension and coronary artery disease. Improved evaluation of left ventricular (LV) mechanical asynchrony is needed, because of the increasing number of patients with LBBB and heart failure. In this paper, we describe tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), strain (rate) imaging and tissue tracking in LBBB patients. A variety of patterns of mechanical activation can be observed in LBBB patients. A recent development, referred to as tissue synchronisation imaging, colour codes TDI time-to-peak systolic velocities of segments and displays mechanical asynchrony. Furthermore, real-time 3D echocardiography provides new regional information about mechanical asynchrony. Contained in an LV model and projected on a bull's eye plot, this modality helps to display the spatial distribution of mechanical asynchrony. Finally, segmental time-to-peak circumferential strain curves, produced by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, provide additional quantification of LV mechanical asynchrony. Effects of LBBB on regional and global cardiac function are impressive, myocardial involvement seems to play a role and with the help of these novel imaging modalities, new insights continue to develop. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696572

  10. The src-family protein-tyrosine kinase p59hck is located on the secretory granules in human neutrophils and translocates towards the phagosome during cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Möhn, H; Le Cabec, V; Fischer, S; Maridonneau-Parini, I

    1995-01-01

    The src-family protein-tyrosine kinase p59hck is mainly expressed in neutrophils; however, its functional role in these cells is unknown. Several other src-family members are localized on secretory vesicles and have been proposed to regulate intracellular traffic. We have established here the subcellular localization of p59hck in human neutrophils. Immunoblotting of subcellular fractions showed that approx. 60% of the p59hck per cell is localized on the secretory granules; the other 40% is distributed equally between non-granular membranes and the cytosol. Immunofluorescence of neutrophils and HL60 cells suggests that the p59hck-positive granules are azurophil granules. Granular p59hck is highly susceptible to degradation by an azurophil-granule proteinase. Different forms of p59hck occur in the three subcellular compartments: a 61 kDa form is mainly found in the granules, a 59 kDa form is predominant in the non-granular membranes, whereas cytosolic p59hck migrates as a doublet at 63 kDa. During the process of phagocytosis-linked degranulation, induced by serum-opsonized zymosan in neutrophils or HL60 cells, granular p59hck translocates towards the phagosome. The subcellular localization of p59hck suggests that the enzyme could be involved in the regulation of the degranulation process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626033

  11. Regional heterogeneity of glycoconjugate distribution in the glomerulus revealed by lectin-gold cytochemistry and SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D.; Vassalli, J. D.; Kunz, A.; Mühlhauser, J.; Orci, L.; Mulhauser, J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have used SDS-PAGE and lectin overlay analysis in parallel with lectin-gold cytochemistry to identify Helix pomatia lectin (HPL) binding glycoconjugates in rat kidney glomeruli. Previous work revealed HPL binding sites only beneath podocyte foot process bases, where they contact the glomerular basement membrane. It is shown here that after neuraminidase digestion of thin sections of glomeruli before incubation with HPL-gold complexes, the number of HPL binding sites is markedly increased. These new sites are mainly associated with the podocyte free surface (adjacent to the urinary space) and with capillary endothelial cells. By lectin overlays, this neuraminidase-dependent HPL binding was shown to be due to reaction of the lectin with desialylated podocalyxin. In contrast, HPL binding sites detected prior to neuraminidase digestion are associated with a novel glycoconjugate having a lower electrophoretic mobility than podocalyxin. Although any role for this glycoconjugate is at present speculative, it is strategically positioned at the site of interaction between foot process bases and the glomerular basement membrane. Its presence correlates with normal podocyte architecture, as shown by our previous studies on developmental and aminonucleoside nephrosis-associated changes in HPL binding to podocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2432793

  12. Predictive Value of Balloon Test Occlusion of the Internal Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Segal, David H.; Sen, Chandranath; Bederson, Joshua B.; Catalano, Peter; Sacher, Michael; Stollman, Aryeh L.; Lorberboym, Mordechai

    1995-01-01

    Balloon test occlusion (BTO) of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is used in conjunction with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging to assess the cerebrovascular collateral reserve prior to surgical manipulation of the artery. The present report reviews 56 consecutive patients with tumors or vascular lesions at the base of the skull who underwent BTO and subsequent treatment on that basis within a 3-year period. Four patients underwent carotid sacrifice, since they tolerated the BTO and had normal SPECT imaging. Postoperatively, one patient had patchy infarcts in the frontal lobe, another a middle cerebral artery territory infarction, a third had a lacunar infarct, and the fourth had an impending stroke and was treated with an emergent revascularization procedure. There were 15 patients who underwent saphenous vein bypass grafting, of these there were three graft occlusions, one of which resulted in an infarction. There were two other infarctions due to technical difficulties, one being related to the revascularization procedure. Based on these results, we suggest that passing BTO with a normal SPECT study does not necessarily indicate that the patient is immune to stroke following carotid sacrifice. Revascularization should be considered, when ICA sacrifice is deemed necessary to treat the pathologic condition adequately, to minimize the likelihood of a stroke. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:17171183

  13. Ionescu-Shiley bovine pericardial bioprostheses. Histologic and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, S. L.; Ferrans, V. J.; McAllister, H. A.; Cooley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were done on the structural changes that develop in Ionescu-Shiley valves that are used as replacement heart valves for 4 to 8 years. These changes were compared with those found in similarly used porcine aortic valve (PAV) bioprostheses. A variety of morphologic differences were observed between bovine pericardial valve (BPV) and PAV bioprostheses after orthotopic implantation including: primary tissue failure associated with the use of an alignment suture, thickening of valve leaflet, leaflet tissue delamination, leaflet calcification, and dystrophic alterations of collagen. These findings indicate that valve design criteria directly influence the durability of pericardial valves. However, other factors unique to pericardial tissue also affect the durability and performance of BPVs. These factors include the inability of pericardial tissue to accommodate dynamic stresses; the extensive insudation of plasma proteins and lipids; and the inability to reduce leaflet calcification using agents that effectively mitigate calcification in PAV bioprostheses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:1580331

  14. Pulmonary response and transmigration of inorganic fibers by inhalation exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K. P.; Barras, C. E.; Griffith, F. D.; Waritz, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs were exposed by inhalation to different concentrations of potassium octatitanate fibers. Following 3 months of exposure, the animals were sacrificed between the 15th and 24th month. The exposed animals showed dose-related dust deposition and pulmonary fibrosis mainly in the respiratory bronchiolar region. Most short fibers (less than 5 micrograms) were phagocytized by alveolar macrophages, but long fibers (greater than 10 micrograms) were phagocytized by foreign body giant cells. Dust-laden macrophages (dust cells) entered into the lumen of bronchial lymphatic or pulmonary blood vessels. Numerous dust cells were transported from the lung to the tracheobronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes where some dust cells penetrated into the blood or lymphatic circulation. Massive direct cell migration of the mediastinal adipose tissue from the lymph nodes occurred occasionally. Dust-laden giant cells were found only occasionally in the liver, and there was widespread migration of the fibers into other vital organs and tissues without any significant responses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:7212016

  15. Propagation of normal human epithelial cell populations using an in vivo culture system. Description and applications.

    PubMed Central

    Klein-Szanto, A. J.; Terzaghi, M.; Mirkin, L. D.; Martin, D.; Shiba, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new model using xenotransplanted human epithelia was developed for the study of toxic and carcinogenic effects of chemicals. Epithelial cells from the respiratory tract of 4 male and 3 female premature and fullterm fetuses were enzymatically removed and inoculated into deepithelialized rat tracheas. These were sealed at both ends and transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 3-4 weeks, a normal mucociliary epithelium covered the tracheal lumen. At this stage the epithelial cells could be isolated again and transplanted into new denuded rat tracheas. This passaging could be repeated up to six times, each permitting an amplification factor of approximately 3. Tracheal transplants containing cells of human origin (in vivo Passages 2-4) were treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Hyperplasias, squamous metaplasias, and dysplasias were seen 1-8 weeks after initiation of treatment, indicating that the responses of human and rodent epithelial cells to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are similar. Initial experiments with skin and esophageal epithelia suggest that other covering epithelia could also be used in this fashion for evaluation of toxicants and carcinogens that are likely to come into contact with these tissues. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:6821529

  16. Macrophage fusion factor elicited from BGG-sensitized lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Warfel, A. H.; Hadden, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocytes obtained from rabbit lymph nodes sensitized to bovine gamma globulin produce in vitro the lymphokine macrophage fusion factor (MFF) which mediates the fusion of approximately 100% of normal alveolar and oil-induced peritoneal macrophages. Giant cells (GC) of Langhans and foreign body type form large syncytia containing as many as several hundred nuclei per cell. Nuclei of GC appear more spherical and larger than those of the normal mononucleated macrophages, and they possess several prominent nucleoli. Giant cells of peritoneal macrophage origin show enhanced intracytoplasmic vacuolization. Normal macrophages cultured as a monolayer in MFF-rich supernatants form cell clusters which progressively fuse during the 24-hour incubation period. A signoid dose-response curve was obtained for cell fusion with MFF-rich supernatants possessing high titers, ie, the latter supernatants undiluted partially inhibited macrophage fusion. MIF-like activity was detected in MFF-rich supernatants as well as a factor(s) which inhibited 3H-thymidine uptake by giant cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:362945

  17. Antigenic heterogeneity of vascular endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Page, C.; Rose, M.; Yacoub, M.; Pigott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic status of vascular endothelium from different sites of the normal adult and fetal human cardiovascular system was investigated. Tissues included aorta (n = 9), pulmonary artery (n = 8), coronary artery (n = 6), ventricle/atrium (n = greater than 10), lymph node (n = 2), fetal whole heart (n = 3), and umbilical cord (n = 7). Frozen sections were studied using monoclonal antibodies recognizing endothelial markers (EN4, vWf, Pal-E, and 44G4), vascular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ELAM, VCAM, and PECAM), the monocyte/endothelial marker (OKM5), and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (class I and class II). Results demonstrate that capillary endothelium is phenotypically different from endothelial cells (EC) lining large vessels. Capillary EC strongly express MHC classes I and II, ICAM, and OKM5, which are variably weak to undetectable on large vessels. In contrast, the large vessels strongly express vWf and appear to constitutively express ELAM-1. This suggests that the capillary EC may be more efficient at antigen presentation or more susceptible to immune attack in vivo. Interestingly, normal coronary arteries, unlike all other large vessels, express MHC class II and VCAM molecules. Future studies should concentrate on comparative functional studies between capillary, coronary, and large vessel EC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519671

  18. Ultrastructural evaluation of parathyroid glands and thyroid C cells of cattle fed Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, W. T.; Capen, C. C.; Döbereiner, J.; Tokarnia, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Fine structural alterations of thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells were evaluated after feeding dried leaves of the calcinogenic plant, Solanum malacoxylon, to cattle for 1, 6 and 32 days. Thyroid C cells initially were degranulated in response to the hypercalcemia, and parathyroid chief cells accumulated secretory granules. There was hypertrophy of thyroid C cells with well-developed secretory organelles but few secretory granules in the cytoplasm after 6 days of feeding S. malacoxylon. Inactive chief cells with dispersed profiles of endoplasmic reticulum and increased lysosomal bodies predominated in the parathyroid glands. Multiple foci of soft tissue mineralization were present in the heart, lung, and kidney. Thyroid C cells underwent hypertrophy and hyperplasia after 32 days of S. malacoxylon, and parathyroid chief cells were inactive or atrophic in response to the long-term hypercalcemia. Severe soft tissue mineralization was present throughout the cardiovascular system, lung, kidney, and spleen. These ultrastructural changes in thyroid C cells and parathyroid chief cells plus the widespread soft tissue mineralization observed after feeding cattle small amounts of S. malacoxylon are consistent with the recent evidence that leaves of this plant are a potent source of the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, of vitamin D. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:869016

  19. Myocarditis induced by targeted expression of the MCP-1 gene in murine cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kolattukudy, P. E.; Quach, T.; Bergese, S.; Breckenridge, S.; Hensley, J.; Altschuld, R.; Gordillo, G.; Klenotic, S.; Orosz, C.; Parker-Thornburg, J.

    1998-01-01

    To explore the possible role of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1) in inflammatory diseases of the heart, we expressed the murine MCP-1(JE) gene under the control of the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain promoter to attempt to target MCP-1 expression to the adult heart muscle. The five lines of transgenic mice thus produced showed targeted expression of MCP-1 transcripts and protein in the adult heart muscle and pulmonary vein but not in skeletal muscle. MCP-1 level in the transgenic hearts increased up to 30 to 45 days of age, and leukocyte infiltration into interstitium between cardiomyocytes increased up to 60 to 75 days. The infiltrate was mainly macrophages but not T cells. The presence of MCP-1 in the transgenic hearts did not induce cytokine production indicative of leukocyte activation. Echocardiographic analysis of 1-year-old mice that express MCP-1 in the myocardium and of age-matched controls revealed cardiac hypertrophy and dilation, increases in left ventricular (LV) mass, and systolic and diastolic left ventricular internal diameters. A significant decline in M-mode shortening fraction showed depressed contractile function. Transgenic hearts were 65% heavier, and histological analysis showed moderate myocarditis, edema, and some fibrosis. Thus, MCP-1 expression in the heart muscle may provide a model to investigate myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9422528

  20. Three-dimensional models of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, M J; Wo, Z G; Oswald, R E

    1996-01-01

    Structural models have been produced for three types of non-NMDA inotropic glutamate receptors: an AMPA receptor, GluR1, a kainate receptor, GluR6; and a low-molecular-weight kainate receptor from goldfish, GFKAR alpha. Modeling was restricted to the domains of the proteins that bind the neurotransmitter glutamate and that form the ion channel. Model building combined homology modeling, distance geometry, molecular mechanics, interactive modeling, and known constraints. The models indicate new potential interactions in the extracellular domain between protein and agonists, and suggest that the transition from the "closed" to the "open" state involves the movement of a conserved positive residue away from, and two conserved negative residues into, the extracellular entrance to the pore upon binding. As a first approximation, the ion channel domain was modeled with a structure comprising a central antiparallel beta-barrel that partially crosses the membrane, and against which alpha-helices from each subunit are packed; a third alpha-helix packs against these two helices in each subunit. Much, but not all, of the available data were consistent with this structure. Modifying the beta-barrel to a loop-like topology produced a model consistent with available data. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785317

  1. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in relation to hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kameya, T.; Shimosato, Y.; Adachi, I.; Abe, K.; Kasai, N.; Kimura, K.; Baba, K.

    1977-01-01

    Eighteen cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid were analyzed immunohistochemically for calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells, and tumor cells in 8 cases were examined by an electron microscope and analyzed by manual and computer procedures with particular attention paid to the size and quality of secretory granules. Calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells were found singly or in clusters in 14 and 11 tumors, respectively. In 4 cases, calcitonin-positive cell clusters and an increase in number of singly scattered C cells were seen apart from the main tumor, suggesting a multicentric nature of certain medullary carcinomas. Some ACTH-containing cells were apparently also positive for calcitonin. In a case of familial Sipple disease, follicular lining cells were replaced in areas with ACTH-containing cells. Three to five frequency distribution curves of the size of secretory granules were obtained in all of 6 cases analyzed, and at least two different types of granule matrix were identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:202164

  2. Rehabilitation of a child with partial unilateral cryptophthalmos and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, H; Merriam, J C; Jones, I S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper describes the surgical rehabilitation of a child with craniofacial anomalies, unilateral syndactyly, and partial unilateral cryptophthalmos associated with inferior colobomata of the iris and optic nerve and agenesis of the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The clinical presentation of cryptophthalmos is described. METHODS: The medical literature since the original description of cryptophthalmos in 1872 was reviewed to define patterns of inheritance and the incidence of associated anomalies. RESULTS: Including this patient, 149 case reports of cryptophthalmos were identified. In two families transmission from parent to child suggests dominant inheritance. None of the five dominant cases had any other anomalies, and all had bilateral complete cryptophthalmos. The incidence of cryptophthalmos in the remaining families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. This group includes patients with bilateral, unilateral, and partial cryptophthalmos. Other anomalies are common, including those of the ear and nose, limbs, genitourinary system, and mouth and palate. Mortality in the perinatal period is associated with renal agenesis, laryngeal atresia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptophthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly with two patterns of inheritance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8719680

  3. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Vance D.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to abnormalities in systemic immune function, patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the pre-AIDS syndromes have significant abnormalities in the distribution of T-cell subsets in the intestinal tract. Such immune deficits predispose such patients to opportunistic infections and tumors, many of which involve the gastrointestinal tract. For example, Candida albicans often causes stomatitis and esophagitis. Intestinal infections with parasites (Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia) or bacteria (Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare) are associated with severe diarrhea and malabsorption, whereas viruses like cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus cause mucosal ulcerations. Clinically debilitating chronic diarrhea develops in many AIDS patients for which no clear cause can be identified. Enteric pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter can be associated with bacteremias. Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma involving the intestinal tract are now well-recognized complications of AIDS. Although AIDS is not associated with a pathognomonic liver lesion, opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma or lymphoma may involve the liver. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:3825111

  4. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of dust-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R J; Curtis, C G

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of cellular and biochemical events in response to the deposition of dust particles in lung tissue is described. Primary reactions at the lung surface include changes in the free cell population, the alveolar surface protein and in the quantity of pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein-rich material secreted by Type II cells. The relationship between these changes and lung fibrogenesis is discussed. It is suggested that such primary changes are protective mechanisms which may assist in the prevention of fibrogenesis rather than lead to an increase in collagen formation and deposition. If these primary defenses are overcome, then the interstitial fibroblastlike cell may have a prominent role in fibrogenesis. Therefore detailed observations of the interaction between lung fibroblasts and mineral dusts in vitro are described. As fibrogenesis may be arrested in vivo, or possibly reversed, and does not always progress to fibrosis, final consideration is given to the step from fibrogenesis to fibrosis. It is suggested that this step may involve other tissue proteins apart from collagen and that the irreversible nature of fibrosis can be explained by the formation of strong intermolecular crosslinks between different proteins. The types of crosslinks that may be involved are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of calcium-dependent transglutaminases in fibrosis, as these enzymes have hitherto received little attention. Images FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 20. FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. FIGURE 23. PMID:6376109

  5. Morphologic studies in the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, D. O.; Horton, W. A.; Rimoin, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the delineation of the genetic skeletal dysplasias, a heterogeneous group of disorders, that consist of over 80 distinct conditions. Morphologic studies have added a further dimension to the delineation of these conditions, their diagnosis, and the investigation of their pathogenetic mechanisms. In certain diseases, the morphologic alterations are characteristic and pathognomonic. In others only nonspecific alterations are observed, whereas in still other disorders growth-plate structure is essentially normal. Histologic, histochemical, and electronmicroscopic studies of growth-plate cartilage have provided new insights into the complexity of morphogenetic events in normal growth through the demonstration of morphologic defects in the genetic disorders of skeletal growth. As yet, very little is known of the biochemical abnormalities underlying the morphologic abnormalities. However, the great variety of morphologic findings points to a number of different pathogenetic defects in the synthesis, release, and assembly of connective tissue macromolecules and in the cells involved in growth-plate metabolism. Images Figure 4 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 PMID:474720

  6. Structural characterization of the mesangial cell type IV collagenase and enhanced expression in a model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, D. H.; Johnson, R. J.; Marti, H. P.; Martin, J.; Davies, M.; Couser, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Secretion of glomerular cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their specific inhibitors, TIMP-1,2, may play an important role in the turnover of the glomerular extracellular matrix under basal and pathologic conditions. A 66-68 kd MMP secreted by cultured mesangial cells (MC) with activity against Type IV collagen and gelatin was purified and shown by amino-acid sequence analysis to be identical with a Type IV collagenase/gelatinase secreted by certain transformed tumor cell lines. The expression of the mesangial MMP in vivo was limited within the kidney to a small subset of the intrinsic glomerular mesangial cell population. After induction of acute anti-Thy 1.1 glomerulonephritis, there was a large increment in the number of Type IV collagenase-secreting MC, temporally coincident with the development of mesangial hypercellularity. The expression of the MMP inhibitor protein, TIMP-1, was not changed over this period. Ultrastructural studies localized the mesangial MMP to areas of evolving mesangiolysis and at sites of glomerular basement membrane disruption. Enhanced expression of the mesangial cell-derived Type IV collagenase may contribute to the evolution of glomerular injury in this model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis or may be involved in the extensive matrix remodeling process that accompanies this form of glomerular injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 and Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:1321565

  7. A murine model of experimental autoimmune lens-induced uveitis using Klebsiella O3 lipopolysaccharide as a potent immunological adjuvant.

    PubMed Central

    Yokochi, T.; Fujii, Y.; Nakashima, I.; Asai, J.; Kiuchi, M.; Kojima, K.; Kato, N.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveitis and finally panophthalmitis could be produced in mice by repeated immunization of syngeneic eyeball extract mixed with Klebsiella O3 lipopolysaccharide (KO3 LPS) as a powerful immunological adjuvant. No ocular lesions were produced in mice given eyeball extract emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), KO3 LPS alone or eyeball extract alone. Histopathological changes in the ocular lesions at the early stage after the second or tertiary immunization were characterized by infiltration with inflammatory cells in the ciliary body and iris. The iridocyclitis was followed by extensive infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) into the cornea, lens and the surrounding tissues after repeated immunization. Finally, these areas were replaced by granulomatous tissues infiltrated with mononuclear cells. On the other hand, the structure of the retina and sclera was partially preserved. Those mice exhibited production of autoantibodies and development of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to syngeneic eyeball extract. Moreover, ocular lesions could be produced in normal recipient mice by transfer of sensitized lymphocytes from hyperimmunized mice. Therefore, it was suggested that the ocular lesions produced by repeated immunization with the mixture of eyeball extract and KO3 LPS were due to the autoimmune mechanism. This might be useful to model immunological phenomena in the pathogenesis of human phacoantigenic uveitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8292555

  8. Structural and functional changes in acute liver injury.

    PubMed Central

    Smuckler, E A

    1976-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride produces liver cell injury in a variety of animal species. The first structurally recognizable changes occur in the endoplasmic reticulum, with alteration in ribosome-membrane interactions. Later there is an increase in intracellular fat, and the formation of tangled nets of the ergastoplasm. At no time are there changes in mitochondria or single membrane limited bodies in cells with intact plasmalemma, although a relative increase in cell sap may appear. In dead cells (those with plasmalemma discontinuties) crystalline deposits of calcium phosphatase may be noted. Functional changes are related to the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. An early decrease in protein synthesis takes place; an accumulation of neutral lipid is related to this change. Later alterations in the ergastoplasmic functions (e.g., mixed function oxidation) occurs. Carbon tetrachloride is not the active agent; rather, a product of its metabolism, probably the CC1, free radical, is. The mechanisms of injury include macromolecular adduction and peroxide propagation. A third possibility includes a cascade effect with the production of secondary and tertiary products, also toxic in nature, with the ability to produce more widespread damage to intracellular structures. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 11. PMID:1001290

  9. Structure of Lipid Tubules Formed from a Polymerizable Lecithin

    PubMed Central

    Yager, Paul; Schoen, Paul E.; Davies, Carol; Price, Ronald; Singh, Alok

    1985-01-01

    We have studied tubules formed from a polymerizable lipid in aqueous dispersion using freeze-fracture replication and transmission electron microscopy. The polymerizable diacetylenic lecithin 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine converts from liposomes to hollow cylinders, which we call tubules, on cooling through its chain melting phase transition temperature. These tubules differ substantially from cochleate cylinders formed by phosphatidylserines on binding of calcium. The tubules have diameters that range from 0.3 to 1 μm and lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers depending on conditions of formation. The thickness of the walls varies from as few as two bilayers to tens of bilayers in some longer tubules. Their surfaces may be either smooth, gently rippled, or with spiral steps depending on sample preparation conditions, including whether the lipids have been polymerized. The spiral steps may reflect the growth of the tubules by rolling up of flattened liposomes. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 4FIGURE 5FIGURE 6FIGURE 7FIGURE 8FIGURE 9 PMID:19431600

  10. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  11. Regulation of extracellular matrix proteins and integrin cell substratum adhesion receptors on epithelium during cutaneous human wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, I.; Murphy, G. F.; Yan, H. C.; Herlyn, M.; Albelda, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although changes in extracellular matrix proteins during wound healing have been well documented, little is known about the regulation of corresponding extracellular matrix adhesion receptors (integrins). To study this process in a human in vivo model, full thickness human skin grafts were transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficient mice and deep excisional wounds involving both the epidermal and dermal layers were then made. The changes in the expression of cell matrix proteins and epithelial integrins over time were analyzed with specific antibodies using immunohistochemistry. Wounding was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix proteins, namely, loss of laminin and type IV collagen in the region of the wound and expression of tenascin and fibronectin. Changes were also noted in the integrins on the migrating keratinocytes. There was marked up-regulation of the alpha v subunit and de novo expression of the fibronectin receptor (alpha 5 beta 1) during the stage of active migration (days 1 to 3 after wounding). In the later stages of wound healing, after epithelial integrity had been established, redistribution of the alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 4 collagen/laminin-binding integrin subunits to suprabasal epidermal layers was noted. Thus, during cutaneous wound healing, keratinocytes up-regulate fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding integrins and redistribute collagen/laminin-binding integrins. This study demonstrates that the human skin/severe combined immunodeficient chimera provides a useful model to study events during human wound repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7694470

  12. Reconstruction of the lids of a child with microblepharon and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J C; Stalnecker, M C; Merriam, G R

    1988-01-01

    The initial stages in the rehabilitation of a male child with severe microblepharon, corneal opacities, bilateral facial clefts, bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and unilateral syndactyly are described. Review of the literature suggests that severe microblepharon is associated with other craniofacial anomalies, and often the child is stillborn or retarded. Surviving children have been abandoned because of their appearance. The child described in this case appears to be unique because his intelligence is normal, and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of penetrating keratoplasty after reconstruction of functional eyelids. The principal problems after corneal grafting appear to have been chronic partial exposure due to inadequate lid length and a poor Bell's reflex and the persistence of a rim of vascularized fibrous tissue around the corneal graft. Future reconstructive surgery is outlined. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:2979029

  13. Physiological and toxicological aspects of smoke produced during the combustion of polymeric materials.

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, I N

    1975-01-01

    Normally one expects that flame contact is the major cause of injury and death during fires. Analysis of the factors involved in numerous fires has revealed that most deaths were not due to flame contact, but were a consequence of the production of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and other combustion products, such as aldehydes, low molecular weight alcohols, hydrogen cyanide, and other noxious species. The major emphasis within the scope of this paper relates to the physiological and toxicological aspects of smoke produced during the combustion of materials. Special emphasis is directed toward laboratory procedures which have been developed to determine the qualitative and quantitative analysis of smoke, factors pertaining to smoke development, and to measure the response of laboratory animals exposed to smoke. The effects that fire retardants, incorporated into polymeric materials as a means of improving flammability characteristics, may have on smoke development, the mechanism of polymer degradation, and on the survival response of laboratory animals are also considered. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. PMID:170077

  14. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  15. The influence of prostaglandin G2 on platelet ultrastructure and platelet secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; Townsend, D.; Stoddard, S.; Witkop, C. J.; White, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Prostaglandin G2 (PGG2) is a labile endoperoxide produced physiologically following exposure of platelets to aggregating agents. We report here studies using isolated PGG2. This agent stimulates a concentration-dependent internal platelet contraction very similar to that produced by the calcium ionophore A23187. EDTA prevented platelet aggregation but did not prevent PGG2-stimulated internal contraction or secretion. In contrast, prostaglandin E1 and dibutyryl cyclic AMP inhich selectively labilizes platelet granules, was added to platelets together with PGG2 there was a superadditive effect on platelet secretion. Thus, granule labilization induced by PMA is a separable phenomenon and complementary to the effect of PGG2 on contraction. The ultimate degree of secretion is dependent on both processes. Studies using additional inhibitors supported the hypothesis that PGG2 activates platelets (either directly or following conversion to thromboxane A2) by transporting calcium from an intracellular store to the cytoplasmic site of the platelet contractile proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:188341

  16. Inhaled particles in human disease and animal models: use of electron beam instrumentation.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, A R

    1984-01-01

    The mineral pneumoconioses (lung disease caused by inhalation of inorganic dust) have been an important disease entity for centuries. In the last several decades, the electron microscope has been used to elucidate the distribution and identification of inhaled minerals, to aid in establishing etiologic factors, and less commonly, to determine the basic biologic mechanisms through which inhaled minerals cause lung disease. In this section, I review the instrumentation and tissue preparation currently used to address some modern problems in particle-induced lung disease. For example, human pneumoconioses of undetermined etiology can be clarified by electron microscopy and X-ray energy spectrometry. In addition, the initial deposition patterns of asbestos and silica are demonstrated in animal models, and the contributions of electron microscopy in establishing the initial lesions of asbestosis are described. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. PMID:6090114

  17. Interstitial accumulation of inhaled chrysotile asbestos fibers and consequent formation of microcalcifications.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, A. R.; Hill, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that inhaled chrysotile asbestos impacts initially at the bifurcations of alveolar ducts in the lungs of rats. Asbestos fibers are transported through alveolar epithelial cells at these bifurcation regions to the interstitium during the 24-hour period after a 1-hour exposure. To further these studies, white rats were exposed to an aerosol of chrysotile asbestos for 1 hour. Animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion immediately after and 1 month after exposure. Blocks of tissue were prepared for light and electron microscopy. We report here, at 1 month after exposure, that numerous asbestos fibers had accumulated within the lung interstitium at alveolar duct bifurcations. Many of these interstitial fibers were found in te center of intracellular microcalcifications. The presence of calcifications was proven by X-ray energy spectrometric analysis of the inclusions in situ. Clear X-ray peaks for calcium and phosphorus were demonstrated. The authors propose that 1 month after a 1-hour exposure to chrysotile asbestos, fiber-induced membrane injury in cells of the lung interstitium leads to formation of microcalcifications. This may represent the presence of early cell injury in the initial pathogenetic sequence of asbestosis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7124904

  18. An ultrastructural and morphometric study of the liver of normal and copper-poisoned sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, S. R.; Howell, J. M.; Cook, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    In sheep given copper (Cu) at the level of 10 ml of a 0.2% solution of CuSO4.5H2O/kg body weight, the volume density of nuclei and cytoplasm of hepatocytes increased and the volume density of the sinusoids and the space of Disse decreased. These changes were interpreted as an indication of cellular swelling. There was a significant increase in volume density, number, and absolute volume of lysosomes when Cu was given. The greatest increase in number occurred during the pre-hemolytic period (mean = 48 days), and the highest increase in volume occurred thereafter. Thus, the most extensive proliferation of lysosomes occurred in livers of the pre-hemolytic sheep, and the hemolytic sheep had the largest and heaviest lysosomes. The liver necrosis in sheep undergoing hemolysis was possible caused by hydrolytic enzymes released by the rupture of the enclosing lysosomal membranes. The significant increase in volume density of mitochondria observed in livers of sheep given Cu was due to an increase in volume (swelling) rather than an increase in number. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7377289

  19. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  20. Influence of dopamine as noradrenaline precursor on the secretory function of the bovine corpus luteum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kotwica, J.; Skarzynski, D.; Bogacki, M.; Miszkiel, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Dopamine is assumed to affect the ovary function after its conversion into noradrenaline (NA). 2. To study this bovine luteal slices from 11-14 days of the oestrous cycle were preincubated for 24 h to recover beta-receptors and next they were incubated for 1, 2 or 4 h with (a) different doses of dopamine; (b) dopamine together with a beta-antagonist (propranolol) or with a dopamine receptor blocker (droperidol); (c) dopamine with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. 3. Dopamine stimulated the luteal content of oxytocin (OT) and progesterone. This effect was inhibited by propanolol but not by droperidol. 4. Dopamine added to the medium was followed by an increase of noradrenaline there. This rise was dose and time-dependent. 5. The dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor, inhibited the stimulating effect of dopamine on luteal progesterone and OT content. 6. Bovine corpus luteum can synthesize de novo NA from dopamine as a precursor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8842430

  1. A Combined Intradural Presigmoid-Transtransversarium-Transcondylar Approach to the Whole Clivus and Anterior Craniospinal Region

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Ma, Jianya; Canalis, Rinaldo; Martin, Neil; Black, Keith; Cheatham, Mel; Bloch, Joseph; Becker, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the clivus is difficult because of its proximity to vital neurovascular structures. The anatomic bases of a new surgical approach to this area are discussed. A supra-auricular skin incision is extended toward the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The vertebral artery is exposed from C2 to the occiput unroofing the foramen transversarium of C1. The bone removal consists of a posterior temporal craniotomy, a suboccipital craniectomy, including mastoidectomy with sigmoid sinus unroofing, removal of the lateral margin of the foramen magnum, of the medial third of the occipital condyle, and retrolabyrinthine petrous drilling. Posterior retraction of the vertebral artery facilitates occipital condyle drilling. Intradural exposure of the petroclival region is achieved by L-shaped cutting of the dura with the long branch placed infratentorially anterior to the sigmoid sinus. Intradural exposure of the craniospinal/upper cervical areas is achieved by cutting of the dura medial to the distal sigmoid sinus and by longitudinal cutting of the dura anterior to the vertebral artery. This approach allows multiple ports of entry to the clivus with full control of the vertebrobasilar system, and of the dural sinuses, and is anatomically suited for controlled removal of tumors located in these areas. This approach, or segments of it, has been used successfully in the treatment of large neoplasms of the craniovertebral junction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17170911

  2. Leukocytes in chemotactic-fragment-induced lung inflammation. Vascular emigration and alveolar surface migration.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    Lung inflammation was induced in rabbits by intratracheal injections of chemotactic fragments obtained from zymosan-activated serum (CF-ZAS), and the route of vascular emigration and alveolar surface interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes migrating into the lung was characterized by transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron-microscopic examination. Leukocytes migrated from capillaries and venules into the alveolar wall interstitium by adherence to the vascular endothelium and migration through the endothelial intracellular junction to attain a position between a reapposed endothelial cell junction and the vascular basement membrane. The cells then migrated into the interstitium through a narrow opening in the basement membrane. Leukocyte entrance into the alveolar space from the interstitium appeared to occur through small openings in the epithelial basement membrane at or near the Type I epithelial intercellular junction. Once in the alveolus, PMNs and macrophages demonstrated surface adherence and spreading along with evidence of migration, pseudopod extension, interalveolar pore transit, and retraction fiber formation. This study indicates the leukocyte influx into the alveolus in acute chemotactic-factor-induced inflammation is via a continuum of migrational activity, beginning at the pulmonary capillary endothelial surface and persisting on the alveolar epithelial surface. Images Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 16 Figure 9 PMID:7435538

  3. Ultrastructural lesions of the liver in human peliosis. A report of 12 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, E. S.; Cazier, A.; Baudelot, A. M.; Feldmann, G.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrastructural lesions of the liver were studied in 12 patients with peliosis hepatis. This vascular lesion consisted of cavities filled with red blood cells and sometimes lined with an endothelial barrier; the cavities were due to cystic dilatation of the space of Disse and/or sinusoidal lumen. The passage of red blood cells through the endothelial barrier was occasionally demonstrated. Other striking alterations included the presence of numerous blebs on the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes and the existence of multiple cellular layers lining the sinusoids. Perisinusoidal fibrosis appeared on follow-up biopsies in 3 patients. There was no major abnormality of the hepatocytes or of the hepatic venules. These findings suggest that alterations of the sinusoidal barrier might constitute the primary event in peliosis, although secondary changes to increased pressure and hypoxia within the lobules cannot be excluded. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6696047

  4. Gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor (GIPACT): gastrointestinal stromal tumors show phenotypic characteristics of the interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed Central

    Kindblom, L. G.; Remotti, H. E.; Aldenborg, F.; Meis-Kindblom, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) form a complex cell network within the gastrointestinal tract wall where they function as a pacemaker system. Expression of the kit proto-oncogene is essential for the development of this system. The aim of our study was to examine the hypothesis that gastrointestinal stromal tumors differentiate toward cells with an ICC phenotype. Ultrastructurally, 58 stromal tumors were characterized and found to share many features with ICC. Seventy-eight stromal tumors were immunophenotyped, particularly with regard to the kit receptor. All 78 tumors revealed strong, homogeneous immunoreactivity for the kit receptor as did ICC of adjacent and control gastrointestinal walls. Focal hyperplasia and hypertrophy of kit receptor positive cells were also observed in the gastrointestinal wall adjacent to the tumors. CD34 immunoreactivity observed in interstitial cells surrounding Auerbach's ganglia suggests that a subpopulation of ICC is CD34 positive and may explain why 56 of 78 stromal tumors were CD34 positive. Thirty control tumors, including gastrointestinal leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, were all negative for the kit receptor. We conclude that gastrointestinal stromal tumors show striking morphological and immunophenotypic similarities with ICC and that they may originate from stem cells that differentiate toward a pacemaker cell phenotype. We propose that the noncommittal name "gastrointestinal stromal tumor" be replaced by gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9588894

  5. Chronic hepatitis: a retrospective study in 34 dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, C; Guest, S; Haywood, S; Horney, B

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the histological changes observed in 34 accessioned cases of canine chronic hepatitis and to correlate these changes with the clinical pathological data. Cases of chronic hepatitis were subdivided into 6 categories: chronic active hepatitis (10/34), chronic persistent hepatitis (7/32), chronic cholestatic hepatitis (6/34), fibrosing hepatitis with cirrhosis (3/34), chronic cholangiohepatitis (3/34), and miscellaneous secondary hepatitis (5/34). Iron accumulation was a consistent finding in all livers examined. Although all cases of chronic hepatitis had elevated liver enzymes, no correlation was detected between biochemical parameters and the severity of morphologic changes. Similarly, no correlation was detected between rhodanine staining for copper and morphologic or biochemical indicators of cholestasis. However, presence of copper correlated well with reticulo-fibrosis (r = 0.8) and bile duct hyperplasia, suggesting that changes in the hemodynamics of the hepatic acini due to fibrosis could influence storage of copper. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9187802

  6. Morphological study of bacterial pneumonia of feedlot cattle: Determination of age of lesions

    PubMed Central

    Daoust, Pierre-Yves

    1989-01-01

    Lungs from 48 feedlot cattle that had died from bacterial pneumonia were examined grossly and microscopically. Criteria based on microscopic lesions were adopted to age these pneumonias. In 38 cases, pneumonic lesions were of relatively uniform age throughout the affected tissue. In eight other cases, the presence of older lesions confined to one or two lobes suggested a previous episode of pneumonia. The aging criteria adopted were in agreement with the duration of the observed clinical signs in 26 cases. In 13 other cases, the pneumonia was estimated to be of longer duration than suggested by the history, whereas in the remaining nine cases, it was estimated to be more recent. Areas of tan discoloration of the parenchyma surrounded by white or yellow borders were considered the best areas to examine microscopically since they offered the best chances of revealing necrosis and fibrosis, the main lesions used to age the pneumonia. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:17423236

  7. A Kinetic Chain Approach for Shoulder Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, John; Uhl, Timothy L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To introduce an approach to shoulder rehabilitation that integrates the kinetic chain throughout the rehabilitation program while providing the theoretical rationale for this program. Background: The focus of a typical rehabilitation program is to identify and treat the involved structures. However, in activities of sport and daily life, the body does not operate in isolated segments but rather works as a dynamic unit. Recently, rehabilitation programs have emphasized closed kinetic chain exercises, core-stabilization exercises, and functional programs. These components are implemented as distinct entities and are used toward the end of the rehabilitation program. Description: Kinetic chain shoulder rehabilitation incorporates the kinetic link biomechanical model and proximal-to-distal motor-activation patterns with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and closed kinetic chain exercise techniques. This approach focuses on movement patterns rather than isolated muscle exercises. Patterns sequentially use the leg, trunk, and scapular musculature to activate weakened shoulder musculature, gain active range of motion, and increase strength. The paradigm of kinetic chain shoulder rehabilitation suggests that functional movement patterns and closed kinetic chain exercises should be incorporated throughout the rehabilitation process. Clinical Advantages: The exercises in this approach are consistent with biomechanical models, apply biomechanical and motor control theory, and work toward sport specificity. The exercises are designed to stimulate weakened tissue by motion and force production in the adjacent kinetic link segments. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:16558646

  8. Time resolved imaging microscopy. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, G; Clegg, R M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1991-01-01

    An optical microscope capable of measuring time resolved luminescence (phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence) images has been developed. The technique employs two phase-locked mechanical choppers and a slow-scan scientific CCD camera attached to a normal fluorescence microscope. The sample is illuminated by a periodic train of light pulses and the image is recorded within a defined time interval after the end of each excitation period. The time resolution discriminates completely against light scattering, reflection, autofluorescence, and extraneous prompt fluorescence, which ordinarily decrease contrast in normal fluorescence microscopy measurements. Time resolved image microscopy produces a high contrast image and particular structures can be emphasized by displaying a new parameter, the ratio of the phosphorescence to fluorescence. Objects differing in luminescence decay rates are easily resolved. The lifetime of the long lived luminescence can be measured at each pixel of the microscope image by analyzing a series of images that differ by a variable time delay. The distribution of luminescence decay rates is displayed directly as an image. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the instrument and the complementarity it offers to conventional fluorescence microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1723311

  9. Molecular basis of maple syrup urine disease: novel mutations at the E1 alpha locus that impair E1(alpha 2 beta 2) assembly or decrease steady-state E1 alpha mRNA levels of branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, J. L.; Fisher, C. R.; Cox, R. P.; Chuang, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    We report the occurrence of three novel mutations in the E1 alpha (BCKDHA) locus of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex that cause maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). An 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is present in one allele of a compound-heterozygous patient (GM-649). A single C nucleotide insertion in exon 2 occurs in one allele of an intermediate-MSUD patient (Lo). The second allele of patient Lo carries an A-to-G transition in exon 9 of the E1 alpha gene. This missense mutation changes Tyr-368 to Cys (Y368C) in the E1 alpha subunit. Both the 8-bp deletion and the single C insertion generate a downstream nonsense codon. Both mutations appear to be associated with a low abundance of the mutant E1 alpha mRNA, as determined by allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. Transfection studies strongly suggest that the Y368C substitution in the E1 alpha subunit impairs its proper assembly with the normal E1 beta. Unassembled as well as misassembled E1 alpha and E1 beta subunits are degraded in the cell. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8037208

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi: histopathology of endocrine system in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, K. S.; Lagrange, P. H.; da Costa, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally immunocompromised athymic mice, neonatal mice and adult outbred OFI mice treated with the immunosuppressive agents cyclophosphamide (CY), dexamethasone (DM) and indomethacin (IM) were infected with trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi Y and CL strains. 10(4) parasites were used, except in the case of IM treatment, where mice received 10(3) trypomastigotes in one group and 10(5) in another. The course of parasitaemia, tissue distribution of amastigotes and time of mortality were compared with an infected thymus intact control group. Neonate and indomethacin treated mice presented the same pattern of parasitaemia. Death occurred as early as 9-10 days after infection. A single dose of CY 200 mg/kg given 5 days after infection enhanced the parasitaemia and increased the number of parasites in the tissues. All groups were similar in terms of colonization of the endocrine system by parasites and the adrenals showed the highest density of amastigotes nests. The thyroid gland (analysed only in neonates) showed intense amastigote accumulation. Colonization of the ovary was observed with amastigotes in both the theca interna and in the stroma. The testes (also examined only in the neonate) showed that the interstitial cells, the tunica albuginea of the seminiferous tubules and the loose connective tissue were infected. Athymic nude mice showed the most intense parasite colonization of the islets of Langerhans. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7734334

  11. Convergent Induction of Osmotic Stress-Responses 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John C.; McElwain, Elizabeth F.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    In Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, salt stress induces the accumulation of proline and a specific isoform of the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) prior to the switch from C3 to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). To determine whether plant growth regulators initiate or imitate these responses, we have compared the effects elicited by NaCl, abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinins using PEPCase and proline levels as diagnostic tools. Exogenously applied ABA is a poor substitute for NaCl in inducing proline and CAM-specific PEPCase accumulation. Even though ABA levels increase 8- to 10-fold in leaves during salt stress, inhibition of ABA accumulation does not affect these salt-induced responses. In contrast, the addition of cytokinins (6-benzylaminopurine, zeatin, 2-isopentyladenine) mimic salt by greatly increasing proline and PEPCase amounts. Endogenous zeatin levels remain unchanged during salt stress. We conclude: (a) The salt-induced accumulation of proline and PEPCase is coincident with, but is not attributable to, the rise in ABA or zeatin concentration. (b) For the first time, cytokinins and NaCl are implicated as independent initiators of a sensing pathway that signals leaves to alter PEPCase gene expression. (c) During stress, the sensing of osmotic imbalances leading to ABA, proline, and CAM-specific PEPCase accumulation may be mediated directly by NaCl. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:16652978

  12. Pretargeted immunoscintigraphy in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, P.; Paganelli, G.; Songini, C.; Samuel, A.; Sudati, F.; Siccardi, A. G.; Fazio, F.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the use of pretargeted immunoscintigraphy (ISG) in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we studied 25 patients with histologically proven disease; ISG was repeated after surgery in two patients. The antibody, either an anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or an antichromogranin A (CgA) biotinylated monoclonal antibody (MAb) or a cocktail of the two biotinylated MAbs was first injected. After 24 h, avidin was administrated i.v., followed by 111In-labelled biotin 24 h later. Fifty-two lesions were visualised. Six primary tumours, diagnosed by increased calcitonin levels, were all correctly diagnosed; 47 recurrences, also suspected by blood tumour markers, were detected and confirmed by cytology or histology. In one case, single photon emission tomography allowed the detection of small lymph nodes with a diameter of 4-7 mm. These lesions, not judged neoplastic by ultrasound, were confirmed to be neoplastic by fine needle aspiration. Pretargeted ISG correctly localises primary tumours and recurrences in MTC patients, when the only marker of relapse is serum elevation of calcitonin. With this three-step pretargeting method, cocktails of potentially useful MAbs can be used, avoiding false-negative studies that may occur when CEA or CgA are not expressed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8795589

  13. Molecular dynamics of individual alpha-helices of bacteriorhodopsin in dimyristol phosphatidylocholine. I. Structure and dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, T B

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the role of the lipid bilayer in membrane protein structure and dynamics is needed for tertiary structure determination methods. However, the molecular details are not well understood. Molecular dynamics computer calculations can provide insight into these molecular details of protein:lipid interactions. This paper reports on 10 simulations of individual alpha-helices in explicit lipid bilayers. The 10 helices were selected from the bacteriorhodopsin structure as representative alpha-helical membrane folding components. The bilayer is constructed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine molecules. The only major difference between simulations is the primary sequence of the alpha-helix. The results show dramatic differences in motional behavior between alpha-helices. For example, helix A has much smaller root-mean-squared deviations than does helix D. This can be understood in terms of the presence of aromatic residues at the interface for helix A that are not present in helix D. Additional motions are possible for the helices that contain proline side chains relative to other amino acids. The results thus provide insight into the types of motion and the average structures possible for helices within the bilayer setting and demonstrate the strength of molecular simulations in providing molecular details that are not directly visualized in experiments. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 Figure 6 PMID:9370432

  14. Intracellular reactive oxygen species as apparent modulators of heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) structural organization and phosphorylation in basal and tumour necrosis factor alpha-treated T47D human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlen, P; Kretz-Remy, C; Briolay, J; Fostan, P; Mirault, M E; Arrigo, A P

    1995-01-01

    The small stress protein heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) is an oligomeric phosphoprotein, constitutively expressed in most human cells, which enhances cellular resistance to tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). This phenomenon correlates with dramatic changes in hsp27 cellular location, structural organization and phosphorylation. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating these properties of hsp27, we investigated whether they were a consequence of the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by TNF alpha. Here, we report that, in T47D carcinoma cell lines, the rapid burst of intracellular ROS production and changes in hsp27 locale, structural organization and phosphoisoform composition induced by TNF alpha were abolished by the overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme seleno-glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx). These effects were greatly diminished when GSHPx-expressing cells were grown in the absence of selenium, a cofactor that is essential for seleno-GSHPx activity, indicating that they are directly linked to the increased GSHPx activity. Moreover, in growing T47D cells, GSHPx expression induced intracellular redistribution of hsp27 and decreased the phosphorylation of this protein without altering its pattern of oligomerization. In contrast, the heat-mediated phosphorylation of hsp27 was not altered by decreased intracellular ROS levels. Hence, in growing and TNF-treated cells, several hsp27 properties appear to be modulated by fluctuations in intracellular ROS levels. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8526844

  15. Immunohistochemistry of a gross cystic disease fluid protein (GCDFP-15) of the breast. A marker of apocrine epithelium and breast carcinomas with apocrine features.

    PubMed Central

    Mazoujian, G.; Pinkus, G. S.; Davis, S.; Haagensen, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Gross cystic disease fluid is a pathologic secretion from breast composed of several glycoproteins, including a unique 15,000-dalton monomer protein, GCDFP-15. By the immunoperoxidase technique, GCDFP-15 was localized in the apocrine metaplastic epithelium lining breast cysts and in apocrine glands in the axilla, vulva, eyelid, and ear canal. In normal breast tissue, a few individual epithelial cells within lobules and small ducts were focally positive for GCDFP-15. Fourteen of 30 breast carcinomas stained positively for GCDFP-15. Of 16 carcinomas with apocrine features, 12 stained positively. Benign and malignant lesions from other tissues, including lung, colon, ovary, endometrium, stomach, prostate, liver, esophagus, and kidney, revealed no immunoreactivity. The only cells of "non-apocrine" tissues that contained GCDFP-15 were serous cells of the submandibular salivary gland, submucosal glands of the bronchi, and accessory lacrimal glands. Phylogenetically, these tissues have biologic features in common with apocrine glands. This report is the first to characterize GCDFP-15 as a specific tissue marker of apocrine epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6130702

  16. A morphological and functional study on antigen binding and endocytosis by immunocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goud, B; Antoine, J C; Gonatas, N K; Stieber, A; Avrameas, S

    1980-01-01

    Immunoenzymatic techniques were used to study antigen binding and endocytosis by lymph node cells of rats immunized against horseradish peroxidase, hen ovalbumin and rabbit IgG. The number of antigen-binding cells varied and depended on the type of antigen used, the time after immunization, and was higher after a booster injection. In secondary responses (4 days after booster), about 80% of antigen-binding cells were proplasmocytes and plasmocytes; by a double staining procedure it was found that 82% of these cells bore in addition to surface antigen, specific intracytoplasmic antibody as well. About 20% of antigen-binding cells were small and medium lymphocytes which did not contain detectable intracytoplasmic antibody. For ultrastructural studies of the endocytosis, peroxidase was used as the antigen. This antigen was found in cytoplasmic compartments which consisted of vesicles, cisternae and large round bodies (lysosomes?) often located near the Golgi apparatus. However, the cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, involved in the synthesis of specific antibody were not sites of retrieval of endocytosed antigen. The effect of endocytosis of antigen on the secretion and synthesis of antibody was studied by the local haemolysis plaque assay and biosynthetic labelling. No change was detected in antibody secretion and synthesis as a result of antigen endocytosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7007216

  17. The embryonic RNA helicase gene (ERH): a new member of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases.

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, J; Putt, W; Morrison, K; Beddington, R; Edwards, Y

    1995-01-01

    DEAD box proteins share several highly conserved motifs including the characteristic Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (D-E-A-D in the amino acid single-letter code) motif and have established or putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity. These proteins are implicated in a range of cellular processes that involve regulation of RNA function, including translation initiation, RNA splicing and ribosome assembly. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of an embryonic RNA helicase gene, ERH, which maps to mouse chromosome 1 and encodes a new member of the DEAD box family of proteins. The predicted ERH protein shows high sequence similarity to the testes-specific mouse PL10 and to the maternally acting Xenopus An3 helicase proteins. The ERH expression profile is similar, to that of An3, which localizes to the animal hemisphere of oocytes and is abundantly expressed in the embryo. ERH is expressed in oocytes and is a ubiquitous mRNA in the 9 days-post-conception embryo, and at later stages of development shows a more restricted pattern of expression in brain and kidney. The similarities in sequence and in expression profile suggest that ERH is the murine equivalent of the Xenopus An3 gene, and we propose that ERH plays a role in translational activation of mRNA in the oocyte and early embryo. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8948440

  18. The pathology of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Liver changes and amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The pathogenesis of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) was studied from 5 to 60 days after inoculation. Ulcerative lesions were noted 10 to 60 days after inoculation. The sequential development of lesions was asynchronous and progressed from destruction of the interglandular epithelium and of glandular crypt elements to loss of mucosa and formation of granulomatous lesions in the submucosa involving the muscularis mucosae. Pathologic changes in the liver correlated with the formation of ulcerative cecal lesions. Subacute hepatic changes showed lymphocytic portal infiltrate, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, multinucleated giant cells, granuloma formation, and sinusoidal mononuclear and granulocytic infiltrates. Metastatic amebic liver abscesses occurred as early as 10 days after inoculation, and small abscesses were found in the portal areas of the right liver lobe. The sequential development and pathologic manifestation of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil for the study of human intestinal amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:4014436

  19. Cellular bases of experimental amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, V.; Mena-Lopez, R.; Anaya-Velazquez, F.; Martinez-Palomo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The complete sequence of morphologic events during amebic liver abscess formation in the hamster has been studied, from the lodgement of amebas in the hepatic sinusoids to the development of extensive liver necrosis. Following intraportal inoculation of live amebas, the early stages of the lesion (from 1 to 12 hours) were characterized by acute cellular infiltration composed of an increasingly large number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which surrounded centrally located trophozoites. Histiocytes and lysed leukocytes were situated on the periphery of the lesions. Hepatocytes close to the early lesions showed degenerative changes which led to necrosis; however, direct contact of liver cells with amebas was very rarely observed. At later stages, the extent of necrosis increased, macrophages and epithelioid cells replaced most leukocytes, and well-organized granulomas developed. Extensive necrosis associated with fused granulomas was present by Day 7. The results suggest that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites do not produce amebic liver abscesses in hamsters through direct lysis of hepatocytes. Rather, tissue destruction is the result of the accumulation and subsequent lysis of leukocytes and macrophages surrounding the amebas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6385728

  20. The pathogenesis of experimentally induced amebic liver abscess in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential development and pathology of experimentally induced amebic liver abscess in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) were studied from 1 to 60 days after inoculation. Early lesions were characterized by an acute inflammatory response, which became granulomatous at 5 days. Early granulomas were discrete, with well-defined fibrohistiocytic walls. Trophozoite dissemination as a result of fibrolysis of granuloma wall was confined to the liver parenchyma. The granulomatous cellular infiltrate (less than 20 days) was characterized by granulocytes and histiocytes; older granulomas (greater than 30 days) were composed of lymphocytic infiltrate, plasma cells, and a few granulocytes, and were characterized by the absence of epithelioid histiocytes. The degree of pathologic change adjacent to liver granulomas followed the sequential development of the amebic liver abscess. Severe changes observed were portal canal lymphocytic infiltration, the presence of foreign body giant cells, periportal fibrosis, proliferation of bile duct epithelium, and hepatocyte anisonucleosis and ballooning degeneration. The pathogenesis of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil model for the study of human amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:6385727

  1. Age as a factor in the bacteriology and response to treatment of subperiosteal abscess of the orbit.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G J

    1993-01-01

    The clinical course of SPA of the orbit is associated with the age of the patient. That association might be explained through a series of intermediate relationships: the clinical course correlates with the bacterial constituency, the bacterial constituency is related to physiologic derangement within the sinuses, the physiologic derangement may vary with the degree of obstruction of the sinus ostia, and the ostial caliber relative to the volume of the cavity that must be drained decreases with patient age into late adolescence. The controversy between pediatricians and surgeons over the appropriate indications for drainage might be resolved with the acknowledgement that each side is correct on the basis of the patient populations treated. It is hoped that recognition of the age-related variations in SPA will permit a more systematic approach to the management of this complex infectious disease. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 PMID:8140703

  2. Use of tracheal organ cultures in toxicity testing.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B P; Miller, S L; Drummond, E J

    1976-01-01

    Fragments of tracheal epithelium alone or in continuity with connective tissues, can be maintained in culture medium and used for short term or long term studies of toxicity of a variety of chemicals. Large numbers of uniform cultures are prepared with the aid of a slicing device or by application of simple method for dissecting sheets of epithelium free from underlying cartilage. The cultures may be placed in an exposure chamber-incubator mounted on a microscope stage and monitored continually for ciliostasis and exfoliation of cells. Morphology is further studied by fixation of selected specimens and preparation for light microscopy and electron microscopy. Synthetic functions are evaluated by autoradiographic measurement of incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules and other dynamic features are indirectly assessed by histochemical and histoenzymatic methods. Short-term studies using these several techniques have shown that ciliostasis does not correlate with cell injury in all instances, and a long-term study has demonstrated dose dependence of a cytotoxic agent when duration of culture viability is measured. The method lends itself to a broad range of investigations in which dose, period of exposure, and role of cofactors must be independently and quantitatively assessed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:1017423

  3. The effect of alpha-difluoromethylornithine on the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Giri, S. N.; Hyde, D. M.; Schwartz, L. W.; Younker, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis was studied in hamsters drinking tap water or 2% alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) dissolved in tap water for 14 days. The fibrotic lesions in the lung were evaluated by biochemical measurements of total neutral salt soluble (NSS) and insoluble (NSI) collagens and by morphometric histopathologic techniques. Daily ingestion of DFMO failed to offer any protection against bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis; instead, it increased the deposition of total lung NSI collagen to 396% of control, as compared with 145% of control caused by bleomycin treatment alone. Daily intake of DFMO by itself increased the accumulation of total lung NSI collagen to 250% of control, as opposed to a 145% increase caused by bleomycin treatment alone. Histopathologically, the lung lesions in hamsters treated with bleomycin and DFMO were qualitatively similar to those of hamsters treated with bleomycin alone. However, morphometric estimates revealed that of lung lesions were more diffuse and severe in the former than in the latter group. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6181691

  4. Gap junctional communication between vascular cells. Induction of connexin43 messenger RNA in macrophage foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Polacek, D.; Lal, R.; Volin, M. V.; Davies, P. F.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and function of blood vessels depend on the ability of vascular cells to receive and transduce signals and to communicate with each other. One means by which vascular cells have been shown to communicate is via gap junctions, specifically connexin43. In atherosclerosis, the normal physical patterns of communication are disrupted by the subendothelial infiltration and accumulation of blood monocytes, which in turn can differentiate into resident foam cells. In this paper we report that neither freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes nor differentiated monocytes/macrophages exhibit functional gap junctional dye transfer in homo-cellular culture or in co-culture with endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells. By Northern analysis, neither freshly isolated blood monocytes nor pure cultures of differentiated monocyte/macrophages expressed gap junction messenger RNA. However, immunohistochemical staining followed by in situ hybridization on sections of human atherosclerotic carotid arteries revealed strong expression of gap junction connexin43 messenger RNA by macrophage foam cells. These results suggest that tissue-specific conditions present in atherosclerotic arteries induce expression of connexin43 messenger RNA in monocyte/macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8382009

  5. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  6. Synthesis of IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta by arterial cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, C. F.; Sajuthi, D.; Tulli, H.; Williams, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been implicated as a regulatory protein in the development and clinical sequelae of atherosclerosis. To determine which cells in the atherosclerotic plaque synthesize IL-1 in situ, the authors evaluated histologic sections of iliac arteries from cynomolgus monkeys using probes for IL-1 alpha and beta. A polyclonal antibody to IL-1 alpha and beta was used to determine if proteins were concomitantly produced. The predominant cells expressing IL-1 alpha and beta mRNA were foam cells in the intima. Adherent leukocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) expressed mRNA for IL-1 alpha. Microvascular endothelium expressed mRNA for both IL-1 alpha and beta. IL-1 proteins were located frequently in cells expressing IL-1 mRNA. These results indicate that endothelium and VSMCs, in conjunction with macrophages, serve as localized sources of IL-1 protein synthesis. These findings suggest that vascular cells may contribute directly to the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease by actively secreting potent biologic mediators that modify vascular and immune cell function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2012178

  7. Human atherosclerosis. II. Immunocytochemical analysis of the cellular composition of human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Gown, A. M.; Tsukada, T.; Ross, R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have performed immunocytochemical investigations of the distribution of various cell types in human atherosclerotic plaques using monoclonal antibodies specific to smooth muscle cells (CGA7 [Gown et al, J Cell Biol 1985, 100:807-813] and HHF35 [Tsukada et al, Am J Pathol (In press)] ); lymphocytes (T200 antigen); endothelial cells (Factor VIII and the Ulex europeus agglutinin); and macrophages, the latter with a new macrophage-specific antibody HAM56. All studies were performed on methanol-Carnoy's-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. In areas of grossly normal aorta, significant numbers of macrophages were noted within areas of diffuse intimal thickening. The cellular composition of the following three types of raised lesions were analyzed: fibro-fatty lesions, which, despite their gross appearance, consistent with fibrous plaques, were composed almost exclusively of macrophages and lymphocytes and almost devoid of smooth muscle cells; fibrous plaques, which were predominantly composed of smooth muscle cells displaying considerable morphologic heterogeneity and an admixture of blood-borne cells; advanced plaques, which were characterized by complex layers of smooth muscle cells and macrophages with considerable variation from region to region. Also noted were foci of medial and even intimal vascularization subjacent to the more advanced plaques. These studies demonstrate the application of monoclonal antibody technology to the study of the cellular composition of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p195-a Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 p201-a Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3777135

  8. The neuropathology of AIDS. UCLA experience and review.

    PubMed Central

    Anders, K. H.; Guerra, W. F.; Tomiyasu, U.; Verity, M. A.; Vinters, H. V.

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has been examined at autopsy in 89 patients who died of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), including 14 patients who died primarily of neurologic complications of the disease. A total of 66 brains (74%) showed significant pathologic abnormalities, with opportunistic infections including cytomegalovirus (14) and cryptococcal (11) infections, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (6), toxoplasmosis (6), and histoplasma microabscesses (1). Incidental Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection was found in 4 cases. Simultaneous CNS infection by more than one microorganism was encountered in 5 patients. Subacute (microglial nodule) encephalitis-related to cytomegalovirus infection or possibly brain infection by the causative agent of AIDS was present in 56 cases. Primary CNS lymphoma was noted in 3 patients. Secondary CNS deposits of lymphoma were found in 1 patient, and another patient had lymphomatoid granulomatosis. Vascular complications were not infrequently seen, and included infarcts secondary to vessel occlusion and disseminated intravascular coagulation in 4 patients and intracranial hemorrhage of variable severity in 13. White matter changes included vacuolar myelopathy (3 cases), central pontine myelinolysis (1 case), and foci of calcified, necrotizing leukoencephalopathy in pontocerebellar fibers of the basis pontis (2 cases). These findings highlight the variety of CNS complications in AIDS, some of which are not associated with clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, characterization of all lesions may be important in understanding the neurologic sequelae of AIDS. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 p540-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2876640

  9. Glomerular lesions in HIV-infected patients: a Yale University Department of Medicine Residency Peer-Teaching Conference.

    PubMed Central

    Wrone, E. M.; Carey, H.; Reilly, R. F.

    1997-01-01

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by heavy proteinuria, absence of edema and an irreversible decline in renal function. Findings on renal biopsy include: collapsed glomerular capillaries; visceral glomerular epitheliosis; microcystic tubules; mesangial prominence; and endothelial tubuloreticular inclusions. Early in the AIDS epidemic, HIVAN was the predominant glomerular lesion observed in HIV-infected patients. It is being increasingly recognized, especially in Caucasian populations, that a variety of immune complex-mediated lesions such as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, proliferative glomerulonephritis and IgA nephropathy are associated with HIV infection. In this review we present two cases: one patient whose first presentation of AIDS was end-stage renal disease, who on biopsy was found to have HIVAN, and the second, who was infected with HIV, and on biopsy was found to have hepatitis C-related hepatitis C related membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. We also review the current literature on HIVAN and HIV-associated immune complex diseases (HIVICDs). Each case illustrates an important clinical point. The first that renal disease can be the first manifestation of HIV infection and the second that HIV-infected patients may develop immune complex related renal diseases, some of which may be potentially treatable. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9493848

  10. Multiple conductances in the large K+ channel from Chara corallina shown by a transient analysis method.

    PubMed Central

    Tyerman, S D; Terry, B R; Findlay, G P

    1992-01-01

    The large conductance K+ channel in the tonoplast of Chara corallina has subconductance states (substates). We describe a method that detects substates by monitoring the time derivative of channel current. Substates near to the full conductance tend to have long durations and high probabilities, while those of smaller amplitude occur with less probability and short duration. The substate pattern is similar in cell-attached, inside-out and outside-out patches over a range of temperatures. The pattern changes at high Ca2+ concentration (10 mol m-3) on the cytoplasmic face of inside-out patches. One substate at approximately 50% of the full conductance is characterized by a high frequency of transitions from the full conductance level. This midstate conductance is not a constant proportion of the full conductance but changes as a function of membrane potential difference (p.d.) showing strong inward rectification. We suggest that the channel is a single pore that can change conformation and/or charge profile to give different conductances. The mean durations of the full conductance level and the midstate decrease as the membrane p.d. becomes more negative. Programs for analysis of channel kinetics based on an half-amplitude detection criterion are shown to be unsuitable for analysis of the K+ channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:1504245

  11. Modulation of the expression of integrins on glial cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. A central role for TNF-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Previtali, S. C.; Archelos, J. J.; Hartung, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins comprise a group of adhesion receptors involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Evidence is accumulating that integrins expressed on mononuclear cells play a central role in the induction of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system. The effects of integrins on glial cell behavior, myelination, and angiogenesis suggest that they may also have a role in resolving inflammation in the nervous system and in promoting tissue repair. We investigated the temporospatial expression of integrins in the rat central nervous system during the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. A higher expression of alpha v- and beta 4-integrin subunits in astrocytes and alpha 2 integrin in oligodendrocytes was observed in active lesions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, in comparison with controls. Proinflammatory cytokines, primarily TNF-alpha, also enhanced alpha v, beta 4, and alpha 2 expression in purified glial cells ex vivo. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of some integrin subunits was modulated in the cerebral vasculature during inflammation. Our results suggest an active role for glial and vascular integrins in the regulation of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system, opening an avenue for new potential immunotherapies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 9 PMID:9358769

  12. Unilateral facet subluxations: an example of a missed post-traumatic unilateral facet subluxation — a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tuling, Jeffrey R; Hsu, William H

    1999-01-01

    Unilateral facet injuries occur in 4-16% of patients with cervical spine injuries, (of which unilateral facet subluxations occur as a subgroup in this population). These injuries arise in motor vehicle accidents because of flexion-distraction forces, or flexion of an already rotated head. Due to the common presentation of a lack of neurological signs and symptoms, delayed diagnosis of unilateral facet subluxations are common. As a result, it is imperative that the proper diagnosis is made so that patient care can be made more effective with ultimately less sequelae. For the clinician, diagnosis can be aided by the use of radiographic analysis. Adequate radiographic analysis is an important tool to accurately assess whiplash associated disorders. Radiographic findings of facet subluxations are subtle on routine views. Utilizing oblique views, the diagnoses are usually evident. Therefore, oblique views are very useful in the clinical setting. This case report will describe a 29-year-old female with a missed unilateral facet subluxation, radiographic findings and characteristics, and the clinical utility of oblique views in patients suffering from whiplash associated disorders. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  13. Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice. The potential role of intravascular platelet aggregation in its genesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Gonçalves, S.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, R.

    1984-01-01

    In male BALB/c mice aged 5-6 weeks inoculated three times at intervals of 15 days with 1 X 10(7) epimastigote forms of the PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and challenged 30 days after the last inoculation with 2 X 10(4) trypomastigote forms of the Colombia strain of T cruzi (the mice were sacrificed 80-100 days after the challenge) a cardiomyopathy very similar to that observed in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease in man develops. The cardiac syndrome is characterized grossly by cardiomegaly with hypertrophy, dilatation of ventricular chambers, and thinning of the apex of the left ventricle (apical aneurysm) and microscopically by focal areas of myocytolytic necrosis and myocardial degeneration with an inflammatory response composed of mononuclear cells (predominantly macrophages and a few lymphocytes) with concurrent interstitial fibrosis and occasional myofibers containing pseudocysts. In addition, aggregated platelets and occlusive thrombi were found in small epicardial and intramyocardial vessels of infected mice as compared with controls. The potential role of intravascular platelet aggregation in the causation of focal myocardial necrosis and degeneration and apical aneurysm in experimental T cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6230012

  14. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  15. Extension of the life span of pressure ulcer fibroblasts with recombinant human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Vande Berg, J. S.; Robson, M. C.; Mikhail, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 beta (rhuIL-1 beta) was investigated in a randomized, blinded placebo-controlled trial to evaluate its effect on the healing of chronic pressure ulcers. The influence of this topically applied cytokine to 26 pressure ulcer patients was correlated with tissue culture and electron microscopic evaluation. Cellular replication studies showed that low (0.01 micrograms/cm2/day) and medium (0.1 micrograms/cm2/day) concentrations of rhuIL-1 beta were not effective in extending replication in pressure ulcer fibroblasts, in vitro. Tissue culture measurements from pressure ulcer biopsies demonstrated that, after 29 days of a high level of rhuIL-1 beta treatment (1.0 micrograms/cm2/day), the cytokine was effective in extending the ability of pressure ulcer fibroblasts to replicate. Tissue culture and electron microscopy suggested that, although rhuIL-1 beta promoted increases in fibroblast numbers, the primary effect appeared to be development of the extracellular matrix. The possible direct and indirect influences of rhuIL-1 beta therapy on pressure ulcers are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:7747819

  16. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 RNA expression in rat and human liver fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, H.; Wege, T.; Milani, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Orzechowski, H. D.; Bechstein, W. O.; Neuhaus, P.; Gressner, A. M.; Schuppan, D.

    1997-01-01

    The remodeling of extracellular matrix during chronic liver disease may partially be attributed to altered activity of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Expression of TIMP-1 and -2 was studied by in situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry in rat (acute and chronic carbon tetrachloride intoxication and secondary biliary fibrosis) and human livers and on isolated rat hepatic stellate cells. TIMP-1 and -2 transcripts appeared in rat livers within 1 to 3 hours after intoxication, pointing to a role in the protection against accidental activation of matrix metalloproteinases, and were present at high levels in all fibrotic rat and human livers predominantly in stellate cells. TIMP-2 RNA distribution largely matched with previously reported patterns of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (72-kd gelatinase) expression, suggesting generation of a TIMP-2/matrix metalloproteinase-2 complex (large inhibitor of metalloproteinases). Isolated stellate cells expressed TIMP-1 and -2 RNA. Addition of transforming growth factor-beta 1 enhanced TIMP-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 RNA levels in vitro, whereas TIMP-2-specific signals were reduced, likely to result in a stoichiometric excess of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 over TIMP-2. In the context of previous demonstrations of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in vivo, these patterns suggest an intrahepatic environment permitting only limited matrix degradation, ultimately resulting in redistribution of extracellular matrix with relative accumulation of collagen type 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9137090

  17. Differential Expression of Matrix-Metalloproteinase-1 and -2 Genes in Normal and Fibrotic Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Stefano; Herbst, Hermann; Schuppan, Detlef; Grappone, Cecilia; Pellegrini, Giulia; Pinzani, Massimo; Casini, Alessandro; Calabró, Antonio; Ciancio, Giuseppe; Stefanini, Francesco; Ciancio, Andrew K.; Surrenti, Calogero

    1994-01-01

    Altered degradation of extracellular matrix has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. We investigated levels and cellular sites of gene expression of two major collagebn-degrading enzymes, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-l (fibroblast type-interstitial collagenase)and MMP-2 (72-kd gelatinase, type IV collagenase) in five normal and 18 fibrotic human livers as well as in cultured human hepatic fat-storing cells by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Fatstoring cells expressed both MMP-1 and MMP-2 RNA in vitro. In vivo, MMP-1 was undetectable in mesenchymal and parenchymal cells of all liver specimens, whereas MMP-2 transcripts were expressed in all livers by vimentin-positive, CD68 negative mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells of all fibrotic livers displayed high transcript levels of transforming growth factor-β1, which is known to modulate MMP expression. Along with de novo fibrogenesis and possibly influenced by transforming growth factor-β1, expression of MMP-2 in the absence of MMP-1 expression may be responsible for the quantitative and qualitative changes of extracellular matrix observed in chronic liver disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 7 PMID:8129038

  18. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix and Developmental Dysregulation in the Pancreas by Transgenic Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Shik; Gu, Danling; Feng, Lili; Curriden, Scott; Arnush, Marc; Krahl, Troy; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Wilson, Curtis; Loskutoff, David L.; Fox, Howard; Sarvetnick, Nora

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the pancreatic β-islet cells directed by human insulin promoter were produced to study in vivo effects of TGF-β1. Fibroblast proliferation and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix were observed from birth onward, finally replacing almost all the exocrine pancreas. Cellular infiltrates comprising macrophages and neutrophils were also observed. Plasminogen activator inhibitor was induced in the transgenic pancreas as well as fibronectin and laminin, partly explaining accumulation of extracellular matrix. TGF-β1 inhibited proliferation of acinar cells in vivo as evidenced by decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Development of pancreatic islets was dysregulated, resulting in small islet cell clusters without formation of normal adult islets; however, the overall islet cell mass was not signfifcantly diminished. Additional transgenic lines with less pronounced phenotypes had less expression of TGF-β1 transgene. These findings suggest that TGF-β1 might be a mediator of diseases associated with extracellular matrix deposition such as chronic pancreatitis, and this mouse model will be useful for further analysis of the in vivo effects of TGF-β1, including its potential for immunosuppression. Imagesp43-aFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7604884

  19. Increased central nervous system production of extracellular matrix components and development of hydrocephalus in transgenic mice overexpressing transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Wyss-Coray, T.; Feng, L.; Masliah, E.; Ruppe, M. D.; Lee, H. S.; Toggas, S. M.; Rockenstein, E. M.; Mucke, L.

    1995-01-01

    A number of important neurological diseases, including HIV-1 encephalitis, Alzheimer's disease, and brain trauma, are associated with increased cerebral expression of the multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). To determine whether overexpression of TGF-beta 1 within the central nervous system (CNS) can contribute to the development of neuropathological alterations, a bioactive form of TGF-beta 1 was expressed in astrocytes of transgenic mice. Transgenic mice with high levels of cerebral TGF-beta 1 expression developed a severe communicating hydrocephalus, seizures, motor incoordination, and early runting. While unmanipulated heterozygous transgenic mice from a low expressor line showed no such alterations, increasing TGF-beta 1 expression in this line by injury-induced astroglial activation or generation of homozygous offspring did result in the abnormal phenotype. Notably, astroglial overexpression of TGF-beta 1 consistently induced a strong upmodulation of the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and fibronectin in the CNS, particularly in the vicinity of TGF-beta 1-expressing perivascular astrocytes, but was not associated with obvious CNS infiltration by hematogenous cells. While low levels of extracellular matrix protein expression may assist in CNS wound repair and regeneration, excessive extracellular matrix deposition could result in the development of hydrocephalus. As an effective inducer of extracellular matrix components, TGF-beta 1 may also contribute to the development of other neuropathological alterations, eg, the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7604885

  20. Aging-associated changes in renal extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Abrass, C. K.; Adcox, M. J.; Raugi, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The composition of renal extracellular matrices was examined in 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old rats by immunofluorescence microscopy. No change in composition of tubular basement membrane was detected. Increased immunostaining for laminin chains B1 and s-laminin and thrombospondin characterized the thickened glomerular basement membrane. Interstitial collagens I and III were not detected in globally sclerotic glomeruli. The major change noted in the aged rat kidney at 24 months was generalized expansion of the interstitium by thrombospondin and fibronectin. In areas of tubular atrophy there was new expression of extra domain A (EDA)+ fibronectin. Collagens I and III were detected focally in the interstitium adjacent to areas of tubular atrophy, but otherwise collagens I, III, and IV and laminin did not contribute to the interstitial fibrosis. Interstitial fibrosis was detectable at 18 months of age and preceded the development of sclerotic glomeruli, tubular atrophy, or accumulations of interstitial collagen. These changes in extracellular matrix composition distinguish the aging kidney from other sclerotic forms of renal disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7887455

  1. Vascular smooth muscle cells from injured rat aortas display elevated matrix production associated with transforming growth factor-beta activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, L. M.; Wolf, Y. G.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1995-01-01

    The arterial response to injury is characterized by a short period of increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells, followed by an extended period of extracellular matrix accumulation in the intima. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) has been implicated as a causative factor in the formation of extracellular matrix in this process, which leads to progressive thickening of the intima, known as intimal hyperplasia. In vitro analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells harvested from normal rat aortas and from aortas injured 14 days earlier showed that both types of cells attached equally well to culture dishes but that the initial spreading of the cells was increased in cells derived from injured vessels. Cells from the injured arteries produced more fibronectin and proteoglycans into the culture medium than the cells from normal arteries and contained more TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 increased proteoglycan synthesis by normal smooth muscle cells, and the presence of a neutralizing anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody reduced proteoglycan synthesis by the cells from injured arteries in culture. Fibronectin synthesis was not altered by these treatments. These results indicate that the accumulation of extracellular matrix components in neointimal lesions is at least partially caused by autocrine TGF-beta activity in vascular smooth muscle cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7573349

  2. Cell and tissue distribution of synthetic oligonucleotides in healthy and tumor-bearing nude mice. An autoradiographic, immunohistological, and direct fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Plenat, F.; Klein-Monhoven, N.; Marie, B.; Vignaud, J. M.; Duprez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides have the ability to inhibit individual gene expression in the potential treatment of cancer and viral diseases. However, the way parenterally administered oligonucleotides distribute themselves into healthy tissues or tumors is poorly understood. In this study, the cell and tissue distribution of two modified or unmodified phosphodiester pentadeca-beta-oligonucleotides intravenously administered to healthy or tumor-bearing nude mice was assessed by autoradiography as well as by direct fluorescence and immunoenzymatic histological methods. Resistance of oligonucleotides to degradation by nuclease activity was previously studied in vitro. Using these methods we were able to show the following: 1) within minutes, oligonucleotides permeate all cells and tissues with the exceptions of erythrocytes and intervertebral discs; 2) cell and tissue distribution does not depend on the sequence of the given oligonucleotide; 3) concentration of oligonucleotides is higher within the connective tissue cells than in the interstitial matrix; 4) after uptake, oligomers partition throughout all of the cellular compartments, including at the highest intracellular concentrations in the nuclei; 5) oligonucleotides penetrate easily the tumor cell compartments, oligonucleotide diffusion being unimpeded by the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7604874

  3. Routine immunofluorescent and histochemical analysis of bone marrow involvement of lymphoma/leukaemia: the use of cryostat sections.

    PubMed Central

    Chilosi, M.; Pizzolo, G.; Fiore-Donati, L.; Bofill, M.; Janossy, G.

    1983-01-01

    Enzyme histochemical and immunohistological (immuno-fluorescence and -peroxidase) techniques have been routinely used for investigating over 70 normal and pathological bone marrow samples. This recently standardized diagnostic procedure is very quick and can be performed in a few hours. In 6 cases the clinical diagnosis of leukaemia/lymphoma has become apparent only after the immunohistological analysis of the bone marrow. In 6 other cases the information about the staging of B cell malignancies was superior in the frozen biopsies to the paraffin embedded preparations. Amongst many other features the monoclonality of B CLL/lymphomas, the special features of B CLL infiltrates (RFA-1+, Leu-1+, HLA-DR+, SmIg+), follicular lymphoma deposits (containing follicular dendritic cells) and non-T, non-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemic blasts (terminal transferase+, HLA-DR+) as well as the sometimes conspicuous presence of infiltrating normal T cells could be clearly and reproducibly demonstrated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:6360192

  4. Syndecan-1 is up-regulated in ras-transformed intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Z. M.; Choo, B.; Li, M.; Carey, D. J.; Cano-Gauci, D. F.; Buick, R. N.

    1998-01-01

    The syndecans, a family of cell-surface heparan sulphate proteoglycans, have been proposed to mediate cellular interactions with extracellular effector molecules, such as growth factors and components of the extracellular matrix, during critical phases of development. Transcripts of all four syndecans are expressed at varying levels in the developing rat intestine and in a series of immature rat intestinal epithelial cell lines. In addition, we report the novel finding that, in the intestinal epithelial cell lines, expression of syndecan-1 transcript is up-regulated by transformation with activated H-ras. This is in contrast to other cell lines in which ras transformation is associated with a decrease in syndecan-1 levels. The observed increase in the syndecan-1 occurs as a result of increased transcription and can be correlated with the degree of transformation of the IEC-18 cells. Transformation is also associated with a decrease in apparent molecular weight and increased shedding of the proteoglycan into the culture medium. Increased shedding of syndecan-1 into the culture medium after transformation with H-ras may contribute to the disruption of proteoglycan interactions with the extracellular matrix, leading to alterations in cell adhesion and organization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9528830

  5. Association between air pollution and intrauterine mortality in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, L A; Loomis, D; Conceição, G M; Braga, A L; Arcas, R M; Kishi, H S; Singer, J M; Böhm, G M; Saldiva, P H

    1998-01-01

    The associations among daily counts of intrauterine mortality and pollutant concentrations (NO2, SO2, CO, O3, and particulate matter (3/4)10 microm) were investigated for the period ranging from January 1991 to December 1992 in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. We used Poisson regression techniques, adjusted for season and weather. The association between intrauterine mortality and air pollution was strong for NO2 (coefficient = 0.0013/ microg/m3; p<0.01) but lesser for SO2 (coefficient = 0.0005/ microg/m3; p<0.10) and CO (coefficient = 0.0223/ppm; p<0.10). A significant association was observed when an index that combined these three pollutants was considered in the models instead of considering each pollutant individually (p<0.01). These associations exhibited a short time lag, not over 5 days. In addition, some evidence of fetal exposure to air pollution was obtained by disclosing a significant association between the levels of carboxyhemoglobin of blood sampled from the umbilical cord and ambient CO levels in children delivered by nonsmoking pregnant women in the period from May to July 1995. Our results suggest that air pollution in São Paulo may promote adverse health effects on fetuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9618348

  6. Response of the macaque nasal epithelium to ambient levels of ozone. A morphologic and morphometric study of the transitional and respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Although ozone (O3)-induced bronchiolitis has been morphologically characterized, effects of O3 on the upper respiratory tract have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposures to ambient levels of O3 induce lesions in the nasal mucosa. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to 0.00, 0.15, or 0.30 ppm O3 for 6 or 90 days, 8 hours/day. After exposure, nasal mucosa was processed for light and electron microscopy. Quantitative changes were evident in the nasal transitional and respiratory epithelium. At 6 or 90 days of exposure to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm O3 lesions consisted of ciliated cell necrosis, shortened cilia, and secretory cell hyperplasia. Inflammatory cell influx was only present at 6 days of exposure. Ultrastructural changes in goblet cells were evident at 90 days. Ambient levels of O3 can induce significant nasal epithelial lesions, which may compromise upper respiratory defense mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:3605312

  7. Comparative analysis of tissue reactions to anesthetic solutions: histological analysis in subcutaneous tissue of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Paulo Domingos; Sanches, Marcio Giampietro; Okamoto, Tetuo

    2003-01-01

    Postanesthetic pain is a relatively common complication after local anesthesia. This complication may be caused by the anesthetic technique or by the anesthetic solution used. Tissue reactions induced by the anesthetic solutions may be one of the factors resulting in pain after anesthesia. The objective of this study was to comparatively analyze tissue reactions induced by different anesthetic solutions in the subcutaneous tissue of rats. The following solutions were utilized: 2% lidocaine without vasoconstrictor; a 0.5% bupivacaine solution with 1:200,000 adrenaline; a 4% articaine solution and 2% mepivacaine, both with 1:100,000 adrenaline; and a 0.9% sodium chloride solution as a control. Sterilized absorbent paper cones packed inside polyethylene tubes were soaked in the solutions and implanted in the subcutaneous region. The sacrifice periods were 1, 2, 5, and 10 days after surgery. The specimens were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological analysis. The results showed that there is a difference in tissue irritability produced by the local anesthetic solutions. The results also showed that there is no relation between the concentration of the drug and the inflammatory intensity, that the mepivacaine and articaine solutions promoted less inflammatory reaction than the bupivacaine, and that the lidocaine solution produced the least intense inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:14959905

  8. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 gene expression in human monocytes stimulated with Salmonella typhimurium porins.

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, M; Cipollaro de L'ero, G; Donnarumma, G; Marcatili, A; Galdiero, F

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether Salmonella typhimurium porins can affect the expression of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) genes. Human monocytes were treated with porins, and total RNAs were analysed by Northern blotting to evaluate the expression of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 in both treated and untreated cell cultures. Porins induced a significant increase in IL-1 and IL-6 transcripts. This increase was related to the dose of porins, and it peaked 5 hr after treatment. The same results were obtained when polymyxin B was added to the porin preparation to eliminate eventual traces of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with porins. The porins-mediated increase in interleukin transcripts did not require de novo protein synthesis, and it was because of the enhanced half-life of IL-1 and IL-6 mRNAs, rather an increased rate of gene transcription. These data suggest that porins may affect inflammatory and immunological responses by enhancing the expression of cytokine genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8567029

  9. VASCULAR LESIONS IN SARCOIDOSIS—Probable Relationship to Steroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Carl C.

    1957-01-01

    In two patients with sarcoidosis treated with cortisone, localized vascular lesions, proven by biopsy, subsequently developed. Vascular lesions occurring in sarcoidosis, basically a granulomatous disease, are rarely described. However, a clinical picture of combined arteritis-sarcoidosis with overlapping features is not infrequently observed. Hence clinical differentiation may be difficult. Some observers suggest an interrelationship, perhaps a common etiological grouping in the hypersensitivity disease classification, because of the basic pathological lesions of granuloma and arteritis. The possible relationship of steroid therapy to the development of diffuse vascular lesions or arteritis appears to be gaining recognition, particularly in the case of susceptible patients with rheumatoid arthritis, although in the two cases here reported the disease for which steroids were administered was sarcoidosis and the arterial lesions observed subsequent to therapy were localized rather than diffuse. Since it seems unlikely that arteritis would be part of the clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis, it is implied that a higher incidence of such lesions (localized or diffuse) may be related to prolonged steroid therapy. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:13489498

  10. Cholangiocarcinomas induced by feeding 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene to rats. Histopathology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. P.; Buschmann, R. J.; Chomet, B.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a carcinogenic (0.064% 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene, 3'-Me-DAB) ground meal normal diet. After 12 weeks the ground meal diet was replaced with a normal pellet diet, and the 30 surviving animals were divided into three equal groups. One group was sacrificed at the twelfth week and the other groups 4 and 8 weeks later. Control animals were also run. Based on previous studies which used "tumor-promoting" diets and 3'-Me-DAB, we expected a less than 100% incidence of predominantly hepatocellular carcinomas. However, we found mucin-producing cholangiocarcinomas in all 30 animals and, in addition, a small hepatocellular component in 3 of the animals. By electron microscopy the intestinal mucosal features of microvillous border cells, goblet cells, and endocrine-like cells were found. We suggest that the tumors produced as described here provide a good animal model of mucin-producing cholangiocarcinomas. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:192081

  11. Basal cell-specific and hyperproliferation-related keratins in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzels, R. H.; Kuijpers, H. J.; Lane, E. B.; Leigh, I. M.; Troyanovsky, S. M.; Holland, R.; van Haelst, U. J.; Ramaekers, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    In normal breast tissue and in noninvasive breast carcinomas, various keratin-14 antibodies were reactive predominantly with the basal/myoepithelial cell layer, although mainly in terminal and larger ducts luminal cells sometimes also were stained. A similar reaction pattern was found with an antibody directed against keratin 17, although this antibody was more often found negative than keratin 14 in the pre-existing myoepithelial cells in intraductal carcinomas. Furthermore antibodies reactive with hyperproliferation-related keratins 6 and 16 were used. One of these (LL025) was completely negative in normal breast tissue and noninvasive breast carcinomas. However 10% of the invasive carcinomas were diffusely or focally positive with this latter antibody, while in 18 of 115 cases of invasive breast carcinomas studied, a basal cell phenotype was detected. A relatively high concordance was found between the carcinomas immunostaining with the basal cell and the hyperproliferation-related keratins, but not between these markers and the proliferation marker Ki-67. This supports the conclusion that basal cells in breast cancer may show extensive proliferation, and that absence of Ki-67 staining does not mean that (tumor) cells are not proliferating. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1705754

  12. Enteric vascular endothelial response to bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Koshi, R.; Mathan, V. I.; David, S.; Mathan, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The response of enteric vasculature to endotoxin was examined at the ultrastructural level using a murine model of endotoxin-induced acute diarrhoea. Morphological changes indicative of endothelial damage were evident as early as 15 minutes following endotoxin challenge. These changes, characterized by widening of intercellular spaces, increased microvillous projections and the appearance of stress fibres, preceded the leucocytic response. Endothelial damage increased with time, being associated with progressive degenerative changes in the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and organelles, ultimately leading to desquamation. These latter changes were temporally associated with margination of neutrophils and platelet adhesion to the denuded subendothelium. The venules were the primary site of these changes while the capillaries were the least affected. The arterioles were markedly constricted with minimal endothelial damage. These changes suggest that the enteric vascular endothelium may be an important target organ, and the resultant endothelial injury may have implications in host responses to endotoxin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8292557

  13. Bay or baylike regions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were potent inhibitors of Gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, L M; Rummel, A M; Masten, S J; Trosko, J E; Upham, B L

    1998-01-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known carcinogens, and a considerable amount of research has been devoted to predicting the tumor-initiating potential of PAHs based on chemical structure. However, there has been little research into the effects of PAHs on the epigenetic events of tumor promotion and no structural correlation has been made thereof. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) activity was used in this study as an epigenetic biomarker to determine the structure-activity relationships of twelve different PAHs. The PAHs used were naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, anthracene, 1-methylanthracene, 2-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9, 10-dimethylanthracene, phenanthrene, fluorene, 1-methylfluorene, and fluoranthene. Results showed that PAHs containing bay or baylike regions inhibited GJIC more than did the linear PAHs. The nonnaphthalene PAHs were not cytotoxic as determined by a vital dye uptake assay, but the naphthalene compounds were cytotoxic at the higher doses, indicating that the down regulation of GJIC by these naphthalenes could be a consequence of general membrane damage. Inhibition of GJIC by all the inhibitory PAHs was reversed when the cells were refreshed with PAH-free growth medium. Inhibition of GJIC occurred within 0.5-5 min and correlated with the aqueous solubility of the PAHs. The present study revealed that there are structural determinants of epigenetic toxicity as determined by GJIC activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9417772

  14. Ultrastructural alterations in the atrial myocardium of pigs with acute monensin toxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monensin, A Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produces left atrial damage in pigs given toxic doses. Eight weanling pigs were given mycelial monensin orally (40 mg/kg body weight) and were killed on days 1, 2, 4, and 16 (two animals at each time interval) for ultrastructural study of the left atrial lesions. On days 1-4, extensive necrosis with contraction bands was present. Rapid macrophagic invasion and phagocytosis of sarcoplasmic debris was seen on days 2 and 4. Missing necrotic myocytes were outlined by persistent "tubes" of external laminas. In some surviving myocytes, sublethal injury was evident on day 1 by mitochondria with condensed conformation and on days 2, 4, and 16 by moderate to marked myofibrillar lysis and sarcoplasmic vacuolation. Monensin cardiotoxicity in pigs constitutes a unique example of selective injury to atrial myocardium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6696048

  15. Sequential changes of extracellular matrix and proliferation of Ito cells with enhanced expression of desmin and actin in focal hepatic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, K.; Suzuki, J.; Mukai, H.; Mori, M.

    1986-01-01

    Immunohistochemical investigations were carried out on the properties of the cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in focal hepatic injuries. A liquid nitrogen-cooled syringe needle was thrust into the rat liver. Necrotic areas became permeated with plasma within 24-hour period. Areas became strongly positive for fibronectin and were infiltrated with inflammatory cells positive for lysozyme. By the third day, Ito cells were proliferated in the peripheral portions of the damaged areas. These Ito cells showed enhanced immunostaining for desmin and actin but were negative for lysozyme. Interstitial fibers which were immunochemically positive for Types I and IV collagens, laminin, and fibronectin, began to increase from Day 3. They appeared on the rim of the hepatocytes adjacent to the damaged areas and extended into the injured regions with the Ito cells. An increase in basal laminas associated with capillaries and bile ducts also increased with a 1-day delay. The damaged areas were replaced by granulation tissue by Day 5. A rapid diminution then occurred in the granulation tissue, and normal hepatic tissue was restored in 7-10 days. These observations demonstrate that ECM changed in a sequential manner and then finally disappeared from the damaged site within 10 days. Although various cells, including parenchymal cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and cholangiolar cells contributed to the healing of the damaged area, Ito cells, which exhibit unique phenotypic changes, presumably had a major role in the process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3799820

  16. Topographic abnormalities of proinsulin to insulin conversion in functioning human insulinomas. Comparison of immunoelectron microscopic and clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, J.; Komminoth, P.; Heitz, P. U.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the major defect in human insulinomas is a decreased hormone storage capacity resulting in uncontrolled release of proinsulin and insulin. By immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies we studied the subcellular distribution of proinsulin and insulin in benign and malignant functioning insulinomas of different histology and compared the findings with various clinical and pathohistological parameters. We found that, in contrast to normal B cells, the proinsulin to insulin conversion in insulinomas occurs already in the trans Golgi apparatus but remains incomplete, resulting in the formation of secretory granules containing both proinsulin and insulin. Thus, in functioning insulinomas, sorting into secretory granules is not a prerequisite for hormone conversion. Furthermore, proinsulin and insulin storage and most probably subsequent secretion occurs through the secretory granules via the regulated pathway. A substantial variability for both proinsulin and insulin immunolabeling in secretory granules was found not only in individual tumor cells but also among the insulinomas studied. This observed variability may account for the lack of correlation between pathohistological, immunohistochemical, and clinical parameters in functioning insulinomas. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7639339

  17. The image and advocacy of public health in American caricature and cartoons from 1860 to 1900.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, B

    1997-01-01

    The decades just before and after the founding of the American Public Health Association in 1872 saw an efflorescence of political cartooning and caricature in national-circulation weeklies. Part of the political and social critique that cartoonists and their editors provided the public focused on needs or opportunities for preventing illness and accidents. This paper presents a small selection of editorial cartoons that agitated in support of public health activities over 4 decades. The goals are to illustrate several concerns that rose to national prominence in that era, to examine the kinds of imagery that newspapers and magazine editors offered their readers, and to observe how frequently the public was encouraged to see politicians and commercial interests as responsible for preventable health problems. This discussion focuses exclusively on propagandistic images, leaving aside the reportorial depictions of events in the news and the neutral illustrations of methods and machines in scientific and technical publications. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:9366637

  18. Hyperglycemic glucose concentrations up-regulate the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Relevance to alterations of peripheral nerves in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Muona, P.; Jaakkola, S.; Zhang, R. Z.; Pan, T. C.; Pelliniemi, L.; Risteli, L.; Chu, M. L.; Uitto, J.; Peltonen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopy of peripheral nerves obtained from two diabetic patients revealed large deposits of microfibrils and the presence of Luse bodies in the vicinity of perineurial cells. Microfibrils were found to accumulate also in the sciatic nerves of diabetic BB rats; these microfibrillar deposits were shown to contain type VI collagen by immunoelectron microscopy. Connective tissue cells cultured from rat sciatic nerves were exposed to high glucose concentrations. High glucose concentrations up-regulated the mRNA steady-state levels of alpha 1(VI), alpha 2(VI), and alpha 3(VI) chains of type VI collagen and caused accumulation of type VI collagen-containing fibrils in the cultures. Immunostaining and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that perineurial cells, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts expressed type VI collagen at the mRNA and protein levels. The results suggest that the turnover and supramolecular assembly of type VI collagen are perturbed in diabetic nerves and that glucose per se increases the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8494053

  19. Malignant progression of an SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, K. W.; Gallimore, P. H.

    1987-01-01

    Human foetal keratinocytes were transfected with a recombinant plasmid (pSV6-1) which contained an origin defective SV40 genome. The resulting transformed cell line had many properties in common with previously described SV40-transformed keratinocytes, including expression of simple epithelial-type keratins. It was non-tumourigenic in nude mice at early passages, forming small benign cysts, however, after approximately 46 in vitro passages, these transformed keratinocytes formed invasive squamous cell carcinomas in athymic nude mice. Several in vitro changes were associated with this acquisition of tumourigenicity (a) an alteration in cellular morphology, (b) development of a cytogenetically marked clone and (c) loss of cell surface fibronectin. The loss of fibronectin was also observed in vivo; cysts formed by SV6-1 Bam/HFK produced human fibronectin whereas tumours did not, although both tumours and cysts were laminin- and keratin-positive. These results indicate that the spontaneous development of secondary events in immortalised human cells may lead to the acquisition of a malignant phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2447927

  20. Testicular Sonogram

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Jagadishwar; White, Sherry

    1980-01-01

    Precise localization, detection, and recognition of minor changes in testicular lesions are important because teratocarcinoma is notorious for manifesting as secondaries at the time the primary site is obvious to the clinician. In the past, questionable enlargement of the testis due to significant pathology required numerous radiographic invasive special procedures to provide a correct diagnosis. Due to the advent of the sophisticated digital ultrasound imager with high frequency quarter wave transducer, it is possible to detect minor changes in the tissue character of the testis, thus enabling the physician to tackle primary neoplasms prior to distant spread. In our case we were able to detect the abnormality in the testis, but unfortunately a large secondary abnormal mass was present. Even at that stage we were able to map out the extent of the lesion which was beneficial to the surgeon and the patient. Ultrasound studies were utilized in serial follow-up studies. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7401191

  1. Cell-to-cell herniae in the arterial wall. I. The pathogenesis of vacuoles in the normal media.

    PubMed Central

    Joris, I.; Majno, G.

    1977-01-01

    Vacuoles were observed by light microscopy in the smooth muscle cells of the media in normal rat arteries. By electron microscopy these vacuoles were limited by two membranes; they usually contained myelin figures, a few organelles (especially mitochondria and microfilaments), and an amorphous background material that varied greatly in density. Morphologic evidence indicates that these structures arise by herniation of one smooth muscle cell into another; it is presumed that herniation occurs during contraction at weak points corresponding to areas where adjacent cells come in close contact. Such cell-to-cell herniae were mostly seen in small arteries (arterioles) with a diameter of 0.4 to 0.2 mm; however, none was found in coronary arteries of this size. This discrepancy suggests that the pathogenesis of cell-to-cell herniae is correlated not only with the caliber of the artery but also with functional demands. (Am J Pathol 87:375-398). Images Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:557903

  2. Equine phacoclastic uveitis: the clinical manifestations, light microscopic findings, and therapy of 7 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, B H; Cullen, C L

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective clinical study describes the clinical manifestations, light microscopic findings, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic lens rupture in the horse. Rupture of the lens capsule in the horse usually results in a chronic, blinding inflammation (phacoclastic uveitis) unless prompt surgical and medical therapies are implemented. The clinical manifestations of acute lens capsule rupture included: cataract; intralenticular displacement of iridal pigment; lens cortical fragments attached to the perforated lens capsule, iris, and corneal endothelium; miosis; aqueous flare; and usually a corneal or scleral perforation with ulceration or focal full thickness corneal edema and scarring. The clinical signs of chronic phacoclastic uveitis include blindness, phthisis bulbi, and generalized corneal opacification related to scarring, vascularization, pigmentation, and edema. In one horse, acute phacoclastic uveitis was successfully treated with phacoemulsification to remove the ruptured lens and medical therapy to control the accompanying inflammation. The affected eyes of the horses with chronic phacoclastic uveitis were enucleated because of persistent clinical signs of nonulcerative keratitis and uveitis, despite long-term medical management. The clinical manifestations and lack of improvement with medical therapy are similar in the horse, dog, cat, and rabbit. However, the histologic findings in equine phacoclastic uveitis differ significantly from those in the dog, and rabbit. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:10816830

  3. Identification of three novel mutations in non-Ashkenazi Italian patients with muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Tsujino, S.; Servidei, S.; Tonin, P.; Shanske, S.; Azan, G.; DiMauro, S.

    1994-01-01

    We have identified three novel mutations in four non-Ashkenazi Italian patients with muscle phosphofructokinase (PFK-M) deficiency (Tarui disease). Patient 1 was homozygous for an A-to-C substitution at the 3' end of intron 6 of the PFK-M gene, changing the consensus splice-junction sequence AG to CG. The mutation leads to activation of two cryptic splice sites in exon 7, resulting in one 5 bp- and one 12 bp-deleted transcript. An affected brother was also homozygous, and both parents were heterozygous, for the splice-junction mutation. Patient 2 was homozygous for a G-to-C substitution at codon 39, changing an encoded arginine (CGA) to proline (CCA). Patient 3 was heterozygous for an A-to-C substitution at codon 543, changing an encoded aspartate (GAC) to alanine (GCC); the PFK-M gene on the other allele was not expressed, but sequencing of the reported regulatory region of the gene did not reveal any mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7513946

  4. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, D L

    1980-01-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 bacteriophage tail structure show that assembly can be controlled by switching the subunits from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called "autostery", by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of a latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assemblies of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6894706

  5. Congenital Stenosis of the Cervical Spine: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Countee, Roger W.; Vijayanathan, Thurairasah

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of 11 cases of congenital stenosis of the cervical spine seen over the past three years is reported. The authors' experiences at an urban community hospital, as well as a large Veterans Administration Hospital, lead them to conclude that this disorder is a neurologically significant anomaly which is probably more common than published reports would imply. It can be clinically and radiographically distinguished from “pure” cervical spondylosis, to which it is related, and its treatment should be appropriately modified. It appears to have a predilection for young adult black males, and cervical myelopathy is the predominant clinical feature. Varying degrees of trauma, a disease endemic to the inner city, plays a major role in precipitating the neurological catastrophes associated with this potentially correctable disorder. Proper management of this entity demands a heightened awareness of its existence as well as a high standard of neurological and roentgenographic diagnosis, and operative performance. A flexible operative strategy which takes into account the specific biomechanical factors involved in this disorder as well as the patient's individual physiological and social status is imperative. Surgery offers a good opportunity for improving neurological function. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:439156

  6. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  7. Oblique section 3-D reconstruction of relaxed insect flight muscle reveals the cross-bridge lattice in helical registration.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, H; Lucaveche, C; Reedy, M K; Taylor, K A

    1994-01-01

    In this work we examined the arrangement of cross-bridges on the surface of myosin filaments in the A-band of Lethocerus flight muscle. Muscle fibers were fixed using the tannic-acid-uranyl-acetate, ("TAURAC") procedure. This new procedure provides remarkably good preservation of native features in relaxed insect flight muscle. We computed 3-D reconstructions from single images of oblique transverse sections. The reconstructions reveal a square profile of the averaged myosin filaments in cross section view, resulting from the symmetrical arrangement of four pairs of myosin heads in each 14.5-nm repeat along the filament. The square profiles form a very regular right-handed helical arrangement along the surface of the myosin filament. Furthermore, TAURAC fixation traps a near complete 38.7 nm labeling of the thin filaments in relaxed muscle marking the left-handed helix of actin targets surrounding the thick filaments. These features observed in an averaged reconstruction encompassing nearly an entire myofibril indicate that the myosin heads, even in relaxed muscle, are in excellent helical register in the A-band. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7819494

  8. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridisation combined with premature chromosome condensation for the identification of chromosome damage.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. W.; Chang, J. A.; Giaccia, A. J.; Pinkel, D.; Brown, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The technique of fusing mitotic cells to interphase cells, thereby producing condensation of the chromosomes of the interphase cell (so-called 'premature chromosome condensation' or PCC), has allowed detection of the initial number of chromosome breaks and their repair following ionising radiation. However, the difficulty and tedium of scoring all the chromosome fragments, as well as the inability to readily detect exchange aberrations, has limited the use of PCC. We describe here the use of the recently developed technique of fluorescence in situ hybridisation with whole chromosome libraries to stain individual human chromosomes (also called 'chromosome painting') with the PCC's and show that this overcomes most of the limitations with the analysis of PCC's. First, by focusing on a single chromosome, scoring of breaks in the target chromosome is easy and rapid and greatly expands the radiation dose range over which the PCC technique can be used. Second, it allows the easy recognition of exchange type aberrations. A number of new applications of this technology, such as predicting the radiosensitivity of human tumours in situ, are feasible. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2021536

  9. Relationships between environmental organochlorine contaminant residues, plasma corticosterone concentrations, and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in Great Lakes herring gull embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, A; Moon, T W; Kennedy, S W; Glen, G A

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to survey and detect differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in herring gull (Larus argentatus) embryos environmentally exposed to organochlorine contaminants in ovo. Unincubated fertile herring gull eggs were collected from an Atlantic coast control site and various Great Lakes sites in 1997 and artificially incubated in the laboratory. Liver and/or kidney tissues from approximately half of the late-stage embryos were analyzed for the activities of various intermediary metabolic enzymes known to be regulated, at least in part, by corticosteroids. Basal plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined for the remaining embryos. Yolk sacs were collected from each embryo and a subset was analyzed for organochlorine contaminants. Regression analysis of individual yolk sac organochlorine residue concentrations, or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQs), with individual basal plasma corticosterone concentrations indicated statistically significant inverse relationships for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-ortho PCBs, and TEQs. Similarly, inverse relationships were observed for the activities of two intermediary metabolic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme) when regressed against PCDDs/PCDFs. Overall, these data suggest that current levels of organochlorine contamination may be affecting the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and associated intermediary metabolic pathways in environmentally exposed herring gull embryos in the Great Lakes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10064546

  10. Electro-optical property of extremely stretched skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, Y; Fujime, S

    1975-01-01

    Skinned fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle could easily be stretched up to 8 mum or more in sarcomere length. Such extremely stretched fibers gave quite sharp optical diffraction patterns. The intensities of all observable diffraction lines were found to increase on application of electric field (10 similar to 100 V/cm) parallel to the fiber axis, provided that there was no overlap between thin and thick filaments. By use of a polarizing microscope, it was concluded that I-bands were mainly responsible for this intensity increase. By application of square pulses, the time course of the intensity increase and decay was followed. The analysis based on a simple model suggests: (a) Each thin filament has a permanent dipole movement and the movement directs from Z-bands to the free end of the thin filament. (b) The flexural rigidity of thin filaments is estimated to be similar to 3 with 10-17 dyn with cm-2. The present fibers will provide various applications in physiochemical studies of in vivo thin and thick filaments. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:1078630

  11. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to lung injury. The intra-alveolar material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for surfactant apoprotein, indicating that the accumulated proteinaceous material contained pulmonary surfactant. Type II pneumocytes in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis exhibited hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy. The few macrophages in lung affected by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for lysozyme. The excessive intraalveolar accumulation of proteinaceous material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis may be the result of both an over-production as well as a deficient removal of pulmonary surfactant. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 p[57]-a PMID:7004201

  12. Carcinoma of type II pneumocytes: immunodiagnosis of a subtype of "bronchioloalveolar carcinomas".

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Torikata, C.

    1981-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from North American (N = 12) and Japanese (N = 11) patients with lung carcinomas were stained by the immunoperoxidase method for surfactant-specific apoprotein. Cytoplasmic and focal nuclear staining was seen in three "bronchioloalveolar carcinomas" occurring in Japanese patients. We refer to these three tumors as carcinomas of Type II pneumocytes. These neoplasms formed discrete masses with minimal growth along the alveolar septa at margins of the tumors. Papillary growth with lymphocytic infiltrates in the stalks of the papillary processes was the usual growth pattern. Focal noncaseating granulomas were seen in the stroma of 2 cases, and similar granulomas in the draining lymph nodes were noted in 1. The abundant cytoplasm was foamy, and the nuclei were generally vacuolated with frequent eosinophilic inclusions in the vacuoles. By electron microscopy, osmiophilic lamellar bodies or whorled lamellas were seen in the cytoplasm of the 3 tumors staining for surfactant apoprotein. The nuclei in 2 of the 3 cases contained tubular inclusions; the tubules had a diameter of 60 nm and a 20-nm core. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 and 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6258440

  13. Keratin proteins in human lung carcinomas. Combined use of morphology, keratin immunocytochemistry, and keratin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Schlegel, S. P.; McDowell, E. M.; Wilson, T. S.; Trump, B. F.; Harris, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Light-microscopic immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy demonstrated that adenocarcinomas (AC) and squamous cell (epidermoid) carcinomas (SCCs) of human lung contained keratin proteins in the form of tonofilament bundles. However, moderately differentiated (md) SCCs contained abundant keratin, whereas poorly differentiated (pd) SCCs and all ACs contained lesser amounts. Lung tumors with the diagnosis of AC or SCC, as defined by WHO criteria, were also analyzed by immunoprecipitation techniques for the presence of keratin proteins. Regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation, SCCs contained a 44 kd keratin which was lacking in ACs. Interestingly, normal bronchial epithelium also contained the same 44 kd keratin. In addition, as SCCs became more differentiated, they exhibited even greater differences in the profile of synthesized keratins. Specifically, the relative abundance of the intermediate-sized keratins (57 and 59 kd) was increased in the md SCCs. Although keratin protein patterns appear to be a valuable adjunct in distinguishing AC from SCC, their usefulness as a diagnostic tool will require survey of a larger number of poorly differentiated tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6198920

  14. Pancreas transplantation. An immunohistologic and histopathologic examination of 100 grafts.

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, R. K.; Sutherland, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined tissues obtained by biopsy, pancreatectomy, and autopsy from 100 pancreas grafts to determine the cause of dysfunction or failure of the graft. Immunohistologic examination of 42 tissues to determine the mononuclear cell phenotypes and Class I and II antigen expression was performed as well. Technical factors--infections, thrombosis, obstruction--accounted for a large number of graft losses, but immunologic-mediated mechanisms resulted in graft dysfunction and failure as well. Pleomorphic inflammatory infiltrates were present in grafts with acute rejection, as well as Silastic and Prolamine duct-obstructed grafts. Criteria useful in the identification of acute rejection from pancreatitis included a more intense, predominantly mononuclear cell infiltration of transformed lymphocytes in the exocrine pancreas and evidence of vascular rejection--endovasculitis or fibrinoid necrosis. Increased expression and/or induction of Class I and II antigens on pancreatic constituents occurred in grafts with evidence of acute rejection, but also with Silastic and prolamine duct-obstructed pancreatitis. An isletitis occurred in 25% of the grafts. Nine of the 25 grafts (36%) with isletitis also had selective loss of beta cells from the islets. Recurrent diabetes mellitus appeared to have developed in these cases, which accounted for loss of graft function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3037911

  15. Early extracellular and cellular lipid deposits in aorta of cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1992-01-01

    Subendothelial accumulation of extracellular liposomes rich in unesterified cholesterol has been described as an early feature of atherosclerosis induced by cholesterol feeding in rabbits. Beta-very-low-density lipoproteins, however, the presumed source of atherogenic lipid in this animal model, contain mostly esterified cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to test for the presence of extracellular neutral lipid deposits consistent with esterified cholesterol, by employing new electron microscopic techniques. Rabbits were fed 0.5% cholesterol, 5% butter for 0, 1, 2, and 4 weeks. The lipid-preserving ultrastructural techniques showed, in control and atherosclerotic rabbit arteries, neutral lipid droplets adherent to the endothelial luminal surface. After 1 to 2 weeks, subendothelial extracellular deposits of mostly membranous lipid appeared; these deposits contained variable amounts of neutral lipid. At the same time, cytoplasmic neutral lipid droplets appeared in smooth muscle cells and in a small number of subendothelial macrophagelike cells. After 4 weeks, monocytic infiltration and macrophage foam cell development were prominent, but abundant extracellular lipid deposits also were found. Therefore, in arteries of cholesterol-fed rabbits, deposition of membranous and neutral lipid in the extracellular space and neutral lipid accumulation in resident arterial cells are early and probably independent events, both occurring before monocytic infiltration of the arterial intima. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1415485

  16. The lipid-rich core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. Prevalence of small lipid droplets and vesicles by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1989-01-01

    Abundant extracellular lipid deposits are associated with cell necrosis and tissue weakening in the core region of human atherosclerotic fibrous plaques. The ultrastructural morphology of the core region, previously undefined because of lipid extraction artifacts, was studied with the aid of new osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium and osmium-tannic acid-paraphenylenediamine sequences for tissue processing. Small droplets of neutral lipid (30 to 400 nm profile diameter) and lipid vesicles with aqueous centers accounted for more than 90% of the area occupied by lipid-rich structures in the core region. No foam cells were present. Cholesterol crystals, lipid droplets of a size similar to those in foam cells (0.4 to 6 mu), and larger neutral lipid deposits (greater than 6 mu) together occupied less than 10% of the total area of lipid structures. Abundant lipid vesicles were associated with the nearby presence of cholesterol crystals, whereas small lipid droplets were predominant in areas without crystals. Many droplets had surface defects in the form of pits and vesicular blebs. These morphologic findings are explained most concisely by postulating direct accumulation of extracellular lipid from interstitial lipoproteins as a major process in core region formation. Moreover, a dynamic state of ongoing physical/metabolic transformation of extracellular lipid deposits is suggested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2646938

  17. Feedback inhibition of thymic secretory activity in mice treated by the thymic extract TP-1 (thymostimulin).

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, J; Ben-David, E; Sandbank, U

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructural changes occurring in the medullary epithelium of the thymus of young mice, as a result of repeated injections of thymic extract, TP-1 (thymostimulin) was investigated. After daily injection of TP-1 for 3 weeks, no changes in thymus architecture could be observed by light microscopy. However, by electron microscopy, specific changes were noticed in the epithelial cells. The secretory granules became dilated and engorged; diameter of granules in normal control thymus was approximately 200-250 nm, but reached 1000 nm in treated mice. Degenerative changes appeared in some of these granules, including myelin bodies, distorted configuration and fat droplets. Signs of involution of whole cells and presence of cellular debri within macrophages were observed. Acid phosphatase staining disclosed many lysosomes containing ingested granules. No such findings were observed in control untreated mice, or in mice treated by a heart extract similarly prepared to TP-1. All these findings can be taken as ultrastructural evidence for feedback inhibition of thymic secretory activity, in analogy to the changes occurring other feedback inhibited, peptide hormone secreting glands. The data indicate that (i) the thymus respond to feedback inhibitory stimuli, as other endocrine glands do; (ii)TP-1, the thymic extract under study, contains a physiologically significant thymic hormone, which, when introduced in high doses can exert specific feedback inhibition. This can be taken as an additional, new criterion for the definition of thymic hormones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7056566

  18. Restoration of junctional tetrads in dysgenic myotubes by dihydropyridine receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Takekura, H; Bennett, L; Tanabe, T; Beam, K G; Franzini-Armstrong, C

    1994-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling was restored in primary cultures of dysgenic myotubes by transfecting the cells with an expression plasmid encoding the rabbit skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor. Dishes containing normal, dysgenic, and transfected myotubes were fixed, freeze-fractured, and replicated for electron microscopy. Numerous small domains in the surface membrane of normal myotubes contain ordered arrays of intramembrane particles in groups of four (tetrads). The disposition of tetrads in the arrays is consistent with alternate positioning of tetrads relative to the underlying feet of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Dysgenic myotubes have no arrays of tetrads. Some myotubes from successfully transfected cultures have arrays of tetrads with spacings equal to those found in normal myotubes. Thus the dihydropyridine receptor appears to be needed for the formation of tetrads and their association with the sarcoplasmic reticulum feet. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that each tetrad is composed of four dihydropyridine receptors. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7948692

  19. INSECTS AS ALLERGEN INJECTANTS—Severe Reactions to Bites and Stings of Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Frank

    1962-01-01

    Arthropods capable of penetrating human skin often cause severe local and systemic reactions. Local reactions suggest delayed hypersensitivity while systemic symptoms resemble more the anaphylactic shock in animals. The nature of the antigen remains obscure but predominant evidence suggests its presence throughout the entire organism. Positive history of hypersensitivity to insect injectants was obtained in approximately 20 per cent of persons in the course of routine interviews of 1,078 patients. Repeated bites and stings at long or irregular intervals often induce a state of hypersensitivity, while repeated regular injections of extracts of these insects at shorter intervals may greatly reduce the hypersensitivity. The clinical evidence of allergic sensitivity to insect bites and stings cannot be readily confirmed by skin testing or by other immunological procedures. The history and the character of the lesions as well as certain entomological knowledge of the habits of the insects offer a better basis for specific diagnosis. Treatment with extracts of the whole offending insect generally provides good results but the protection afforded by such treatment varies in degree and duration. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:14485406

  20. Total lower lid reconstruction: technical details.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W L

    1976-01-01

    The main complications of this type of lower lid reconstruction are lash loss or malposition, entropion of the upper lid, upper lid retraction, undue laxity of the lower lid, and lid margin deformities. These can all be avioded by meticulous attention to surgical details and dressing techniques. I believe that this is the best and simplest method of providing a lid of acceptable function and appearance. The advantages of this type of operation are: (1) The new lower lid is constructed of lid tissue including the tarsus and conjunctiva from the upper lid. (2) The function and appearance of the new lower lid are acceptable with practically no tendency to late retraction. (3) The function and appearance of the upper lid need not be interfered with. (4) No external scars are produced except when a lash transplant is done. This transplant leaves a small, hardly noticeable scar in the lower part of the opposite brow. (5) The technique is relatively simple and well within the realm of any well-trained ophthalmic surgeon. The obvious disadvantages are the surgeon's inability to inspect the eye for two to four months and the inconvenience to the patient of having one eye closed for such a long period of time. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:867633

  1. Distribution of type XV collagen transcripts in human tissue and their production by muscle cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kivirikko, S.; Saarela, J.; Myers, J. C.; Autio-Harmainen, H.; Pihlajaniemi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Type XV collagen is a recently identified member of the diverse family of collagens, its structure being characterized by extensive interruptions in the collagenous sequences. A combination of Northern blot hybridization of fetal and adult human tissues and in situ hybridization analyses of a fetus with Down's syndrome, several placentas, and adult skin were used to localize expression of its mRNAs. Northern blot analysis revealed marked expression in heart, skeletal muscle, and placenta tissues and moderate levels in the kidney and pancreas. Clear in situ hybridization signals were detected in fibroblasts and endothelial cells in all tissues studied. Examination of fetal heart, skeletal muscle, and smooth muscle tissues showed that the high type XV collagen mRNA level in the muscle RNA was localized not only to fibroblasts residing in the endomysium but also to myoblasts. Interestingly, type XV collagen mRNAs were also synthesized by certain epithelial cells in kidney, lung, pancreas, and placenta. It was the morphologically immature glomeruli in the kidney and the lower parts of the nephron, especially the collecting ducts, that contained these mRNAs but not the mature glomeruli or proximal tubules, suggesting differences in expression during development. These findings indicate a wide distribution of type XV collagen transcripts, the main producers being mesenchymally derived cells, particularly muscle cells and fibroblasts. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485412

  2. Basic fibroblast growth factor has a differential effect on MyoD conversion of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from newborn and adult rats.

    PubMed Central

    van Neck, J. W.; Medina, J. J.; Onnekink, C.; van der Ven, P. F.; Bloemers, H. P.; Schwartz, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    MyoD is a master regulatory gene for myogenesis that also converts many mesoderm-derived cells into the skeletal muscle phenotype. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells do not contain MyoD homologous mRNA. However, expression of an exogenously supplied MyoD gene in aortic smooth muscle cells cultured from newborn and adult animals converts these cells to elongated myoblasts and myotubes expressing the skeletal muscle genes for titin, nebulin, myosin, and skeletal alpha-actin. The presence of basic fibroblast growth factor during growth and serum starvation completely inhibits MyoD-mediated conversion in cultures of newborn smooth muscle cells. However, in smooth muscle cell cultures derived from adult rats the presence of fibroblast growth factor increases the conversion frequency. The differential response of exogenous MyoD suggests that the two morphological types of aortic smooth muscle cells, one typical for the newborn rat, the other for the adult rat, represent two distinctive states of differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8391216

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  4. Driving through: postpartum care during World War II.

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, E

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, public outcry over shortened hospital stays for new mothers and their infants led to the passage of a federal law banning "drive-through deliveries." This recent round of brief postpartum stays is not unprecedented. During World War II, a baby boom overwhelmed maternity facilities in American hospitals. Hospital births became more popular and accessible as the Emergency Maternal and Infant Care program subsidized obstetric care for servicemen's wives. Although protocols before the war had called for prolonged bed rest in the puerperium, medical theory was quickly revised as crowded hospitals were forced to discharge mothers after 24 hours. To compensate for short inpatient stays, community-based services such as visiting nursing care, postnatal homes, and prenatal classes evolved to support new mothers. Fueled by rhetoric that identified maternal-child health as a critical factor in military morale, postpartum care during the war years remained comprehensive despite short hospital stays. The wartime experience offers a model of alternatives to legislation for ensuring adequate care of postpartum women. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:10191809

  5. Myocardial changes in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Ultrastructural evidence of immune damage and the role of microangiopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Andrade, S. G.; Correa, R.; Sadigursky, M.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1994-01-01

    Histological and ultrastructural studies of the hearts of dogs sacrificed 18 to 26 days after intraperitoneal inoculation with 4 x 10(5) blood forms of the 12 SF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi/kg of body weight disclosed myocarditis characterized by parasitic invasion of some myocytes, damage and necrosis of nonparasitized myocytes, and interstitial infiltration by mononuclear cells. Nonparasitized myocytes showed alterations ranging from mild edema to severe myocytolysis. These changes often were accompanied by contacts of myocytes with lymphocytes (both granular and agranular) and macrophages. These contacts were characterized by focal loss of the myocyte basement membrane and close approximation of the plasma membranes of the two cells. Contacts between lymphocytes and capillary endothelial cells were also frequent. Platelet aggregates and fibrin microthrombi were observed in some capillaries. Our findings suggest that immune effector cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the myocyte damage and the microangiopathy in acute Chagas' disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8203476

  6. Cellular immune response in multiple sclerosis plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, E. A.; McGeer, P. L.

    1990-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis plaques were immunohistochemically stained to exhibit cells expressing immune-system antigens. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-positive cells formed dense rings around all plaque regions. The majority were reactive microglia/macrophages. Counterstaining with oil red O revealed heavy myelin debris within these cells. They were distinct from astrocytes, which were identified with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and which did not contain oil red O myelin debris. Numerous leukocytes and microglia were stained with antibody to leukocyte common antigen (LCA). Lymphocytes in cuffs around vessels, along the margins of capillary walls, and, sparingly, in the tissue matrix of affected areas, were stained with antibodies to CD4 (T-helper/inducer) and CD8 (T-cytotoxic/suppressor). In experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced in Lewis rats, a similar proliferation of Ia-positive (OX6, OX17) cells displaying reactive microglia/macrophage morphology was observed. These Ia-positive cells also were easily distinguished from GFAP-positive astrocytes. The results suggest that macrophages/reactive microglia, and not astrocytes, express class II MHC antigens in multiple sclerosis and EAE plaques. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1698025

  7. Ultrastructural cytochemistry of the ischemic (endocrine) kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Nascimento, M. d.; Désormeaux, Y.; Cantin, M.

    1976-01-01

    Partial ligation of the aorta between the renal arteries induces marked atrophy of the cortical tubules (including the macula densa) of the left (endocrine) kidney with a remarkable increase in the number and granularity of hypersecretory juxtaglomerular granulated cells (JGC) which are found not only at the glomerular pole of arterioles but also in the walls of arteries and arterioles far removed from the glomerulus. Staining of fine sections of Araldite-embedded endocrine kidneys according to the periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate technique of Thiery reveals abundant glycogen in the JGC and less in the blood vessels and tubules. Juxtaglomerular granules are argentaphobic, but their rim is positively stained when ultrathin sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed, glycol methacrylate-embedded kidneys are exposed to phosphotungstic acid at a low pH. A positive reaction is also shown by the cell coat and lysosomes of JGC as well as by the thickened basal lamina, cell coat, cytosomes, and cytosegresomes of the atrophic tubules. Atrophy is most pronounced in the proximal convoluted tubules, which lose their apical microvilli, their basal infoldings and the majority of their mitochondria and cytosomes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1258975

  8. Ultrastructural damage associated with the Ca2+ paradox. The protective effect of Mn2+.

    PubMed Central

    Elz, J. S.; Nayler, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    Hearts repleted with Ca2+-containing buffers after only a few minutes of Ca2+-free perfusioN display extensive ultrastructural damage and accumulate Ca2+. Ultrastructural damage includes separation of the intercalated disks, development of contracture bands, and splitting of the internal and external layers of the glycocalyx. In this study, the authors have used isolated spontaneously beating Langendorff perfused hearts to investigate whether Mn2+ alters the ultrastructural damage associated with Ca2+ repletion after Ca2+-free perfusion, previous studies having shown that it attenuates or abolishes the gain in Ca2+ which normally occurs under these conditions. Mn2+ added only at the time of Ca2+ repletion did not attenuate the ultrastructural damage. When Mn2+ (2 mM) was added during the Ca2+-free period or the Ca2+-free and Ca2+ repletion periods, however, the hearts were not as extensively damaged. The myofibrils were relaxed, and the intercalated disks were intact. However, splitting of the glycocalyx still occurred and was a prominent feature. These results indicate that splitting of the glycocalyx per se does not necessarily result in a massive gain in Ca2+ when Ca2+ is returned to Ca2+-depleted hearts. Possible mechanisms of action of Mn2+ are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6486241

  9. Before Nugent took charge: early efforts to reform chiropractic education, 1919-1941

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2003-01-01

    John J. Nugent, D.C. is remembered by many as either the “Abraham Flexner of Chiropractic” or the “anti-Christ of Chiropractic.” From 1941 until his forced retirement in 1959, the Irish-born Palmer graduate was one of the most important factors in the profession's educational reforms. Yet Nugent's work as the National Chiropractic Association's (NCA's) director of research was not the beginning of the campaign to upgrade chiropractic education. This paper looks at earlier influences and events which set the stage for Nugent's campaign. Among these were the introduction of licensure for chiropractors, the self-defeating actions of B.J. Palmer, the introduction of basic science legislation, the lethargy of the schools, and the struggle for control of education between the schools, on the one hand, and the NCA and the Council of State Chiropractic Examining Boards on the other ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25Figure 26Figure 28Figure 29Figure 30Figure 31Figure 32Figure 33Figure 34Figure 35Figure 36Figure 37Figure 38

  10. Chronic systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor in pigs causes pronounced urothelial growth with accumulation of glycoconjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Vinter-Jensen, L.; Juhl, C. O.; Djurhuus, J. C.; Poulsen, S. S.; Dajani, E. Z.; Brown, K. D.; Orntoft, T. F.; Teglbjaerg, P. S.; Nexø, E.

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is present in large amounts in the urine, but the effects of systemically administered EGF on the urinary tract have not been described previously. In the present paper, we describe a potent growth induction of EGF on the urinary tract. Goettingen minipigs were treated with solvent (n = 5), EGF 30 micrograms/kg/day (n = 6) for 4 weeks, or EGF 30 micrograms/kg/day for 5 weeks followed by 3 weeks of recovery (n = 5). The ureters and bladders were examined by routine histology and electron microscopy and were immunostained for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Four weeks of EGF treatment increased the median cross sectional area of the ureter fourfold with growth of all wall layers. The urothelium was widened from 5 cell layers in the controls to 10 in the EGF-treated animals. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining revealed an increased mitotic activity in the basal zone of the urothelium. In the luminal zone, glycoconjugates accumulated in goblet cells, in cells with intracytoplasmic lumina, and beneath the luminal cell membrane in the umbrella cells. Our studies present a new experimental approach to growth induction of the urinary tract. The findings implicate the EGF system in regulating urothelial growth and glycoconjugate biosynthesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7485396

  11. ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MAdCAM-1 are expressed on choroid plexus epithelium but not endothelium and mediate binding of lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, B. J.; Breier, G.; Butcher, E. C.; Schulz, M.; Engelhardt, B.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in the choroid plexus was studied in normal brain and during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the SJL/J mouse during inflammation induced by intracerebral injection of killed Corynebacterium parvum in the C3H/He mouse. Both ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, but not MAdCAM-1, were constitutively expressed on choroid plexus epithelium but not on the fenestrated capillary endothelial cells within the choroid plexus. During EAE, we observed an up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and de novo expression of MAdCAM-1 on choroid plexus epithelial cells. In contrast, endothelial cells in the choroid plexus were not induced to express any of the investigated CAMs. In in situ hybridization analysis we demonstrated that ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MAdCAM-1 were locally synthesized and that the amount of their mRNAs increased in the inflamed choroid plexus. In vitro, primary choroid plexus epithelial cells could be induced to express ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MAdCAM-1 on their surface after treatment with proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interferon-gamma, and lipopolysaccharide. To investigate the functional status of the expressed CAMs we performed Stamper-Woodruff binding assays on frozen sections of inflamed and naive brains. ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MAdCAM-1 expressed in choroid plexus epithelial cells mediated binding of lymphocytes via their known ligands LFA-1 and alpha4-integrin, respectively. The expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MAdCAM-1 on choroid plexus epithelial cells together with the lack of their expression on the fenestrated choroid plexus endothelium raises the possibility that the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier plays an important role in the immunosurveillance of the central nervous system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3A Figure 3B Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8669469

  12. Remedial Investigation Report, Presidio Main Installation, Presidio of San Francisco. Volume 3: Figures Sections 1-5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    0.01 LITHOLOGY FILL 070, 70 Zinc 406.721 843SS05 , UITHOLOGY FILi Zinc 190 :’ s - p - • 6843SB01 DEPTH 2.0’ 5.0’LITHOLOGY FILL I FIL DET .1DEPTH 2.0’ 4.8...Final Remedial Investigation Report Presidio Main Installation Presidio of San Francisco Volume III Figures Sections 1-5 Contract No. DAAA 15-90-D-00...contract No. DAAA15-90-D-0018 with the USAEC. Volume II, this volume , of the Final Remedial Investigation Report contains the figures referenced by

  13. A Brief Journey Through the History of Gun Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    1 Figure 2. The challenge for more performance: increasing the area under the pressure vs. travel...curve without exceeding system pressure limits..............................................................2 Figure 3. (a) Noble crusher gage (4); (b...5). ..............................4 Figure 5. Predicted pressure vs. time profiles for nominal telescoped ammunition (12). ..............5 Figure

  14. Polymer Based Highly Parallel Nanoscopic Sensors for Rapid Detection of Chemical and Biological Threats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-18

    9 points across the wafer. The average resistance and uniformity were recorded. Filter Disc Electrical Testing A vacuum filtration setup was...Figure 2: Schematic of cross-flow filtration process ....................................................................4 Figure 3: Original cross...flow filtration process equipment design ...............................................5 Figure 4: Final cross-flow filtration process equipment

  15. Stability: from biomechanical concept to chiropractic practice

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Stuart M

    1999-01-01

    This paper formalizes stability in a clinician-friendly way and then discusses ways for chiropractors to ensure stability of spinal joints that may have their stability compromized from manipulation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

  16. Chemical vs. Sonochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Silver, Gold, and Hybrid Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    characterized optically and structurally by using ultraviolet-visible ( UV -Vis) spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM...4 Figure 3. All solutions lined up in order, from Ag QD Solutions 2–7. ..........................................5 Figure 4. UV -Vis...8 Figure 10. UV -Vis absorption on hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles. .....................................................9

  17. “Organic” Erection Dysfunction: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Ronald W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article discusses the basic diagnostic work-up for a physically based erection dysfunction and reviews the five current treatment options (medicinal, physical, surgical, counselling, and intracavernosal injection). ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21253073

  18. 16 CFR Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204 - High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna System Test Setup

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna System Test Setup 3 Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... ANTENNAS Pt. 1204, Figs. 3, 4 Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204—High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna...

  19. 16 CFR Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204 - High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna System Test Setup

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna System Test Setup 3 Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... ANTENNAS Pt. 1204, Figs. 3, 4 Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204—High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna...

  20. 16 CFR Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204 - High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna System Test Setup

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna System Test Setup 3 Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... ANTENNAS Pt. 1204, Figs. 3, 4 Figures 3 and 4 to Part 1204—High Voltage Test Facility and Antenna...

  1. Solar Power Optimization Tool for Onsite Needs (SPOT-ON) User’s Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Launch SPOT-ON. 3 Figure 2. SITE view. Table 1. Surface type and fractional albedo. Desert, Light soil 0.30 Deciduous forest , Green...meadows 0.15 Coniferous forest , Dark soil 0.10 Fresh snow 0.85 Snow 0.55 Crops 0.20 4 Figure 3. Surface choices. Figure 4 displays a screen

  2. Genital Ulcers: Their Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Stephen L.

    1987-01-01

    This article offers some background information on diagnosis and treatment of three major causes of genital ulcers: syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chancroid. The author also discusses differential diagnoses and suggests an approach to treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:21263799

  3. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  4. Potential injury mechanisms to the climber's belayer.

    PubMed Central

    Butlin, P A

    1985-01-01

    Photographs and transparencies of the techniques used in belaying, combined with information gained from discussions amongst experienced climbers, provided evidence of the potential injury mechanisms which may be subjected to the belayer in having to arrest a falling climber, whilst moving towards the belayer. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 Plate 3 Figure 1 Plate 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:4092137

  5. Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) Logistics Management System Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Tracking of U.S. Equipment Procured for ANSF. ..........................................3 Figure 3. ALMS Construct Overview...5 Figure 4. ALMS Historical Database Schema...deployed analyst to NTM-A/CSTC-A served as a conduit to coordinate the efforts of ANSF Logistics Management System ( ALMS ) reach-back support. CAA’s

  6. Gene expression of GLUT3 glucose transporter regulated by glucose in vivo in mouse brain and in vitro in neuronal cell cultures from rat embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, S; Sawa, H; Inoue, N; Nakamichi, Y; Takeshima, H; Hoshino, T

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether glucose regulates the gene expression of glucose transporter GLUT3 in neurons. We examined the regulation of GLUT3 mRNA by glucose in vivo in mouse brain and in vitro by using neuronal cultures from rat embryos. Hypoglycaemia (< 30 mg/dl), produced by 72 h of starvation, increased GLUT3 mRNA in mouse brain by 2-fold. Hybridization studies in situ demonstrated that hypoglycaemia-induced increases in GLUT3 mRNA expression were observed selectively in brain regions including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex and piriform cortex, but not the cerebellum. Primary neuronal cultures from rat embryos deprived of glucose for 48 h also showed an increase (4-fold over control) in GLUT3 mRNA, indicating that glucose can directly regulate expression of GLUT3 mRNA. In contrast with hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia produced by streptozotocin did not alter the expression of GLUT3 mRNA. We also confirmed previous findings that hypoglycaemia increases GLUT1 mRNA expression in brain. The increase in GLUT1 expression was probably limited to the blood-brain barrier in vivo, since GLUT1 mRNA could not be detected in neurons of the mouse cerebrum. Thus we conclude that up-regulation of neuronal GLUT3 in response to glucose starvation represents a protective mechanism against energy depletion in neurons. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8198523

  7. Molecular and genetic ecotoxicologic approaches to aquatic environmental bioreporting.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, B J; Black, W C; Carlson, J O; Clements, W H; DuTeau, N; Harrahy, E; Nuckols, J; Kenneth, E; Olson, K E; Rayms-Keller, A

    1998-01-01

    geophysical information. Integrated spatial, structural, and temporal analyses of these parameters will provide invaluable information concerning environmental determinants that restrict or promote gene flow in bioreporter populations. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9860898

  8. Virtual reality applied to hepatic surgery simulation: the next revolution.

    PubMed Central

    Marescaux, J; Clément, J M; Tassetti, V; Koehl, C; Cotin, S; Russier, Y; Mutter, D; Delingette, H; Ayache, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes a preliminary work on virtual reality applied to liver surgery and discusses the repercussions of assisted surgical strategy and surgical simulation on tomorrow's surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver surgery is considered difficult because of the complexity and variability of the organ. Common generic tools for presurgical medical image visualization do not fulfill the requirements for the liver, restricting comprehension of a patient's specific liver anatomy. METHODS: Using data from the National Library of Medicine, a realistic three-dimensional image was created, including the envelope and the four internal arborescences. A computer interface was developed to manipulate the organ and to define surgical resection planes according to internal anatomy. The first step of surgical simulation was implemented, providing the organ with real-time deformation computation. RESULTS: The three-dimensional anatomy of the liver could be clearly visualized. The virtual organ could be manipulated and a resection defined depending on the anatomic relations between the arborescences, the tumor, and the external envelope. The resulting parts could also be visualized and manipulated. The simulation allowed the deformation of a liver model in real time by means of a realistic laparoscopic tool. CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional visualization of the organ in relation to the pathology is of great help to appreciate the complex anatomy of the liver. Using virtual reality concepts (navigation, interaction, and immersion), surgical planning, training, and teaching for this complex surgical procedure may be possible. The ability to practice a given gesture repeatedly will revolutionize surgical training, and the combination of surgical planning and simulation will improve the efficiency of intervention, leading to optimal care delivery. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9833800

  9. Mutation in and lack of expression of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) in melanocytes from an individual with brown oculocutaneous albinism: a new subtype of albinism classified as "OCA3".

    PubMed Central

    Boissy, R. E.; Zhao, H.; Oetting, W. S.; Austin, L. M.; Wildenberg, S. C.; Boissy, Y. L.; Zhao, Y.; Sturm, R. A.; Hearing, V. J.; King, R. A.; Nordlund, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Most types of human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) result from mutations in the gene for tyrosinase (OCA1) or the P protein (OCA2), although other types of OCA have been described but have not been mapped to specific loci. Melanocytes were cultured from an African-American with OCA, who exhibited the phenotype of Brown OCA, and his normal fraternal twin. Melanocytes cultured from the patient with OCA and the normal twin appeared brown versus black, respectively. Melanocytes from both the patient with OCA and the normal twin demonstrated equal amounts of NP-40-soluble melanin; however, melanocytes from the patient with OCA contained only 7% of the amount of insoluble melanin found from the normal twin. Tyrosinase- related protein-1 (TRP-1) was not detected in the OCA melanocytes by use of various anti-TRP-1 probes. Furthermore, transcripts for TRP-1 were absent in cultured OCA melanocytes. The affected twin was homozygous for a single-bp deletion in exon 6, removing an A in codon 368 and leading to a premature stop at codon 384. Tyrosine hydroxylase activity of the OCA melanocytes was comparable to controls when assayed in cell lysates but was only 30% of controls when assayed in intact cells. We conclude that this mutation of the human TRP-1 gene affects its interaction with tyrosinase, resulting in dysregulation of tyrosinase activity, promotes the synthesis of brown versus black melanin, and is responsible for a third genetic type of OCA in humans, which we classify as "OCA3." Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8651291

  10. Effects of endocrine-disrupting contaminants on amphibian oogenesis: methoxychlor inhibits progesterone-induced maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pickford, D B; Morris, I D

    1999-01-01

    There is currently little evidence of pollution-induced endocrine dysfunction in amphibia, in spite of widespread concern over global declines in this ecologically diverse group. Data regarding the potential effects of endocrine-disrupting contaminants (EDCs) on reproductive function in amphibia are particularly lacking. We hypothesized that estrogenic EDCs may disrupt progesterone-induced oocyte maturation in the adult amphibian ovary, and tested this with an in vitro germinal vesicle breakdown assay using defolliculated oocytes from the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. While a variety of natural and synthetic estrogens and xenoestrogens were inactive in this system, the proestrogenic pesticide methoxychlor was a surprisingly potent inhibitor of progesterone-induced oocyte maturation (median inhibitive concentration, 72 nM). This inhibitory activity was specific to methoxychlor, rather than to its estrogenic contaminants or metabolites, and was not antagonized by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780, suggesting that this activity is not estrogenic per se. The inhibitory activity of methoxychlor was dose dependent, reversible, and early acting. However, washout was unable to reverse the effect of short methoxychlor exposure, and methoxychlor did not competitively displace [3H]progesterone from a specific binding site in the oocyte plasma membrane. Therefore, methoxychlor may exert its action not directly at the site of progesterone action, but downstream on early events in maturational signaling, although the precise mechanism of action is unclear. The activity of methoxychlor in this system indicates that xenobiotics may exert endocrine-disrupting effects through interference with progestin-regulated processes and through mechanisms other than receptor antagonism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10090707

  11. Immunocytochemical patterns of islet cell tumors as defined by the monoclonal antibody HISL-19.

    PubMed Central

    Bordi, C.; Krisch, K.; Horvat, G.; Srikanta, S.

    1988-01-01

    A series of 51 islet cell tumors removed from 28 patients was investigated immunohistochemically with the monoclonal antibody HISL-19. The antibody was produced after immunization of BALB/c mice with human islet cells and was found to react with a wide range of neuroendocrine and neural cells. All tumors presented positive immunoreaction showing various combinations of 2 basic patterns. The first pattern reflected the immunostaining of the secretory granules of the tumor cells. This "granular" staining was predominantly associated with benign neoplasms and with the tumoral production of glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), while it was absent or inconsistent in most insulin-secreting tumors. The second pattern consisted of focal immunoreactive aggregates located in a peri- (and, in polarized cells, supra-) nuclear position. This "cluster-type" staining showed a good morphologic and topographic correspondence with the Golgi apparatus of the cells of the same tumors, as shown by electron microscopy. The latter pattern was well represented in all types of islet cell tumors except those producing PP. Moreover, it was more apparent in less differentiated tumors in which the granular pattern was often absent or inconsistent. Cluster-type (but not granular) immunoreactivity was frequently found in some nonendocrine, nontumoral pancreatic structures, particularly in the epithelium of small ducts. However, the immunoreactive aggregates of nonendocrine cells were distinctly less prominent than those of endocrine cells. On the basis of a comparison with other immunohistochemical markers for neuroendocrine cells, it is concluded that the HISL-19 monoclonal antibody presents specific staining characteristics useful for the cytologic analysis of islet cell tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2840831

  12. Dose response for TCDD promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in rats initiated with DEN: histologic, biochemical, and cell proliferation endpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Maronpot, R R; Foley, J F; Takahashi, K; Goldsworthy, T; Clark, G; Tritscher, A; Portier, C; Lucier, G

    1993-01-01

    The present study examines the dose-response relationship for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) promotion of histologic and biochemical parameters by using a two-stage model for hepatocarcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats initiated with a single intraperitoneal dose of 175 mg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)/kg body weight at 70 days of age. Starting 2 weeks after initiation, treatment groups of 8-10 rats were given TCDD by gavage in corn oil once every 2 weeks for 30 weeks. Doses were 3.5, 10.7, 35.7, and 125 ng TCDD/kg body weight/day. A significant body weight reduction was present in the noninitiated group that received 125 ng TCDD. Relative liver weight was statistically increased in initiated rats treated with > or = 10.7 ng TCDD and in noninitiated rats treated with > or = 35.7 ng TCDD. Histopathologic evidence of cytotoxicity was dose-related in all TCDD-treated groups. There was a statistically significant dose response in the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) S-phase labeling index (LI) in the DEN-initiated rats (p < 0.01) and a marginally significant trend in the saline-treated rats (p = 0.10), but proliferating cell nuclear antigen S-phase LI and growth fraction within altered hepatic foci showed no increase. Among the DEN-initiated groups there was a significant increase in glutathione S-transferase altered hepatic foci stereological parameters in the 125 ng TCDD group. This study demonstrates that dose-response relationships for TCDD's effects on cell proliferation growth of altered hepatic foci are different from previously reported effects on P450 gene expression, indicating that different biological or biochemical responses may exhibit different dose-response relationships.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8143597

  13. The pathogenesis of hyaline arteriolosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, C. N.

    1986-01-01

    Although hyaline arteriolosclerosis is very common and has been of interest to pathologists for well over 100 years, its pathogenesis has never been determined. This study demonstrates that iC3b bound via an ester linkage to hydroxyl groups on the repeating disaccharide units of hyaluronic acid is a major component of arteriolar hyaline. The deposition of iC3b within the walls of arterioles appears to be due to slow spontaneous activation of the alternative complement pathway and random binding of metastable C3b to proximate hyaluronic acid within the arteriolar wall. Since hyaluronic acid does not activate the alternative complement pathway, bound C3b is rapidly inactivated by factors I and H to iC3b, which, along with factor H, remains bound to hyaluronic acid. The hyaline in some hyalinized arterioles also contains IgM and early and late classical complement pathway components. Indirect evidence suggests that the IgM represents immunoconglutinin, an autoantibody to neoantigens on iC3b and that their interaction results in activation of the classical complement pathway. The gradual accumulation of iC3b, factor H, and, at times, IgM and classical complement pathway components within the walls of arterioles is considered to be a physiologic consequence of aging and probably cannot be prevented, because interruption of the initial binding of metastable C3b to hyaluronic acid would require abrogation of the critically important functions of the alternative complement pathway. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:2420184

  14. Human liver tumors in relation to steroidal usage.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, G H; Christopherson, W M

    1983-01-01

    Since 1973 a number of investigators have reported an association between liver neoplasia and steroid usage. Through referral material we have examined the histology of over 250 cases of hepatic neoplasia, most in patients receiving steroid medications. The majority have been benign, predominantly focal nodular hyperplasia (55%) and hepatocellular adenoma (39%). The average age was 31.4 years; 83% had significant steroid exposure with an average duration of 71 months for focal nodular hyperplasia and 79.6 months for hepatocellular adenoma. The type of estrogenic agent was predominantly mestranol; however, during the period mestranol was the most frequently used synthetic steroid. A distinct clinical entity of life threatening hemorrhage from the lesion occurred in 31% of patients with hepatocellular adenoma and 9% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia. Recurrence of benign tumors has occurred in some patients who continued using steroids and regression has been observed in patients who had incomplete tumor removal but discontinued steroid medication. Medial and intimal vascular changes have been present in a large number of the benign tumors. The relationship of these vascular changes to oncogenesis is unclear, but similar lesions have been described in the peripheral vasculature associated with steroid administration. A number of hepatocellular carcinomas have also been seen. Of significance is the young age of these patients and lack of abnormal histology in adjacent nonneoplastic liver. A striking number of the malignant hepatocellular tumors have been of the uncommon type described as "eosinophilic hepatocellular carcinoma with lamellar fibrosis." The epidemiology of liver lesions within this series is difficult to assess, since the material has been referred from very diverse locations. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:6307679

  15. Cardiac disease induced by chronic adriamycin administration in dogs and an evaluation of vitamin E and selenium as cardioprotectants.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.; Weirich, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic adriamycin (ADR) intoxication was produced in three groups of beagle dogs by weekly intravenous injections (1 mg/kg body weight) for 20 weeks (cumulative dose 400 mg/sq m). Group A (6 dogs) received ADR only; Group B (6 dogs) were given ADR and weekly doses of vitamin E (17 mg/kg body weight) as alpha-tocopherol acetate; and Group C (6 dogs) received ADR and weekly doses of vitamin E as did Group B and selenium (0.06 mg/kg body weight as selenite). Each of the 18 dogs developed ADR-induced cardiomyopathy (CMY), and death occurred in 11 dogs during Weeks 17-20. Mortality was lowest in Group B (2 of 6), but no differences between groups were seen either in survival time of the dogs that died or in severity of CMY. Cardiomyopathy was more severe in dogs that died than in survivors. Congestive heart failure with transudation was present in 4 of 11 dogs that died. Cardiac histopathology was characterized by vacuolar degeneration of myocytes. Myocardial damage was most severe in the left ventricle and the ventricular septum, intermediate in the right ventricle and the left atrium, and least in the right atrium. Ultrastructural study showed that an early alteration in damaged myocytes was distention of sarcoplasmic reticulum to form sarcoplasmic vacuoles. Occasional damaged fibers had myofibrillar lysis and focal proliferation of sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study demonstrates that the dog offers a suitable model for studies of chronic ADR cardiotoxicity in man. The lack of cardioprotection from vitamin E and selenium supplementation fails to support the proposed role of lipoperoxidative damage in the development of chronic ADR-induced CMY. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:7361854

  16. Juvenile hypothyroidism among two populations exposed to radioiodine.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, J R; Grossman, C M; Morton, W E; Nussbaum, R H; Kordysh, E A; Quastel, M R; Sobel, R B; Nussbaum, F D

    1999-01-01

    We found an epidemic of juvenile hypothyroidism among a population of self-defined "downwinders" living near the Hanford nuclear facility located in southeast Washington State. The episode followed massive releases of 131I. Self-reported data on 60 cases of juvenile hypothyroidism (<20 years of age) among a group of 801 Hanford downwinders are presented, as well as data concerning the thyroid status of approximately 160,000 children exposed to radioiodine before 10 years of age as a result of the 26 April 1986 Chernobyl explosion in the former Soviet Union. These children were residents of five regions near Chernobyl. They were examined by standardized screening protocols over a period of 5 years from 1991 to 1996. They are a well-defined group of 10 samples. Fifty-six cases of hypothyroidism were found among boys and 92 among girls. Body burdens of 137Cs have been correlated with hypothyroidism prevalence rates. On the other hand, the group of juvenile (<20 years of age) Hanford downwinders is not a representative sample. Most of the 77 cases of juvenile hypothyroidism in the Hanford group were diagnosed from 1945 to 1970. However, the ratio of reported cases to the county population under 20 years of age is roughly correlated with officially estimated mean levels of cumulative thyroid 131I uptake in these counties, providing evidence that juvenile hypothyroidism was associated with radioiodine exposures. Because even subtle hypothyroidism may be of clinical significance in childhood and can be treated, it may be useful to screen for the condition in populations exposed to radioiodine fallout. Although radiation exposure is associated with hypothyroidism, its excess among fallout-exposed children has not been previously quantified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10090710

  17. Retrospective on community dentistry and public health at the University of Southern California (1966-1976), Part 2.

    PubMed Central

    Dummett, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    The authorization of departments of community dentistry and public health in the nation's dental schools is a relatively recent innovation in dental education. Such a department was established at the University of Southern California School of Dentistry in 1966, as part of the School of Medicine's effort to share responsibility in providing both access and availability of health services in inner-city Los Angeles, California. Dentistry was included in the protocol submitted to the US Office of Economic Opportunity to build a neighborhood health center in Watts, operated under the joint jurisdiction of the medical and dental schools. The dental division of the health center was designated a satellite of the community dentistry department. The department envisioned future changes during the revolutionary 1960s when all aspects of the nation were experiencing upheaval as traditional concepts were challenged by new attitudes. The nation's leaders in government and education as well as in the health professions were stimulated by scientific and technologic discoveries. Dentistry had come of age, having gained the respect of other health-care disciplines. It was a time of expanded exploration of means toward a healthier populace and a more sensitive ethical provider of health care. In one decade, the USC community dentistry department accomplished a major shift in attitude about the specialty from one of pervasive opposition and antipathy to that of acceptance and even enthusiasm. The department became competitive with similar units nationwide in educating dental students and practitioners to fulfill their responsibilities at the highest level of proficiency and to be true to the trust bestowed on them by the public. In pursuit of these goals, the department reflected credit on dentistry and the University of Southern California. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9617072

  18. Heat shock protein 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of CdCl2.

    PubMed Central

    Somji, S; Sens, D A; Garrett, S H; Sens, M A; Todd, J H

    1999-01-01

    The expression of hsp 27 mRNA and protein was determined in cultured human proximal tubule (HPT) cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cd2+ under both acute and extended conditions. Initial procedures demonstrated that HPT cells display the classic stress response following physical and chemical stress. Heat stress (42.5 degrees C for 1 hr) caused an increase in both hsp 27 mRNA and protein as well as a shift in the protein to a more phosphorylated state. Results were similar when the cells were subjected to chemical stress (exposure to 100 microM sodium arsenite for 4 hr). Acute exposure to 53 microM CdCl2 for 4 hr also resulted in an increase in hsp 27 mRNA and protein and a shift to the more phosphorylated protein isoform. Extended Cd2+ exposure involved continuous treatment with Cd2+ at both lethal and sublethal levels over a 16-day time course. The results of this treatment showed that chronic exposure to Cd2+ failed to increase either hsp 27 mRNA or protein expression in HPT cells, even at lethal Cd2+ concentrations. In fact, hsp 27 protein levels decreased as compared to controls at both lethal and sub-lethal exposure to Cd2+. These findings imply that hsp 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells may have two distinct modes depending on the nature (acute vs. chronic) of the stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10379001

  19. Hazard evaluation of chemicals that cause accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin, hyaline droplet nephropathy, and tubule neoplasia in the kidneys of male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, G C; Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P; Richards, W L; McGaughy, R E; Valcovic, L R

    1993-01-01

    This review paper examines the relationship between chemicals inducing excessive accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g) (CIGA) in hyaline droplets in male rat kidneys and the subsequent development of nephrotoxicity and renal tubule neoplasia in the male rat. This dose-responsive hyaline droplet accumulation distinguishes CIGA carcinogens from classical renal carcinogens. CIGA carcinogens also do not appear to react with DNA and are generally negative in short-term tests for genotoxicity, CIGA or their metabolites bind specifically, but reversibly, to male rat alpha 2u-g. The resulting complex appears to be more resistant to hydrolytic degradation in the proximal tubule than native, unbound alpha 2u-g. Single cell necrosis of the tubule epithelium, with associated granular cast formation and papillary mineralization, is followed by sustained regenerative tubule cell proliferation, foci of tubule hyperplasia in the convoluted proximal tubules, and renal tubule tumors. Although structurally similar proteins have been detected in other species, including humans, renal lesions characteristic of alpha 2u-g nephropathy have not been observed. Epidemiologic investigation has not specifically examined the CIGA hypothesis for humans. Based on cancer bioassays, hormone manipulation studies, investigations in an alpha 2u-g-deficient strain of rat, and other laboratory data, an increased proliferative response caused by chemically induced cytotoxicity appears to play a role in the development of renal tubule tumors in male rats. Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that the renal effects induced in male rats by chemicals causing alpha 2u-g accumulation are unlikely to occur in humans. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. PMID:7686485

  20. Effect of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) on the Thyroid Gland of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Collins, William T.; Capen, Charles C.; Kasza, Louis; Carter, Celester; Dailey, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) produced ultrastructural lesions in thyroid follicular cells and reductions in serum thyroxine levels in rats that were time- and dose-dependent. The acute effects (4 week) of PCB (50 and 500 ppm) consisted of an accumulation of lysosomal bodies and colloid droplets in follicular cells with abnormalities of microvilli on the luminal surface. The chronic administration (12 week) of PCB (50 and 500/250 ppm) resulted in a striking distention of many follicular cells with large lysosomal bodies with strong acid phosphatase activity and colloid droplets, blunt and abnormally branched microvilli, and mitochondrial vacuolation. These ultrastructural alterations in follicular cells were associated with a highly significant reduction in serum thyroxine with both the low and the high dose of PCB. Follicular cells remained responsive to the lowered thyroxine level after feeding PCB for 4 and 12 weeks and underwent moderate compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Thyroid follicles were smaller than in controls and were lined by more columnar cells that occasionally formed papillary projections into the colloid. Residual ultrastructural alterations persisted for 12 weeks following cessation of feeding the compound, and serum thyroxine levels were significantly lower than in control rats. However, 35 weeks after discontinuing PCB, thyroid follicular cells were similar to those in controls and serum thyroxine levels had returned to normal. The striking ultrastructural lesions in follicular cells produced by feeding PCB to rats appeared to contribute to the lowering of serum thyroxine levels, in combination with the known stimulation of peripheral thyroxine metabolism by these compounds. Certain metabolic alterations produced by PCB intoxication in experimental animals and human beings may be related to an alteration in thyroid function. ImagesFigure 7Figure 8Figure 11Figure 12Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 9Figure 10 PMID

  1. Reduction of ischemic myocardial damage in the dog by lidocaine infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, R. G.; Stewart, G.; Strong, M.; Ruotolo, R.; Lemoie, G.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of lidocaine infusion on the ultrastructural damage induced in cardiac muscle by normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass were assessed in 15 dogs. Six dogs received no medication other than sodium pentobarbital (25 mg/kg, intravenously) while 9 dogs were treated with lidocaine after anesthesia. Lidocaine was given as a 2-mg/kg loading dose 10 minutes prior to ischemic arrest and a 2-mg/min continuous infusion during the entire experimental period. Biopsy samples of the left ventricular apex were taken 15 and 45 minutes after the start of ischemic arrest and 5 minutes after resumption of coronary blood flow. Biopsy samples were also obtained from 4 animals after thoracotomy to serve as controls for experimental procedures. Myocardial ultrastructure in the 4 control animals was comparable to that reported by other investigators. Five of 6 of the nontreated dogs and 8 of 9 lidocaine-treated dogs survived the entire period of ischemia and 5 minutes of coronary reperfusion. However, the extent of ultrastructural damage varied considerably between the two groups. In the experimental dogs receiving no lidocaine, mitochondria were swollen, cristae were absent, the mitochondrial matrix was cleared, and sarcomeres were disrupted. Myelin figures and contraction bands were also observed. None of the surviving lidocaine-treated animals had ultrastructural changes comparable to the worst ones in nontreated dogs. Damage was limited to some swelling of mitochondria with focal clearing of matrix. Most cristae remained intact. There were no myelin figures and few contraction bands. The results suggest that lidocaine protects the integrity of ischemic myocardium. It is suggested that this protection resulted from stabilization of plasma and/or mitochondrial membranes. (Am J Pathol 87:399-414, 1977). Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:851172

  2. Neuronal injury after photoactivation of photofrin II.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Y.; Dereski, M. O.; Garcia, J. H.; Hetzel, F. W.; Chopp, M.

    1992-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been used in the management of patients with malignant brain tumors even though the effects of this form of treatment on the adjacent normal brain are incompletely characterized. The authors examined, in sequential experiments, morphologic alterations affecting the cerebral cortex in rats injected with Photophrin II and exposed to light. Initially, minimal cell alterations, including cisternal swelling of both endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, involved only neurons located in the superficial layers of the cerebral cortex exposed to light. These changes spread, over a period of several hours, from the surface to the bottom of the cortex and eventually involved the entire cortical segment exposed to light. The earliest structural signs of lethal injury to neurons developed over a period of 18 hours after porphyrins had been photoactivated and astrocytes had been severely damaged. Signs of lethal injury to neurons included an increase in the number of mitochondrial cristae and appearance of amorphous electron-dense deposits within swollen mitochondria. The appearance of these alterations was followed by segregation of intracytoplasmic organelles and fragmentation of nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes. The tissue changes, including those involving neurons, eventually progressed to coagulation necrosis at 48 hours. These observations suggest that prophyrins injected to rats (48 hours before photoactivation) cause swelling and necrosis of astrocytes. This is followed by neuronal necrosis, which appears at two time intervals; the initial neuronal necrosis occurs after the astrocytic disintegration. A second type of neuronal alteration appears after microvessels become thrombosed and ischemia is likely to develop. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1415489

  3. Ultrastructure of the attack of eosinophils stimulated by blood mononuclear cell products on schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, J. P.; Lenzi, H. L.; Elsas, P.; Dessein, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Purified human eosinophils were treated with peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants containing eosinophil cytotoxic enhancing activity (ECEA). Schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni which had been coated either with antibody (Ab) from the sera of infected patients or with the lectin concanavalin A (Con A) were incubated with ECEA-treated and untreated cells for 2 minutes to 12 hours and examined ultrastructurally. Killing was assayed at 18 hours. ECEA caused an increase in the killing of Ab-coated worms, but Con-A-coated worms were not killed by either ECEA-treated or untreated cells. Eosinophils began to degranulate on Ab-coated worms within 2 minutes and continued to degranulate, so that by 12 hours about half of the parasites had greater than 50% of their surface covered by discharge material. The ECEA-treated cells degranulated more than the untreated cells. There was much less discharge material on Con-A-coated worms than on Ab-coated worms. Eosinophils adhered to discharge material on the surface of both Ab- and Con-A-coated parasites. At 3 and 12 hours, lysed cells and cell fragments were also seen adhering to discharge material. In the absence of discharge material the cells adhered to residual glycocalyx or to the tegumental outer membrane. These studies suggest that eosinophils kill schistosomula by progressively degranulating onto their surface over many hours and that the increased toxicity caused by ECEA is due to an increase in discharge. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:4037065

  4. Internucleosomal DNA cleavage triggered by plasma membrane damage during necrotic cell death. Involvement of serine but not cysteine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Z.; Saikumar, P.; Weinberg, J. M.; Venkatachalam, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    apoptosis and necrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9358745

  5. Reactive Neuromuscular Training for the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gray; Burton, Lee; Fields, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the response to a proprioceptive training model during a 1-week rehabilitation regime. The techniques were demonstrated on a college-aged female basketball player who had injured her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) several weeks earlier. The athlete was tested, trained, and then retested during her semester break. Background: The ACL injury has become a fairly common occurrence in the world of athletics. Knowing this, the athletic trainer is constantly searching for ways to improve the rehabilitative process. New research demonstrates that rehabilitation should be based on proprioception. The ACL not only serves a mechanical role by limiting passive knee mobility but also serves a sensory role through the mechanoreceptors deep in its tissue, which communicate with the neuromuscular system to provide proprioceptive feedback during training and competition. Differential Diagnosis: Partial or complete tear of the ACL. Treatment: The athlete was treated with a rehabilitation protocol based on proprioception, which uses reactive neuromuscular training. Uniqueness: Our rehabilitation focused on the muscular imbalances about the hip, knee, and ankle. The athlete achieved dramatic decreases in muscular imbalances about the hip and knee in only 1 week of rehabilitation through reactive neuromuscular training. Conclusions: The athlete had significant gains in strength over her brief period of therapy. However, these gains can be viewed only as neuromuscular changes and not strictly as gains in strength. The athlete returned to postseason competition under the supervision of her surgeon, who later recommended surgical reconstruction at the completion of the basketball season with rehabilitation during the offseason. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:16558562

  6. A time-series analysis of acidic particulate matter and daily mortality and morbidity in the Buffalo, New York, region.

    PubMed Central

    Gwynn, R C; Burnett, R T; Thurston, G D

    2000-01-01

    A component of particulate matter (PM) air pollution that may provide one biologically plausible pathway for the observed PM air pollution-health effect associations is aerosol acidity (H(+)). An increasing number of observational studies have demonstrated associations between H(+) and increased adverse health effects in the United States and abroad. Although studies have shown significant H(+) associations with increased morbidity in the United States, similar associations have yet to be shown with daily mortality. We considered a 2.5-year record of daily H(+) and sulfate measurements (May 1988-October 1990) collected in the Buffalo, New York, region in a time-series analysis of respiratory, circulatory, and total daily mortality and hospital admissions. Other copollutants considered included particulate matter [less than/equal to] 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter, coefficient of haze, ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. Various modeling techniques were applied to control for confounding of effect estimates due to seasonality, weather, and day-of-week effects. We found multiple significant pollutant-health effect associations--most strongly between SO(4)(2-) and respiratory hospital admissions (as indicated by its t-statistic). Additionally, H(+) and SO(4)(2-) demonstrated the most coherent associations with both respiratory hospital admissions [H(+): relative risk (RR) = 1. 31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.14-1.51; and SO(4)(2-): RR = 1. 18, CI, 1.09-1.28] and respiratory mortality (H(+): RR = 1.55, CI, 1. 09-2.20; and SO(4)(2-): RR = 1.24, CI, 1.01-1.52). Thus, acidic sulfate aerosols represent a component of PM air pollution that may contribute to the previously noted adverse effects of PM mass on human health, and the associations demonstrated in this study support the need for further investigations into the potential health effects of acidic aerosols. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10656852

  7. Lipid Accumulation in Hypoxic Tissue Culture Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Gerald B.; Barcza, Maureen A.; Bush, Marilyn E.

    1977-01-01

    Lipid droplets have long been recognized by light microscopy to accumulate in hypoxic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In the present tissue culture experiments, correlative electron microscopic observations and lipid analyses were performed to determine the nature and significance of lipid accumulation in hypoxia. Strain L mouse fibroblasts were grown in suspension culture, both aerobically and under severe oxygen restriction obtained by gassing cultures daily with an 8% CO2-92% nitrogen mixture. After 48 hours, hypoxic cells showed an increase in total lipid/protein ratio of 42% over control cells. Most of this increase was accounted for by an elevation in the level of cellular triglyceride from 12.3 ± 0.9 μg/mg cell protein in aerobic cultures to 41.9 ± 0.7 in the hypoxic cultures, an increase of 240%. Levels of cellular free fatty acids (FFA) were 96% higher in the hypoxic cultures. No significant changes in the levels of cellular phospholipid or cholesterol were noted. Electron microscopic examination revealed the accumulation of homogeneous cytoplasmic droplets. The hypoxic changes were reversible upon transferring the cultures to aerobic atmospheres with disappearance of the lipid. These experiments indicate that hypoxic injury initially results in triglyceride and FFA accumulation from an inability to oxidize fatty acids taken up from the media and not from autophagic processes, as described in other types of cell injury associated with the sequestration of membranous residues and intracellular cholesterol and phospholipid accumulation. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 1Figure 2 PMID:196505

  8. The origins and early history of the National Chiropractic Association

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C; Rehm, William S

    1993-01-01

    Early organization in chiropractic was prompted by the profession’s need to promote itself and to defend against the onslaught of political medicine and organized osteopathy. The first priorities were legal defense against prosecution for unlicensed practice and malpractice insurance. The Universal Chiropractors’ Association (UCA), organized at the Palmer School of Chiropractic (PSC) in 1906, sought to meet these needs by insuring its members and by developing a legal department under the supervision of attorney Tom Morris, one time lieutenant governor of Wisconsin. The public relations and marketing needs of chiropractors were largely served by the PSC and its legendary leader. However, as chiropractors increasingly sought to avoid prosecution by passage of chiropractic laws, Palmer’s efforts to direct this legislation so as to limit chiropractors’ scope of practice increasingly alienated many in the profession. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) was founded in 1922 to provide a broadscope alternative to BJ’s UCA. With Palmer’s departure from the UCA following the neurocalometer debacle, ACA and UCA sought amalgamation. Simultaneously, organized medicine renewed its attack on the profession by introducing basic science legislation, which prompted chiropractors to try to upgrade and standardize chiropractic education. Early efforts to bring about the needed consensus were centered in the International Chiropractic Congress (ICC), particularly its division of state examining boards. In 1930 the ACA and UCA combined to form the National Chiropractic Association (NCA), and by 1934 the ICC had merged with the NCA to form part of its council structure. With this modicum of solidarity the NCA began the process of educational boot-strapping at its 1935 convention in Los Angeles, when its Committee on Education, a forerunner of today’s Council on Chiropractic Education, was proposed by C.O. Watkins of Montana. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

  9. Genetically null mice reveal a central role for epidermal growth factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicle and normal hair development.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L. A.; Alexander, N.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, J. P.; Dlugosz, A.; Threadgill, D. W.; Magnuson, T.; Yuspa, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mice harboring a targeted disruption of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele exhibit a severely disorganized hair follicle phenotype, fuzzy coat, and systemic disease resulting in death before 3 weeks. This skin phenotype was reproduced in whole skin grafts and in grafts of EGFR null hair follicle buds onto nude mice, providing a model to evaluate the natural evolution of skin lacking the EGFR. Hair follicles in grafts of null skin did not progress from anagen to telogen and scanning electron micrografts revealed wavy, flattened hair fibers with cuticular abnormalities. Many of the EGFR null hair follicles in the grafted skin were consumed by an inflammatory reaction resulting in complete hair loss in 67% of the grafts by 10 weeks. Localization of follicular differentiation markers including keratin 6, transglutaminase, and the hair keratins mHa2 and hacl-1 revealed a pattern of premature differentiation within the null hair follicles. In intact EGFR null mice, proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, but not hair follicles, was greatly decreased in the absence of EGFR. In contrast, grafting of EGFR null skin resulted in a hyperplastic response in the epidermis that did not resolve even after 10 weeks, although the wound-induced hyperplasia in EGFR wild-type grafts had resolved within 3 to 4 weeks. Thus, epithelial expression of the EGFR has complex functions in the skin. It is important in delaying follicular differentiation, may serve to protect the hair follicle from immunological reactions, and modifies both normal and wound-induced epidermal proliferation but seems dispensable for follicular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9176390

  10. Isolation and characterization of fibronectin-alpha 1-microglobulin complex in rat plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, C; Enghild, J J; Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Akerström, B

    1994-01-01

    Molecules containing the 28 kDa immunoregulatory protein alpha 1-microglobulin (alpha 1-m), also known as protein HC, were isolated from rat plasma or serum by immunoaffinity chromatography. Three molecular species were distinguished on the basis of nondenaturing PAGE. Two of these have been described previously: uncomplexed alpha 1-m, and the complex of alpha 1-m with alpha 1-inhibitor-3. The third species was analysed by denaturing PAGE, immunoblotting, proteinase digestion and N-terminal-sequence analyses, and shown to consist of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin. This complex, with a mass of about 560 kDa, was resistant to dissociation in the presence of denaturants, but not in the presence of reducing agents in combination with denaturants, and we conclude that the two components are linked by disulphide bonds. About 60% of the total detectable plasma alpha 1-m exists as high-molecular-mass complexes distributed approximately evenly between fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Immunochemical analyses were used to determine the proportion of the total plasma pools of fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3 that circulate in complex with alpha 1-m. About 3-7% of the total plasma fibronectin from three different rat strains contained alpha 1-m, whereas 0.3-0.8% of the total plasma alpha 1-inhibitor-3 contained alpha 1-m. Complexes were found at similar levels in plasma and serum, indicating that coagulation is not responsible for complex formation. Moreover, immunochemical analyses of human plasma revealed small amounts of alpha 1-m in complex with fibronectin and alpha 2-macroglobulin (an alpha 1-inhibitor-3 homologue). The existence of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin in rats and humans suggests a mechanism for the incorporation of the immunoregulatory molecule alpha 1-m into the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7519849

  11. CNA.42, a new monoclonal antibody directed against a fixative-resistant antigen of follicular dendritic reticulum cells.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, I.; Al Saati, T.; Tkaczuk, J.; Chittal, S.; Delsol, G.

    1997-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody (MAb), CNA.42, was generated using the CEM T-cell line. It recognizes a 120-kd formalin-resistant glycosylated antigen that is mainly expressed by follicular dendritic reticulum cells (FDRCs). This antigen is also expressed by a few mononuclear cells in the paracortical area of reactive lymph nodes and by some cortical thymocytes. Two hundred and eighty-nine cases of hematopoietic tumors of various types were tested with this antibody. They showed either intact FDRC networks or FDRC networks dispersed among malignant cells. In follicular lymphomas, the follicular pattern was highlighted by CNA.42 MAb. Expanded FDRC networks were found in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas. Neoplastic cells were positive in 43.6% (24/55) of T-cell and 4.6% (6/129) of B-cell lymphomas. The highest percentage of cases with positive neoplastic cells was found in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (62.5%; 15/24). In Hodgkin's disease, FDRC networks, sometimes encasing Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, were found. HRS cells were also stained by this antibody in 23 (21.9%) of the 105 cases examined. A variety of normal nonlymphoid tissues and nonhematopoietic tumors, such as some neurogenic tumors, carcinoma, and occasional sarcomas, were found to be positive. Analysis of the reactivity of CNA.42 antibody with FDRCs of lymphoid tissue from different animal species showed similar reactivity to that observed in humans, suggesting widespread evolutionary conservation of the antigen recognized by this antibody. In daily diagnostic practice, CNA.42 MAb seems to be a suitable FDRC marker and possibly has an auxiliary role in recognizing T-cell lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9403709

  12. Immunopathology of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Reed, S. G.; Roters, S. B.; Sadigursky, M.

    1984-01-01

    Relatively susceptible BALB/c and relatively resistant A/J mice were infected subcutaneously in the right hind footpad with promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. A large localized lesion developed within 2 months after infection in the BALB/c mice, while A/J mice exhibited a small discrete fibrotic nodule. Sequential immunologic and histologic examination demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed a nodular foam-cell type of lesion and progressive depression of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to leishmania antigen, while the A/J mice had a mixed cellular fibrosing and encapsulating reaction and developed and maintained positive DTH responses to leishmania antigen. Anti-leishmania antibody responses were positive at similar levels in both strains. The lesions in BALB/c mice were found in bone marrow, tendon, skin appendages, and regional lymph nodes, with a tendency toward cutaneous metastases. Lesions in A/J mice remained localized. Fibrosis, focal fibrinoid necrosis, and lymphocytic and macrophagic infiltration were the outstanding features. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies indicated that no outstanding destruction of leishmanias seemed to occur within macrophages of either mouse strain. In the more resistant A/J mice, however, parasitized macrophages were frequently necrotic, and degenerating leishmanias were often seen free in the interstitial tissue. These observations help the interpretation of the histologic features, as well as the pathogenesis, of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in man. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6691411

  13. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-01-01

    . Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:9684044

  14. Characterization of estrogenicity of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived experimental model.

    PubMed Central

    Hopert, A C; Beyer, A; Frank, K; Strunck, E; Wünsche, W; Vollmer, G

    1998-01-01

    Severe developmental and reproductive disorders in wild animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with hormonal activity. These adverse effects of environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern and have received increasing attention. Although numerous chemicals with the capacity to interfere with the estrogen receptor (ER) have been identified, information on their molecular mechanism of action and their relative potency is rather limited. For the endometrium, the lack of information is due to the lack of a suitable experimental model. We investigated the functions of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived model, RUCA-I rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane to preserve their functional differentiation and estrogen responsiveness. We assessed the relative binding affinity to the estrogen receptor of the selected phytoestrogens coumestrol, genistein, daidzein, and the putative phytoestrogen mangostin compared to estradiol by a competitive Scatchard analysis. The following affinity ranking was measured: 17beta-estradiol >>> coumestrol > genistein > daidzein >>> mangostin. In addition, we investigated the capacity of these compounds to promote the increased production of complement C3, a well-known estradiol-regulated protein of the rat endometrium. All substances tested increased the production of complement C3, although different concentrations were necessary to achieve equivalent levels of induction compared to estradiol. Mechanistically we were able to demonstrate that the increase of complement C3 production was mediated by primarily increasing its steady-state mRNA level. These findings indicate that RUCA-I cells represent a sensitive model system to elucidate relative potencies and functions of environmental estrogens in an endometrium-derived model. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721258

  15. Role of the Ito cell in liver parenchymal fibrosis in rats fed alcohol and a high fat-low protein diet.

    PubMed Central

    French, S. W.; Miyamoto, K.; Wong, K.; Jui, L.; Briere, L.

    1988-01-01

    Eight pairs of young adult rats were pair-fed a high fat-low protein diet and ethanol or isocaloric glucose by permanent intragastric cannula for up to 6 months. Biopsies of the liver were taken monthly and the fibrosis was quantitated morphometrically using the sirius red polarization method of collagen visualization by light microscopy. Morphometric analysis of the sinusoids and scars were performed on electron micrographs made from the liver biopsies. An increase in the collagen in both the central and portal areas was found when the livers of the alcohol-fed rats were compared with controls. The predominant cell in the scars was the Ito cell. An increase in the percentage of the total Ito cell square area made up of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was noted when the sinusoids of the liver of the ethanol-fed rats were compared with controls. No difference in the RER was found when the sinusoidal Ito cells were compared with the Ito cells located within the scars of the ethanol-fed rats. It was concluded that Ito cell "activation" by chronic ethanol feeding in the sinusoids of rats accurately predicts "activation" of the Ito cells within scars. The Ito cells are diffusely activated even though the scarring is localized. This implies that local factors as well as Ito cell activation are necessary for scar formation. In the case of alcoholic liver disease, scar formation may be initiated by centrilobular necrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3394803

  16. Immunopathology of B-cell lymphomas induced in C57BL/6 mice by dualtropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV).

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.; Twomey, P.; Hill, S.; Jonasson, J.; Beardsley, T.; Haas, M.

    1982-01-01

    Combined clinicopathologic and immunomorphologic evidence is presented that would indicate that a murine leukemia virus (MuLV) with the dualtropic host range is capable of producing a clinically malignant lesion composed of immunoblasts and associated plasma cells in C57BL/6 mice. This process, morphologically diagnosed as an immunoblastic lymphoma of B cells using standard histopathologic criteria, was found to be distinctly polyclonal with regard to immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype when analyzed for both surface and cytoplasmic Ig. Further studies demonstrated that this clinicopathologically malignant, dualtropic MuLV-induced, polyclonal immunoblastic lymphoma of B cells in C57BL/6 mice was normal diploid and unable to be successfully transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. Although all serum heavy and light chain components were found to be progressively elevated as the tumor load increased, the polyclonal increase in serum immunoglobulins was most pronounced for mu heavy and kappa light chains (ie, mu greater than gamma 2A greater than alpha greater than gamma 2B greater than gamma 1; kappa greater than lamba). The dissociation of clinicopathologic and biologic criteria for malignancy in the presently described dualtropic (RadLV) MuLV-induced B-cell lesion is sharply contrasted with the thymotropic (RadLV), MuLV-induced T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in C57BL/6 mice. This process is also a clinicopathologically malignant lesion but, when one uses biologic criteria, is found to be distinctly monoclonal, aneuploid, and easily transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. The close clinicopathologic and biologic similarities of the dualtropic MuLV-induced animal model to corresponding human B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases are stressed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:6282131

  17. Disparate temporal expression of the prothrombin and thrombin receptor genes during mouse development.

    PubMed Central

    Soifer, S. J.; Peters, K. G.; O'Keefe, J.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8291612

  18. Characterization of α-Amylase-Inhibitor, a Lectin-Like Protein in the Seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Joaquin; Altabella, Teresa; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1990-01-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect α-amylases, but not of plant α-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, α-amylase inhibitor (αAl) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Purified αAl can be resolved by SDS-PAGE into five bands (Mr 15,000-19,000), four of which have covalently attached glycans. These bands represent glycoforms of two different polypeptides. All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it (LM Hoffman [1984] J Mol Appl Genet 2: 447-453; J Moreno, MJ Chrispeels [1989] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:7885-7889). The primary translation product of αAl is a polypeptide of Mr 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of Mr 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (Mr 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that αAl is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmlc reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667338

  19. Synthesis of Lectin-Like Protein in Developing Cotyledons of Normal and Phytohemagglutinin-Deficient Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Alessandro; Zoppè, Monica; Fabbrini, M. Serena; Genga, Annamaria; Rivas, Liliana; Bollini, Roberto

    1989-01-01

    The genome of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris contains a small gene family that encodes lectin and lectin-like proteins (phytohemagglutinin, arcelin, and others). One of these phytohemagglutinin-like genes was cloned by L. M. Hoffman et al. ([1982] Nucleic Acids Res 10: 7819-7828), but its product in bean cells has never been identified. We identified the product of this gene, referred to as lectin-like protein (LLP), as an abundant polypeptide synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of developing bean cotyledons. The gene product was first identified in extracts of Xenopus oocytes injected with either cotyledonary bean RNA or LLP-mRNA obtained by hybrid-selection with an LLP cDNA clone. A tryptic map of this protein was identical with a tryptic map of a polypeptide with the same SDS-PAGE mobility detectable in the ER of bean cotyledons pulse-labeled with either [3H]glucosamine or [3H]amino acids, both in a normal and in a phytohemagglutinin-deficient cultivar (cultivars Greensleeves and Pinto UI 111). Greensleeves LLP has Mr 40,000 and most probably has four asparagine-linked glycans. Pinto UI 111 LLP has Mr 38,500. Unlike phytohemagglutinin which is a tetramer, LLP appears to be a monomer by gel filtration analysis. Incorporation of [3H]amino acids indicates that synthesis of LLP accounts for about 3% of the proteins synthesized on the ER, a level similar to that of phytohemagglutinin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16666845

  20. Nonsedimentable Microvesicles from Senescing Bean Cotyledons Contain Gel Phase-Forming Phospholipid Degradation Products 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kening; Paliyath, Gopinadhan; Thompson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A mixture of liquid-crystalline and gel-phase lipid domains is detectable by wide angle x-ray diffraction in smooth microsomal membranes isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons, whereas corresponding membranes from young 2-day-old cotyledons are exclusively liquid-crystalline. The gel-phase domains in the senescent membranes comprise phospholipid degradation products including diacylglycerols, free fatty acids, long-chain aldehydes, and long-chain hydrocarbons. The same complement of phospholipid degradation products is also present in nonsedimentable microvesicles isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons by filtration of a 250,000g, 12-hour supernatant through a 300,000 dalton cut-off filter. The phospholipid degradation products in the microvesicles form gel-phase lipid domains when reconstituted into phospholipid liposomes. Nonsedimentable microvesicles of a similar size, which are again enriched in the same gel-phase-forming phospholipid degradation products, are also generated in vitro from smooth microsomal membranes isolated from 2-day-old cotyledons when Ca2+ is added to activate membrane-associated lipolytic enzymes. The Ca2+-treated membranes do not contain detectable gel-phase domains, suggesting that the phospholipid degradation products are completely removed by microvesiculation. The observations collectively indicate that these nonsedimentable microvesicles serve as a vehicle for moving phospholipid degradation products out of membrane bilayers into the cytosol. As noted previously (Yao K, Paliyath G, Humphrey RW, Hallett FR, Thompson JE [1991] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88: 2269-2273), the term “deteriosome” connotes this putative function and would serve to distinguish these microvesicles from other cytoplasmic microvesicles unrelated to deterioration. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668427

  1. Distribution of lymphocytes with interleukin-2 receptors (TAC antigens) in reactive lymphoproliferative processes, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. An immunohistologic study of 300 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Sheibani, K.; Winberg, C. D.; van de Velde, S.; Blayney, D. W.; Rappaport, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated the distribution of interleukin-2 receptors (TAC antigen) in the lymph nodes of 300 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. They used fresh-frozen sections to evaluate a possible correlation between the immunophenotype of specific lymphoid disorders and the presence or absence of TAC expression and to determine whether the TAC positivity of lymphoid cells contributes to the characterization of lymphoproliferative processes. All of the cases had previously been studied with a large screening panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antisera. Among 85 patients with a variety of benign reactive processes, the lymph nodes from 47 contained TAC-bearing lymphocytes in various patterns of distribution. Of 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 37 had TAC-bearing lymphocytes. Of 26 B-cell, well-differentiated lymphocytic lymphomas (WDL), 14 were diffusely TAC-positive and one had TAC-bearing cells in random distribution. Six cases of intermediate lymphocytic lymphoma were also studied, and three showed randomly distributed TAC-bearing lymphocytes. Of 19 patients with follicular or follicular and diffuse, poorly differentiated lymphocytic (PDL) lymphoma, 14 were TAC-positive. All 3 diffuse PDL lymphomas studied were TAC-negative. Among 23 cases of B-cell and 5 cases of T-cell mixed cell lymphoma, 15 and three, respectively, had TAC-positive lymphocytes. Of 39 large cell lymphomas (B-cell, 33; T-cell, 6), 14 were TAC-positive. All 13 cases of hairy cell leukemia were diffusely positive. Of 23 T-lymphoblastic lymphomas, only 1 showed positive TAC reactivity, which was focal. Of 5 cases of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, 2 had TAC-bearing lymphocytes. Our study indicates that the TAC antigen is not lineage-specific, and that it may be expressed by lymphoid cells regardless of their phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3105322

  2. The T-tubule is a cell-surface target for insulin-regulated recycling of membrane proteins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P; Rosemblatt, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Thoidis, G; Pilch, P F; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    (1) In this study we have determined the distribution of various membrane proteins involved in insulin-activated glucose transport in T-tubules and in sarcolemma from rat skeletal muscle. Two independent experimental approaches were used to determine the presence of membrane proteins in T-tubules: (i) the purification of T-tubules free from sarcolemmal membranes by lectin agglutination, and (ii) T-tubule vesicle immunoadsorption. These methods confirmed that T-tubules from rat skeletal muscle were enriched with dihydropyridine receptors and tt28 protein and did not contain the sarcolemmal markers dystrophin or beta 1-integrin. Both types of experiments revealed an abundant content of GLUT4 glucose carriers, insulin receptors and SCAMPs (secretory carrier membrane proteins) in T-tubule membranes. (2) Acute administration in vivo of insulin caused an increased abundance of GLUT4 in T-tubules and sarcolemma. On the contrary, insulin led to a 50% reduction in insulin receptors present in T-tubules and in sarcolemma, demonstrating that insulin-induced insulin receptor internalization affects T-tubules in the muscle fibre. The alteration in the content of GLUT4 and insulin receptors in T-tubules was a consequence of insulin-induced redistribution of these proteins. SCAMPs also redistributed in muscle membranes in response to insulin. They were recruited by insulin from intracellular high-density fractions to intracellular lighter-density fractions and to the cell surface, showing a pattern of insulin-induced cellular redistribution distinct from those of GLUT4 and the insulin receptor. (3) In conclusion, the T-tubule is a cell-surface target for membrane proteins involved in recycling such as SCAMPs or for membrane proteins that acutely redistribute in response to insulin such as GLUT4 or insulin receptors. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8526847

  3. Skeletal Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, I. Ross

    1979-01-01

    Skeletal scintigraphy, using phosphates or diphosphonates labeled with technetium 99m, is a sensitive method of detecting bone abnormalities. The most important and most frequent role of bone scanning is evaluating the skeletal areas in patients who have a primary cancer, especially a malignant condition that has a tendency to spread to bone areas. The bone scan is superior to bone radiographs in diagnosing these abnormalities; 15 percent to 25 percent of patients with breast, prostate or lung cancer, who have normal roentgenograms, also have abnormal scintigrams due to metastases. The majority of bone metastases appear as hot spots on the scan and are easily recognized. The incidence of abnormal bone scans in patients with early stages (I and II) of breast cancer varies from 6 percent to 26 percent, but almost invariably those patients with scan abnormalities have a poor prognosis and should be considered for additional therapies. Progression or regression of bony lesions can be defined through scanning, and abnormal areas can be identified for biopsy. The incidence of metastases in solitary scan lesions in patients with known primary tumors varies from 20 percent to 64 percent. Bone scintigraphy shows positive uptake in 95 percent of cases with acute osteomyelitis. Stress fractures and trauma suspected in battered babies can be diagnosed by scanning before there is radiological evidence. The procedure is free from acute or long-term side effects and, except in cases of very young patients, sedation is seldom necessary. Although the test is sensitive, it is not specific and therefore it is difficult to overemphasize the importance of clinical, radiographic, biochemical and scanning correlation in each patient. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:390886

  4. Comparative morphologic and immunohistochemical studies of estrogen plus alpha-naphthoflavone-induced liver tumors in Syrian hamsters and rats.

    PubMed Central

    Oberley, T. D.; Slattery, A. F.; Gonzalez, A.; Li, S. A.; Li, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Syrian hamsters were treated with ethinylestradiol and maintained on a diet containing alpha-naphthoflavone (alpha NF), a regimen that produces a high incidence of liver tumors. Morphologic analyses (light microscopy, immunoperoxidase studies, and electron microscopy) were performed on livers of these animals. After 4 months of hormone plus alpha NF treatment, marked hepatocyte cell changes were already present, as demonstrated by loss of eosinophilic staining of hepatocyte cytoplasm. Large multinucleated hepatocytes exhibiting frequent mitoses were observed around central veins. After 5 months of treatment, there was proliferation of bile ducts, and small cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm resembling hepatocytes appeared surrounding these bile ducts. At 7 to 8 months, the first tumor nodules (foci) were seen. Tumor foci in the portal area consisted of small clusters of large cells resembling hepatocytes with irregular nuclei. At the same time, dysplastic glands were identified among proliferating bile ducts. By 8 to 10 months, large tumors were present. These were trabecular hepatocellular carcinomas with widely varying individual cell morphology. Compared with adjacent liver, dysplastic glands in the portal areas, microcarcinomas, and large tumors all showed intense immunostaining for cytokeratin. Rats treated with the same regimen also developed hepatic tumors, but the light and electron microscopy results and immunohistochemical profiles were very different. Altered hepatic foci composed of small hepatocytes were typically prominent; however, malignant tumors did not arise from the portal area. Neither altered foci nor tumors stained significantly for cytokeratin. These data suggest that the biochemical events giving rise to these liver tumors differ between the species studied, despite the animals being exposed to the same treatment regimens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1887866

  5. Characterization of indoor particle sources: A study conducted in the metropolitan Boston area.

    PubMed Central

    Abt, E; Suh, H H; Allen, G; Koutrakis, P

    2000-01-01

    An intensive particle monitoring study was conducted in homes in the Boston, Massachusetts, area during the winter and summer of 1996 in an effort to characterize sources of indoor particles. As part of this study, continuous particle size and mass concentration data were collected in four single-family homes, with each home monitored for one or two 6-day periods. Additionally, housing activity and air exchange rate data were collected. Cooking, cleaning, and the movement of people were identified as the most important indoor particle sources in these homes. These sources contributed significantly both to indoor concentrations (indoor-outdoor ratios varied between 2 and 33) and to altered indoor particle size distributions. Cooking, including broiling/baking, toasting, and barbecuing contributed primarily to particulate matter with physical diameters between 0.02 and 0.5 microm [PM((0.02-0.5))], with volume median diameters of between 0.13 and 0.25 microm. Sources of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters between 0.7 and 10 microm [PM((0.7-10))] included sautéing, cleaning (vacuuming, dusting, and sweeping), and movement of people, with volume median diameters of between 3 and 4.3 microm. Frying was associated with particles from both PM((0.02-0.5)) and PM((0.7-10)). Air exchange rates ranged between 0.12 and 24.3 exchanges/hr and had significant impact on indoor particle levels and size distributions. Low air exchange rates (< 1 exchange/hr) resulted in longer air residence times and more time for particle concentrations from indoor sources to increase. When air exchange rates were higher (> 1 exchange/hr), the impact of indoor sources was less pronounced, as indoor particle concentrations tracked outdoor levels more closely. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:10620522

  6. Rat alveolar myofibroblasts acquire alpha-smooth muscle actin expression during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vyalov, S. L.; Gabbiani, G.; Kapanci, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of fibroblasts in alveolar septa are characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic bundles of microfilaments that contain cytoplasmic actin isoforms; these cells have been named contractile interstitial cells or V-type myofibroblasts. In the rat, they express desmin as intermediate filament protein. In this study, we explored the possibility that modulation and replication of such septal fibroblasts result in the appearance of alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin-positive myofibroblasts, typical of lung fibrosis. Experimental pulmonary fibrosis was produced by a unique intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to 28 rats. Eight additional rats used as controls received the equivalent volume of saline. Paraffin and frozen sections of lungs were examined at days 1, 3, 5 and 7 after treatment. Microfilaments and intermediate filaments were stained using antibodies against total actin, alpha-SM actin, desmin, vimentin, keratin, and SM myosin. Electron microscopic labeling of desmin and alpha-SM actin using immunogold technique was done on Lowicryl K4M resin-embedded specimens. alpha-SM actin appeared in desmin-positive alveolar fibroblasts as early as 24 hours after intratracheal bleomycin instillation; the modulation of alpha-SM actin in these cells was preceded by a lymphomonocytic infiltration of alveolar septa. Twenty-four hours to 3 days after bleomycin administration, a proliferation of alveolar myofibroblasts occurred. Fibrosis with laying down of collagen fibers took place after the above mentioned cellular modifications. Our results support the view that septal fibroblastic cells can modulate into typical alpha-SM actin-containing myofibroblasts during experimental bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In such a modulation a possible role of cytokines, particularly of transforming growth factor-beta, is considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

  7. Phase behavior of stratum corneum lipids in mixed Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    ten Grotenhuis, E; Demel, R A; Ponec, M; Boer, D R; van Miltenburg, J C; Bouwstra, J A

    1996-01-01

    The lipids found in the bilayers of the stratum corneum fulfill the vital barrier role of mammalian bodies. The main classes of lipids found in stratum corneum are ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. For an investigation of their phase behavior, mixed Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of these lipids were prepared. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the structure of the monolayers as a function of the monolayer composition. Three different types of ceramide were used: ceramide extracted from pigskin, a commercially available ceramide with several fatty acid chain lengths, and two synthetic ceramides that have only one fatty acid chain length. In pigskin ceramide-cholesterol mixed monolayers phase separation was observed. This phase separation was also found for the commercially available type III Sigma ceramide-cholesterol mixed monolayers with molar ratios ranging from 1:0.1 to 1:1. These monolayers separated into two phases, one composed of the long fatty acid chain fraction of Sigma ceramide III and the other of the short fatty acid chain fraction of Sigma ceramide III mixed with cholesterol. Mixtures with a higher cholesterol content consisted of only one phase. These observations were confirmed by the results obtained with synthetic ceramides, which have only one fatty acid chain length. The synthetic ceramide with a palmitic acid (16:0) chain mixed with cholesterol, and the synthetic ceramide with a lignoceric acid (24:0) chain did not. Free fatty acids showed a preference to mix with one of these phases, depending on their fatty acid chain lengths. The results of this investigation suggest that the model system used in this study is in good agreement with those of other studies concerning the phase behavior of the stratum corneum lipids. By varying the composition of the monolayers one can study the role of each lipid class in detail. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8874014

  8. PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs in human blood in relation to consumption of crabs from a contaminated Fjord area in Norway.

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, H R; Alexander, J; Rossland, O J; Planting, S; Løvik, M; Gaarder, P I; Gdynia, W; Bjerve, K S; Becher, G

    1996-01-01

    Consumption of fish and shellfish from contaminated areas may be an important source of human exposure to persistent organohalogen compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). We determined concentrations of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs and 19 PCB congeners in whole blood samples from three groups of men, 40-54 years of age, with different consumption levels of crabs from a fjord area in southern Norway polluted with organochlorine compounds from a magnesium production plant. A significant increase of many PCDD/PCDF congeners was found in the blood when comparing the referents, moderate-, and high-intake groups. The greatest difference was observed for several of the PCDFs that are characteristic for the contamination of the marine biota of the fjord. PCBs, in general, play a minor role in the contamination of the fjord by the magnesium production process, except for the highly chlorinated congeners such as PCB-209. Nevertheless, almost all PCBs increased from the referents to the high-intake group. However, the relative concentrations of several highly chlorinated PCBs (particularly PCB-209) in blood are unexpectedly low compared to their abundance in crabs, indicating low uptake of these congeners. The exposure to PCDDs/PCDFs from crab consumption calculated from individual body burdens of these compounds were in good agreement with the intake estimated from previously measured concentrations in crabs, reported fishing sites, and consumption. Almost all subjects in the high-intake group exceeded the tolerable weekly intake of 35 pg TEQ/kg body weight/week proposed by a Nordic Expert Group. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8841762

  9. Glomerular lesions induced in the rabbit by physicochemically altered homologous IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Cavalot, F.; Miyata, M.; Vladutiu, A.; Terranova, V.; Dubiski, S.; Burlingame, R.; Tan, E.; Brentjens, J.; Milgrom, F.; Andres, G.

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous or even autologous IgG induces formation of antibodies combining with IgG of rabbit and of foreign species. Cardiac but not renal lesions were reported in such animals. This study examined the nephritogenic potential of the immune response to cationized or heat-aggregated homologous IgG of b9 or b4 allotype in rabbits of the b4 allotype. Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 cationized IgG produced antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and with histones; they also developed abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 corresponding to alterations of the glomerular basement membranes (GBM). Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 aggregated IgG developed antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 in the GBM and in the mesangium with subendothelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits. Some rabbits in both groups had proliferative and exudative glomerulonephritis and proteinuria. The results showed that immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous IgG induces an immune response to rabbit and human IgG and to histones as well as glomerular deposits of autologous IgG and C3 and other glomerular lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:1546743

  10. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Human Orthotopic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. Jake; Jaffe, Ron; Tzakis, A.; Ramsey, Glenn; Todo, S.; Belle, Steven; Esquivel, Carlos; Shapiro, Ron; Markus, Bernd; Mroczek, Elizabeth; Van Thiel, D. H.; Sysyn, Greg; Gordon, Robert; Makowka, Leonard; Starzl, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A clinicopathologic analysis of liver transplantation across major ABO blood group barriers was carried out 1) to determine if antibody-mediated (humoral) rejection was a cause of graft failure and if humoral rejection can be identified, 2) to propose criteria for establishing the diagnosis, and 3) to describe the clinical and pathologic features of humoral rejection. A total of 51 (24 primary) ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) liver grafts were transplanted into 49 recipients. There was a 46% graft failure rate during the first 30 days for primary ABO-I grafts compared with an 11% graft failure rate for primary ABO compatible (ABO-C), crossmatch negative, age, sex and priority-matched control patients (P < 0.02). A similarly high early graft failure rate (60%) was seen for nonprimary ABO-I grafts during the first 30 days. Clinically, the patients experienced a relentless rise in serum transaminases, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy during the first weeks after transplant. Pathologic examination of ABO-I grafts that failed early demonstrated widespread areas of geographic hemorrhagic necrosis with diffuse intraorgan coagulation. Prominent arterial deposition of antibody and complement components was demonstrated by immunoflourescent staining. Elution studies confirmed the presence of tissue-bound, donor-specific isoagglutinins within the grafts. No such deposition was seen in control cases. These studies confirm that antibody mediated rejection of the liver occurs and allows for the development of criteria for establishing the diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3046369

  11. Optic nerve axons and acquired alterations in the appearance of the optic disc.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtschafter, J D

    1983-01-01

    The pathophysiologic events in optic nerve axons have recently been recognized as crucial to an understanding of clinically significant acquired alterations in the ophthalmoscopic appearance of the optic disc. Stasis and related abnormalities of axonal transport appear to explain most aspects of optic nerve head swelling, including optic disc drusen and retinal cottonwool spots. Loss of axoplasm and axonal death can be invoked to interpret optic disc pallor, thinning and narrowing of rim tissue, changes in the size and outline of the optic cup, laminar dots, atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer, and acquired demyelination and myelination of the retinal nerve fiber layer. It is speculated that the axons may also play a role in the mechanical support of the lamina cribrosa in resisting the pressure gradient across the pars scleralis of the optic nerve head. Axons and their associated glial cells may be involved in those cases where "reversibility" of cupping of the optic disc has been reported. The structure, physiology, and experimental pathologic findings of the optic nerve head have been reviewed. Many aspects concerning the final anatomic appearance of the optic nerve head have been explained. However, many questions remain concerning the intermediate mechanisms by which increased intracranial pressure retards the various components of axonal transport in papilledema and by which increased IOP causes axonal loss in glaucoma. Investigation of the molecular biology of axonal constituents and their responses to abnormalities in their physical and chemical milieu could extend our understanding of the events that result from mechanical compression and local ischemia. Moreover, we have identified a need to further explore the role of axons in the pathophysiology of optic disc cupping. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:6203209

  12. Photochemical injury to the foveomacula of the monkey eye following argon blue-green panretinal photocoagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Parver, L M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Visual loss following panretinal photocoagulation was found in the Diabetic Retinopathy and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Studies. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that light scattered in the monkey eye during a procedure designed to mimic a clinical panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) can produce a photochemical injury to the foveomacula. METHODS: Ten eyes of 5 adult cynomologous monkeys underwent a PRP using an argon blue-green laser. Three eyes in 2 monkeys underwent a sham PRP, and an additional eye had a PRP with blue filtered slit-lamp illumination. The animals had baseline fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms that were repeated 24 hours after the experimental procedure. Forty-eight hours after the experimental procedure, the eyes were removed and processed for light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: There were no observable changes in the macula on fundus photography or fluorescein angiography 24 hours following PRP. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated changes in the retinal pigment epithelium and the outer photoreceptors, which were confined to the foveola. The control eyes showed no apparent effect from the slit lamp illumination used during the PRP. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of histologic evidence of retinal injury in the foveomacula of the monkey eye after a procedure designed to mimic clinical PRP supports the hypothesis that photochemical retinal damage in the foveola may be associated with this procedure. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 1C FIGURE 1D FIGURE 1E FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:11190033

  13. Chaperonins GroEL and GroES: views from atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Mou, J; Sheng, S; Ho, R; Shao, Z

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonins, GroEL and GroES, as well as their complexes in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable nucleotide AMP-PNP, have been imaged with the atomic force microscope (AFM). We demonstrate that both GroEL and GroES that have been adsorbed to a mica surface can be resolved directly by the AFM in aqueous solution at room temperature. However, with glutaraldehyde fixation of already adsorbed molecules, the resolution of both GroEL and GroES was further improved, as all seven subunits were well resolved without any image processing. We also found that chemical fixation was necessary for the contact mode AFM to image GroEL/ES complexes, and in the AFM images. GroEL with GroES bound can be clearly distinguished from those without. The GroEL/ES complex was about 5 nm higher than GroEL alone, indicating a 2 nm upward movement of the apical domains of GroEL. Using a slightly larger probe force, unfixed GroEL could be dissected: the upper heptamer was removed to expose the contact surface of the two heptamers. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of cross-linking agents for the determination of molecular structures with the AFM. They also pave the way for using the AFM to study the structural basis for the function of GroE system and other molecular chaperones. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8889197

  14. The role of inorganic metals and metalloporphyrins in the induction of haem oxygenase and heat-shock protein 70 in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, K; Fujita, H; Fukuda, Y; Kappas, A; Sassa, S

    1993-01-01

    The role of inorganic metals and metalloporphyrins in the induction of mRNAs for haem oxygenase and heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70), the two heat-shock proteins, was examined in human HepG2 and Hep3B hepatoma cells. SnCl2, but not Sn-protoporphyrin, was found to be a potent inducer of both haem oxygenase and hsp70 mRNAs. In contrast, CoCl2, ZnCl2 and FeCl2 caused little induction of haem oxygenase and hsp70 mRNAs, whereas the porphyrin complexes of these metals strongly induced haem oxygenase mRNA, without influencing the level of hsp70 mRNA. The induction process was largely transcriptional, as judged by the inhibition of induction by actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide, and by increased transcription demonstrated by nuclear run-off analysis. Since CoCl2 is a potent inducer of haem oxygenase in vivo in animals, the possibility of the biosynthesis of Co-protoporphyrin was examined in human hepatoma cells by incubating them with CoCl2 and protoporphyrin, or delta-aminolaevulinate (ALA), the precursor of protoporphyrin. Both types of treatment led to a potent induction of haem oxygenase mRNA. Co-protoporphyrin formation was also spectrally demonstrated in cells incubated with the metal and ALA. The results of this study indicate that certain metals, e.g. SnCl2, may directly induce haem oxygenase mRNA, whereas with other elements, incorporation of the metal into the porphyrin macrocycle is necessary for induction. Therefore CoCl2, like haemin, may activate the haem oxygenase gene via a haem-responsive transcription factor, whereas SnCl2 may exert its effect via a metal-responsive transcription factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8384446

  15. The thymus in myasthenia gravis. Changes typical for the human disease are absent in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis of the Lewis rat.

    PubMed Central

    Meinl, E.; Klinkert, W. E.; Wekerle, H.

    1991-01-01

    In human myasthenia gravis (MG) formation of autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is commonly associated with thymic changes termed lymphofollicular hyperplasia (LFH). To learn whether the thymic lesions of human MG are primary changes in the autoimmune pathogenesis, or rather secondary events caused by peripheral autoimmunization, the authors compared the pathologic changes of MG thymuses with the thymuses of Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). EAMG was induced either actively by immunization with AChR, or transferred passively with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) binding to AChR. The clinical diagnosis of EAMG was confirmed by electromyography. Germinal centers, which are typical for human MG thymuses, were not detectable in the thymus of EAMG rats. Scattered B cells were seen as normal components of the thymic medulla. In EAMG their number was not augmented, nor were they accumulated focally. The perivascular spaces (PVS) were not distended and the amount of reticulin was not increased. Thymic myoid cells were identified in EAMG as well as in control thymuses; their cellular microenvironment was inconspicuous. Both in normal and in EAMG thymuses, a subpopulation of myoid cells expressed the main immunogenic region of the AChR. Heavily affected rats showed a severe cortical involution, but no specific changes of the medulla. The fact that none of the thymic lesions characteristic for human MG was found in EAMG is compatible with the concept that the thymic changes in MG are primary events in the autoimmune pathogenesis of this disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1951638

  16. More than one mutant allele causes infantile Tay-Sachs disease in French-Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Hechtman, Peter; Kaplan, Feige; Bayleran, Janet; Boulay, Bernard; Andermann, Eva; de Braekeleer, Marc; Melançon, Serge; Lambert, Marie; Potier, Michel; Gagné, Richard; Kolodny, Edwin; Clow, Carol; Capua, Aniceta; Prevost, Claude; Scriver, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Two Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patients of French-Canadian origin were shown by Myerowitz and Hogikyan to be homozygous for a 7.6-kb deletion mutation at the 5' end of the hexosaminidase A α-subunit gene. In order to determine whether all French-Canadian TSD patients were homozygotes for the deletion allele and to assess the geographic origins of TSD in this population, we ascertained 12 TSD families of French-Canadian origin and screened for occurrence of mutations associated with infantile TSD. DNA samples were obtained from 12 French-Canadian TSD families. Samples were analyzed using polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) amplification followed by hybridization to allele-specific oligonucleotides (ASO) or by restriction analysis of PCR products. In some cases Southern analysis of genomic DNA was performed. Eighteen of the 22 independently segregating mutant chromosomes in this sample carried the 7.6-kb deletion mutation at the 5' end of the gene. One chromosome carried the 4-nucleotide insertion in exon 11 (a “Jewish” mutation). In this population no individuals were detected who had the substitution at the splice junction of exon 12 previously identified in Ashkenazi Jews. One chromosome carried an undescribed B1 mutation; this allele came from a parent of non-French-Canadian origin. Patients in three families carried TSD alleles different from any of the above mutations. The 5' deletion mutation clusters in persons originating in southeastern Quebec (Gaspé) and adjacent counties of northern New Brunswick. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:2220821

  17. Critical periods of vulnerability for the developing nervous system: evidence from humans and animal models.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D; Barone, S

    2000-01-01

    Vulnerable periods during the development of the nervous system are sensitive to environmental insults because they are dependent on the temporal and regional emergence of critical developmental processes (i.e., proliferation, migration, differentiation, synaptogenesis, myelination, and apoptosis). Evidence from numerous sources demonstrates that neural development extends from the embryonic period through adolescence. In general, the sequence of events is comparable among species, although the time scales are considerably different. Developmental exposure of animals or humans to numerous agents (e.g., X-ray irradiation, methylazoxymethanol, ethanol, lead, methyl mercury, or chlorpyrifos) demonstrates that interference with one or more of these developmental processes can lead to developmental neurotoxicity. Different behavioral domains (e.g., sensory, motor, and various cognitive functions) are subserved by different brain areas. Although there are important differences between the rodent and human brain, analogous structures can be identified. Moreover, the ontogeny of specific behaviors can be used to draw inferences regarding the maturation of specific brain structures or neural circuits in rodents and primates, including humans. Furthermore, various clinical disorders in humans (e.g., schizophrenia, dyslexia, epilepsy, and autism) may also be the result of interference with normal ontogeny of developmental processes in the nervous system. Of critical concern is the possibility that developmental exposure to neurotoxicants may result in an acceleration of age-related decline in function. This concern is compounded by the fact that developmental neurotoxicity that results in small effects can have a profound societal impact when amortized across the entire population and across the life span of humans. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 14 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:10852851

  18. Progression from ischemic injury to infarct following middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. H.; Yoshida, Y.; Chen, H.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Z. G.; Lian, J.; Chen, S.; Chopp, M.

    1993-01-01

    Focal brain ischemia induced in rats by occlusion of an intracranial artery is a widely used paradigm of human brain infarct. Details of the structural changes that develop in either the human or the rat brain at various times after occlusion of an intracranial artery are incompletely characterized. We studied, in 48 adult Wistar rats, structural alterations involving the cerebral hemisphere ipsilateral to an arterial occlusion, at intervals ranging from 30 min to 7 days. Microscopic changes developed over time in separate areas of the corresponding cerebral hemisphere in a predictable pattern, appearing as small lesions in the preoptic area (30 minutes), enlarging to involve the striatum, and finally involving the cerebral cortex. Two types of neuronal responses were noted according to the time elapsed; acute changes (up to 6 hours) included scalloping, shrinkage, and swelling, whereas delayed changes (eosinophilia and karyolysis) appeared later (> or = 12 hours). Three types of astrocytic responses were noted. 1) Cytoplasmic disintegration occurred in the preoptic area at a time and in a place where neurons appeared minimally injured. 2) Nuclear and cytoplasmic swelling were prominent responses in the caudoputamen and cerebral cortex at a time when neurons showed minimal alterations. 3) Increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein reactivity was noted at the interface between the lesion and the surrounding brain tissue after 4 to 6 hours. The gross pattern of the brain lesion and the maturation of neuronal changes typical of a brain infarct have a predictable progression. Focal brain ischemia of up to 6-hour duration does not induce coagulation necrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434652

  19. Intraglomerular basement membrane translocation of immune complex (IC) in the development of passive in situ IC nephritis of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Fujigaki, Y.; Nagase, M.; Honda, N.

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms of charge-based immune complex nephritis. A chronological observation after induction of nephritis was made by immunoelectron microscopy to clarify whether antigen (Ag) remains in association with antibody (Ab) and C3 during the translocation through the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Fifteen minutes after intrarenal perfusion with cationized ferritin (pI > 10.0) as Ag, followed by injection of rabbit anti-ferritin Ab, deposition of subendothelial Ag-Ab-C3 complexes was observed. Between 2 hours and 1 day, a large number of Ag in close association with Ab was noted in the lamina densa, but only a small amount of C3 was detectable. During this time Ag and Ab in the subendothelial region gradually decreased. However, C3 reappeared in the subepithelial region together with the Ag-Ab complex after 1 day, and the subendothelial C3 significantly decreased. At 2 hours and day 1, the distributions of Ag and Ab in the GBM were similar in immersion-fixed kidneys regardless of the preperfusion with phosphate-buffered saline. On the other hand, the passage of Ag across the lamina densa was delayed in the experimental rats as compared with the controls. Significant albuminuria also appeared on day 1. Despite the general concept that Ab binding to cationized Ag results in low avidity immune complex, cationized Ag translocated across the GBM in close association with Ab. The complement was activated biphasically in the subendothelial and in the subepithelial space. The subendothelial complement activation may have contributed to the translocation of immune complex. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8456943

  20. Radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-human food chain near uranium mining operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P A; Gates, T E

    1999-01-01

    The richest uranium ore bodies ever discovered (Cigar Lake and McArthur River) are presently under development in northeastern Saskatchewan. This subarctic region is also home to several operating uranium mines and aboriginal communities, partly dependent upon caribou for subsistence. Because of concerns over mining impacts and the efficient transfer of airborne radionuclides through the lichen-caribou-human food chain, radionuclides were analyzed in tissues from 18 barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus). Radionuclides included uranium (U), radium (226Ra), lead (210Pb), and polonium (210Po) from the uranium decay series; the fission product (137Cs) from fallout; and naturally occurring potassium (40K). Natural background radiation doses average 2-4 mSv/year from cosmic rays, external gamma rays, radon inhalation, and ingestion of food items. The ingestion of 210Po and 137Cs when caribou are consumed adds to these background doses. The dose increment was 0.85 mSv/year for adults who consumed 100 g of caribou meat per day and up to 1.7 mSv/year if one liver and 10 kidneys per year were also consumed. We discuss the cancer risk from these doses. Concentration ratios (CRs), relating caribou tissues to lichens or rumen (stomach) contents, were calculated to estimate food chain transfer. The CRs for caribou muscle ranged from 1 to 16% for U, 6 to 25% for 226Ra, 1 to 2% for 210Pb, 6 to 26% for 210Po, 260 to 370% for 137Cs, and 76 to 130% for 40K, with 137Cs biomagnifying by a factor of 3-4. These CRs are useful in predicting caribou meat concentrations from the lichens, measured in monitoring programs, for the future evaluation of uranium mining impacts on this critical food chain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10378999

  1. Immunochemical demonstration of tropomyosin in the neurofibrillary pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, P. G.; Mulvihill, P.; Siedlak, S.; Mijares, M.; Kawai, M.; Padget, H.; Kim, R.; Perry, G.

    1990-01-01

    pathologic condition of Alzheimer's disease to generate novel, abnormal polymers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2386197

  2. Accumulation of chlorpyrifos on residential surfaces and toys accessible to children.

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, S; Robson, M; Freeman, N; Buckley, B; Roy, A; Meyer, R; Bukowski, J; Lioy, P J

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative examination of major pathways and routes of exposure to pesticides is essential for determining human risk. The current study was conducted in two apartments and examines the accumulation of the pesticide chlorpyrifos in childrens' toys after the time suggested for reentry after application. It has been established for the first time that a semivolatile pesticide will accumulate on and in toys and other sorbant surfaces in a home via a two-phase physical process that continues for at least 2 weeks postapplication. A summation of the above for a 3-6-year-old child yielded an estimated nondietary total dose of 208 microg/kg/day. Potential exposure from the inhalation pathway was negligible, while dermal and nondietary oral doses from playing with toys contributed to 39 and 61% of the total dose, respectively. If children with high frequency mouthing behavior are considered as candidates for acute exposure to chlorpyrifos residues, the estimated acute dose could be as high as 356 microg/kg/day. Routine reapplication of pesticides could lead to continued accumulation in toys and other sorbant surfaces, e.g., pillows, with large sorbant reservoirs, which can become a long-term source of exposure to a child. Estimates of a child's nondietary exposure to chlorpyrifos associated with toys and other sorbant surfaces for a period of 1 week following application appear to be of public health concern, and studies of actual childhood exposure from this pathway are warranted in the home environment. The above information should be used to determine if current procedures for postapplication reentry are sufficient and to evaluate the need for procedures to store frequently used household toys, pillows, and other sorbant objects during insecticidal application. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9417768

  3. Ultrastructure of sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial myocardium of patients with mitral valvular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Thiedermann, K. U.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1976-01-01

    Alterations observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells in left and right atrial myocardium from 10 patients with mitral valvular disease consisted of: a) proliferation of rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, which formed large cisterns in perinuclear areas of hypertrophied cells and was considered indicative of increased protein synthesis; b) proliferation of free sarcoplasmic reticulum, a change that occurred in degenerated cells and appeared to be related to loss of contractile elements; c) two types of aggregates of tubules of free SR--one type was associated wtih abnormal Z-band material and was found only in cells showing loss of myofibrils and proliferation of free SR, whereas the other was not associated with either of these changes and occurred in less severely altered cells; and d) proliferation and enlargement of cisterns of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum, which formed two distinct types of complexes: the first of these consisted of large, convoluted (Type A) cisterns that were wide (550 to 650 A in thickness) and did not have a central dense lamina; the second was composed of stacks of concentric or parallel (Type B) cisterns that were narrower (220 to 300 A in thickness), had a central dense lamina, and were separated from one another by layers of glycogen granules. The formation of these complexes of cisterns was regarded as an extreme form of overdevelopment of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial muscle cells. Images Figure 21 Figures 22-25 Figures 1-3 Figures 26-29 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figures 30 and 31 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 32-36 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 37-39 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figures 40 and 41 Figure 18 Figures 19 and 20 PMID:1275054

  4. Accumulation of Group 3 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins in Zea mays Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, Estela B.; Sollinger, John; White, Constance; Rivin, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Several different types of proteins that are modulated by abscisic acid (ABA) accumulate in developing embryos of maize (Zea mays L.). Some of these proteins are specific to the developing seed, such as the storage globulin, GLB1, whereas others are involved in general responses to water deficit. Here we describe a maize protein family of this second type, a Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (MLG3). Like other proteins of this class, MLG3 polypeptides are ABA-responsive. They are found in maturing seeds and in dehydrating plant tissues. Antigenically related proteins are found in other cereals. To distinguish the regulation of developmentally programmed ABA responses from those that are environmentally induced, we compared the ontological pattern and accumulation requirements of MLG3 polypeptides with those we previously described for GLB1. GLB1 accumulation begins early in the maturation phase and specifically requires high levels of ABA and the participation of the Viviparous-1 (Vp1) gene product. Vp1 is required for other ABA-modulated events in maize seed development as well. In experiments using vp1 mutants and mutants deficient in ABA synthesis (vp5 mutation), we show that MLG3 accumulation also is dependent upon ABA, but it shows striking differences from GLB1. MLG3 accumulates much later in embryogenesis, coincident with the onset of dehydration. In contrast to GLB1, MLG3 proteins can be induced by de novo ABA synthesis in response to culturing in high osmoticum. Unlike GLB1, MLG3 has no specific requirement for the Vp1 gene product. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668930

  5. The soft keratoprosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, D R

    1997-01-01

    appearance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 17A FIGURE 17B FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:9440192

  6. Pharmacodynamics of venlafaxine evaluated by EEG brain mapping, psychometry and psychophysiology.

    PubMed Central

    Saletu, B; Grünberger, J; Anderer, P; Linzmayer, L; Semlitsch, H V; Magni, G

    1992-01-01

    1. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the effects of venlafaxine--a novel nontricyclic compound inhibiting neuronal uptake of serotonin, noradrenaline and to a lesser extent dopamine--were investigated utilizing EEG brain mapping, psychometric and psychophysiological measures. 2. Sixteen healthy volunteers (eight males, eight females) aged 21-36 years received randomized and at weekly intervals single oral doses of placebo, 12.5 mg, 25 mg and 50 mg venlafaxine. EEG recordings, psychometric and psychophysiological tests, and evaluation of pulse, blood pressure and side-effects were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h. 3. EEG brain mapping demonstrated that venlafaxine exerted a significant action on human brain function as compared with placebo at all three doses, characterized mostly by attenuation of absolute power, increase of relative delta/theta and beta, and decrease of alpha power, as well as by an acceleration of the total centroid fronto-temporally and by its slowing centrally and parietally. These findings are similar to antidepressants such as imipramine. Topographically, drug-induced alterations were most pronounced over both fronto-temporal and the right temporal to temporo-occipital regions. 4. Psychometric and psychophysiological investigations demonstrated significant dose-dependent psychotropic properties of the drug. Multivariate statistics exhibited an improvement of both the noopsyche (e.g. attention, concentration, attention variability, memory, fine motor activity, reaction time performance) and thymopsyche (e.g. drive, wakefulness)) but also significant psychophysiological activation (e.g. in c.f.f., pupillary and skin conductance measures). 5. Time-efficiency calculations showed significant central effects from the 2nd hour onwards, with increasing differences between placebo and treatment up to the 8th hour. Nausea was the most frequent complaint and appeared dose dependent. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure

  7. Immunophenotypic criteria for the diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Picker, L. J.; Weiss, L. M.; Medeiros, L. J.; Wood, G. S.; Warnke, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    This study examines the immunohistologic profiles of a large series of histologically proven benign and malignant lymphoproliferative processes in order to define immunophenotypic criteria useful in the diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Using a method of analysis relying solely on immunoarchitectural features of a given case, the authors were able to define immunologic criteria capable of differentiating benign from malignant lymphoid processes independent from conventional morphologic analysis. In general, these criteria involved identification of abnormal expression or loss of antigens in B- and T-lineage populations. Among B-lineage populations the following features were associated with malignant histology: 1) light-chain-restricted B lineage, 2) light chain -B lineage, 3) Leu-1+ B lineage, 4) L60+ B lineage, 5) 41H+, Ki-67+ B lineage, 6) loss of pan-B antigens, and 7) LFA-1-B lineage. Among T-cell populations outside the thymus, phenotypes associated with malignancy included 1) loss of pan-T antigens (including loss of the beta chain of the T-cell antigen receptor), 2) coexpression or loss of T-subset antigens, 3) Leu-6+ T-lineage, and 4) MB-1+ T lineage. Application of these criteria to a series of nearly 500 cases of lymphoma indicated that over 90% of B-lineage and about 80% of T-lineage neoplasms manifested immunophenotypic abnormalities that could distinguish them from benign, reactive lymphoid processes. It is concluded that immunophenotypic analysis of lymphoproliferative lesions is sufficiently sensitive and specific to confirm the histologic diagnosis of lymphoma in the vast majority of cases seen in clinical practice. Furthermore, in difficult cases or those with limited material or poor histology, immunophenotypic analysis may be the only means of making a definitive diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3111266

  8. Immediate breast reconstruction-impact on radiation management.

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ravi A.; Nibhanupudy, J. Rao; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Ashton, Cori; Goldson, Alfred L.

    2003-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is an option for women undergoing modified radical mastectomy due to a diagnosis of breast cancer. In certain patients, breast reconstruction is performed by insertion of a temporary tissue expander prior to the placement of permanent breast implants. Some of these patients, following mastectomy, may require chest wall irradiation to prevent loco regional relapse. The compatibility of radiation and tissue expanders placed in the chest wall is of major concern to the radiation oncologist. Clinically undetectable changes can occur in the tissue expander during the course of radiation therapy. This can lead to radiation treatment set-up changes, variation in tissue expansion resulting in unwanted cosmesis, and deviation from the prescribed radiation dose leading to over and/or under dosing of tumor burden. At Howard University hospital, a CT scan was utilized to evaluate the status of the temporary tissue expander during radiation treatment to enable us to prevent radiation treatment related complications resulting from dosimetric discrepancies. CT images of the tissue expander were obtained through the course of treatment. To avoid a 'geographic miss' the amount of fluid injected into the tissue expander was kept constant following patient's satisfaction with the size of the breast mound. The CT scans allowed better visualization of the prosthesis and its relation to the surrounding tumor bed. This technique ensured that anatomical changes occurring during radiation treatment, if any, were minimized. Repeated dosimetry evaluations showed no changes to the prescribed dose distribution. A CT of the reconstructed breast provides an important quality control. Further studies with greater number of patients are required for confirming this impact on radiation treatment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:12749619

  9. Developmental cholinotoxicants: nicotine and chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, T A

    1999-01-01

    . Accordingly, the window of developmental vulnerability to chlorpyrifos is likely to extend from the embryonic period into postnatal life. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:10229709

  10. The final stages of spliceosome maturation require Spp2p that can interact with the DEAH box protein Prp2p and promote step 1 of splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, J; Kim, K; Maddock, J R; Anthony, J G; Woolford, J L

    1995-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing occurs by assembly of splicing factors on the substrate to form the spliceosome followed by two consecutive RNA cleavage-ligation reactions. The Prp2 protein hydrolyzes ATP and is required for the first reaction (Yean SL, Lin RJ, 1991, Mol Cell Biol 11:5571-5577; Kim SH, Smith J, Claude A, Lin RJ, 1992, EMBO J 11:2319-2326). The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPP2 gene was previously identified as a high-copy suppressor of temperature-sensitive prp2 mutants (Last RL, Maddock JR, Woolford JL Jr, 1987, Genetics 117:619-631). We have characterized the function of Spp2p in vivo and in vitro. Spp2p is an essential protein required for the first RNA cleavage reaction in vivo. Depletion of Spp2p from yeast cells results in accumulation of unspliced pre-mRNAs. A temperature-sensitive spp2-1 mutant accumulates pre-mRNAs in vivo and is unable to undergo the first splicing reaction in vitro. However, spliceosomal complexes are assembled in extracts prepared from the mutant. We show that Spp2p function is required after spliceosome assembly but prior to the first reaction. Spp2p associates with the spliceosome before the first RNA cleavage reaction and is likely to be released from the spliceosome following ATP hydrolysis by Prp2p. The Prp2 and Spp2 proteins are capable of physically interacting with each other. These results suggest that Spp2p interacts with Prp2p in the spliceosome prior to the first cleavage-ligation reaction. Spp2p is the first protein that has been found to interact with a DEAD/H box splicing factor. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:7493316

  11. Slow cellular dynamics in MDCK and R5 cells monitored by time-lapse atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, C A; Hoh, J H

    1994-01-01

    We have examined dynamic events that occur on a time scale of minutes in an epithelial monolayer of Madine-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and in ras-transformed MDCK cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells were imaged under physiological conditions, and time-lapse movies representing approximately 60 s real time per frame were assembled. In normal MDCK cells, two types of protrusions in the apical plasma membrane exhibit dynamic behavior. First, smooth bulges formed transiently over the time scale of minutes to tens of minutes. Second, spike-like protrusions appear initially as bulges, extend well above the apical surface and, finally, seem to detach. R5, an oncogenic transformant derived from MDCK cells, grows very flat on glass. During AFM imaging, these cells sometimes round up and detach from the substrate. In light microscopic observations of parallel preparations, cells rarely detach, suggesting that this is an active response of these cells to irritation by the AFM tip. R5 cells often extend processes that are supported by actin stress fibers. During imaging with the AFM, these processes withdraw at a rate of 1-5 microns/min, similar to that observed by light microscopy. During the withdrawal, movement of the stress fibers can be clearly seen. In the flat periphery of these cells, the transport of intracellular particles along cytoskeletal elements was seen. In addition, we have observed two types of wave-like movements through the cell, which appear to be an organized rearrangement of cytoplasm. One type of wave moves radially out from center of the cell while the other moves circularly along the cell periphery. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948707

  12. Regional differences in the distribution of the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin in the extracellular matrix of atherosclerotic and restenotic human coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Riessen, R.; Isner, J. M.; Blessing, E.; Loushin, C.; Nikol, S.; Wight, T. N.

    1994-01-01

    well to pathologically altered human coronary arteries. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8178945

  13. Various cell types in human atherosclerotic lesions express ICAM-1. Further immunocytochemical and immunochemical studies employing monoclonal antibody 10F3.

    PubMed Central

    Printseva OYu; Peclo, M. M.; Gown, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    The specificity of monoclonal antibody 10F3, generated to smooth muscle cells isolated from fetal human aorta, has been further explored in a series of biological, biochemical, and immunocytochemical studies. In the first assay, it was found that 10F3 could inhibit aggregation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphocytes in a manner comparable to that of antibody RR1/1, an anti-intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) monoclonal antibody. In immunoprecipitation experiments followed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, both 10F3 and RR1/1 immunoprecipitated 90 kd proteins, with results suggesting that the two antibodies recognized different epitopes of the same molecule. A series of immunocytochemical studies on human atherosclerotic lesions was performed; using single-labeling techniques, 10F3-positive cells were found in the vessel wall and in lesions of virtually all specimens of fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Using double-labeling techniques, 10F3-positive macrophages and 10F3-positive smooth muscle cells were found; however, there were also a significant number of non-smooth muscle, nonmacrophage 10F3-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that 10F3 identifies ICAM-1, and that this protein is expressed on a variety of cell types in human atherosclerotic lesions. ICAM-1 may represent a developmentally regulated protein that is expressed in fetal but not adult mesenchymal cells, but can be re-expressed in pathologic processes such as atherosclerosis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1348606

  14. All histological types of primary human rhabdomyosarcoma express alpha-cardiac and not alpha-skeletal actin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, W.; Bochaton-Piallat, M. L.; Geinoz, A.; d'Amore, E.; Laurini, R. N.; Cintorino, M.; Bégin, L. R.; Boivin, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    Eleven human primary rhabdomyosarcomas (RMSs), including all histological variants, were analyzed morphologically, immunohistochemically for intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms, and by means of Northern blots with probes specific for total actin, alpha-skeletal (SK), alpha-cardiac (CARD), and alpha-smooth muscle actin messenger (m)RNAs. All tumors disclosed ultrastructural evidence of skeletal muscle features with terminal differentiation in three cases. The RMSs contained immunohistochemically the intermediate filament proteins vimentin and desmin and reacted positively with the alpha-sarcomeric actin antibody, which recognizes alpha-SK and alpha-CARD actin isoforms. All RMSs reacted with the total actin probe, recognizing at 2.1 kb cytoplasmic actin mRNAs and at 1.7 kb alpha-actin mRNAs. With the specific probes, all RMSs expressed alpha-CARD actin mRNA, four neoplasms expressed also alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, whereas the probe for alpha-SK actin mRNA never produced a signal except in one case, in which the tumor masses were intermingled with non-neoplastic preexistent striated muscle fibers. Because alpha-CARD and alpha-smooth muscle actins are transiently expressed during normal skeletal muscle development, RMSs seem to follow normal skeletal myogenesis without completing the final step, consisting of alpha-SK actin mRNA expression. The use of Northern blots for alpha-CARD actin as an adjunct to conventional techniques may be helpful for the precise identification of primary RMSs compared to other soft tissue neoplasms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8160781

  15. Heterogeneity of smooth muscle cells in atheromatous plaque of human aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, V. R.; Bobryshev, Y. V.; Stenina, O. V.; Tararak, E. M.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and the ultrastructure of cells in normal intima and atheromatous plaque of human aorta. It has been established, using double-labeling immunofluorescence, that smooth muscle cells (SMC) in normal aortic intima contain myosin, vimentin, and alpha-actin but do not react with antibodies against desmin. In contrast, 7 of 28 atherosclerotic plaques contained many cells expressing desmin in addition to the other cytoskeletal proteins characteristic of normal intima SMC. These cells were localized predominantly in the plaque cap and had the ultrastructural features of modulated SMC, ie, well-developed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Besides, some cells in the 13 atherosclerotic plaques proved to be myosin, alpha actin, and desmin negative but contained vimentin and actin as revealed by fluorescent phalloidin. These cells were found in the immediate proximity of atheromatous material and reacted with a monoclonal antibody specific to SMC surface protein (11G10) but not with monoclonal anti-muscle actin (HHF35) and anti-macrophage (HAM56) antibodies. Electron microscopy of this plaque zone revealed that the cytoplasm of these cells was filled with rough endoplasmic reticulum and a developed Golgi complex. At the same time, a certain proportion of cells in this region retained morphologic features of differentiated SMC such as the presence of a basal lamina and myofilament bundles. The revealed peculiarities of cytoskeletal protein expression and the ultrastructure of cells in human aortic atherosclerotic plaques may be explained by a phenotypic modulation of vascular SMC. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2190471

  16. The invertebrate myosin filament: subfilament arrangement of the solid filaments of insect flight muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Beinbrech, G; Ashton, F T; Pepe, F A

    1992-01-01

    Transverse sections (approximately 140 nm thick) of solid myosin filaments of the flight muscles of the fleshfly, Phormia terrae-novae, the honey bee, Apis mellifica, and the waterbug, Lethocerus uhleri, were photographed in a JEM model 200A electron microscope at 200 kV. The images were digitized and computer processed by rotational filtering. In each of these filaments it was found that the symmetry of the core and the wall was not the same. The power spectra of the images showed sixfold symmetry for the wall and threefold symmetry for the core of the filaments. The images of the filaments in each muscle were superimposed according to the sixfold center of the wall. These averaged images for all three muscles showed six pairs of subunits in the wall similar to those found in the wall of tubular filaments. From serial sections of the fleshfly filaments, we conclude that the subunits in the wall of the filaments represent subfilaments essentially parallel to the long axis of the filament. In each muscle there are additional subunits in the core, closely related to the subunits in the wall. Evaluation of serial sections through fleshfly filaments suggests that the relationship of the three subunits observed in the core to those in the wall varies along the length of the filaments. In waterbug filaments there are three dense and three less dense subunits for a total of six all closely related to the wall. Bee filaments have three subunits related to the wall and three subunits located eccentrically in the core of the filaments. The presence of core subunits can be related to the paramyosin content of the filaments. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 PMID:1617135

  17. Sequential expression of cellular fibronectin by platelets, macrophages, and mesangial cells in proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. L.; Hastings, R. R.; De la Garza, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) regulates cell migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix formation during embryogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fn also promotes mesangial cell migration and proliferation in vitro and contributes to extracellular matrix formation and tissue remodeling during glomerular disease. In this study, we examined, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, the temporal glomerular localization and cellular sources of Fn in Habu snake venom (HSV)-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. Early HSV-induced glomerular lesions consisted of microaneurysms devoid of resident glomerular cells and filled with platelets, leukocytes, and erythrocytes. Over the course of the disease, mesangial cells migrated into the lesions, proliferated, and formed a confluent cellular mass. Fn was present in lesions beginning at 8 hours, with highest intensity at 72 hours and diminishing at 2 weeks after HSV. Staining for Fn at 8 and 24 hours after HSV was attributed to platelets and macrophages. In situ hybridization and phenotypic identification of cell types within lesions revealed macrophages as the predominant source of cellular Fn mRNA at these times. At 48 hours after HSV, Fn mRNA was expressed in proliferating mesangial cells in addition to macrophages. Most cells in lesions at 72 hours after HSV were mesangial, at a time when expression of Fn mRNA peaked. Cellular expression for Fn mRNA and translated protein declined at 2 weeks after HSV. These studies support the hypothesis that Fn, derived from platelets and macrophages, provides a provisional matrix involved with mesangial cell migration into glomerular lesions. Fn produced by mesangial cells might contribute to the formation of a stable extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8080041

  18. Expression of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase and activation of progelatinase A in human osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, K.; Ohta, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Fujimoto, N.; Sato, H.; Seiki, M.; Okada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are expressed in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage and are thought to be involved in the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM). Among these proteinases, MMP-2 (gelatinase A) demonstrates a wide range of substrate specificity against the ECM present in cartilage. Although MMP-2 expression increases in OA cartilage, the activation mechanism of the corresponding zymogen (pro-MMP-2) in cartilage is unknown. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of membrane-type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP) in human OA articular cartilage and its correlation with the activation of pro-MMP-2. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrate that MT1-MMP localizes to the chondrocytes in the superficial and transitional zones in all of the samples examined directly correlating with cartilage degradation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed the predominant expression of MT1-MMP mRNA in the OA cartilage. In situ hybridization revealed the site of expression of MT1-MMP in OA cartilage to be the chondrocytes. Through gelatin zymography and a sandwich enzyme immunoassay it was demonstrated that OA cartilage explants secrete significantly higher levels of pro-MMP-2 than normal samples. Pro-MMP-2 activation was enhanced in the OA cartilage samples and correlated with MT1-MMP expression in the cartilage. Plasma membranes prepared from cultured chondrocytes with MT1-MMP expression and those directly isolated from OA cartilage could activate pro-MMP-2. MT1-MMP gene expression in cultured chondrocytes was induced by treatment with interleukin-1 alpha and/or tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These data suggest that cytokine-induced MT1-MMP in the chondrocytes may play a key role in the activation of pro-MMP-2 in the OA articular cartilage, leading to cartilage destruction through ECM degradation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9212749

  19. Expression and distribution of CD9 in myelin of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Y.; Iwamoto, R.; Mekada, E.

    1996-01-01

    CD9 is a member of the newly identified tetra-membrane-spanning protein family. We show here that CD9 is a constituent of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Expression of CD9 was detected in human cerebral white matter and sciatic nerve by Northern and Western blotting. Myelin in the central and peripheral nervous systems was strongly stained with a monoclonal antibody against human CD9 antigen in paraffin-embedded sections. CD9 was detected in adult nervous tissue but not in developing brain at less than 20 weeks of gestation. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that expression of CD9 is correlated with myelination and is somewhat delayed compared with expression of myelin basic protein, a major component protein of myelin. In the central nervous system, CD9 was detected along the outermost membrane of compact myelin but not inside compact myelin or the periaxonal region. Although the membrane-anchored form of heparin-binding epidermal-growth-factor-like growth factor (proHB-EGF), which is identical to the diphtheria toxin receptor, forms a complex with CD9 in some human and monkey cell lines, proHB-EGF was not detected in myelin immunocytochemically. The distribution of CD9 in the outer surface of myelin and its relatively late developmental appearance suggest that CD9 may interact with the extracellular matrix or cell adhesion molecules and participate in the maintenance of the entire myelin sheath. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8701996

  20. Obstructive Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas Taylor

    1982-01-01

    The techniques that have come into general use for diagnosing problems of obstructive jaundice, particularly in the past ten years, have been ultrasonography, computerized tomography, radionuclide imaging, transhepatic percutaneous cholangiography using a long thin needle, transhepatic percutaneous drainage for obstructive jaundice due to malignancy, endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the papilla (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy and choledochoscopy. It is helpful to review obstructive jaundice due to gallstones from a clinical point of view and the use of the directable stone basket for the retrieval of retained stones, choledochoscopy for the same purpose using the rigid versus flexible choledochoscopes and dissolution of stones using various fluids through a T tube. The use of dilation of the sphincter for the treatment of stenosis or stricture of the bile duct is now frowned on; rather, treatment choices are between the use of sphincteroplasty versus choledochoduodenostomy and choledochojejunostomy. Any patient with obstructive jaundice or anyone undergoing manipulation of the bile ducts should have prophylactic antibiotic therapy. The current literature regarding treatment of cancer of the bile ducts is principally devoted to the new ideas relative to treatment of tumors of the upper third, especially the bifurcation tumors that are now being resected rather than bypassed. Tumors of the distal bile duct are still being resected by focal operations. Finally, it is now felt that early operation for congenital biliary atresia and choledochal cysts gives the best prognosis, with preoperative diagnosis now possible with the use of ultrasonography and ERCP. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:7051569

  1. Chemical speciation of lead dust associated with primary lead smelting.

    PubMed Central

    Spear, T M; Svee, W; Vincent, J H; Stanisich, N

    1998-01-01

    The research presented in this article assessed geochemical factors relating to dust produced during primary lead smelting. Bulk dust samples and size-selective airborne dust samples were collected from four areas of a primary lead smelter and analyzed by X-ray diffraction and sequential chemical extraction. X-ray diffraction showed that the smelter dusts were composed primarily of sulfides, oxides, sulfates, and silicates of metal ores, with galena being the primary dust component. Sequential extraction revealed the solubility of lead compounds at less than 7% in the exchangeable and mildly acidic steps for the bulk dusts collected from four smelter areas. The later steps of the extraction procedure were more effective in dissolving the lead compounds associated with the bulk dust samples, with 43%, 26%, and 8% of the total lead, in the ore storage, sinter, and blast/dross smelter areas, respectively, being extracted in the residual step. Sequential extraction of coarse airborne dust samples from the ore storage and sinter plant showed that 1.2% and 4.1% of the total lead, respectively, was exchangeable. The finer particle size fractions from these areas of the smelter showed higher percentages of exchangeable lead. Of the course airborne dust from the blast/dross furnace processes, 65% of the total lead was exchangeable. However, the largest percentage of lead from these areas was associated with the finer particle-size fractions. If lead bioavailability is related to its solubility as determined through sequential extraction, the health hazards associated with lead exposure may be appreciably enhanced in the blast and dross furnace processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721256

  2. Expression of platelet-derived growth factor and its receptors in normal human liver and during active hepatic fibrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinzani, M.; Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Gentilini, A.; Caligiuri, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Ngo, D. V.; Romanelli, R. G.; Gentilini, P.

    1996-01-01

    Expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptor (R) subunits was evaluated in normal human liver and in cirrhotic liver tissue by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. In normal liver, PDGF and PDGF-R subunit expression was limited to a few mesenchymal cells of the portal tract stroma and vessels. In cirrhotic liver, PDGF-A and -B chain mRNA expression was markedly increased and was co-distributed with immunoreactivity for PDGF-AA and -BB in infiltrating inflammatory cells and along vascular structures within fibrous septa. These aspects were paralleled by a marked overexpression of PDGF-R alpha- and beta-subunit mRNAs and of the relative immunoreactivities in a wide range of mesenchymal cells in fibrous septa and in perisinusoidal alpha-smooth-muscle-actin-positive cells. In general expression and distribution of PDGF-R subunits appeared to be related to the activation of different mesenchymal cell types involved in the fibroproliferative process. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of PDGF-R subunits in liver tissue specimens with increasing degrees of necroinflammatory activity. The results of this additional study confirmed that expression of PDGF-R subunits is highly correlated with the severity of histological lesions and collagen deposition. Our results, providing evidence for a functional involvement of PDGF/PDGF-R in liver fibrogenesis, greatly support the results of previous in vitro studies and direct attention toward pharmacological strategies able to affect the series of signaling events arising from the autophosphorylation of PDGF-R subunits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8774134

  3. Silica-induced apoptosis in alveolar and granulomatous cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, J; Wang, H; Bonin, A; Peters, M; Ruan, X

    1997-01-01

    Silica is a toxicant that can stimulate cells to produce various cellular products such as free radicals, cytokines, and growth factors. Silica and its induced substances may induce apoptosis to regulate the evolution of silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. To examine this hypothesis, groups of Wistar male rats were intratracheally instilled with different doses of Min-U-Sil 5 silica (Silica, Berkeley Springs, WV). Ten days after the instillation, we obtained cells by bronchoalveolar lavage and placed them on slides by cytospin preparation. The slides were stained with Diff-Quik (Lab Aids, Sydney, NSW, Australia) and examined under oil immersion. A substantial number of cells with apoptotic features were identified in all silica-instilled rats and the apoptosis was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The number of apoptotic cells was clearly related to silica dosage. Engulfment of apoptotic cells by macrophages was also noted. Neutrophil influx in silica-instilled rats could be saturated with the increase of silica dosage and the number of macrophages in different dose groups changed in parallel with the proportion of apoptotic cells. Fifty-six days after instillation, morphologically apoptotic cells could be identified in granulomatous cells of lung tissue from silica-instilled rats. We conclude that intratracheal instillation of silica could induce apoptosis in both alveolar and granulomatous cells, and the apoptotic change and subsequent engulfment by macrophages might play a role in the evolution of silica-induced effects. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9400731

  4. The association of viruses with urveal melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, D M

    1979-01-01

    Electron microscopic examination of 57 ocular melanomas (54 human, two feline and one canine) revealed the presence of viral particles in six specimens. Herpesviruses particles were observed in one human specimen and were passed in human fibroblasts (WI-38), where they gave rise to intranuclear inclusions. A-type oncornavirus particles (oncogenic RNA virus) were observed in a second case, both in cells of tumor directly removed from an enucleated eye as well as in cells grown in tissue culture. In three human specimens and one feline specimen, togavirus particles were observed. Rubella is a member of this group, and the possibility that the presence of togavirus in these tumors is the result of latent ocular infection by rubella virus is raised. Herpes virus and RNA tumor viruses are widely considered as having a possible etiologic role for certain human cancers. The observation of togavirus is unexpected, as this virus has not been previously implicated in human or animal tumors. Injection of an RNA tumor virus (Gardner strain feline sarcoma virus) into the anterior chamber of newborn kittens resulted in the development of iris and ciliary body melanomas, many of which showed invasion and, in one instance, metastasis. This is the first animal model of a viral-induced uveal melanoma, and the histology and ultrastructure are described. These results emphasize the need for the continued investigation of the role of these viruses in uveal melanoma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 PMID:545833

  5. Effects of Jasmonic Acid on Embryo-Specific Processes in Brassica and Linum Oilseeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, Ronald W.; van Rooijen, Gijs J. H.; Pearce, David W.; Pharis, Richard P.; Holbrook, Larry A.; Moloney, Maurice M.

    1991-01-01

    A number of effects on embryogenesis of the putative phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA), and its methyl ester (MeJA), were investigated in two oilseed plants, repeseed (Brassica napus) and flax (Linum usitatissimum). Results from treatments with JA and MeJA were compared with those of a known effector of several aspects of embryogenesis, abscisic acid (ABA). Jasmonic acid was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as a naturally occurring substance in both plant species during embryo development. Both JA and MeJA can prevent precocious germination of B. napus microspore embryos and of cultured zygotic embryos of both species at an exogenous concentration of >1 micromolar. This dose-response was comparable with results obtained with ABA. Inhibitory effects were also observed on seed germination with all three growth regulators in rapeseed and flax. A number of molecular aspects of embryogenesis were also investigated. Expression of the B. napus storage protein genes (napin and cruciferin) was induced in both microspore embryos and zygotic embryos by the addition of 10 micromolar JA. The level of napin and cruciferin mRNA detected was similar to that observed when 10 micromolar ABA was applied to these embryos. For MeJA only slight increases in napin or cruciferin mRNA were observed at concentrations of 30 micromolar. Several oilbody-associated proteins were found to accumulate when the embryos were incubated with either JA or ABA in both species. The MeJA had little effect on oilbody protein synthesis. The implications of JA acting as a natural regulator of gene expression in zygotic embryogenesis are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16667997

  6. Chronic beryllium disease and cancer risk estimates with uncertainty for beryllium released to the air from the Rocky Flats Plant.

    PubMed Central

    McGavran, P D; Rood, A S; Till, J E

    1999-01-01

    Beryllium was released into the air from routine operations and three accidental fires at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado from 1958 to 1989. We evaluated environmental monitoring data and developed estimates of airborne concentrations and their uncertainties and calculated lifetime cancer risks and risks of chronic beryllium disease to hypothetical receptors. This article discusses exposure-response relationships for lung cancer and chronic beryllium disease. We assigned a distribution to cancer slope factor values based on the relative risk estimates from an occupational epidemiologic study used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine the slope factors. We used the regional atmospheric transport code for Hanford emission tracking atmospheric transport model for exposure calculations because it is particularly well suited for long-term annual-average dispersion estimates and it incorporates spatially varying meteorologic and environmental parameters. We accounted for model prediction uncertainty by using several multiplicative stochastic correction factors that accounted for uncertainty in the dispersion estimate, the meteorology, deposition, and plume depletion. We used Monte Carlo techniques to propagate model prediction uncertainty through to the final risk calculations. We developed nine exposure scenarios of hypothetical but typical residents of the RFP area to consider the lifestyle, time spent outdoors, location, age, and sex of people who may have been exposed. We determined geometric mean incremental lifetime cancer incidence risk estimates for beryllium inhalation for each scenario. The risk estimates were < 10(-6). Predicted air concentrations were well below the current reference concentration derived by the EPA for beryllium sensitization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10464074

  7. Interaction of human malignant melanoma (ST-ML-12) tumor spheroids with endothelial cell monolayers. Damage to endothelium by oxygen-derived free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, F. A.; Wirtz, H. C.; Schiefer, J.; Bigalke, I.; Klosterhalfen, B.; Bittinger, F.; Mittermayer, C.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that tumor-induced endothelial cell injury may be one of several initial events in the establishment of tumor metastases. To test this hypothesis, the authors have analyzed the interaction of malignant melanoma (ST-ML-12) multicenter tumor spheroids with endothelial cell monolayers in a three-dimensional coculture system. After 1.5 hours of interaction, the authors observed a toxic effect on endothelial cells in the perispheroid region. The latter was demonstrated by testing membrane integrity with the fluorescent probes acridine orange/ethidium bromide and resulted in sensitivity to shear stress of the damaged cells. The endothelium then underwent a regenerative cycle to replace the denuded halo. Addition of the oxygen radical-scavenging enzyme superoxide dismutase to the culture medium prevented this endothelial cell damage in a dose-dependent manner for up to 12 hours. By contrast, catalase, deferoxamine mesylate, allopurinol, and the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and aprotinin were not protective under the same conditions. The endothelial damage was dependent on the attachment of the spheroids. Medium conditioned by ST-ML-12-spheroids proved to be ineffective. A similar, but less prominent, deleterious effect was seen when human peritoneal mesothelial cells were used in place of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Spheroids of the uroepithelial cell line HU-609 were used as control. No toxicity was observed in these cocultures. Melanin biosynthesis is associated with the production of oxygen-derived free radicals. The results suggest a possible implication of these free radicals in metastasis formation of malignant melanoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519667

  8. Exposure estimates to disinfection by-products of chlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, C P; Kim, H; Haltmeier, P; Klotz, J B

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) of drinking water is multiroute and occurs in households serviced by municipal water treatment facilities that disinfect the water as a necessary step to halt the spread of waterborne infectious diseases. Biomarkers of the two most abundant groups of DBPs of chlorination, exhaled breath levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) and urinary levels of two haloacetic acids, were compared to exposure estimates calculated from in-home tap water concentrations and responses to a questionnaire related to water usage. Background THM breath concentrations were uniformly low. Strong relationships were identified between the THM breath concentrations collected after a shower and both the THM water concentration and the THM exposure from a shower, after adjusting for the postshower delay time in collecting the breath sample. Urinary haloacetic acid excretion rates were not correlated to water concentrations. Urinary trichloroacetic acid excretion rates were correlated with ingestion exposure, and that correlation was stronger in a subset of individuals who consumed beverages primarily within their home where the concentration measurements were made. No correlation was observed between an average 48-hr exposure estimate and the urinary dichloroacetic acid excretion rate, presumably because of its short biological half-life. Valid biomarkers were identified for DBP exposures, but the time between the exposure and sample collection should be considered to account for different metabolic rates among the DBPs. Further, using water concentration as an exposure estimate can introduce misclassification of exposure for DBPs whose primary route is ingestion due to the great variability in the amount of water ingested across a population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9924004

  9. Characterization of defectiveness in endogenous antigen presentation of novel murine cells established from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, K; Yamashina, K; Kitatani, N; Kagishima, A; Hamaoka, T; Hosaka, Y

    1995-01-01

    Three cell lines (4A1, 4C2 and 6D1 cells) derived from fibrosarcoma induced by the inoculation of 3-methylcholanthrene into C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice were examined for their ability to present antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). 6D1 and 4C2 cells were deficient in presenting endogenously synthesized influenza virus antigens to CTL, but they were able to present antigens when they were sensitized with a synthetic epitope peptide. The expression of the H-2 Kk gene in 4C2 and 6D1 cells was much reduced and was detectable only with Northern blot hybridization. The expression of two transporter genes (TAP1 and TAP2), examined by Northern hybridization, was also reduced in both cells, and negligible particularly in 4C2 cells. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment of these cells induced expression of Kk, TAP1 and TAP2 genes and rescued the defect of class I-restricted antigen presentation in 4C2 and 6D1 cells. Even after this treatment, however, antigen-presentation capability of 4C2 cells was still much lower than that of normal 4A1 cells. This finding suggests that 4C2 cells might have an additional defective gene(s), whose products are involved in the processing of class I-restricted antigen, besides the Kk and TAP genes, and this may explain the difficulty of 4C2 cells to induce tumour-specific immunity, as described previously. To our knowledge, the 4C2 cell is the first tumour cell postulated to have more than three defective genes involved in class I-restricted antigen presentation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7890298

  10. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle of pigs with acute monensin myotoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Large doses of monensin, a Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produce polyfocal, monophasic necrosis of skeletal muscle, with Type I fiber selectivity, in swine. For a study of the sequential ultrastructural alterations in affected skeletal muscles, 14 weanling pigs were given 40 mg monensin/kg body weight and were euthanatized 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 days later. Myotoxicosis and myoglobinuria were apparent clinically. At necropsy, white, dry areas of necrosis were present in the muscle masses of the anterior and posterior thigh, shoulder, and loin. Two patterns of skeletal muscle necrosis were observed on Day 1, especially in Type I fibers. In fibers exhibiting the first of these patterns, the contractile material was disrupted, forming dense amorphous and filamentous clumps scattered within the persistent sheaths of external lamina (sarcolemmal tubes); the mitochondria were swollen and contained flocculent matrix densities, and the nuclei were pyknotic. Fibers showing the second pattern were uniformly dense, but their sarcoplasm was not disrupted. Sublethally injured fibers were also observed and showed focal myofibrillar lysis. On Days 2 and 4, the necrotic muscle had marked infiltration of macrophages in the interstitium and within sarcolemmal tubes. Rapid resolution of the fiber necrosis occurred by phagocytosis of the sarcoplasmic debris. Regeneration of affected muscles developed early following injury and progressed rapidly to complete restoration of the necrotic muscles without residual fibrosis. Regeneration was initiated on Day 1 by activation of satellite cells to form presumptive myoblasts; on Days 4 and 8 these cells showed evidence of fusion, forming myotubes to restore the necrotic fibers. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6696050

  11. Carcinogenic and Cocarcinogenic Effects of Radon and Radon Daughters in Rats.

    PubMed Central

    Monchaux, G; Morlier, JP; Morin, M; Chameaud, J; Lafuma, J; Masse, R

    1994-01-01

    It has been previously established that lung cancer could be induced in rats by exposure to radon and radon daughters. Although the oat-cell carcinomas that are common in humans were not found in rats, other histological types of lung carcinomas, especially squamous cell carcinomas and primitive lung adenocarcinomas, were similar to those observed in humans. A dose-effect relationship was established for cumulative doses varying from 25 to 3000 working-level-months (WLM), which was similar for medium and high cumulative doses to that observed in uranium miners. This experimental protocol was also used to study the potential cocarcinogenic effects of other environmental or industrial airborne pollutants such as tobacco smoke, mineral fibers, diesel exhausts, or minerals from metallic mine ores that may act synergistically with radon exposure. In rats exposed to radon and tobacco smoke combined, the incidence of lung cancers was higher by a factor of 2-4 according to the cumulative radon exposure and the duration of tobacco smoke exposure. When mineral fibers were injected intrapleurally, an increased incidence of malignant thoracic tumors was observed in rats exposed to radon and fibers combined, but synergistic effects resulted in additivity. With diesel exhausts or minerals from metallic ores, a slight, nonsignificant increase in the incidence of lung carcinomas was observed compared with rats exposed to radon alone. These results demonstrated that it is possible to establish the potential cocarcinogenic action, showing either multiplicative, additive, or no effect of various environmental or industrial airborne pollutants combined with radon exposure. This radon model is valid for investigating possible interactions between two occupational exposures. Images p64-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9719670

  12. The failure of selenium supplementation to prevent copper-induced liver damage in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed Central

    Aburto, E M; Cribb, A; Fuentealba, I C; Ikede, B O; Kibenge, F S; Markham, F

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates the ability of selenium (Se) supplementation to prevent experimental copper (Cu)-induced hepatocellular damage. Weanling male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned to groups of 15, 3 groups (A,B,C) were fed Cu-loaded diets (containing 2000 microg/g copper, added as CuSO4) and different levels of Se (added as Na2SeO3 x 5H2O) as follows: A) Cu-loaded/Se adequate diet (0.4 microg/g Se, fed basis); B) Cu-loaded/Se-supplemented diet (2 microg/g Se); and C) Cu-loaded/Se-deficient diet (< 0.2 microg/g). Three additional groups (D,E,F) were fed diets containing adequate levels of Cu (14 microg/g Cu, fed basis) and different levels of Se as follows: D) Cu-adequate/Se-adequate diet; E) Cu-adequate/Se-supplemented diet (2 microg/g Se); and F) Cu-adequate/Se-deficient (< 0.2 microg/g) diet. After 4, 8, and 12 weeks on the experimental diets, liver samples were processed for histology, histochemistry, metal analysis, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) measurement, and quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA). Morphologic changes characteristic of Cu-associated hepatitis, without an increase in hepatic MDA levels, were seen in all Cu-loaded rats in each sampling. Similar changes occurred in rats fed Se-adequate, Se-supplemented and Se-deficient diets. This study demonstrates that Fischer 344 rats fed 2000 microg/g Cu develop morphologic changes due to Cu toxicity without evidence of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, Se supplementation does not result in protection against Cu-induced liver injury. Images Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:11346254

  13. Altered biologic activities of commercial polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures after microbial reductive dechlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, M A; Ganey, P E; Quensen, J F; Madhukar, B V; Chou, K; Giesy, J P; Fischer, L J; Boyd, S A

    1998-01-01

    Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9860899

  14. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, E. S.; Lee, H.; Suh, Y. K.; Tang, W.; Qi, M.; Yin, S.; Remick, D. G.; Ulich, T. R.

    1996-01-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 12 Figure 14 PMID:8863677

  15. Resistance to cerebral malaria in tumor necrosis factor-alpha/beta-deficient mice is associated with a reduction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 up-regulation and T helper type 1 response.

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, W.; Eugster, H. P.; Bordmann, G.; Bonato, J.; Müller, M.; Yamage, M.; Ryffel, B.

    1997-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection was suggested to play an important role in the development of cerebral malaria (CM). We asked whether TNF-alpha/beta double-deficient mice, which have a complete disruption of the TNF-signaling pathways, are protected from CM and what might be the possible mechanisms of protection. PbA infection induces fatal CM in wild-type mice, which die within 5 to 8 days with severe neurological signs. In contrast, TNF-alpha/beta-deficient mice are completely resistant to PbA-induced CM. As PbA-induced up-regulation of endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression as well as the systemic release of nitric oxide is found only in wild-type mice, TNF is apparently central for the recruitment of mononuclear cells and microvascular damage. Mononuclear cell adhesion to the endothelium, vascular leak and, perivascular hemorrhage are found only in the brain of wild-type mice. By contrast, the development of parasitemia and anemia is independent of TNF. Resistance to CM in TNF-alpha/beta-deficient mice is associated with reduced interferon-gamma and interleukin-12 expression in the brain, in the absence of increased T helper type 2 cytokines. In conclusion, TNF apparently is required for PbA-induced endothelial ICAM-1 up-regulation and subsequent microvascular pathology resulting in fatal CM. In the absence of TNF, ICAM-1 and nitric oxide up-regulation are reduced, and PbA infection fails to cause fatal CM. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9006341

  16. Tumor cell and connective tissue cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Transfer of platelet-derived growth factor-AB/BB to stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, C.; Branting, M.; Gerdin, B.; Rubin, K.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptors expressed on connective tissue cells in human colorectal adenocarcinoma were investigated in this study. PDGF-AB/BB, but not PDGF receptors, was expressed by tumor cells in situ, as well as in tumor cell isolates of low passage from human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In an experimental co-culture system, conditioned medium from tumor cells only marginally activated PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. In contrast, co-culturing of the two cell types led to a marked PDGF beta-receptor activation. Functional PDGF-AB/BB was found to be associated with heparinase-I-sensitive components on the tumor cell surface. PDGF-AB/BB, isolated from heparinase-I-sensitive cell surface components, induced a marked activation of PDGF beta-receptors. Furthermore, co-culturing tumor cells together with fibroblasts led to a sustained activation of PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. Double immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, combined with computer-aided image analysis, revealed that nonproliferating tumor cells were the predominant cellular source of PDGF-AB/BB in the tumor stroma. In addition, PDGF-AB/BB-expressing tumor cells were found juxtapositioned to microvascular cells expressing activated PDGF beta-receptors. Confocal microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic and cell-membrane-associated expression of PDGF-AB/BB in tumor cells situated in the stroma. In contrast, epithelial cells situated in normal or tumorous acinar structures revealed only a cell-membrane-associated PDGF-AB/BB expression. The is vitro and in situ results demonstrate that tumor cells not only facilitate but also have the ability to modulate connective tissue cell responsiveness to PDGF-AB/BB in a paracrine fashion, through direct cell-cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9250160

  17. Expression of CD44 isoforms in renal cell tumors. Positive correlation to tumor differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Terpe, H. J.; Störkel, S.; Zimmer, U.; Anquez, V.; Fischer, C.; Pantel, K.; Günthert, U.

    1996-01-01

    CD44 isoforms have been implicated in tumor progression and embryogenesis. Primary renal cell tumors (n = 100) of various histopathological differentiation and grading stages were analyzed for expression of CD44 isoforms in comparison with nonmalignant adult and fetal renal tissues. Evaluations were performed by immunohistochemistry using CD44 isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies and by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). In the nonmalignant kidney no CD44 variant isoforms were detected. There was a significant increase in expression of CD44 standard (CD44s) and several variant isoforms (CD44v) in the course of tumor differentiation in clear cell carcinomas (n = 68) from stages G1 to G3 (P < 0.0001 for CD44s and isoforms containing CD44-6v, and P < 0.007 for those containing CD44-9v). Also, in chromophilic cell carcinomas (n = 13), CD44 isoform expression correlated with grading; ie, no CD44 expression was detected in G1 tumors, whereas in approximately 50% of the G2 tumors, CD44s, CD44-6v, and CD44-9v isoforms were present. Oncocytomas (n = 8), which are benign renal cell tumors, did not express CD44 isoforms, whereas invasive chromophobe cell carcinomas (n = 11) were positive for CD44s and CD44v isoforms. Transcript analyses by RT-PCR revealed that the upregulated isoforms in the carcinoma cells contained exons 8 to 10 and 3, 8 to 10 in combination from the variant region. In conclusion, expression of variant CD44 isoforms was strongly correlated with grading and appears to mediate a more aggressive phenotype to renal cell tumors. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8579108

  18. Role of interferon-gamma in interleukin 12-induced pathology in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Eng, V. M.; Schnyder, B.; LeHir, M.; Shakhov, A. N.; Woerly, G.; Huang, S.; Aguet, M.; Anderson, T. D.; Ryffel, B.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) activates natural killer (NK) and T cells with the secondary synthesis and release of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines. IL-12-induced organ alterations are reported for mice and the pathogenetic role of IFN-gamma is investigated by the use of mice deficient in the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R-/-). IL-12 caused a rapid infiltration of liver and splenic red pulp with activated macrophages; this and increased NK cells resulted in a fivefold increase of splenic weight in wild-type mice. Splenomegaly was associated with myelosuppression and decreasing peripheral leukocyte counts. IL-12-induced changes in wild-type mice were associated with markedly increased IFN-gamma serum levels and up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II expression in various epithelia. IL-12 induced a qualitatively similar macrophage infiltration in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, less marked splenomegaly (to 2 x normal), and no MHC upregulation. Strikingly increased vascular endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was apparent in both IFN-gamma R-/- and IFN-gamma R+/+ mice. Restricted to mutant mice was a severe, invariably lethal, interstitial, and perivascular pulmonary macrophage infiltration with diffuse pulmonary edema. Extensive quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an increase of only IL-6 and IL-10 pulmonary gene transcripts in IFN-gamma R-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-12-induced myelosuppression is due to IFN-gamma-release from NK cells and T cells, and is associated with macrophage activation and distinct MHC class I and II antigen upregulation. The pulmonary pathology in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, however, reveals a toxic potential for IL-12 and suggests that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a protective role in preventing fatal pulmonary disease in these mice. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7495294

  19. Onset and progression of pathological lesions in transforming growth factor-beta 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, G. P.; O'Toole, B. A.; Orsmby, I. E.; Diebold, R. J.; Eis, M. J.; Doetschman, T.; Kier, A. B.

    1995-01-01

    Null-mutant (knockout) mice were obtained through disruption of the sixth exon of the endogenous transforming growth factor-beta 1 allele in murine embryonic stem cells via homologous recombination. Mice lacking transforming growth factor-beta 1 (mutants) were born grossly indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. With time, mutant mice exhibited a wasting phenotype that manifested itself in severe weight loss and dishevelled appearance (between 15 and 36 days of age). Examination of these moribund mice histologically revealed that transforming growth factor-beta 1-deficient mice exhibit a moderate to severe, multifocal, organ-dependent, mixed inflammatory cell response adversely affecting the heart, stomach, diaphragm, liver, lung, salivary gland, and pancreas. Because of the known multifunctional nature of transforming growth factor-beta 1 on the control of growth and differentiation of many different cell types, it is important to determine the degree to which the inflammatory response interacts with or masks other deficiencies that are present. To this end, we examined the extent and nature of the inflammatory lesions in different ages of neonatal knockout mice (5, 7, 10, and 14 days of age) and older moribund mice (> 15 days of age) and compared them with the histology seen in wild-type normal animals. Mild inflammatory infiltrates were first observed in 5-day mutant mice in the heart, by day 7 in the lung, salivary gland, and pancreas, and by day 14 inflammatory lesions were found in almost all organs examined. Moderate to severe inflammation was not present until the mice were 10 to 14 days old. In the older animals, there was a slight increase in the severity of the inflammatory lesions as the mice aged. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7856734

  20. An experimental approach to the study of intraocular Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Luxenberg, M N

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study of nematode endophthalmitis due to T canis and review of the literature has been presented. Six owl monkeys were infected either by nasogastric tube using embryonated T canis eggs or by carotid or intravitreal injection of second stage larvae. The clinical manifestations, especially ocular, were observed and various diagnostic tests performed. Only minimal or no intraocular changes were seen after systemic infection but significant abnormalities such as retinal hemorrhages and venous dilation were noted after intravitreal infection. Motile larvae were observed in the lenses of three eyes and in the vitreous of five eyes and, probably a sixth, after intravitreal injection. The intensity and timing of the intraocular reaction seemed to correlate with the infecting dose and apparent disappearance of larvae from the eye. Pathologic confirmation of larvae in the lens was obtained in one eye. A marked inflammatory reaction occurred in eyes receiving intraocular infection but none was seen in eyes with only systemic infectin. Various laboratory and serologic studies were performed, including the ELISA test, which were used to evaluate systemic as well as intraocular responses to infection with T canis. The two monkeys infected by nasogastric tube gave a positive ELISA response in the serum but intraocular fluids gave a negative response in all monkeys including those infected syst:mically and/or intraocularly. Problems in the understanding of clinical aspects of the disease, laboratory diagnosis and treatment are discussed. The need for future experimental studies is emphasized. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 2 D FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 PMID:120993

  1. Dexamethasone inhibits induction of liver tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA and liver growth induced by lead nitrate and ethylene dibromide.

    PubMed Central

    Ledda-Columbano, G. M.; Columbano, A.; Cannas, A.; Simbula, G.; Okita, K.; Kayano, K.; Kubo, Y.; Katyal, S. L.; Shinozuka, H.

    1994-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a single injection of the mitogen lead nitrate to rats induced a rapid increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA in the liver and suggested that this cytokine may be involved in triggering hepatocyte proliferation in this model of direct hyperplasia. In this study, we examined whether a similar induction of liver TNF-alpha mRNA could be observed preceding the onset of hepatocyte proliferation induced by ethylene dibromide, another hepatocyte mitogen. In addition, we used dexamethasone, a well known inhibitor of TNF-alpha production, to determine whether its administration could suppress hepatocyte proliferation induced by lead nitrate and ethylene dibromide. A single intragastric administration of ethylene dibromide (100 mg/kg) to male Wistar rats enhanced liver TNF-alpha mRNA after 4 and 7 hours, which then returned to control levels by 24 hours. TNF-alpha mRNA was detectable only in a nonparenchymal cell fraction of the liver. Pretreatment of rats with a single dose of dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) 60 minutes before lead nitrate (100 mumol/kg) or ethylene dibromide completely abolished the increased levels of liver TNF-alpha mRNA induced by these agents. Inhibition by dexamethasone of TNF-alpha mRNA was associated with an inhibition of liver cell proliferation induced by these mitogens, as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation into hepatic DNA, mitotic index, and DNA content. These results further support the hypothesis that TNF-alpha may be involved in triggering hepatocyte proliferation induced by primary mitogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7943184

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of the surfactant apoprotein and Clara cell antigen in chemically induced and naturally occurring pulmonary neoplasms of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Anderson, L. M.; Kovatch, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The localization of surfactant apoprotein (SAP) and the Clara cell antigen(s) (CCA) was studied in naturally occurring and experimentally induced pulmonary hyperplasias and neoplasms by avidin-biotin peroxidase complex (ABC) immunocytochemistry. Lungs of B6C3F1 and A strain mice with naturally occurring lesions, B6C3F1 mice given injections of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), BALB/c nu/nu or nu/+ mice exposed transplacentally on Day 16 of gestation to ethylnitrosourea (ENU), or BALB/c nu/+ mice exposed to ENU at 8-12 weeks of age were preserved in formalin or Bouin's fixative. After ABC immunocytochemistry, SAP was found in the cytoplasm of normal alveolar Type II cells; in the majority of cells in focal alveolar and solid hyperplasias originating in peribronchiolar or peripheral locations; and in solid, tubular, papillary, and mixed adenomas and carcinomas. The larger mixed-pattern neoplasms and small or large tubular neoplasms usually had the least number of cells with SAP. The majority of large papillary adenomas and carcinomas in BALB/c mice exposed to ENU and in untreated A strain mice contained SAP in the nuclei of many neoplastic cells but only in the cytoplasm of a few neoplastic cells. CCA was found in normal Clara cells of bronchi and bronchioles but not in any hyperplastic or neoplastic lesion of any mouse studied. This study provided immunocytochemical evidence that the vast majority of naturally occurring and experimentally induced pulmonary neoplasms of mice are alveolar Type II cell adenomas and carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3883798

  3. Immunohistochemical demonstration of Clara cell antigen in lung tumors of bronchiolar origin induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine in Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, S.; Takahashi, M.; Ward, J. M.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.; Henneman, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    pulmonary tumors of the hamsters progressed towards a squamoid cell type, CCA was no longer detectable but cells became immunoreactive for keratin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2464284

  4. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, A. M.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Amano, S.; Ebschner, U.; Burgeson, R. E.; Uitto, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC-->G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly healing erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8644730

  5. HIV is trapped and masked in the cytoplasm of lymph node follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tacchetti, C.; Favre, A.; Moresco, L.; Meszaros, P.; Luzzi, P.; Truini, M.; Rizzo, F.; Grossi, C. E.; Ciccone, E.

    1997-01-01

    To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, lymph nodes from seven asymptomatic HIV+ subjects were analyzed during the latent phase of disease. Both ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that, in all of the cases, plasma cells producing IgM/gamma were present in germinal centers. Secreted immunoglobulins formed extracellular deposits mimicking the follicular dendritic cell network. Immunoglobulin produced by germinal center plasma cells are specific for HIV because they bind the HIV env protein gp 120. Plasma cells producing antibodies with the same specificity were also abundant in the extrafollicular regions of lymph nodes. During the latent phase of infection, the virus largely accumulates within the germinal centers. Therefore, extracellular immunoglobulin may form immune complexes, as shown by the presence of HIV-specific antibodies, HIV particles, and complement components C3c, C3d, and C1q in the interdendritic spaces. When the ultrastructural localization of HIV in germinal centers was analyzed, abundant virus particles were found in the interdendritic spaces. In addition to this extracellular localization of HIV, receptor-mediated endocytosis of viral particles by follicular dendritic cells was observed. Complete HIV particles were found within the endosomal compartment of the follicular dendritic cells and, as complete viral particles, free in the cytoplasm, indicating that the virus may escape from the endocytic compartment. As the virus is abundant in the cytoplasm, this event leads to formation of a hidden reservoir within follicular dendritic cells. In this location, HIV escapes recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In contrast, virus budding indicating a productive infection of follicular dendritic cells that would render them susceptible to T-cell-mediated lysis has been seldom observed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9033269

  6. Detailed phenotypic analysis of B-cell lymphoma using a panel of antibodies reactive in routinely fixed wax-embedded tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, A. J.; Isaacson, P. G.

    1987-01-01

    Sixty-three well characterized B-cell lymphomas, with diagnoses previously established by conventional cryostat immunocytochemistry or limited paraffin immunocytochemistry, were studied. The tumors encompassed most of the Kiel subtypes and included the newly recognized entity, sclerosing mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex technique, each tumor was stained with a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies reactive in routinely fixed wax-embedded tissues. The panel included four reagents recognizing probable T-cell and B-cell restricted leukocyte common moieties (UCHL1, MT1, MB1, 4KB5), three antibodies to B-cell-related antigens (KiB3, MB2, LN1), and one to a macrophage-related antigen (Mac411). Other antibodies employed included anti-mu chain, anti-kappa, anti-lambda, and seven antibodies to non-phenotype-associated antigens, including HLA-DR (TAL-1B5, LN3, LN2, MB3), CD15 (C3D-1), and CD30 (BER-H2). Monotypic surface or perinuclear space and cytoplasmic immunoglobulin were detected in 80% of cases. Distinctive immunocytochemical profiles were demonstrable in many tumor categories by means of the panel of antibodies, thus facilitating the differential diagnosis of tumors of similar morphology. These results, together with our work on T-cell lymphoma in paraffin sections, show that accurate phenotypic analysis of lymphoma is now possible in routinely processed tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3113255

  7. Environmental injustice in North Carolina's hog industry.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Cole, D; Grant, G

    2000-01-01

    Rapid growth and the concentration of hog production in North Carolina have raised concerns of a disproportionate impact of pollution and offensive odors on poor and nonwhite communities. We analyzed the location and characteristics of 2,514 intensive hog operations in relation to racial, economic, and water source characteristics of census block groups, neighborhoods with an average of approximately 500 households each. We used Poisson regression to evaluate the extent to which relationships between environmental justice variables and the number of hog operations persisted after consideration of population density. There are 18.9 times as many hog operations in the highest quintile of poverty as compared to the lowest; however, adjustment for population density reduces the excess to 7.2. Hog operations are approximately 5 times as common in the highest three quintiles of the percentage nonwhite population as compared to the lowest, adjusted for population density. The excess of hog operations is greatest in areas with both high poverty and high percentage nonwhites. Operations run by corporate integrators are more concentrated in poor and nonwhite areas than are operations run by independent growers. Most hog operations, which use waste pits that can contaminate groundwater, are located in areas with high dependence on well water for drinking. Disproportionate impacts of intensive hog production on people of color and on the poor may impede improvements in economic and environmental conditions that are needed to address public health in areas which have high disease rates and low access to medical care as compared to other areas of the state. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10706528

  8. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    mutation yet reported in type II procollagen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7741714

  9. The Molecular Basis of Canavan (Aspartoacylase Deficiency) Disease in European Non-Jewish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shaag, A.; Anikster, Y.; Christensen, E.; Glustein, J. Z.; Fois, A.; Michelakakis, H.; Nigro, F.; Pronicka, E.; Ribes, A.; Zabot, M. T.; Elpeleg, O. N.

    1995-01-01

    Canavan disease is an infantile neurodegenerative disease that is due to aspartoacylase deficiency. The disease has been reported mainly in Ashkenazi Jews but also occurs in other ethnic groups. Determination of enzymatic activity for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis is considered unreliable. In the present study, nine mutations were found in the aspartoacylase gene of 19 non-Jewish patients. These included four point mutations (A305E [39.5% of the mutated alleles], C218X [15.8%], F295S [2.6%], and G274R [5.3%]); four deletion mutations (827delGT [5.3%], 870del4 [2.6%], 566del7 [2.6%], and 527del6 [2.6%]); and one exon skip (527del108 [5.3%]). The A305E mutation is pan-European and probably the most ancient mutation, identified in patients of Greek, Polish, Danish, French, Spanish, Italian, and British origin. In contrast, the G274R and 527del108 mutations were found only in patients of Turkish origin, and the C218X mutation was identified only in patients of Gypsy origin. Homozygosity for the A305E mutation was identified in patients with both the severe and the mild forms of Canavan disease. Mutations were identified in 31 of the 38 alleles, resulting in an overall detection rate of 81.6%. All nine mutations identified in non-Jewish patients reside in exons 4–6 of the aspartoacylase gene. The results would enable accurate genetic counseling in the families of 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients, in whom two mutations were identified in the aspartoacylase cDNA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:7668285

  10. Proteoglycans in the microvasculature. I. Histochemical localization in microvessels of the rabbit eye.

    PubMed Central

    Ausprunk, D. H.; Boudreau, C. L.; Nelson, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of ruthenium red (RR) stainable material within small blood vessels located in the limbus of the rabbit eye was studied. Proteoglycans were identified in this material by digesting tissues with Streptomyces hyaluronidase, testicular hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC, or heparinase before ruthenium red staining. Neuraminidase digestion enabled separate identification of sialoglycoprotein. The luminal surface of endothelial cells demonstrates an RR-stained glycocalyx containing both sialoglycoprotein and proteoglycans, which are removed by testicular hyaluronidase and crude heparinase. The basal coat of endothelial cells and small granules (10-20 nm in diameter) located within the basal lamina stain with RR and are removed only by crude heparinase. The surface coat of smooth muscle cells and small granules (10-20 nm) within their basal laminas are also digested by crude heparinase. Large proteoglycan granules (20-50 nm), which are completely removed by testicular hyaluronidase and partially digested by Streptomyces hyaluronidase, are deposited between the connective tissue fibers of the media and adventitia. Other large granules that are attached to collagen fibers contain enzyme-resistant anionic materials. The surface coat of adventitial fibroblasts is removed only by crude heparinase. Thin filaments (3-5 nm in diameter) interconnect the cell coat material, basal lamina granules, and large connective tissue granules, to form a network of proteoglycans that traverses the intima, media, and adventitia. The highly ordered arrangement of proteoglycans in the microvascular wall suggests that these macromolecules play several roles in microvascular function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6165246

  11. Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, A; Ross, J

    1994-01-01

    In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:7948674

  12. Transitional features in human atherosclerosis. Intimal thickening, cholesterol clefts, and cell loss in human aortic fatty streaks.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1993-01-01

    The possible transition from a subset of fatty streaks to fibrous plaques in human atherosclerosis has long been postulated, but transitional features in lesions have rarely been demonstrated. We examined human aortic fatty streaks to determine whether significant tendencies toward intimal thickening and toward deep extracellular lipid deposition might be found. To provide accurate ultrastructural assessment of lipid, tissues were processed by new electron microscopic cytochemical techniques. Unilateral fatty streaks exhibited a 60% increase in intimal thickness when compared to contralateral control tissue. Fat droplets in intimal cells accounted for approximately half of the increase; nonfat portions of cells and extracellular matrix accounted for the remainder. Six of 32 fatty streaks (19%) contained cholesterol clefts, which were found in the musculo-elastic (deep) layer of the intima or in the tunica media. Volume fractions occupied by cells in deep intima were reduced when cholesterol clefts were evident, suggesting loss of cells in early core regions. Light and electron microscopy showed structures consistent with lipid-rich core regions in lesions with cholesterol clefts and in a few lesions without cholesterol clefts. The findings of intimal thickening, core region formation, and disappearance of intimal cells constitute new evidence that some fatty streaks are progressive lesions and sites of eventual fibrous plaque development. The findings also suggest that the lipid-rich core region does not originate primarily from the debris of dead foam cells in the superficial intima, but instead arises from lipids accumulating gradually in the extracellular matrix of the deep intima. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8238260

  13. Ultrastructure of the human aortic fibrolipid lesion. Formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core.

    PubMed Central

    Bocan, T. M.; Schifani, T. A.; Guyton, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core has been elucidated by electron microscopy of the core region in small, raised fibrolipid lesions. The relationship among lipid deposits, extracellular matrix, and cells found in distinct regions of the fibrolipid lesion was examined. Extracellular lipid droplets, verified by osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium staining, made up approximately 40% of the lipid-rich core volume. The lipid droplets were often found distinctly associated with elastin and/or collagen; these associations were dependent upon the location examined within or near the lipid-rich core. Within areas of intense extracellular lipid deposits, crystalline clefts suggesting cholesterol monohydrate were observed. Stereologic analysis of the lipid-rich core components revealed marked reductions in the volume fractions of cells, reticular ground substance, and basement membrane; while the extent of extracellular lipid increased 7-10-fold. Eleven percent or less of lipid in the core region was found within cells, usually smooth muscle cells. Above the core region in the lesion cap, monocyte-macrophage foam cells were prominent. Cellular lipid droplets were much larger (profile diameters sixfold higher) than extracellular droplets. With these data as well as transitional morphologic features at the boundaries of the core region, it is suggested that the abundant extracellular lipid does not derive from cell necrosis, and lipid deposition in association with extracellular matrix constituents is an early event in the development of the lipid-rich core. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3717297

  14. Shape changes of giant liposomes induced by an asymmetric transmembrane distribution of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Farge, E; Devaux, P F

    1992-01-01

    The influence of a phospholipid transmembrane redistribution on the shape of nonspherical flaccid vesicles was investigated at a fixed temperature by optical microscopy. In a first series of experiments, a transmembrane pH gradient was imposed on egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC)-egg phosphatidylglycerol (EPG) (100:1) giant vesicles. The delta pH induced an asymmetric distribution of EPG. Simultaneously, discoid vesicles were transformed into tubular or a series of connected small vesicles. The fraction of phospholipid transfer necessary for a shape change from discoid to two connected vesicles was of the order of 0.1% of the total phospholipids. Additional lipid redistribution was accompanied by a sequence of shape changes. In a second series of experiments, lyso phosphatidylcholine (L-PC) was added to, or subtracted from, the external leaflet of giant EPC vesicles. The addition of L-PC induced a change from discoid to a two-vesicle state without further evolution, suggesting that lipid transfer and lipid addition are not equivalent. L-PC depletion from the outer leaflet generated stomatocyte-like vesicles. Whenever possible, we have determined whether the giant vesicles undergoing shape changes were unilamellar or multilamellar by measuring the elastic area compressibility modulus, K, by the micropipette assay (Kwok and Evans, 1981). Shape transformations triggered by phospholipid modification of the most external bilayer were indeed influenced by the presence of other underlying membranes that played a role comparable to that of a passive cytoskeleton layer. It appears that in real cells, invaginations of the plasma membrane or budding of organelles could be triggered by a phospholipid transfer from one leaflet to the other caused, for instance, by the aminophospholipid translocase which is present in eukaryotic membranes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:1547324

  15. Ultrastructural alterations in allylamine cardiovascular toxicity. Late myocardial and vascular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Boor, P. J.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    The late myocardial and vascular ultrastructural changes in rat hearts following consumption of the cardiovascular toxin allylamine were studied. Rats were given 0.1% allylamine HCl in drinking water for 10-104 days. From 10 to 21 days, there was organization of acute myocardial necrosis by macrophages and scattered polymorphonuclear leukocytes with prominent interstitial-cell proliferation. Alterations at 21-104 days included extensive scarring with formation of dense mature collagen with scattered fibroblasts present, grossly evident left-ventricular aneurysm, and gross and microscopic changes similar to those observed in the secondary form of endocardial fibroelastosis. Areas of scar contained highly cellular foci of smooth-muscle cells, myofibroblasts, and abundant extracellular elastin. Cardiac myocytes frequently showed markedly disorganized myofilaments, bizarrely distorted mitochondria with condensed cristae, and other severe degenerative changes. Small vessels within and adjacent to scar showed proliferation of intimal smooth-muscle cells. Endothelial lesions or recent or organized thrombi were not seen. Focal endocardial metaplasia, consisting of both chondroid and osseous tissue, was found in areas of transmural scarring, or ventricular aneurysm. Chondrocytes had the overall nuclear and cellular morphology, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, and surrounding lacunae typical of mature fibrocartilage. In some areas, the collagen matrix was undergoing calcification with the typical cross-banded pattern of calcifying connective tissue. Osteocytes were located in a densely calcified bone matrix and displayed characteristic cellular extensions into surrounding canaliculi. These findings indicate a severe myocardial, small-vessel, and endocardial injury during the course of chronic allylamine intoxication. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure

  16. Familial cutaneous vasculopathy of German shepherds: clinical, genetic and preliminary pathological and immunological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, J A; Yager, J A; Caswell, J L; Parker, W M; Johnstone, I B; Basrur, P K; Emms, C

    1994-01-01

    A genodermatosis affecting the German shepherd breed has been recognized in 26 dogs in Ontario since 1991. Clinical signs, first noted in young puppies, are manifested as pyrexia and lethargy. The main cutaneous lesions are footpad swelling and depigmentation, but there is also crusting and ulceration of ear tips and tail tips, and focal depigmentation of the nasal planum. Affected puppies show no consistent abnormalities in hematological or biochemical parameters, and immunological tests (antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor titer, immunoglobulin levels, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte percentages) are normal. Bone marrow analysis has shown myeloid hyperplasia in 5 of 7 cases and myelofibrosis has been detected in 1 case. All but 3 of the 19 clinical cases have been strongly positive for platelet factor-3; however, normal puppies routinely develop positive platelet factor-3 tests. Furthermore, affected pups all had normal numbers of platelets on repeat complete blood counts. Light microscopic examination of footpad biopsies reveals a multifocal nodular dermatitis in which neutrophils and mononuclear inflammatory cells surround foci of dermal collagenolysis, and degenerative and inflammatory vessel lesions. Depigmented lesions have a mild, cell-poor, interface dermatitis, characterized by single cell necrosis of the basal cells, in addition to the nodular dermatitis. Similarities and differences between this disease, a condition known as collagen disorder of the footpads of German shepherds and other forms of cutaneous vasculitis in the dog are discussed. The cause and the pathogenesis of the disease are yet to be elucidated; however, pedigree analysis indicates an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9132286

  17. Acute respiratory bronchiolitis: an ultrastructural and autoradiographic study of epithelial cell injury and renewal in rhesus monkeys exposed to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Dungworth, D. L.; Schwartz, L. W.; Tyler, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute respiratory bronchiolitis was examined in rhesus monkeys exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone fpr 4--50 hours. Epithelial injury and renewal was qualitatively and quantitatively characterized by correlated techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by light-microscopic autoradiography following labeling with tritiated thymidine. Extensive degeneration and necrosis of Type 1 epithelial cells occurred on the respiratory bronchiolar wall during the initial 4--12 hours of exposure. Increased numbers of labeled epithelial cells were present in this region after 18 hours of exposure, and the highest labeling index (18% was measured after 50 hours of exposure. Most (67--80%) of the labeled cells and all the mitotic epithelial cells (22) observed ultrastructurally were cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells. Of the labeled epithelial cells, 20--33% were Type 2 epithelial cells. After 50 hours of exposure the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium was hyperplastic. The predominant inflammatory cell in respiratory bronchiolar exudate was the alveolar macrophage. Monkeys that were exposed for 50 hours and allowed to recover in unozonized air for 7 days had incomplete resolution of respiratory bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia. The results indicate that Type 1 epithelial cells lining respiratory bronchioles are the cell type most sensitive to injury and that both cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells and Type 2 epithelial cells function as stem cells in epithelial renewal. Images Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6767409

  18. Cyclin D1 (Bcl-1, PRAD1) protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, W. I.; Zukerberg, L. R.; Motokura, T.; Arnold, A.; Harris, N. L.

    1994-01-01

    Mantle cell (centrocytic) lymphoma (MCL) and occasional cases of B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-SLL/CLL) show a characteristic translocation, t(11:14)(q13;q32) involving rearrangement of the Bcl-1 region. Recently it was shown that the key Bcl-1 region oncogene is cyclin D1/PRAD1; cyclin D1 mRNA was shown to be overexpressed in cases of MCL. We examined cyclin D1 protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive lymphoid hyperplasias using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to cyclin D1 protein. Definite nuclear staining was seen in 15 of 15 MCLs, 1 of 7 B-SLL/CLLs, 0 of 7 reactive hyperplasias, 0 of 10 follicular lymphomas, and 0 of 4 lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue using immunoperoxidase stains on paraffin-embedded sections. Best results were obtained with the affinity-purified polyclonal antibody on microwave-treated, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. MCLs showed diffuse nuclear staining, whereas the one positive B-SLL/CLL showed dot-like or globular nuclear staining. Nuclear cyclin D1 protein can be detected in all cases of MCL and in rare cases of B-SLL/CLL using an immunohistochemical technique on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, and it does not appear to be detectable in reactive hyperplasias and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. This protein may be useful in subclassification of low-grade B-cell lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7518196

  19. Seasonal and spatial variation of the bacterial mutagenicity of fine organic aerosol in southern california.

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, M P; Cass, G R; Lafleur, A L; Busby, W F; Thilly, W G

    1996-01-01

    reactions occur, they likely occur in the winter and spring seasons as well as the photochemically more active summer and early fall periods. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8732954

  20. An age-specific kinetic model of lead metabolism in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, R W

    1993-01-01

    with data on human subjects exposed to lead under a variety of experimental and natural conditions. Images p598-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. D Figure 7. E Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 10. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 11. Figure 12. p613-a PMID:8143593

  1. Application of Advanced Laser Diagnostics to High-Impact Technologies: Science and Applications of Ultrafast, Ultraintense Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    the location of the peak ns spark plasma emission...somewhat different plasma conditions for the same laser spark . The data shown in Figure 4.2.4, Figure 4.2.5, Figure 4.2.6, and Figure 4.2.8 was recorded...symmetric along the propagation axis. The peak plasma emission tends to appear closer to the leading edge of the spark than the trailing edge. With this

  2. Teaching active transport at the turn of the twenty-first century: recent discoveries and conceptual changes.

    PubMed Central

    Inesi, G

    1994-01-01

    The conceptual advances introduced by recent discoveries in the field of active transport have triggered a transition from a "black box" approach to a "mechanistic" approach. At present, treating this subject in the graduate setting requires consideration of equilibrium and kinetic experimentation, protein chemistry, mutational analysis and molecular structure, with the aim of defining the "transport machine." Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8011889

  3. Rehabilitation of the proximal crossed syndrome in an elderly blind patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Henry M

    2000-01-01

    Muscle imbalances play an important role in the development of musculoskeletal complaints that are presented in clinical practice. According to Karel Lewit, muscle imbalance usually precedes recurrent joint dysfunction. Chiropractors are uniquely positioned to recognize and treat such imbalances through low tech rehabilitation techniques. A case report is presented of an elderly blind patient and the challenges involved in the rehabilitation of her proximal crossed syndrome. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  4. Piezocomposites for Active Surface Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-19

    section of 100 mm single layer SmartPanel 3 Figure 4. Preliminary design for 2-layer SmartPanel 3 Figure 5. Baseline SonoPanel configuration 4 Figure 6...baseline SonoPanel design 10 Figure 12. TVR of 100 x 100 mm baseline SonoPanel design 10 Figure 13. FFVS of 250 x 250 mm baseline SonoPanel design ...12 Figure 14. TVR of 250 x 250 mm baseline SonoPanel design 12 Figure15. 100 mm, 250 mm, and 750 mm SonoPanel transducers 13 Figure 16

  5. The Human Factors of Sensor Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    White, 1999).. 3 Figure 2. Revised JDL user model, 2003-2006 (Blasch & Plano , 2003)....................................... 4 Figure 3. The...Figure 2. Revised JDL user model, 2003-2006 (Blasch & Plano , 2003). 2. Purpose of Report The purpose of this report is to provide a general...2. As an example from a military intelligence analyst environment, the six functions associated with this level are (Blasch & Plano , 2003) 1

  6. On pigeons and people: A preliminary look at the columban simulation project

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Simulations of complex human behaviors with pigeons are providing plausible environmental accounts of such behaviors, as well as data-based commentaries on non-behavioristic psychology. Behaviors said to show “symbolic communication,” “insight,” “self-awareness,” and the “spontaneous use of memoranda” have thus far been simulated, and other simulations are in progress. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:22478538

  7. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  8. PULMONARY INFLAMMATORY HYPERINFLATION IN INFANTS

    PubMed Central

    Vaudagna, J. S.; Volpe, F.

    1963-01-01

    In infants less than 3 years old pulmonary hyperinflation can be a clinical and radiological sign of acute pneumonitis. It is an early, nonspecific occurrence in the presence of inflammation. The most reliable radiologic signs include flattening and undulation of the diaphragm, mediastinal elongation and narrowing, and a cardiac outline completely visualized above the diaphragm. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:13996469

  9. Radar Transponder Antenna Systems Evaluation Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Figure 4-10. Haigh - Farr wraparound. .................................................................................. 4-7 Figure 5-1. Area centered...4-10. Haigh - Farr wraparound. 4-3 Figure 4-1. Tecom cavity backed helix. Figure 4-2. Vega cavity backed helix. 4-4 Figure 4-3...band wraparound. Figure 4-10. Haigh - Farr wraparound. 4-8 4.4 Antenna System Design Considerations The following paragraphs describe

  10. PubMed Central

    Mitchell, A. Girard et D.

    1962-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the techniques and equipment used at the Animal Diseases Research Institute, Hull, Que. for the production of specific pathogen-free pigs. From 23 litters delivered by cesarian section, 190 piglets have been reared. Approximately fifty of these animals were used as foundation stock for a minimal disease herd. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17649409

  11. Polymyositis associated with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, S; Dilawari, J B; Sawhney, I M; Dang, N; Radotra, B D; Chawla, Y K

    1993-01-01

    An elderly woman with chronic ulcerative colitis who developed proximal muscle weakness, increased serum creatine phosphokinase activity, and histological and electromyographic abnormalities characteristic of polymyositis is described. Treatment with corticosteroids and 5-acetylsalicylic acid was followed by a remission in bowel symptoms, improvement in muscle power, and reversal of electromyographic changes. An autoimmune link between the two disorders seems likely. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8491410

  12. Imaging of Common Adult Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, Michael K.; Marotta, Thomas R.; TerBrugge, Karel G.; Marotta, Joseph T.

    1991-01-01

    The family physician is often called upon to diagnose a range of adult neurologic disorders. Clinical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies are required to discover their cause. Various imaging modalities can be used to evaluate common adult disorders of the central nervous system. ImagesFigures 1-2Figure 3Figure 4Figures 5-6Figures 7-8Figures 9-11 PMID:21229013

  13. ROUTINE CHOLANGIOGRAPHY DURING OPERATION FOR GALLSTONES

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. C.; Faris, George A.

    1959-01-01

    Cholangiography done routinely during operation was found valuable for detection of stones in the bile ducts. Operation for stone not seen in the operative cholangiogram was seldom necessary. When no stone is demonstrated, it seems proper to spare the patient the additional trauma of common duct exploration. ImagesFigure 1 (Case 1).Figure 2 (Case 1).Figure 3 (Case 2).Figure 4 (Case 3).Figure 5 (Case 5).Figure 6 (Case 6). PMID:13651956

  14. Radiologic Automated Diagnosis (RAD)

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Gordon; Vries, John K.; McLinden, Sean

    1986-01-01

    RAD is a program currently being developed to interpret neuroimages. Given the clinical information usually available on the imaging request, RAD will analyze the scan directly from the data generated by the scanning machine to produce a differential diagnostic list explaining any lesions it discovers. RAD uses a computerized three-dimensional stereotaxic atlas of the nervous system as a model of normal structures in the analysis of scans. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8

  15. Rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine continuously administered at low doses. From basophilic areas of hepatocytes to hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, C.; Klimek, F.; Nogueira, E.

    1991-01-01

    application of some carcinogens at high doses, they are not obligatory precursors of hepatocellular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 PMID:1951631

  16. Products of cells cultured from gliomas. VI. Immunofluorescent, morphometric, and ultrastructural characterization of two different cell types growing from explants of human gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, P. E.; Smith, B. H.; Taren, J. A.; Wahl, R. L.; Kornblith, P. L.; Chronwall, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    cell types may increase our understanding of the mechanism of antigenic changes in gliomas and may provide clues to improved therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:3555104

  17. Syphilis superinfection activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus I in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, C. K.; Hughes, M. A.; Hsu, P. L.; Mahoney, S.; Duvic, M.; Sell, S.

    1991-01-01

    lesions. These results indicate that latent HIV-infection of rabbits may be activated by immunostimulation and that latently HIV-infected rabbits have impaired delayed hypersensitivity reactions. It is hypothesized that true latent HIV-infection in the rabbits is in monocytes and postulated that further immunostimulation may produce infection of lymphocytes and activation of disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1850960

  18. Changing patterns in the management of splenic trauma: the impact of nonoperative management.

    PubMed Central

    Pachter, H L; Guth, A A; Hofstetter, S R; Spencer, F C

    1998-01-01

    of therapy. As a result, 65% of all blunt splenic injuries and select stab wounds can be managed with minimal transfusions, morbidity, or mortality, with a success rate of 98%. Splenectomy, when necessary, continues to be associated with excessive transfusion and an inordinately high postoperative sepsis rate. Images Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:9605662

  19. Expression of fibronectin splicing variants in organ transplantation: a differential pattern between rat cardiac allografts and isografts.

    PubMed Central

    Coito, A. J.; Brown, L. F.; Peters, J. H.; Kupiec-Weglinski, J. W.; van de Water, L.

    1997-01-01

    isografts and provide a foundation for testing their function on leukocytes and a rationale for FN-based therapeutics to modulate allograft rejection in transplant recipients. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9137099

  20. Fish models for environmental carcinogenesis: the rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, G S; Williams, D E; Hendricks, J D

    1996-01-01

    fish models can serve as highly useful adjuncts to conventional rodent models in the study of environmental carcinogenesis and its modulation. For some problems, fish models can provide wholly unique approaches. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. PMID:8722107

  1. A twin study on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S M

    1994-01-01

    ; this included the one dizygotic pair which was discordant for basal laminar drusen. The data of this study strongly suggest a genetic predisposition to AMD. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1 (cont.) FIGURE 2 FIGURE 2 (cont.) FIGURE 2 (cont.) FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 4 FIGURE 4 (cont.) FIGURE 5 FIGURE 5 (cont.) FIGURE 5 (cont.) FIGURE 6 FIGURE 6 (cont.) FIGURE 7 FIGURE 7 (cont.) FIGURE 8 FIGURE 8 (cont.) FIGURE 9 FIGURE 9 (cont.) FIGURE 9 (cont.) FIGURE 10 FIGURE 10 (cont.) FIGURE 11 FIGURE 11 (cont.) FIGURE 11 (cont.) FIGURE 12 FIGURE 12 (cont.) FIGURE 12 (cont.) PMID:7886884

  2. Urinary tract ultrasonography in normal rams and in rams with obstructive urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ueli; Schefer, Ursula; Föhn, Josef

    1992-01-01

    We determined the position, dimensions, and structure of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra in 20 healthy, adult rams by use of ultrasonography. The findings were compared with those of seven rams with obstructive urolithiasis, thus establishing criteria for the diagnosis of urolithiasis via ultrasonography. A 5.0 MHz convex transducer was placed over the right paralumbar fossa to examine the kidneys, and a 5.0 MHz linear rectal transducer was used to examine the bladder and urethra transrectally. All examinations were performed on standing rams. The left kidney had a length of 8.4 ± 0.3 cm (mean ± SD), a width of 4.7 ± 0.3 cm, and a depth of 4.4 ± 0.3 cm. The diameter of the renal sinus of the left kidney was 1.5 ± 0.2 cm. The circumference of the medullary pyramids measured 2.8 ± 0.3 cm. Similar ultrasonographic measurements were obtained for the right kidney. The mean diameter of the bladder of 12 rams was 7.5 ± 2.8 cm. The diameter of the bladder could not be determined in the remaining eight rams because it was greater than 10 cm and therefore beyond the penetration depth of the scanner. The only part of the urethra which could be visualized ultrasonographically was the internal urethral orifice. It had a diameter of 0.2 ± 0.1 cm. Ultrasonographic examination of seven rams with obstructive urolithiasis revealed a markedly dilated urethra and urinary bladder. Due to severe cystitis, the contents of the urinary bladder appeared as multiple, tiny, uniformly distributed echoes. The renal pelvis and medullary pyramids of both kidneys were dilated in four rams. In two rams, uroperitoneum and accumulation of urine in the abdomen were diagnosed via ultrasonography. In one ram this was due to a ruptured ureter and in one to a ruptured bladder. The results of this study indicate that ultrasonography is a useful aid in the diagnosis of obstructive urolithiasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:17424090

  3. Pulmonary toxicity in hamsters of smoke particles from Kuwaiti oil fires.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, J D; Long, N C; Wolfthal, S F; Dumyahn, T; Dockery, D W

    1998-01-01

    long-term effects of exposure to these particles remains unknown, further studies are needed to fully assess the health effects of the Kuwaiti oil fires. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9449679

  4. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    mediator of cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death. Given the role that SMCs normally play in maintaining medial architecture and in arterial wall matrix remodeling, the induction of SMC apoptosis likely makes an important contribution to the evolution of aneurysm degeneration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9060837

  5. The expression of acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins on the surface membrane of different tissues in autoimmune and normal mice which are the target molecules for anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, K H; Liu, W T; Tang, S J; Tsai, C Y; Hsieh, S C; Wu, T H; Han, S H; Yu, C L

    1996-01-01

    damage in patients with SLE. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8778020

  6. Characteristics of Sternberg-Reed, and related cells in Hodgkin's disease: an immunohistological study.

    PubMed Central

    Dorreen, M. S.; Habeshaw, J. A.; Stansfeld, A. G.; Wrigley, P. F.; Lister, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    cytoplasmic staining with PNL. HD cells were negative with all other antibodies. On the basis of these findings, no lineage specificity can confidently be attributed to the HD cell. However, the pattern of immunohistological reactions suggest that it is related to a cell of B follicular origins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:6370286

  7. Human spleen contains phenotypic subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells that occupy discrete microanatomic locations.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, P. J.; Smith, M. R.; Braverman, M. F.; Dickson, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    of functional specialization. Images Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:3307443

  8. Ultrastructure of the myocardium after pulmonary embolism. A study in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cuénoud, H. F.; Joris, I.; Majno, G.

    1978-01-01

    of right-sided failure; it can be correlated with the electrocardiographic abnormalities found in the comparable human condition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 8 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 9 Figure 23 Figure 10 Figure 24 Figure 11 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 12 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:677269

  9. Joshua N Haldeman, DC: the Canadian Years, 1926-1950

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C; Haldeman, Scott

    1995-01-01

    aviator and explorer. Although he died in 1974, the values he instilled in his son, Scott Haldeman, D.C., Ph.D., M.D. continue to influence the profession. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10

  10. Characterization of the human mucin gene MUC5AC: a consensus cysteine-rich domain for 11p15 mucin genes?

    PubMed Central

    Guyonnet Duperat, V; Audie, J P; Debailleul, V; Laine, A; Buisine, M P; Galiegue-Zouitina, S; Pigny, P; Degand, P; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N

    1995-01-01

    To date five human mucin cDNAs (MUC2, 5A, 5B, 5C and 6) mapped to 11p15.3-15.5, so it appears that this chromosome region might contain several distinct gene loci for mucins. Three of these cDNAs, MUC5A, B and C, were cloned in our laboratory and previously published. A common number, 5, was recommended by the Human Gene Mapping Nomenclature Committee to designate them because of their common provenance from human tracheobronchial mucosa. In order to define whether they are products of the same gene locus or distinct loci, we describe in this paper physical mapping of these cDNAs using the strategy of analysis of CpG islands by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The data suggest that MUC5A and MUC5C are part of the same gene (called MUC5AC) which is distinct from MUC5B. In the second part of this work, complete sequences of the inserts corresponding to previously described (JER47, JER58) and novel (JER62, JUL32, MAR2, MAR10 and MAR11) cDNAs of the so-called MUC5AC gene are presented and analysed. The data show that in this mucin gene, the tandem repeat domain is interrupted several times with a subdomain encoding a 130 amino acid cysteine-rich peptide in which the TR3A and TR3B peptides previously isolated by Rose et al. [Rose, Kaufman and Martin (1989) J. Biol. Chem., 264, 8193-8199] from airway mucins are found. A consensus peptide sequence for these subdomains involving invariant positions of most of the cysteines is proposed. The consensus nucleotide sequence of this subdomain is also found in the MUC2 gene and in the MUC5B gene, two other mucin genes mapped to 11p15. The functional significance for secreted mucins of these cysteine-rich subdomains and the modular organization of mucin peptides are discussed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 PMID:7826332

  11. Experimental and clinical observations on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Lakhanpal, V

    1993-01-01

    in such future studies on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 51 figure 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 56 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 FIGURE 67 FIGURE 68 FIGURE 69 PMID:8140705

  12. Regulation of GLUT5 gene expression in rat intestinal mucosa: regional distribution, circadian rhythm, perinatal development and effect of diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, A; Gumá, A; Sevilla, L; Furriols, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    fructose uptake by absorptive enterocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7619068

  13. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System and Head and Neck Lesions, Using a Conformal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy System (Peacock™ System)

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Bernardo, Antonio; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Yakoob, Richard; Al-Ghazi, Matthew; Kuo, Jeffrey; Ammirati, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    . It has been used to treat intracranial, head and neck, and spinal lesions. The option of fractionation, the lack of volume constraint, and the capability of treating intracranial, head and neck, and spinal pathology make stereotactic IMRT a valuable adjunct to established stereotactic radiotherapy systems delivering convergent-beam irradiation using the Linac or Gamma Knife. In a clinical setting that offers Linac, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and conformal stereotactic radiotherapy, the latter may have advantages for treating large (> 25-cm3) and irregular lesions, especially when fractionation is considered useful. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17167610

  14. Fat-storing cells and myofibroblasts are involved in the initial phase of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis in BN/BiRij rats.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, W. F.; Roholl, P. J.; Blauw, B.; van der Ham, F.; van Thiel-De Ruiter, C. F.; Seifert-Bock, I.; Bosma, A.; Knook, D. L.; Brouwer, A.

    1994-01-01

    fibrosis, d+ sma+ myofibroblasts remained localized in the fibrotic septa, but now along their outer edge. The majority of the cells in the septa were formed by d- sma- cells indicating a prominent role of fibroblasts in the septal formation. Septal fibroblasts are not only likely to produce matrix components, but also were shown to degrade collagen, as evidenced by the increased number of collagen-containing vacuoles during the course of fibrosis. In conclusion, myofibroblasts and FSC appear to be the main cell types involved in the initial phase of liver fibrogenesis induced by CCl4. Both myofibroblasts and FSC divide and transform.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8199005

  15. Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for fulminant hepatitis. The Paul Brousse experience.

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, H; Azoulay, D; Samuel, D; Reynes, M; Grimon, G; Majno, P; Castaing, D

    1996-01-01

    procedure, auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation may not be as effective in arresting the progression of neurologic damage. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:8968226

  16. Dephosphorylation of cofilin in stimulated platelets: roles for a GTP-binding protein and Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, M M; Haslam, R J

    1994-01-01

    -binding protein or Ca2+. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8037689

  17. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    a newly recognized, often fatal disease, with a spectrum of microscopic morphological changes, which may be an important cause of severe and fatal illness presenting as adult respiratory distress syndrome. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15 PMID:7887439

  18. Expression of the constitutive and inducible forms of heat shock protein 70 in human proximal tubule cells exposed to heat, sodium arsenite, and CdCl(2).

    PubMed Central

    Somji, S; Todd, J H; Sens, M A; Garrett, S H; Sens, D A

    1999-01-01

    protein does not result from the transcription of a single gene, but is derived from what may be a complex interplay of several underlying genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10544156

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of P-selectin in intact platelets and in a disulphide-linked complex with immunoprecipitated pp60c-src.

    PubMed Central

    Modderman, P W; von dem Borne, A E; Sonnenberg, A

    1994-01-01

    Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7514867

  20. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  1. Acquired color vision loss and a possible mechanism of ganglion cell death in glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Nork, T M

    2000-01-01

    FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:11190032

  2. Collagenase-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-13) expression is induced in oral mucosal epithelium during chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, V. J.; Airola, K.; Vaalamo, M.; Johansson, N.; Putnins, E. E.; Firth, J. D.; Salonen, J.; López-Otín, C.; Saarialho-Kere, U.; Kähäri, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    due to exposure to cytokines and collagen. Thus, it is likely that MMP-13 expression is instrumental in the subepithelial collagenolysis and local invasion of the activated mucosal epithelium into the connective tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9626053

  3. Dynamic redistribution of major platelet surface receptors after contact-induced platelet activation and spreading. An immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, N.; Guichard, J.; Breton-Gorius, J.

    1992-01-01

    colocalization of Fg and TSP, GPIV and TSP, as well as Fg and GPIIb-IIIa, although no typical coclustering of GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV or GPIIb-IIIa and p24 was apparent. Our results further suggest that 1) on surface activated adherent platelets, not all GPIIb-IIIa molecules become competent to bind Fg, 2) GPIa-IIa is not anchored to the platelet membrane skeleton, and 3) during the early stage of platelet activation, a communication exists between the alpha granules and the platelet surface. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1309961

  4. Thallium 201 Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    McKillop, James H.

    1980-01-01

    patients with suspected or established acute myocardial infarction. Imaging of organs other than the heart with 201TI has received much less attention but has been reported in patients with peripheral vascular disease and various primary and secondary neoplasms. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7222645

  5. A comparative clinicopathologic study of endogenous mycotic endophthalmitis: variations in clinical and histopathologic changes in candidiasis compared to aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Hidayat, A

    2000-01-01

    areas of deep retinitis/choroiditis. Contrary to the findings in Candida endophthalmitis, vitreous biopsy may not yield positive results in aspergillosis. Aspergillus endophthalmitis is usually associated with a high rate of mortality caused by cerebral and cardiac complications. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:11190022

  6. Antibodies to glycolipids activate complement and promote proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Susani, M.; Schulze, M.; Exner, M.; Kerjaschki, D.

    1994-01-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis is an experimental rat model of human membranous nephropathy induced by injection of antisera against crude renal cortical fractions such as Fx1A or rat tubular microvilli. This results in the formation of subepithelial immune deposits, the activation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement, and severe proteinuria. While the formation of immune deposits is attributed to in situ immune complex formation with antibodies specific for the gp330-Heymann nephritis antigenic complex (HNAC), activation of complement and proteinuria appear to be caused by at least one additional antibody species present in anti-Fx1A sera. We have separated by affinity absorption polyspecific antisera against Fx1A and rat microvilli into one IgG fraction directed specifically against microvillar proteins (anti-Fx1A-prot) and another IgG fraction specific for glycolipids (ant-Fx1A-lip) of tubular microvilli. When injected into rats, the anti-Fx1A-prot fraction induced immune deposits but failed to activate complement or produce proteinuria, similar to results obtained with affinity-purified anti-gp330 IgG. When the antibodies of the anti-Fx1A-lip fraction were injected alone they did not bind to glomeruli. By contrast, when the IgGs specific for the Fx1A-prot fraction (or for gp330-HNAC) were combined with those directed against the Fx1A-lip glycolipid preparation, immune deposits were formed, in situ complement activation was observed, and also proteinuria was induced. It is concluded that within anti-Fx1A and anti-microvillar sera there are at least two IgG fractions of relevance for the development of PHN: one directed against the gp330-HNAC complex which is responsible for the development of immune deposits, and a second specific for glycolipid antigen(s) which activate(s) the complement cascade. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8160779

  7. The response of the macaque tracheobronchial epithelium to acute ozone injury. A quantitative ultrastructural and autoradiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. W.; Plopper, C. G.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    important participants in the repair of chemically injured airway epithelium; stratification and increased amounts of cytoplasmic filament bundles and desmosomal attachments, rather than being evidence of squamous metaplasia or dysplastic change, might be stereotypic responses of airway epithelium to injury; and the ciliated cell population becomes less susceptible to ozone-induced necrosis with continuing exposure. Images Figure 21 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 26 Figure 27 PMID:6540523

  8. Cellular pathology of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed Central

    Buja, L. M.; Kovanen, P. T.; Bilheimer, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 24 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 22 Figure 23 PMID:118674

  9. Constitution and behavior of follicular structures in the human anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Ciocca, D. R.; Puy, L. A.; Stati, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    The follicular structures present in the human pituitary gland were studied, at the light-microscopic level, using histochemical and immunocytochemical techniques. The antisera applied in the peroxidase-antiperoxidase procedure were anti-hFSH beta, anti-hLH beta, anti-hPRL, anti-hGH, anti-hTSH beta, anti-hLPH beta, anti-pACTH, and anti-hACTH. In the 10 normal pituitaries examined, follicles were always found in the three areas of the adenohypophysis. The wall of the pars distalis follicles showed the seven immunoreactive cell types studied, while follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) cells were the only ones present in the wall of the pars tuberalis follicles. Most of the cell types studied were also present in the wall of the intermediate area follicles, but these follicles had characteristics not found in the other two areas. They were very large, with frequent interconnections forming a three-dimensional network of anastomotic cavities, and the colloid had different histochemical affinity. None of the hormones studied could be detected by immunocytochemistry within the follicular colloid. Three of the ten pituitary adenomas examined showed numerous follicular structures. Some of the follicles in the adenomatous pituitaries were similar to those found in the normal adenohypophysis, but there were also follicles filled with only traces of colloid and numerous blood cells in the cavity, and follicles filled with neoformed connective tissue. In one of these cases, FSH/LH immunoreactive adenoma cells were seen in the wall of the follicles. The results obtained suggest that the finding of pituitary adenomas with follicular structures is not uncommon and that the follicles originate from the tumor cells. In addition, the follicles seem to have several functional stages, explaining the finding of different types of follicular formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11

  10. Regression analysis of time trends in perinatal mortality in Germany 1980-1993.

    PubMed Central

    Scherb, H; Weigelt, E; Brüske-Hohlfeld, I

    2000-01-01

    should be interpreted with caution, and further independent evidence should be sought. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10656857

  11. Specific and Abundant Secretion of a Novel Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoprotein from Salt-Adapted Winged Bean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Esaka, Muneharu; Hayakawa, Hiromi; Hashimoto, Mami; Matsubara, Naomi

    1992-01-01

    Winged bean callus was adapted to increasing concentrations of NaCl by sequential transfer to medium with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% (w/v) NaCl. When the culture media, after cell suspension cultures of callus adapted to 0.5 (SA-0.5), 1.0 (SA-1.0), 1.5 (SA-1.5), or 2.0% (w/v) NaCl (SA-2.0), were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, six specific or enhanced polypeptide bands (SAP1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and -6) were observed. SAP1, with a molecular weight of 84,000, was abundantly secreted in suspension cultures of SA-1.0 and SA-1.5, and was observed as the most striking polypeptide band. The SAP1 yield was about 4 mg/g cells fresh weight. SAP1 was abundantly secreted after the suspension culture of SA-1.0 in the presence of AlCl3, but little was secreted in the presence of KCl, LiCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, mannitol, sucrose, or abscisic acid. SAP1 was purified from the culture medium after suspension culture of SA-1.0 in the presence of 1.0% (w/v) NaCl. Two steps, ammonium sulfate fractionation and CM-cellulose chromatography, were sufficient for purification to homogeneity. Finally, about 5 mg of SAP1 could be isolated from 7 g of fresh callus cells. Of the amino-terminal 32 amino acid residues of SAP1, 10 and 5 were found to be hydroxyproline and proline, respectively. SAP1 on an acrylamide gel was stained by the periodic acid-Schiff method. It is interesting that SAP1 has pentahydroxyproline blocks (Hyp5) instead of tetrahydroxyproline blocks (Hyp4) common to many hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins in dicotyledons. Thus, this novel hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein was shown to be abundantly secreted from NaCl-adapted winged bean cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16653126

  12. Canine cutaneous histiocytoma is an epidermotropic Langerhans cell histiocytosis that expresses CD1 and specific beta 2-integrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Schrenzel, M. D.; Affolter, V. K.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1996-01-01

    further the understanding of LC proliferative disorders, particularly the self-limiting, cutaneous form of human LC histiocytosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8623937

  13. Localization of keratin mRNA in human tracheobronchial epithelium and bronchogenic carcinomas by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Obara, T.; Baba, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Fuchs, E.; Resau, J. H.; Trump, B. F.; Klein-Szanto, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    keratinization markers of human tracheobronchial epithelial lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2454581

  14. Personal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel vapors and exhaust at air force bases.

    PubMed Central

    Pleil, J D; Smith, L B; Zelnick, S D

    2000-01-01

    equipment that optimize risk reduction without undue impact on a mission. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10706522

  15. Microtubule coils versus the surface membrane cytoskeleton in maintenance and restoration of platelet discoid shape.

    PubMed Central

    White, J. G.; Rao, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    in combination with taxol, inhibited the cold-induced shape change but not dilation of the open canalicular system. Rewarming eliminated open canalicular system dilation and restored lentiform appearance. The results indicate that microtubule coils are the major structural elements responsible for disc shape and its restoration after submaximal stimulation or rewarming of chilled platelets. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:9466587

  16. High-level expression and in vitro mutagenesis of a fibrillogenic 109-amino-acid C-terminal fragment of Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gardella, J E; Gorgone, G A; Candela, L; Ghiso, J; Castaño, E M; Frangione, B; Gorevic, P D

    1993-01-01

    We amplified DNA encoding the 3' 109 codons of Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) inclusive of the beta protein (A beta) and cytoplasmic domains from cDNA using oligonucleotide primers designed to facilitate cloning into the T7 expression vector pT7Ad23K13. We also modified this construct to generate recombinant molecules incorporating two recently described APP mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. Both native C109 (deletion construct inclusive of the C-terminal 109 residues of APP) and constructs with a single mutation at codon 642 (T-->G, resulting in a substitution of glycine for valine) or a double mutation at codons 595 (G-->T, substituting asparagine for lysine) and 596 (A-->C, substituting leucine for methionine) were expressed in Escherichia coli to levels of 5-20% of total bacterial protein after induction. The major constituent of expressed C109 protein had an apparent molecular mass of 16-18 kDa by SDS/PAGE and appeared to be the full-length construct by size and N-terminal microsequencing. Also present was a 4-5 kDa species that co-purified with C109, constituting only approximately 1% of expressed protein, which was revealed by Western-blot analysis with antibodies specific for A beta epitopes and after biotinylation of purified recombinant C109. This fragment shared N-terminal sequence with, and appeared to arise by proteolysis of, full-length C109 in biosynthetic labelling experiments. C109 spontaneously precipitated after dialysis against NaCl or water, and with prolonged (> 20 weeks) standing was found by electron microscopy to contain a minor (< 5%) fibrillar component that was reactive with antibodies to a C-terminal epitope of APP. Recombinant C109 appears to duplicate some of the biochemical and physicochemical properties of C-terminal A beta-inclusive fragments of APP that have been found in transfected cells, brain cortex and cerebral microvessels. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID

  17. Electron-microscopic analysis of nephroblastomas induced transplacentally in the IIIVO/J rabbit by a single dose of N-ethylnitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, G. C.; Fox, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    fascicles, in most cases, consisted of thin, basement-membrane-invested ribbons of attenuated cells enclosing small lumens sealed by intercellular junctions, suggestive of abortive tubule formation. Tumor cells disposed in fascicles therefore conformed to the same epithelial lineage as the other neoplastic components of these tumors. In contrast, cellular elements of the fibrocollagenous stroma--namely, fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells, and scattered mononuclear inflammatory cells--could be clearly discriminated from the various tumor cell components on morphologic grounds, constituting a host reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 p245-a Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6093544

  18. Biosynthesis, surface expression and function of the fibronectin receptor after rat liver cell transformation to tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Decastel, M; Doyennette-Moyne, M A; Gouet, E; Aubery, M; Codogno, P

    1993-01-01

    . Furthermore, both the abnormal mature 130-kDa and precursor 100-kDa beta 1-subunits were detected on the surface of Zajdela hepatoma cells, associated with the alpha 5-subunit. The relationship between these structural alterations in the fibronectin receptor and the impaired Zajdela hepatoma cell binding to soluble fibronectin or to a coated fibronectin matrix that was observed in this study is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8471041

  19. Run-down of the GABAA response under experimental ischaemia in acutely dissociated CA1 pyramidal neurones of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Harata, N; Wu, J; Ishibashi, H; Ono, K; Akaike, N

    1997-01-01

    1. The effect of experimental ischaemia on the response to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was assessed in acutely dissociated CA1 pyramidal neurones of rats, using the patch-clamp technique. 2. Rapid application of 3 x 10(-5) M GABA induced a bicuculline-sensitive inward Cl- current (IGABA) at a holding potential (Vh) of -44 mV. The peak amplitude of IGABA showed a time-dependent decrease (run-down) when it was recorded with the conventional whole-cell mode without internal ATP. The run-down was not observed when the intracellular ATP concentration ([ATP]i) was maintained by the nystatin-perforated recording with an intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) of 0 mM. 3. When [Na+]i was increased to more than 30 mM, the IGABA run-down was observed even with the nystatin-perforated recording. 4. The IGABA run-down observed at 60 mM [Na+]i with the nystatin method was further enhanced under experimental ischaemia without changes in the reversal potential of IGABA. The enhanced run-down was suppressed by application of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase inhibitors, ouabain and SPAI-1. 5. IGABA run-down during ischaemia was also accompanied by an outward holding current and a concomitant increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in 48.5% of the neurones. The outward current was a Ca(2+)-activated K+ current, which was blocked by 3 x 10(-7) M charybdotoxin. 6. In the inside-out mode of the single-channel analysis, GABA activated three subconductance states with conductances of 33.4, 22.7 and 15.2 pS. Reduction of ATP concentration from 2 to 0 mM on the intracellular side suppressed the channel activities, while an increase in Ca2+ concentration from 0.7 x 10(-9) to 1.1 x 10(-6) M had no effect. 7. These results suggest that ischaemia induces the run-down of the postsynaptic GABA response at the GABAA receptor level, and that this run-down is triggered by a decrease in [ATP]i. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9161985

  20. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  1. Immunolocalization of SPARC, tenascin, and thrombospondin in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, C.; Mason, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    results are consistent with a role for SPARC in fibroblast migration. TN may function in both fibroblast migration and the adhesion of metaplastic bronchial-type epithelium. However, these proteins also have other activities that may be important in pulmonary fibrosis. The localization of thrombospondin 1 suggests that it may be synthesized by regenerating epithelium where it may aid in the adhesion or migration of the epithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7495300

  2. Brain and Optic System Pathology in Hypocholesterolemic Dogs Treated with a Competitive Inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Berry, P. H.; MacDonald, J. S.; Alberts, A. W.; Molon-Noblot, S.; Chen, J. S.; Lo, C.-Y. L.; Greenspan, M. D.; Allen, H.; Durand-Cavagna, G.; Jensen, R.; Bailly, Y.; Delort, P.; Duprat, P.

    1988-01-01

    evidence of drug induced adverse effects in the CNS of dogs given up to 30 mg/kg/day lovastatin for 2 years. ImagesFigure 7Figure 10Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:3414776

  3. Eduard Jaeger's Test-Types (Schrift-Scalen) and the historical development of vision tests.

    PubMed Central

    Runge, P E

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Eduard Jaeger's original Test-Types were carefully evaluated: (1) to determine whether Jaeger had maintained a consistent standard, (2) to establish the correct Snellen equivalent for Jaeger's Test-Types, (3) to answer the question of why and how the standard was lost, and (4) to compare the visual angle of optotypes to lines of continuous text. METHODS: All original Viennese editions of Jaeger's Test-Types, as well as first generation United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US) versions, were evaluated. Data were collected objectively using a microruler with a 20X loupe and subjectively using a laser distance-measuring device. The data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. All previous measurements of Jaeger's Test-Types, objective and subjective, collected over the past 133 years were compared to the current data and to each other. RESULTS: The correct Snellen equivalent of Jaeger's Test-Types was determined. The visual angle created from the measurement of the height of lowercase letters, without ascenders or descenders, provides an accurate method of assigning a visual angle of a line of continuous text. Comparing the typefaces used in printing first generation UK and US versions of Jaeger's Test-Types to the Viennese editions provided an explanation for the absence of a consistent standard for Jaeger's Test-Types today. CONCLUSIONS: All 10 versions of Jaeger's original Test-Types are virtually identical and established a gold standard for reading vision tests. Jaeger's standard was lost when his Test-Types were first printed in the UK and the US using local typefaces. The Jaeger standard has been re-established. Visual angles determined using continuous text are comparable to those obtained by using optotypes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7C FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19A FIGURE 19B p409-a FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE

  4. Response of cardiac myocytes to a ramp increase of diacylglycerol generated by photolysis of a novel caged diacylglycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, X P; Sreekumar, R; Patel, J R; Walker, J W

    1996-01-01

    FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9172772

  5. Induction of a reversible cardiac lipidosis by a dietary long-chain fatty acid (erucic acid). Relationship to lipid accumulation in border zones of myocardial infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    Chien, K. R.; Bellary, A.; Nicar, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Buja, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cardiac myocytes in the border zone of acute myocardial infarction become markedly overloaded with neutral lipid during the transition from reversible to irreversible injury. To examine directly the role of these changes in neutral lipid metabolism in the development of irreversible cellular injury and associated increases in tissue Ca2+ content, the authors fed rats large amounts of a fatty acid (erucic acid) that is poorly oxidized by the heart and that subsequently accumulates as neutral lipid. Rats fed a high erucic acid (C22:1) diet in the form of 20% rapeseed oil for 3-5 days had a fourfold increase in triglyceride (49.5 +/- 3.8 SEM mg/g wet wt versus 13.6 +/- 13, n = 4) and a 60% increase in long-chain acyl CoA content (166.0 +/- 21.9 versus 91.5 +/- 9.0 nM/g wet wt, n = 4), compared with controls. However, there was no change in long-chain acyl carnitine or total phospholipid content. Histochemical studies showed accumulation of numerous lipid droplets in the myocytes, and electron microscopy revealed localization of lipid vesicles in direct contact with mitochondria, thus mimicking the lipid-laden cells in the border zone regions of acute myocardial infarcts. The acute lipidosis was reversible with either continued feeding of erucic acid for several weeks or conversion to a normal diet. It was not associated with an increased tissue Ca2+ content, nor with cell necrosis. However, continued erucic acid intake for 3 months was associated with focal myocardial degeneration and loss of myocytes. These results suggest that acute increases in neutral lipids, as found in the border zone of acute myocardial infarction, may not be the cause of progression to irreversible damage during acute myocardial injury, but that the persistent presence of similar lipid material over months may result in focal myocardial degeneration. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6859230

  6. Mouse bronchiolar cell carcinogenesis. Histologic characterization and expression of Clara cell antigen in lesions induced by N-nitrosobis-(2-chloroethyl) ureas.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, S.; Lijinsky, W.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    neoplastic lesions. N-nitroso-methyl-bis-chloroethylurea- and NTCU-induced mouse bronchiolar cell alterations could be an interesting new model to study mechanisms of bronchiolar cell differentiation and tumor formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:1651059

  7. "Viable motheaten," a new allele at the motheaten locus. I. Pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, L. D.; Coman, D. R.; Bailey, C. L.; Beamer, W. G.; Sidman, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    spermatogenesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6380298

  8. A sequential treatment regimen with melatonin and all-trans retinoic acid induces apoptosis in MCF-7 tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eck, K. M.; Yuan, L.; Duffy, L.; Ram, P. T.; Ayettey, S.; Chen, I.; Cohn, C. S.; Reed, J. C.; Hill, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    together, the results suggest that use of an appropriate regimen of melatonin and atRA should be considered for preclinical and clinical evaluation against ER-positive human breast cancer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9649124

  9. 4A11, a monoclonal antibody recognizing a novel antigen expressed on aberrant vascular endothelium. Upregulation in an in vivo model of contact dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Nickoloff, B. J.; Holgersson, J.; Seed, B.; Haines, G. K.; Burrows, J. C.; Leibovich, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    glycolipids. The presence of the novel 4A11 antigen in inflamed and malignant tissues containing many blood vessels and its differential upregulation in allergic contact dermatitis may signify an important function for this antigen in the inflammatory process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8311112

  10. In situ microscopic analysis of asbestos and synthetic vitreous fibers retained in hamster lungs following inhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, R A; Antonini, J M; Brismar, H; Lai, J; Hesterberg, T W; Oldmixon, E H; Thevenaz, P; Brain, J D

    1999-01-01

    retention and also fiber lengths and burdens in good agreement with ashing/SEM results. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10210692

  11. Regulation of local host-mediated anti-tumor mechanisms by cytokines: direct and indirect effects on leukocyte recruitment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M.; McCormick, K. L.; Volker, K.; Ortaldo, J. R.; Wigginton, J. M.; Brunda, M. J.; Wiltrout, R. H.; Fogler, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    recruitment and activation of host effector cells. Moreover, this model provides a unique opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) underlying both tumor angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment to metastatic lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9137109

  12. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-01-01

    screening method will be useful to screen environmental chemicals for their antiaromatase activity and for their interaction with androgen receptor. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10544151

  13. Compilation of 1993 Annual Reports of the Navy ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 3. Tabs G-I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    1 3 4 liT Research Institute 10 West 35th Street Chicago, Illinois 60616-3799 "Statement A, unlimited" E Printed in the United States of America This... 4 Figure 3 . Mean number of species and individuals observed/500 m transect in treatment and control study areas during spring migration 1986 to...Haradem et al. 1989). Breeding and migrating birds - 4 - T 1 M 95 %, , I TI T 3 C h a n n ng P, Ip h ’ T5 Figure 2. Location of control (Cl to C5) and

  14. Blackboard Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    The Blackboard Model 4 Figure 1-2 Solving Jigsaw Puzzles 5 Figure 1-3: Finding Koalas 7 Figure 1-4.: Koalas : Blackboard Structure and Knowledge Sources...example. This time let us consider another hypothetical problem, that of finding koalas in a eucalyptus forest (see Figure 1-3). Imagine yourself in...Australia. One of the musts if you are a tourist is to go and look for koalas in their natural habitat. So, you go to a koala preserve and start looking

  15. Assessment of Aerothermodynamic Flight Prediction Tools through Ground and Flight Experimentation (Evaluation des outils aerothermodynamiques de prediction de vol par l’experimentation au sol et en vol)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    1.2 SCEBD Super Catalytic Baldwin- Lomax TAU-Code Structured 1 Mio. Cells (as Level 1/LORE), or Solution Adaptive, Hybrid /Unstructured 4 Mio...the structured Level 1 (1Mio cells ) meshes identical to the LORE meshes were used for both points in time, for the 4800 s case a hybrid /unstructured...AS-202 6-4 Figure 6-4 Locations of Calorimeters on AS-202 Conical Afterbody 6-5 Figure 6-5 Hybrid TAU-Code CFD Grid for the AS-202 Flight Test

  16. Current Status of Prosthetic Cardiac Valves

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Wilfred M.; Wareham, Ellsworth E.

    1967-01-01

    The majority of patients with acquired valvular heart disease have severe damage to valves which is not amenable to repair but can now be treated by valve replacement with an acceptable mortality and morbidity. The caged ball or disc valve is widely used and is proving clinically satisfactory for cardiac valve replacement. Thromboembolism is the significant complication. With improvement in technique the incidence of infection, detachment and other complications has been reduced. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:6039188

  17. Measuring Sleep by Wrist Actigraph.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    4 FIGURES 1 AND 2 5-7 FIGURE 3 8 EXPERIMENT 3: TRANSDUCER ORIENTATION 9 EXPERIMENT 4: TRANSDUCER PLACEMENT 9 FIGURE 4 10 FIGURE 5 11 EXPERIMENT 5...FIGURE 9 23 SLEEP RECOGNITION SOFTWARE 24 ASSESSMENT OF VALIDATION 25 TABLE 3 26 FIGURE 10 27 TABLE 4 28 HARDWARE SPECIFICATIONS OF A WRIST-WEARABLE...4.4 z 1.7 ca) and connected .e "he our channels of a Medilog recorder. line subjects completed o" 9 ., .o_ _ TRANSDUCER - ACCELER -OMETER 5SOC Figure 4

  18. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Demonstration of the muscle type of intermediate filament protein, desmin, as a diagnostic aid.

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, M.; Lehto, V. P.; Badley, R. A.; Virtanen, I.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of soft-tissue sarcomas with the characteristic histologic features of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, but lacking cytoplasmic cross-striations, were studied ultrastructurally and immunohistochemically to confirm the diagnosis and evaluate the histogenesis. The results showed that it was not possible to judge the skeletal muscle derivation of the cells at the ultrastructural level. However, immunohistochemically, the results of every case were positive for desmin-the muscle type of the intermediate filament protein. The results suggest that demonstration of desmin may be a helpful adjunct tool in the diagnosis of poorly differentiated alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6765734

  19. TINEA CAPITIS DUE TO TRICHOPHYTON TONSURANS—Incidence, Diagnosis and Epidemiology in the San Francisco Bay Region

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Herbert L.; Halde, Carlyn

    1955-01-01

    Eighty-five cases of tinea capitis due to T. tonsurans were observed in the San Francisco Bay area during the five years 1950-54. This disease, unlike the common microsporum infections, sometimes affects adults and adolescents. Hairs infected with T. tonsurans do not fluoresce under the Wood's light. Diagnosis is a laboratory procedure in which the fungus is isolated from the hair. There are three clinical varieties of the disease. The course is prolonged and treatment is unsatisfactory. The disease apparently has spread from Mexico, through the Southwest and Southern California. Control is difficult. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 4. PMID:13260935

  20. Collaborative Research and Development (CR&D). Task Order 0061: Modeling Complex Structural Geometry and Process Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    a Titanium and Gamma-TiAl Alloy, JOM, September 2005, 50-54 4 Chapter 1 [ref3] Caton, M.J., Jha, S.K., Larsen, J.M., Rosenberger, A.H., TMS...Figure 5: Notch 3 strain distribution at 900MPa 25 Chapter 3 Figure 6 : Notch 3 inverse pole figure of local microstructure. Figure 7: Notch 4 ...showing the local grain structure Figure 6 : Local strain distribution at 986MPa calculated from 36 Chapter 4 Figure 7: Secondary electron

  1. Canine Distemper Viral Inclusions in Blood Cells of Four Vaccinated Dogs

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Bruce G.; Adams, Pamela S.; Cornell, William D.; Elkins, A. Darrel

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of canine distemper were detected by the presence of numerous cytoplasmic inclusions in various circulating blood cells. Fluorescent antibody techniques and electron microscopy confirmed the identity of the viral inclusions. The cases occurred in the same geographic area and within a short time span. All four dogs had been vaccinated against canine distemper, but stress or other factors may have compromised their immune status. The possibility of an unusually virulent virus strain was also considered. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17422596

  2. Comprehensive Monitoring Program: Final Biota Annual Report for 1989. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Results for Soils at CMP-BSA 12 Staked Sites Table 3.1- 3 Summary of 1989 Contaminant Monitoring Field Program Table 3.1- 4 Selection Criteria for RMA...RMA in 1989 3 Table 4.2- 3 Endrin Statistical Results for Aquatic Species on RMA in 1989 Table 4.2- 4 DDT Statistical Results for Aquatic Species on RMA...Figure 3.2-2 Biota Sampling Location, Staked Site BS3- 4 Figure 3.2- 3 CMP-BSA 1, RMA Figure 3.2- 4 CMP-BSA 2, RMA 3 Figure 3.2-5 CMP-BSA 3 , RMA Figure

  3. Mesoporous Nitrogen Doped Carbon-Glass Ceramic Cathode for High Performance Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2012 Conference Proceedings Postprint 01 June 2012 – 01 June 2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE MESOPOROUS NITROGEN... 3 , a solid-state lithium-oxygen cell with a 2 cm2 area was fabricated (Figure 4 ). Figure 4 . Photograph of a Solid-State lithium-oxygen...0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Vo lta ge (V ) Cell Capacity (mA.h) 1 2 3 Figure 5. Discharge profiles for a lithium-oxygen cell at 75 C

  4. PubMed Central

    Breton, L.; Bonneau, N. H.; Beauregard, M.

    1984-01-01

    An osteosarcoma of the femoral diaphysis associated with the presence of a bone plate in a dog A bone tumor which developed in the middle third of the left femur of an Irish Setter, seven years after a metallic plate had been used to reduce a fracture, is described. Through radiographs, the tumor was found to involve the diaphysis of the bone. The histopathology revealed that it was an osteosarcoma. Spontaneous and induced osteosarcomas are compared, and the possible correlation between the development of a tumor of this nature and the use of orthopedic implants is discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17422477

  5. Cell-Mediated Immunity and Its Role in Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Edward J.; Remington, Jack S.

    1977-01-01

    The recently acquired knowledge of the importance of cell-mediated immunity in many illnesses and the discovery of a variety of substances that can restore certain cell-mediated immune functions has served to focus the attention of physicians on this area of immunity. It is important for practicing physicians to have a clear understanding of current knowledge of the role of cell-mediated immunity in resistance to infection and how this arm of the immune system relates to the diagnosis and therapy of infectious diseases. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:318786

  6. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  7. Pleural Empyema in Infants and Children: Analysis of 298 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebayo O.; Adejuyigbe, O.; Taiwo, O. O.

    1984-01-01

    Of 298 infants and children with empyema thoracis seen, 62 percent were under 2 years of age. The majority of the cases had underlying pulmonary infection, and Staphylococcus aureus was dominant among the organisms isolated. The diagnosis was made in all cases on the basis of chest x-ray films and thoracentesis. Full expansion of the lung and resolution of the underlying pneumonia occurred on administration of appropriate antibiotics and catheter drainage in all cases except in two patients who had decortication. The mortality rate was 5 percent; delayed presentation and suboptimal prehospitalization antibiotics influenced the morbidity. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:6471117

  8. Occurrence and Effects of High Temperature Stress in Rations Stored in Container Vans: A Comparison with Storage Studies in the 1950s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    appropriate decreases in reflectance with certain TTis. Significant decreases in sensory qualities of color and other attributes in rations were noted...Proving Ground.. 41 Appendix B Container Van Codes, Time-Temperature labels ..••.•.... 45 iv Figure 1. Figure 2 . Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5...30 Top carton vs Ambient Air, Weekly Mean Temperatures (Dr) .••.•••••.••.••••.•••••••••..••• 31 Color Values of Ration

  9. Management of chemical burns of the canine cornea

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Significant clinical signs and general principles of treatment for chemical burns of the canine cornea are presented using three typical case studies for illustration. Alkali burns are more common in dogs than acid burns. The sources of alkali in this study were soap, cement, and mortar dust. Common signs of chemical burns are ocular pain, corneal ulceration, tear film inadequacy, corneal edema, and marked corneal neovascularity. Successful treatment requires thorough ocular lavage, treatment for corneal ulceration, and adequate anti-inflammatory therapy when the corneal epithelium becomes intact. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423874

  10. Cutaneous Manifestations of Internal Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    McLean, David I.

    1987-01-01

    The skin can provide clues to the well-being of our patients. Some skin changes, such as hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita or erythema gyratum repens, are so specific that there is a virtual certainty of internal malignancy. Other changes, such as severe pruritus, are significant management problems in late-stage lymphoma and leukemia. Still others, such as herpes zoster in a cancer patient in remission, may be a marker for recurrent malignant disease. This review will discuss many of the skin changes associated with systemic cancer. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21263960

  11. Advantages of using aquatic animals for biomedical research on reproductive toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, N K; Landolt, M L

    1987-01-01

    Major advantages of the use of aquatic animals, such as trout, English sole, or sea urchins, for studying the mechanisms of reproductive toxicology are discussed. The remarkable synchrony of differentiation of gametes in large quantities for detailed morphologic and biochemical measurements enables research not readily done on mammalian nonseasonal breeders. Structural differences such as the absence of a fibrous sheath in the more simple structure of fish and sea urchin sperm flagella facilitates comparative study of the mechanism of action of microtubules in flagella movement and the coupling of mitochondrial energy production to microtubules movement. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:3297666

  12. ELECTROCARDIOGRAMS BY TELEMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Travis; Sibley, E. A.; Fisher, E. K.

    1961-01-01

    Radiocardiography makes it possible to transmit an electrocardiogram by air from patient to recording device. The distance of transmission may be a few feet, as in a physician's office; or it may be many miles, as when transmitting electrocardiograms from aircraft, rockets or satellites to the earth. The radiocardiographic method has the advantage of versatility, simplicity, freedom of movement for the patient and high amplitude, and is especially suited for recording electrocardiograms during exercise. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:13785896

  13. Common emergencies in cancer medicine: cardiovascular and neurologic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.; Edmondson, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    A myriad of multisystem disorders may result from primary malignant disease, metastasis, or treatment. Neoplastic pericardial disease in the form of malignant effusions, tamponade, and pericarditis are not uncommonly seen. Compromise of blood return to the right side of the heart due to the superior vena cava syndrome is a well known entity that is also still undergoing examination of the variety of treatment options available. The central and peripheral nervous systems also may be involved from both primary or secondary malignant disease. The recognition, diagnostic approach, natural history, and therapeutic options will be reviewed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5A Figure 5B PMID:1766012

  14. Energy Savings and Persistence from an Energy Services Performance Contract at an Army Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    were converted to daily ESL -IC-11-10-01 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...En er gy U sa ge B1 C B2 B4B3En er gy U sa ge Ambient Temperature (g) ESL -IC-11-10-01 3 Figure 1. ASHRAE IMT Change-Point Models. (a...Data_2010 Pre-Retrofit Post-Retrofit ESL -IC-11-10-01 4 Figure 3.410-Headquarters Building Daily Electricity Models for Weekdays (Left) and

  15. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of the Cerebellopontine Angle

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Luis; Roda, José María; Frutos, Remedios; Patrón, Mercedes; Gavilán, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas are rare lesions that may involve any segment of the facial nerve. Because of their rarity and the lack of a consistent clinical and radiological pattern, facial nerve schwannomas located at the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. In this report, a case of a CPA/IAC facial nerve schwannoma is presented. Contemporary diagnosis and management of this rare lesion are analyzed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167683

  16. Role of Bone Graft in Reconstruction of Skull Base Defect

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Minakawa, Hidehiko; Yoshida, Tetsunori; Igawa, Hiroharu; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Ohura, Takehiko; Nohira, Kunihiko

    1993-01-01

    Ten patients underwent reconstruction of skull base defects between 1989 and 1992. In this series, the maximum size of the skull base defect was 6 × 5 cm. Three patients underwent bone grafts to reinforce the skull base. The postoperative course of seven patients without bone grafts was uneventful. There was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, extradural abscess, on brain herniation. On the other hand, two of the three patients with bone grafts developed extradural abseesses requiring the bone grafts to be removed. Although the number of patients in this series is not large, this study demonstrates that the use of bone grafts in reconstruction of skull base detects could be one of the factors in increasing the chances of infectious complications. We think that a bone graft is not necessary to reconstruct moderate-sized skull base defects. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 4p228-aFigure 4Figure 4 PMID:17170915

  17. Applications of Laser Light Scattering in Polymer Dilute Solution Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    independent of the solvent usedi. and is the ,e,.ht- average value, as opposed to the number-average Mn determined from colligative property measurements...2 Figure 3. Time-dependent property "A(t). ............................. 3 Figure 4. Autocorreiatioi fundtion of scattereo iigidt intensity...for ’t ran-ing from 0 to a point at which the sicnad is no lne: correlated. Alt) AI 1~ 2 +nA AA A4. i+1 t 3 5 Figure 3. Time-dependent property "A

  18. Estimating Rates of Motor Vehicle Crashes Using Medical Encounter Data: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-05

    see Table 3). Figure 6 shows changes in MVC rates across the study period. The DoN as a whole experienced a slight decline in MVC rates of about...duty; M = mean; MVC = motor vehicle crash; SD = standard deviation. Figure 7 displays changes in MVC rates over time for male...rank groups were less than 1 in 100 (E4–E5: 0.7%, E6–E9: 0.6%, officers: 0.5%). Figures 9a and 9b show changes in rates of MVCs among personnel

  19. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    all stages of HIV infection. Fifty-six percent of the cases of ocular toxoplasmosis had simultaneous toxoplasmic cerebritis. Ocular toxoplasmosis responded to standard anti-microbial therapy. Varicella zoster virus retinitis, when manifested by the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) syndrome, responded to intravenous acyclovir therapy. Conversely, in a limited number of patients with the progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome, the disease responded poorly to intravenous acyclovir therapy, but appeared to respond to combination foscarnet and acyclovir therapy. Neuro-ophthalmic lesions were present in 6% of the patients with AIDS. The most common cause of a neuro-ophthalmic lesion was cryptococcal meningitis, and 25% of the patients with cryptococcal meningitis developed a neuro-ophthalmic complication. CONCLUSIONS: Ocular manifestations are common in patients with AIDS. CMV retinitis represented a major vision-threatening problem in these patients. While available therapy was successful in initially controlling the retinitis, the phenomenon of relapse resulted in some degree of long-term visual loss. Preservation of the patient's visual acuity in at least one eye was generally successful. Other opportunistic ocular infections were substantially less common than CMV retinitis but require aggressive therapy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719695

  20. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    in cancer initiation. Comparative studies with the development of the human breast and the pathogenesis of breast cancer have contributed to validate rodent-to-human extrapolations. However, it has not been definitively established what type of information is necessary for human risk assessment, whether currently toxicity testing methodologies are sufficient for fulfilling those needs, or whether treatment-induced tumorigenic responses in rodents are predictive of potential human risk. An alternative to the traditional bioassays are mechanism-based toxicology and molecular and cellular approaches, combined with comparative in vitro systems. These approaches might allow the rapid screen of chemicals for setting priorities for further studies to determine the dose-response relationship for chemical effects at low doses, to assess effects other than mutagenesis and/or tumorigenesis, or to establish qualitative and quantitative relationships of biomarkers to toxic effects. Until there is enough information on the predictive value of mechanism-based toxicology for risk assessment, this approach should be used in conjunction with and validated by the traditional in vivo long-term bioassays. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. Figure 17. Figure 18. Figure 19. Figure 20. Figure 21. Figure 22. Figure 23. Figure 24. Figure 25. Figure 26. PMID:8899375