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Sample records for 3g cellular networks

  1. Condition monitoring of 3G cellular networks through competitive neural models.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Guilherme A; Mota, João C M; Souza, Luis G M; Frota, Rewbenio A; Aguayo, Leonardo

    2005-09-01

    We develop an unsupervised approach to condition monitoring of cellular networks using competitive neural algorithms. Training is carried out with state vectors representing the normal functioning of a simulated CDMA2000 network. Once training is completed, global and local normality profiles (NPs) are built from the distribution of quantization errors of the training state vectors and their components, respectively. The global NP is used to evaluate the overall condition of the cellular system. If abnormal behavior is detected, local NPs are used in a component-wise fashion to find abnormal state variables. Anomaly detection tests are performed via percentile-based confidence intervals computed over the global and local NPs. We compared the performance of four competitive algorithms [winner-take-all (WTA), frequency-sensitive competitive learning (FSCL), self-organizing map (SOM), and neural-gas algorithm (NGA)] and the results suggest that the joint use of global and local NPs is more efficient and more robust than current single-threshold methods.

  2. Video Medical Interpretation over 3G Cellular Networks: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Deborah; Sterrett, James; Detzler, Isabel; Ackerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To test the feasibility of using cell phone technology to provide video medical interpretation services at a distance. Materials and Methods: Alternative cell phone services were researched and videoconferencing technologies were tried out to identify video products and telecommunication services needed to meet video medical interpretation requirements. The video and telecommunication technologies were tried out in a pharmacy setting and compared with use of the telephone. Results: Outcomes were similar to findings in previous research involving video medical interpretation with higher bandwidth and video quality. Patients appreciated the interpretation service no matter how it is provided, while health providers and interpreters preferred video. Conclusion: It is possible to provide video medical interpretation services via cellular communication using lower bandwidth videoconferencing technology that provides sufficient quality, at least in pharmacy settings. However, a number of issues need to be addressed to ensure quality of service. PMID:22011055

  3. Providing QoS guarantee in 3G wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, MooiChoo; Huang, Min; Kumar, Suresh

    2001-07-01

    The third generation networks and services present opportunities to offer multimedia applications and services that meet end-to-end quality of service requirements. In this article, we present UMTS QoS architecture and its requirements. This includes the definition of QoS parameters, traffic classes, the end-to-end data delivery model, and the mapping of end-to-end services to the services provided by the network elements of the UMTS. End-to-end QoS of a user flow is achieved by the combination of the QoS control over UMTS Domain and the IP core Network. In the Third Generation Wireless network, UMTS bearer service manager is responsible to manage radio and transport resources to QoS-enabled applications. The UMTS bearer service consists of the Radio Access Bearer Service between Mobile Terminal and SGSN and Core Network bearer service between SGSN and GGSN. The Radio Access Bearer Service is further realized by the Radio Bearer Service (mostly air interface) and Iu bearer service. For the 3G air interface, one can provide differentiated QoS via intelligent burst allocation scheme, adaptive spreading factor control and weighted fair queueing scheduling algorithms. Next, we discuss the requirements for the transport technologies in the radio access network to provide differentiated QoS to multiple classes of traffic. We discuss both ATM based and IP based transport solutions. Last but not least, we discuss how QoS mechanism is provided in the core network to ensure e2e quality of service requirements. We discuss how mobile terminals that use RSVP as QoS signaling mechanisms can be are supported in the 3G network which may implement only IETF diffserv mechanism. . We discuss how one can map UMTS QoS classes with IETF diffserv code points. We also discuss 2G/3G handover scenarios and how the 2G/3G QoS parameters can be mapped.

  4. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  5. Design considerations and implementation of a cost-effective, portable remote monitoring unit using 3G wireless data networks.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashank; Ganz, Aura

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a light-weight, autonomous, patient-centric, portable medical unit that allows for anytime/anywhere monitoring and can find use in many monitoring scenarios like home-care, hospital wards, emergency help and disaster relief. The proposed unit called "TelePatient" achieves portability by exploiting a PDA and allows mobility through the use of cellular technology, enabling complete ubiquity. The design is based on open standards and is cost-effective. We incorporate transcoding software to fit data to limited bandwidth, as well as conserve energy on the power constrained PDA. We validate our design over real network 3G CDMA conditions and also test its use over WLAN802.11b, which can together cover a number of Telemedicine scenarios. PMID:17270983

  6. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  7. Comparison of average global exposure of population induced by a macro 3G network in different geographical areas in France and Serbia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Varsier, Nadège; Niksic, Stevan; Kocan, Enis; Pejanovic-Djurisic, Milica; Popovic, Milica; Koprivica, Mladen; Neskovic, Aleksandar; Milinkovic, Jelena; Gati, Azeddine; Person, Christian; Wiart, Joe

    2016-09-01

    This article is the first thorough study of average population exposure to third generation network (3G)-induced electromagnetic fields (EMFs), from both uplink and downlink radio emissions in different countries, geographical areas, and for different wireless device usages. Indeed, previous publications in the framework of exposure to EMFs generally focused on individual exposure coming from either personal devices or base stations. Results, derived from device usage statistics collected in France and Serbia, show a strong heterogeneity of exposure, both in time, that is, the traffic distribution over 24 h was found highly variable, and space, that is, the exposure to 3G networks in France was found to be roughly two times higher than in Serbia. Such heterogeneity is further explained based on real data and network architecture. Among those results, authors show that, contrary to popular belief, exposure to 3G EMFs is dominated by uplink radio emissions, resulting from voice and data traffic, and average population EMF exposure differs from one geographical area to another, as well as from one country to another, due to the different cellular network architectures and variability of mobile usage. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:382-390, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27385053

  8. Micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Cibula, Matthew; Feng, Jingchen; Krnacik, Emma A.; McIntyre, David H.; Levine, Herbert; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Collagen gels are widely used in experiments on cell mechanics because they mimic the extracellular matrix in physiological conditions. Collagen gels are often characterized by their bulk rheology; however, variations in the collagen fiber microstructure and cell adhesion forces cause the mechanical properties to be inhomogeneous at the cellular scale. We study the mechanics of type I collagen on the scale of tens to hundreds of microns by using holographic optical tweezers to apply pN forces to microparticles embedded in the collagen fiber network. We find that in response to optical forces, particle displacements are inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and asymmetric. Gels prepared at 21 °C and 37 °C show qualitative difference in their micromechanical characteristics. We also demonstrate that contracting cells remodel the micromechanics of their surrounding extracellular matrix in a strain- and distance-dependent manner. To further understand the micromechanics of cellularized extracellular matrix, we have constructed a computational model which reproduces the main experiment findings. PMID:26324923

  9. Influence of the Packet Size on the One-Way Delay in 3G Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlos, Patrik; Fiedler, Markus

    We currently observe a rising interest in mobile broadband, which users expect to perform in a similar way as its fixed counterpart. On the other hand, the capacity allocation process on mobile access links is far less transparent to the user; still, its properties need to be known in order to minimize the impact of the network on application performance. This paper investigates the impact of the packet size on the minimal one-way delay for the uplink in third-generation mobile networks. For interactive and real-time applications such as VoIP, one-way delays are of major importance for user perception; however, they are challenging to measure due to their sensitivity to clock synchronisation. Therefore, the paper applies a robust and innovative method to assure the quality of these measurements. Results from measurements from several Swedish mobile operators show that applications can gain significantly in terms of one-way delay from choosing optimal packet sizes. We show that, in certain cases, an increased packet size can improve the one-way delay performance at best by several hundred milliseconds.

  10. Remote Energy Monitoring System via Cellular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunoki, Shoji; Tamaki, Satoshi; Takada, May; Iwaki, Takashi

    Recently, improvement on power saving and cost efficiency by monitoring the operation status of various facilities over the network has gained attention. Wireless network, especially cellular network, has advantage in mobility, coverage, and scalability. On the other hand, it has disadvantage of low reliability, due to rapid changes in the available bandwidth. We propose a transmission control scheme based on data priority and instantaneous available bandwidth to realize a highly reliable remote monitoring system via cellular network. We have developed our proposed monitoring system and evaluated the effectiveness of our scheme, and proved it reduces the maximum transmission delay of sensor status to 1/10 compared to best effort transmission.

  11. Inferring cellular networks – a review

    PubMed Central

    Markowetz, Florian; Spang, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    In this review we give an overview of computational and statistical methods to reconstruct cellular networks. Although this area of research is vast and fast developing, we show that most currently used methods can be organized by a few key concepts. The first part of the review deals with conditional independence models including Gaussian graphical models and Bayesian networks. The second part discusses probabilistic and graph-based methods for data from experimental interventions and perturbations. PMID:17903286

  12. Analysis of blocking rate and bandwidth usage of mobile IPTV services in wireless cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes. PMID:25379521

  13. Analysis of Blocking Rate and Bandwidth Usage of Mobile IPTV Services in Wireless Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes. PMID:25379521

  14. Analysis of blocking rate and bandwidth usage of mobile IPTV services in wireless cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks become more and more popular, owing to the significant growth in access bandwidth of wireless cellular networks such as 3G/4G and WiMAX. However, the spectrum resources of wireless cellular networks is rare. How to enhance the spectral efficiency of mobile networks becomes an important issue. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast are the most important transport schemes for offering mobile IPTV services over wireless cellular networks. Therefore, bandwidth usages and blocking rates of unicast, broadcast, and multicast IPTV services were analyzed and compared in this paper. Simulations were also conducted to validate the analytical results. Numerical results demonstrate that the presented analysis is correct, and multicast scheme achieves the best bandwidth usage and blocking rate performance, relative to the other two schemes.

  15. WD40 proteins propel cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Stirnimann, Christian U; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Russell, Robert B; Müller, Christoph W

    2010-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that WD40 domains play central roles in biological processes by acting as hubs in cellular networks; however, they have been studied less intensely than other common domains, such as the kinase, PDZ or SH3 domains. As suggested by various interactome studies, they are among the most promiscuous interactors. Structural studies suggest that this property stems from their ability, as scaffolds, to interact with diverse proteins, peptides or nucleic acids using multiple surfaces or modes of interaction. A general scaffolding role is supported by the fact that no WD40 domain has been found with intrinsic enzymatic activity despite often being part of large molecular machines. We discuss the WD40 domain distributions in protein networks and structures of WD40-containing assemblies to demonstrate their versatility in mediating critical cellular functions.

  16. Cellular recurrent deep network for image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.; Vidyaratne, L.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2015-09-01

    Image registration using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) remains a challenging learning task. Registration can be posed as a two-step problem: parameter estimation and actual alignment/transformation using the estimated parameters. To date ANN based image registration techniques only perform the parameter estimation, while affine equations are used to perform the actual transformation. In this paper, we propose a novel deep ANN based image rigid registration that combines parameter estimation and transformation as a simultaneous learning task. Our previous work shows that a complex universal approximator known as Cellular Simultaneous Recurrent Network (CSRN) can successfully approximate affine transformations with known transformation parameters. This study introduces a deep ANN that combines a feed forward network with a CSRN to perform full rigid registration. Layer wise training is used to pre-train feed forward network for parameter estimation and followed by a CSRN for image transformation respectively. The deep network is then fine-tuned to perform the final registration task. Our result shows that the proposed deep ANN architecture achieves comparable registration accuracy to that of image affine transformation using CSRN with known parameters. We also demonstrate the efficacy of our novel deep architecture by a performance comparison with a deep clustered MLP.

  17. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215

  18. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  19. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  20. A Wireless Communications Laboratory on Cellular Network Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawy, Z.; Husseini, A.; Yaacoub, E.; Al-Kanj, L.

    2010-01-01

    The field of radio network planning and optimization (RNPO) is central for wireless cellular network design, deployment, and enhancement. Wireless cellular operators invest huge sums of capital on deploying, launching, and maintaining their networks in order to ensure competitive performance and high user satisfaction. This work presents a lab…

  1. Optimizing Cellular Networks Enabled with Renewal Energy via Strategic Learning.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Insoo; Liu, Huaping; Ansari, Nirwan

    2015-01-01

    An important issue in the cellular industry is the rising energy cost and carbon footprint due to the rapid expansion of the cellular infrastructure. Greening cellular networks has thus attracted attention. Among the promising green cellular network techniques, the renewable energy-powered cellular network has drawn increasing attention as a critical element towards reducing carbon emissions due to massive energy consumption in the base stations deployed in cellular networks. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that is used to evaluate and optimize systems with multiple players with conflicting objectives and has been successfully used to solve various problems in cellular networks. In this paper, we model the green energy utilization and power consumption optimization problem of a green cellular network as a pilot power selection strategic game and propose a novel distributed algorithm based on a strategic learning method. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm achieves correlated equilibrium of the pilot power selection game, resulting in optimum green energy utilization and power consumption reduction. PMID:26167934

  2. Optimizing Cellular Networks Enabled with Renewal Energy via Strategic Learning

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Insoo; Liu, Huaping; Ansari, Nirwan

    2015-01-01

    An important issue in the cellular industry is the rising energy cost and carbon footprint due to the rapid expansion of the cellular infrastructure. Greening cellular networks has thus attracted attention. Among the promising green cellular network techniques, the renewable energy-powered cellular network has drawn increasing attention as a critical element towards reducing carbon emissions due to massive energy consumption in the base stations deployed in cellular networks. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that is used to evaluate and optimize systems with multiple players with conflicting objectives and has been successfully used to solve various problems in cellular networks. In this paper, we model the green energy utilization and power consumption optimization problem of a green cellular network as a pilot power selection strategic game and propose a novel distributed algorithm based on a strategic learning method. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm achieves correlated equilibrium of the pilot power selection game, resulting in optimum green energy utilization and power consumption reduction. PMID:26167934

  3. Realization problem of multi-layer cellular neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ban, Jung-Chao; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates whether the output space of a multi-layer cellular neural network can be realized via a single layer cellular neural network in the sense of the existence of finite-to-one map from one output space to the other. Whenever such realization exists, the phenomena exhibited in the output space of the revealed single layer cellular neural network is at most a constant multiple of the phenomena exhibited in the output space of the original multi-layer cellular neural network. Meanwhile, the computation complexity of a single layer system is much less than the complexity of a multi-layer system. Namely, one can trade the precision of the results for the execution time. We remark that a routine extension of the proposed methodology in this paper can be applied to the substitution of hidden spaces although the detailed illustration is omitted.

  4. Shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with chaotic external inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet, M. U.; Fen, M. O.

    2013-06-01

    Taking advantage of external inputs, it is shown that shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks behave chaotically. The analysis is based on the Li-Yorke definition of chaos. Appropriate illustrations which support the theoretical results are depicted.

  5. Shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with chaotic external inputs.

    PubMed

    Akhmet, M U; Fen, M O

    2013-06-01

    Taking advantage of external inputs, it is shown that shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks behave chaotically. The analysis is based on the Li-Yorke definition of chaos. Appropriate illustrations which support the theoretical results are depicted.

  6. Extracting insight from noisy cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Landry, Christian R; Levy, Emmanuel D; Abd Rabbo, Diala; Tarassov, Kirill; Michnick, Stephen W

    2013-11-21

    Network biologists attempt to extract meaningful relationships among genes or their products from very noisy data. We argue that what we categorize as noisy data may sometimes reflect noisy biology and therefore may shield a hidden meaning about how networks evolve and how matter is organized in the cell. We present practical solutions, based on existing evolutionary and biophysical concepts, through which our understanding of cell biology can be enormously enriched. PMID:24267884

  7. Extracting insight from noisy cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Landry, Christian R; Levy, Emmanuel D; Abd Rabbo, Diala; Tarassov, Kirill; Michnick, Stephen W

    2013-11-21

    Network biologists attempt to extract meaningful relationships among genes or their products from very noisy data. We argue that what we categorize as noisy data may sometimes reflect noisy biology and therefore may shield a hidden meaning about how networks evolve and how matter is organized in the cell. We present practical solutions, based on existing evolutionary and biophysical concepts, through which our understanding of cell biology can be enormously enriched.

  8. A new small-world network created by Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yuhong; Li, Anwei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we generate small-world networks by the Cellular Automaton based on starting with one-dimensional regular networks. Besides the common properties of small-world networks with small average shortest path length and large clustering coefficient, the small-world networks generated in this way have other properties: (i) The edges which are cut in the regular network can be controlled that whether the edges are reconnected or not, and (ii) the number of the edges of the small-world network model equals the number of the edges of the original regular network. In other words, the average degree of the small-world network model equals to the average degree of the original regular network.

  9. Optimal Prediction by Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nils B.; Mugler, Andrew; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    Living cells can enhance their fitness by anticipating environmental change. We study how accurately linear signaling networks in cells can predict future signals. We find that maximal predictive power results from a combination of input-noise suppression, linear extrapolation, and selective readout of correlated past signal values. Single-layer networks generate exponential response kernels, which suffice to predict Markovian signals optimally. Multilayer networks allow oscillatory kernels that can optimally predict non-Markovian signals. At low noise, these kernels exploit the signal derivative for extrapolation, while at high noise, they capitalize on signal values in the past that are strongly correlated with the future signal. We show how the common motifs of negative feedback and incoherent feed-forward can implement these optimal response functions. Simulations reveal that E. coli can reliably predict concentration changes for chemotaxis, and that the integration time of its response kernel arises from a trade-off between rapid response and noise suppression.

  10. Ambulance 3G.

    PubMed

    Banitsas, Konstantinos; Perakis, Konstantinos; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Konis, Georgios; Tachakra, Sapal

    2005-01-01

    Minimising the time required for a patient to receive primary care has always been the concern of the Accidents and Emergency units. Ambulances are usually the first to arrive on the scene and to administer first aid. However, as the time that it takes to transfer the patient to the hospital increases, so does the fatality rate. In this paper, a mobile teleconsultation system is presented, based primarily on third generation mobile links and on Wi-Fi hotspots around a city. This system can be installed inside an ambulance and will permit high-resolution videoconferencing between the moving vehicle and a doctor or a consultant within a base station (usually a hospital). In addition to video and voice, high quality still images and screenshots from medical equipment can also be sent. The test was carried out in Athens, Greece where a 3G system was recently deployed by Vodafone. The results show that the system can perform satisfactory in most conditions and can effectively increase the patient's quality of service, while having a modest cost.

  11. Personal communication in traditional cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuer, Ellwood I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the flow of calls through the mobile network as it applies to the operation of Basic and Enhanced Services. Included in the discussion is the overall network layout, the physical connections between the network entities, and the signaling protocols which allow the entities to be integrated. The specific functionality of the applications and services are not detailed as the specific implementation varies from vendor to vendor and from service provider to service provider. The Enhanced Services Platform is installed in a service providers network in order to offer mobile subscribers services and applications which would otherwise not be available. The service providers' objective is to increase revenue/subscriber, increase subscriber loyalty/decrease churn, and build competitive advantages through differentiation. The services provided on the Enhanced Services platform can be viewed as either Basic or Enhanced. For the purpose of this paper, Basic Services refers to Numeric Paging, Call Answering, and Voice Messaging while Enhanced Services refers to FAX Messaging, One Number Service, Voice Dialing and other Voice Recognition applications, Information Services including FAX on Demand, and Automated Call Routing.

  12. Increasing cellular coverage within integrated terrestrial/satellite mobile networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Jonathan P.

    1995-01-01

    When applying the hierarchical cellular concept, the satellite acts as giant umbrella cell covering a region with some terrestrial cells. If a mobile terminal traversing the region arrives to the border-line or limits of a regular cellular ground service, network transition occurs and the satellite system continues the mobile coverage. To adequately assess the boundaries of service of a mobile satellite system an a cellular network within an integrated environment, this paper provides an optimized scheme to predict when a network transition may be necessary. Under the assumption of a classified propagation phenomenon and Lognormal shadowing, the study applies an analytical approach to estimate the location of a mobile terminal based on a reception of the signal strength emitted by a base station.

  13. Template learning of cellular neural network using genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Elsayed; Tazaki, Eiichiro

    2004-08-01

    A new learning algorithm for space invariant Uncoupled Cellular Neural Network is introduced. Learning is formulated as an optimization problem. Genetic Programming has been selected for creating new knowledge because they allow the system to find new rules both near to good ones and far from them, looking for unknown good control actions. According to the lattice Cellular Neural Network architecture, Genetic Programming will be used in deriving the Cloning Template. Exploration of any stable domain is possible by the current approach. Details of the algorithm are discussed and several application results are shown.

  14. Modeling integrated cellular machinery using hybrid Petri-Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Berestovsky, Natalie; Zhou, Wanding; Nagrath, Deepak; Nakhleh, Luay

    2013-01-01

    The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM) that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them using such more

  15. Designed Proteins To Modulate Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Liu, Tina Y.; Hochstrasser, Mark; Regan, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge of protein design is to create useful new proteins that interact specifically with biological targets in living cells. Such binding modules have many potential applications, including the targeted perturbation of protein networks. As a general approach to create such modules, we designed a library with approximately 109 different binding specificities based on a small 3-tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif framework. We employed a novel strategy, based on split GFP reassembly, to screen the library for modules with the desired binding specificity. Using this approach, we identified modules that bind tightly and specifically to Dss1, a small human protein that interacts with the tumor suppressor protein BRCA2. We showed that these modules also bind the yeast homologue of Dss1, Sem1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these modules inhibit Sem1 activity in yeast. This strategy will be generally applicable to make novel genetically encoded tools for systems/synthetic biology applications. PMID:20020775

  16. Millimeter-Wave Evolution for 5G Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Kei; Tran, Gia Khanh; Shimodaira, Hidekazu; Nanba, Shinobu; Sakurai, Toshiaki; Takinami, Koji; Siaud, Isabelle; Strinati, Emilio Calvanese; Capone, Antonio; Karls, Ingolf; Arefi, Reza; Haustein, Thomas

    Triggered by the explosion of mobile traffic, 5G (5th Generation) cellular network requires evolution to increase the system rate 1000 times higher than the current systems in 10 years. Motivated by this common problem, there are several studies to integrate mm-wave access into current cellular networks as multi-band heterogeneous networks to exploit the ultra-wideband aspect of the mm-wave band. The authors of this paper have proposed comprehensive architecture of cellular networks with mm-wave access, where mm-wave small cell basestations and a conventional macro basestation are connected to Centralized-RAN (C-RAN) to effectively operate the system by enabling power efficient seamless handover as well as centralized resource control including dynamic cell structuring to match the limited coverage of mm-wave access with high traffic user locations via user-plane/control-plane splitting. In this paper, to prove the effectiveness of the proposed 5G cellular networks with mm-wave access, system level simulation is conducted by introducing an expected future traffic model, a measurement based mm-wave propagation model, and a centralized cell association algorithm by exploiting the C-RAN architecture. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed network to realize 1000 times higher system rate than the current network in 10 years which is not achieved by the small cells using commonly considered 3.5 GHz band. Furthermore, the paper also gives latest status of mm-wave devices and regulations to show the feasibility of using mm-wave in the 5G systems.

  17. The role of actin networks in cellular mechanosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatov, Mikheil

    Physical processes play an important role in many biological phenomena, such as wound healing, organ development, and tumor metastasis. During these processes, cells constantly interact with and adapt to their environment by exerting forces to mechanically probe the features of their surroundings and generating appropriate biochemical responses. The mechanisms underlying how cells sense the physical properties of their environment are not well understood. In this thesis, I present my studies to investigate cellular responses to the stiffness and topography of the environment. In order to sense the physical properties of their environment, cells dynamically reorganize the structure of their actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of biopolymers, altering the shape and spatial distribution of protein assemblies. Several observations suggest that proteins that crosslink actin filaments may play an important role in cellular mechanosensitivity. Palladin is an actin-crosslinking protein that is found in the lamellar actin network, stress fibers and focal adhesions, cellular structures that are critical for mechanosensing of the physical environment. By virtue of its close interactions with these structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of actin crosslinkers in general, and palladin in particular, in cellular force generation and mechanosensing is not well known. I have investigated the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. I have shown that the expression levels of palladin modulate the forces exerted by cells and their ability to sense substrate stiffness. Perturbation experiments also suggest that palladin levels in cells altered myosin motor activity. These results suggest that the actin crosslinkers, such as palladin, and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant

  18. Using Cellular Communication Networks To Detect Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    David, Noam; Gao, H Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Accurate real time monitoring of atmospheric conditions at ground level is vital for hazard warning, meteorological forecasting, and various environmental applications required for public health and safety. However, conventional monitoring facilities are costly and often insufficient, for example, since they are not representative of the larger space and are not deployed densely enough in the field. There have been numerous scientific works showing the ability of commercial microwave links that comprise the data transmission infrastructure in cellular communication networks to monitor hydrometeors as a potential complementary solution. However, despite the large volume of research carried out in this emerging field during the past decade, no study has shown the ability of the system to provide critical information regarding air quality. Here we reveal the potential for identifying atmospheric conditions prone to air pollution by detecting temperature inversions that trap pollutants at ground level. The technique is based on utilizing standard signal measurements from an existing cellular network during routine operation. PMID:27490182

  19. Using Cellular Communication Networks To Detect Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    David, Noam; Gao, H Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Accurate real time monitoring of atmospheric conditions at ground level is vital for hazard warning, meteorological forecasting, and various environmental applications required for public health and safety. However, conventional monitoring facilities are costly and often insufficient, for example, since they are not representative of the larger space and are not deployed densely enough in the field. There have been numerous scientific works showing the ability of commercial microwave links that comprise the data transmission infrastructure in cellular communication networks to monitor hydrometeors as a potential complementary solution. However, despite the large volume of research carried out in this emerging field during the past decade, no study has shown the ability of the system to provide critical information regarding air quality. Here we reveal the potential for identifying atmospheric conditions prone to air pollution by detecting temperature inversions that trap pollutants at ground level. The technique is based on utilizing standard signal measurements from an existing cellular network during routine operation.

  20. Cellular Automata with network incubation in information technology diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseo, Renato; Guidolin, Mariangela

    2010-06-01

    Innovation diffusion of network goods determines direct network externalities that depress sales for long periods and delay full benefits. We model this effect through a multiplicative dynamic market potential driven by a latent individual threshold embedded in a special Cellular Automata representation. The corresponding mean field approximation of its aggregate version is a Riccati equation with a closed form solution. This allows the detection of a change-point time separating an incubation period from a subsequent take-off due to a collective threshold (critical mass). Weighted nonlinear least squares are the main inferential methodology. An application is analysed with reference to USA fax machine diffusion.

  1. Network Medicine: From Cellular Networks to the Human Diseasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Given the functional interdependencies between the molecular components in a human cell, a disease is rarely a consequence of an abnormality in a single gene, but reflects the perturbations of the complex intracellular network. The tools of network science offer a platform to explore systematically not only the molecular complexity of a particular disease, leading to the identification of disease modules and pathways, but also the molecular relationships between apparently distinct (patho)phenotypes. Advances in this direction not only enrich our understanding of complex systems, but are also essential to identify new disease genes, to uncover the biological significance of disease-associated mutations identified by genome-wide association studies and full genome sequencing, and to identify drug targets and biomarkers for complex diseases.

  2. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  3. Hybrid Spectral Efficient Cellular Network Deployment to Reduce RF Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Sumit; K. Jain, R.; K. Agrawal, N.

    2012-09-01

    As the mobile telecommunication systems are growing tremendously all over the world, the numbers of handheld and base stations are also rapidly growing and it became very popular to see these base stations distributed everywhere in the neighborhood and on roof tops which has caused a considerable amount of panic to the public in Palestine concerning wither the radiated electromagnetic fields from these base stations may cause any health effect or hazard. Recently UP High Court in India ordered for removal of BTS towers from residential area, it has created panic among cellular communication network designers too. Green cellular networks could be a solution for the above problem. This paper deals with green cellular networks with the help of multi-layer overlaid hierarchical structure (macro / micro / pico / femto cells). Macrocell for area coverage, micro for pedestrian and a slow moving traffic while pico for indoor use and femto for individual high capacity users. This could be the answer of the problem of energy conservation and enhancement of spectral density also.

  4. Reverse engineering cellular networks with information theoretic methods.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Ross, John; Banga, Julio R

    2013-01-01

    Building mathematical models of cellular networks lies at the core of systems biology. It involves, among other tasks, the reconstruction of the structure of interactions between molecular components, which is known as network inference or reverse engineering. Information theory can help in the goal of extracting as much information as possible from the available data. A large number of methods founded on these concepts have been proposed in the literature, not only in biology journals, but in a wide range of areas. Their critical comparison is difficult due to the different focuses and the adoption of different terminologies. Here we attempt to review some of the existing information theoretic methodologies for network inference, and clarify their differences. While some of these methods have achieved notable success, many challenges remain, among which we can mention dealing with incomplete measurements, noisy data, counterintuitive behaviour emerging from nonlinear relations or feedback loops, and computational burden of dealing with large data sets.

  5. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  6. Country-wide rainfall maps from cellular communication networks.

    PubMed

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-02-19

    Accurate and timely surface precipitation measurements are crucial for water resources management, agriculture, weather prediction, climate research, as well as ground validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks such data, and in many parts of the world the density of surface precipitation gauging networks is even rapidly declining. This development can potentially be counteracted by using received signal level data from the enormous number of microwave links used worldwide in commercial cellular communication networks. Along such links, radio signals propagate from a transmitting antenna at one base station to a receiving antenna at another base station. Rain-induced attenuation and, subsequently, path-averaged rainfall intensity can be retrieved from the signal's attenuation between transmitter and receiver. Here, we show how one such a network can be used to retrieve the space-time dynamics of rainfall for an entire country (The Netherlands, ∼35,500 km(2)), based on an unprecedented number of links (∼2,400) and a rainfall retrieval algorithm that can be applied in real time. This demonstrates the potential of such networks for real-time rainfall monitoring, in particular in those parts of the world where networks of dedicated ground-based rainfall sensors are often virtually absent. PMID:23382210

  7. Country-wide rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    PubMed Central

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and timely surface precipitation measurements are crucial for water resources management, agriculture, weather prediction, climate research, as well as ground validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks such data, and in many parts of the world the density of surface precipitation gauging networks is even rapidly declining. This development can potentially be counteracted by using received signal level data from the enormous number of microwave links used worldwide in commercial cellular communication networks. Along such links, radio signals propagate from a transmitting antenna at one base station to a receiving antenna at another base station. Rain-induced attenuation and, subsequently, path-averaged rainfall intensity can be retrieved from the signal’s attenuation between transmitter and receiver. Here, we show how one such a network can be used to retrieve the space–time dynamics of rainfall for an entire country (The Netherlands, ∼35,500 km2), based on an unprecedented number of links (∼2,400) and a rainfall retrieval algorithm that can be applied in real time. This demonstrates the potential of such networks for real-time rainfall monitoring, in particular in those parts of the world where networks of dedicated ground-based rainfall sensors are often virtually absent. PMID:23382210

  8. Modeling a Nonlinear Liquid Level System by Cellular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Romero, Norberto; Seck-Tuoh-Mora, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Manuel; Medina-Marin, Joselito; Flores-Romero, Juan Jose

    This paper presents the analogue simulation of a nonlinear liquid level system composed by two tanks; the system is controlled using the methodology of exact linearization via state feedback by cellular neural networks (CNNs). The relevance of this manuscript is to show how a block diagram representing the analogue modeling and control of a nonlinear dynamical system, can be implemented and regulated by CNNs, whose cells may contain numerical values or arithmetic and control operations. In this way the dynamical system is modeled by a set of local-interacting elements without need of a central supervisor.

  9. GPM ground validation via commercial cellular networks: an exploratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Brasjen, Noud; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    The suitability of commercial microwave link networks for ground validation of GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) data is evaluated here. Two state-of-the-art rainfall products are compared over the land surface of the Netherlands for a period of 7 months, i.e., rainfall maps from commercial cellular communication networks and Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG). Commercial microwave link networks are nowadays the core component in telecommunications worldwide. Rainfall rates can be retrieved from measurements of attenuation between transmitting and receiving antennas. If adequately set up, these networks enable rainfall monitoring tens of meters above the ground at high spatiotemporal resolutions (temporal sampling of seconds to tens of minutes, and spatial sampling of hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers). The GPM mission is the successor of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission). For two years now, IMERG offers rainfall estimates across the globe (180°W - 180°E and 60°N - 60°S) at spatiotemporal resolutions of 0.1° x 0.1° every 30 min. These two data sets are compared against a Dutch gauge-adjusted radar data set, considered to be the ground truth given its accuracy, spatiotemporal resolution and availability. The suitability of microwave link networks in satellite rainfall evaluation is of special interest, given the independent character of this technique, its high spatiotemporal resolutions and availability. These are valuable assets for water management and modeling of floods, landslides, and weather extremes; especially in places where rain gauge networks are scarce or poorly maintained, or where weather radar networks are too expensive to acquire and/or maintain.

  10. Sources of Uncertainty in Rainfall Maps from Cellular Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    and quantify the sources of uncertainty in such rainfall maps, but also to test the actual and optimal performance of one commercial microwave network from one of the cellular providers in The Netherlands.

  11. Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2009-06-09

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  12. Network modeling of membrane-based artificial cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Eric C.; Philen, Michael K.; Leo, Donald J.

    2013-04-01

    Computational models are derived for predicting the behavior of artificial cellular networks for engineering applications. The systems simulated involve the use of a biomolecular unit cell, a multiphase material that incorporates a lipid bilayer between two hydrophilic compartments. These unit cells may be considered building blocks that enable the fabrication of complex electrochemical networks. These networks can incorporate a variety of stimuli-responsive biomolecules to enable a diverse range of multifunctional behavior. Through the collective properties of these biomolecules, the system demonstrates abilities that recreate natural cellular phenomena such as mechanotransduction, optoelectronic response, and response to chemical gradients. A crucial step to increase the utility of these biomolecular networks is to develop mathematical models of their stimuli-responsive behavior. While models have been constructed deriving from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model focusing on describing the system as a combination of traditional electrical components (capacitors and resistors), these electrical elements do not sufficiently describe the phenomena seen in experiment as they are not linked to the molecular scale processes. From this realization an advanced model is proposed that links the traditional unit cell parameters such as conductance and capacitance to the molecular structure of the system. Rather than approaching the membrane as an isolated parallel plate capacitor, the model seeks to link the electrical properties to the underlying chemical characteristics. This model is then applied towards experimental cases in order that a more complete picture of the underlying phenomena responsible for the desired sensing mechanisms may be constructed. In this way the stimuli-responsive characteristics may be understood and optimized.

  13. Optimizing the bulk modulus of low-density cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Durand, Marc

    2005-07-01

    We present an alternative derivation of upper-bounds for the bulk modulus of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional cellular materials. For two-dimensional materials, we recover exactly the expression of the Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) upper-bound in the low-density limit, while for three-dimensional materials we even improve the HS bound. Furthermore, we establish necessary and sufficient conditions on the cellular structure for maximizing the bulk modulus, for a given solid volume fraction. The conditions are found to be exactly those under which the electrical (or thermal) conductivity of the material reaches its maximal value as well. These results provide a set of straightforward criteria allowing us to address the design of optimized cellular materials, and shed light on recent studies of structures with both maximal bulk modulus and maximal conductivity. Finally, we discuss the specific case of spring networks, and analyze the compatibility of the criteria presented here with the geometrical constraints caused by minimization of surface energy in a real foam.

  14. Perturbation Biology: Inferring Signaling Networks in Cellular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Martin L.; Gauthier, Nicholas P.; Jing, Xiaohong; Kaushik, Poorvi; He, Qin; Mills, Gordon; Solit, David B.; Pratilas, Christine A.; Weigt, Martin; Braunstein, Alfredo; Pagnani, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Sander, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present a powerful experimental-computational technology for inferring network models that predict the response of cells to perturbations, and that may be useful in the design of combinatorial therapy against cancer. The experiments are systematic series of perturbations of cancer cell lines by targeted drugs, singly or in combination. The response to perturbation is quantified in terms of relative changes in the measured levels of proteins, phospho-proteins and cellular phenotypes such as viability. Computational network models are derived de novo, i.e., without prior knowledge of signaling pathways, and are based on simple non-linear differential equations. The prohibitively large solution space of all possible network models is explored efficiently using a probabilistic algorithm, Belief Propagation (BP), which is three orders of magnitude faster than standard Monte Carlo methods. Explicit executable models are derived for a set of perturbation experiments in SKMEL-133 melanoma cell lines, which are resistant to the therapeutically important inhibitor of RAF kinase. The resulting network models reproduce and extend known pathway biology. They empower potential discoveries of new molecular interactions and predict efficacious novel drug perturbations, such as the inhibition of PLK1, which is verified experimentally. This technology is suitable for application to larger systems in diverse areas of molecular biology. PMID:24367245

  15. Assessing the weather monitoring capabilities of cellular microwave link networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fencl, Martin; Vrzba, Miroslav; Rieckermann, Jörg; Bareš, Vojtěch

    2016-04-01

    Using of microwave links for rainfall monitoring was suggested already by (Atlas and Ulbrich, 1977). However, this technique attracted broader attention of scientific community only in the recent decade, with the extensive growth of cellular microwave link (CML) networks, which form the backbone of today's cellular telecommunication infrastructure. Several studies have already shown that CMLs can be conveniently used as weather sensors and have potential to provide near-ground path-integrated observations of rainfall but also humidity or fog. However, although research is still focusing on algorithms to improve the weather sensing capabilities (Fencl et al., 2015), it is not clear how to convince cellular operators to provide the power levels of their network. One step in this direction is to show in which regions or municipalities the networks are sufficiently dense to provide/develop good services. In this contribution we suggest a standardized approach to evaluate CML networks in terms of rainfall observation and to identify suitable regions for CML rainfall monitoring. We estimate precision of single CML based on its sensitivity to rainfall, i.e. as a function of frequency, polarization and path length. Capability of a network to capture rainfall spatial patterns is estimated from the CML coverage and path lengths considering that single CML provides path-integrated rain rates. We also search for suitable predictors for regions where no network topologies are available. We test our approach on several European networks and discuss the results. Our results show that CMLs are very dense in urban areas (> 1 CML/km2), but less in rural areas (< 0.02 CML/km2). We found a strong correlation between a population and CML network density (e.g. R2 = 0.97 in Czech Republic), thus population could be a simple proxy to identify suitable regions for CML weather monitoring. To enable a simple and efficient assessment of the CML monitoring potential for any region worldwide

  16. Countrywide rainfall maps from a commercial cellular telecommunication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information. Many countries do not have continuously operating weather radars, and have no or few rain gauges. A new development is rainfall estimation from microwave links of commercial cellular telecommunication networks. Such networks cover large parts of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The estimation of rainfall using commercial microwave links could therefore become a valuable source of information. The data produced by microwave links is essentially a by-product of the communication between mobile telephones. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated. Previous studies have shown that average rainfall intensities over the length of a link can be derived from the path-integrated attenuation. A dataset from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed, containing data from an unprecedented number of links (1500) covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35500 km2). This dataset consists of 24 days with substantial rainfall in June - September 2011. A rainfall retrieval algorithm is presented to derive rainfall intensities from the microwave link data, which have a temporal resolution of 15 min. Rainfall maps (1 km spatial resolution) are generated from these rainfall intensities using Kriging. This algorithm is suited for real-time application, and is calibrated on a subset (12 days) of the dataset. The other 12 days in the dataset are used to validate the algorithm. Both calibration and validation are done using gauge-adjusted radar data

  17. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions. PMID:24591646

  18. A rigorous framework for multiscale simulation of stochastic cellular networks

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Michael W.; El-Samad, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Noise and stochasticity are fundamental to biology and derive from the very nature of biochemical reactions where thermal motion of molecules translates into randomness in the sequence and timing of reactions. This randomness leads to cell-cell variability even in clonal populations. Stochastic biochemical networks are modeled as continuous time discrete state Markov processes whose probability density functions evolve according to a chemical master equation (CME). The CME is not solvable but for the simplest cases, and one has to resort to kinetic Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the stochastic trajectories of the biochemical network under study. A commonly used such algorithm is the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). Because it tracks every biochemical reaction that occurs in a given system, the SSA presents computational difficulties especially when there is a vast disparity in the timescales of the reactions or in the number of molecules involved in these reactions. This is common in cellular networks, and many approximation algorithms have evolved to alleviate the computational burdens of the SSA. Here, we present a rigorously derived modified CME framework based on the partition of a biochemically reacting system into restricted and unrestricted reactions. Although this modified CME decomposition is as analytically difficult as the original CME, it can be naturally used to generate a hierarchy of approximations at different levels of accuracy. Most importantly, some previously derived algorithms are demonstrated to be limiting cases of our formulation. We apply our methods to biologically relevant test systems to demonstrate their accuracy and efficiency. PMID:19673546

  19. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  20. Mesoscale assembly of chemically modified graphene into complex cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barg, Suelen; Perez, Felipe Macul; Ni, Na; Do Vale Pereira, Paula; Maher, Robert C.; Garcia-Tuñon, Esther; Eslava, Salvador; Agnoli, Stefano; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    The widespread technological introduction of graphene beyond electronics rests on our ability to assemble this two-dimensional building block into three-dimensional structures for practical devices. To achieve this goal we need fabrication approaches that are able to provide an accurate control of chemistry and architecture from nano to macroscopic levels. Here, we describe a versatile technique to build ultralight (density ≥1 mg cm-3) cellular networks based on the use of soft templates and the controlled segregation of chemically modified graphene to liquid interfaces. These novel structures can be tuned for excellent conductivity; versatile mechanical response (elastic-brittle to elastomeric, reversible deformation, high energy absorption) and organic absorption capabilities (above 600 g per gram of material). The approach can be used to uncover the basic principles that will guide the design of practical devices that by combining unique mechanical and functional performance will generate new technological opportunities.

  1. Mesoscale assembly of chemically modified graphene into complex cellular networks

    PubMed Central

    Barg, Suelen; Perez, Felipe Macul; Ni, Na; do Vale Pereira, Paula; Maher, Robert C.; Garcia-Tuñon, Esther; Eslava, Salvador; Agnoli, Stefano; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The widespread technological introduction of graphene beyond electronics rests on our ability to assemble this two-dimensional building block into three-dimensional structures for practical devices. To achieve this goal we need fabrication approaches that are able to provide an accurate control of chemistry and architecture from nano to macroscopic levels. Here, we describe a versatile technique to build ultralight (density ≥1 mg cm−3) cellular networks based on the use of soft templates and the controlled segregation of chemically modified graphene to liquid interfaces. These novel structures can be tuned for excellent conductivity; versatile mechanical response (elastic-brittle to elastomeric, reversible deformation, high energy absorption) and organic absorption capabilities (above 600 g per gram of material). The approach can be used to uncover the basic principles that will guide the design of practical devices that by combining unique mechanical and functional performance will generate new technological opportunities. PMID:24999766

  2. Country-wide rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijnse, Hidde; Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-04-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America, and Africa. This calls for alternative sources of rainfall information. Various studies have shown that microwave links from operational cellular telecommunication networks may be employed for rainfall monitoring. Such networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The basic principle of rainfall monitoring using microwave links is as follows. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated. Previous studies have shown that average rainfall intensities over the length of a link can be derived from the path-integrated attenuation. Here we show how one cellular telecommunication network can be used to retrieve the space-time dynamics of rainfall for an entire country. A dataset from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed, containing data from an unprecedented number of links (2400) covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35500 km2). This dataset consists of 24 days with substantial rainfall in June - September 2011. A rainfall retrieval algorithm is presented to derive rainfall intensities from the microwave link data, which have a temporal resolution of 15 min. Rainfall maps (1 km spatial resolution) are generated from these rainfall intensities using Kriging. This algorithm is suited for real-time application, and is calibrated on a subset (12 days) of the dataset. The other 12 days in the dataset are used to validate the algorithm. Both

  3. Coexistence of 3G repeaters with LTE base stations.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Woon-Young; Lee, Sang-Min; Hwang, Gyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Repeaters have been an attractive solution for mobile operators to upgrade their wireless networks at low cost and to extend network coverage effectively. Since the first LTE commercial deployment in 2009, many mobile operators have launched LTE networks by upgrading their 3G and legacy networks. Because all 3G frequency bands are shared with the frequency bands for LTE deployment and 3G mobile operators have an enormous number of repeaters, reusing 3G repeaters in LTE networks is definitely a practical and cost-efficient solution. However, 3G repeaters usually do not support spatial multiplexing with multiple antennas, and thus it is difficult to reuse them directly in LTE networks. In order to support spatial multiplexing of LTE, the role of 3G repeaters should be replaced with small LTE base stations or MIMO-capable repeaters. In this paper, a repeater network is proposed to reuse 3G repeaters in LTE deployment while still supporting multilayer transmission of LTE. Interestingly, the proposed network has a higher cluster throughput than an LTE network with MIMO-capable repeaters.

  4. Coexistence of 3G Repeaters with LTE Base Stations

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Woon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Repeaters have been an attractive solution for mobile operators to upgrade their wireless networks at low cost and to extend network coverage effectively. Since the first LTE commercial deployment in 2009, many mobile operators have launched LTE networks by upgrading their 3G and legacy networks. Because all 3G frequency bands are shared with the frequency bands for LTE deployment and 3G mobile operators have an enormous number of repeaters, reusing 3G repeaters in LTE networks is definitely a practical and cost-efficient solution. However, 3G repeaters usually do not support spatial multiplexing with multiple antennas, and thus it is difficult to reuse them directly in LTE networks. In order to support spatial multiplexing of LTE, the role of 3G repeaters should be replaced with small LTE base stations or MIMO-capable repeaters. In this paper, a repeater network is proposed to reuse 3G repeaters in LTE deployment while still supporting multilayer transmission of LTE. Interestingly, the proposed network has a higher cluster throughput than an LTE network with MIMO-capable repeaters. PMID:24459420

  5. Video sequence compression via supervised training on cellular neural networks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, L; Zufiria, P J; Berzal, J A

    1997-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for video sequence compression using Cellular Neural Networks (CNN's) is presented. CNN's are nets characterized by local interconnections between neurons (usually called cells), and can be modeled as dynamical systems. From among many different types, a CNN model operating in discrete-time (DT-CNN) has been chosen, its parameters being defined so that they are shared among all the cells in the network. The compression process proposed in this work is based on the possibility of replicating a given video sequence as a trajectory generated by the DT-CNN. In order for the CNN to follow a prescribed trajectory, a supervised training algorithm is implemented. Compression is achieved due to the fact that all the information contained in the sequence can be stored into a small number of parameters and initial conditions once training is stopped. Different improvements upon the basic formulation are analyzed and issues such as feasibility and complexity of the compression problem are also addressed. Finally, some examples with real video sequences illustrate the applicability of the method.

  6. Rainfall maps from cellular communication networks: Assessing uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Several studies show the potential applicability of commercial cellular communication networks in the retrieval of rainfall fields, sometimes even for an entire country. The key principle of rainfall monitoring using microwave links is based on the attenuation, due to rainfall, of the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link, as a function of time, the path-averaged rainfall intensity can be estimated. This study focuses on the quality of country-wide rainfall maps derived from commercial microwave link data compared to a quality-controlled gauge-adjusted radar rainfall data set, considered as ground-truth. Part of the differences can be attributed to the interpolation methodology, as well as to the much higher spatial resolution (≡38.000 pixels of 0.9 by 0.9 km2) of the radar data compared to the relatively low density of the microwave link network (≡1700 microwave links with an average length of 3.1 km). The magnitude of these factors is assessed by simulating microwave link rainfall depths from the radar rainfall data set. The Ordinary-Kriging (OK) methodology is used to obtain rainfall maps based on the simulated and real microwave link data. This work quantifies what percentage of the errors in link-based rainfall maps can be attributed to the interpolation methodology itself and the limited spatial density of the microwave link network. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the error in rainfall maps is quantified in relation to the spatial density and temporally variable availability of links, which is highly relevant since the microwave link data are non-uniformly distributed in space or time. Finally, the applicability of the OK-methodology is tested over Dutch areas with different spatial densities of commercial microwave links.

  7. Sources of uncertainty in rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, M. F.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    ground truth). Thus, we were able to not only identify and quantify the sources of uncertainty in such rainfall maps, but also to test the actual and optimal performance of one commercial microwave network from one of the cellular providers in the Netherlands.

  8. Using cellular network diagrams to interpret large-scale datasets: past progress and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Peter D.; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne

    2011-03-01

    Cellular networks are graphs of molecular interactions within the cell. Thanks to the confluence of genome sequencing and bioinformatics, scientists are now able to reconstruct cellular network models for more than 1,000 organisms. A variety of bioinformatics tools have been developed to support the visualization and navigation of cellular network data. Another important application is the use of cellular network diagrams to visualize and interpret large-scale datasets, such as gene-expression data. We present the Cellular Overview, a network visualization tool developed at SRI International (SRI) to support visualization, navigation, and interpretation of large-scale datasets on metabolic networks. Different variations of the diagram have been generated algorithmically for more than 1,000 organisms. We discuss the graphical design of the diagram and its interactive capabilities.

  9. Environmental Monitoring using Measurements from Cellular Network Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, N.; Gao, O. H.

    2015-12-01

    atmospheric phenomena using current and future planned frequencies of cellular network infrastructure will be introduced.

  10. Radio Resource Allocation on Complex 4G Wireless Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psannis, Kostas E.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we consider the heuristic algorithm which improves step by step wireless data delivery over LTE cellular networks by using the total transmit power with the constraint on users’ data rates, and the total throughput with the constraints on the total transmit power as well as users’ data rates, which are jointly integrated into a hybrid-layer design framework to perform radio resource allocation for multiple users, and to effectively decide the optimal system parameter such as modulation and coding scheme (MCS) in order to adapt to the varying channel quality. We propose new heuristic algorithm which balances the accessible data rate, the initial data rates of each user allocated by LTE scheduler, the priority indicator which signals delay- throughput- packet loss awareness of the user, and the buffer fullness by achieving maximization of radio resource allocation for multiple users. It is noted that the overall performance is improved with the increase in the number of users, due to multiuser diversity. Experimental results illustrate and validate the accuracy of the proposed methodology.

  11. Hierarchical Interference Mitigation for Massive MIMO Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, An; Lau, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    We propose a hierarchical interference mitigation scheme for massive MIMO cellular networks. The MIMO precoder at each base station (BS) is partitioned into an inner precoder and an outer precoder. The inner precoder controls the intra-cell interference and is adaptive to local channel state information (CSI) at each BS (CSIT). The outer precoder controls the inter-cell interference and is adaptive to channel statistics. Such hierarchical precoding structure reduces the number of pilot symbols required for CSI estimation in massive MIMO downlink and is robust to the backhaul latency. We study joint optimization of the outer precoders, the user selection, and the power allocation to maximize a general concave utility which has no closed-form expression. We first apply random matrix theory to obtain an approximated problem with closed-form objective. We show that the solution of the approximated problem is asymptotically optimal with respect to the original problem as the number of antennas per BS grows large. Then using the hidden convexity of the problem, we propose an iterative algorithm to find the optimal solution for the approximated problem. We also obtain a low complexity algorithm with provable convergence. Simulations show that the proposed design has significant gain over various state-of-the-art baselines.

  12. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  13. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  14. When are two multi-layer cellular neural networks the same?

    PubMed

    Ban, Jung-Chao; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to characterize whether a multi-layer cellular neural network is of deep architecture; namely, when can an n-layer cellular neural network be replaced by an m-layer cellular neural network for mnetwork is revealed.

  15. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment. PMID:23889048

  16. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment.

  17. Adaptive handoff algorithms based on self-organizing neural networks to enhance the quality of service of nonstationary traffic in heirarchical cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2000-03-01

    Third-generation (3G) wireless networks, based on a hierarchical cellular structure, support tiered levels of multimedia services. These services can be categorized as real-time and delay-sensitive, or non-real-time and delay- insensitive. Each call carries demand for one or more services in parallel; each with a guaranteed quality of service (QoS). Roaming is handled by handoff procedures between base stations (BSs) and the mobile subscribers (MSs) within the network. Metrics such as the probabilities of handoff failure, dropped calls and blocked calls; handoff transition time; and handoff rate are used to evaluate the handoff schemes, which also directly affects QoS. Previous researchers have proposed a fuzzy logic system (FLS) with neural encoding of the rule base and probabilistic neural network to solve the handoff decision as a pattern recognition problem in the set of MS signal measurements and mobility amid fading path uncertainties. Both neural approaches evalute only voice traffic in a closed, single- layer network of uniform cells. This paper proposed a new topology-preserving, self-organizing neural network (SONN) for both handoff and admission control as part of an overall resource allocation (RA) problem to support QoS in a three- layer, wideband CDMA HCS with dynamic loading of multimedia services. MS profiles include simultaneous service requirements, which are mapped to a new set of variables, defined in terms of the network radio resources (RRs). Simulations of the new SONN-based algorithms under various operating scenarios of MS mobility, dynamic loading, active set size, and RR bounds, using published traffic models of 3G services, compare their performance with earlier approaches.

  18. Design mobile satellite system architecture as an integral part of the cellular access digital network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, E. S. K.; Marinho, J. A.; Russell, J. E., Sr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cellular Access Digital Network (CADN) is the access vehicle through which cellular technology is brought into the mainstream of the evolving integrated telecommunications network. Beyond the integrated end-to-end digital access and per call network services provisioning of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the CADN engenders the added capability of mobility freedom via wireless access. One key element of the CADN network architecture is the standard user to network interface that is independent of RF transmission technology. Since the Mobile Satellite System (MSS) is envisioned to not only complement but also enhance the capabilities of the terrestrial cellular telecommunications network, compatibility and interoperability between terrestrial cellular and mobile satellite systems are vitally important to provide an integrated moving telecommunications network of the future. From a network standpoint, there exist very strong commonalities between the terrestrial cellular system and the mobile satellite system. Therefore, the MSS architecture should be designed as an integral part of the CADN. This paper describes the concept of the CADN, the functional architecture of the MSS, and the user-network interface signaling protocols.

  19. Stress-induced rearrangements of cellular networks: Consequences for protection and drug design.

    PubMed

    Szalay, Máté S; Kovács, István A; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Böde, Csaba; Csermely, Péter

    2007-07-31

    The complexity of the cells can be described and understood by a number of networks such as protein-protein interaction, cytoskeletal, organelle, signalling, gene transcription and metabolic networks. All these networks are highly dynamic producing continuous rearrangements in their links, hubs, network-skeleton and modules. Here we describe the adaptation of cellular networks after various forms of stress causing perturbations, congestions and network damage. Chronic stress decreases link-density, decouples or even quarantines modules, and induces an increased competition between network hubs and bridges. Extremely long or strong stress may induce a topological phase transition in the respective cellular networks, which switches the cell to a completely different mode of cellular function. We summarize our initial knowledge on network restoration after stress including the role of molecular chaperones in this process. Finally, we discuss the implications of stress-induced network rearrangements in diseases and ageing, and propose therapeutic approaches both to increase the robustness and help the repair of cellular networks. PMID:17433306

  20. Traffic Driven Analysis of Cellular and WiFi Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Utpal Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Since the days Internet traffic proliferated, measurement, monitoring and analysis of network traffic have been critical to not only the basic understanding of large networks, but also to seek improvements in resource management, traffic engineering and security. At the current times traffic in wireless local and wide area networks are facing…

  1. Effects of cellular homeostatic intrinsic plasticity on dynamical and computational properties of biological recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Naudé, Jérémie; Cessac, Bruno; Berry, Hugues; Delord, Bruno

    2013-09-18

    Homeostatic intrinsic plasticity (HIP) is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism regulating neuronal activity, cardinal for the proper functioning of nervous systems. In invertebrates, HIP is critical for orchestrating stereotyped activity patterns. The functional impact of HIP remains more obscure in vertebrate networks, where higher order cognitive processes rely on complex neural dynamics. The hypothesis has emerged that HIP might control the complexity of activity dynamics in recurrent networks, with important computational consequences. However, conflicting results about the causal relationships between cellular HIP, network dynamics, and computational performance have arisen from machine-learning studies. Here, we assess how cellular HIP effects translate into collective dynamics and computational properties in biological recurrent networks. We develop a realistic multiscale model including a generic HIP rule regulating the neuronal threshold with actual molecular signaling pathways kinetics, Dale's principle, sparse connectivity, synaptic balance, and Hebbian synaptic plasticity (SP). Dynamic mean-field analysis and simulations unravel that HIP sets a working point at which inputs are transduced by large derivative ranges of the transfer function. This cellular mechanism ensures increased network dynamics complexity, robust balance with SP at the edge of chaos, and improved input separability. Although critically dependent upon balanced excitatory and inhibitory drives, these effects display striking robustness to changes in network architecture, learning rates, and input features. Thus, the mechanism we unveil might represent a ubiquitous cellular basis for complex dynamics in neural networks. Understanding this robustness is an important challenge to unraveling principles underlying self-organization around criticality in biological recurrent neural networks.

  2. Effects of cellular homeostatic intrinsic plasticity on dynamical and computational properties of biological recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Naudé, Jérémie; Cessac, Bruno; Berry, Hugues; Delord, Bruno

    2013-09-18

    Homeostatic intrinsic plasticity (HIP) is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism regulating neuronal activity, cardinal for the proper functioning of nervous systems. In invertebrates, HIP is critical for orchestrating stereotyped activity patterns. The functional impact of HIP remains more obscure in vertebrate networks, where higher order cognitive processes rely on complex neural dynamics. The hypothesis has emerged that HIP might control the complexity of activity dynamics in recurrent networks, with important computational consequences. However, conflicting results about the causal relationships between cellular HIP, network dynamics, and computational performance have arisen from machine-learning studies. Here, we assess how cellular HIP effects translate into collective dynamics and computational properties in biological recurrent networks. We develop a realistic multiscale model including a generic HIP rule regulating the neuronal threshold with actual molecular signaling pathways kinetics, Dale's principle, sparse connectivity, synaptic balance, and Hebbian synaptic plasticity (SP). Dynamic mean-field analysis and simulations unravel that HIP sets a working point at which inputs are transduced by large derivative ranges of the transfer function. This cellular mechanism ensures increased network dynamics complexity, robust balance with SP at the edge of chaos, and improved input separability. Although critically dependent upon balanced excitatory and inhibitory drives, these effects display striking robustness to changes in network architecture, learning rates, and input features. Thus, the mechanism we unveil might represent a ubiquitous cellular basis for complex dynamics in neural networks. Understanding this robustness is an important challenge to unraveling principles underlying self-organization around criticality in biological recurrent neural networks. PMID:24048833

  3. On Window Control Algorithm over Wireless Cellular Networks with Large Delay Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Byun, Hee-Jung; Lim, Jong-Tae

    In addition to high bit error rates, large and sudden variations in delay often occur in wireless cellular networks. The delay can be several times the typical round-trip time, which can cause the spurious timeout. In this letter, we propose a new window control algorithm to improve TCP performance in wireless cellular networks with large delay variation and high bit error rates. Simulation results illustrate that our proposal improves the performance of TCP in terms of fairness and link utilization.

  4. Cues for cellular assembly of vascular elastin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    Elastin, a structural protein distributed in the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues is critical to the maintenance of vascular mechanics, besides regulation of cell-signaling pathways involved in injury response and morphogenesis. Thus, congenital absence or disease-mediated degradation of vascular elastin and its malformation within native vessels due to innately poor elastin synthesis by adult vascular cells compromise vascular homeostasis. Current elastin regenerative strategies using tissue engineering principles are limited by the progressive destabilization of tropoelastin mRNA expression in adult vascular cells and the unavailability of scaffolds that can provide cellular cues necessary to up-regulate elastin synthesis and regenerate faithful mimics of native elastin. Since our earlier studies demonstrated the elastogenic utility of hyaluronan (HA)-based cues, we have currently sought to identify a unique set of culture conditions based on HA fragments (0.756-2000 kDa), growth factors (TGF-beta1, IGF-1) and other biomolecules (Cu2+ ions, LOX), which will together enhance synthesis, crosslinking, maturation and fibrous elastin matrix formation by adult SMCs, under both healthy and inflammatory conditions. It was observed that TGF-beta1 (1 ng/mL) together with HA oligomers (0.2 microg/mL) synergistically suppressed SMC proliferation, enhanced tropoelastin (8-fold) and matrix elastin synthesis (5.5-fold), besides improving matrix yield (4.5-fold), possibly by increasing production and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX). Though addition of IGF-1 alone did not offer any advantage, HA fragments (20-200 kDa) in the presence of IGF-1 stimulated tropoelastin and soluble elastin synthesis more than 2.2-fold, with HMW HA contributing for ˜5-fold increase in crosslinked matrix elastin synthesis. Similarly, 0.1 M of Cu2+ ions, alone or together with HA fragments stimulated synthesis of tropoelastin (4-fold) and crosslinked matrix elastin (4.5-fold), via increases in

  5. Participatory sensing as an enabler for self-organisation in future cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Muhammad Ali; Imran, Ali; Onireti, Oluwakayode

    2013-12-01

    In this short review paper we summarise the emerging challenges in the field of participatory sensing for the self-organisation of the next generation of wireless cellular networks. We identify the potential of participatory sensing in enabling the self-organisation, deployment optimisation and radio resource management of wireless cellular networks. We also highlight how this approach can meet the future goals for the next generation of cellular system in terms of infrastructure sharing, management of multiple radio access techniques, flexible usage of spectrum and efficient management of very small data cells.

  6. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    EPA Science Inventory

    With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate t...

  7. Tools and Models for Integrating Multiple Cellular Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstein, Mark

    2015-11-06

    In this grant, we have systematically investigated the integrated networks, which are responsible for the coordination of activity between metabolic pathways in prokaryotes. We have developed several computational tools to analyze the topology of the integrated networks consisting of metabolic, regulatory, and physical interaction networks. The tools are all open-source, and they are available to download from Github, and can be incorporated in the Knowledgebase. Here, we summarize our work as follow. Understanding the topology of the integrated networks is the first step toward understanding its dynamics and evolution. For Aim 1 of this grant, we have developed a novel algorithm to determine and measure the hierarchical structure of transcriptional regulatory networks [1]. The hierarchy captures the direction of information flow in the network. The algorithm is generally applicable to regulatory networks in prokaryotes, yeast and higher organisms. Integrated datasets are extremely beneficial in understanding the biology of a system in a compact manner due to the conflation of multiple layers of information. Therefore for Aim 2 of this grant, we have developed several tools and carried out analysis for integrating system-wide genomic information. To make use of the structural data, we have developed DynaSIN for protein-protein interactions networks with various dynamical interfaces [2]. We then examined the association between network topology with phenotypic effects such as gene essentiality. In particular, we have organized E. coli and S. cerevisiae transcriptional regulatory networks into hierarchies. We then correlated gene phenotypic effects by tinkering with different layers to elucidate which layers were more tolerant to perturbations [3]. In the context of evolution, we also developed a workflow to guide the comparison between different types of biological networks across various species using the concept of rewiring [4], and Furthermore, we have developed

  8. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Leijnse, Hidde

    2016-04-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of microwave links in such a network. We present a rainfall retrieval algorithm, which is employed to obtain rainfall maps from microwave links in a cellular communication network. We compare these rainfall maps to gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps. The microwave link data set, as well as the developed code, a package in the open source scripting language "R", are freely available at GitHub (https://github.com/overeem11/RAINLINK). The purpose of this presentation is to promote rainfall mapping utilizing microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  9. Channel modeling for fifth generation cellular networks and wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Amir

    In view of exponential growth in data traffic demand, the wireless communications industry has aimed to increase the capacity of existing networks by 1000 times over the next 20 years. A combination of extreme cell densification, more bandwidth, and higher spectral efficiency is needed to support the data traffic requirements for fifth generation (5G) cellular communications. In this research, the potential improvements achieved by using three major 5G enabling technologies (i.e., small cells, millimeter-wave spectrum, and massive MIMO) in rural and urban environments are investigated. This work develops SPM and KA-based ray models to investigate the impact of geometrical parameters on terrain-based multiuser MIMO channel characteristic. Moreover, a new directional 3D channel model is developed for urban millimeter-wave (mmW) small cells. Path-loss, spatial correlation, coverage distance, and coherence length are studied in urban areas. Exploiting physical optics (PO) and geometric optics (GO) solutions, closed form expressions are derived for spatial correlation. Achievable spatial diversity is evaluated using horizontal and vertical linear arrays as well as planar 2D arrays. In another study, a versatile near-ground field prediction model is proposed to facilitate accurate wireless sensor network (WSN) simulations. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the effects of antenna height, frequency of operation, polarization, and terrain dielectric and roughness properties on WSNs performance.

  10. Quantifying Uncertainties in Rainfall Maps from Cellular Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Rios Gaona, M. F.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.

    2014-12-01

    The core idea behind rainfall retrievals from commercial microwave link networks is to measure the decrease in power due to attenuation of the electromagnetic signal by raindrops along the link path. Accurate rainfall measurements are of vital importance in hydrological applications, for instance, flash-flood early-warning systems, agriculture, and climate modeling. Hence, such an alternative technique fulfills the need for measurements with higher resolution in time and space, especially in places where standard rain gauge-networks are scarce or poorly maintained. Rainfall estimation via commercial microwave link networks, at country-wide scales, has recently been demonstrated. Despite their potential applicability in rainfall estimation at higher spatiotemporal resolutions, the uncertainties present in link-based rainfall maps are not yet fully comprehended. Now we attempt to quantify the inherent sources of uncertainty present in interpolated maps computed from commercial microwave link rainfall retrievals. In order to disentangle these sources of uncertainty we identified four main sources of error: 1) microwave link measurements, 2) availability of microwave link measurements, 3) spatial distribution of the network, and 4) interpolation methodology. We computed more than 1000 rainfall fields, for The Netherlands, from real and simulated microwave link data. These rainfall fields were compared to quality-controlled gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps considered as ground-truth. Thus we were able to quantify the contribution of errors in microwave link measurements to the overall uncertainty. The actual performance of the commercial microwave link network is affected by the intermittent availability of the links, not only in time but also in space. We simulated a fully-operational network in time and space, and thus we quantified the role of the availability of microwave link measurements to the overall uncertainty. This research showed that the largest source of

  11. Reverse engineering cellular decisions for hybrid reconfigurable network modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Howard A.; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W.

    2011-06-01

    Cells as microorganisms and within multicellular organisms make robust decisions. Knowing how these complex cells make decisions is essential to explain, predict or mimic their behavior. The discovery of multi-layer multiple feedback loops in the signaling pathways of these modular hybrid systems suggests their decision making is sophisticated. Hybrid systems coordinate and integrate signals of various kinds: discrete on/off signals, continuous sensory signals, and stochastic and continuous fluctuations to regulate chemical concentrations. Such signaling networks can form reconfigurable networks of attractors and repellors giving them an extra level of organization that has resilient decision making built in. Work on generic attractor and repellor networks and on the already identified feedback networks and dynamic reconfigurable regulatory topologies in biological cells suggests that biological systems probably exploit such dynamic capabilities. We present a simple behavior of the swimming unicellular alga Chlamydomonas that involves interdependent discrete and continuous signals in feedback loops. We show how to rigorously verify a hybrid dynamical model of a biological system with respect to a declarative description of a cell's behavior. The hybrid dynamical systems we use are based on a unification of discrete structures and continuous topologies developed in prior work on convergence spaces. They involve variables of discrete and continuous types, in the sense of type theory in mathematical logic. A unification such as afforded by convergence spaces is necessary if one wants to take account of the affect of the structural relationships within each type on the dynamics of the system.

  12. Resource Management in QoS-Aware Wireless Cellular Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Emerging broadband wireless networks that support high speed packet data with heterogeneous quality of service (QoS) requirements demand more flexible and efficient use of the scarce spectral resource. Opportunistic scheduling exploits the time-varying, location-dependent channel conditions to achieve multiuser diversity. In this work, we study…

  13. Application of Cellular Automata to Detection of Malicious Network Packets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    A problem in computer security is identification of attack signatures in network packets. An attack signature is a pattern of bits that characterizes a particular attack. Because there are many kinds of attacks, there are potentially many attack signatures. Furthermore, attackers may seek to avoid detection by altering the attack mechanism so that…

  14. Cellular network entropy as the energy potential in Waddington's differentiation landscape.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Christopher R S; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Severini, Simone; Widschwendter, Martin; Enver, Tariq; Zhou, Joseph X; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2013-10-24

    Differentiation is a key cellular process in normal tissue development that is significantly altered in cancer. Although molecular signatures characterising pluripotency and multipotency exist, there is, as yet, no single quantitative mark of a cellular sample's position in the global differentiation hierarchy. Here we adopt a systems view and consider the sample's network entropy, a measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, computable from a sample's genome-wide expression profile. We demonstrate that network entropy provides a quantitative, in-silico, readout of the average undifferentiated state of the profiled cells, recapitulating the known hierarchy of pluripotent, multipotent and differentiated cell types. Network entropy further exhibits dynamic changes in time course differentiation data, and in line with a sample's differentiation stage. In disease, network entropy predicts a higher level of cellular plasticity in cancer stem cell populations compared to ordinary cancer cells. Importantly, network entropy also allows identification of key differentiation pathways. Our results are consistent with the view that pluripotency is a statistical property defined at the cellular population level, correlating with intra-sample heterogeneity, and driven by the degree of signaling promiscuity in cells. In summary, network entropy provides a quantitative measure of a cell's undifferentiated state, defining its elevation in Waddington's landscape.

  15. Logical Modeling and Dynamical Analysis of Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Traynard, Pauline; Monteiro, Pedro T.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Helikar, Tomáš; Thieffry, Denis; Chaouiya, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    The logical (or logic) formalism is increasingly used to model regulatory and signaling networks. Complementing these applications, several groups contributed various methods and tools to support the definition and analysis of logical models. After an introduction to the logical modeling framework and to several of its variants, we review here a number of recent methodological advances to ease the analysis of large and intricate networks. In particular, we survey approaches to determine model attractors and their reachability properties, to assess the dynamical impact of variations of external signals, and to consistently reduce large models. To illustrate these developments, we further consider several published logical models for two important biological processes, namely the differentiation of T helper cells and the control of mammalian cell cycle. PMID:27303434

  16. Logical Modeling and Dynamical Analysis of Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Traynard, Pauline; Monteiro, Pedro T; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Helikar, Tomáš; Thieffry, Denis; Chaouiya, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    The logical (or logic) formalism is increasingly used to model regulatory and signaling networks. Complementing these applications, several groups contributed various methods and tools to support the definition and analysis of logical models. After an introduction to the logical modeling framework and to several of its variants, we review here a number of recent methodological advances to ease the analysis of large and intricate networks. In particular, we survey approaches to determine model attractors and their reachability properties, to assess the dynamical impact of variations of external signals, and to consistently reduce large models. To illustrate these developments, we further consider several published logical models for two important biological processes, namely the differentiation of T helper cells and the control of mammalian cell cycle.

  17. Dynamical modeling and analysis of large cellular regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérenguier, D.; Chaouiya, C.; Monteiro, P. T.; Naldi, A.; Remy, E.; Thieffry, D.; Tichit, L.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical analysis of large biological regulatory networks requires the development of scalable methods for mathematical modeling. Following the approach initially introduced by Thomas, we formalize the interactions between the components of a network in terms of discrete variables, functions, and parameters. Model simulations result in directed graphs, called state transition graphs. We are particularly interested in reachability properties and asymptotic behaviors, which correspond to terminal strongly connected components (or "attractors") in the state transition graph. A well-known problem is the exponential increase of the size of state transition graphs with the number of network components, in particular when using the biologically realistic asynchronous updating assumption. To address this problem, we have developed several complementary methods enabling the analysis of the behavior of large and complex logical models: (i) the definition of transition priority classes to simplify the dynamics; (ii) a model reduction method preserving essential dynamical properties, (iii) a novel algorithm to compact state transition graphs and directly generate compressed representations, emphasizing relevant transient and asymptotic dynamical properties. The power of an approach combining these different methods is demonstrated by applying them to a recent multilevel logical model for the network controlling CD4+ T helper cell response to antigen presentation and to a dozen cytokines. This model accounts for the differentiation of canonical Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, as well as of inflammatory Th17 and regulatory T cells, along with many hybrid subtypes. All these methods have been implemented into the software GINsim, which enables the definition, the analysis, and the simulation of logical regulatory graphs.

  18. Intrinsic Cellular Properties and Connectivity Density Determine Variable Clustering Patterns in Randomly Connected Inhibitory Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Scott; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus and cortex play a pivotal role in generating rhythmic activity by clustering and synchronizing cell firing. Results of our simulations demonstrate that both the intrinsic cellular properties of neurons and the degree of network connectivity affect the characteristics of clustered dynamics exhibited in randomly connected, heterogeneous inhibitory networks. We quantify intrinsic cellular properties by the neuron's current-frequency relation (IF curve) and Phase Response Curve (PRC), a measure of how perturbations given at various phases of a neurons firing cycle affect subsequent spike timing. We analyze network bursting properties of networks of neurons with Type I or Type II properties in both excitability and PRC profile; Type I PRCs strictly show phase advances and IF curves that exhibit frequencies arbitrarily close to zero at firing threshold while Type II PRCs display both phase advances and delays and IF curves that have a non-zero frequency at threshold. Type II neurons whose properties arise with or without an M-type adaptation current are considered. We analyze network dynamics under different levels of cellular heterogeneity and as intrinsic cellular firing frequency and the time scale of decay of synaptic inhibition are varied. Many of the dynamics exhibited by these networks diverge from the predictions of the interneuron network gamma (ING) mechanism, as well as from results in all-to-all connected networks. Our results show that randomly connected networks of Type I neurons synchronize into a single cluster of active neurons while networks of Type II neurons organize into two mutually exclusive clusters segregated by the cells' intrinsic firing frequencies. Networks of Type II neurons containing the adaptation current behave similarly to networks of either Type I or Type II neurons depending on network parameters; however, the adaptation current creates differences in the cluster dynamics

  19. Mitochondria: the cellular hub of the dynamic coordinated network.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the eukaryotic cell. After billions of years of evolution, mitochondria have adaptively integrated into the symbiont. Such integration is not only evidenced by the consolidation of genetic information, that is, the transfer of most mitochondrial genes into the nucleus, but also manifested by the functional recombination by which mitochondria participate seamlessly in various cellular processes. In the past decade, the field of mitochondria biology has been focused on the dynamic and interactive features of these semiautonomous organelles. Aspects of a complex multilayer quality control system coordinating mitochondrial function and environmental changes are being uncovered and refined. This Forum summarizes the recent progress of these critical topics, with a focus on the dynamic quality control of mitochondrial reticulum, including their biogenesis, dynamic remodeling, and degradation, as well as the homeostasis of the mitochondrial proteome. These diverse but interconnected mechanisms are found to be critical in the maintenance of a functional, efficient, and responsive mitochondrial population and could therefore become therapeutic targets in numerous mitochondrion-implicated disorders.

  20. Proportional Fair Scheduling for Multicast Services in Wireless Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Chung Ha; Kim, Young Yong

    Recently, there has been extensive research on resource allocation schemes for multicast services that would satisfy the requirements of multimedia traffic. Although several schemes have been proposed to improve the performance of individual multicast groups, it is not easy to achieve both throughput efficiency and user fairness. In this study, we propose a new multicast scheduling scheme for achieving proportional fair (PF) allocation in wireless cellular systems. The basic idea of PF is to schedule the user whose corresponding instantaneous channel quality is the highest relative to the average channel condition over a given time scale. We first extend the PF metric to the extent that the scheduler can reflect the user's varying channel gain, and fairness, not only in the unicast case, but also in multicast transmissions. A multicast PF scheme maximizes the summation of the logarithmic average rate of all multicasting users. Thus, it improves the fairness to mobile users when compared to max-rate allocation, because the logarithmic rate gives more weight to lower rate users, while achieving high throughput. Moreover, the proposed scheme is less complex than max-rate allocation.

  1. A Mathematical Model to study the Dynamics of Epithelial Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Alessandro; Vincent, Stéphane; Dobbe, Roel; Silletti, Alberto; Master, Neal; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Tomlin, Claire J.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelia are sheets of connected cells that are essential across the animal kingdom. Experimental observations suggest that the dynamical behavior of many single-layered epithelial tissues has strong analogies with that of specific mechanical systems, namely large networks consisting of point masses connected through spring-damper elements and undergoing the influence of active and dissipating forces. Based on this analogy, this work develops a modeling framework to enable the study of the mechanical properties and of the dynamic behavior of large epithelial cellular networks. The model is built first by creating a network topology that is extracted from the actual cellular geometry as obtained from experiments, then by associating a mechanical structure and dynamics to the network via spring-damper elements. This scalable approach enables running simulations of large network dynamics: the derived modeling framework in particular is predisposed to be tailored to study general dynamics (for example, morphogenesis) of various classes of single-layered epithelial cellular networks. In this contribution we test the model on a case study of the dorsal epithelium of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo during early dorsal closure (and, less conspicuously, germband retraction). PMID:23221083

  2. Exponential synchronization for fuzzy cellular neural networks with time-varying delays and nonlinear impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Pu, Hao; Liu, Yanmin; Jiang, Haijun; Hu, Cheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the globally exponential synchronization of delayed fuzzy cellular neural networks with nonlinear impulsive effects are concerned. By utilizing inequality techniques and Lyapunov functional method, some sufficient conditions on the exponential synchronization are obtained based on [Formula: see text]-norm. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  3. Cooperative Game-Based Energy Efficiency Management over Ultra-Dense Wireless Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Pengpeng; Gao, Shouwan

    2016-09-13

    Ultra-dense wireless cellular networks have been envisioned as a promising technique for handling the explosive increase of wireless traffic volume. With the extensive deployment of small cells in wireless cellular networks, the network spectral efficiency (SE) is improved with the use of limited frequency. However, the mutual inter-tier and intra-tier interference between or among small cells and macro cells becomes serious. On the other hand, more chances for potential cooperation among different cells are introduced. Energy efficiency (EE) has become one of the most important problems for future wireless networks. This paper proposes a cooperative bargaining game-based method for comprehensive EE management in an ultra-dense wireless cellular network, which highlights the complicated interference influence on energy-saving challenges and the power-coordination process among small cells and macro cells. Especially, a unified EE utility with the consideration of the interference mitigation is proposed to jointly address the SE, the deployment efficiency (DE), and the EE. In particular, closed-form power-coordination solutions for the optimal EE are derived to show the convergence property of the algorithm. Moreover, a simplified algorithm is presented to reduce the complexity of the signaling overhead, which is significant for ultra-dense small cells. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed cooperative bargaining game-based and simplified schemes.

  4. Cooperative Game-Based Energy Efficiency Management over Ultra-Dense Wireless Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Pengpeng; Gao, Shouwan

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-dense wireless cellular networks have been envisioned as a promising technique for handling the explosive increase of wireless traffic volume. With the extensive deployment of small cells in wireless cellular networks, the network spectral efficiency (SE) is improved with the use of limited frequency. However, the mutual inter-tier and intra-tier interference between or among small cells and macro cells becomes serious. On the other hand, more chances for potential cooperation among different cells are introduced. Energy efficiency (EE) has become one of the most important problems for future wireless networks. This paper proposes a cooperative bargaining game-based method for comprehensive EE management in an ultra-dense wireless cellular network, which highlights the complicated interference influence on energy-saving challenges and the power-coordination process among small cells and macro cells. Especially, a unified EE utility with the consideration of the interference mitigation is proposed to jointly address the SE, the deployment efficiency (DE), and the EE. In particular, closed-form power-coordination solutions for the optimal EE are derived to show the convergence property of the algorithm. Moreover, a simplified algorithm is presented to reduce the complexity of the signaling overhead, which is significant for ultra-dense small cells. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed cooperative bargaining game-based and simplified schemes. PMID:27649170

  5. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  6. Cooperative Game-Based Energy Efficiency Management over Ultra-Dense Wireless Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Chen, Pengpeng; Gao, Shouwan

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-dense wireless cellular networks have been envisioned as a promising technique for handling the explosive increase of wireless traffic volume. With the extensive deployment of small cells in wireless cellular networks, the network spectral efficiency (SE) is improved with the use of limited frequency. However, the mutual inter-tier and intra-tier interference between or among small cells and macro cells becomes serious. On the other hand, more chances for potential cooperation among different cells are introduced. Energy efficiency (EE) has become one of the most important problems for future wireless networks. This paper proposes a cooperative bargaining game-based method for comprehensive EE management in an ultra-dense wireless cellular network, which highlights the complicated interference influence on energy-saving challenges and the power-coordination process among small cells and macro cells. Especially, a unified EE utility with the consideration of the interference mitigation is proposed to jointly address the SE, the deployment efficiency (DE), and the EE. In particular, closed-form power-coordination solutions for the optimal EE are derived to show the convergence property of the algorithm. Moreover, a simplified algorithm is presented to reduce the complexity of the signaling overhead, which is significant for ultra-dense small cells. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed cooperative bargaining game-based and simplified schemes. PMID:27649170

  7. The Electrophysiological MEMS Device with Micro Channel Array for Cellular Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonomura, Wataru; Kurashima, Toshiaki; Takayama, Yuzo; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Konishi, Satoshi

    This paper describes a new type of MCA (Micro Channel Array) for simultaneous multipoint measurement of cellular network. Presented MCA employing the measurement principles of the patch-clamp technique is designed for advanced neural network analysis which has been studied by co-authors using 64ch MEA (Micro Electrode Arrays) system. First of all, sucking and clamping of cells through channels of developed MCA is expected to improve electrophysiological signal detections. Electrophysiological sensing electrodes integrated around individual channels of MCA by using MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) technologies are electrically isolated for simultaneous multipoint measurement. In this study, we tested the developed MCA using the non-cultured rat's cerebral cortical slice and the hippocampal neurons. We could measure the spontaneous action potential of the slice simultaneously at multiple points and culture the neurons on developed MCA. Herein, we describe the experimental results together with the design and fabrication of the electrophysiological MEMS device with MCA for cellular network analysis.

  8. A self-learning call admission control scheme for CDMA cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Huaguang

    2005-09-01

    In the present paper, a call admission control scheme that can learn from the network environment and user behavior is developed for code division multiple access (CDMA) cellular networks that handle both voice and data services. The idea is built upon a novel learning control architecture with only a single module instead of two or three modules in adaptive critic designs (ACDs). The use of adaptive critic approach for call admission control in wireless cellular networks is new. The call admission controller can perform learning in real-time as well as in offline environments and the controller improves its performance as it gains more experience. Another important contribution in the present work is the choice of utility function for the present self-learning control approach which makes the present learning process much more efficient than existing learning control methods. The performance of our algorithm will be shown through computer simulation and compared with existing algorithms. PMID:16252828

  9. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-06-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide (≈ 35 500 km2) 15 min rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of approximately 2400 microwave links in such a network. Here we give a detailed description of the employed rainfall retrieval algorithm. Moreover, the documented, modular, and user-friendly code (a package in the scripting language "R") is made available, including a 2-day data set of approximately 2600 commercial microwave links from the Netherlands. The purpose of this paper is to promote rainfall mapping utilising microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  10. Cellular automata with object-oriented features for parallel molecular network modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Yinghui; Huang, Sui; Sun, Yan; Dhar, Pawan

    2005-06-01

    Cellular automata are an important modeling paradigm for studying the dynamics of large, parallel systems composed of multiple, interacting components. However, to model biological systems, cellular automata need to be extended beyond the large-scale parallelism and intensive communication in order to capture two fundamental properties characteristic of complex biological systems: hierarchy and heterogeneity. This paper proposes extensions to a cellular automata language, Cellang, to meet this purpose. The extended language, with object-oriented features, can be used to describe the structure and activity of parallel molecular networks within cells. Capabilities of this new programming language include object structure to define molecular programs within a cell, floating-point data type and mathematical functions to perform quantitative computation, message passing capability to describe molecular interactions, as well as new operators, statements, and built-in functions. We discuss relevant programming issues of these features, including the object-oriented description of molecular interactions with molecule encapsulation, message passing, and the description of heterogeneity and anisotropy at the cell and molecule levels. By enabling the integration of modeling at the molecular level with system behavior at cell, tissue, organ, or even organism levels, the program will help improve our understanding of how complex and dynamic biological activities are generated and controlled by parallel functioning of molecular networks. Index Terms-Cellular automata, modeling, molecular network, object-oriented. PMID:16117022

  11. Modeling approaches for qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of cellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of systems biology is the construction of predictive models of bio-molecular networks. Cellular networks of moderate size have been modeled successfully in a quantitative way based on differential equations. However, in large-scale networks, knowledge of mechanistic details and kinetic parameters is often too limited to allow for the set-up of predictive quantitative models. Here, we review methodologies for qualitative and semi-quantitative modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. In particular, we focus on three different but related formalisms facilitating modeling of signaling processes with different levels of detail: interaction graphs, logical/Boolean networks, and logic-based ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Albeit the simplest models possible, interaction graphs allow the identification of important network properties such as signaling paths, feedback loops, or global interdependencies. Logical or Boolean models can be derived from interaction graphs by constraining the logical combination of edges. Logical models can be used to study the basic input–output behavior of the system under investigation and to analyze its qualitative dynamic properties by discrete simulations. They also provide a suitable framework to identify proper intervention strategies enforcing or repressing certain behaviors. Finally, as a third formalism, Boolean networks can be transformed into logic-based ODEs enabling studies on essential quantitative and dynamic features of a signaling network, where time and states are continuous. We describe and illustrate key methods and applications of the different modeling formalisms and discuss their relationships. In particular, as one important aspect for model reuse, we will show how these three modeling approaches can be combined to a modeling pipeline (or model hierarchy) allowing one to start with the simplest representation of a signaling network (interaction graph), which can later be refined to

  12. Modeling approaches for qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of cellular signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Samaga, Regina; Klamt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of systems biology is the construction of predictive models of bio-molecular networks. Cellular networks of moderate size have been modeled successfully in a quantitative way based on differential equations. However, in large-scale networks, knowledge of mechanistic details and kinetic parameters is often too limited to allow for the set-up of predictive quantitative models.Here, we review methodologies for qualitative and semi-quantitative modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. In particular, we focus on three different but related formalisms facilitating modeling of signaling processes with different levels of detail: interaction graphs, logical/Boolean networks, and logic-based ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Albeit the simplest models possible, interaction graphs allow the identification of important network properties such as signaling paths, feedback loops, or global interdependencies. Logical or Boolean models can be derived from interaction graphs by constraining the logical combination of edges. Logical models can be used to study the basic input-output behavior of the system under investigation and to analyze its qualitative dynamic properties by discrete simulations. They also provide a suitable framework to identify proper intervention strategies enforcing or repressing certain behaviors. Finally, as a third formalism, Boolean networks can be transformed into logic-based ODEs enabling studies on essential quantitative and dynamic features of a signaling network, where time and states are continuous.We describe and illustrate key methods and applications of the different modeling formalisms and discuss their relationships. In particular, as one important aspect for model reuse, we will show how these three modeling approaches can be combined to a modeling pipeline (or model hierarchy) allowing one to start with the simplest representation of a signaling network (interaction graph), which can later be refined to logical

  13. Application of GA in optimization of pore network models generated by multi-cellular growth algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, Saeid; Boozarjomehry, Ramin Bozorgmehry; Pishvaie, Mahmoud Reza

    2009-10-01

    In pore network modeling, the void space of a rock sample is represented at the microscopic scale by a network of pores connected by throats. Construction of a reasonable representation of the geometry and topology of the pore space will lead to a reliable prediction of the properties of porous media. Recently, the theory of multi-cellular growth (or L-systems) has been used as a flexible tool for generation of pore network models which do not require any special information such as 2D SEM or 3D pore space images. In general, the networks generated by this method are irregular pore network models which are inherently closer to the complicated nature of the porous media rather than regular lattice networks. In this approach, the construction process is controlled only by the production rules that govern the development process of the network. In this study, genetic algorithm has been used to obtain the optimum values of the uncertain parameters of these production rules to build an appropriate irregular lattice network capable of the prediction of both static and hydraulic information of the target porous medium.

  14. A new cellular nonlinear network emulation on FPGA for EEG signal processing in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jens; Müller, Jan; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    For processing of EEG signals, we propose a new architecture for the hardware emulation of discrete-time Cellular Nonlinear Networks (DT-CNN). Our results show the importance of a high computational accuracy in EEG signal prediction that cannot be achieved with existing analogue VLSI circuits. The refined architecture of the processing elements and its resource schedule, the cellular network structure with local couplings, the FPGA-based embedded system containing the DT-CNN, and the data flow in the entire system will be discussed in detail. The proposed DT-CNN design has been implemented and tested on an Xilinx FPGA development platform. The embedded co-processor with a multi-threading kernel is utilised for control and pre-processing tasks and data exchange to the host via Ethernet. The performance of the implemented DT-CNN has been determined for a popular example and compared to that of a conventional computer.

  15. Application of neural networks to channel assignment for cellular CDMA networks with multiple services and mobile base stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    1996-03-01

    The use of artificial neural networks to the channel assignment problem for cellular code- division multiple access (CDMA) telecommunications systems is considered. CDMA takes advantage of voice activity and spatial isolation because its capacity is only interference limited, unlike time-division multiple access (TDMA) and frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) where capacities are bandwidth limited. Any reduction in interference in CDMA translates linearly into increased capacity. FDMA and TDMA use a frequency reuse pattern as a method to increase capacity, while CDMA reuses the same frequency for all cells and gains a reuse efficiency by means of orthogonal codes. The latter method can improve system capacity by factors of four to six over digital TDMA or FDMA. Cellular carriers are planning to provide multiple communication services using CDMA in the next generation cellular system infrastructure. The approach of this study is the use of neural network methods for automatic and local network control, based on traffic behavior in specific cell cites and demand history. The goal is to address certain problems associated with the management of mobile and personal communication services in a cellular radio communications environment. In planning a cellular radio network, the operator assigns channels to the radio cells so that the probability of the processed carrier-to-interference ratio, CII, exceeding a predefined value is sufficiently low. The RF propagation, determined from the topography and infrastructure in the operating area, is used in conjunction with the densities of expected communications traffic to formulate interference constraints. These constraints state which radio cells may use the same code (channel) or adjacent channels at a time. The traffic loading and the number of service grades can also be used to calculate the number of required channels (codes) for each cell. The general assignment problem is the task of assigning the required number

  16. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells.

  17. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-06-14

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network.

  18. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network. PMID:27314351

  19. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network. PMID:27314351

  20. An Asynchronous Recurrent Network of Cellular Automaton-Based Neurons and Its Reproduction of Spiking Neural Network Activities.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takashi; Torikai, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Modeling and implementation approaches for the reproduction of input-output relationships in biological nervous tissues contribute to the development of engineering and clinical applications. However, because of high nonlinearity, the traditional modeling and implementation approaches encounter difficulties in terms of generalization ability (i.e., performance when reproducing an unknown data set) and computational resources (i.e., computation time and circuit elements). To overcome these difficulties, asynchronous cellular automaton-based neuron (ACAN) models, which are described as special kinds of cellular automata that can be implemented as small asynchronous sequential logic circuits have been proposed. This paper presents a novel type of such ACAN and a theoretical analysis of its excitability. This paper also presents a novel network of such neurons, which can mimic input-output relationships of biological and nonlinear ordinary differential equation model neural networks. Numerical analyses confirm that the presented network has a higher generalization ability than other major modeling and implementation approaches. In addition, Field-Programmable Gate Array-implementations confirm that the presented network requires lower computational resources.

  1. Copper enhances cellular and network excitabilities, and improves temporal processing in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Maureira, Carlos; Letelier, Juan Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Delgado, Ricardo; Vergara, Cecilia

    2015-12-01

    Copper, an ion with many important metabolic functions, has also been proposed to have a role as modulator on neuronal function, mostly based on its effects on voltage- and neurotransmitter-gated conductance as well as on neurological symptoms of patients with altered copper homeostasis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which copper exerts its neuromodulatory effects have not been clearly established in a functional neuronal network. Using rat hippocampus slices as a neuronal network model, the effects of copper in the range of 10-100 nm were tested on the intrinsic, synaptic and network properties of the CA1 region. Most of the previously described effects of this cation were in the micromolar range of copper concentrations. The current results indicate that copper is a multifaceted neuromodulator, having effects that may be grouped into two categories: (i) activity enhancement, by modulating synaptic communication and action potential (AP) conductances; and (ii) temporal processing and correlation extraction, by improving reliability and depressing inhibition. Specifically it was found that copper hyperpolarizes AP firing threshold, enhances neuronal and network excitability, modifies CA3-CA1 pathway gain, enhances the frequency of spontaneous synaptic events, decreases inhibitory network activity, and improves AP timing reliability. Moreover, copper chelation by bathocuproine decreases spontaneous network spiking activity. These results allow the proposal that copper affects the network activity from cellular to circuit levels on a moment-by-moment basis, and should be considered a crucial functional component of hippocampal neuronal circuitry.

  2. Motion Adaptive Vertical Handoff in Cellular/WLAN Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin; Fu, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals' handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS) is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms. PMID:24741347

  3. Phase transitions in pancreatic islet cellular networks and implications for type-1 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, I. J.; Jackson, Elais; Wang, Xujing

    2014-01-01

    In many aspects the onset of a chronic disease resembles a phase transition in a complex dynamic system: Quantitative changes accumulate largely unnoticed until a critical threshold is reached, which causes abrupt qualitative changes of the system. In this study we examine a special case, the onset of type-1 diabetes (T1D), a disease that results from loss of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β cells. Within each islet, the β cells are electrically coupled to each other via gap-junctional channels. This intercellular coupling enables the β cells to synchronize their insulin release, thereby generating the multiscale temporal rhythms in blood insulin that are critical to maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Using percolation theory we show how normal islet function is intrinsically linked to network connectivity. In particular, the critical amount of β-cell death at which the islet cellular network loses site percolation is consistent with laboratory and clinical observations of the threshold loss of β cells that causes islet functional failure. In addition, numerical simulations confirm that the islet cellular network needs to be percolated for β cells to synchronize. Furthermore, the interplay between site percolation and bond strength predicts the existence of a transient phase of islet functional recovery after onset of T1D and introduction of treatment, potentially explaining the honeymoon phenomenon. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the onset of T1D may be the result of a phase transition of the islet β-cell network.

  4. The translational machinery is an optimized molecular network that affects cellular homoeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Kazana, Eleanna; von der Haar, Tobias

    2014-02-01

    Translation involves interactions between mRNAs, ribosomes, tRNAs and a host of translation factors. Emerging evidence on the eukaryotic translational machinery indicates that these factors are organized in a highly optimized network, in which the levels of the different factors are finely matched to each other. This optimal factor network is essential for producing proteomes that result in optimal fitness, and perturbations to the optimal network that significantly affect translational activity therefore result in non-optimal proteomes, fitness losses and disease. On the other hand, experimental evidence indicates that translation and cell growth are relatively robust to perturbations, and viability can be maintained even upon significant damage to individual translation factors. How the eukaryotic translational machinery is optimized, and how it can maintain optimization in the face of changing internal parameters, are open questions relevant to the interaction between translation and cellular disease states.

  5. Issues for the integration of satellite and terrestrial cellular networks for mobile communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delre, Enrico; Mistretta, Ignazio; Dellipriscoli, Francesco; Settimo, Franco

    1991-09-01

    Satellite and terrestrial cellular systems naturally complement each other for land mobile communications, even though present systems have been developed independently. The main advantages of the integrated system are a faster wide area coverage, a better management of overloading traffic conditions, an extension to geographical areas not covered by the terrestrial network and, in perspective, the provision of only one integrated system for all mobile communications (land, aeronautical, and maritime). To achieve these goals, as far as possible the same protocols of the terrestrial network should be used also for the satellite network. Discussed here are the main issues arising from the requirements of the main integrated system. Some results are illustrated, and possible future improvements due to technical solutions are presented.

  6. Optimal design of sewer networks using cellular automata-based hybrid methods: Discrete and continuous approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, M. H.; Rohani, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, cellular automata based hybrid methods are proposed for the optimal design of sewer networks and their performance is compared with some of the common heuristic search methods. The problem of optimal design of sewer networks is first decomposed into two sub-optimization problems which are solved iteratively in a two stage manner. In the first stage, the pipe diameters of the network are assumed fixed and the nodal cover depths of the network are determined by solving a nonlinear sub-optimization problem. A cellular automata (CA) method is used for the solution of the optimization problem with the network nodes considered as the cells and their cover depths as the cell states. In the second stage, the nodal cover depths calculated from the first stage are fixed and the pipe diameters are calculated by solving a second nonlinear sub-optimization problem. Once again a CA method is used to solve the optimization problem of the second stage with the pipes considered as the CA cells and their corresponding diameters as the cell states. Two different updating rules are derived and used for the CA of the second stage depending on the treatment of the pipe diameters. In the continuous approach, the pipe diameters are considered as continuous variables and the corresponding updating rule is derived mathematically from the original objective function of the problem. In the discrete approach, however, an adhoc updating rule is derived and used taking into account the discrete nature of the pipe diameters. The proposed methods are used to optimally solve two sewer network problems and the results are presented and compared with those obtained by other methods. The results show that the proposed CA based hybrid methods are more efficient and effective than the most powerful search methods considered in this work.

  7. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Thomas; Schellenberg, Katja; Maier, Bert; Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E; Futschik, Matthias E; Kramer, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour) clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression) suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc.) contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner. PMID:23555304

  8. Segmentation algorithm via Cellular Neural/Nonlinear Network: implementation on Bio-inspired hardware platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabiber, Fethullah; Vecchio, Pietro; Grassi, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    The Bio-inspired (Bi-i) Cellular Vision System is a computing platform consisting of sensing, array sensing-processing, and digital signal processing. The platform is based on the Cellular Neural/Nonlinear Network (CNN) paradigm. This article presents the implementation of a novel CNN-based segmentation algorithm onto the Bi-i system. Each part of the algorithm, along with the corresponding implementation on the hardware platform, is carefully described through the article. The experimental results, carried out for Foreman and Car-phone video sequences, highlight the feasibility of the approach, which provides a frame rate of about 26 frames/s. Comparisons with existing CNN-based methods show that the conceived approach is more accurate, thus representing a good trade-off between real-time requirements and accuracy.

  9. Cellular network formation of hydrophobic alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles on mica surface mediated by water islands.

    PubMed

    John, Neena S; Raina, Gargi; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2010-09-01

    Dendritic and cellular networks of nanoparticles are known to form commonly either by random diffusion-limited aggregation or by solvent evaporation dynamics. Using alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles deposited on mica imaged under ambient and controlled water vapor conditions by atomic force microscope and in situ scanning electron microscope, respectively, we show a third mechanism in action. The cellular network consisting of open and closed polygons is formed by the nucleation and lateral growth of adsorbed water islands, the contact lines of which push the randomly distributed hydrophobic nanoparticles along the growth directions, eventually leading to the polygonal structure formation as the boundaries of the growing islands meet. Such nanoparticle displacement has been possible due to the weakly adhering nature of the hydrophilic substrate, mica. These results demonstrate an important but hitherto neglected effect of adsorbed water in the structure formation on hydrophilic substrates and provide a facile tool for the fabrication of nanoparticle networks without specific particle or substrate modifications and without a tight control on particle deposition conditions during the solvent evaporation. PMID:20831330

  10. Cellular Signaling Networks Function as Generalized Wiener-Kolmogorov Filters to Suppress Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-10-01

    Cellular signaling involves the transmission of environmental information through cascades of stochastic biochemical reactions, inevitably introducing noise that compromises signal fidelity. Each stage of the cascade often takes the form of a kinase-phosphatase push-pull network, a basic unit of signaling pathways whose malfunction is linked with a host of cancers. We show that this ubiquitous enzymatic network motif effectively behaves as a Wiener-Kolmogorov optimal noise filter. Using concepts from umbral calculus, we generalize the linear Wiener-Kolmogorov theory, originally introduced in the context of communication and control engineering, to take nonlinear signal transduction and discrete molecule populations into account. This allows us to derive rigorous constraints for efficient noise reduction in this biochemical system. Our mathematical formalism yields bounds on filter performance in cases important to cellular function—such as ultrasensitive response to stimuli. We highlight features of the system relevant for optimizing filter efficiency, encoded in a single, measurable, dimensionless parameter. Our theory, which describes noise control in a large class of signal transduction networks, is also useful both for the design of synthetic biochemical signaling pathways and the manipulation of pathways through experimental probes such as oscillatory input.

  11. Three Years of Country-Wide Rainfall Maps from Cellular Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America, and Africa. This calls for alternative sources of rainfall information. Various studies have shown that microwave links from operational cellular communication networks may be used for rainfall monitoring. Such networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The basic principle of rainfall estimation using microwave links is as follows. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated, which can be converted to average rainfall intensities over the length of a link. This is particularly interesting for those countries where few surface rainfall observations are available. A data set from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed. The data set runs from January 2011 - January 2014 and consists of roughly 2,000 links covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35,500 square kilometers). From this 3-year data set country-wide rainfall maps are retrieved, which are compared to a gauge-adjusted radar data set. The ability of cellular communication networks to estimate rainfall is studied for different temporal and spatial scales (including the catchment scale). To summarize, the results further confirm the potential of these networks for rainfall monitoring for hydrological applications.

  12. Three Years of Country-Wide Rainfall Maps from Cellular Communication Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Rios Gaona, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America, and Africa. This calls for alternative sources of rainfall information. Various studies have shown that microwave links from operational cellular communication networks may be used for rainfall monitoring. Such networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The basic principle of rainfall estimation using microwave links is as follows. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated, which can be converted to average rainfall intensities over the length of a link. This is particularly interesting for those countries where few surface rainfall observations are available. A data set from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed. The data set runs from January 2011 - January 2014 and consists of roughly 2000 links covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35,500 square kilometers). From this 3-year data set country-wide rainfall maps are retrieved, which are compared to a gauge-adjusted radar data set. The ability of cellular communication networks to estimate rainfall is studied for different temporal and spatial scales, as well as for several air temperature classes. Case studies are presented to investigate the performance of the algorithm during snow and sleet and to show the influence of dew formation on the antennas on the received signal levels. To summarize, the results further confirm the potential of these networks for rainfall monitoring.

  13. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, M P; Reukov, V V; Thompson, G L; Vertegel, A A; Guo, S; Kalinin, S V; Jesse, S

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  14. New color image encryption algorithm based on compound chaos mapping and hyperchaotic cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinqing; Bai, Fengming; Di, Xiaoqiang

    2013-01-01

    We propose an image encryption/decryption algorithm based on chaotic control parameter and hyperchaotic system with the composite permutation-diffusion structure. Compound chaos mapping is used to generate control parameters in the permutation stage. The high correlation between pixels is shuffled. In the diffusion stage, compound chaos mapping of different initial condition and control parameter generates the diffusion parameters, which are applied to hyperchaotic cellular neural networks. The diffusion key stream is obtained by this process and implements the pixels' diffusion. Compared with the existing methods, both simulation and statistical analysis of our proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has a good performance against attacks and meets the corresponding security level.

  15. Functional Recognition Imaging Using Artificial Neural Networks: Applications to Rapid Cellular Identification by Broadband Electromechanical Response

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, M.P.; Reukov, V.V.; Thompson, G.L.; Vertegel, A.A.; Guo, S.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Functional recognition imaging in Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses to identify the target behavior, reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain and obviating the need for analytical models. As an example of recognition imaging, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method. PMID:19752493

  16. Evolving Transport Networks With Cellular Automata Models Inspired by Slime Mould.

    PubMed

    Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch; Adamatzky, Andrew I

    2015-09-01

    Man-made transport networks and their design are closely related to the shortest path problem and considered amongst the most debated problems of computational intelligence. Apart from using conventional or bio-inspired computer algorithms, many researchers tried to solve this kind of problem using biological computing substrates, gas-discharge solvers, prototypes of a mobile droplet, and hot ice computers. In this aspect, another example of biological computer is the plasmodium of acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum (P. polycephalum), which is a large single cell visible by an unaided eye and has been proven as a reliable living substrate for implementing biological computing devices for computational geometry, graph-theoretical problems, and optimization and imitation of transport networks. Although P. polycephalum is easy to experiment with, computing devices built with the living slime mould are extremely slow; it takes slime mould days to execute a computation. Consequently, mapping key computing mechanisms of the slime mould onto silicon would allow us to produce efficient bio-inspired computing devices to tackle with hard to solve computational intelligence problems like the aforementioned. Toward this direction, a cellular automaton (CA)-based, Physarum-inspired, network designing model is proposed. This novel CA-based model is inspired by the propagating strategy, the formation of tubular networks, and the computing abilities of the plasmodium of P. polycephalum. The results delivered by the CA model demonstrate a good match with several previously published results of experimental laboratory studies on imitation of man-made transport networks with P. polycephalum. Consequently, the proposed CA model can be used as a virtual, easy-to-access, and biomimicking laboratory emulator that will economize large time periods needed for biological experiments while producing networks almost identical to the tubular networks of the real-slime mould.

  17. Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2006-12-12

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  18. Stability analysis of switched cellular neural networks: A mode-dependent average dwell time approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuangxia; Cao, Jie; Cao, Jinde

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the exponential stability of switched cellular neural networks by using the mode-dependent average dwell time (MDADT) approach. This method is quite different from the traditional average dwell time (ADT) method in permitting each subsystem to have its own average dwell time. Detailed investigations have been carried out for two cases. One is that all subsystems are stable and the other is that stable subsystems coexist with unstable subsystems. By employing Lyapunov functionals, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), Jessen-type inequality, Wirtinger-based inequality, reciprocally convex approach, we derived some novel and less conservative conditions on exponential stability of the networks. Comparing to ADT, the proposed MDADT show that the minimal dwell time of each subsystem is smaller and the switched system stabilizes faster. The obtained results extend and improve some existing ones. Moreover, the validness and effectiveness of these results are demonstrated through numerical simulations.

  19. Attractivity analysis of memristor-based cellular neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenyuan; Wang, Jun; Yan, Zheng

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents new theoretical results on the invariance and attractivity of memristor-based cellular neural networks (MCNNs) with time-varying delays. First, sufficient conditions to assure the boundedness and global attractivity of the networks are derived. Using state-space decomposition and some analytic techniques, it is shown that the number of equilibria located in the saturation regions of the piecewise-linear activation functions of an n-neuron MCNN with time-varying delays increases significantly from 2(n) to 2(2n2)+n) (2(2n2) times) compared with that without a memristor. In addition, sufficient conditions for the invariance and local or global attractivity of equilibria or attractive sets in any designated region are derived. Finally, two illustrative examples are given to elaborate the characteristics of the results in detail.

  20. Using prior knowledge from cellular pathways and molecular networks for diagnostic specimen classification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For many complex diseases, an earlier and more reliable diagnosis is considered a key prerequisite for developing more effective therapies to prevent or delay disease progression. Classical statistical learning approaches for specimen classification using omics data, however, often cannot provide diagnostic models with sufficient accuracy and robustness for heterogeneous diseases like cancers or neurodegenerative disorders. In recent years, new approaches for building multivariate biomarker models on omics data have been proposed, which exploit prior biological knowledge from molecular networks and cellular pathways to address these limitations. This survey provides an overview of these recent developments and compares pathway- and network-based specimen classification approaches in terms of their utility for improving model robustness, accuracy and biological interpretability. Different routes to translate omics-based multifactorial biomarker models into clinical diagnostic tests are discussed, and a previous study is presented as example. PMID:26141830

  1. Using prior knowledge from cellular pathways and molecular networks for diagnostic specimen classification.

    PubMed

    Glaab, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    For many complex diseases, an earlier and more reliable diagnosis is considered a key prerequisite for developing more effective therapies to prevent or delay disease progression. Classical statistical learning approaches for specimen classification using omics data, however, often cannot provide diagnostic models with sufficient accuracy and robustness for heterogeneous diseases like cancers or neurodegenerative disorders. In recent years, new approaches for building multivariate biomarker models on omics data have been proposed, which exploit prior biological knowledge from molecular networks and cellular pathways to address these limitations. This survey provides an overview of these recent developments and compares pathway- and network-based specimen classification approaches in terms of their utility for improving model robustness, accuracy and biological interpretability. Different routes to translate omics-based multifactorial biomarker models into clinical diagnostic tests are discussed, and a previous study is presented as example.

  2. Long term country-wide rainfall monitoring employing cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-04-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America, and Africa. This calls for alternative sources of rainfall information. Various studies have shown that microwave links from operational cellular telecommunication networks may be employed for rainfall monitoring. Such networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The basic principle of rainfall monitoring using microwave links is as follows. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated. Previous studies have shown that average rainfall intensities over the length of a link can be derived from the path-integrated attenuation. This is particularly interesting for those countries where few surface rainfall observations are available. Here we present preliminary results of long term country-wide rainfall monitoring employing cellular communication networks. A dataset from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed, containing data from an unprecedented number of links (~ 2000) covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35500 square kilometres). This dataset spans from January 2011 through October 2012. Daily rainfall maps (1 km spatial resolution) are derived from the microwave link data and compared to maps from a gauge-adjusted radar dataset. The performance of the rainfall retrieval algorithm will be investigated, particularly a possible seasonal dependence.

  3. Decentralized Dynamic Sub-Carrier Assignment for OFDMA-Based Adhoc and Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Duc; Haas, Harald; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere; Chedjou, Jean-Chamerlain; Nguyen, Tien-Hoa; Yoon, Seokho; Choo, Hyunseung

    In this paper, a novel decentralised dynamic sub-carrier assignment (DSA) algorithm for orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA)-based adhoc and cellular networks operating in time division duplexing (TDD) mode is proposed to solve the hidden and exposed node problem in media access control (MAC). This method reduces the co-channel interference (CCI), and thus increases the overall throughput of the network. Reduced CCI and increased throughput can be achieved, if time and frequency selectivity of the multi-path fading channel and the channel reciprocity offered by the TDD are fully exploited. The time and frequency selectivity of the channel are usually the main problem in mobile communication. However, in the context of channel assignment for OFDMA-based networks in TDD mode, the time and frequency selectivity of the channel are the key to reduce the interference. In the proposed channel assignment mechanism, several clusters of sub-carriers are assigned for data transmission between a transmitter and a receiver only if the corresponding channels of those sub-carriers linking this transmitter to potential victim receivers are deeply faded. In addition, the proposed algorithm works in a fully decentralised fashion and, therefore, it is able to effectively support ad hoc and multihop communication as well as network self-organisation. Numerical results show that the throughput obtained by the proposed approach for a given quality of service is higher than those of the conventional methods in any precondition of adhoc geographic scenario.

  4. Effect of crystals and fibrous network polymer additives on cellular morphology of microcellular foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoma; Utano, Tatsumi; Yasuhara, Shunya; Ishihara, Shota; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the core-back foam injection molding was used for preparing microcelluar polypropylene (PP) foam with either a 1,3:2,4 bis-O-(4-methylbenzylidene)-D-sorbitol gelling agent (Gel-all MD) or a fibros network polymer additive (Metablen 3000). Both agent and addiive could effectively control the celluar morphology in foams but somehow different ways. In course of cooling the polymer with Gel-all MD in the mold caity, the agent enhanced the crystal nucleation and resulted in the large number of small crystals. The crystals acted as effective bubble nucleation agent in foaming process. Thus, the agent reduced the cell size and increased the cell density, drastically. Furthermore, the small crystals provided an inhomogenuity to the expanding cell wall and produced the high open cell content with nano-scale fibril structure. Gell-all as well as Metablene 3000 formed a gel-like fibrous network in melt. The network increased the elongational viscosity and tended to prevent the cell wall from breaking up. The foaming temperature window was widened by the presence of the network. Especially, the temperature window where the macro-fibrous structure was formed was expanded to the higher temperature. The effects of crystal nucleating agent and PTFE on crystals' size and number, viscoelsticity, rheological propreties of PP and cellular morphology were compared and thorougly investigated.

  5. The yeast galactose network as a quantitative model for cellular memory

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Sarah R.; Landry, Christian R.; Rifkin, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed surprising behavior in the yeast galactose (GAL) pathway, one of the preeminent systems for studying gene regulation. Under certain circumstances, yeast cells display memory of their prior nutrient environments. We distinguish two kinds of cellular memory discovered by quantitative investigations of the GAL network and present a conceptual framework for interpreting new experiments and current ideas on GAL memory. Reinduction memory occurs when cells respond transcriptionally to one environment, shut down the response during several generations in a second environment, then respond faster and with less cell-to-cell variation when returned to the first environment. Persistent memory describes a long-term, arguably stable response in which cells adopt a bimodal or unimodal distribution of induction levels depending on their preceding environment. Deep knowledge of how the yeast GAL pathway responds to different sugar environments has enabled rapid progress in uncovering the mechanisms behind GAL memory, which include cytoplasmic inheritance of inducer proteins and positive feedback loops among regulatory genes. This network of genes, long used to study gene regulation, is now emerging as a model system for cellular memory. PMID:25328105

  6. ComPPI: a cellular compartment-specific database for protein–protein interaction network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Daniel V.; Gyurkó, Dávid M.; Thaler, Benedek; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Fazekas, Dávid; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present ComPPI, a cellular compartment-specific database of proteins and their interactions enabling an extensive, compartmentalized protein–protein interaction network analysis (URL: http://ComPPI.LinkGroup.hu). ComPPI enables the user to filter biologically unlikely interactions, where the two interacting proteins have no common subcellular localizations and to predict novel properties, such as compartment-specific biological functions. ComPPI is an integrated database covering four species (S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens). The compilation of nine protein–protein interaction and eight subcellular localization data sets had four curation steps including a manually built, comprehensive hierarchical structure of >1600 subcellular localizations. ComPPI provides confidence scores for protein subcellular localizations and protein–protein interactions. ComPPI has user-friendly search options for individual proteins giving their subcellular localization, their interactions and the likelihood of their interactions considering the subcellular localization of their interacting partners. Download options of search results, whole-proteomes, organelle-specific interactomes and subcellular localization data are available on its website. Due to its novel features, ComPPI is useful for the analysis of experimental results in biochemistry and molecular biology, as well as for proteome-wide studies in bioinformatics and network science helping cellular biology, medicine and drug design. PMID:25348397

  7. Path planning on cellular nonlinear network using active wave computing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeniçeri, Ramazan; Yalçın, Müstak E.

    2009-05-01

    This paper introduces a simple algorithm to solve robot path finding problem using active wave computing techniques. A two-dimensional Cellular Neural/Nonlinear Network (CNN), consist of relaxation oscillators, has been used to generate active waves and to process the visual information. The network, which has been implemented on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip, has the feature of being programmed, controlled and observed by a host computer. The arena of the robot is modelled as the medium of the active waves on the network. Active waves are employed to cover the whole medium with their own dynamics, by starting from an initial point. The proposed algorithm is achieved by observing the motion of the wave-front of the active waves. Host program first loads the arena model onto the active wave generator network and command to start the generation. Then periodically pulls the network image from the generator hardware to analyze evolution of the active waves. When the algorithm is completed, vectorial data image is generated. The path from any of the pixel on this image to the active wave generating pixel is drawn by the vectors on this image. The robot arena may be a complicated labyrinth or may have a simple geometry. But, the arena surface always must be flat. Our Autowave Generator CNN implementation which is settled on the Xilinx University Program Virtex-II Pro Development System is operated by a MATLAB program running on the host computer. As the active wave generator hardware has 16, 384 neurons, an arena with 128 × 128 pixels can be modeled and solved by the algorithm. The system also has a monitor and network image is depicted on the monitor simultaneously.

  8. Country-wide rainfall maps from a commercial cellular telephone network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for many applications, for instance, as input for hydrological models. Weather radars often provide data with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution, but usually need adjustment. In general, only few rain gauge measurements are available to adjust the radar data in real-time, for example, each hour. Physically based methods, such as a VPR correction, can be valuable and hold a promise. However, they are not always performed in real-time yet and can be difficult to implement. The estimation of rainfall using microwave links from commercial cellular telephone networks is a new and potentially valuable source of information. Such networks cover large parts of the land surface of the earth and have a high density. The data produced by the microwave links in such networks is essentially a by-product of the communication between mobile telephones. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated. Previous studies have shown that average rainfall intensities over the length of a link can be derived from the path-integrated attenuation. A recent study of us shows that urban rainfall can be estimated from commercial microwave link data for the Rotterdam region, a densely-populated delta city in the Netherlands. A data set from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed, containing approximately 1500 links covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35500 km2). This data set consists of several days with extreme rainfall in June, July and August 2011. A methodology is presented to derive rainfall intensities and daily rainfall depths from the microwave link data, which have a temporal resolution of 15 min. The magnitude and dynamics of these rainfall intensities

  9. Host APOBEC3G Protein Inhibits HCV Replication through Direct Binding at NS3

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhou-Yi; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Si, Shu-Yi; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts replication of certain viruses. We have previously reported that hA3G was a host restriction factor against hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication, and hA3G stabilizers showed a significant inhibitory activity against HCV. However, the molecular mechanism of hA3G against HCV remains unknown. We show in this study that hA3G’s C-terminal directly binds HCV non-structural protein NS3 at its C-terminus, which is responsible for NS3’s helicase and NTPase activity. Binding of hA3G to the C-terminus of NS3 reduced helicase activity, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. The anti-HCV mechanism of hA3G appeared to be independent of its deamination activity. Although early stage HCV infection resulted in an increase in host hA3G as an intracellular response against HCV replication, hA3G was gradually diminished after a long-term incubation, suggesting an unknown mechanism(s) that protects HCV NS3 from inactivation by hA3G. The process represents, at least partially, a cellular defensive mechanism against HCV and the action is mediated through a direct interaction between host hA3G and HCV NS3. We believe that understanding of the antiviral mechanism of hA3G against HCV might open an interesting avenue to explore hA3G stabilizers as a new class of anti-HCV agents. PMID:25811715

  10. Knowledge-guided fuzzy logic modeling to infer cellular signaling networks from proteomic data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Mishra, Shital Kumar; Zhou, Shuigeng; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of signaling pathways is crucial for understanding and predicting cellular responses to drug treatments. However, canonical signaling pathways curated from literature are seldom context-specific and thus can hardly predict cell type-specific response to external perturbations; purely data-driven methods also have drawbacks such as limited biological interpretability. Therefore, hybrid methods that can integrate prior knowledge and real data for network inference are highly desirable. In this paper, we propose a knowledge-guided fuzzy logic network model to infer signaling pathways by exploiting both prior knowledge and time-series data. In particular, the dynamic time warping algorithm is employed to measure the goodness of fit between experimental and predicted data, so that our method can model temporally-ordered experimental observations. We evaluated the proposed method on a synthetic dataset and two real phosphoproteomic datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that our model can uncover drug-induced alterations in signaling pathways in cancer cells. Compared with existing hybrid models, our method can model feedback loops so that the dynamical mechanisms of signaling networks can be uncovered from time-series data. By calibrating generic models of signaling pathways against real data, our method supports precise predictions of context-specific anticancer drug effects, which is an important step towards precision medicine. PMID:27774993

  11. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular

    PubMed Central

    Okasaka, Shozo; Weiler, Richard J.; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Pudeyev, Andrey; Maltsev, Alexander; Karls, Ingolf; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G) will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave) spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet) architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP) and user plane (UP) will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC) was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access. PMID:27571074

  12. Network, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Carasatorre, Mariana; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The neural network stores information through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that occurs in populations of neurons. Persistent forms of synaptic plasticity may account for long-term memory storage, and the most salient forms are the changes in the structure of synapses. The theory proposes that encoding should use a sparse code and evidence suggests that this can be achieved through offline reactivation or by sparse initial recruitment of the network units. This idea implies that in some cases the neurons that underwent structural synaptic plasticity might be a subpopulation of those originally recruited; However, it is not yet clear whether all the neurons recruited during acquisition are the ones that underwent persistent forms of synaptic plasticity and responsible for memory retrieval. To determine which neural units underlie long-term memory storage, we need to characterize which are the persistent forms of synaptic plasticity occurring in these neural ensembles and the best hints so far are the molecular signals underlying structural modifications of the synapses. Structural synaptic plasticity can be achieved by the activity of various signal transduction pathways, including the NMDA-CaMKII and ACh-MAPK. These pathways converge with the Rho family of GTPases and the consequent ERK 1/2 activation, which regulates multiple cellular functions such as protein translation, protein trafficking, and gene transcription. The most detailed explanation may come from models that allow us to determine the contribution of each piece of this fascinating puzzle that is the neuron and the neural network.

  13. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular.

    PubMed

    Okasaka, Shozo; Weiler, Richard J; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Pudeyev, Andrey; Maltsev, Alexander; Karls, Ingolf; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G) will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave) spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet) architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP) and user plane (UP) will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC) was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access.

  14. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  15. Proof-of-Concept of a Millimeter-Wave Integrated Heterogeneous Network for 5G Cellular.

    PubMed

    Okasaka, Shozo; Weiler, Richard J; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Pudeyev, Andrey; Maltsev, Alexander; Karls, Ingolf; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The fifth-generation mobile networks (5G) will not only enhance mobile broadband services, but also enable connectivity for a massive number of Internet-of-Things devices, such as wireless sensors, meters or actuators. Thus, 5G is expected to achieve a 1000-fold or more increase in capacity over 4G. The use of the millimeter-wave (mmWave) spectrum is a key enabler to allowing 5G to achieve such enhancement in capacity. To fully utilize the mmWave spectrum, 5G is expected to adopt a heterogeneous network (HetNet) architecture, wherein mmWave small cells are overlaid onto a conventional macro-cellular network. In the mmWave-integrated HetNet, splitting of the control plane (CP) and user plane (UP) will allow continuous connectivity and increase the capacity of the mmWave small cells. mmWave communication can be used not only for access linking, but also for wireless backhaul linking, which will facilitate the installation of mmWave small cells. In this study, a proof-of-concept (PoC) was conducted to demonstrate the practicality of a prototype mmWave-integrated HetNet, using mmWave technologies for both backhaul and access. PMID:27571074

  16. Network, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Carasatorre, Mariana; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The neural network stores information through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that occurs in populations of neurons. Persistent forms of synaptic plasticity may account for long-term memory storage, and the most salient forms are the changes in the structure of synapses. The theory proposes that encoding should use a sparse code and evidence suggests that this can be achieved through offline reactivation or by sparse initial recruitment of the network units. This idea implies that in some cases the neurons that underwent structural synaptic plasticity might be a subpopulation of those originally recruited; However, it is not yet clear whether all the neurons recruited during acquisition are the ones that underwent persistent forms of synaptic plasticity and responsible for memory retrieval. To determine which neural units underlie long-term memory storage, we need to characterize which are the persistent forms of synaptic plasticity occurring in these neural ensembles and the best hints so far are the molecular signals underlying structural modifications of the synapses. Structural synaptic plasticity can be achieved by the activity of various signal transduction pathways, including the NMDA-CaMKII and ACh-MAPK. These pathways converge with the Rho family of GTPases and the consequent ERK 1/2 activation, which regulates multiple cellular functions such as protein translation, protein trafficking, and gene transcription. The most detailed explanation may come from models that allow us to determine the contribution of each piece of this fascinating puzzle that is the neuron and the neural network. PMID:22976275

  17. Firing patterns in a random network cellular automata model of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Lamprianidou, E.; Moraño, J.-A.; Villanueva-Oller, J.; Villanueva, R.-J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the main challenges in the simulation of even reduced areas of the brain is the presence of a large number of neurons and a large number of connections among them. Even from a theoretical point of view, the behaviour of dynamical models of complex networks with high connectivity is unknown, precisely because the cost of computation is still unaffordable and it will likely be in the near future. In this paper we discuss the simulation of a cellular automata network model of the brain including up to one million sites with a maximum average of three hundred connections per neuron. This level of connectivity was achieved thanks to a distributed computing environment based on the BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) platform. Moreover, in this work we consider the interplay among excitatory neurons (which induce the excitation of their neighbours) and inhibitory neurons (which prevent resting neurons from firing and induce firing neurons to pass to the refractory state). Our objective is to classify the normal (noisy but asymptotically constant patterns) and the abnormal (high oscillations with spindle-like behaviour) patterns of activity in the model brain and their stability and parameter ranges in order to determine the role of excitatory and inhibitory compensatory effects in healthy and diseased individuals.

  18. Inhibition of APOBEC3G activity impedes double-stranded DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A; Kotler, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ionizing radiation. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G, and APOBEC3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, whereas replacing a single residue in the LYYF motif completely abrogates inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break repair after irradiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit double-strand break repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target that is amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition.

  19. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  20. Smart-Pixel Array Processors Based on Optimal Cellular Neural Networks for Space Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Sheu, Bing J.; Venus, Holger; Sandau, Rainer

    1997-01-01

    A smart-pixel cellular neural network (CNN) with hardware annealing capability, digitally programmable synaptic weights, and multisensor parallel interface has been under development for advanced space sensor applications. The smart-pixel CNN architecture is a programmable multi-dimensional array of optoelectronic neurons which are locally connected with their local neurons and associated active-pixel sensors. Integration of the neuroprocessor in each processor node of a scalable multiprocessor system offers orders-of-magnitude computing performance enhancements for on-board real-time intelligent multisensor processing and control tasks of advanced small satellites. The smart-pixel CNN operation theory, architecture, design and implementation, and system applications are investigated in detail. The VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) implementation feasibility was illustrated by a prototype smart-pixel 5x5 neuroprocessor array chip of active dimensions 1380 micron x 746 micron in a 2-micron CMOS technology.

  1. Pesticide residue screening using a novel artificial neural network combined with a bioelectric cellular biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ferentinos, Konstantinos P; Yialouris, Costas P; Blouchos, Petros; Moschopoulou, Georgia; Kintzios, Spyridon

    2013-01-01

    We developed a novel artificial neural network (ANN) system able to detect and classify pesticide residues. The novel ANN is coupled, in a customized way, to a cellular biosensor operation based on the bioelectric recognition assay (BERA) and able to simultaneously assay eight samples in three minutes. The novel system was developed using the data (time series) of the electrophysiological responses of three different cultured cell lines against three different pesticide groups (carbamates, pyrethroids, and organophosphates). Using the novel system, we were able to classify correctly the presence of the investigated pesticide groups with an overall success rate of 83.6%. Considering that only 70,000-80,000 samples are annually tested in Europe with current conventional technologies (an extremely minor fraction of the actual screening needs), the system reported in the present study could contribute to a screening system milestone for the future landscape in food safety control.

  2. Multiscale Systems Analysis of Root Growth and Development: Modeling Beyond the Network and Cellular Scales

    PubMed Central

    Band, Leah R.; Fozard, John A.; Godin, Christophe; Jensen, Oliver E.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm J.; King, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, we have gained detailed knowledge of many processes involved in root growth and development. However, with this knowledge come increasing complexity and an increasing need for mechanistic modeling to understand how those individual processes interact. One major challenge is in relating genotypes to phenotypes, requiring us to move beyond the network and cellular scales, to use multiscale modeling to predict emergent dynamics at the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we highlight recent developments in multiscale modeling, illustrating how these are generating new mechanistic insights into the regulation of root growth and development. We consider how these models are motivating new biological data analysis and explore directions for future research. This modeling progress will be crucial as we move from a qualitative to an increasingly quantitative understanding of root biology, generating predictive tools that accelerate the development of improved crop varieties. PMID:23110897

  3. Adaptive call admission control and resource allocation in multi server wireless/cellular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Madhu; Mittal, Ragini

    2016-11-01

    The ever increasing demand of the subscribers has put pressure on the capacity of wireless networks around the world. To utilize the scare resources, in the present paper we propose an optimal allocation scheme for an integrated wireless/cellular model with handoff priority and handoff guarantee services. The suggested algorithm optimally allocates the resources in each cell and dynamically adjust threshold to control the admission. To give the priority to handoff calls over the new calls, the provision of guard channels and subrating scheme is taken into consideration. The handoff voice call may balk and renege from the system while waiting in the buffer. An iterative algorithm is implemented to generate the arrival rate of the handoff calls in each cell. Various performance indices are established in term of steady state probabilities. The sensitivity analysis has also been carried out to examine the tractability of algorithms and to explore the effects of system descriptors on the performance indices.

  4. Convergence and attractivity of memristor-based cellular neural networks with time delays.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sitian; Wang, Jun; Xue, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents theoretical results on the convergence and attractivity of memristor-based cellular neural networks (MCNNs) with time delays. Based on a realistic memristor model, an MCNN is modeled using a differential inclusion. The essential boundedness of its global solutions is proven. The state of MCNNs is further proven to be convergent to a critical-point set located in saturated region of the activation function, when the initial state locates in a saturated region. It is shown that the state convergence time period is finite and can be quantitatively estimated using given parameters. Furthermore, the positive invariance and attractivity of state in non-saturated regions are also proven. The simulation results of several numerical examples are provided to substantiate the results.

  5. A novel method to assess human population exposure induced by a wireless cellular network.

    PubMed

    Varsier, Nadège; Plets, David; Corre, Yoann; Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Martens, Luc; Wiart, Joe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new metric to evaluate electromagnetic exposure induced by wireless cellular networks. This metric takes into account the exposure induced by base station antennas as well as exposure induced by wireless devices to evaluate average global exposure of the population in a specific geographical area. The paper first explains the concept and gives the formulation of the Exposure Index (EI). Then, the EI computation is illustrated through simple phone call scenarios (indoor office, in train) and a complete macro urban data long-term evolution scenario showing how, based on simulations, radio-planning predictions, realistic population statistics, user traffic data, and specific absorption rate calculations can be combined to assess the index. Bioelectromagnetics. 36:451-463, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26113174

  6. Modeling of trophospheric ozone concentrations using genetically trained multi-level cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, H. Kurtulus; Bilgili, Erdem; Sahin, Ulku; Ucan, O. Nuri; Bayat, Cuma

    2007-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations, which are an important air pollutant, are modeled by the use of an artificial intelligence structure. Data obtained from air pollution measurement stations in the city of Istanbul are utilized in constituting the model. A supervised algorithm for the evaluation of ozone concentration using a genetically trained multi-level cellular neural network (ML-CNN) is introduced, developed, and applied to real data. A genetic algorithm is used in the optimization of CNN templates. The model results and the actual measurement results are compared and statistically evaluated. It is observed that seasonal changes in ozone concentrations are reflected effectively by the concentrations estimated by the multilevel-CNN model structure, with a correlation value of 0.57 ascertained between actual and model results. It is shown that the multilevel-CNN modeling technique is as satisfactory as other modeling techniques in associating the data in a complex medium in air pollution applications.

  7. A novel method to assess human population exposure induced by a wireless cellular network.

    PubMed

    Varsier, Nadège; Plets, David; Corre, Yoann; Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Martens, Luc; Wiart, Joe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new metric to evaluate electromagnetic exposure induced by wireless cellular networks. This metric takes into account the exposure induced by base station antennas as well as exposure induced by wireless devices to evaluate average global exposure of the population in a specific geographical area. The paper first explains the concept and gives the formulation of the Exposure Index (EI). Then, the EI computation is illustrated through simple phone call scenarios (indoor office, in train) and a complete macro urban data long-term evolution scenario showing how, based on simulations, radio-planning predictions, realistic population statistics, user traffic data, and specific absorption rate calculations can be combined to assess the index. Bioelectromagnetics. 36:451-463, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Multiscale systems analysis of root growth and development: modeling beyond the network and cellular scales.

    PubMed

    Band, Leah R; Fozard, John A; Godin, Christophe; Jensen, Oliver E; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, John R

    2012-10-01

    Over recent decades, we have gained detailed knowledge of many processes involved in root growth and development. However, with this knowledge come increasing complexity and an increasing need for mechanistic modeling to understand how those individual processes interact. One major challenge is in relating genotypes to phenotypes, requiring us to move beyond the network and cellular scales, to use multiscale modeling to predict emergent dynamics at the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we highlight recent developments in multiscale modeling, illustrating how these are generating new mechanistic insights into the regulation of root growth and development. We consider how these models are motivating new biological data analysis and explore directions for future research. This modeling progress will be crucial as we move from a qualitative to an increasingly quantitative understanding of root biology, generating predictive tools that accelerate the development of improved crop varieties.

  9. Global detection of live virtual machine migration based on cellular neural networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kang; Yang, Yixian; Zhang, Ling; Jing, Maohua; Xin, Yang; Li, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of operation monitoring of large scale, autoscaling, and heterogeneous virtual resources in the existing cloud computing, a new method of live virtual machine (VM) migration detection algorithm based on the cellular neural networks (CNNs), is presented. Through analyzing the detection process, the parameter relationship of CNN is mapped as an optimization problem, in which improved particle swarm optimization algorithm based on bubble sort is used to solve the problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can display the VM migration processing intuitively. Compared with the best fit heuristic algorithm, this approach reduces the processing time, and emerging evidence has indicated that this new approach is affordable to parallelism and analog very large scale integration (VLSI) implementation allowing the VM migration detection to be performed better. PMID:24959631

  10. Two years of country-wide rainfall maps employing cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijlenhoet, Remko; Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Rios Gaona, Manuel Felipe

    2014-05-01

    Accurate rainfall observations with high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed for hydrological applications, agriculture, meteorology, and climate monitoring. However, the majority of the land surface of the earth lacks accurate rainfall information and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America, and Africa. This calls for alternative sources of rainfall information. Various studies have shown that microwave links from operational cellular telecommunication networks may be employed for rainfall monitoring. Such networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have a high density, especially in urban areas. The basic principle of rainfall monitoring using microwave links is as follows. Rainfall attenuates the electromagnetic signals transmitted from one telephone tower to another. By measuring the received power at one end of a microwave link as a function of time, the path-integrated attenuation due to rainfall can be calculated. Previous studies have shown that average rainfall intensities over the length of a link can be derived from the path-integrated attenuation. This is particularly interesting for those countries where few surface rainfall observations are available. Here we present almost two years of country-wide rainfall maps employing cellular communication networks. A data set from a commercial microwave link network over the Netherlands is analyzed, containing data from an unprecedented number of links (~ 2000) covering the land surface of the Netherlands (35500 square kilometers). This data set almost completely covers the years 2011 and 2012. Fifteen-minute and daily rainfall maps (1 km spatial resolution) are derived from the microwave link data and compared to maps from a gauge-adjusted radar data set. The performance of the rainfall retrieval algorithm will be studied, particularly differences in time and space. Time series of air temperature and snow from automatic weather stations, operated by the

  11. BioJazz: in silico evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity using rule-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Song; Ollivier, Julien F; Swain, Peter S; Soyer, Orkun S

    2015-10-30

    Systems biologists aim to decipher the structure and dynamics of signaling and regulatory networks underpinning cellular responses; synthetic biologists can use this insight to alter existing networks or engineer de novo ones. Both tasks will benefit from an understanding of which structural and dynamic features of networks can emerge from evolutionary processes, through which intermediary steps these arise, and whether they embody general design principles. As natural evolution at the level of network dynamics is difficult to study, in silico evolution of network models can provide important insights. However, current tools used for in silico evolution of network dynamics are limited to ad hoc computer simulations and models. Here we introduce BioJazz, an extendable, user-friendly tool for simulating the evolution of dynamic biochemical networks. Unlike previous tools for in silico evolution, BioJazz allows for the evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity by combining rule-based modeling with an encoding of networks that is akin to a genome. We show that BioJazz can be used to implement biologically realistic selective pressures and allows exploration of the space of network architectures and dynamics that implement prescribed physiological functions. BioJazz is provided as an open-source tool to facilitate its further development and use. Source code and user manuals are available at: http://oss-lab.github.io/biojazz and http://osslab.lifesci.warwick.ac.uk/BioJazz.aspx.

  12. Intragranular cellular segregation network structure strengthening 316L stainless steel prepared by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Leifeng; Wikman, Stefan; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) supported by Fusion for Energy (F4E). Almost fully dense 316L stainless steel (SS316L) components were prepared from gas-atomized powder and with optimized SLM processing parameters. Tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C and 250 °C and the results showed that SLM SS316L fulfill the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterization reveals the presence of hierarchical macro-, micro- and nano-structures in as-built samples that were very different from SS316L microstructures prepared by other established methods. The formation of a characteristic intragranular cellular segregation network microstructure appears to contribute to the increase of yield strength without losing ductility. Silicon oxide nano-inclusions were formed during the SLM process that generated a micro-hardness fluctuation in the building direction. The combined influence of a cellular microstructure and the nano-inclusions constraints the size of ductile dimples to nano-scale. The crack propagation is hindered by a pinning effect that improves the defect-tolerance of the SLM SS316L. This work proves that it was possible to manufacture SS316L with properties suitable for ITER First Wall panels. Further studies on irradiation properties of SLM SS316L and manufacturing of larger real-size components are needed.

  13. Functional connectivity estimation over large networks at cellular resolution based on electrophysiological recordings and structural prior

    PubMed Central

    Ullo, Simona; Nieus, Thierry R.; Sona, Diego; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Despite many structural and functional aspects of the brain organization have been extensively studied in neuroscience, we are still far from a clear understanding of the intricate structure-function interactions occurring in the multi-layered brain architecture, where billions of different neurons are involved. Although structure and function can individually convey a large amount of information, only a combined study of these two aspects can probably shade light on how brain circuits develop and operate at the cellular scale. Here, we propose a novel approach for refining functional connectivity estimates within neuronal networks using the structural connectivity as prior. This is done at the mesoscale, dealing with thousands of neurons while reaching, at the microscale, an unprecedented cellular resolution. The High-Density Micro Electrode Array (HD-MEA) technology, combined with fluorescence microscopy, offers the unique opportunity to acquire structural and functional data from large neuronal cultures approaching the granularity of the single cell. In this work, an advanced method based on probabilistic directional features and heat propagation is introduced to estimate the structural connectivity from the fluorescence image while functional connectivity graphs are obtained from the cross-correlation analysis of the spiking activity. Structural and functional information are then integrated by reweighting the functional connectivity graph based on the structural prior. Results show that the resulting functional connectivity estimates are more coherent with the network topology, as compared to standard measures purely based on cross-correlations and spatio-temporal filters. We finally use the obtained results to gain some insights on which features of the functional activity are more relevant to characterize actual neuronal interactions. PMID:25477790

  14. Functional connectivity estimation over large networks at cellular resolution based on electrophysiological recordings and structural prior.

    PubMed

    Ullo, Simona; Nieus, Thierry R; Sona, Diego; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Despite many structural and functional aspects of the brain organization have been extensively studied in neuroscience, we are still far from a clear understanding of the intricate structure-function interactions occurring in the multi-layered brain architecture, where billions of different neurons are involved. Although structure and function can individually convey a large amount of information, only a combined study of these two aspects can probably shade light on how brain circuits develop and operate at the cellular scale. Here, we propose a novel approach for refining functional connectivity estimates within neuronal networks using the structural connectivity as prior. This is done at the mesoscale, dealing with thousands of neurons while reaching, at the microscale, an unprecedented cellular resolution. The High-Density Micro Electrode Array (HD-MEA) technology, combined with fluorescence microscopy, offers the unique opportunity to acquire structural and functional data from large neuronal cultures approaching the granularity of the single cell. In this work, an advanced method based on probabilistic directional features and heat propagation is introduced to estimate the structural connectivity from the fluorescence image while functional connectivity graphs are obtained from the cross-correlation analysis of the spiking activity. Structural and functional information are then integrated by reweighting the functional connectivity graph based on the structural prior. Results show that the resulting functional connectivity estimates are more coherent with the network topology, as compared to standard measures purely based on cross-correlations and spatio-temporal filters. We finally use the obtained results to gain some insights on which features of the functional activity are more relevant to characterize actual neuronal interactions. PMID:25477790

  15. Turning gold into 'junk': transposable elements utilize central proteins of cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Abrusán, György; Szilágyi, András; Zhang, Yang; Papp, Balázs

    2013-03-01

    The numerous discovered cases of domesticated transposable element (TE) proteins led to the recognition that TEs are a significant source of evolutionary innovation. However, much less is known about the reverse process, whether and to what degree the evolution of TEs is influenced by the genome of their hosts. We addressed this issue by searching for cases of incorporation of host genes into the sequence of TEs and examined the systems-level properties of these genes using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster genomes. We identified 51 cases where the evolutionary scenario was the incorporation of a host gene fragment into a TE consensus sequence, and we show that both the yeast and fly homologues of the incorporated protein sequences have central positions in the cellular networks. An analysis of selective pressure (Ka/Ks ratio) detected significant selection in 37% of the cases. Recent research on retrovirus-host interactions shows that virus proteins preferentially target hubs of the host interaction networks enabling them to take over the host cell using only a few proteins. We propose that TEs face a similar evolutionary pressure to evolve proteins with high interacting capacities and take some of the necessary protein domains directly from their hosts.

  16. Trans-species learning of cellular signaling systems with bimodal deep belief networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lujia; Cai, Chunhui; Chen, Vicky; Lu, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Model organisms play critical roles in biomedical research of human diseases and drug development. An imperative task is to translate information/knowledge acquired from model organisms to humans. In this study, we address a trans-species learning problem: predicting human cell responses to diverse stimuli, based on the responses of rat cells treated with the same stimuli. Results: We hypothesized that rat and human cells share a common signal-encoding mechanism but employ different proteins to transmit signals, and we developed a bimodal deep belief network and a semi-restricted bimodal deep belief network to represent the common encoding mechanism and perform trans-species learning. These ‘deep learning’ models include hierarchically organized latent variables capable of capturing the statistical structures in the observed proteomic data in a distributed fashion. The results show that the models significantly outperform two current state-of-the-art classification algorithms. Our study demonstrated the potential of using deep hierarchical models to simulate cellular signaling systems. Availability and implementation: The software is available at the following URL: http://pubreview.dbmi.pitt.edu/TransSpeciesDeepLearning/. The data are available through SBV IMPROVER website, https://www.sbvimprover.com/challenge-2/overview, upon publication of the report by the organizers. Contact: xinghua@pitt.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25995230

  17. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-09-02

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown.

  18. An empirical Bayesian approach for model-based inference of cellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A common challenge in systems biology is to infer mechanistic descriptions of biological process given limited observations of a biological system. Mathematical models are frequently used to represent a belief about the causal relationships among proteins within a signaling network. Bayesian methods provide an attractive framework for inferring the validity of those beliefs in the context of the available data. However, efficient sampling of high-dimensional parameter space and appropriate convergence criteria provide barriers for implementing an empirical Bayesian approach. The objective of this study was to apply an Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo technique to a typical study of cellular signaling pathways. Results As an illustrative example, a kinetic model for the early signaling events associated with the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling network was calibrated against dynamic measurements observed in primary rat hepatocytes. A convergence criterion, based upon the Gelman-Rubin potential scale reduction factor, was applied to the model predictions. The posterior distributions of the parameters exhibited complicated structure, including significant covariance between specific parameters and a broad range of variance among the parameters. The model predictions, in contrast, were narrowly distributed and were used to identify areas of agreement among a collection of experimental studies. Conclusion In summary, an empirical Bayesian approach was developed for inferring the confidence that one can place in a particular model that describes signal transduction mechanisms and for inferring inconsistencies in experimental measurements. PMID:19900289

  19. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown. PMID:26340633

  20. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:19596552

  1. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach.

  2. APOBEC3G restricts early HIV-1 replication in the cytoplasm of target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jenny L.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2008-05-25

    Cellular APOBEC3G (A3G) protein is packaged into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions in producer cells yet restricts viral replication in target cells. To characterize this restriction in target cells, the effect of A3G on generating various HIV-1 cDNA products was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. A3G decreased cDNA products from Vif-deficient HIV-1, with minor effects on early reverse transcripts and larger declines in late reverse transcripts. However, the greatest decline was typically observed in nuclear 2-LTR circles. Moreover, the magnitude of these declines varied with A3G dose. Adding integration inhibitor did not stop the A3G-mediated loss in 2-LTR circles. Moreover, obstructing HIV-1 nuclear entry using vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein did not stop the A3G-mediated decline in late reverse transcripts. Collectively, these data suggest that A3G has important restriction activity in the cytoplasm and progressively diminishes viral cytoplasmic and nuclear cDNA forms with increasing magnitude during restriction.

  3. Measurement and interpolation uncertainties in rainfall maps from cellular communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Gaona, M. F.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2015-08-01

    compared against quality-controlled gauge-adjusted radar rainfall fields (assumed to be the ground truth). Thus, we were able to not only identify and quantify the sources of uncertainty in such rainfall maps, but also test the actual and optimal performance of one commercial microwave network from one of the cellular providers in the Netherlands. Errors in microwave link measurements were found to be the source that contributes most to the overall uncertainty.

  4. Enzymatically Active APOBEC3G Is Required for Efficient Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Miyagi, Eri; Opi, Sandrine; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Khan, Mohammad; Goila-Gaur, Ritu; Kao, Sandra; Strebel, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    APOBEC3G (APO3G) is a cellular cytidine deaminase with potent antiviral activity. Initial studies of the function of APO3G demonstrated extensive mutation of the viral genome, suggesting a model in which APO3G's antiviral activity is due to hypermutation of the viral genome. Recent studies, however, found that deaminase-defective APO3G mutants transiently expressed in virus-producing cells exhibited significant antiviral activity, suggesting that the antiviral activity of APO3G could be dissociated from its deaminase activity. To directly compare the antiviral activities of wild-type (wt) and deaminase-defective APO3G, we used two approaches: (i) we titrated wt and deaminase-defective APO3G in transient-transfection studies to achieve similar levels of virus-associated APO3G and (ii) we constructed stable cell lines and selected clones expressing comparable amounts of wt and deaminase-defective APO3G. Viruses produced under these conditions were tested for viral infectivity. The results from the two approaches were consistent and suggested that the antiviral activity of deaminase-defective APO3G was significantly lower than that of wt APO3G. We conclude that efficient inhibition of vif-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 requires catalytically active APO3G. PMID:17928335

  5. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  6. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases. PMID:26608097

  7. Mapping the Vif-A3G interaction using peptide arrays: a basis for anti-HIV lead peptides.

    PubMed

    Reingewertz, Tali H; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Viard, Mathias; Jacobs, Amy; Miller, Abigail; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeeseong; Blumenthal, Robert; Kotler, Moshe; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-06-15

    Human apolipoprotein-B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts retroviruses, endogenous retro-elements and DNA viruses. A3G plays a key role in the anti-HIV-1 innate cellular immunity. The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts A3G mainly by leading A3G towards the proteosomal machinery and by direct inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Both activities involve direct interaction between Vif and A3G. Disrupting the interaction between A3G and Vif may rescue A3G antiviral activity and inhibit HIV-1 propagation. Here, mapping the interaction sites between A3G and Vif by peptide array screening revealed distinct regions in Vif important for A3G binding, including the N-terminal domain (NTD), C-terminal domain (CTD) and residues 83-99. The Vif-binding sites in A3G included 12 different peptides that showed strong binding to either full-length Vif, Vif CTD or both. Sequence similarity was found between Vif-binding peptides from the A3G CTD and NTD. A3G peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to counteract Vif action. A3G 211-225 inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell culture and impaired Vif dependent A3G degradation. In vivo co-localization of full-length Vif with A3G 211-225 was demonstrated by use of FRET. This peptide has the potential to serve as an anti-HIV-1 lead compound. Our results suggest a complex interaction between Vif and A3G that is mediated by discontinuous binding regions with different affinities.

  8. Noise-robust realization of Turing-complete cellular automata by using neural networks with pattern representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Makito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-11-01

    A modularly-structured neural network model is considered. Each module, which we call a ‘cell’, consists of two parts: a Hopfield neural network model and a multilayered perceptron. An array of such cells is used to simulate the Rule 110 cellular automaton with high accuracy even when all the units of neural networks are replaced by stochastic binary ones. We also find that noise not only degrades but also facilitates computation if the outputs of multilayered perceptrons are below the threshold required to update the states of the cells, which is a stochastic resonance in computation.

  9. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage

  10. Adiponectin fine-tuning of liver regeneration dynamics revealed through cellular network modelling.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Jason M; Cook, Daniel; Aksamitiene, Edita; Swarup, Aditi; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-15

    Following partial hepatectomy, the liver initiates a regenerative programme involving hepatocyte priming and replication driven by the coordinated actions of cytokine and growth factors. We investigated the mechanisms underlying adiponectin's (Adn) regulation of liver regeneration through modulation of these mediators. Adn(-/-) mice showed delayed onset of hepatocyte replication, but accelerated cell cycle progression relative to wild-type mice, suggesting Adn has multiple effects fine-tuning the kinetics of liver regeneration. We developed a computational model describing the molecular and physiological kinetics of liver regeneration in Adn(-/-) mice. We employed this computational model to evaluate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Our analysis predicted that Adn is required for an efficient early cytokine response to partial hepatectomy, but is inhibitory to later growth factor actions. Consistent with this prediction, Adn knockout reduced hepatocyte responses to interleukin-6 during the priming phase, but enhanced growth factor levels through peak hepatocyte replication. By contrast, supraphysiological concentrations of Adn resulting from rosiglitazone treatment suppressed regeneration by reducing growth factor levels during S phase, consistent with computational predictions. Together, these results revealed that Adn fine-tunes the progression of liver regeneration through dynamically modulating molecular mediator networks and cellular interactions within the liver.

  11. Data fusion and classification using a hybrid intrinsic cellular inference network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Walenz, Brett; Seiffertt, John; Robinette, Paul; Wunsch, Donald

    2010-04-01

    Hybrid Intrinsic Cellular Inference Network (HICIN) is designed for battlespace decision support applications. We developed an automatic method of generating hypotheses for an entity-attribute classifier. The capability and effectiveness of a domain specific ontology was used to generate automatic categories for data classification. Heterogeneous data is clustered using an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) inference engine on a sample (unclassified) data set. The data set is the Lahman baseball database. The actual data is immaterial to the architecture, however, parallels in the data can be easily drawn (i.e., "Team" maps to organization, "Runs scored/allowed" to Measure of organization performance (positive/negative), "Payroll" to organization resources, etc.). Results show that HICIN classifiers create known inferences from the heterogonous data. These inferences are not explicitly stated in the ontological description of the domain and are strictly data driven. HICIN uses data uncertainty handling to reduce errors in the classification. The uncertainty handling is based on subjective logic. The belief mass allows evidence from multiple sources to be mathematically combined to increase or discount an assertion. In military operations the ability to reduce uncertainty will be vital in the data fusion operation.

  12. A universal concept based on cellular neural networks for ultrafast and flexible solving of differential equations.

    PubMed

    Chedjou, Jean Chamberlain; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2015-04-01

    This paper develops and validates a comprehensive and universally applicable computational concept for solving nonlinear differential equations (NDEs) through a neurocomputing concept based on cellular neural networks (CNNs). High-precision, stability, convergence, and lowest-possible memory requirements are ensured by the CNN processor architecture. A significant challenge solved in this paper is that all these cited computing features are ensured in all system-states (regular or chaotic ones) and in all bifurcation conditions that may be experienced by NDEs.One particular quintessence of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a solver concept that shows and ensures that CNN processors (realized either in hardware or in software) are universal solvers of NDE models. The solving logic or algorithm of given NDEs (possible examples are: Duffing, Mathieu, Van der Pol, Jerk, Chua, Rössler, Lorenz, Burgers, and the transport equations) through a CNN processor system is provided by a set of templates that are computed by our comprehensive templates calculation technique that we call nonlinear adaptive optimization. This paper is therefore a significant contribution and represents a cutting-edge real-time computational engineering approach, especially while considering the various scientific and engineering applications of this ultrafast, energy-and-memory-efficient, and high-precise NDE solver concept. For illustration purposes, three NDE models are demonstratively solved, and related CNN templates are derived and used: the periodically excited Duffing equation, the Mathieu equation, and the transport equation. PMID:25794380

  13. A universal concept based on cellular neural networks for ultrafast and flexible solving of differential equations.

    PubMed

    Chedjou, Jean Chamberlain; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2015-04-01

    This paper develops and validates a comprehensive and universally applicable computational concept for solving nonlinear differential equations (NDEs) through a neurocomputing concept based on cellular neural networks (CNNs). High-precision, stability, convergence, and lowest-possible memory requirements are ensured by the CNN processor architecture. A significant challenge solved in this paper is that all these cited computing features are ensured in all system-states (regular or chaotic ones) and in all bifurcation conditions that may be experienced by NDEs.One particular quintessence of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a solver concept that shows and ensures that CNN processors (realized either in hardware or in software) are universal solvers of NDE models. The solving logic or algorithm of given NDEs (possible examples are: Duffing, Mathieu, Van der Pol, Jerk, Chua, Rössler, Lorenz, Burgers, and the transport equations) through a CNN processor system is provided by a set of templates that are computed by our comprehensive templates calculation technique that we call nonlinear adaptive optimization. This paper is therefore a significant contribution and represents a cutting-edge real-time computational engineering approach, especially while considering the various scientific and engineering applications of this ultrafast, energy-and-memory-efficient, and high-precise NDE solver concept. For illustration purposes, three NDE models are demonstratively solved, and related CNN templates are derived and used: the periodically excited Duffing equation, the Mathieu equation, and the transport equation.

  14. A Proposal for Energy-Efficient Cellular Neural Network Based on Spintronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chenyun; Naeemi, Azad

    2016-09-01

    Due to the massive parallel computing capability and outstanding image and signal processing performance, cellular neural network (CNN) is one promising type of non-Boolean computing system that can outperform the traditional digital logic computation and mitigate the physical scaling limit of the conventional CMOS technology. The CNN was originally implemented by VLSI analog technologies with operational amplifiers and operational transconductance amplifiers as neurons and synapses, respectively, which are power and area consuming. In this paper, we propose a hybrid structure to implement the CNN with magnetic components and CMOS peripherals with a complete driving and sensing circuitry. In addition, we propose a digitally programmable magnetic synapse that can achieve both positive and negative values of the templates. After rigorous performance analyses and comparisons, optimal energy is achieved based on various design parameters, including the driving voltage and the CMOS driving size. At a comparable footprint area and operation speed, a spintronic CNN is projected to achieve more than one order of magnitude energy reduction per operation compared to its CMOS counterpart.

  15. Memristor-based cellular nonlinear/neural network: design, analysis, and applications.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shukai; Hu, Xiaofang; Dong, Zhekang; Wang, Lidan; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2015-06-01

    Cellular nonlinear/neural network (CNN) has been recognized as a powerful massively parallel architecture capable of solving complex engineering problems by performing trillions of analog operations per second. The memristor was theoretically predicted in the late seventies, but it garnered nascent research interest due to the recent much-acclaimed discovery of nanocrossbar memories by engineers at the Hewlett-Packard Laboratory. The memristor is expected to be co-integrated with nanoscale CMOS technology to revolutionize conventional von Neumann as well as neuromorphic computing. In this paper, a compact CNN model based on memristors is presented along with its performance analysis and applications. In the new CNN design, the memristor bridge circuit acts as the synaptic circuit element and substitutes the complex multiplication circuit used in traditional CNN architectures. In addition, the negative differential resistance and nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of the memristor have been leveraged to replace the linear resistor in conventional CNNs. The proposed CNN design has several merits, for example, high density, nonvolatility, and programmability of synaptic weights. The proposed memristor-based CNN design operations for implementing several image processing functions are illustrated through simulation and contrasted with conventional CNNs. Monte-Carlo simulation has been used to demonstrate the behavior of the proposed CNN due to the variations in memristor synaptic weights.

  16. The potential of cellular network infrastructures for sudden rainfall monitoring in dry climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, N.; Alpert, P.; Messer, H.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring of precipitation and in particular sudden rain, in rural dry climate regions, is a subject of great significance in several weather related processes such as soil erosion, flash flooding, triggering epidemics and more. The rainfall monitoring facilities in these regions and as a result precipitation data are, however, commonly, severely lacking. As was recently shown, cellular networks infrastructures supply high resolution precipitation measurements at ground level while often being situated in dry areas, covering large parts of these climatic zones. The potential found in these systems to provide early monitoring and essential precipitation information, directly from arid regions, based on standard measurements of commercial microwave links, is exemplified here over the Negev and the Southern Judean desert, South Israel. We present the results of two different rainfall events occurred in these regions. It is shown that the microwave system measured precipitation between at least 50 min (in case 1) and at least 1 h and 40 min (in case 2) before each of the sparse rain gauges. During each case, the radar system, located relatively far from the arid sites, provided measurements from heights of at least 1500 m and 2000 m above surface, respectively. A third case study demonstrates a relative advantage of microwave links to measure precipitation intensity with respect to the radar system, over an area of complex topography located in northeastern Israel, which is relatively far (~ 150 km) from the radar.

  17. Modeling urban land use changes in Lanzhou based on artificial neural network and cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xibao; Zhang, Jianming; Zhou, Xiaojian

    2008-10-01

    This paper presented a model to simulate urban land use changes based on artificial neural network (ANN) and cellular automata (CA). The model was scaled down at the intra-urban level with subtle land use categorization, developed with Matlab 7.2 and loosely coupled with GIS. Urban land use system is a very complicated non-linear social system influenced by many factors. In this paper, four aspects of a totality 17 factors, including physical, social-economic, neighborhoods and policy, were considered synthetically. ANN was proposed as a solution of CA model calibration through its training to acquire the multitudinous parameters as a substitute for the complex transition rules. A stochastic perturbation parameter v was added into the model, and five different scenarios with different values of v and the threshold were designed for simulations and predictions to explore their effects on urban land use changes. Simulations of 2005 and predictions of 2015 under the five different scenarios were made and evaluated. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of the model were discussed.

  18. A new approach to the structural features of the Aegean Sea: Cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Davut; Elmas, Ali; Albora, A. Muhittin; Ucan, Osman N.

    2005-03-01

    In this study, structural features in the Aegean Sea were investigated by application of Cellular Neural Network (CNN) and Cross-Correlation methods to the gravity anomaly map. CNN is a stochastic image processing technique, which is based on template optimization using neighbourhood relationships of pixels, and probabilistic properties of two-Dimensional (2-D) input data. The performance of CNN can be evaluated by various interesting real applications in geophysics such as edge detection, data enhancement and separation of regional/residual potential anomaly maps. In this study, CNN is used in edge detection of geological bodies closer to the surface, which are masked by other structures with various depths and dimensions. CNN was first tested for (prismatic) synthetic examples and satisfactory results were obtained. Subsequently, CNN/Cross-Correlation maps and bathymetric features were evaluated together to obtain a new structural map for most of the Aegean Sea. In our structural map, the locations of the faults and basins are generally in accordance with the previous maps from restricted areas based on seismic data. In the southern and southeastern parts of the Aegean Sea, E-W trending faults cut NE-SW trending basins and faults, similar to on-shore Western Anatolia. Also, in the western, central and northern parts of the Aegean Sea, all of these structures are truncated by NE-trending faults.

  19. Adiponectin fine-tuning of liver regeneration dynamics revealed through cellular network modeling.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Jason M; Cook, Daniel; Aksamitiene, Edita; Swarup, Aditi; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B

    2014-11-10

    Following partial hepatectomy, the liver initiates a regenerative program involving hepatocyte priming and replication driven by coordinated cytokine and growth factor actions. We investigated the mechanisms underlying Adiponectin's (Adn) regulation of liver regeneration through modulation of these mediators. Adn-/- mice showed delayed onset of hepatocyte replication, but accelerated cell cycle progression relative to wild-type mice, suggesting Adn has multiple effects fine-tuning the kinetics of liver regeneration. We developed a computational model describing the molecular and physiological kinetics of liver regeneration in Adn-/- mice. We employed this computational model to evaluate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Our analysis predicted that Adn is required for an efficient early cytokine response to partial hepatectomy, but is inhibitory to later growth factor actions. Consistent with this prediction, Adn knockout reduced hepatocyte responses to IL-6 during the priming phase, but enhanced growth factor levels through peak hepatocyte replication. By contrast, supraphysiological concentrations of Adn resulting from rosiglitazone treatment suppressed regeneration by reducing growth factor levels during S phase, consistent with computational predictions. Together, these results revealed that Adn fine-tunes the progression of liver regeneration through dynamically modulating molecular mediator networks and cellular interactions within the liver. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatio-temporal analysis of brain electrical activity in epilepsy based on cellular nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollas, Frank; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common chronic disorder of the nervous system. Generally, epileptic seizures appear without foregoing sign or warning. The problem of detecting a possible pre-seizure state in epilepsy from EEG signals has been addressed by many authors over the past decades. Different approaches of time series analysis of brain electrical activity already are providing valuable insights into the underlying complex dynamics. But the main goal the identification of an impending epileptic seizure with a sufficient specificity and reliability, has not been achieved up to now. An algorithm for a reliable, automated prediction of epileptic seizures would enable the realization of implantable seizure warning devices, which could provide valuable information to the patient and time/event specific drug delivery or possibly a direct electrical nerve stimulation. Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) are promising candidates for future seizure warning devices. CNN are characterized by local couplings of comparatively simple dynamical systems. With this property these networks are well suited to be realized as highly parallel, analog computer chips. Today available CNN hardware realizations exhibit a processing speed in the range of TeraOps combined with low power consumption. In this contribution new algorithms based on the spatio-temporal dynamics of CNN are considered in order to analyze intracranial EEG signals and thus taking into account mutual dependencies between neighboring regions of the brain. In an identification procedure Reaction-Diffusion CNN (RD-CNN) are determined for short segments of brain electrical activity, by means of a supervised parameter optimization. RD-CNN are deduced from Reaction-Diffusion Systems, which usually are applied to investigate complex phenomena like nonlinear wave propagation or pattern formation. The Local Activity Theory provides a necessary condition for emergent behavior in RD-CNN. In comparison linear spatio

  1. Impedance matching network for high frequency ultrasonic transducer for cellular applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Gon; Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Hyung Ham; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-02-01

    An approach for the design of an impedance matching network (IMN) for high frequency ultrasonic transducers with large apertures based on impedance analysis for cellular applications is presented in this paper. The main objectives were to maximize energy transmission from the excitation source to the ultrasonic transducers for cell manipulation and to achieve low input parameters for the safe operation of an ultrasonic transducer because the piezoelectric material in high frequency ultrasonic transducers is prone to breakage due to its being extremely thin. Two ultrasonic transducers, which were made of lithium niobate single crystal with the thickness of 15 μm, having apertures of 4.3 mm (fnumber=1.23) and 2.6mm (fnumber=0.75) were tested. L-type IMN was selected for high sensitivity and compact design of the ultrasonic transducers. The target center frequency was chosen as the frequency where the electrical admittance (|Y|) and phase angle (θz) from impedance analysis was maximal and zero, respectively. The reference center frequency and reference echo magnitude were selected as the center frequency and echo magnitude, measured by pulse-echo testing, of the ultrasonic transducer without IMN. Initial component values and topology of IMN were determined using the Smith chart, and pulse-echo testing was analyzed to verify the performance of the ultrasonic transducers with and without IMN. After several iterations between changing component values and topology of IMN, and pulse-echo measurement of the ultrasonic transducer with IMN, optimized component values and topology of IMN were chosen when the measured center frequency from pulse-echo testing was comparable to the target frequency, and the measured echo magnitude was at least 30% larger than the reference echo magnitude. Performance of an ultrasonic transducer with and without IMN was tested by observing a tangible dent on the surface of a plastic petridish and single cell response after an acoustic pulse was

  2. Geometric phase transition in the cellular network of the pancreatic islets may underlie the onset of type 1diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xujing

    Living systems are characterized by complexity in structure and emergent dynamic orders. In many aspects the onset of a chronic disease resembles phase transition in a dynamic system: quantitative changes accumulate largely unnoticed until a critical threshold is reached, which causes abrupt qualitative changes of the system. In this study we investigate this idea in a real example, the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells and the onset of type 1 diabetes. Within each islet, the β-cells are electrically coupled to each other, and function as a network with synchronized actions. Using percolation theory we show how normal islet function is intrinsically linked to network connectivity, and the critical point where the islet cellular network loses site percolation, is consistent with laboratory and clinical observations of the threshold β-cell loss that causes islet functional failure. Numerical simulations confirm that the islet cellular network needs to be percolated for β-cells to synchronize. Furthermore, the interplay between site percolation and bond strength predicts the existence of a transient phase of islet functional recovery after disease onset and introduction of treatment, potentially explaining a long time mystery in the clinical study of type 1 diabetes: the honeymoon phenomenon. Based on these results, we hypothesized that the onset of T1D may be the result of a phase transition of the islet β-cell network. We further discuss the potential applications in identifying disease-driving factors, and the critical parameters that are predictive of disease onset.

  3. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation.

    PubMed

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3'UTR than for the 5'UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent K(d) = 27 +/- 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5' and 3'UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5'UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes.

  4. Self-organization in phase separation of a lyotropic liquid crystal into cellular, network and droplet morphologies.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Hajime

    2006-02-01

    Phase separation is one of the most fundamental physical phenomena that controls the morphology of heterogeneous structures. Phase separation of a binary mixture of simple liquids produces only two morphologies: a bicontinuous or a droplet structure in the case of a symmetric or an asymmetric composition, respectively. For complex fluids, there is a possibility to produce other interesting morphologies. We found that a network structure of the minority phase can also be induced transiently on phase separation if the dynamics of the minority phase are much slower than those of the majority phase. Here we induce a cellular structure of the minority phase intentionally with the help of its smectic ordering, using phase separation of a lyotropic liquid crystal into the isotropic and smectic phase. We can control the three morphologies, cellular, network and droplet structures, solely by changing the heating rate. We demonstrate that the kinetic interplay between phase separation and smectic ordering is a key to the morphological selection. This may provide a new route to the formation of network and cellular morphologies in soft materials.

  5. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  6. Chrysler improved numerical differencing analyzer for third generation computers CINDA-3G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaski, J. D.; Lewis, D. R.; Thompson, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    New and versatile method has been developed to supplement or replace use of original CINDA thermal analyzer program in order to take advantage of improved systems software and machine speeds of third generation computers. CINDA-3G program options offer variety of methods for solution of thermal analog models presented in network format.

  7. The involvement of the interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases (IRAKs) in cellular signaling networks controlling inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ringwood, Lorna; Li, Liwu

    2008-01-01

    Innate immunity and inflammation plays a key role in host defense and wound healing. However, Excessive or altered inflammatory processes can contribute to severe and diverse human diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. The interleukin-1 receptor associated kinases (IRAKs) are critically involved in the regulation of intra-cellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. Collective studies indicate that IRAKs are present in many cell types, and can mediate signals from various cell receptors including Toll-Like-Receptors (TLRs). Consequently, diverse downstream signaling processes can be elicited following the activation of various IRAKs. Given the critical and complex roles IRAK proteins play, it is not surprising that genetic variations in human IRAK genes have been found to be linked with various human inflammatory diseases. This review intends to summarize the recent advances regarding the regulations of various IRAK proteins and their cellular functions in mediating inflammatory signaling processes. PMID:18249132

  8. Mechanical models of the cellular cytoskeletal network for the analysis of intracellular mechanical properties and force distributions: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-12-01

    The cytoskeleton, which is the major mechanical component of cells, supports the cell body and regulates the cellular motility to assist the cell in performing its biological functions. Several cytoskeletal network models have been proposed to investigate the mechanical properties of cells. This review paper summarizes these models with a focus on the prestressed cable network, the semi-flexible chain network, the open-cell foam, the tensegrity, and the granular models. The components, material parameters, types of connection joints, tension conditions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated from a structural and biological point of view. The underlying mechanisms that are associated with the morphological changes of spreading cells are expected to be simulated using a cytoskeletal model; however, it is still paid less attention most likely due to the lack of a suitable cytoskeletal model that can accurately model the spreading process. In this review article, the established cytoskeletal models are hoped to provide useful information for the development of future cytoskeletal models with different degrees of cell attachment for the study of the mechanical mechanisms underlying the cellular behaviors in response to external stimulations. PMID:23062682

  9. Systematic Reverse Engineering of Network Topologies: A Case Study of Resettable Bistable Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Debasish; Dougherty, Edward; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Carbo, Adria; Yao, Guang; Xing, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A focused theme in systems biology is to uncover design principles of biological networks, that is, how specific network structures yield specific systems properties. For this purpose, we have previously developed a reverse engineering procedure to identify network topologies with high likelihood in generating desired systems properties. Our method searches the continuous parameter space of an assembly of network topologies, without enumerating individual network topologies separately as traditionally done in other reverse engineering procedures. Here we tested this CPSS (continuous parameter space search) method on a previously studied problem: the resettable bistability of an Rb-E2F gene network in regulating the quiescence-to-proliferation transition of mammalian cells. From a simplified Rb-E2F gene network, we identified network topologies responsible for generating resettable bistability. The CPSS-identified topologies are consistent with those reported in the previous study based on individual topology search (ITS), demonstrating the effectiveness of the CPSS approach. Since the CPSS and ITS searches are based on different mathematical formulations and different algorithms, the consistency of the results also helps cross-validate both approaches. A unique advantage of the CPSS approach lies in its applicability to biological networks with large numbers of nodes. To aid the application of the CPSS approach to the study of other biological systems, we have developed a computer package that is available in Information S1. PMID:25170839

  10. Systematic reverse engineering of network topologies: a case study of resettable bistable cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasish; Dougherty, Edward; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Carbo, Adria; Yao, Guang; Xing, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A focused theme in systems biology is to uncover design principles of biological networks, that is, how specific network structures yield specific systems properties. For this purpose, we have previously developed a reverse engineering procedure to identify network topologies with high likelihood in generating desired systems properties. Our method searches the continuous parameter space of an assembly of network topologies, without enumerating individual network topologies separately as traditionally done in other reverse engineering procedures. Here we tested this CPSS (continuous parameter space search) method on a previously studied problem: the resettable bistability of an Rb-E2F gene network in regulating the quiescence-to-proliferation transition of mammalian cells. From a simplified Rb-E2F gene network, we identified network topologies responsible for generating resettable bistability. The CPSS-identified topologies are consistent with those reported in the previous study based on individual topology search (ITS), demonstrating the effectiveness of the CPSS approach. Since the CPSS and ITS searches are based on different mathematical formulations and different algorithms, the consistency of the results also helps cross-validate both approaches. A unique advantage of the CPSS approach lies in its applicability to biological networks with large numbers of nodes. To aid the application of the CPSS approach to the study of other biological systems, we have developed a computer package that is available in Information S1.

  11. Position and Velocity Tracking in Cellular Networks Using the Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2009-01-01

    Access to the right information anytime, anywhere is becoming the new driving force for the information technology revolution. The 'right' information's relevance is based on the user's profile and his/her current geographical position and/or time. Location Based Service (LBS) is an innovative technology that provides information or makes information available based on the geographical location of the mobile user. Analysts predict that LBSs will lead to new applications, generating billions of US dollars worldwide (Leite, 2001; Searle, 2001). The need for an efficient and accurate mobile station (MS) positioning system is growing day by day. The ability to pinpoint the location of an individual has an obvious and vital value in the context of emergency services (Chan, 2003; Olama et al., 2008). Pinpointing the location of people and other valuable assets also opens the door to a new world of previously unimagined information services and m-commerce probabilities. For example, availability of services like 'Where is the nearest ATM?', 'Check traffic conditions on the highway on my route', 'Find a parking lot nearby', as well as answers to 'Where is my advisor?', and 'Where is my car?' will be an everyday rule in our lives (Charalambous & Panayiotou, 2004). A technology independent LBS architecture can be considered as comprised by three main parts (Girodon, 2002): A user requesting information, a mobile network operator and its partners, and several content providers (e.g. data, maps). The subscriber requests a personalized service dependant on his geographic location. The system will ask the Location Services Manager (which is in charge of handling requests, i.e., send/receive to the Location Calculator and the Content Providers) to pinpoint the location of the mobile. The Location Services Manager (LSM), using the Location Calculator, will ask the Content Provider (CP) to supply qualified information according to the mobile's geographical position. The LSM will

  12. Exact quantification of cellular robustness in genome-scale metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Gerstl, Matthias P.; Klamt, Steffen; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Robustness, the ability of biological networks to uphold their functionality in spite of perturbations, is a key characteristic of all living systems. Although several theoretical approaches have been developed to formalize robustness, it still eludes an exact quantification. Here, we present a rigorous and quantitative approach for the structural robustness of metabolic networks by measuring their ability to tolerate random reaction (or gene) knockouts. Results: In analogy to reliability theory, based on an explicit consideration of all possible knockout sets, we exactly quantify the probability of failure for a given network function (e.g. growth). This measure can be computed if the network’s minimal cut sets (MSCs) are known. We show that even in genome-scale metabolic networks the probability of (network) failure can be reliably estimated from MSCs with lowest cardinalities. We demonstrate the applicability of our theory by analyzing the structural robustness of multiple Enterobacteriaceae and Blattibacteriaceae and show a dramatically low structural robustness for the latter. We find that structural robustness develops from the ability to proliferate in multiple growth environments consistent with experimentally found knowledge. Conclusion: The probability of (network) failure provides thus a reliable and easily computable measure of structural robustness and redundancy in (genome-scale) metabolic networks. Availability and implementation: Source code is available under the GNU General Public License at https://github.com/mpgerstl/networkRobustnessToolbox. Contact: juergen.zanghellini@boku.ac.at Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26543173

  13. EIF3G is associated with narcolepsy across ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anja; Lin, Ling; Faraco, Juliette; Mostafavi, Sara; Battle, Alexis; Zhu, Xiaowei; Levinson, Douglas F; Han, Fang; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel; Kornum, Birgitte R

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, an autoimmune disease affecting hypocretin (orexin) neurons, is strongly associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. Among polymorphisms associated with the disease is single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2305795 (c.*638G>A) located within the P2RY11 gene. P2RY11 is in a region of synteny conserved in mammals and zebrafish containing PPAN, EIF3G and DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1). As mutations in DNMT1 cause a rare dominant form of narcolepsy in association with deafness, cerebellar ataxia and dementia, we questioned whether the association with P2RY11 in sporadic narcolepsy could be secondary to linkage disequilibrium with DNMT1. Based on genome-wide association data from two cohorts of European and Chinese ancestry, we found that the narcolepsy association signal drops sharply between P2RY11/EIF3G and DNMT1, suggesting that the association with narcolepsy does not extend into the DNMT1 gene region. Interestingly, using transethnic mapping, we identified a novel single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3826784 (c.596-260A>G) in the EIF3G gene also associated with narcolepsy. The disease-associated allele increases EIF3G mRNA expression. EIF3G is located in the narcolepsy risk locus and EIF3G expression correlates with PPAN and P2RY11 expression. This suggests shared regulatory mechanisms that might be affected by the polymorphism and are of relevance to narcolepsy.

  14. Rainfall monitoring based on microwave links from cellular telecommunication networks: First results from a West African test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumounia, Ali; Gosset, Marielle; Cazenave, Frederic; Kacou, Modeste; Zougmore, François

    2014-08-01

    Rainfall monitoring based on commercial terrestrial microwave links is tested for the first time in Burkina Faso, in Sahelian West Africa. In collaboration with one national cellular phone operator, Telecel Faso, the attenuation on a 29 km long microwave link operating at 7 GHz was monitored at 1 s time rate for the monsoon season 2012. The time series of attenuation is transformed into rain rates and compared with rain gauge data. The method is successful in quantifying rainfall: 95% of the rainy days are detected. The correlation with the daily rain gauge series is 0.8, and the season bias is 6%. The correlation at the 5 min time step within each event is also high. These results demonstrate the potential interest of exploiting national and regional wireless telecommunication networks for monitoring rainfall in Africa, where operational rain gauge networks are degrading and the hydrometeorological risk increasing.

  15. Mitigating Handoff Call Dropping in Wireless Cellular Networks: A Call Admission Control Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Moses Effiong; Udoh, Victoria Idia; Bassey, Udoma James

    2016-06-01

    Handoff management has been an important but challenging issue in the field of wireless communication. It seeks to maintain seamless connectivity of mobile users changing their points of attachment from one base station to another. This paper derives a call admission control model and establishes an optimal step-size coefficient (k) that regulates the admission probability of handoff calls. An operational CDMA network carrier was investigated through the analysis of empirical data collected over a period of 1 month, to verify the performance of the network. Our findings revealed that approximately 23 % of calls in the existing system were lost, while 40 % of the calls (on the average) were successfully admitted. A simulation of the proposed model was then carried out under ideal network conditions to study the relationship between the various network parameters and validate our claim. Simulation results showed that increasing the step-size coefficient degrades the network performance. Even at optimum step-size (k), the network could still be compromised in the presence of severe network crises, but our model was able to recover from these problems and still functions normally.

  16. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle.

  17. Beta Cell Formation in vivo Through Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) in Wild Type Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Bruno; Hu, Wenchao; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is essential in type 1 diabetic individuals and is required in ~40- 50% of type 2 diabetics during their lifetime. Prior attempts at beta cell regeneration have relied upon pancreatic injury to induce beta cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and activation of the embryonic pathway, or stem cell replacement. We report an alternative method to transform adult non-stem (somatic) cells into pancreatic beta cells. The Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) approach targets cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic function in the organ's adult state and utilizes a synergistic mechanism that integrates three important levels of cellular regulation to induce beta cell formation: (i) glucose metabolism, (ii) membrane receptor function, and (iii) gene transcription. The aim of the present study was to induce pancreatic beta cell formation in vivo in adult animals without stem cells and without dedifferentiating cells to recapitulate the embryonic pathway as previously published (1-3). Our results employing CNIP demonstrate that: (i) insulin secreting cells can be generated in adult pancreatic tissue in vivo and circumvent the problem of generating endocrine (glucagon and somatostatin) cells that exert deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis, and (ii) longterm normalization of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion can be achieved in a wild type diabetic mouse model. The CNIP cocktail has the potential to be used as a preventative or therapeutic treatment or cure for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26696016

  18. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  19. The dynamic and geometric phase transition in the cellular network of pancreatic islet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xujing

    2013-03-01

    The pancreatic islet is a micro-organ that contains several thousands of endocrine cells, majority of which being the insulin releasing β - cells . - cellsareexcitablecells , andarecoupledtoeachother through gap junctional channels. Here, using percolation theory, we investigate the role of network structure in determining the dynamics of the β-cell network. We show that the β-cell synchronization depends on network connectivity. More specifically, as the site occupancy is reducing, initially the β-cell synchronization is barely affected, until it reaches around a critical value, where the synchronization exhibit a sudden rapid decline, followed by an slow exponential tail. This critical value coincides with the critical site open probability for percolation transition. The dependence over bond strength is similar, exhibiting critical-behavior like dependence around a certain value of bond strength. These results suggest that the β-cell network undergoes a dynamic phase transition when the network is percolated. We further apply the findings to study diabetes. During the development of diabetes, the β - cellnetworkconnectivitydecreases . Siteoccupancyreducesfromthe reducing β-cell mass, and the bond strength is increasingly impaired from β-cell stress and chronic hyperglycemia. We demonstrate that the network dynamics around the percolation transition explain the disease dynamics around onset, including a long time mystery in diabetes, the honeymoon phenomenon.

  20. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  1. Opinion evolution based on cellular automata rules in small world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiao-Ming; Shi, Lun; Zhang, Jie-Fang

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we apply cellular automata rules, which can be given by a truth table, to human memory. We design each memory as a tracking survey mode that keeps the most recent three opinions. Each cellular automata rule, as a personal mechanism, gives the final ruling in one time period based on the data stored in one's memory. The key focus of the paper is to research the evolution of people's attitudes to the same question. Based on a great deal of empirical observations from computer simulations, all the rules can be classified into 20 groups. We highlight the fact that the phenomenon shown by some rules belonging to the same group will be altered within several steps by other rules in different groups. It is truly amazing that, compared with the last hundreds of presidential voting in America, the eras of important events in America's history coincide with the simulation results obtained by our model.

  2. Coverage extension and balancing the transmitted power of the moving relay node at LTE-A cellular network.

    PubMed

    Aldhaibani, Jaafar A; Yahya, Abid; Ahmad, R Badlishah

    2014-01-01

    The poor capacity at cell boundaries is not enough to meet the growing demand and stringent design which required high capacity and throughput irrespective of user's location in the cellular network. In this paper, we propose new schemes for an optimum fixed relay node (RN) placement in LTE-A cellular network to enhance throughput and coverage extension at cell edge region. The proposed approach mitigates interferences between all nodes and ensures optimum utilization with the optimization of transmitted power. Moreover, we proposed a new algorithm to balance the transmitted power of moving relay node (MR) over cell size and providing required SNR and throughput at the users inside vehicle along with reducing the transmitted power consumption by MR. The numerical analysis along with the simulation results indicates that an improvement in capacity for users is 40% increment at downlink transmission from cell capacity. Furthermore, the results revealed that there is saving nearly 75% from transmitted power in MR after using proposed balancing algorithm. ATDI simulator was used to verify the numerical results, which deals with real digital cartographic and standard formats for terrain.

  3. A New Approach for Border Detection of the Dumluca (Turkey) Iron Ore Area: Wavelet Cellular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albora, A. Muhittin; Bal, Abdullah; Ucan, Osman N.

    2007-01-01

    Anomaly analysis is used for various geophysics applications such as determination of geophysical structure's location and border detections. Besides the classical geophysical techniques, artificial intelligence based image processing algorithms have been found attractive for geophysical anomaly analysis. Recently, cellular neural networks (CNN) have been applied to geophysical data and satisfactory results are reported. CNN provides fast and parallel computational capability for geophysical image processing applications due to its filtering structure. The behavior of CNN is defined by two template matrices that are adjusted by a properly supervised learning algorithm. After training stage for geophysical data, Bouguer anomaly maps can be processed and analyzed sequentially. In this paper, CNN learning and processing capability have been improved, combining Wavelet functions and backpropagation learning algorithms. The new architecture is denoted as Wavelet-Cellular Neural networks (Wave-CNN) and it is employed to analyze Bouguer anomaly maps which are important to extract useful information in geophysics. At first, Wave-CNN performance is tested on synthetic geophysical data, which are created by a computer environment. Then, Bouguer anomaly maps of the Dumluca iron ore field have been analyzed and results are reported in comparison to real drilling results.

  4. Coverage Extension and Balancing the Transmitted Power of the Moving Relay Node at LTE-A Cellular Network

    PubMed Central

    Aldhaibani, Jaafar A.; Yahya, Abid; Ahmad, R. Badlishah

    2014-01-01

    The poor capacity at cell boundaries is not enough to meet the growing demand and stringent design which required high capacity and throughput irrespective of user's location in the cellular network. In this paper, we propose new schemes for an optimum fixed relay node (RN) placement in LTE-A cellular network to enhance throughput and coverage extension at cell edge region. The proposed approach mitigates interferences between all nodes and ensures optimum utilization with the optimization of transmitted power. Moreover, we proposed a new algorithm to balance the transmitted power of moving relay node (MR) over cell size and providing required SNR and throughput at the users inside vehicle along with reducing the transmitted power consumption by MR. The numerical analysis along with the simulation results indicates that an improvement in capacity for users is 40% increment at downlink transmission from cell capacity. Furthermore, the results revealed that there is saving nearly 75% from transmitted power in MR after using proposed balancing algorithm. ATDI simulator was used to verify the numerical results, which deals with real digital cartographic and standard formats for terrain. PMID:24672378

  5. A modified size-dependent core-shell model and its application in the wave propagation of square cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Ya-Chuan; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    We propose a modified core-shell model to depict the size-dependent elastic properties of materials with several different cross-sections. By using the Young-Laplace equation, a modified Euler-Bernoulli equation, which has taken a power-law relation between the bulk and surface moduli into account, is derived. A finite element method of the modified Euler-Bernoulli equation is formulated, and assembled to investigate the dispersion relations of the infinite two-dimensional periodic square cellular networks. The effectiveness of the proposed core-shell model is verified by comparing with results of the experiments and the molecular dynamics simulations available in the literature. Numerical results show that surface effects play an important role on the cellular networks with small diameters, large aspect ratios and high wave frequencies. Meanwhile, the analytical expressions for the size-dependent elastic modulus may be useful for the study of the size-dependent elasticity of materials and structures at small length scales.

  6. Robust synchronization analysis in nonlinear stochastic cellular networks with time-varying delays, intracellular perturbations and intercellular noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wei; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2011-08-01

    Naturally, a cellular network consisted of a large amount of interacting cells is complex. These cells have to be synchronized in order to emerge their phenomena for some biological purposes. However, the inherently stochastic intra and intercellular interactions are noisy and delayed from biochemical processes. In this study, a robust synchronization scheme is proposed for a nonlinear stochastic time-delay coupled cellular network (TdCCN) in spite of the time-varying process delay and intracellular parameter perturbations. Furthermore, a nonlinear stochastic noise filtering ability is also investigated for this synchronized TdCCN against stochastic intercellular and environmental disturbances. Since it is very difficult to solve a robust synchronization problem with the Hamilton-Jacobi inequality (HJI) matrix, a linear matrix inequality (LMI) is employed to solve this problem via the help of a global linearization method. Through this robust synchronization analysis, we can gain a more systemic insight into not only the robust synchronizability but also the noise filtering ability of TdCCN under time-varying process delays, intracellular perturbations and intercellular disturbances. The measures of robustness and noise filtering ability of a synchronized TdCCN have potential application to the designs of neuron transmitters, on-time mass production of biochemical molecules, and synthetic biology. Finally, a benchmark of robust synchronization design in Escherichia coli repressilators is given to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:21624379

  7. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders.

  8. An Arabidopsis WDR protein coordinates cellular networks involved in light, stress response and hormone signals.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huey-Wen; Feng, Ji-Huan; Feng, Yung-Lin; Wei, Miam-Ju

    2015-12-01

    The WD-40 repeat (WDR) protein acts as a scaffold for protein interactions in various cellular events. An Arabidopsis WDR protein exhibited sequence similarity with human WDR26, a scaffolding protein implicated in H2O2-induced cell death in neural cells. The AtWDR26 transcript was induced by auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ET), osmostic stress and salinity. The expression of AtWDR26 was regulated by light, and seed germination of the AtWDR26 overexpression (OE) and seedling growth of the T-DNA knock-out (KO) exhibited altered sensitivity to light. Root growth of the OE seedlings increased tolerance to ZnSO4 and NaCl stresses and were hypersensitive to inhibition of osmotic stress. Seedlings of OE and KO altered sensitivities to multiple hormones. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic plants overexpressing AtWDR26 showed that genes involved in the chloroplast-related metabolism constituted the largest group of the up-regulated genes. AtWDR26 overexpression up-regulated a large number of genes related to defense cellular events including biotic and abiotic stress response. Furthermore, several members of genes functioning in the regulation of Zn homeostasis, and hormone synthesis and perception of auxin and JA were strongly up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Our data provide physiological and transcriptional evidence for AtWDR26 role in hormone, light and abiotic stress cellular events.

  9. Design, Surface Treatment, Cellular Plating, and Culturing of Modular Neuronal Networks Composed of Functionally Inter-connected Circuits.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Sivan; Bisio, Marta; Cohen, Gilad; Goldin, Miri; Tedesco, Marieteresa; Hanein, Yael; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari; Chiappalone, Michela; Bonifazi, Paolo

    2015-04-15

    The brain operates through the coordinated activation and the dynamic communication of neuronal assemblies. A major open question is how a vast repertoire of dynamical motifs, which underlie most diverse brain functions, can emerge out of a fixed topological and modular organization of brain circuits. Compared to in vivo studies of neuronal circuits which present intrinsic experimental difficulties, in vitro preparations offer a much larger possibility to manipulate and probe the structural, dynamical and chemical properties of experimental neuronal systems. This work describes an in vitro experimental methodology which allows growing of modular networks composed by spatially distinct, functionally interconnected neuronal assemblies. The protocol allows controlling the two-dimensional (2D) architecture of the neuronal network at different levels of topological complexity. A desired network patterning can be achieved both on regular cover slips and substrate embedded micro electrode arrays. Micromachined structures are embossed on a silicon wafer and used to create biocompatible polymeric stencils, which incorporate the negative features of the desired network architecture. The stencils are placed on the culturing substrates during the surface coating procedure with a molecular layer for promoting cellular adhesion. After removal of the stencils, neurons are plated and they spontaneously redirected to the coated areas. By decreasing the inter-compartment distance, it is possible to obtain either isolated or interconnected neuronal circuits. To promote cell survival, cells are co-cultured with a supporting neuronal network which is located at the periphery of the culture dish. Electrophysiological and optical recordings of the activity of modular networks obtained respectively by using substrate embedded micro electrode arrays and calcium imaging are presented. While each module shows spontaneous global synchronizations, the occurrence of inter-module synchronization

  10. Inhibition of a NEDD8 Cascade Restores Restriction of HIV by APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, David C.; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Eunju; Yen, Linda; Cartozo, Nathalie Caretta; Li, Ming; Jäger, Stefanie; Mason-Herr, Jeremy; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Krogan, Nevan J.; Harris, Reuben S.; Peterlin, Boris Matija; Gross, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular restriction factors help to defend humans against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV accessory proteins hijack at least three different Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases, which must be activated by the small ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8, in order to counteract host cellular restriction factors. We found that conjugation of NEDD8 to Cullin-5 by the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBE2F is required for HIV Vif-mediated degradation of the host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G). Pharmacological inhibition of the NEDD8 E1 by MLN4924 or knockdown of either UBE2F or its RING-protein binding partner RBX2 bypasses the effect of Vif, restoring the restriction of HIV by A3G. NMR mapping and mutational analyses define specificity determinants of the UBE2F NEDD8 cascade. These studies demonstrate that disrupting host NEDD8 cascades presents a novel antiretroviral therapeutic approach enhancing the ability of the immune system to combat HIV. PMID:23300442

  11. Analysis of the local organization and dynamics of cellular actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weiwei; Yu, Cheng-han; Lieu, Zi Zhao; Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    A ctin filaments, with the aid of multiple accessory proteins, self-assemble into a variety of network patterns. We studied the organization and dynamics of the actin network in nonadhesive regions of cells bridging fibronectin-coated adhesive strips. The network was formed by actin nodes associated with and linked by myosin II and containing the formin disheveled-associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (DAAM1) and the cross-linker filamin A (FlnA). After Latrunculin A (LatA) addition, actin nodes appeared to be more prominent and demonstrated drift-diffusion motion. Superresolution microscopy revealed that, in untreated cells, DAAM1 formed patches with a similar spatial arrangement to the actin nodes. Node movement (diffusion coefficient and velocity) in LatA-treated cells was dependent on the level and activity of myosin IIA, DAAM1, and FlnA. Based on our results, we developed a computational model of the dynamic formin-filamin-actin asters that can self-organize into a contractile actomyosin network. We suggest that such networks are critical for connecting distant parts of the cell to maintain the mechanical coherence of the cytoplasm. PMID:24081490

  12. Reconstruction of cellular signal transduction networks using perturbation assays and linear programming.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Bettina; Kaderali, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation experiments for example using RNA interference (RNAi) offer an attractive way to elucidate gene function in a high throughput fashion. The placement of hit genes in their functional context and the inference of underlying networks from such data, however, are challenging tasks. One of the problems in network inference is the exponential number of possible network topologies for a given number of genes. Here, we introduce a novel mathematical approach to address this question. We formulate network inference as a linear optimization problem, which can be solved efficiently even for large-scale systems. We use simulated data to evaluate our approach, and show improved performance in particular on larger networks over state-of-the art methods. We achieve increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as a significant reduction in computing time. Furthermore, we show superior performance on noisy data. We then apply our approach to study the intracellular signaling of human primary nave CD4(+) T-cells, as well as ErbB signaling in trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cells. In both cases, our approach recovers known interactions and points to additional relevant processes. In ErbB signaling, our results predict an important role of negative and positive feedback in controlling the cell cycle progression.

  13. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  14. Rainfall measurements from cellular networks microwave links : an alternative ground reference for satellite validation and hydrology in Africa .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, Marielle; cazenave, frederic; Zougmore, françois; Doumounia, Ali; kacou, Modeste

    2015-04-01

    In many part of the Tropics the ground based gauge networks are sparse, often degrading and accessing this data for monitoring rainfall or for validating satellite products is sometime difficult. Here, an alternative rainfall measuring technique is proposed and tested in West Africa. It is based on using commercial microwave links from cellular telephone networks to detect and quantify rainfall. Rainfall monitoring based on commercial terrestrial microwave links has been tested for the first time in Burkina Faso, in Sahel. The rainfall regime is characterized by intense rainfall intensities brought by mesoscale Convective systems (MCS), generated by deep organized convection. The region is subjected to drought as well as dramatic floods associated with the intense rainfall provided by a few MCSs. The hydrometeorological risk is increasing and need to be monitored. In collaboration with the national cellular phone operator, Telecel Faso, the attenuation on 29 km long microwave links operating at 7 GHz was monitored at 1s time rate for the monsoon season 2012. The time series of attenuation is transformed into rain rates and compared with rain gauge data. The method is successful in quantifying rainfall: 95% of the rainy days are detected. The correlation with the daily raingauge series is 0.8 and the season bias is 5%. The correlation at the 5 min time step within each event is also high. We will present the quantitative results, discuss the uncertainties and compare the time series and the 2D maps with those derived from a polarimetric radar. The results demonstrate the potential interest of exploiting national and regional wireless telecommunication networks to provide rainfall maps for various applications : urban hydrology, agro-hydrological risk monitoring, satellite validation and development of combined rainfall products. We will also present the outcome of the first international Rain Cell Africa workshop held in Ouagadougou early 2015.

  15. iGPCR-drug: a web server for predicting interaction between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the most frequent targets of therapeutic drugs. It is time-consuming and expensive to determine whether a drug and a GPCR are to interact with each other in a cellular network purely by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (dimensional) structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most GPCRs are still unknown. To overcome the situation, a sequence-based classifier, called "iGPCR-drug", was developed to predict the interactions between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking. In the predictor, the drug compound is formulated by a 2D (dimensional) fingerprint via a 256D vector, GPCR by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) generated with the grey model theory, and the prediction engine is operated by the fuzzy K-nearest neighbour algorithm. Moreover, a user-friendly web-server for iGPCR-drug was established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in this paper just for its integrity. The overall success rate achieved by iGPCR-drug via the jackknife test was 85.5%, which is remarkably higher than the rate by the existing peer method developed in 2010 although no web server was ever established for it. It is anticipated that iGPCR-Drug may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the approach presented here can also be extended to study other drug - target interaction networks.

  16. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  17. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  18. Actin-binding proteins: the long road to understanding the dynamic landscape of cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Pekka

    2016-08-15

    The actin cytoskeleton supports a vast number of cellular processes in nonmuscle cells. It is well established that the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are controlled by a large array of actin-binding proteins. However, it was only 40 years ago that the first nonmuscle actin-binding protein, filamin, was identified and characterized. Filamin was shown to bind and cross-link actin filaments into higher-order structures and contribute to phagocytosis in macrophages. Subsequently many other nonmuscle actin-binding proteins were identified and characterized. These proteins regulate almost all steps of the actin filament assembly and disassembly cycles, as well as the arrangement of actin filaments into diverse three-dimensional structures. Although the individual biochemical activities of most actin-regulatory proteins are relatively well understood, knowledge of how these proteins function together in a common cytoplasm to control actin dynamics and architecture is only beginning to emerge. Furthermore, understanding how signaling pathways and mechanical cues control the activities of various actin-binding proteins in different cellular, developmental, and pathological processes will keep researchers busy for decades. PMID:27528696

  19. R&D on wireless broadband communication systems: new generation ubiquitous mobile network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Hiroyo

    2007-09-01

    R&D on new generation mobile network has attracted a growing interest over the world on the background of rapid market growth for 2nd and 3rd - generation cellular networks and wireless LANs/MANs. The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) has been carried out the New Generation Mobile Network Project from April 2002 to March 2006, and has developed fundamental technologies to enable seamless and secure integration of various wireless access networks such as existing cellular networks, wireless LANs, home networks, intelligent transport systems (ITS), the Beyond-3G (B3G) cellular and other wireless access systems. From April 2006, Ubiquitous Mobile Network project focused on cognitive radio technology and integrated seamless networking technology was started. This paper overviews the achievement and the future plan of these projects.

  20. Inhibition of LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition by exosomes encapsidating APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Atanu K; Taylor, Harry E; Hildreth, James E K; Popik, Waldemar

    2010-04-25

    Human cytidine deaminases, including APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F, are part of a cellular defense system against retroviruses and retroelements including non-LTR retrotransposons LINE-1 (L1) and Alu. Expression of cellular A3 proteins is sufficient for inhibition of L1 and Alu retrotransposition, but the effect of A3 proteins transferred in exosomes on retroelement mobilization is unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that exosomes secreted by CD4(+)H9 T cells and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells encapsidate A3G and A3F and inhibit L1 and Alu retrotransposition. A3G is the major contributor to the inhibitory activity of exosomes, however, the contribution of A3F in H9 exosomes cannot be excluded. Additionally, we show that exosomes encapsidate mRNAs coding for A3 proteins. A3G mRNA, and less so A3F, was enriched in exosomes secreted by H9 cells. Exosomal A3G mRNA was functional in vitro. Whether exosomes inhibit retrotransposons in vivo requires further investigation.

  1. Mobility-Aware Caching and Computation Offloading in 5G Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Hao, Yixue; Qiu, Meikang; Song, Jeungeun; Wu, Di; Humar, Iztok

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends show that Internet traffic is increasingly dominated by content, which is accompanied by the exponential growth of traffic. To cope with this phenomena, network caching is introduced to utilize the storage capacity of diverse network devices. In this paper, we first summarize four basic caching placement strategies, i.e., local caching, Device-to-Device (D2D) caching, Small cell Base Station (SBS) caching and Macrocell Base Station (MBS) caching. However, studies show that so far, much of the research has ignored the impact of user mobility. Therefore, taking the effect of the user mobility into consideration, we proposes a joint mobility-aware caching and SBS density placement scheme (MS caching). In addition, differences and relationships between caching and computation offloading are discussed. We present a design of a hybrid computation offloading and support it with experimental results, which demonstrate improved performance in terms of energy cost. Finally, we discuss the design of an incentive mechanism by considering network dynamics, differentiated user’s quality of experience (QoE) and the heterogeneity of mobile terminals in terms of caching and computing capabilities. PMID:27347975

  2. Mobility-Aware Caching and Computation Offloading in 5G Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Hao, Yixue; Qiu, Meikang; Song, Jeungeun; Wu, Di; Humar, Iztok

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends show that Internet traffic is increasingly dominated by content, which is accompanied by the exponential growth of traffic. To cope with this phenomena, network caching is introduced to utilize the storage capacity of diverse network devices. In this paper, we first summarize four basic caching placement strategies, i.e., local caching, Device-to-Device (D2D) caching, Small cell Base Station (SBS) caching and Macrocell Base Station (MBS) caching. However, studies show that so far, much of the research has ignored the impact of user mobility. Therefore, taking the effect of the user mobility into consideration, we proposes a joint mobility-aware caching and SBS density placement scheme (MS caching). In addition, differences and relationships between caching and computation offloading are discussed. We present a design of a hybrid computation offloading and support it with experimental results, which demonstrate improved performance in terms of energy cost. Finally, we discuss the design of an incentive mechanism by considering network dynamics, differentiated user's quality of experience (QoE) and the heterogeneity of mobile terminals in terms of caching and computing capabilities. PMID:27347975

  3. Hierarchical random cellular neural networks for system-level brain-like signal processing.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Robert; Puljic, Marko

    2013-09-01

    Sensory information processing and cognition in brains are modeled using dynamic systems theory. The brain's dynamic state is described by a trajectory evolving in a high-dimensional state space. We introduce a hierarchy of random cellular automata as the mathematical tools to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of the cortex. The corresponding brain model is called neuropercolation which has distinct advantages compared to traditional models using differential equations, especially in describing spatio-temporal discontinuities in the form of phase transitions. Phase transitions demarcate singularities in brain operations at critical conditions, which are viewed as hallmarks of higher cognition and awareness experience. The introduced Monte-Carlo simulations obtained by parallel computing point to the importance of computer implementations using very large-scale integration (VLSI) and analog platforms.

  4. Assembling global maps of cellular function through integrative analysis of physical and genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Srivas, Rohith; Hannum, Gregory; Ruscheinski, Johannes; Ono, Keiichiro; Wang, Peng-Liang; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey

    2012-01-01

    To take full advantage of high-throughput genetic and physical interaction mapping projects, the raw interactions must first be assembled into models of cell structure and function. PanGIA (for physical and genetic interaction alignment) is a plug-in for the bioinformatics platform Cytoscape, designed to integrate physical and genetic interactions into hierarchical module maps. PanGIA identifies ‘modules’ as sets of proteins whose physical and genetic interaction data matches that of known protein complexes. Higher-order functional cooperativity and redundancy is identified by enrichment for genetic interactions across modules. This protocol begins with importing interaction networks into Cytoscape, followed by filtering and basic network visualization. Next, PanGIA is used to infer a set of modules and their functional inter-relationships. This module map is visualized in a number of intuitive ways, and modules are tested for functional enrichment and overlap with known complexes. The full protocol can be completed between 10 and 30 min, depending on the size of the data set being analyzed. PMID:21886098

  5. Mathematical model of the SH-3G helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model of the Sikorsky SH-3G helicopter based on classical nonlinear, quasi-steady rotor theory was developed. The model was validated statically and dynamically by comparison with Navy flight-test data. The model incorporates ad hoc revisions which address the ideal assumptions of classical rotor theory and improve the static trim characteristics to provide a more realistic simulation, while retaining the simplicity of the classical model.

  6. An integrative model of the cardiovascular system coupling heart cellular mechanics with arterial network hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung; Shim, Eun Bo

    2013-08-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements.

  7. Solution structure of At3g28950 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the solution structure of At3g28950 from A. thaliana, a homolog of At5g39720, whose structure we solved earlier. The secondary structure of the 165-aa protein consists of a 5-strand anti-parallel β-barrel domain flanked by two α-helices and a 2-strand β-sheet; an additional free C-terminal α-helix extends into solution. Bioinformatic searches and analyses suggest that members of this growing set of structurally related proteins have been recruited to serve a wide variety of functions ranging from γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase activity, to participation in plant responses to chemical and biotic stimuli. Expression of a human homolog is elevated in bladder cancer tissues. Expression patterns for At3g28950 and its Arabidopsis paralogs suggest that each one evolved different a physiological role. The At3g28950 structure was solved as part of a structural genomics effort, and the results demonstrate how such a project can further understanding of genome evolution in addition to sequence-structure and structure-function relationships. PMID:18214976

  8. From molecular interaction to acute promyelocytic leukemia: Calculating leukemogenesis and remission from endogenous molecular-cellular network

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ruoshi; Zhu, Xiaomei; Radich, Jerald P.; Ao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) remains the best example of a malignancy that can be cured clinically by differentiation therapy. We demonstrate that APL may emerge from a dynamical endogenous molecular-cellular network obtained from normal, non-cancerous molecular interactions such as signal transduction and translational regulation under physiological conditions. This unifying framework, which reproduces APL, normal progenitor, and differentiated granulocytic phenotypes as different robust states from the network dynamics, has the advantage to study transition between these states, i.e. critical drivers for leukemogenesis and targets for differentiation. The simulation results quantitatively reproduce microarray profiles of NB4 and HL60 cell lines in response to treatment and normal neutrophil differentiation, and lead to new findings such as biomarkers for APL and additional molecular targets for arsenic trioxide therapy. The modeling shows APL and normal states mutually suppress each other, both in “wiring” and in dynamical cooperation. Leukemogenesis and recovery under treatment may be a consequence of spontaneous or induced transitions between robust states, through “passes” or “dragging” by drug effects. Our approach rationalizes leukemic complexity and constructs a platform towards extending differentiation therapy by performing “dry” molecular biology experiments. PMID:27098097

  9. Morphogenesis in sea urchin embryos: linking cellular events to gene regulatory network states

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Deidre; Kaltenbach, Stacy; McClay, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrulation in the sea urchin begins with ingression of the primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) at the vegetal pole of the embryo. After entering the blastocoel the PMCs migrate, form a syncitium, and synthesize the skeleton of the embryo. Several hours after the PMCs ingress the vegetal plate buckles to initiate invagination of the archenteron. That morphogenetic process occurs in several steps. The non-skeletogenic cells produce the initial inbending of the vegetal plate. Endoderm cells then rearrange and extend the length of the gut across the blastocoel to a target near the animal pole. Finally, cells that will form part of the midgut and hindgut are added to complete gastrulation. Later, the stomodeum invaginates from the oral ectoderm and fuses with the foregut to complete the archenteron. In advance of, and during these morphogenetic events an increasingly complex gene regulatory network controls the specification and the cell biological events that conduct the gastrulation movements. PMID:23801438

  10. The p53 network: Cellular and systemic DNA damage responses in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome instability contributes to cancer development and accelerates age-related pathologies as evidenced by a variety of congenital cancer susceptibility and progeroid syndromes that are caused by defects in genome maintenance mechanisms. DNA damage response pathways that are mediated through the tumor suppressor p53 play an important role in the cell intrinsic responses to genome instability, including a transient cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. Both senescence and apoptosis are powerful tumor suppressive pathways preventing the uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells. However, both pathways can potentially deplete stem and progenitor cell pools, thus promoting tissue degeneration and organ failure, which are both hallmarks of aging. p53 signaling is also involved in mediating non-cell autonomous interactions with the innate immune system and in the systemic adjustments during the aging process. The network of p53 target genes thus functions as an important regulator of cancer prevention and the physiology of aging. PMID:22265392

  11. Multimode fibers in millimeter-wave evolution for 5G cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, C.; Montero, D. S.; Ponce, W.; Lallana, P. C.; Larrabeiti, D.; Montalvo, J.; Tapetado, A.; Pinzón, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    Small-cell and cloud-RAN systems along with the use of the millimeter-wave band have been considered as promising solutions to meet the capacity demand of the future wireless access networks. Radio over Multimode fibers (RoMMF) can play a role in the integrated optical-wireless access systems for next-generation wireless communications, mainly in within-building environments. The numerical results show the effectiveness of MMF to transmit at 60 GHz band with 7- GHz bandwidth for different link lengths and refractive index profiles under restricted mode launching and using narrow linewidth sources. The integration with optically powered remote antenna units is also proposed based on the large core effective area of MMF. Temperature impairments and graded index plastic optical fiber transmission are also discussed.

  12. Evolving gene regulation networks into cellular networks guiding adaptive behavior: an outline how single cells could have evolved into a centralized neurosensory system

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Elliott, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the neurosensory system of man, able to reflect on its own origin, is one of the major goals of comparative neurobiology. Details of the origin of neurosensory cells, their aggregation into central nervous systems and associated sensory organs, their localized patterning into remarkably different cell types aggregated into variably sized parts of the central nervous system begin to emerge. Insights at the cellular and molecular level begin to shed some light on the evolution of neurosensory cells, partially covered in this review. Molecular evidence suggests that high mobility group (HMG) proteins of pre-metazoans evolved into the definitive Sox [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box] genes used for neurosensory precursor specification in metazoans. Likewise, pre-metazoan basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes evolved in metazoans into the group A bHLH genes dedicated to neurosensory differentiation in bilaterians. Available evidence suggests that the Sox and bHLH genes evolved a cross-regulatory network able to synchronize expansion of precursor populations and their subsequent differentiation into novel parts of the brain or sensory organs. Molecular evidence suggests metazoans evolved patterning gene networks early and not dedicated to neuronal development. Only later in evolution were these patterning gene networks tied into the increasing complexity of diffusible factors, many of which were already present in pre-metazoans, to drive local patterning events. It appears that the evolving molecular basis of neurosensory cell development may have led, in interaction with differentially expressed patterning genes, to local network modifications guiding unique specializations of neurosensory cells into sensory organs and various areas of the central nervous system. PMID:25416504

  13. Human Papillomavirus Deregulates the Response of a Cellular Network Comprising of Chemotactic and Proinflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rezaul; Meyers, Craig; Backendorf, Claude; Ludigs, Kristina; Offringa, Rienk; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Boer, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the presence of intracellular pathogen recognition receptors that allow infected cells to attract the immune system, undifferentiated keratinocytes (KCs) are the main targets for latent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (hrHPVs). HPV infections are transient but on average last for more than one year suggesting that HPV has developed means to evade host immunity. To understand how HPV persists, we studied the innate immune response of undifferentiated human KCs harboring episomal copies of HPV16 and 18 by genome-wide expression profiling. Our data showed that the expression of the different virus-sensing receptors was not affected by the presence of HPV. Poly(I:C) stimulation of the viral RNA receptors TLR3, PKR, MDA5 and RIG-I, the latter of which indirectly senses viral DNA through non-self RNA polymerase III transcripts, showed dampening in downstream signalling of these receptors by HPVs. Many of the genes downregulated in HPV-positive KCs involved components of the antigen presenting pathway, the inflammasome, the production of antivirals, pro-inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines, and components downstream of activated pathogen receptors. Notably, gene and/or protein interaction analysis revealed the downregulation of a network of genes that was strongly interconnected by IL-1β, a crucial cytokine to activate adaptive immunity. In summary, our comprehensive expression profiling approach revealed that HPV16 and 18 coordinate a broad deregulation of the keratinocyte's inflammatory response, and contributes to the understanding of virus persistence. PMID:21423754

  14. Structurally Dynamic Cellular Networks as Models for Planck Scale Physics and the Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requardt, Manfred

    Starting from the working hypothesis that both physics and the corresponding mathematics have to be described by means of discrete concepts on the Planck scale, one of the many problems one has to face in this enterprise is to find the discrete protoforms of the building blocks of our ordinary continuum physics and mathematics. We regard these continuum concepts and continuum space-time (S-T) in particular as being emergent, coarse-grained and derived relative to an underlying erratic and disordered microscopic substratum which is expected to play by quite different rules. A central role in our analysis is played by a geometric renormalization group which creates (among other things) a kind of sparse translocal network of correlations in classical continuous space-time and underlies in our view such mysterious phenomena as holography and the black hole entropy-area law. The same point of view holds for quantum theory which we also regard as a low-energy, coarse-grained continuum theory, being emergent from something more fundamental.

  15. A Dynamic Programming Approach for Base Station Sleeping in Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jie; Zhou, Sheng; Niu, Zhisheng

    The energy consumption of the information and communication technology (ICT) industry, which has become a serious problem, is mostly due to the network infrastructure rather than the mobile terminals. In this paper, we focus on reducing the energy consumption of base stations (BSs) by adjusting their working modes (active or sleep). Specifically, the objective is to minimize the energy consumption while satisfying quality of service (QoS, e.g., blocking probability) requirement and, at the same time, avoiding frequent mode switching to reduce signaling and delay overhead. The problem is modeled as a dynamic programming (DP) problem, which is NP-hard in general. Based on cooperation among neighboring BSs, a low-complexity algorithm is proposed to reduce the size of state space as well as that of action space. Simulations demonstrate that, with the proposed algorithm, the active BS pattern well meets the time variation and the non-uniform spatial distribution of system traffic. Moreover, the tradeoff between the energy saving from BS sleeping and the cost of switching is well balanced by the proposed scheme.

  16. Incorporation of aggrecan in interpenetrating network hydrogels to improve cellular performance for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Frei, Anthony W; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  17. Ultra-Porous Nanoparticle Networks: A Biomimetic Coating Morphology for Enhanced Cellular Response and Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Noushin; Ceramidas, Anthony; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Panneerselvan, Anitha; Nisbet, David R.; Tricoli, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic treatments are amongst the most common cause of surgery and are responsible for a large share of global healthcare expenditures. Engineering materials that can hasten bone integration will improve the quality of life of millions of patients per year and reduce associated medical costs. Here, we present a novel hierarchical biomimetic coating that mimics the inorganic constituent of mammalian bones with the aim of improving osseointegration of metallic implants. We exploit the thermally-driven self-organization of metastable core-shell nanoparticles during their aerosol self-assembly to rapidly fabricate robust, ultra-porous nanoparticle networks (UNN) of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAp). Comparative analysis of the response of osteoblast cells to the ultra-porous nanostructured HAp surfaces and to the spin coated HAp surfaces revealed superior osseointegrative properties of the UNN coatings with significant cell and filopodia infiltration. This flexible synthesis approach for the engineering of UNN HAp coatings on titanium implants provides a platform technology to study the bone-implant interface for improved osseointegration and osteoconduction. PMID:27076035

  18. Incorporation of Aggrecan in Interpenetrating Network Hydrogels to Improve Cellular Performance for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Frei, Anthony W.; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  19. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  20. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  1. A cellular nonlinear network: real-time technology for the analysis of microfluidic phenomena in blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapuppo, F.; Bucolo, M.; Intaglietta, M.; Fortuna, L.; Arena, P.

    2006-02-01

    A new approach to the observation and analysis of dynamic structural and functional parameters in the microcirculation is described. The new non-invasive optical system is based on cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs), highly integrated analogue processor arrays whose processing elements, the cells, interact directly within a finite local neighbourhood. CNNs, thanks to their parallel processing feature and spatially distributed structure, are widely used to solve high-speed image processing and recognition problems and in the description and modelling of biological dynamics through the solution of time continuous partial differential equations (PDEs). They are therefore considered extremely suitable for spatial-temporal dynamic characterization of fluidic phenomena at micrometric to nanometric scales, such as blood flow in microvessels and its interaction with the cells of the vessel wall. A CNN universal machine (CNN-UM) structure was used to implement, via simulation and hardware (ACE16k), the algorithms to determine the functional capillarity density (FCD) and red blood cell velocity (RBCV) in capillaries obtained by intravital microscopy during in vivo experiments on hamsters. The system exploits the moving particles to distinguish the functional capillaries from the stationary background. This information is used to reconstruct a map and to calculate the velocity of the moving objects.

  2. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  3. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  4. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  5. Develop 3G Application with The J2ME SATSA API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JunWu, Xu; JunLing, Liang

    This paper describes research in the use of the Security and Trust Services API for J2ME (SATSA) to develop mobile applications. for 3G networks. SATSA defines a set of APIs that allows J2ME applications to communicate with and access functionality, secure storage and cryptographic operations provided by security elements such as smart cards and Wireless Identification Modules (WIM). A Java Card application could also work as an authentication module in a J2ME-based e-bank application. The e-bank application would allow its users to access their bank accounts using their cell phones.

  6. Investigating the specific core genetic-and-epigenetic networks of cellular mechanisms involved in human aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable part of life for humans, and slowing down the aging process has become a main focus of human endeavor. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to construct protein-protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic networks, i.e. genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs), of elderly individuals and young controls. We then compared these GENs to extract aging mechanisms using microarray data in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microRNA (miRNA) data, and database mining. The core GENs of elderly individuals and young controls were obtained by applying principal network projection to GENs based on Principal Component Analysis. By comparing the core networks, we identified that to overcome the accumulated mutation of genes in the aging process the transcription factor JUN can be activated by stress signals, including the MAPK signaling, T-cell receptor signaling, and neurotrophin signaling pathways through DNA methylation of BTG3, G0S2, and AP2B1 and the regulations of mir-223 let-7d, and mir-130a. We also address the aging mechanisms in old men and women. Furthermore, we proposed that drugs designed to target these DNA methylated genes or miRNAs may delay aging. A multiple drug combination comprising phenylalanine, cholesterol, and palbociclib was finally designed for delaying the aging process. PMID:26895224

  7. Dendritic type, accessory cells within the mammalian thymic microenvironment. Antigen presentation in the dendritic neuro-endocrine-immune cellular network.

    PubMed

    Bodey, B; Bodey, B; Kaiser, H E

    1997-01-01

    During mammalian ontogenesis, the thymic "pure" endodermal epithelial anlage develops and differentiates into a complex cellular microenvironment. Beginning the 7-8th week of intrauterine development, thymic epithelial cells chemotactically regulate (induce) numerous waves of migration of stem cells into the thymus, including the CD34+, yolk sac-derived, committed hematopoietic stem cells. In vitro experiments have established that CD34+ CD38dim human thymocytes differentiate into T lymphocytes when co-cultured with mouse fetal thymic organs. Hematopoietic stem cells for myeloid and thymic stromal dendritic cells (DCs) are present within the minute population of CD34+ progenitors within the mammalian thymus. The common myeloid, DC, natural killer (NK) and T lymphocyte progenitors have also been identified within the CD34+ stem cell population in the human thymus. Interactions between the endocrine and immune systems have been reported in various regions of the mammalian body including the anterior pituitary (AP), the skin, and the central (thymus) and peripheral lymphatic system. The network of bone marrow derived DCs is a part of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and DCs represent the cellular mediators of these regulatory endocrine-immune interactions. Folliculo-stellate cells (FSC) in the AP, Langerhans cells (LCs) in the skin and lymphatic system, "veiled" cells, lympho-dendritic and interdigitating cells (IDCs) in a number of tissues comprising the lymphatic system are the cell types of the DC meshwork of "professional" antigen presenting cells (APCs). Most of these cells express the immunocytochemical markers S-100, CD1. CD45, CD54, F418, MHC class I and II antigens, Fc and complement receptors. FSCs are non-hormone secreting cells which communicate directly with hormone producing cells, a form of neuro-endocrine-immune regulation. As a result, an attenuation of secretory responses follows stimulation of these cells. FSCs are also the cells in the AP

  8. Rationalisation of the differences between APOBEC3G structures from crystallography and NMR studies by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Autore, Flavia; Bergeron, Julien R C; Malim, Michael H; Fraternali, Franca; Huthoff, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    The human APOBEC3G (A3G) protein is a cellular polynucleotide cytidine deaminase that acts as a host restriction factor of retroviruses, including HIV-1 and various transposable elements. Recently, three NMR and two crystal structures of the catalytic deaminase domain of A3G have been reported, but these are in disagreement over the conformation of a terminal beta-strand, beta2, as well as the identification of a putative DNA binding site. We here report molecular dynamics simulations with all of the solved A3G catalytic domain structures, taking into account solubility enhancing mutations that were introduced during derivation of three out of the five structures. In the course of these simulations, we observed a general trend towards increased definition of the beta2 strand for those structures that have a distorted starting conformation of beta2. Solvent density maps around the protein as calculated from MD simulations indicated that this distortion is dependent on preferential hydration of residues within the beta2 strand. We also demonstrate that the identification of a pre-defined DNA binding site is prevented by the inherent flexibility of loops that determine access to the deaminase catalytic core. We discuss the implications of our analyses for the as yet unresolved structure of the full-length A3G protein and its biological functions with regard to hypermutation of DNA. PMID:20635000

  9. Modeling land use and land cover changes in a vulnerable coastal region using artificial neural networks and cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Yi; Lam, Nina S N

    2015-03-01

    As one of the most vulnerable coasts in the continental USA, the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB) region has endured numerous hazards over the past decades. The sustainability of this region has drawn great attention from the international, national, and local communities, wanting to understand how the region as a system develops under intense interplay between the natural and human factors. A major problem in this deltaic region is significant land loss over the years due to a combination of natural and human factors. The main scientific and management questions are what factors contribute to the land use land cover (LULC) changes in this region, can we model the changes, and how would the LULC look like in the future given the current factors? This study analyzed the LULC changes of the region between 1996 and 2006 by utilizing an artificial neural network (ANN) to derive the LULC change rules from 15 human and natural variables. The rules were then used to simulate future scenarios in a cellular automation model. A stochastic element was added in the model to represent factors that were not included in the current model. The analysis was conducted for two sub-regions in the study area for comparison. The results show that the derived ANN models could simulate the LULC changes with a high degree of accuracy (above 92 % on average). A total loss of 263 km(2) in wetlands from 2006 to 2016 was projected, whereas the trend of forest loss will cease. These scenarios provide useful information to decision makers for better planning and management of the region. PMID:25647797

  10. Modeling land use and land cover changes in a vulnerable coastal region using artificial neural networks and cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Yi; Lam, Nina S N

    2015-03-01

    As one of the most vulnerable coasts in the continental USA, the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB) region has endured numerous hazards over the past decades. The sustainability of this region has drawn great attention from the international, national, and local communities, wanting to understand how the region as a system develops under intense interplay between the natural and human factors. A major problem in this deltaic region is significant land loss over the years due to a combination of natural and human factors. The main scientific and management questions are what factors contribute to the land use land cover (LULC) changes in this region, can we model the changes, and how would the LULC look like in the future given the current factors? This study analyzed the LULC changes of the region between 1996 and 2006 by utilizing an artificial neural network (ANN) to derive the LULC change rules from 15 human and natural variables. The rules were then used to simulate future scenarios in a cellular automation model. A stochastic element was added in the model to represent factors that were not included in the current model. The analysis was conducted for two sub-regions in the study area for comparison. The results show that the derived ANN models could simulate the LULC changes with a high degree of accuracy (above 92 % on average). A total loss of 263 km(2) in wetlands from 2006 to 2016 was projected, whereas the trend of forest loss will cease. These scenarios provide useful information to decision makers for better planning and management of the region.

  11. Intracellular interactions between APOBEC3G, RNA, and HIV-1 Gag: APOBEC3G multimerization is dependent on its association with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Friew, Yeshitila N; Boyko, Vitaly; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2009-01-01

    Background Host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G) blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by G-to-A hypermutation, and by inhibiting DNA synthesis and provirus formation. Previous reports have suggested that A3G is a dimer and its virion incorporation is mediated through interactions with viral or nonviral RNAs and/or HIV-1 Gag. We have now employed a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay (BiFC) to analyze the intracellular A3G-A3G, A3G-RNA, and A3G-Gag interactions in living cells by reconstitution of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) from its N- or C-terminal fragments. Results The results obtained with catalytic domain 1 and 2 (CD1 and CD2) mutants indicate that A3G-A3G and A3G-Gag multimerization is dependent on an intact CD1 domain, which is required for RNA binding. A mutant HIV-1 Gag that exhibits reduced RNA binding also failed to reconstitute BiFC with wild-type A3G, indicating a requirement for both HIV-1 Gag and A3G to bind to RNA for their multimerization. Addition of a non-specific RNA binding peptide (P22) to the N-terminus of a CD1 mutant of A3G restored BiFC and virion incorporation, but failed to inhibit viral replication, indicating that the mutations in CD1 resulted in additional defects that interfere with A3G's antiviral activity. Conclusion These studies establish a robust BiFC assay for analysis of intracellular interactions of A3G with other macromolecules. The results indicate that in vivo A3G is a monomer that forms multimers upon binding to RNA. In addition, we observed weak interactions between wild-type A3G molecules and RNA binding-defective mutants of A3G, which could explain previously described protein-protein interactions between purified A3G molecules. PMID:19497112

  12. Anticipatory grip force between 1 and 3g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Olivier; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Hermsdorfer, Joachim; Lefevre, Philippe

    One remarkable capacity of utilizing common tools appropriately as soon as we grasp them relies on the ability to determine in advance the grip force (GF) required to handle them in relation to their mechanical properties and the surrounding environment. This anticipatory strategy avoids the uncompressible delays in the feedback system. The predictive control of GF is made possible because the nervous system can learn, store and then select the internal representations of the dynamics of innumerable objects, known as internal models. Beside this flexibility, the nervous system's ability to learn different task dynamics is often limited in classical robotic experiments The environment itself can be profoundly modified in altered gravity or centrifugation. The few studies that investigated motor adaptation in such contexts did not consider the interaction between gravitational phases and even less the transitions across environments. Here, we tested subject's abilities to adapt to levels of gravitational fields generated by a human centrifuge. In Experiment 1, seven subjects performed 4 lifting trials in each gravitational phase (1 to 2.5g and then 2.5 to 1g by steps of 0.5g) with a 0.12 kg instrumented object. In Experiment 2, six subjects performed vertical oscillations of the object during transitions between 1 and 3g (0.5g steps, ascending and descending phases, profile repeated twice). We continuously measured GF, load force (LF) and ambient gravity. We hypothesized that participants were able to predictively adjust GF to the new environment. In Experiment 1, participants adjusted their GF proportionally to gravity and decreased GF across trials within a given gravitational environment. Preload phases decreased over time from 300ms to 50ms irrespective of gravity. We quantified the abilities of participants to switch across environments by subtracting GF recorded in the last trial in the current gravity level from GF during the first trial in the new environment

  13. APOBEC3G polymorphism as a selective barrier to cross-species transmission and emergence of pathogenic SIV and AIDS in a primate host.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Annabel; McCarthy, Kevin R; Ooms, Marcel; Letko, Michael; Morgan, Jennifer S; Simon, Viviana; Johnson, Welkin E

    2013-01-01

    Cellular restriction factors, which render cells intrinsically resistant to viruses, potentially impose genetic barriers to cross-species transmission and emergence of viral pathogens in nature. One such factor is APOBEC3G. To overcome APOBEC3G-mediated restriction, many lentiviruses encode Vif, a protein that targets APOBEC3G for degradation. As with many restriction factor genes, primate APOBEC3G displays strong signatures of positive selection. This is interpreted as evidence that the primate APOBEC3G locus reflects a long-term evolutionary "arms-race" between retroviruses and their primate hosts. Here, we provide direct evidence that APOBEC3G has functioned as a barrier to cross-species transmission, selecting for viral resistance during emergence of the AIDS-causing pathogen SIVmac in captive colonies of Asian macaques in the 1970s. Specifically, we found that rhesus macaques have multiple, functionally distinct APOBEC3G alleles, and that emergence of SIVmac and simian AIDS required adaptation of the virus to evade APOBEC3G-mediated restriction. Our evidence includes the first comparative analysis of APOBEC3G polymorphism and function in both a reservoir and recipient host species (sooty mangabeys and rhesus macaques, respectively), and identification of adaptations unique to Vif proteins of the SIVmac lineage that specifically antagonize rhesus APOBEC3G alleles. By demonstrating that interspecies variation in a known restriction factor selected for viral counter-adaptations in the context of a documented case of cross-species transmission, our results lend strong support to the evolutionary "arms-race" hypothesis. Importantly, our study confirms that APOBEC3G divergence can be a critical determinant of interspecies transmission and emergence of primate lentiviruses, including viruses with the potential to infect and spread in human populations.

  14. A Single Chance to Contact Multiple Targets: Distinct Osteocyte Morphotypes Shed Light on the Cellular Mechanism Ensuring the Robust Formation of Osteocytic Networks.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Alan; Bertin, Ariana; Hanna, Patricia; Nualart, Francisco; Marcellini, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    The formation of the complex osteocytic network relies on the emission of long cellular processes involved in communication, mechanical strain sensing, and bone turnover control. Newly deposited osteocytic processes rapidly become trapped within the calcifying matrix, and, therefore, they must adopt their definitive conformation and contact their targets in a single morphogenetic event. However, the cellular mechanisms ensuring the robustness of this unique mode of morphogenesis remain unknown. To address this issue, we examined the developing calvaria of the amphibian Xenopus tropicalis by confocal, two-photon, and super-resolution imaging, and described flattened osteocytes lying within a woven bone structured in lamellae of randomly oriented collagen fibers. While most cells emit peripheral and perpendicular processes, we report two osteocytes morphotypes, located at different depth within the bone matrix and exhibiting distinct number and orientation of perpendicular cell processes. We show that this pattern is conserved with the chick Gallus gallus and suggest that the cellular microenvironment, and more particularly cell-cell contact, plays a fundamental role in the induction and stabilization of osteocytic processes. We propose that this intrinsic property might have been evolutionarily selected for its ability to robustly generate self-organizing osteocytic networks harbored by the wide variety of bone shapes and architectures found in extant and extinct vertebrates. PMID:27381191

  15. Based on 3G and RFID logistic delivery management system application and practice analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Peng, Longjun; Zhong, Kaiwen; Huang, Jianming

    2008-10-01

    This article in view of the Logistic Delivery Management characteristic, analysis the logistic delivery management cannot satisfy requests rapid reaction and conformity transportation at present and so on. This article elaborated based on 3G (GIS, GPS, and GPRS) and RFID technology logistic delivery contents and so on management system, system design and architecture design, and its effective integration. The system design mentality uses the systems engineering method, follows the humanist idea, and embarks from user's demand, according to the user demand and the network request, divides according to the laminated structure into the decision-making strata, the service level, the management maintenance level and the technical support level 4 levels. The overall structural design including the system function structural design and the software system design, and take some province logistic delivery management system in management service as an example, introduced the design mentality and the application way.

  16. Stackelberg Game Based Power Allocation for Physical Layer Security of Device-to-device Communication Underlaying Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Junyue; Cai, Yueming; Wu, Dan; Chen, Hualiang

    2014-05-01

    The problem of power allocation for device-to-device (D2D) underlay communication to improve physical layer security is addressed. Specifically, to improve the secure communication of the cellular users, we introduce a Stackelberg game for allocating the power of the D2D link under a total power constraint and a rate constraint at the D2D pair. In the introduced Stackelberg game the D2D pair works as a seller and the cellular UEs work as buyers. Firstly, because the interference signals from D2D pair are unknown to both the legitimate receiver and the illegitimate eavesdropper, it is possible that a cellular UE decline to participate in the introduced Stackelberg game. So the condition under which a legitimate user will participate in the introduced Stackelberg game is discussed. Then, based on the Stackelberg game, we propose a semi-distributed power allocation algorithm, which is proved to conclude after finite-time iterations. In the end, some simulations are presented to verify the performance improvement in the physical layer security of cellular UEs using the proposed power allocation algorithm. We can determine that with the proposed algorithm, while the D2D pair's communication demand is met, the physical layer security of cellular UEs can be improved.

  17. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Cellular Epigenetic States: Stochasticity in Molecular Networks, Chromatin Folding in Cell Nuclei, and Tissue Pattern Formation of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gursoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions.

  19. Simultaneous generation of 3G and millimeter-wave signals using a dual-electrode MZM in ROF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiang-yue; Xu, Tie-feng; Liu, Tai-jun; Nie, Qiu-hua; Wen, Hua-feng; Li, Jun

    2015-07-01

    A novel radio-over-fiber (ROF) scheme to simultaneously generate and transmit the 3rd generation telecommunication (3G) and millimeter-wave (MMW) signals by using a single dual-electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) is proposed. There is no apparent nonlinearity induced by the ROF system. By employing this analog ROF signal transmission technique, highly transparent fiber-wireless convergence networks can be realized, which are ideal for multi-standard wireless system operation.

  20. Global Exponential Stability of Almost Periodic Solution for Neutral-Type Cohen-Grossberg Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks with Distributed Delays and Impulses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Jiang, Qi; Gu, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    A kind of neutral-type Cohen-Grossberg shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with distributed delays and impulses is considered. Firstly, by using the theory of impulsive differential equations and the contracting mapping principle, the existence and uniqueness of the almost periodic solution for the above system are obtained. Secondly, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the global exponential stability of the unique almost periodic solution is also investigated. The work in this paper improves and extends some results in recent years. As an application, an example and numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the main results. PMID:27190502

  1. Crystal structures of APOBEC3G N-domain alone and its complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Li, Shu-Xing; Yang, Hanjing; Chen, Xiaojiang S

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent restriction factor of HIV-1. The N-terminal domain of A3G (A3G-CD1) is responsible for oligomerization and nucleic acid binding, both of which are essential for anti-HIV activity. As a countermeasure, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) binds A3G-CD1 to mediate A3G degradation. The structural basis for the functions of A3G-CD1 remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structures of a primate A3G-CD1 (rA3G-CD1) alone and in complex with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). rA3G-CD1 shares a conserved core structure with the previously determined catalytic APOBECs, but displays unique features for surface charge, dimerization and nucleic acid binding. Its co-crystal structure with ssDNA reveals how the conformations of loops and residues surrounding the Zn-coordinated centre (Zn-centre) change upon DNA binding. The dimerization interface of rA3G-CD1 is important for oligomerization, nucleic acid binding and Vif-mediated degradation. These findings elucidate the molecular basis of antiviral mechanism and HIV-Vif targeting of A3G. PMID:27480941

  2. Crystal structures of APOBEC3G N-domain alone and its complex with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiao; Li, Shu-Xing; Yang, Hanjing; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent restriction factor of HIV-1. The N-terminal domain of A3G (A3G-CD1) is responsible for oligomerization and nucleic acid binding, both of which are essential for anti-HIV activity. As a countermeasure, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) binds A3G-CD1 to mediate A3G degradation. The structural basis for the functions of A3G-CD1 remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structures of a primate A3G-CD1 (rA3G-CD1) alone and in complex with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). rA3G-CD1 shares a conserved core structure with the previously determined catalytic APOBECs, but displays unique features for surface charge, dimerization and nucleic acid binding. Its co-crystal structure with ssDNA reveals how the conformations of loops and residues surrounding the Zn-coordinated centre (Zn-centre) change upon DNA binding. The dimerization interface of rA3G-CD1 is important for oligomerization, nucleic acid binding and Vif-mediated degradation. These findings elucidate the molecular basis of antiviral mechanism and HIV-Vif targeting of A3G. PMID:27480941

  3. Interaction between cellular voltage-sensitive conductance and network parameters in a model of neocortex can generate epileptiform bursting.

    SciTech Connect

    van Drongelen, W.; Lee, H. C.; Koch, H.; Elsen, F.; Carroll, M. S.; Hereld, M.; Stevens, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of both intrinsic neuronal membrane properties and network parameters on oscillatory activity in a model of neocortex. A scalable network model with six different cell types was built with the pGENESIS neural simulator. The neocortical network consisted of two types of pyramidal cells and four types of inhibitory interneurons. All cell types contained both fast sodium and delayed rectifier potassium channels for generation of action potentials. A subset of the pyramidal neurons contained an additional slow inactivating (persistent) sodium current (NaP). The neurons with the NaP current showed spontaneous bursting activity in the absence of external stimulation. The model also included a routine to calculate a simulated electroencephalogram (EEG) trace from the population activity. This revealed emergent network behavior which ranged from desynchronized activity to different types of seizure-like bursting patterns. At settings with weaker excitatory network effects, the propensity to generate seizure-like behavior increased. Strong excitatory network connectivity destroyed oscillatory behavior, whereas weak connectivity enhanced the relative importance of the spontaneously bursting cells. Our findings are in contradiction with the general opinion that strong excitatory synaptic and/or insufficient inhibition effects are associated with seizure initiation, but are in agreement with previously reported behavior in neocortex.

  4. Probing Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Immune Response in the Progression of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using Multiscale Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhichao; Yu, Haishan; Liao, Jie-Lou

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by progressive destruction of lung tissues and airway obstruction. COPD is currently the third leading cause of death worldwide and there is no curative treatment available so far. Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major risk factor for COPD. Yet, only a relatively small percentage of smokers develop the disease, showing that disease susceptibility varies significantly among smokers. As smoking cessation can prevent the disease in some smokers, quitting smoking cannot halt the progression of COPD in others. Despite extensive research efforts, cellular and molecular mechanisms of COPD remain elusive. In particular, the disease susceptibility and smoking cessation effects are poorly understood. To address these issues in this work, we develop a multiscale network model that consists of nodes, which represent molecular mediators, immune cells and lung tissues, and edges describing the interactions between the nodes. Our model study identifies several positive feedback loops and network elements playing a determinant role in the CS-induced immune response and COPD progression. The results are in agreement with clinic and laboratory measurements, offering novel insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of COPD. The study in this work also provides a rationale for targeted therapy and personalized medicine for the disease in future. PMID:27669518

  5. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Gag Assembly and Export Are Directed by Matrix Protein through trans-Golgi Networks and Cellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zeli; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Xiang; Su, Chao; Yao, Qiu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gag intracellular assembly and export are very important processes for lentiviruses replication. Previous studies have demonstrated that equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) matrix (MA) possesses distinct phosphoinositide affinity compared with HIV-1 MA and that phosphoinositide-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. In this study, we compared the cellular assembly sites of EIAV and HIV-1. We observed that the assembly of EIAV particles occurred on interior cellular membranes, while HIV-1 was targeted to the plasma membrane (PM) for assembly. Then, we determined that W7 and K9 in the EIAV MA N terminus were essential for Gag assembly and release but did not affect the cellular distribution of Gag. The replacement of EIAV MA with HIV-1 MA directed chimeric Gag to the PM but severely impaired Gag release. MA structural analysis indicated that the EIAV and HIV-1 MAs had similar spatial structures but that helix 1 of the EIAV MA was closer to loop 2. Further investigation indicated that EIAV Gag accumulated in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but not the early and late endosomes. The 9 N-terminal amino acids of EIAV MA harbored the signal that directed Gag to the TGN membrane system. Additionally, we demonstrated that EIAV particles were transported to the extracellular space by the cellular vesicle system. This type of EIAV export was not associated with multivesicular bodies or microtubule depolymerization but could be inhibited by the actin-depolymerizing drug cytochalasin D, suggesting that dynamic actin depolymerization may be associated with EIAV production. IMPORTANCE In previous studies, EIAV Gag was reported to localize to both the cell interior and the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that EIAV likely uses the TGN as the assembly site in contrast to HIV-1, which is targeted to the PM for assembly. These distinct assembly features are determined by the MA domain. We also identified

  6. The role of the Parkinson's disease gene PARK9 in essential cellular pathways and the manganese homeostasis network in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chesi, Alessandra; Kilaru, Austin; Fang, Xiaodong; Cooper, Antony A; Gitler, Aaron D

    2012-01-01

    YPK9 (Yeast PARK9; also known as YOR291W) is a non-essential yeast gene predicted by sequence to encode a transmembrane P-type transport ATPase. However, its substrate specificity is unknown. Mutations in the human homolog of YPK9, ATP13A2/PARK9, have been linked to genetic forms of early onset parkinsonism. We previously described a strong genetic interaction between Ypk9 and another Parkinson's disease (PD) protein α-synuclein in multiple model systems, and a role for Ypk9 in manganese detoxification in yeast. In humans, environmental exposure to toxic levels of manganese causes a syndrome similar to PD and is thus an environmental risk factor for the disease. How manganese contributes to neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we describe multiple genome-wide screens in yeast aimed at defining the cellular function of Ypk9 and the mechanisms by which it protects cells from manganese toxicity. In physiological conditions, we found that Ypk9 genetically interacts with essential genes involved in cellular trafficking and the cell cycle. Deletion of Ypk9 sensitizes yeast cells to exposure to excess manganese. Using a library of non-essential gene deletions, we screened for additional genes involved in tolerance to excess manganese exposure, discovering several novel pathways involved in manganese homeostasis. We defined the dependence of the deletion strain phenotypes in the presence of manganese on Ypk9, and found that Ypk9 deletion modifies the manganese tolerance of only a subset of strains. These results confirm a role for Ypk9 in manganese homeostasis and illuminates cellular pathways and biological processes in which Ypk9 likely functions. PMID:22457822

  7. APOBEC3G exerts tumor suppressive effects in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Ching; Kuo, Ting-Yin; Liu, Ching-Wen; Chen, Yaw-Sen; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Wu, Pei-Fung

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we collected 44 hepatitis B virus surface antigen positivity HBsAg (+) tumor and nontumor hepatocellular tissues from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients during hepatectomy, and quantified the APOBEC3G (A3G) mRNA by using a real-time PCR. Our results showed higher expression of A3G mRNA in the nontumor tissues than in the tumor tissues of the HBsAg (+) HCC patients. To further investigate this phenomenon, we constructed a pLV-A3G vector and transfected it into the human HCC cell line, Hep 3B. The results of an immunofluorescence analysis showed the overexpression of A3G in the cytoplasm. We then evaluated A3G cytotoxicity by using a cell viability assay (MTS assay), the results of which showed that Hep 3B cell viability was 88 and 58% after the transfection of pLV and pLV-A3G, respectively, indicating the growth inhibitory effects of A3G on Hep 3B cells. To further evaluate the tumor suppressive effects of A3G, we used a plastic pipette tip to scratch Hep 3B cells grown on a culture dish (to 70-80% confluence) after transfection with pLV-A3G. Our data indicated a ratio of wound closure of 100% in the control cells and in the pLV-expressing cells, compared with 43% in the pLV-A3G-overexpressing cells, 72 h after the wound scratch, as observed using phase-contrast microscopy. These results indicated that A3G inhibits wound healing in Hep 3B cells. Overall, our results suggest that A3G inhibits the growth of human hepatoma cells. PMID:24500029

  8. The iron-sulfur cluster assembly network component NARFL is a key element in the cellular defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Monique V; Rockx, Davy A P; Oostra, Anneke B; Joenje, Hans; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to explore cellular changes associated with increased resistance to atmospheric oxygen using high-resolution DNA and RNA profiling combined with functional studies. Two independently selected oxygen-resistant substrains of HeLa cells (capable of proliferating at >80% O2, i.e. hyperoxia) were compared with their parental cells (adapted to growth at 20% O2, but unable to grow at >80% O2). A striking consistent alteration found to be associated with the oxygen-resistant state appeared to be an amplified and overexpressed region on chromosome 16p13.3 harboring 21 genes. The driver gene of this amplification was identified by functional studies as NARFL, which encodes a component of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly system. In line with this result we found the cytosolic c-aconitase activity as well as the nuclear protein RTEL1, both Fe-S dependent proteins, to be protected by NARFL overexpression under hyperoxia. In addition, we observed a protective effect of NARFL against hyperoxia-induced loss of sister-chromatid cohesion. NARFL thus appeared to be a key factor in the cellular defense against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress in human cells. Our findings suggest that new insight into age-related degenerative processes may come from studies that specifically address the involvement of iron-sulfur proteins.

  9. Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibits protein synthesis by interacting with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit p44 (eIF3g).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Kwang Dong; Song, Eun Young; Lee, Hee Gu; Kim, Jae Wha; Kim, Jung Woo; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Myeong-Sok; Yang, Young; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2006-11-27

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a ubiquitous FAD-binding flavoprotein comprised of 613 amino acids and plays an important role in caspase-independent apoptosis. During apoptotic induction, AIF is translocated from the mitochondrial intermembrane space to the nucleus, where it interacts with DNA and activates a nuclear endonuclease. By performing a yeast two-hybrid screen with mature AIF, we have isolated the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit p44 (eIF3g). Our deletion mutant analysis revealed that the eIF3g N-terminus interacts with the C-terminal region of AIF. The direct interaction between AIF and eIF3g was confirmed in a GST pull-down assay and also verified by the results of co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Using an in vitro TNT coupled transcription-translation system, we found that mature AIF could inhibit newly-translated protein synthesis and this inhibition was significantly blocked by eIF3g competitively. These results were also confirmed in cells. In addition, mature AIF overexpression specifically resulted in the activation of caspase-7, thereby amplifying the inhibition of protein synthesis including eIF3g cleavage. Our data suggest that eIF3g is one of the cytosolic targets that interacts with mature AIF, and provide insight into the AIF's cellular functions of the inhibition of protein synthesis during apoptosis.

  10. A novel podocyte gene, semaphorin 3G, protects glomerular podocyte from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Ryoichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; He, Peng; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Tsurutani, Yuya; Ide, Shintaro; Ide, Kana; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Tryggvason, Karl; Betsholtz, Christer; Yokote, Koutaro

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy have become huge medical problems, although its precise mechanisms are still far from understood. In order to increase our knowledge about the patho-physiology of kidney, we have previously identified >300 kidney glomerulus-enriched transcripts through large-scale sequencing and microarray profiling of the mouse glomerular transcriptome. One of the glomerulus-specific transcripts identified was semaphorin 3G (Sema3G) which belongs to the semaphorin family. The aim of this study was to analyze both the in vivo and in vitro functions of Sema3G in the kidney. Sema3G was expressed in glomerular podocytes. Although Sema3G knockout mice did not show obvious glomerular defects, ultrastructural analyses revealed partially aberrant podocyte foot processes structures. When these mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide to induce acute inflammation or streptozotocin to induce diabetes, the lack of Sema3G resulted in increased albuminuria. The lack of Sema3G in podocytes also enhanced the expression of inflammatory cytokines including chemokine ligand 2 and interleukin 6. On the other hand, the presence of Sema3G attenuated their expression through the inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced Toll like receptor 4 signaling. Taken together, our results surmise that the Sema3G protein is secreted by podocytes and protects podocytes from inflammatory kidney diseases and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27180624

  11. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  12. Stoichiometry of the antiviral protein APOBEC3G in HIV-1 virions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongzhan; Chertova, Elena; Chen, Jianbo; Ott, David E; Roser, James D; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2007-04-10

    A host cytidine deaminase, APOBEC3G (A3G), inhibits replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by incorporating into virions in the absence of the virally encoded Vif protein (Deltavif virions), at least in part by causing G-to-A hypermutation. To gain insight into the antiretroviral function of A3G, we determined the quantities of A3G molecules that are incorporated in Deltavif virions. We combined three experimental approaches-reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), scintillation proximity assay (SPA), and quantitative immunoblotting-to determine the molar ratio of A3G to HIV-1 capsid protein in Deltavif virions. Our studies revealed that the amount of the A3G incorporated into Deltavif virions was proportional to the level of its expression in the viral producing cells, and the ratio of the A3G to Gag in the Deltavif virions produced from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was approximately 1:439. Based on previous estimates of the stoichiometry of HIV-1 Gag in virions (1400-5000), we conclude that approximately 7 (+/-4) molecules of A3G are incorporated into Deltavif virions produced from human PBMCs. These results indicate that virion incorporation of only a few molecules of A3G is sufficient to inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:17126871

  13. Examining the process of de novo gene birth: an educational primer on "integration of new genes into cellular networks, and their structural maturation".

    PubMed

    Frietze, Seth; Leatherman, Judith

    2014-03-01

    New genes that arise from modification of the noncoding portion of a genome rather than being duplicated from parent genes are called de novo genes. These genes, identified by their brief evolution and lack of parent genes, provide an opportunity to study the timeframe in which emerging genes integrate into cellular networks, and how the characteristics of these genes change as they mature into bona fide genes. An article by G. Abrusán provides an opportunity to introduce students to fundamental concepts in evolutionary and comparative genetics and to provide a technical background by which to discuss systems biology approaches when studying the evolutionary process of gene birth. Basic background needed to understand the Abrusán study and details on comparative genomic concepts tailored for a classroom discussion are provided, including discussion questions and a supplemental exercise on navigating a genome database.

  14. Molecular crime and cellular punishment: active detoxification of misfolded and aggregated proteins in the cell by the chaperone and protease networks.

    PubMed

    Hinault, Marie-Pierre; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Labile or mutation-sensitised proteins may spontaneously convert into aggregation-prone conformations that may be toxic and infectious. This hazardous behavior, which can be described as a form of "molecular criminality", can be actively counteracted in the cell by a network of molecular chaperone and proteases. Similar to law enforcement agents, molecular chaperones and proteases can specifically identify, apprehend, unfold and thus neutralize "criminal" protein conformers, allowing them to subsequently refold into harmless functional proteins. Irreversibly damaged polypeptides that have lost the ability to natively refold are preferentially degraded by highly controlled ATP-consuming proteases. Damaged proteins that escape proteasomal degradation can also be "incarcerated" into dense amyloids, "evicted" from the cell, or internally "exiled" to the lysosome to be hydrolysed and recycled. Thus, remarkable parallels exist between molecular and human forms of criminality, as well as in the cellular and social responses to various forms of crime. Yet, differences also exist: whereas programmed death is the preferred solution chosen by aged and aggregation-stressed cells, collective suicide is seldom chosen by lawless societies. Significantly, there is no cellular equivalent for the role of familial care and of education in general, which is so crucial to the proper shaping of functional persons in the society. Unlike in the cell, humanism introduces a bias against radical solutions such as capital punishment, favouring crime prevention, reeducation and social reinsertion of criminals.

  15. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Christopher J; Mayekar, Manasi K; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C; Quiñones, Octavio A; Johnson, Peter F

    2015-12-14

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg(-/-) mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg(-/-) mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells.

  16. Cellular Protein WDR11 Interacts with Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Proteins at the trans-Golgi Network To Promote Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryne E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been proposed that the herpes simplex virus (HSV) protein ICP0 has cytoplasmic roles in blocking antiviral signaling and in promoting viral replication in addition to its well-known proteasome-dependent functions in the nucleus. However, the mechanisms through which it produces these effects remain unclear. While investigating this further, we identified a novel cytoplasmic interaction between ICP0 and the poorly characterized cellular protein WDR11. During an HSV infection, WDR11 undergoes a dramatic change in localization at late times in the viral replication cycle, moving from defined perinuclear structures to a dispersed cytoplasmic distribution. While this relocation was not observed during infection with viruses other than HSV-1 and correlated with efficient HSV-1 replication, the redistribution was found to occur independently of ICP0 expression, instead requiring viral late gene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that WDR11 is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it interacts specifically with some, but not all, HSV virion components, in addition to ICP0. Knockdown of WDR11 in cultured human cells resulted in a modest but consistent decrease in yields of both wild-type and ICP0-null viruses, in the supernatant and cell-associated fractions, without affecting viral gene expression. Although further study is required, we propose that WDR11 participates in viral assembly and/or secondary envelopment. IMPORTANCE While the TGN has been proposed to be the major site of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, this process is incompletely understood, and in particular, the role of cellular TGN components in this pathway is unknown. Additionally, little is known about the cellular functions of WDR11, although the disruption of this protein has been implicated in multiple human diseases. Therefore, our finding that WDR11 is a TGN-resident protein that interacts with specific viral proteins to enhance viral yields improves both

  17. Model of cellular and network mechanisms for odor-evoked temporal patterning in the locust antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, M; Stopfer, M; Rabinovich, M; Abarbanel, H D; Sejnowski, T J; Laurent, G

    2001-05-01

    Locust antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) respond to olfactory stimuli with sequences of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing epochs, each lasting hundreds of milliseconds. A computer simulation of an AL network was used to test the hypothesis that slow inhibitory connections between local neurons (LNs) and PNs are responsible for temporal patterning. Activation of slow inhibitory receptors on PNs by the same GABAergic synapses that underlie fast oscillatory synchronization of PNs was sufficient to shape slow response modulations. This slow stimulus- and neuron-specific patterning of AL activity was resistant to blockade of fast inhibition. Fast and slow inhibitory mechanisms at synapses between LNs and PNs can thus form dynamical PN assemblies whose elements synchronize transiently and oscillate collectively, as observed not only in the locust AL, but also in the vertebrate olfactory bulb.

  18. High-resolution genome-wide scan of genes, gene-networks and cellular systems impacting the yeast ionome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To balance the demand for uptake of essential elements with their potential toxicity living cells have complex regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen to identify genes that impact the elemental composition (‘ionome’) of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) we quantify Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn in 11890 mutant strains, including 4940 haploid and 1127 diploid deletion strains, and 5798 over expression strains. Results We identified 1065 strains with an altered ionome, including 584 haploid and 35 diploid deletion strains, and 446 over expression strains. Disruption of protein metabolism or trafficking has the highest likelihood of causing large ionomic changes, with gene dosage also being important. Gene over expression produced more extreme ionomic changes, but over expression and loss of function phenotypes are generally not related. Ionomic clustering revealed the existence of only a small number of possible ionomic profiles suggesting fitness tradeoffs that constrain the ionome. Clustering also identified important roles for the mitochondria, vacuole and ESCRT pathway in regulation of the ionome. Network analysis identified hub genes such as PMR1 in Mn homeostasis, novel members of ionomic networks such as SMF3 in vacuolar retrieval of Mn, and cross-talk between the mitochondria and the vacuole. All yeast ionomic data can be searched and downloaded at http://www.ionomicshub.org. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate the power of high-throughput ICP-MS analysis to functionally dissect the ionome on a genome-wide scale. The information this reveals has the potential to benefit both human health and agriculture. PMID:23151179

  19. A microRNA network regulates proliferative timing and extracellular matrix synthesis during cellular quiescence in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although quiescence (reversible cell cycle arrest) is a key part in the life history and fate of many mammalian cell types, the mechanisms of gene regulation in quiescent cells are poorly understood. We sought to clarify the role of microRNAs as regulators of the cellular functions of quiescent human fibroblasts. Results Using microarrays, we discovered that the expression of the majority of profiled microRNAs differed between proliferating and quiescent fibroblasts. Fibroblasts induced into quiescence by contact inhibition or serum starvation had similar microRNA profiles, indicating common changes induced by distinct quiescence signals. By analyzing the gene expression patterns of microRNA target genes with quiescence, we discovered a strong regulatory function for miR-29, which is downregulated with quiescence. Using microarrays and immunoblotting, we confirmed that miR-29 targets genes encoding collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins and that those target genes are induced in quiescence. In addition, overexpression of miR-29 resulted in more rapid cell cycle re-entry from quiescence. We also found that let-7 and miR-125 were upregulated in quiescent cells. Overexpression of either one alone resulted in slower cell cycle re-entry from quiescence, while the combination of both together slowed cell cycle re-entry even further. Conclusions microRNAs regulate key aspects of fibroblast quiescence including the proliferative state of the cells as well as their gene expression profiles, in particular, the induction of extracellular matrix proteins in quiescent fibroblasts. PMID:23259597

  20. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Christopher J.; Mayekar, Manasi K.; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L.; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C.; Quiñones, Octavio A.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg−/− mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg−/− mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells. PMID:26667036

  1. Processing the Bouguer anomaly map of Biga and the surrounding area by the cellular neural network: application to the southwestern Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, D.

    2007-04-01

    An image processing technique called the cellular neural network (CNN) approach is used in this study to locate geological features giving rise to gravity anomalies such as faults or the boundary of two geologic zones. CNN is a stochastic image processing technique based on template optimization using the neighborhood relationships of cells. These cells can be characterized by a functional block diagram that is typical of neural network theory. The functionality of CNN is described in its entirety by a number of small matrices (A, B and I) called the cloning template. CNN can also be considered to be a nonlinear convolution of these matrices. This template describes the strength of the nearest neighbor interconnections in the network. The recurrent perceptron learning algorithm (RPLA) is used in optimization of cloning template. The CNN and standard Canny algorithms were first tested on two sets of synthetic gravity data with the aim of checking the reliability of the proposed approach. The CNN method was compared with classical derivative techniques by applying the cross-correlation method (CC) to the same anomaly map as this latter approach can detect some features that are difficult to identify on the Bouguer anomaly maps. This approach was then applied to the Bouguer anomaly map of Biga and its surrounding area, in Turkey. Structural features in the area between Bandirma, Biga, Yenice and Gonen in the southwest Marmara region are investigated by applying the CNN and CC to the Bouguer anomaly map. Faults identified by these algorithms are generally in accordance with previously mapped surface faults. These examples show that the geologic boundaries can be detected from Bouguer anomaly maps using the cloning template approach. A visual evaluation of the outputs of the CNN and CC approaches is carried out, and the results are compared with each other. This approach provides quantitative solutions based on just a few assumptions, which makes the method more

  2. APOBEC3DE Antagonizes Hepatitis B Virus Restriction Factors APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Caval, Vincent; Suspène, Rodolphe; Hallez, Camille; Pineau, Pascal; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-28

    The APOBEC3 locus consists of seven genes (A3A-A3C, A3DE, A3F-A3H) that encode DNA cytidine deaminases. These enzymes deaminate single-stranded DNA, the result being DNA peppered with CG →TA mutations preferentially in the context of 5'TpC with the exception of APOBEC3G (A3G), which prefers 5'CpC dinucleotides. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA is vulnerable to genetic editing by APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, A3G being a major restriction factor. APOBEC3DE (A3DE) stands out in that it is catalytically inactive due to a fixed Tyr320Cys substitution in the C-terminal domain. As A3DE is closely related to A3F and A3G, which can form homo- and heterodimers and multimers, the impact of A3DE on HBV replication via modulation of other APOBEC3 restriction factors was investigated. A3DE binds to itself, A3F, and A3G and antagonizes A3F and, to a lesser extent, A3G restriction of HBV replication. A3DE suppresses A3F and A3G from HBV particles, leading to enhanced HBV replication. Ironically, while being part of a cluster of innate restriction factors, the A3DE phenotype is proviral. As the gorilla genome encodes the same Tyr320Cys substitution, this proviral phenotype seems to have been selected for. PMID:27289067

  3. Exposure assessment of one-year-old child to 3G tablet in uplink mode and to 3G femtocell in downlink mode using polynomial chaos decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liorni, I.; Parazzini, M.; Varsier, N.; Hadjem, A.; Ravazzani, P.; Wiart, J.

    2016-04-01

    So far, the assessment of the exposure of children, in the ages 0-2 years old, to relatively new radio-frequency (RF) technologies, such as tablets and femtocells, remains an open issue. This study aims to analyse the exposure of a one year-old child to these two sources, tablets and femtocells, operating in uplink (tablet) and downlink (femtocell) modes, respectively. In detail, a realistic model of an infant has been used to model separately the exposures due to (i) a 3G tablet emitting at the frequency of 1940 MHz (uplink mode) placed close to the body and (ii) a 3G femtocell emitting at 2100 MHz (downlink mode) placed at a distance of at least 1 m from the infant body. For both RF sources, the input power was set to 250 mW. The variability of the exposure due to the variation of the position of the RF sources with respect to the infant body has been studied by stochastic dosimetry, based on polynomial chaos to build surrogate models of both whole-body and tissue specific absorption rate (SAR), which makes it easy and quick to investigate the exposure in a full range of possible positions of the sources. The major outcomes of the study are: (1) the maximum values of the whole-body SAR (WB SAR) have been found to be 9.5 mW kg-1 in uplink mode and 65 μW kg-1 in downlink mode, i.e. within the limits of the ICNIRP 1998 Guidelines; (2) in both uplink and downlink mode the highest SAR values were approximately found in the same tissues, i.e. in the skin, eye and penis for the whole-tissue SAR and in the bone, skin and muscle for the peak SAR; (3) the change in the position of both the 3G tablet and the 3G femtocell significantly influences the infant exposure.

  4. Exposure assessment of one-year-old child to 3G tablet in uplink mode and to 3G femtocell in downlink mode using polynomial chaos decomposition.

    PubMed

    Liorni, I; Parazzini, M; Varsier, N; Hadjem, A; Ravazzani, P; Wiart, J

    2016-04-21

    So far, the assessment of the exposure of children, in the ages 0-2 years old, to relatively new radio-frequency (RF) technologies, such as tablets and femtocells, remains an open issue. This study aims to analyse the exposure of a one year-old child to these two sources, tablets and femtocells, operating in uplink (tablet) and downlink (femtocell) modes, respectively. In detail, a realistic model of an infant has been used to model separately the exposures due to (i) a 3G tablet emitting at the frequency of 1940 MHz (uplink mode) placed close to the body and (ii) a 3G femtocell emitting at 2100 MHz (downlink mode) placed at a distance of at least 1 m from the infant body. For both RF sources, the input power was set to 250 mW. The variability of the exposure due to the variation of the position of the RF sources with respect to the infant body has been studied by stochastic dosimetry, based on polynomial chaos to build surrogate models of both whole-body and tissue specific absorption rate (SAR), which makes it easy and quick to investigate the exposure in a full range of possible positions of the sources. The major outcomes of the study are: (1) the maximum values of the whole-body SAR (WB SAR) have been found to be 9.5 mW kg(-1) in uplink mode and 65 μW kg(-1) in downlink mode, i.e. within the limits of the ICNIRP 1998 Guidelines; (2) in both uplink and downlink mode the highest SAR values were approximately found in the same tissues, i.e. in the skin, eye and penis for the whole-tissue SAR and in the bone, skin and muscle for the peak SAR; (3) the change in the position of both the 3G tablet and the 3G femtocell significantly influences the infant exposure.

  5. Modified SNOW 3G: Stream cipher algorithm using piecewise linear chaotic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasi, Muhammad Arif Ali; Windarta, Susila

    2016-02-01

    SNOW 3G is a synchronous stream cipher developed by Thomas Johansson and Patrik Ekhdal at Lund University. In 2006, it was chosen as the main part of the second set of Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) confidentiality and integrity algorithms [2]. In 2008, Patrik Böhm published a report entitled "Statistical Evaluation of Stream Cipher SNOW 3G". He tested the randomness properties of SNOW 3G key stream generator. Böhm using NIST statistical test suite as randomness test tool with three kinds of test, i.e. long key stream data set, short key stream data set, and initialization vector data set. The result of the report shows that from three kind of tests, only short key stream data set has not passed eight randomness tests. He state that the suggests SNOW 3G fail because there is a weakness in the initialization of the cipher. In this paper we modify SNOW 3G algorithm using piecewise linear chaotic map (PLCM) on the key initialization mode and keystream generation mode. We use the same statistical test that have been used by Böhm [5]. The experiment shows that modified SNOW 3G stream cipher algorithm has passed all the statistical test. The results prove that PLCM impact on algorithm's randomness.

  6. Structure of the DNA deaminase domain of the HIV-1 restriction factor APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Ming; Harjes, Elena; Gross, Phillip J; Fahmy, Amr; Lu, Yongjian; Shindo, Keisuke; Harris, Reuben S; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    The human APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B messenger-RNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G) protein is a single-strand DNA deaminase that inhibits the replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), other retroviruses and retrotransposons. APOBEC3G anti-viral activity is circumvented by most retroelements, such as through degradation by HIV-1 Vif. APOBEC3G is a member of a family of polynucleotide cytosine deaminases, several of which also target distinct physiological substrates. For instance, APOBEC1 edits APOB mRNA and AID deaminates antibody gene DNA. Although structures of other family members exist, none of these proteins has elicited polynucleotide cytosine deaminase or anti-viral activity. Here we report a solution structure of the human APOBEC3G catalytic domain. Five alpha-helices, including two that form the zinc-coordinating active site, are arranged over a hydrophobic platform consisting of five beta-strands. NMR DNA titration experiments, computational modelling, phylogenetic conservation and Escherichia coli-based activity assays combine to suggest a DNA-binding model in which a brim of positively charged residues positions the target cytosine for catalysis. The structure of the APOBEC3G catalytic domain will help us to understand functions of other family members and interactions that occur with pathogenic proteins such as HIV-1 Vif.

  7. C3G regulates cortical neuron migration, preplate splitting and radial glial cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Voss, Anne K; Britto, Joanne M; Dixon, Mathew P; Sheikh, Bilal N; Collin, Caitlin; Tan, Seong-Seng; Thomas, Tim

    2008-06-01

    Neuronal migration is integral to the development of the cerebral cortex and higher brain function. Cortical neuron migration defects lead to mental disorders such as lissencephaly and epilepsy. Interaction of neurons with their extracellular environment regulates cortical neuron migration through cell surface receptors. However, it is unclear how the signals from extracellular matrix proteins are transduced intracellularly. We report here that mouse embryos lacking the Ras family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G (Rapgef1, Grf2), exhibit a cortical neuron migration defect resulting in a failure to split the preplate into marginal zone and subplate and a failure to form a cortical plate. C3G-deficient cortical neurons fail to migrate. Instead, they arrest in a multipolar state and accumulate below the preplate. The basement membrane is disrupted and radial glial processes are disorganised and lack attachment in C3G-deficient brains. C3G is activated in response to reelin in cortical neurons, which, in turn, leads to activation of the small GTPase Rap1. In C3G-deficient cells, Rap1 GTP loading in response to reelin stimulation is reduced. In conclusion, the Ras family regulator C3G is essential for two aspects of cortex development, namely radial glial attachment and neuronal migration.

  8. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  9. Image processing with cellular nonlinear networks implemented on field-programmable gate arrays for real-time applications in nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, S.; Murari, A.; Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P.; Mazon, D.; de Maack, A.; Jet-Efda Contributors

    2010-08-01

    In the past years cameras have become increasingly common tools in scientific applications. They are now quite systematically used in magnetic confinement fusion, to the point that infrared imaging is starting to be used systematically for real-time machine protection in major devices. However, in order to guarantee that the control system can always react rapidly in case of critical situations, the time required for the processing of the images must be as predictable as possible. The approach described in this paper combines the new computational paradigm of cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs) with field-programmable gate arrays and has been tested in an application for the detection of hot spots on the plasma facing components in JET. The developed system is able to perform real-time hot spot recognition, by processing the image stream captured by JET wide angle infrared camera, with the guarantee that computational time is constant and deterministic. The statistical results obtained from a quite extensive set of examples show that this solution approximates very well an ad hoc serial software algorithm, with no false or missed alarms and an almost perfect overlapping of alarm intervals. The computational time can be reduced to a millisecond time scale for 8 bit 496×560-sized images. Moreover, in our implementation, the computational time, besides being deterministic, is practically independent of the number of iterations performed by the CNN—unlike software CNN implementations.

  10. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed. PMID:26157976

  11. Dissecting APOBEC3G Substrate Specificity by Nucleoside Analog Interference*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Jason W.; Chelico, Linda; Goodman, Myron F.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2009-01-01

    The apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) cytidine deaminase genes encode a set of enzymes including APOBEC1 (A1), APOBEC2 (A2), APOBEC4 (A4), and APOBEC3A-H (A3A-H). Although each possesses one or more zinc binding motifs conserved among enzymes catalyzing C → U conversion, the functions and substrate specificities of these gene products vary considerably. For example, although two closely related enzymes, A3F and A3G, both restrict HIV-1 infection in strains deficient in virus infectivity factor (vif), A3F selectively deaminates cytosine within 5′-TTCA-3′ motifs in single stranded DNA, whereas A3G targets 5′-CCCA-3′ sequences. In the present study we have used nucleoside analog interference mapping to probe A3G-DNA interactions throughout the enzyme-substrate complex as well as to determine which DNA structural features determine substrate specificity. Our results indicate that multiple components of nucleosides within the consensus sequence are important for substrate recognition by A3G (with base moieties being most critical), whereas deamination interference by analog substitution outside this region is minimal. Furthermore, exocyclic groups in pyrimidines 1–2 nucleotides 5′ of the target cytosine were shown to dictate substrate recognition by A3G, with chemical composition at ring positions 3 and 4 found to be more important than at ring position 5. Taken together, these results provide insights into how the enzyme selects A3G hotspot motifs for deamination as well as which approaches might be best suited for forming a stable, catalytically competent cross-linked A3G-DNA complex for future structural studies. PMID:19136562

  12. iCDI-PseFpt: identify the channel-drug interaction in cellular networking with PseAAC and molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-21

    Many crucial functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction and central nervous system response, are controlled by cell signalings via various ion channels. Therefore, ion channels have become an excellent drug target, and study of ion channel-drug interaction networks is an important topic for drug development. However, it is both time-consuming and costly to determine whether a drug and a protein ion channel are interacting with each other in a cellular network by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most protein ion channels are still unknown. With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age, it is highly desirable to develop the sequence-based computational method to address this problem. To take up the challenge, we developed a new predictor called iCDI-PseFpt, in which the protein ion-channel sample is formulated by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) generated with the gray model theory, the drug compound by the 2D molecular fingerprint, and the operation engine is the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The overall success rate achieved by iCDI-PseFpt via the jackknife cross-validation was 87.27%, which is remarkably higher than that by any of the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iCDI-PseFpt is freely accessible to the public at the website http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt/. Furthermore, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in the paper just for its integrity. It has not escaped our notice that the current approach can also be used to study other drug-target interaction networks.

  13. Definition of the interacting interfaces of Apobec3G and HIV-1 Vif using MAPPIT mutagenesis analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavens, Delphine; Peelman, Frank; Van der Heyden, José; Uyttendaele, Isabel; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Verhee, Annick; Van Schoubroeck, Bertrand; Kurth, Julia; Hallenberger, Sabine; Clayton, Reginald; Tavernier, Jan

    2010-04-01

    The host restriction factor Apobec3G is a cytidine deaminase that incorporates into HIV-1 virions and interferes with viral replication. The HIV-1 accessory protein Vif subverts Apobec3G by targeting it for proteasomal degradation. We propose a model in which Apobec3G N-terminal domains symmetrically interact via a head-to-head interface containing residues 122 RLYYFW 127. To validate this model and to characterize the Apobec3G-Apobec3G and the Apobec3G-Vif interactions, the mammalian protein-protein interaction trap two-hybrid technique was used. Mutations in the head-to-head interface abrogate the Apobec3G-Apobec3G interaction. All mutations that inhibit Apobec3G-Apobec3G binding also inhibit the Apobec3G-Vif interaction, indicating that the head-to head interface plays an important role in the interaction with Vif. Only the D128K, P129A and T32Q mutations specifically affect the Apobec3G-Vif association. In our model, D128, P129 and T32 cluster at the edge of the head-to-head interface, possibly forming a Vif binding site composed of two Apobec3G molecules. We propose that Vif either binds at the Apobec3G head-to-head interface or associates with an RNA-stabilized Apobec3G oligomer. PMID:20015971

  14. Human APOBEC3G drives HIV-1 evolution and the development of drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tamoy; Kim, Eun - Young; Koning, Fransje; Malim, Michael; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is an innate virus restriction factor that induces deamination of specific cytidine residues in single-stranded human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Whereas destructive hA3G editing leads to a profound loss of HIV-1 infectivity, more limited editing could be a source of adaptation and diversification. Here we show that the presence of hA3G in T-cells can drive the development of diversity in HIV-1 populations and that under selection pressure imposed by the nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3TC ((-)2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine), a single point mutation that confers 3TC resistance, methionine 184 to isoleucine (M1841), emerges rapidly and reaches fixation. These results provide strong evidence that mutation by hA3G is an important source of genetic variation on which natural selection acts to shape the structure of the viral population and drive the tempo of HIV-1 evolution.

  15. APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F Act in Concert To Extinguish HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, John F.; Begum, Nurjahan; Baker, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The multifunctional HIV-1 accessory protein Vif counters the antiviral activities of APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F), and some Vifs counter stable alleles of APOBEC3H (A3H). Studies in humanized mice have shown that HIV-1 lacking Vif expression is not viable. Here, we look at the relative contributions of the three APOBEC3s to viral extinction. Inoculation of bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) mice with CCR5-tropic HIV-1JRCSF (JRCSF) expressing a vif gene inactive for A3G but not A3F degradation activity (JRCSFvifH42/43D) displayed either no or delayed replication. JRCSF expressing a vif gene mutated to inactivate A3F degradation but not A3G degradation (JRCSFvifW79S) always replicated to high viral loads with variable delays. JRCSF with vif mutated to lack both A3G and A3F degradation activities (JRCSFvifH42/43DW79S) failed to replicate, mimicking JRCSF without Vif expression (JRCSFΔvif). JRCSF and JRCSFvifH42/43D, but not JRCSFvifW79S or JRCSFvifH42/43DW79S, degraded APOBEC3D. With one exception, JRCSFs expressing mutant Vifs that replicated acquired enforced vif mutations. These mutations partially restored A3G or A3F degradation activity and fully replaced JRCSFvifH42/43D or JRCSFvifW79S by 10 weeks. Surprisingly, induced mutations temporally lagged behind high levels of virus in blood. In the exceptional case, JRCSFvifH42/43D replicated after a prolonged delay with no mutations in vif but instead a V27I mutation in the RNase H coding sequence. JRCSFvifH42/43D infections exhibited massive GG/AG mutations in pol viral DNA, but in viral RNA, there were no fixed mutations in the Gag or reverse transcriptase coding sequence. A3H did not contribute to viral extinction but, in combination with A3F, could delay JRCSF replication. A3H was also found to hypermutate viral DNA. IMPORTANCE Vif degradation of A3G and A3F enhances viral fitness, as virus with even a partially restored capacity for degradation outgrows JRCSFvifH42/43D and JRCSFvifW79S. Unexpectedly

  16. iDrug-Target: predicting the interactions between drug compounds and target proteins in cellular networking via benchmark dataset optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Liu, Zi; Cheng, Xiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Information about the interactions of drug compounds with proteins in cellular networking is very important for drug development. Unfortunately, all the existing predictors for identifying drug-protein interactions were trained by a skewed benchmark data-set where the number of non-interactive drug-protein pairs is overwhelmingly larger than that of the interactive ones. Using this kind of highly unbalanced benchmark data-set to train predictors would lead to the outcome that many interactive drug-protein pairs might be mispredicted as non-interactive. Since the minority interactive pairs often contain the most important information for drug design, it is necessary to minimize this kind of misprediction. In this study, we adopted the neighborhood cleaning rule and synthetic minority over-sampling technique to treat the skewed benchmark datasets and balance the positive and negative subsets. The new benchmark datasets thus obtained are called the optimized benchmark datasets, based on which a new predictor called iDrug-Target was developed that contains four sub-predictors: iDrug-GPCR, iDrug-Chl, iDrug-Ezy, and iDrug-NR, specialized for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), ion channels, enzymes, and NR (nuclear receptors), respectively. Rigorous cross-validations on a set of experiment-confirmed datasets have indicated that these new predictors remarkably outperformed the existing ones for the same purpose. To maximize users' convenience, a public accessible Web server for iDrug-Target has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDrug-Target/ , by which users can easily get their desired results. It has not escaped our notice that the aforementioned strategy can be widely used in many other areas as well.

  17. Crystal structure of the APOBEC3G catalytic domain reveals potential oligomerization interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shandilya, Shivender M. D.; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, John C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Harjes, Elena; Kouno, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has anti-viral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 Å. This structure corroborates features previously observed in NMR studies, a bulge in the second β-strand and a lengthening of the second α-helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function. PMID:20152150

  18. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  19. 78 FR 42107 - Certain Wireless Devices With 3G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices With 3G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for... certain wireless devices with 3G capabilities and components thereof imported by respondents...

  20. 76 FR 54252 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Devices With 3G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Wireless Devices With 3G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Notice of... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain wireless devices with 3G... after ] importation of certain wireless devices with 3G capabilities and components thereof...

  1. 78 FR 8191 - Certain Wireless Devices With 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices With 3G and/or 4G Capabilities and Components Thereof; Institution of... certain wireless devices with 3G and/or 4G capabilities and components thereof by reason of infringement... wireless devices with 3G and/or 4G capabilities and components thereof by reason of infringement of one...

  2. HIV-1 Adapts To Replicate in Cells Expressing Common Marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Oliva, Alberto; Finzi, Andrés; Haim, Hillel; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that a major block to HIV-1 replication in common marmosets operates at the level of viral entry and that this block can be overcome by adaptation of the virus in tissue-cultured cells. However, our current studies indicate that HIV-1 encounters additional postentry blocks in common marmoset peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we show that the common marmoset APOBEC3G (A3G) and BST2 proteins block HIV-1 in cell cultures. Using a directed-evolution method that takes advantage of the natural ability of HIV-1 to mutate during replication, we have been able to overcome these blocks in tissue-cultured cells. In the adapted viruses, specific changes were observed in gag, vif, env, and nef. The contribution of these changes to virus replication in the presence of the A3G and BST2 restriction factors was studied. We found that certain amino acid changes in Vif and Env that arise during adaptation to marmoset A3G and BST2 allow the virus to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors. The changes in Vif reduce expression levels and encapsidation of marmoset APOBEC3G, while the changes in Env increase viral fitness and discretely favor cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, allowing viral escape from these restriction factors. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 can infect only humans and chimpanzees. The main reason for this narrow tropism is the presence in many species of dominant-acting factors, known as restriction factors, that block viral replication in a species-specific way. We have been exploring the blocks to HIV-1 in common marmosets, with the ultimate goal of developing a new animal model of HIV-1 infection in these monkeys. In this study, we observed that common marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2, two known restriction factors, are able to block HIV-1 in cell cultures. We have adapted HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors and have characterized the mechanisms of escape. These studies can help in the

  3. Restraint hypothermia in cold-exposed rats at 3 G and 1 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, C. B.; Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between heat loss, heat production, and hypothermia was investigated in experiments with rats which determined if hypergravity affects heat production by altering oxygen consumption and if restraint modifies the ability of the rats to activate thermogenic mechanisms after cold exposure in a hypergravic field. Restrained and unrestrained rats were exposed for 1 hr periods to 1 G and 3 G at ambient temperatures of 24 C or 10 C, and the rate of oxygen consumption, the core temperatures, and the tail temperatures were measured. Results show that thermoregulatory mechanisms are impaired when rats are exposed to 3 G fields, and at 24 C as well as at 10 C this impairment leads to an inappropriate increase in heat loss.

  4. Study on fatigue experiment for transverse butt welds under 2G and 3G weld positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Wook; Park, Yong-Man; Jang, Beom-Seon; Jeon, Yu-Chul; Kim, Seong-Min

    2015-09-01

    Although the transverse butt weld method with ceramic backing strip has been widely used in various industrial fields for its fabricational convenience, it is rarely used in offshore industries since the fatigue strength of the weld joint has not been proved sufficiently. This study conducted fatigue tests for series of butt weld specimens with horizontal (2G) and vertical (3G) welding positions in order to verify the fatigue strength compared to S-N curve by DNV (Det Norske Veritas), IIW (International Institute of Welding) and Eurocode 3. The difference of the 2G specimens and the 3G specimens are investigated in terms of angular distortion and the effect on the fatigue strength are analyzed.

  5. Reg3g overexpression promotes β cell regeneration and induces immune tolerance in nonobese-diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Cao, Hui; Du, Jiao; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    The regenerating islet-derived gene was first isolated in regenerated pancreas tissues, greatly contributing to β cell regeneration. It is an anti-inflammatory in response to cellular stress. This encouraged us to investigate the exact role of a novel member of Reg family, regenerating islet-derived gene γ, in type 1 diabetes of nonobese-diabetic mice. For this, Reg3g gene was overexpressed in pancreatic islets, and conferred beneficial effects on β cell regeneration through activating the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. Lentiviral vector-encoding regenerating islet-derived gene γ treatment also decreased lymphocyte infiltrates of the intra-islet and peri-islet by inducing both differentiation of regulatory T cell and immature dendritic cells of tolerogenic properties, which attenuated autoimmunity. This treatment further contributed to rebalanced levels of type 1/2 helper T cell cytokines and elevated α1-antitrypsin levels in the serum. These results were not observed in phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice or in lentivirus-control mice. We have shown, for the first time, to our knowledge, that regenerating islet-derived gene γ promotes β cell regeneration and preserves β cells from autoimmunity damage by increasing regulatory T cell differentiation and inducing tolerated dendritic cells. This regenerating islet-derived gene γ infusion could probably be developed into an optimal gene therapy for the prevention and reversal of type 1 diabetes. PMID:26667474

  6. Wildlife hazards from Furadan 3G applications to rice in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; King, K.A.; Stout, W.F.; Mohn, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Mortality of birds, fish, frogs, crayfish, earthworms, and nontarget insects occurred in rice fields after treatments of Furadan 3G granules in 3 Texas counties in 1970 and 1973-75. Three western sandpipers (Ereunetes mauri), 1 pectoral sandpiper (Erolia melanotos), and 2 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were found dead or moribund between 17 and 24 hours after treatment. Cricket frogs (Acris crepitans blanchardi) were intoxicated 15 minutes post-treatment, and mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) showed effects 1 hour post-treatment. Mortality of mosquito fish, Gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus), Atlantic croaker (Micropogon undulatus), and European carp (Cyprinus carpio) usually occurred between 24 and 28 hours after treatment. Mortality of frogs, crayfish, and nontarget insects generally occurred in rice field water between 1 and 45 hours after treatment. Mortality of earthworms in soil persisted for 52 hours. As a replacement for aldrin in Texas rice fields, Furadan 3G appeared to cause Iess mortality of birds than aldrin, but Furadan 3G was toxic to birds, fish, and invertebrates.

  7. Ubiquitin-fusion as a strategy to modulate protein half-life: A3G antiviral activity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cadima-Couto, Iris; Freitas-Vieira, Acilino; Nowarski, Roni; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe; Goncalves, Joao

    2009-10-25

    The human APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and its activity is suppressed by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif). Vif neutralizes A3G mainly by inducing its degradation in the proteasome and blocking its incorporation into HIV-1 virions. Assessing the time needed for A3G incorporation into virions is, therefore, important to determine how quickly Vif must act to induce its degradation. We show that modelling the intracellular half-life of A3G can induce its Vif-independent targeting to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. By using various amino acids (X) in a cleavable ubiquitin-X-A3G fusion, we demonstrate that the half-life (t1/2) of X-A3G can be manipulated. We show that A3G molecules with a half-life of 13 min are incorporated into virions, whereas those with a half-life shorter than 5 min were not. The amount of X-A3G incorporated into virions increases from 13 min (Phe-A3G) to 85 min (Asn-A3G) and remains constant after this time period. Interestingly, despite the presence of similar levels of Arg-A3G (t1/2 = 28 min) and Asp-A3G (t1/2 = 65 min) into HIV-1 DELTAvif virions, inhibition of viral infectivity was only evident in the presence of A3G proteins with a longer half-life (t1/2 >= 65 min).

  8. Preliminary Analysis of the efficacy of Artificial neural Network (ANN) and Cellular Automaton (CA) based Land Use Models in Urban Land-Use Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, R.

    2013-05-01

    This research provides an opportunity of collaboration between urban planners and modellers by providing a clear theoretical foundations on the two most widely used urban land use models, and assessing the effectiveness of applying the models in urban planning context. Understanding urban land cover change is an essential element for sustainable urban development as it affects ecological functioning in urban ecosystem. Rapid urbanization due to growing inclination of people to settle in urban areas has increased the complexities in predicting that at what shape and size cities will grow. The dynamic changes in the spatial pattern of urban landscapes has exposed the policy makers and environmental scientists to great challenge. But geographic science has grown in symmetry to the advancements in computer science. Models and tools are developed to support urban planning by analyzing the causes and consequences of land use changes and project the future. Of all the different types of land use models available in recent days, it has been found by researchers that the most frequently used models are Cellular Automaton (CA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) models. But studies have demonstrated that the existing land use models have not been able to meet the needs of planners and policy makers. There are two primary causes identified behind this prologue. First, there is inadequate understanding of the fundamental theories and application of the models in urban planning context i.e., there is a gap in communication between modellers and urban planners. Second, the existing models exclude many key drivers in the process of simplification of the complex urban system that guide urban spatial pattern. Thus the models end up being effective in assessing the impacts of certain land use policies, but cannot contribute in new policy formulation. This paper is an attempt to increase the knowledge base of planners on the most frequently used land use model and also assess the

  9. Production of ethanol 3G from Kappaphycus alvarezii: evaluation of different process strategies.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Paulo Iiboshi; Barcelos, Carolina Araújo; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Augusto; Pereira, Nei

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the potential of Kappaphycus alvarezii as feedstock for ethanol production, i.e. ethanol 3G. First, aquatic biomass was subjected to a diluted acid pretreatment. This acid pretreatment generated two streams--a galactose-containing liquid fraction and a cellulose-containing solid fraction, which were investigated to determine their fermentability with the following strategies: a single-stream process (simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of both fractions altogether), which achieved 64.3 g L(-1) of ethanol, and a two-stream process (fractions were fermented separately), which resulted in 38 g L(-1) of ethanol from the liquid fraction and 53.0 g L(-1) from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the solid fraction. Based on the average fermentable carbohydrate concentration, it was possible to obtain 105 L of ethanol per ton of dry seaweed. These preliminaries results indicate that the use of the macro-algae K. alvarezii has a good potential feedstock for bioethanol production. PMID:23500583

  10. A remote patient monitoring system using a Java-enabled 3G mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Kogure, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Hiroki; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yohsuke; Zhang, Qinyu

    2007-01-01

    Telemedicine systems have become an important supporting for the medical staffs. As the development of the mobile phones, it is possible to apply the mobile phones to be a part of telemedicine systems. We developed an innovative Remote Patient Monitoring System using a Java-enabled 3G mobile phone. By using this system, doctors can monitor the vital biosignals of patients in ICU/CCU, such as ECG, RESP, SpO2, EtCO2 and so on by using the real-time waveform and data monitoring and list trend data monitoring functions of installed Java jiglet application on the mobile phone. Futhermore, doctors can check the patients' information by using the patient information checking function. The 3G mobile phone used has the ability to implement the application as the same time as being used to mak a voice call. Therefore, the doctor can get more and more information both from the browsing the screen of the mobile phone and the communicating with the medical staffs who are beside the patients and the monitors. The system can be conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, efficiency, and safety of telediagnosis. PMID:18002804

  11. Production of ethanol 3G from Kappaphycus alvarezii: evaluation of different process strategies.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Paulo Iiboshi; Barcelos, Carolina Araújo; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Augusto; Pereira, Nei

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the potential of Kappaphycus alvarezii as feedstock for ethanol production, i.e. ethanol 3G. First, aquatic biomass was subjected to a diluted acid pretreatment. This acid pretreatment generated two streams--a galactose-containing liquid fraction and a cellulose-containing solid fraction, which were investigated to determine their fermentability with the following strategies: a single-stream process (simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of both fractions altogether), which achieved 64.3 g L(-1) of ethanol, and a two-stream process (fractions were fermented separately), which resulted in 38 g L(-1) of ethanol from the liquid fraction and 53.0 g L(-1) from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the solid fraction. Based on the average fermentable carbohydrate concentration, it was possible to obtain 105 L of ethanol per ton of dry seaweed. These preliminaries results indicate that the use of the macro-algae K. alvarezii has a good potential feedstock for bioethanol production.

  12. Definition of the interacting interfaces of Apobec3G and HIV-1 Vif using MAPPIT mutagenesis analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lavens, Delphine; Peelman, Frank; Van der Heyden, José; Uyttendaele, Isabel; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Verhee, Annick; Van Schoubroeck, Bertrand; Kurth, Julia; Hallenberger, Sabine; Clayton, Reginald; Tavernier, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The host restriction factor Apobec3G is a cytidine deaminase that incorporates into HIV-1 virions and interferes with viral replication. The HIV-1 accessory protein Vif subverts Apobec3G by targeting it for proteasomal degradation. We propose a model in which Apobec3G N-terminal domains symmetrically interact via a head-to-head interface containing residues 122 RLYYFW 127. To validate this model and to characterize the Apobec3G–Apobec3G and the Apobec3G–Vif interactions, the mammalian protein–protein interaction trap two-hybrid technique was used. Mutations in the head-to-head interface abrogate the Apobec3G–Apobec3G interaction. All mutations that inhibit Apobec3G–Apobec3G binding also inhibit the Apobec3G–Vif interaction, indicating that the head-to head interface plays an important role in the interaction with Vif. Only the D128K, P129A and T32Q mutations specifically affect the Apobec3G–Vif association. In our model, D128, P129 and T32 cluster at the edge of the head-to-head interface, possibly forming a Vif binding site composed of two Apobec3G molecules. We propose that Vif either binds at the Apobec3G head-to-head interface or associates with an RNA-stabilized Apobec3G oligomer. PMID:20015971

  13. SIMULATION OF GENERAL ANESTHESIA ON THE "SIMMAN 3G" AND ITS EFFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Potapov, A F; Matveev, A S; Ignatiev, V G; Ivanova, A A; Aprosimov, L A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years in medical educational process new innovative technologies are widely used with computer simulation, providing the reality of medical intervations and procedures. Practice-training teaching with using of simulation allows to improve the efficiency of learning material at the expense of creating imaginary professional activity and leading barring material to practical activity. The arm of the investigation is evaluation of the students training efficiency at the Medical Institute on the topic "General Anesthesia with using a modern simulation "SimMan 3 G". The material of the investigation is the results, carried out on the basis of the Centre of Practical skills and medical virtual educational technologies (Simulation Centre) at the Medical Institute of NEFU by M.K. Ammosov. The Object of the investigation was made up by 55 students of the third (3) course of the Faculty of General Medicine of the Medical Institute of NEFU. The investigation was hold during practical trainings (April-May 2014) of the General Surgery Department on the topic "General Anesthesia". A simulation practical course "General Anesthesia" consisted of 12 academic hours. Practical training was carried out using instruments, equipments and facilities to install anesthesia on the SimMan 3G with shooting the process and further discussions of the results. The methods of the investigations were the appreciation of students background knowledge before and after practical training (by 5 points scale) and the analysis of the results. The results of the investigation showed that before the practical course only 23 students (41.8%) had dot positive marks: "Good"--7 students (12.7%) and "Satisfactory"--16 (29.1%) students. The rest 22 (58.2%) students had bad results. The practical trainings using real instruments, equipments and facilities with imitation of installation of preparations for introductory anesthesia, main analgesics and muscle relaxants showed a patients reaction on the

  14. Clustered mutations in hominid genome evolution are consistent with APOBEC3G enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Arbiza, Leonardo; Sams, Aaron J.; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The gradual accumulation of mutations by any of a number of mutational processes is a major driving force of divergence and evolution. Here, we investigate a potentially novel mutational process that is based on the activity of members of the AID/APOBEC family of deaminases. This gene family has been recently shown to introduce—in multiple types of cancer—enzyme-induced clusters of co-occurring somatic mutations caused by cytosine deamination. Going beyond somatic mutations, we hypothesized that APOBEC3—following its rapid expansion in primates—can introduce unique germline mutation clusters that can play a role in primate evolution. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive comparative genomic screen for APOBEC3-induced mutagenesis patterns across different hominids. We detected thousands of mutation clusters introduced along primate evolution which exhibit features that strongly fit the known patterns of APOBEC3G mutagenesis. These results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutations have contributed to the evolution of all genomes we studied. This is the first indication of site-directed, enzyme-induced genome evolution, which played a role in the evolution of both modern and archaic humans. This novel mutational mechanism exhibits several unique features, such as its higher tendency to mutate transcribed regions and regulatory elements and its ability to generate clusters of concurrent point mutations that all occur in a single generation. Our discovery demonstrates the exaptation of an anti-viral mechanism as a new source of genomic variation in hominids with a strong potential for functional consequences. PMID:27056836

  15. Metadata Standard and Data Exchange Specifications to Describe, Model, and Integrate Complex and Diverse High-Throughput Screening Data from the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS).

    PubMed

    Vempati, Uma D; Chung, Caty; Mader, Chris; Koleti, Amar; Datar, Nakul; Vidović, Dušica; Wrobel, David; Erickson, Sean; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Berriz, Gabriel; Benes, Cyril H; Subramanian, Aravind; Pillai, Ajay; Shamu, Caroline E; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-06-01

    The National Institutes of Health Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program is generating extensive multidimensional data sets, including biochemical, genome-wide transcriptional, and phenotypic cellular response signatures to a variety of small-molecule and genetic perturbations with the goal of creating a sustainable, widely applicable, and readily accessible systems biology knowledge resource. Integration and analysis of diverse LINCS data sets depend on the availability of sufficient metadata to describe the assays and screening results and on their syntactic, structural, and semantic consistency. Here we report metadata specifications for the most important molecular and cellular components and recommend them for adoption beyond the LINCS project. We focus on the minimum required information to model LINCS assays and results based on a number of use cases, and we recommend controlled terminologies and ontologies to annotate assays with syntactic consistency and semantic integrity. We also report specifications for a simple annotation format (SAF) to describe assays and screening results based on our metadata specifications with explicit controlled vocabularies. SAF specifically serves to programmatically access and exchange LINCS data as a prerequisite for a distributed information management infrastructure. We applied the metadata specifications to annotate large numbers of LINCS cell lines, proteins, and small molecules. The resources generated and presented here are freely available.

  16. Structure at 1.6 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Simon T. M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Bitto, Eduard; Jeon, Won Bae; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-07-01

    The crystal structure of the 18 kDa At3g22680 gene product from A. thaliana was determined at 1.6 Å resolution. At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformational space. The gene product of At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana codes for a protein of unknown function. The crystal structure of the At3g22680 gene product was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined to an R factor of 16.0% (R{sub free} = 18.4%) at 1.60 Å resolution. The refined structure shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit, with one molecule of the non-denaturing detergent CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate) tightly bound. Protein At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformation space.

  17. Alterations of a Cellular Cholesterol Metabolism Network Are a Molecular Feature of Obesity-Related Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jingzhong; Reynolds, Lindsay M; Zeller, Tanja; Müller, Christian; Lohman, Kurt; Nicklas, Barbara J; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Huang, Zhiqing; de la Fuente, Alberto; Soranzo, Nicola; Settlage, Robert E; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Howard, Timothy; Xu, Ning; Goodarzi, Mark O; Chen, Y-D Ida; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David S; Parks, John S; Murphy, Susan; Jacobs, David R; Post, Wendy; Tracy, Russell P; Wild, Philipp S; Blankenberg, Stefan; Hoeschele, Ina; Herrington, David; McCall, Charles E; Liu, Yongmei

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular diseases; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We aimed to identify obesity-associated molecular features that may contribute to obesity-related diseases. Using circulating monocytes from 1,264 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants, we quantified the transcriptome and epigenome. We discovered that alterations in a network of coexpressed cholesterol metabolism genes are a signature feature of obesity and inflammatory stress. This network included 11 BMI-associated genes related to sterol uptake (↑LDLR, ↓MYLIP), synthesis (↑SCD, FADS1, HMGCS1, FDFT1, SQLE, CYP51A1, SC4MOL), and efflux (↓ABCA1, ABCG1), producing a molecular profile expected to increase intracellular cholesterol. Importantly, these alterations were associated with T2D and coronary artery calcium (CAC), independent from cardiometabolic factors, including serum lipid profiles. This network mediated the associations between obesity and T2D/CAC. Several genes in the network harbored C-phosphorus-G dinucleotides (e.g., ABCG1/cg06500161), which overlapped Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)-annotated regulatory regions and had methylation profiles that mediated the associations between BMI/inflammation and expression of their cognate genes. Taken together with several lines of previous experimental evidence, these data suggest that alterations of the cholesterol metabolism gene network represent a molecular link between obesity/inflammation and T2D/CAC.

  18. SmartCell, a framework to simulate cellular processes that combines stochastic approximation with diffusion and localisation: analysis of simple networks.

    PubMed

    Ander, M; Beltrao, P; Di Ventura, B; Ferkinghoff-Borg, J; Foglierini, M; Kaplan, A; Lemerle, C; Tomás-Oliveira, I; Serrano, L

    2004-06-01

    SmartCell has been developed to be a general framework for modelling and simulation of diffusion-reaction networks in a whole-cell context. It supports localisation and diffusion by using a mesoscopic stochastic reaction model. The SmartCell package can handle any cell geometry, considers different cell compartments, allows localisation of species, supports DNA transcription and translation, membrane diffusion and multistep reactions, as well as cell growth. Moreover, different temporal and spatial constraints can be applied to the model. A GUI interface that facilitates model making is also available. In this work we discuss limitations and advantages arising from the approach used in SmartCell and determine the impact of localisation on the behaviour of simple well-defined networks, previously analysed with differential equations. Our results show that this factor might play an important role in the response of networks and cannot be neglected in cell simulations.

  19. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  20. Integrative omics reveals MYCN as a global suppressor of cellular signalling and enables network-based therapeutic target discovery in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Iljin, Kristiina; Mehta, Jai Prakash; Killick, Kate; Whilde, Jenny; Turriziani, Benedetta; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Fey, Vidal; Fischer, Matthias; Westermann, Frank; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Bannert, Steffen; Higgins, Desmond G.; Kolch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Despite intensive study, many mysteries remain about the MYCN oncogene's functions. Here we focus on MYCN's role in neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial childhood cancer. MYCN gene amplification occurs in 20% of cases, but other recurrent somatic mutations are rare. This scarcity of tractable targets has hampered efforts to develop new therapeutic options. We employed a multi-level omics approach to examine MYCN functioning and identify novel therapeutic targets for this largely un-druggable oncogene. We used systems medicine based computational network reconstruction and analysis to integrate a range of omic techniques: sequencing-based transcriptomics, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, siRNA screening and interaction proteomics, revealing that MYCN controls highly connected networks, with MYCN primarily supressing the activity of network components. MYCN's oncogenic functions are likely independent of its classical heterodimerisation partner, MAX. In particular, MYCN controls its own protein interaction network by transcriptionally regulating its binding partners. Our network-based approach identified vulnerable therapeutically targetable nodes that function as critical regulators or effectors of MYCN in neuroblastoma. These were validated by siRNA knockdown screens, functional studies and patient data. We identified β-estradiol and MAPK/ERK as having functional cross-talk with MYCN and being novel targetable vulnerabilities of MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma. These results reveal surprising differences between the functioning of endogenous, overexpressed and amplified MYCN, and rationalise how different MYCN dosages can orchestrate cell fate decisions and cancerous outcomes. Importantly, this work describes a systems-level approach to systematically uncovering network based vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets for multifactorial diseases by integrating disparate omic data types. PMID:26673823

  1. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, Pulari U.; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G–Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ∼0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R{sub 0}, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G–Vif axis. - Highlights: • We perform simulations and mathematical modeling of the role of APOBEC3G in suppressing HIV-1 infection. • In three distinct ways, we estimate that when over 80% of progeny virions carry APOBEC3G, productive HIV-1 infection would be suppressed. • Our estimate of this critical fraction presents quantitative guidelines for strategies targeting the APOBEC3G–Vif axis.

  2. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Pulari U; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G-Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ~0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R0, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G-Vif axis.

  3. Fish otolith growth in 1g and 3g depends on the gravity vector.

    PubMed

    Anken, R H; Werner, K; Breuer, J; Rahmann, H

    2000-01-01

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right side) as well as calcium (Ca) content of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were determined after a long-term stay at hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens and the absolute amount of otolith-Ca was diminished. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry concerning lapilli was markedly decreased. In the course of another experiment larvae were raised in aquarium hatch baskets, from which one was placed directly above aeration equipment which resulted in random water circulation shifting the fish around ("shifted" specimens). The lapillar asymmetry of the "stationary" specimens showed a highly significant increase during early development when larvae were forced to lay on their sides due to their prominent yolk-sacs. In later developmental stages, when they began to swim freely, a dramatic decrease in lapillar asymmetry was apparent. Taken together with own previous findings according to which otolith growth stops after vestibular nerve transaction, the results presented here suggest that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector, obviously involving a feedback loop between the brain and the inner ear. PMID:11542852

  4. EEG Changes Due to Experimentally Induced 3G Mobile Phone Radiation.

    PubMed

    Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 15-minute placement of a 3G dialing mobile phone causes direct changes in EEG activity compared to the placement of a sham phone. Furthermore, it was investigated whether placement of the mobile phone on the ear or the heart would result in different outcomes. Thirty-one healthy females participated. All subjects were measured twice: on one of the two days the mobile phone was attached to the ear, the other day to the chest. In this single-blind, cross-over design, assessments in the sham phone condition were conducted directly preceding and following the mobile phone exposure. During each assessment, EEG activity and radiofrequency radiation were recorded jointly. Delta, theta, alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma activity was computed. The association between radiation exposure and the EEG was tested using multilevel random regression analyses with radiation as predictor of main interest. Significant radiation effects were found for the alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma bands. When analyzed separately, ear location of the phone was associated with significant results, while chest placement was not. The results support the notion that EEG alterations are associated with mobile phone usage and that the effect is dependent on site of placement. Further studies are required to demonstrate the physiological relevance of these findings. PMID:26053854

  5. EEG Changes Due to Experimentally Induced 3G Mobile Phone Radiation.

    PubMed

    Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 15-minute placement of a 3G dialing mobile phone causes direct changes in EEG activity compared to the placement of a sham phone. Furthermore, it was investigated whether placement of the mobile phone on the ear or the heart would result in different outcomes. Thirty-one healthy females participated. All subjects were measured twice: on one of the two days the mobile phone was attached to the ear, the other day to the chest. In this single-blind, cross-over design, assessments in the sham phone condition were conducted directly preceding and following the mobile phone exposure. During each assessment, EEG activity and radiofrequency radiation were recorded jointly. Delta, theta, alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma activity was computed. The association between radiation exposure and the EEG was tested using multilevel random regression analyses with radiation as predictor of main interest. Significant radiation effects were found for the alpha, slowbeta, fastbeta, and gamma bands. When analyzed separately, ear location of the phone was associated with significant results, while chest placement was not. The results support the notion that EEG alterations are associated with mobile phone usage and that the effect is dependent on site of placement. Further studies are required to demonstrate the physiological relevance of these findings.

  6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the mouse platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) to mouse chromosome 6, region F3-G1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yong; Muller, W.A.

    1996-10-15

    Human platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1), an important member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, is widely distributed on cells of the vascular system and mediates cellular interactions through both homophilic and heterophilic adhesive mechanisms. The function of PECAM1 in vitro has begun to be understood, but its function in vivo is yet to be established. To study the function of PECAM1 in vivo, its mouse counterpart was identified and its cDNA gene isolated and characterized. In this study, the mouse chromosomal localization was determined for the mouse gene encoding Pecam. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to map the Pecam gene on mouse chromosome 6, region F3-G1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Extension of RAPTOR-M3G to r-θ-z Geometry for Use in Reactor Dosimetry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Melissa A.; Longoni, Gianluca; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2009-08-01

    The RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation - Multiple 3-D Geometries) is a new deterministic radiation transport code that was originally developed for x-y-z geometry. The development of the r-θ-z version of RAPTOR-M3G and its application to determine ex-vessel neutron dosimetry responses in the cavity of a typical 2-loop pressurized water reactor is presented. The neutron dosimetry responses determined from RAPTOR-M3G and TORT 3-D r-θ-z calculations are compared to actual measured responses.

  8. Modelling mammalian cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible non-proliferating state. The reactivation of ‘sleep-like’ quiescent cells (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes and stem cells) into proliferation is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration and a key to the growth, development and health of higher multicellular organisms, such as mammals. Quiescence has been a primarily phenotypic description (i.e. non-permanent cell cycle arrest) and poorly studied. However, contrary to the earlier thinking that quiescence is simply a passive and dormant state lacking proliferating activities, recent studies have revealed that cellular quiescence is actively maintained in the cell and that it corresponds to a collection of heterogeneous states. Recent modelling and experimental work have suggested that an Rb-E2F bistable switch plays a pivotal role in controlling the quiescence–proliferation balance and the heterogeneous quiescent states. Other quiescence regulatory activities may crosstalk with and impinge upon the Rb-E2F bistable switch, forming a gene network that controls the cells’ quiescent states and their dynamic transitions to proliferation in response to noisy environmental signals. Elucidating the dynamic control mechanisms underlying quiescence may lead to novel therapeutic strategies that re-establish normal quiescent states, in a variety of hyper- and hypo-proliferative diseases, including cancer and ageing. PMID:24904737

  9. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  10. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  11. Random mutagenesis MAPPIT analysis identifies binding sites for Vif and Gag in both cytidine deaminase domains of Apobec3G.

    PubMed

    Uyttendaele, Isabel; Lavens, Delphine; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Lemmens, Irma; Bovijn, Celia; Tavernier, Jan; Peelman, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in intact human cells. We developed a random mutagenesis screening strategy based on MAPPIT to detect mutations that disrupt the interaction of one protein with multiple protein interactors simultaneously. The strategy was used to detect residues of the human cytidine deaminase Apobec3G that are important for its homodimerization and its interaction with the HIV-1 Gag and Vif proteins. The strategy is able to identify the previously described head-to-head homodimerization interface in the N-terminal domain of Apobec3G. Our analysis further detects two new potential interaction surfaces in the N-and C-terminal domain of Apobec3G for interaction with Vif and Gag or for Apobec3G dimerization. PMID:22970171

  12. Random Mutagenesis MAPPIT Analysis Identifies Binding Sites for Vif and Gag in Both Cytidine Deaminase Domains of Apobec3G

    PubMed Central

    Uyttendaele, Isabel; Lavens, Delphine; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Lemmens, Irma; Bovijn, Celia

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in intact human cells. We developed a random mutagenesis screening strategy based on MAPPIT to detect mutations that disrupt the interaction of one protein with multiple protein interactors simultanously. The strategy was used to detect residues of the human cytidine deaminase Apobec3G that are important for its homodimerization and its interaction with the HIV-1 Gag and Vif proteins. The strategy is able to identify the previously described head-to-head homodimerization interface in the N-terminal domain of Apobec3G. Our analysis further detects two new potential interaction surfaces in the N-and C-terminal domain of Apobec3G for interaction with Vif and Gag or for Apobec3G dimerization. PMID:22970171

  13. A Non-Stationary 1981-2012 AVHRR NDVI(sub 3g) Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinzon, Jorge E.; Tucker, Compton J.

    2014-01-01

    The NDVI(sub 3g) time series is an improved 8-km normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data set produced from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments that extends from 1981 to the present. The AVHRR instruments have flown or are flying on fourteen polar-orbiting meteorological satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and are currently flying on two European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, MetOp-A and MetOp-B. This long AVHRR record is comprised of data from two different sensors: the AVHRR/2 instrument that spans July 1981 to November 2000 and the AVHRR/3 instrument that continues these measurements from November 2000 to the present. The main difficulty in processing AVHRR NDVI data is to properly deal with limitations of the AVHRR instruments. Complicating among-instrument AVHRR inter-calibration of channels one and two is the dual gain introduced in late 2000 on the AVHRR/3 instruments for both these channels. We have processed NDVI data derived from the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) from 1997 to 2010 to overcome among-instrument AVHRR calibration difficulties. We use Bayesian methods with high quality well-calibrated SeaWiFS NDVI data for deriving AVHRR NDVI calibration parameters. Evaluation of the uncertainties of our resulting NDVI values gives an error of plus or minus 0.005 NDVI units for our 1981 to present data set that is independent of time within our AVHRR NDVI continuum and has resulted in a non-stationary climate data set.

  14. Systematic Verification of Upstream Regulators of a Computable Cellular Proliferation Network Model on Non-Diseased Lung Cells Using a Dedicated Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; Poussin, Carine; Gebel, Stephan; Mathis, Carole; Schlage, Walter K.; Lichtner, Rosemarie B.; Quadt-Humme, Sibille; Wagner, Sandra; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently constructed a computable cell proliferation network (CPN) model focused on lung tissue to unravel complex biological processes and their exposure-related perturbations from molecular profiling data. The CPN consists of edges and nodes representing upstream controllers of gene expression largely generated from transcriptomics datasets using Reverse Causal Reasoning (RCR). Here, we report an approach to biologically verify the correctness of upstream controller nodes using a specifically designed, independent lung cell proliferation dataset. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells were arrested at G1/S with a cell cycle inhibitor. Gene expression changes and cell proliferation were captured at different time points after release from inhibition. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated cell cycle response specificity via an overrepresentation of proliferation related gene sets. Coverage analysis of RCR-derived hypotheses returned statistical significance for cell cycle response specificity across the whole model as well as for the Growth Factor and Cell Cycle sub-network models. PMID:23926424

  15. A single immunization with recombinant rabies virus (ERAG3G) confers complete protection against rabies in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose New alternative bait rabies vaccines applicable to pet dogs and wild animals are needed to eradicate rabies in Korea. In this study, recombinant rabies virus, ERAG3G strain was constructed using reverse genetic system and the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of the ERAG3G strain was evaluated in mice and dogs. Materials and Methods Using the full-length genome mutated amino acid at position 333 of glycoprotein of rabies virus (RABV) and helper plasmids, the ERAG3G strain was rescued in BHK/T7-9 cells successfully. Mice were inoculated with the ERAG3G strain for safety and efficacy. Safety and immunogenicity of the dog inoculated with the ERAG3G strain (1 mL, 108.0 FAID50/mL) via intramuscular route was evaluated for 28 days after inoculation. Results The ERAG3G strain rescued by reverse genetic system was propagated well in the mouse neuroblastoma cells revealing titer of 108.5 FAID50/mL and was not pathogenic to 4- or 6-week-old mice that received by intramuscular or intracranical route. Immunization with the ERAG3G strain conferred complete protection from lethal RABV in mice. Dogs inoculated with the vaccine candidate via intramuscular route showed high neutralizing antibody titer ranging from 2.62 to 23.9 IU/mL at 28 days postinoculation. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the ERAG3G strain plays an important role in inducing protective efficacy in mice and causes to arise anti-rabies neutralizing antibody in dogs. PMID:25003091

  16. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. 20/34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access substrate DNA cytosines. PMID:22181350

  17. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  18. Nuclear distribution of eIF3g and its interacting nuclear proteins in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, QIAOLI; LIU, HAO; YE, JINGJIA; ZHANG, HUI; JIA, ZHENYU; CAO, JIANG

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit g (eIF3g) is a core subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, and is important in the initiation of translation. It is also involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and is upregulated in multidrug-resistant cancer cells. In the present study, the nuclear distribution of eIF3g was determined by performing co-immunoprecipitation of proteins that potentially interact with eIF3g in the nucleus. Mass spectrometry characterization showed that three proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U/scaffold attachment factor A, HSZFP36/zinc finger protein 823 and β-actin, were among the candidate eIF3g-interacting proteins in the nucleus. The protein-protein interaction was further confirmed by cross-linking and a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, followed by western blotting. The co-localization of these proteins was determined by confocal microscopy. These findings provide novel insight into the possible functions of eIF3g in the nucleus and serves as an important first step for further investigation of the roles of eIF3g in cancer development. PMID:26935993

  19. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    cross-linked or branched networks. It is a highly dynamical system in which filaments are able to elongate or slide one on the other with the contribution of very active cellular proteins like molecular motors. The versatile properties of this cytoskeleton ensure the diversity of mechanical behaviors to explain cell rigidity as well as cell motility.

  20. Analysis of train movement dynamics under various temporal-spatial constraints in fixed-block railway network using extended cellular automaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yonghua; Zhang, Zhenlin; Liu, Deng

    2014-03-01

    In the fixed-block railway traffic, the trains adjust their speeds in view of their preceding allowable spaces caused by their respective front adjacent trains or specified by scheduling commands. The railway lines have the line-type speed limits within some block sections and the point-type ones at the terminals of block sections. Those speed limits originate from line conditions, scheduling commands and indications of signal equipment. This paper attempts to in detail reveal the train movement mechanism synthetically considering those temporal-spatial constraints. The proposed train movement model defines four kinds of target points and utilizes them to successively engender the instantaneous target points with their corresponding target speeds. It adopts the rule-based description mechanism in cellular automata (CA) but with continuous spaces to replicate restrictive, autonomous and synergistic behaviors of and among trains. The selections of accelerations and decelerations are based upon the data models of practical acceleration and deceleration processes; thereupon, the model is data-driven. The analysis of train movement dynamics through case studies demonstrates that the extended CA model can reproduce the train movement mechanism of grading speed control to satisfy the aforementioned temporal-spatial constraints. The model is applicable to represent the as-is or should-be states of train movements when adjustable parameters are properly configured.

  1. SPT-3G: a next-generation cosmic microwave background polarization experiment on the South Pole telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, B. A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allen, S. W.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Cliche, J. F.; Crawford, T. M.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanson, D.; Harrington, N. L.; Hattori, K.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Kubik, D.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; McDonald, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Montgomery, J.; Myers, M.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Reichardt, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Simard, G.; Smecher, G.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirokoff, E.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Suzuki, A.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the design of a new polarization sensitive receiver, spt-3g, for the 10-meter South Pole Telescope (spt). The spt-3g receiver will deliver a factor of ~20 improvement in mapping speed over the current receiver, spt-pol. The sensitivity of the spt-3g receiver will enable the advance from statistical detection of B-mode polarization anisotropy power to high signal-to-noise measurements of the individual modes, i.e., maps. This will lead to precise (~0.06 eV) constraints on the sum of neutrino masses with the potential to directly address the neutrino mass hierarchy. It will allow a separation of the lensing and inflationary B-mode power spectra, improving constraints on the amplitude and shape of the primordial signal, either through spt-3g data alone or in combination with bicep2/keck, which is observing the same area of sky. The measurement of small-scale temperature anisotropy will provide new constraints on the epoch of reionization. Additional science from the spt-3g survey will be significantly enhanced by the synergy with the ongoing optical Dark Energy Survey (des), including: a 1% constraint on the bias of optical tracers of large-scale structure, a measurement of the differential Doppler signal from pairs of galaxy clusters that will test General Relativity on ~200Mpc scales, and improved cosmological constraints from the abundance of clusters of galaxies

  2. Comparative analysis of the gene-inactivating potential of retroviral restriction factors APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Kasandra; Langlois, Marc-André

    2015-09-01

    APOBEC3 (A3) proteins are host-encoded restriction factors that inhibit retrovirus infection by mutagenic deamination of cytosines in minus-strand DNA replication intermediates. APOBEC3F (A3F) and APOBEC3G (A3G) are two of the most potent A3 enzymes in humans with each having a different target DNA specificity. A3G prefers to deaminate cytosines preceded by a cytosine (5'-CC), whereas A3F preferentially targets cytosines preceded by a thymine (5'-TC). Here we performed a detailed comparative analysis of retrovirus-encoded gene sequences edited by A3F and A3G, with the aim of correlating the context and intensity of the mutations with their effects on gene function. Our results revealed that, when there are few (TGG) tryptophan codons in the sequence, both enzymes alter gene function with a similar efficiency when given equal opportunities to deaminate in their preferred target DNA context. In contrast, tryptophan-rich genes are efficiently inactivated in the presence of a low mutational burden, through termination codon generation by A3G but not A3F. Overall, our results clearly demonstrated that the target DNA specificity of an A3 enzyme along with the intensity of the mutational burden and the tryptophan content of the gene being targeted are the factors that have the most forceful influence on whether A3-induced mutations will favour either terminal inactivation or genetic diversification of a retrovirus. PMID:26048885

  3. The Vaporization of B2O3(l) to B2O3(g) and B2O2(g)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2011-01-01

    The vaporization of B2O3 in a reducing environment leads to formation of both B2O3(g) and B2O2(g). While formation of B2O3(g) is well understood, many questions about the formation of B2O2(g) remain. Previous studies using B(s) + B2O3(l) have led to inconsistent thermodynamic data. In this study, it was found that after heating, B(s) and B2O3(l) appear to separate and variations in contact area likely led to the inconsistent vapor pressures of B2O2(g). To circumvent this problem, an activity of boron is fixed with a two-phase mixture of FeB and Fe2B. Both second and third law enthalpies of formation were measured for B2O2(g) and B2O3(g). From these the enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K are calculated to be -479.9 +/- 41.5 kJ/mol for B2O2(g) and -833.4 +/- 13.1 kJ/mol for B2O3(g). Ab initio calculations to determine the enthalpies of formation of B2O2(g) and B2O3(g) were conducted using the W1BD composite method and show good agreement with the experimental values.

  4. Female sex steroids and glia cells: Impact on multiple sclerosis lesion formation and fine tuning of the local neurodegenerative cellular network.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus; Hochstrasser, Tanja; Schmitz, Christoph; Beyer, Cordian

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease that shows a female-to-male gender prevalence and alleviation of disease activity during late stage pregnancy. In MS-related animal models, sex steroids ameliorate symptoms and protect from demyelination and neuronal damage. Underlying mechanisms of these protective avenues are continuously discovered, in part by using novel transgenic animal models. In this review article, we highlight the regulation of glia cell function by female sex steroids. We specifically focus on the relevance of glia cells for immune cell recruitment into the central nervous system and show how estrogen and progesterone can modulate these cell-cell communication pathways. Since MS is considered to have a strong neurodegenerative component, principal neuroprotective mechanisms, exerted by sex-steroids will be discussed as well. Activation of steroid receptors might not just act as immunosuppressant but at the same time harmonize brain-intrinsic networks to dampen neurodegeneration and, thus, disease progression in MS.

  5. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Vinton G.

    1991-01-01

    The demands placed on the networks transporting the information and knowledge generated by the increased diversity and sophistication of computational machinery are described. What is needed to support this increased flow, the structures already in place, and what must be built are topics of discussion. (KR)

  6. SMAC: A soft MAC to reduce control overhead and latency in CDMA-based AMI networks

    SciTech Connect

    Garlapati, Shravan; Kuruganti, Teja; Buehrer, Michael R.; Reed, Jeffrey H.

    2015-10-26

    The utilization of state-of-the-art 3G cellular CDMA technologies in a utility owned AMI network results in a large amount of control traffic relative to data traffic, increases the average packet delay and hence are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications. Like the CDG, we consider a utility owned cellular like CDMA network for smart grid distribution applications and classify the distribution smart grid data as scheduled data and random data. Also, we propose SMAC protocol, which changes its mode of operation based on the type of the data being collected to reduce the data collection latency and control overhead when compared to 3G cellular CDMA2000 MAC. The reduction in the data collection latency and control overhead aids in increasing the number of smart meters served by a base station within the periodic data collection interval, which further reduces the number of base stations needed by a utility or reduces the bandwidth needed to collect data from all the smart meters. The reduction in the number of base stations and/or the reduction in the data transmission bandwidth reduces the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) and OPerational EXpenditure (OPEX) of the AMI network. Finally, the proposed SMAC protocol is analyzed using markov chain, analytical expressions for average throughput and average packet delay are derived, and simulation results are also provided to verify the analysis.

  7. SMAC: A soft MAC to reduce control overhead and latency in CDMA-based AMI networks

    DOE PAGES

    Garlapati, Shravan; Kuruganti, Teja; Buehrer, Michael R.; Reed, Jeffrey H.

    2015-10-26

    The utilization of state-of-the-art 3G cellular CDMA technologies in a utility owned AMI network results in a large amount of control traffic relative to data traffic, increases the average packet delay and hence are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications. Like the CDG, we consider a utility owned cellular like CDMA network for smart grid distribution applications and classify the distribution smart grid data as scheduled data and random data. Also, we propose SMAC protocol, which changes its mode of operation based on the type of the data being collected to reduce the data collection latency andmore » control overhead when compared to 3G cellular CDMA2000 MAC. The reduction in the data collection latency and control overhead aids in increasing the number of smart meters served by a base station within the periodic data collection interval, which further reduces the number of base stations needed by a utility or reduces the bandwidth needed to collect data from all the smart meters. The reduction in the number of base stations and/or the reduction in the data transmission bandwidth reduces the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) and OPerational EXpenditure (OPEX) of the AMI network. Finally, the proposed SMAC protocol is analyzed using markov chain, analytical expressions for average throughput and average packet delay are derived, and simulation results are also provided to verify the analysis.« less

  8. Effects of electromagnetic radiation from 3G mobile phone on heart rate, blood pressure and ECG parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Colak, Cengiz; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Ermis, Necip; Tagluk, Mehmet Emin; Colak, Cemil; Sarihan, Ediz; Dilek, Omer Faruk; Turan, Bahadir; Bakir, Sevtap; Acet, Ahmet

    2012-08-01

    Effects of electromagnetic energy radiated from mobile phones (MPs) on heart is one of the research interests. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) from third-generation (3G) MP on the heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and ECG parameters and also to investigate whether exogenous melatonin can exert any protective effect on these parameters. In this study 36 rats were randomized and evenly categorized into 4 groups: group 1 (3G-EMR exposed); group 2 (3G-EMR exposed + melatonin); group 3 (control) and group 4 (control + melatonin). The rats in groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 3G-specific MP's EMR for 20 days (40 min/day; 20 min active (speech position) and 20 min passive (listening position)). Group 2 was also administered with melatonin for 20 days (5 mg/kg daily during the experimental period). ECG signals were recorded from cannulated carotid artery both before and after the experiment, and BP and HR were calculated on 1st, 3rd and 5th min of recordings. ECG signals were processed and statistically evaluated. In our experience, the obtained results did not show significant differences in the BP, HR and ECG parameters among the groups both before and after the experiment. Melatonin, also, did not exhibit any additional effects, neither beneficial nor hazardous, on the heart hemodynamics of rats. Therefore, the strategy (noncontact) of using a 3G MP could be the reason for ineffectiveness; and use of 3G MP, in this perspective, seems to be safer compared to the ones used in close contact with the head. However, further study is needed for standardization of such an assumption.

  9. Knee-ligament loading properties as influenced by gravity. I - Junction with bone of 3-G rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunder, C. C.; Matthes, R. D.; Tipton, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of 3-G conditions on the bone-to-ligament junctions of the knee is studied in rats. Results following chronic 3-G centrifugation of rats show that their bone-to-ligament junctions exhibited a force-sustaining capacity (F) which was 95 + or - 12% of the value for the control group. However, F was actually 29 + or - 5% greater for centrifuged rats than for control rats of comparable size, as the experimental animals grew to smaller body mass. It is concluded that gravity determines part of the magnitude of F, and therefore this value will probably be weaker after development in a weightless environment.

  10. The murine Nck SH2/SH3 adaptors are important for the development of mesoderm-derived embryonic structures and for regulating the cellular actin network.

    PubMed

    Bladt, Friedhelm; Aippersbach, Elke; Gelkop, Sigal; Strasser, Geraldine A; Nash, Piers; Tafuri, Anna; Gertler, Frank B; Pawson, Tony

    2003-07-01

    Mammalian Nck1 and Nck2 are closely related adaptor proteins that possess three SH3 domains, followed by an SH2 domain, and are implicated in coupling phosphotyrosine signals to polypeptides that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. However, the in vivo functions of Nck1 and Nck2 have not been defined. We have mutated the murine Nck1 and Nck2 genes and incorporated beta-galactosidase reporters into the mutant loci. In mouse embryos, the two Nck genes have broad and overlapping expression patterns. They are functionally redundant in the sense that mice deficient for either Nck1 or Nck2 are viable, whereas inactivation of both Nck1 and Nck2 results in profound defects in mesoderm-derived notochord and embryonic lethality at embryonic day 9.5. Fibroblast cell lines derived from Nck1(-/-) Nck2(-/-) embryos have defects in cell motility and in the organization of the lamellipodial actin network. These data suggest that the Nck SH2/SH3 adaptors have important functions in the development of mesodermal structures during embryogenesis, potentially linked to a role in cell movement and cytoskeletal organization.

  11. Robustness of networks of networks with degree-degree correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Canals, Santiago; Makse, Hernan

    Many real-world complex systems ranging from critical infrastructure and transportation networks to living systems including brain and cellular networks are not formed by an isolated network but by a network of networks. Randomly coupled networks with interdependency between different networks may easily result in abrupt collapse. Here, we seek a possible explanation of stable functioning in natural networks of networks including functional brain networks. Specifically, we analyze the robustness of networks of networks focused on one-to-many interconnections between different networks and degree-degree correlation. Implication of the network robustness on functional brain networks of rats is also discussed.

  12. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  13. Identification of a Protein Network Interacting with TdRF1, a Wheat RING Ubiquitin Ligase with a Protective Role against Cellular Dehydration1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Davide; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Lopez-Torrejon, Gema; Marzin, Stephan; Schweizer, Patrick; Stanca, Antonio Michele; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mazzucotelli, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Plants exploit ubiquitination to modulate the proteome with the final aim to ensure environmental adaptation and developmental plasticity. Ubiquitination targets are specifically driven to degradation through the action of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Genetic analyses have indicated wide functions of ubiquitination in plant life; nevertheless, despite the large number of predicted E3s, only a few of them have been characterized so far, and only a few ubiquitination targets are known. In this work, we characterized durum wheat (Triticum durum) RING Finger1 (TdRF1) as a durum wheat nuclear ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, its barley (Hordeum vulgare) homolog was shown to protect cells from dehydration stress. A protein network interacting with TdRF1 has been defined. The transcription factor WHEAT BEL1-TYPE HOMEODOMAIN1 (WBLH1) was degraded in a TdRF1-dependent manner through the 26S proteasome in vivo, the mitogen-activated protein kinase TdWNK5 [for Triticum durum WITH NO LYSINE (K)5] was able to phosphorylate TdRF1 in vitro, and the RING-finger protein WHEAT VIVIPAROUS-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (WVIP2) was shown to have a strong E3 ligase activity. The genes coding for the TdRF1 interactors were all responsive to cold and/or dehydration stress, and a negative regulative function in dehydration tolerance was observed for the barley homolog of WVIP2. A role in the control of plant development was previously known, or predictable based on homology, for wheat BEL1-type homeodomain1(WBLH1). Thus, TdRF1 E3 ligase might act regulating the response to abiotic stress and remodeling plant development in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22167118

  14. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  15. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  16. Oligomerization transforms human APOBEC3G from an efficient enzyme to a slowly dissociating nucleic acid-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; McCauley, Micah J.; Wang, Wei; Qualley, Dominic F.; Wu, Tiyun; Kitamura, Shingo; Geertsema, Hylkje; Chan, Denise S. B.; Hertz, Amber; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Levin, Judith G.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 proteins are a family of DNA-editing enzymes that play an important role in the innate immune response against retroviruses and retrotransposons. APOBEC3G is a member of this family that inhibits HIV-1 replication in the absence of the viral infectivity factor Vif. Inhibition of HIV replication occurs by both deamination of viral single-stranded DNA and a deamination-independent mechanism. Efficient deamination requires rapid binding to and dissociation from ssDNA. However, a relatively slow dissociation rate is required for the proposed deaminase-independent roadblock mechanism in which APOBEC3G binds the viral template strand and blocks reverse transcriptase-catalysed DNA elongation. Here, we show that APOBEC3G initially binds ssDNA with rapid on-off rates and subsequently converts to a slowly dissociating mode. In contrast, an oligomerization-deficient APOBEC3G mutant did not exhibit a slow off rate. We propose that catalytically active monomers or dimers slowly oligomerize on the viral genome and inhibit reverse transcription.

  17. Reactor Dosimetry Applications Using RAPTOR-M3G:. a New Parallel 3-D Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, Gianluca; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2009-08-01

    The numerical solution of the Linearized Boltzmann Equation (LBE) via the Discrete Ordinates method (SN) requires extensive computational resources for large 3-D neutron and gamma transport applications due to the concurrent discretization of the angular, spatial, and energy domains. This paper will discuss the development RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation - Multiple 3D Geometries), a new 3-D parallel radiation transport code, and its application to the calculation of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry responses in the cavity of a commercial 2-loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). RAPTOR-M3G is based domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architectures. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor, yielding an efficient solution methodology for large 3-D problems. Measured neutron dosimetry responses in the reactor cavity air gap will be compared to the RAPTOR-M3G predictions. This paper is organized as follows: Section 1 discusses the RAPTOR-M3G methodology; Section 2 describes the 2-loop PWR model and the numerical results obtained. Section 3 addresses the parallel performance of the code, and Section 4 concludes this paper with final remarks and future work.

  18. Vehicular ad hoc network for a surveillance system using multifrequency band enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunruangses, Montree; Sunat, Khamron; Mitatha, Somsak; Yupapin, Preecha P.

    2010-09-01

    We present a new design of a surveillance system via a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) integrated by a 3-G or 4-G cellular wireless network. We propose dense wavelength division multiplexing wavelength enhancement for increasing the channel capacity and signal security. Increase in the number of channels can be obtained by increasing the wavelength density. Signal security is introduced by a specific wavelength filter controlled by the central operator. Optical communication wavelength enhancement is reviewed. The advantage of this proposed system is that it can easily be implemented and incorporated into the existing communication link in either a cellular or ad hoc wireless system, where signal security and hence privacy can be provided.

  19. SonTek SL3G Side-Looking Doppler Current Meter application in Complex Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, D.

    2014-12-01

    The SonTek Argonaut SL Side-Looking Doppler Current Meters are well established products in the measurement of real-time water velocity in open channels. With the development of acoustic doppler technology the decision was made to incorporate latest technology in the Argonaut SL and hence the SonTek SL3G was born.The SonTek SL3G Acoustic Doppler instrument incorporates a number of innovations that improves velocity measurements and quality assurance of data for Side-Looking Doppler Current Meters. SmartPulseHD was originally introduced with the launch of the SonTek M9/S5 RiverSurveyor Acoustic Doppler Instruments and the increased accuracy and resolution of velocity measurements made it obvious to include into the new SL3G instruments. SmartPulseHD continuously tracks the water conditions and selects the optimum processing configuration required using multiple ping types and processing techniques. The new SL3G design makes it the smallest Side Looking Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter on the market reducing flow disturbance caused by the instrument and the distance of first measurement cell from boundary.The application of the SL3G Acoustic Doppler instrument is designed for complex flow conditions where the use of conventional stage-discharge relationships is economically not viable and therefore requires the use of velocity index methodology. The case-study presented in this paper is situated in the Colorado River downstream of Imperial Dam affected by controlled releases, drainage from adjacent irrigation areas and backwater from a weir situated downstream of the monitoring site. The paper analyses the relationship between measured mean velocity and index velocity and if additional variables such as stage and or Y-velocity need to be incorporated in the development of the index velocity rating. In addition, to determine the variables impacting on the index velocity rating, the index velocity applied will be evaluated by the best linear relationship between the

  20. Crystal Structure of DNA Cytidine Deaminase ABOBEC3G Catalytic Deamination Domain Suggests a Binding Mode of Full-length Enzyme to Single-stranded DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA. PMID:25542899

  1. Crystal structure of DNA cytidine deaminase ABOBEC3G catalytic deamination domain suggests a binding mode of full-length enzyme to single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-02-13

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA.

  2. A synthetic snRNA m3G-CAP enhances nuclear delivery of exogenous proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pedro M D; Wenska, Malgorzata; Lundin, Karin E; Wrange, Orjan; Strömberg, Roger; Smith, C I Edvard

    2009-04-01

    Accessing the nucleus through the surrounding membrane poses one of the major obstacles for therapeutic molecules large enough to be excluded due to nuclear pore size limits. In some therapeutic applications the large size of some nucleic acids, like plasmid DNA, hampers their access to the nuclear compartment. However, also for small oligonucleotides, achieving higher nuclear concentrations could be of great benefit. We report on the synthesis and possible applications of a natural RNA 5'-end nuclear localization signal composed of a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap (m(3)G-CAP). The cap is found in the small nuclear RNAs that are constitutive part of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in nuclear splicing. We demonstrate the use of the m(3)G signal as an adaptor that can be attached to different oligonucleotides, thereby conferring nuclear targeting capabilities with capacity to transport large-size cargo molecules. The synthetic capping of oligos interfering with splicing may have immediate clinical applications.

  3. Single dose oral amoxycillin 3 g with either 125 mg or 250 mg clavulanic acid to treat uncomplicated anogenital gonorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A G; Shanson, D C

    1985-01-01

    A single supervised oral dose of amoxycillin 3 g combined with clavulanic acid 125 mg as a suspension (Augmentin 3.125G) plus probenecid 1 g, cured 97 of 100 assessable patients who had uncomplicated anogenital gonorrhoea. Thirteen of the 100 patients were infected with penicillinase producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) and 11 (85%) of these patients were cured, including one infected with a PPNG strain that was also resistant to spectinomycin. Another group of 93 assessable patients was treated with ampicillin 3 g plus probenecid 1 g, and only 85 (91%) patients were cured. Of the eight treatment failures in this group, five were found to be infected with PPNG strains. In a second study 144 assessable patients were treated with amoxycillin 3 g combined with clavulanic acid 250 mg, (Augmentin 3.250G) plus probenecid 1 g, and a 97% cure rate was again obtained. Five of seven (71%) patients infected with PPNG strains were cured. Although both Augmentin regimens were effective for treating gonorrhoea caused by PPNG and non-PPNG strains, side effects were noted in more patients treated with 250 mg clavulanic acid (24%) than with 125 mg clavulanic acid (5%). In addition, a similar cure rate was obtained in the three primary sites of infection, the urethra, cervix, and rectum. PMID:4007860

  4. Overview of cellular CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-05-01

    A general description of code division multiple access (CDMA) is presented. This overview of CDMA highlights the potential of increasing capacity in future cellular communications. The author describes the mobile radio environment and its impact on narrowband and wideband propagation. The advantage of having CDMA in cellular systems is discussed, and the concept of radio capacity in cellular is introduced. The power control schemes in CDMA are analyzed in detail.

  5. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  6. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  7. Increased expression with differential subcellular location of cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G in human CD4(+) T-cell activation and dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Harold; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Martinez-Navio, José M; Rodríguez-García, Marta; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Climent, Núria; Prado, Carolina; Gil, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; García, Felipe; Miró, José M; Franco, Rafael; Borras, Francesc E; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Gatell, José M; Gallart, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G) is an innate defense protein showing activity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Activated CD4(+) T cells are highly permissive for HIV-1 replication, whereas resting CD4(+) T cells are refractory. Dendritic cells (DCs), especially mature DCs, are also refractory. We investigated whether these differences could be related to a differential A3G expression and/or subcellular distribution. We found that A3G mRNA and protein expression is very low in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs, but increases strongly following T-cell activation and DC maturation. The Apo-7 anti-A3G monoclonal antibody (mAb), which was specifically developed, confirmed these differences at the protein level and disclosed that A3G is mainly cytoplasmic in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs. Nevertheless, A3G translocates to the nucleus in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, yet remaining cytoplasmic in matured DCs, a finding confirmed by immunoblotting analysis of cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Apo-7 mAb was able to immunoprecipitate endogenous A3G allowing to detect complexes with numerous proteins in activated-proliferating but not in resting CD4(+) T cells. The results show for the first time the nuclear translocation of A3G in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells.

  8. The signal to noise and distortion ratio for sigma delta ADC for SDR 3G/4G mobile receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Preeti; Verma, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Simulation for the test of SNDR (Signal to noise and Distortion ratio) in Sigma Delta ADC for SDR 3G and 4G mobile Receivers. Now a days, SNDR is one of the most important parameter which directly effects the performance of ADC. Simulation results show the Capability of the simulink to obtain SNDR for a 8 bit and 10 bit audio Sigma delta ADC. SNDR of ADC will always be less than SNR. The simulation model of second order Sigma Delta ADC is given in the paper. The SNR and SNDR have been taken into account.

  9. Effect of 3G cell phone exposure with computer controlled 2-D stepper motor on non-thermal activation of the hsp27/p38MAPK stress pathway in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Meena, Ramovatar; Nirala, Jayprakash; Kumar, Jitender; Verma, H N

    2014-03-01

    Cell phone radiation exposure and its biological interaction is the present concern of debate. Present study aimed to investigate the effect of 3G cell phone exposure with computer controlled 2-D stepper motor on 45-day-old male Wistar rat brain. Animals were exposed for 2 h a day for 60 days by using mobile phone with angular movement up to zero to 30°. The variation of the motor is restricted to 90° with respect to the horizontal plane, moving at a pre-determined rate of 2° per minute. Immediately after 60 days of exposure, animals were scarified and numbers of parameters (DNA double-strand break, micronuclei, caspase 3, apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, expression of stress-responsive genes) were performed. Result shows that microwave radiation emitted from 3G mobile phone significantly induced DNA strand breaks in brain. Meanwhile a significant increase in micronuclei, caspase 3 and apoptosis were also observed in exposed group (P < 0.05). Western blotting result shows that 3G mobile phone exposure causes a transient increase in phosphorylation of hsp27, hsp70, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which leads to mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated cytochrome c release and subsequent activation of caspases, involved in the process of radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Study shows that the oxidative stress is the main factor which activates a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways, among them the hsp27/p38MAPK is the pathway of principle stress response. Results conclude that 3G mobile phone radiations affect the brain function and cause several neurological disorders.

  10. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  11. Fabrication of large dual-polarized multichroic TES bolometer arrays for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Byrum, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Ciocys, S. T.; Cliche, J. F.; Crawford, T. M.; Cukierman, A.; Czaplewski, D.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hattori, K.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O.; Keisler, R.; Kubik, D.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lendinez, S.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Myers, M.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Smecher, G.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirokoff, E.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Sobrin, J.; Story, K.; Suzuki, A.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Ziegler, K. E.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory to fabricate large arrays of multichroic transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. These detectors will be assembled into the focal plane for the SPT-3G camera, the third generation CMB camera to be installed in the South Pole Telescope. The complete SPT-3G camera will have approximately 2690 pixels, for a total of 16 140 TES bolometric detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip line. In-line filters are used to define the different bands before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES bolometers. There are six TES bolometer detectors per pixel, which allow for measurements of three band-passes (95, 150 and 220 GHz) and two polarizations. The steps involved in the monolithic fabrication of these detector arrays are presented here in detail. Patterns are defined using a combination of stepper and contact lithography. The misalignment between layers is kept below 200 nm. The overall fabrication involves a total of 16 processes, including reactive and magnetron sputtering, reactive ion etching, inductively coupled plasma etching and chemical etching.

  12. Signal processing in cellular clocks.

    PubMed

    Forger, Daniel B

    2011-03-15

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(t), either two variables of a model or two experimentally measured time courses. We show how s(t) can be decomposed into two parts, the first being a function of r(t), and the second the derivative of a function of r(t). Geometric principles are then derived that can be used to understand when oscillations appear in biochemical feedback loops, the period of these oscillations, and their time course. Specific examples of this theory are provided that show how certain networks are prone or not prone to oscillate, how individual biochemical processes affect the period, and how oscillations in one chemical species can be deduced from oscillations in other parts of the network.

  13. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  14. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  15. Cellular signalling: the role of the peroxisome.

    PubMed

    Masters, C J

    1996-03-01

    This article reviews the role of the peroxisome in cellular signalling, with particular emphasis on the unique contributions of this organelle to the complex regulatory inter-relationships of cellular processes within the mammalian organism. Among the topics covered are the close alignments between the signalling systems governing peroxisome proliferation and those of the steroid hormone/thyroid hormone/vitamin D nuclear-receptor superfamily; the regulation of the permeability of the peroxisomal membrane; the involvements of lysophosphatidic acid as an intra- and inter-cellular messenger; the special role of the phosphatidylcholine cycle and its derivative messengers in relation to peroxisomal metabolism; peroxisomal contributions to the regulation of oxygen free radical levels in tissues and the significance of these radicals as second messengers; the evidence of peroxisomal influences on inter-cellular signalling from metabolic turnover studies; modifications of the regulatory significance of fatty acids by the peroxisome; the commonalities in metabolic relationships between the peroxisome and other cellular organelles; and regulatory shuttles associated with peroxisomal function. It is concluded that the peroxisome displays several significant interconnections with the cellular-signalling apparatus, that it is capable of imprinting a characteristic influence on the regulatory network in the cell, and that the contributions of this organelle deserve greater consideration in future investigations of cell-signalling phenomena.

  16. Wound Documentation by Using 3G Mobile as Acquisition Terminal: An Appropriate Proposal for Community Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kui; Wu, Minjie; Liu, Hu; Gong, Jiahong; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Qiang; Fang, Min; Tao, Yanping; Cai, Minqiang; Chen, Hua; Wang, Jianbo; Xie, Ting; Lu, Shuliang

    2015-06-01

    The increasing numbers of cases of wound disease are now posing a big challenge in China. For more convenience of wound patients, wound management in community health care centers under the supervision of a specialist at general hospitals is an ideal solution. To ensure an accurate diagnosis in community health clinics, it is important that "the same language" for wound description, which may be composed of unified format description, including wound image, must be achieved. We developed a wound information management system that was built up by acquisition terminal, wound description, data bank, and related software. In this system, a 3G mobile phone was applied as acquisition terminal, which could be used to access to the data bank. This documentation system was thought to be an appropriate proposal for community wound care because of its objectivity, uniformity, and facilitation. It also provides possibility for epidemiological study in the future. PMID:25256281

  17. Knee-ligament loading properties as influenced by gravity: I. Junction with bone of 3-G rodents.

    PubMed

    Wunder, C C; Matthes, R D; Tipton, C M

    1982-11-01

    After chronic 3-G centrifugation of rats, their bone-to-ligament junctions exhibited 95 +/- 12% of the control junctions' force-sustaining capacity (F). F was actually 29 +/- 5% greater for centrifuged rats than for control rats of comparable size, as experimental animals grew to smaller body mass. This suggests that gravity determines part of F's magnitude. These junctions are, therefore, hypothesized to be weaker after development in a weightless environment. The effect was less measurable for mice. F was measured in situ as load needed to separate the knee's medial collateral ligament from the tibia of 34 male rats (Sprague-Dawley, 27-320 d of age, exposed 4-65 d), 30 control rats, 22 male mice (Swiss Webster, 35-166 d, exposed 9-56 d), and 15 control mice.

  18. Wound Documentation by Using 3G Mobile as Acquisition Terminal: An Appropriate Proposal for Community Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kui; Wu, Minjie; Liu, Hu; Gong, Jiahong; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Qiang; Fang, Min; Tao, Yanping; Cai, Minqiang; Chen, Hua; Wang, Jianbo; Xie, Ting; Lu, Shuliang

    2015-06-01

    The increasing numbers of cases of wound disease are now posing a big challenge in China. For more convenience of wound patients, wound management in community health care centers under the supervision of a specialist at general hospitals is an ideal solution. To ensure an accurate diagnosis in community health clinics, it is important that "the same language" for wound description, which may be composed of unified format description, including wound image, must be achieved. We developed a wound information management system that was built up by acquisition terminal, wound description, data bank, and related software. In this system, a 3G mobile phone was applied as acquisition terminal, which could be used to access to the data bank. This documentation system was thought to be an appropriate proposal for community wound care because of its objectivity, uniformity, and facilitation. It also provides possibility for epidemiological study in the future.

  19. NIa-Pro of Papaya ringspot virus interacts with Carica papaya eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit G (CpeIF3G).

    PubMed

    Gao, Le; Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of papaya eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit G (CpeIF3G) with Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) NIa-Pro was validated using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in papaya protoplasts based on the previous yeast two-hybrid assay results. The C-terminal (residues 133-239) fragment of PRSV NIa-Pro and the central domain (residues 59-167) of CpeIF3G were required for effective interaction between NIa-Pro and CpeIF3G as shown by a Sos recruitment yeast two-hybrid system with several deletion mutants of NIa-Pro and CpeIF3G. The central domain of CpeIF3G, which contains a C2HC-type zinc finger motif, is required to bind to other eIFs of the translational machinery. In addition, quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assay confirmed that PRSV infection leads to a 2- to 4.5-fold up-regulation of CpeIF3G mRNA in papaya. Plant eIF3G is involved in various stress response by enhancing the translation of resistance-related proteins. It is proposed that the NIa-Pro-CpeIF3G interaction may impair translation preinitiation complex assembly of defense proteins and interfere with host defense.

  20. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  1. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  2. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  3. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  4. Coordination of autophagy with other cellular activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Qin, Zheng-hong

    2013-01-01

    The cell biological phenomenon of autophagy has attracted increasing attention in recent years, partly as a consequence of the discovery of key components of its cellular machinery. Autophagy plays a crucial role in a myriad of cellular functions. Autophagy has its own regulatory mechanisms, but this process is not isolated. Autophagy is coordinated with other cellular activities to maintain cell homeostasis. Autophagy is critical for a range of human physiological processes. The multifunctional roles of autophagy are explained by its ability to interact with several key components of various cell pathways. In this review, we focus on the coordination between autophagy and other physiological processes, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), energy homeostasis, aging, programmed cell death, the immune responses, microbial invasion and inflammation. The insights gained from investigating autophagic networks should increase our understanding of their roles in human diseases and their potential as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23474706

  5. Vehicular-networking- and road-weather-related research in Sodankylä

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukuvaara, Timo; Mäenpää, Kari; Ylitalo, Riika

    2016-10-01

    Vehicular-networking- and especially safety-related wireless vehicular services have been under intensive research for almost a decade now. Only in recent years has road weather information also been acknowledged to play an important role when aiming to reduce traffic accidents and fatalities via intelligent transport systems (ITSs). Part of the progress can be seen as a result of the Finnish Meteorological Institute's (FMI) long-term research work in Sodankylä within the topic, originally started in 2006. Within multiple research projects, the FMI Arctic Research Centre has been developing wireless vehicular networking and road weather services, in co-operation with the FMI meteorological services team in Helsinki. At the beginning the wireless communication was conducted with traditional Wi-Fi type local area networking, but during the development the system has evolved into a hybrid communication system of a combined vehicular ad hoc networking (VANET) system with special IEEE 802.11p protocol and supporting cellular networking based on a commercial 3G network, not forgetting support for Wi-Fi-based devices also. For piloting purposes and further research, we have established a special combined road weather station (RWS) and roadside unit (RSU), to interact with vehicles as a service hotspot. In the RWS-RSU we have chosen to build support to all major approaches, IEEE 802.11, traditional Wi-Fi and cellular 3G. We employ road weather systems of FMI, along with RWS and vehicle data gathered from vehicles, in the up-to-date localized weather data delivered in real time. IEEE 802.11p vehicular networking is supported with Wi-Fi and 3G communications. This paper briefly introduces the research work related to vehicular networking and road weather services conducted in Sodankylä, as well as the research project involved in this work. The current status of instrumentation, available services and capabilities are presented in order to formulate a clear general view of

  6. Juxtaposition of C(2)M and the transverse filament protein C(3)G within the central region of Drosophila synaptonemal complex

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lorinda K.; Royer, Suzanne M.; Page, Scott L.; McKim, Kim S.; Lai, Ann; Lilly, Mary A.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2005-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is intimately involved in the process of meiotic recombination in most organisms, but its exact role remains enigmatic. One reason for this uncertainty is that the overall structure of the SC is evolutionarily conserved, but many SC proteins are not. Two putative SC proteins have been identified in Drosophila: C(3)G and C(2)M. Mutations in either gene cause defects in SC structure and meiotic recombination. Although neither gene is well conserved at the amino acid level, the predicted secondary structure of C(3)G is similar to that of transversefilament proteins, and C(2)M is a distantly related member of the α-kleisin family that includes Rec8, a meiosis-specific cohesin protein. Here, we use immunogold labeling of SCs in Drosophila ovaries to localize C(3)G and C(2)M at the EM level. We show that both C(3)G and C(2)M are components of the SC, that the orientation of C(3)G within the SC is similar to other transverse-filament proteins, and that the N terminus of C(2)M is located in the central region adjacent to the lateral elements (LEs). Based on our data and the known phenotypes of C(2)M and C(3)G mutants, we propose a model of SC structure in which C(2)M links C(3)G to the LEs. PMID:15767569

  7. Evolution of HIV-1 Isolates that Use a Novel Vif-independent Mechanism to Resist Restriction by Human APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Haché, Guylaine; Shindo, Keisuke; Albin, John S.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The human APOBEC3G protein restricts the replication of Vif-deficient HIV-1 by deaminating nascent viral cDNA cytosines to uracils, leading to viral genomic strand G-to-A hypermutations [1–4]. However, the HIV-1 Vif protein triggers APOBEC3G degradation, helping explain why this innate defense does not protect patients [5]. The APOBEC3G-Vif interaction is a promising therapeutic target, but the benefit of enabling HIV-1 restriction in patients is unlikely to be known until Vif antagonists are developed. As a necessary prelude to such studies, cell-based HIV-1 evolution experiments were done to ask whether APOBEC3G can provide a long-term block to Vif-deficient virus replication and, if so, whether HIV-1 variants would emerge that resist restriction. APOBEC3G-expressing T cells were infected with Vif-deficient HIV-1. Virus infectivity was suppressed in 45/48 cultures for over 5 weeks, but replication was eventually detected in 3 cultures. Virus growth characteristics and sequencing demonstrated that these isolates were still Vif-deficient. Rather, these viruses had acquired a promoter mutation and a Vpr null mutation. Resistance occurred by a novel tolerance mechanism in which the resistant viruses packaged less APOBEC3G and accumulated fewer hypermutations. These data support the development of anti-retrovirals that antagonize Vif and thereby enable endogenous APOBEC3G to suppress HIV-1 replication. PMID:18501607

  8. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  9. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  10. Femur-bending properties as influenced by gravity. I - Ultimate load and moment for 3-G rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunder, C. C.; Welch, R. C.; Glade, R.; Fleming, B. P.; Cook, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    Fresh experimental bones can withstand greater bending forces and moments after 1.0 to 2.5 weeks of 3-G exposure. This appears more attributable to a 50% greater strength of bone material than to effects upon size or shape, and is most measurable for animals of 5 to 8 weeks of age. Experimental bone material seems to grow to its mature level at a younger age rather then there being so marked an effect upon the mature level itself. We simulated 3.1 G by chronic centrifugation of 66 albino rats and compared them to 63 1-G controls. Extrapolation of the simplest mathematical description of the present results to weaker, zero-G bones could be tested by a total of 60 space-based control and experimental animals. A flight of only 15 animals would be necessary for comparison to ground-based control animals. This is consistent with reports of bone demineralization during space-flight. In light of the differences in bone histology, however, extrapolation of these results to humans would be premature and, if at all applicable, are most likely to be so for children rather than adults.

  11. Decolorization of the anthraquinone dye Cibacron Blue 3G-A with immobilized Coprinus cinereus in fluidized bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Moutaouakkil, A; Blaghen, M

    2011-01-01

    Coprinus cinereus, which was able to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Cibacron Blue 3G-A (CB) enzymatically, was used as a biocatalyst for the decolorization of synthetic solutions containing this reactive dye. Coprinus cinereus was immobilized in both calcium alginate and polyacrylamide gels, and was used for the decolorization of CB from synthetic water by using a fluidized bed bioreactor. The highest specific decolorization rate was obtained when Coprinus cinereus was entrapped in calcium alginate beads, and was of about 3.84 mg g(-1) h(-1) with a 50% conversion time (t1/2) of about 2.60 h. Moreover, immobilized fungal biomass in calcium alginate continuously decolorized CB even after 7 repeated experiments without significant loss of activity, while polyacrylamide-immobilized fungal biomass retained only 67% of its original activity. The effects of some physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH and dye concentration on decolorization performance of isolated fungal strain were also investigated. PMID:21438473

  12. SensorWeb 3G: Extending On-Orbit Sensor Capabilities to Enable Near Realtime User Configurability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Cappelaere, Pat; Frye, Stuart; Sohlberg, Rob; Ly, Vuong; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Davies, Ashley; Sullivan, Don; Ames, Troy; Witt, Ken; Stanley, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This research effort prototypes an implementation of a standard interface, Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS), which is an Open Geospatial Consortium(OGC) standard, to enable users to define, test, upload and execute algorithms for on-orbit sensor systems. The user is able to customize on-orbit data products that result from raw data streaming from an instrument. This extends the SensorWeb 2.0 concept that was developed under a previous Advanced Information System Technology (AIST) effort in which web services wrap sensors and a standardized Extensible Markup Language (XML) based scripting workflow language orchestrates processing steps across multiple domains. SensorWeb 3G extends the concept by providing the user controls into the flight software modules associated with on-orbit sensor and thus provides a degree of flexibility which does not presently exist. The successful demonstrations to date will be presented, which includes a realistic HyspIRI decadal mission testbed. Furthermore, benchmarks that were run will also be presented along with future demonstration and benchmark tests planned. Finally, we conclude with implications for the future and how this concept dovetails into efforts to develop "cloud computing" methods and standards.

  13. Neurovestibular Adaptation in the Utricular Otolith Following Extended Periods of 3G Exposure and Re-Adaptation to 1G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, R.; Popova, Y.; Varelas, J.; Mofrad, A.; Kondrachuk, A.

    2008-06-01

    In the present study we characterize the firing rate response of utricular afferents to servo-controlled translational accelerations and tilt profiles in the anesthetized adult oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. The measurements have been done after 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 8- and 16-day exposure to 3G centrifugation, and following 1-8 days recovery to study re-adaptation to IG. Typically >60 afferents are well characterized in each animal. Since centrifugation includes a 228°/s constant velocity rotation, 45-60 horizontal canal afferents are also studied to yaw rotation in each fish. Results to date show a biphasic pattern: an initial sensitivity up-regulation (3- and 4-day) followed by a significant decrease after 16-day exposures. Return to control values following 16-day exposure is on the order of 4-8 days. The otolith sensitivity of fish to acceleration is clearly regulated by altered gravity exposure, and indicates that this paradigm might be used to study the neural and behavioral responses, including the response to countermeasure intervention, to altered gravity in a ground-based model.

  14. A novel method combining cellular neural networks and the coupled nonlinear oscillators' paradigm involving a related bifurcation analysis for robust image contrast enhancement in dynamically changing difficult visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain Chedjou, Jean; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that a machine vision-based analysis of a dynamic scene, for example in the context of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), does require real-time processing capabilities. Therefore, the system used must be capable of performing both robust and ultrafast analyses. Machine vision in ADAS must fulfil the above requirements when dealing with a dynamically changing visual context (i.e. driving in darkness or in a foggy environment, etc). Among the various challenges related to the analysis of a dynamic scene, this paper focuses on contrast enhancement, which is a well-known basic operation to improve the visual quality of an image (dynamic or static) suffering from poor illumination. The key objective is to develop a systematic and fundamental concept for image contrast enhancement that should be robust despite a dynamic environment and that should fulfil the real-time constraints by ensuring an ultrafast analysis. It is demonstrated that the new approach developed in this paper is capable of fulfilling the expected requirements. The proposed approach combines the good features of the 'coupled oscillators'-based signal processing paradigm with the good features of the 'cellular neural network (CNN)'-based one. The first paradigm in this combination is the 'master system' and consists of a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that are (a) the so-called 'van der Pol oscillator' and (b) the so-called 'Duffing oscillator'. It is then implemented or realized on top of a 'slave system' platform consisting of a CNN-processors platform. An offline bifurcation analysis is used to find out, a priori, the windows of parameter settings in which the coupled oscillator system exhibits the best and most appropriate behaviours of interest for an optimal resulting image processing quality. In the frame of the extensive bifurcation analysis carried out, analytical formulae have been derived, which are capable of determining the various

  15. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  16. Lattice energies of apatites and the estimation of DeltaH f degrees (PO 4 3-, g).

    PubMed

    Flora, Natalie J; Yoder, Claude H; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2004-04-01

    Experimentally based lattice energies are calculated for the apatite family of double salts M(5)(PO(4))(3)X, where M is a divalent metal cation (Ca, Sr, Ba) and X is hydroxide or a halide. These values are also shown to be estimable, generally to within 4%, using the recently derived Glasser-Jenkins equation, U(POT) = AI(2I/V(m))(1/3), where A = 121.39 kJ mol(-)(1). The apatites exhibiting greater covalent character (e.g., M = Pb, Cd, etc.) are less well reproduced but are within 8% of the experimentally based value. The lattice energy for ionic apatites (having identical lattice ionic strengths, I) takes the particularly simple form U(POT)/kJ mol(-)(1) = 26680/(V(m)/nm(3))(1/3), reproducing cycle values of U(POT) well when V(m) is estimated by ion volume summation and employing a volume for the PO(4)(3)(-) ion (not previously quantified with an associated error) of 0.063 +/- 0.003 nm(3). A value for the enthalpy of formation of the gaseous phosphate ion, DeltaH(f)( ) degrees (PO(4)(3)(-), g), is absent from current thermochemical tabulations. Examination of solution and solid state thermochemical cycles for apatites, however, leads us to a remarkably consistent value of 321.8 +/- 1.2 kJ mol(-)(1). Experimental and estimated lattice energies were used along with other thermodynamic data to determine enthalpies, entropies, and free energies of dissolution for apatites of uncertain stabilities. These dissolution values are compared with the corresponding values for stable apatites and are used to rationalize the relative instability of certain derivatives.

  17. The influence of leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Berry, Joseph A

    2013-10-01

    The distribution of nitrogen isotopes in the biosphere has the potential to offer insights into the past, present and future of the nitrogen cycle, but it is challenging to unravel the processes controlling patterns of mixing and fractionation. We present a mathematical model describing a previously overlooked process: nitrogen isotope fractionation during leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange. The model predicts that when leaf-atmosphere exchange of NH3(g ) occurs in a closed system, the atmospheric reservoir of NH3(g ) equilibrates at a concentration equal to the ammonia compensation point and an isotopic composition 8.1‰ lighter than nitrogen in protein. In an open system, when atmospheric concentrations of NH3(g ) fall below or rise above the compensation point, protein can be isotopically enriched by net efflux of NH3(g ) or depleted by net uptake. Comparison of model output with existing measurements in the literature suggests that this process contributes to variation in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants as well as NH3(g ) in the atmosphere, and should be considered in future analyses of nitrogen isotope circulation. The matrix-based modelling approach that is introduced may be useful for quantifying isotope dynamics in other complex systems that can be described by first-order kinetics. PMID:23452149

  18. The influence of leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Berry, Joseph A

    2013-10-01

    The distribution of nitrogen isotopes in the biosphere has the potential to offer insights into the past, present and future of the nitrogen cycle, but it is challenging to unravel the processes controlling patterns of mixing and fractionation. We present a mathematical model describing a previously overlooked process: nitrogen isotope fractionation during leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange. The model predicts that when leaf-atmosphere exchange of NH3(g ) occurs in a closed system, the atmospheric reservoir of NH3(g ) equilibrates at a concentration equal to the ammonia compensation point and an isotopic composition 8.1‰ lighter than nitrogen in protein. In an open system, when atmospheric concentrations of NH3(g ) fall below or rise above the compensation point, protein can be isotopically enriched by net efflux of NH3(g ) or depleted by net uptake. Comparison of model output with existing measurements in the literature suggests that this process contributes to variation in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants as well as NH3(g ) in the atmosphere, and should be considered in future analyses of nitrogen isotope circulation. The matrix-based modelling approach that is introduced may be useful for quantifying isotope dynamics in other complex systems that can be described by first-order kinetics.

  19. Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Agapie, Alexandru; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case—connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders—the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  20. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  1. Contribution of APOBEC3G/F activity to the development of low-abundance drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Julian, M; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Di Giallonardo, F; Schuurman, R; Däumer, M; Aitken, S; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F; D'Arminio Monforte, A; Geretti, A M; Booth, C L; Kaiser, R; Michalik, C; Jansen, K; Masquelier, B; Bellecave, P; Kouyos, R D; Castro, E; Furrer, H; Schultze, A; Günthard, H F; Brun-Vezinet, F; Metzner, K J; Paredes, R

    2016-02-01

    Plasma drug-resistant minority human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants (DRMVs) increase the risk of virological failure to first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor antiretroviral therapy (ART). The origin of DRMVs in ART-naive patients, however, remains unclear. In a large pan-European case-control study investigating the clinical relevance of pre-existing DRMVs using 454 pyrosequencing, the six most prevalent plasma DRMVs detected corresponded to G-to-A nucleotide mutations (V90I, V106I, V108I, E138K, M184I and M230I). Here, we evaluated if such DRMVs could have emerged from apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 3G/F (APOBEC3G/F) activity. Out of 236 ART-naive subjects evaluated, APOBEC3G/F hypermutation signatures were detected in plasma viruses of 14 (5.9%) individuals. Samples with minority E138K, M184I, and M230I mutations, but not those with V90I, V106I or V108I, were significantly associated with APOBEC3G/F activity (Fisher's P < 0.005), defined as the presence of > 0.5% of sample sequences with an APOBEC3G/F signature. Mutations E138K, M184I and M230I co-occurred in the same sequence as APOBEC3G/F signatures in 3/9 (33%), 5/11 (45%) and 4/8 (50%) of samples, respectively; such linkage was not found for V90I, V106I or V108I. In-frame STOP codons were observed in 1.5% of all clonal sequences; 14.8% of them co-occurred with APOBEC3G/F signatures. APOBEC3G/F-associated E138K, M184I and M230I appeared within clonal sequences containing in-frame STOP codons in 2/3 (66%), 5/5 (100%) and 4/4 (100%) of the samples. In a re-analysis of the parent case control study, the presence of APOBEC3G/F signatures was not associated with virological failure. In conclusion, the contribution of APOBEC3G/F editing to the development of DRMVs is very limited and does not affect the efficacy of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor ART. PMID:26482266

  2. Different mutagenic potential of HIV-1 restriction factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F is determined by distinct single-stranded DNA scanning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P; Chelico, Linda

    2014-03-01

    The APOBEC3 deoxycytidine deaminase family functions as host restriction factors that can block replication of Vif (virus infectivity factor) deficient HIV-1 virions to differing degrees by deaminating cytosines to uracils in single-stranded (-)HIV-1 DNA. Upon replication of the (-)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils, thereby inducing C/G→T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. Although both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are expressed in cell types HIV-1 infects and are suppressed by Vif, there has been no prior biochemical analysis of APOBEC3F, in contrast to APOBEC3G. Using synthetic DNA substrates, we characterized APOBEC3F and found that similar to APOBEC3G; it is a processive enzyme and can deaminate at least two cytosines in a single enzyme-substrate encounter. However, APOBEC3F scanning movement is distinct from APOBEC3G, and relies on jumping rather than both jumping and sliding. APOBEC3F jumping movements were also different from APOBEC3G. The lack of sliding movement from APOBEC3F is due to an ¹⁹⁰NPM¹⁹² motif, since insertion of this motif into APOBEC3G decreases its sliding movements. The APOBEC3G NPM mutant induced significantly less mutations in comparison to wild-type APOBEC3G in an in vitro model HIV-1 replication assay and single-cycle infectivity assay, indicating that differences in DNA scanning were relevant to restriction of HIV-1. Conversely, mutation of the APOBEC3F ¹⁹¹Pro to ¹⁹¹Gly enables APOBEC3F sliding movements to occur. Although APOBEC3F ¹⁹⁰NGM¹⁹² could slide, the enzyme did not induce more mutagenesis than wild-type APOBEC3F, demonstrating that the unique jumping mechanism of APOBEC3F abrogates the influence of sliding on mutagenesis. Overall, we demonstrate key differences in the impact of APOBEC3F- and APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis on HIV-1 that supports a model in which both the processive DNA scanning mechanism and preferred deamination motif

  3. Contribution of APOBEC3G/F activity to the development of low-abundance drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Julian, M; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Di Giallonardo, F; Schuurman, R; Däumer, M; Aitken, S; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F; D'Arminio Monforte, A; Geretti, A M; Booth, C L; Kaiser, R; Michalik, C; Jansen, K; Masquelier, B; Bellecave, P; Kouyos, R D; Castro, E; Furrer, H; Schultze, A; Günthard, H F; Brun-Vezinet, F; Metzner, K J; Paredes, R

    2016-02-01

    Plasma drug-resistant minority human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants (DRMVs) increase the risk of virological failure to first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor antiretroviral therapy (ART). The origin of DRMVs in ART-naive patients, however, remains unclear. In a large pan-European case-control study investigating the clinical relevance of pre-existing DRMVs using 454 pyrosequencing, the six most prevalent plasma DRMVs detected corresponded to G-to-A nucleotide mutations (V90I, V106I, V108I, E138K, M184I and M230I). Here, we evaluated if such DRMVs could have emerged from apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 3G/F (APOBEC3G/F) activity. Out of 236 ART-naive subjects evaluated, APOBEC3G/F hypermutation signatures were detected in plasma viruses of 14 (5.9%) individuals. Samples with minority E138K, M184I, and M230I mutations, but not those with V90I, V106I or V108I, were significantly associated with APOBEC3G/F activity (Fisher's P < 0.005), defined as the presence of > 0.5% of sample sequences with an APOBEC3G/F signature. Mutations E138K, M184I and M230I co-occurred in the same sequence as APOBEC3G/F signatures in 3/9 (33%), 5/11 (45%) and 4/8 (50%) of samples, respectively; such linkage was not found for V90I, V106I or V108I. In-frame STOP codons were observed in 1.5% of all clonal sequences; 14.8% of them co-occurred with APOBEC3G/F signatures. APOBEC3G/F-associated E138K, M184I and M230I appeared within clonal sequences containing in-frame STOP codons in 2/3 (66%), 5/5 (100%) and 4/4 (100%) of the samples. In a re-analysis of the parent case control study, the presence of APOBEC3G/F signatures was not associated with virological failure. In conclusion, the contribution of APOBEC3G/F editing to the development of DRMVs is very limited and does not affect the efficacy of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor ART.

  4. Different Mutagenic Potential of HIV-1 Restriction Factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F Is Determined by Distinct Single-Stranded DNA Scanning Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P.; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 deoxycytidine deaminase family functions as host restriction factors that can block replication of Vif (virus infectivity factor) deficient HIV-1 virions to differing degrees by deaminating cytosines to uracils in single-stranded (−)HIV-1 DNA. Upon replication of the (−)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils, thereby inducing C/G→T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. Although both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are expressed in cell types HIV-1 infects and are suppressed by Vif, there has been no prior biochemical analysis of APOBEC3F, in contrast to APOBEC3G. Using synthetic DNA substrates, we characterized APOBEC3F and found that similar to APOBEC3G; it is a processive enzyme and can deaminate at least two cytosines in a single enzyme-substrate encounter. However, APOBEC3F scanning movement is distinct from APOBEC3G, and relies on jumping rather than both jumping and sliding. APOBEC3F jumping movements were also different from APOBEC3G. The lack of sliding movement from APOBEC3F is due to an 190NPM192 motif, since insertion of this motif into APOBEC3G decreases its sliding movements. The APOBEC3G NPM mutant induced significantly less mutations in comparison to wild-type APOBEC3G in an in vitro model HIV-1 replication assay and single-cycle infectivity assay, indicating that differences in DNA scanning were relevant to restriction of HIV-1. Conversely, mutation of the APOBEC3F 191Pro to 191Gly enables APOBEC3F sliding movements to occur. Although APOBEC3F 190NGM192 could slide, the enzyme did not induce more mutagenesis than wild-type APOBEC3F, demonstrating that the unique jumping mechanism of APOBEC3F abrogates the influence of sliding on mutagenesis. Overall, we demonstrate key differences in the impact of APOBEC3F- and APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis on HIV-1 that supports a model in which both the processive DNA scanning mechanism and preferred deamination motif (APOBEC3F, 5

  5. Low frequency vibrational spectra, barrier to internal rotation, and RHF/STO-3G * ab initio calculations of 3-bromopropene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, J. R.; Tang, Qun; Little, T. S.

    1992-06-01

    The far-infrared spectrum of gaseous 3-bromopropene, CH 2CHCH 2Br, has been recorded from 350 to 35 cm -1 at a resolution of 0.1 cm -1. The fundamental asymmetric torsional frequencies of the more stable gauche (dihedral angle ∢ CCCBr = 118.0 ± 0.2°) and higher energy cis (bromine atom eclipsing the double bond and dihedral angle ∢ CCCBr = 0°) conformers have been observed at about 93 and 113.3 cm -1 in the low frequency Raman and far-infrared spectra of the gas respectively. Three excited state torsional transitions falling to lower frequency have also been observed for the cis conformer. From studies of the Raman spectrum of the gas at variable temperatures, a value of 257 ± 50 cm -1 (735 ± 143 cal mol -1) has been determined for the enthalpy difference between the conformers. From these data the asymmetric torsional potential governing internal rotation about the CC has been determined and the potential coefficients are: V1 = -293 ± 18; V2 = -106 ± 26; V3 = 825 ± 12; V4 = 85 ± 13; V6 = -53 ± 6 cm -1. This potential function gives cis to gauche, gauche to gauche and gauche to cis barriers of 749, 770 and 986 cm -1 respectively, and an enthalpy difference between the conformers of 237 ± 56 cm -1 (672 ± 160 cal mol -1). The r0 structural parameters for the heavy atom skeleton of the gauche conformer have been determined from previously reported microwave rotational constants along with a fixed CBr distance taken from the electron diffraction study. The determined parameters (distances in »ngströms, angles in degrees) are: r(C 1 = C 2) = 1.335 ± 0.003; r(C 2C 3) = 1.492 ± 0.002; ∢ C 1C 2C 3 = 122.6 ± 0.1; ∢ BrC 3C 2 = 110.1 ± 0.1; ∢ C 1C 2C 3Br = 118.0 ± 0.2. The asymmetric torsional potential surface, complete equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies have been calculated using restricted Hartree-Fock calculations with the STO-3G * basis set. All of these results are discussed and compared with the corresponding

  6. Inter-Cellular Forces Orchestrate Contact Inhibition of Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Davis, John R.; Luchici, Andrei; Mosis, Fuad; Thackery, James; Salazar, Jesus A.; Mao, Yanlan; Dunn, Graham A.; Betz, Timo; Miodownik, Mark; Stramer, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is a multifaceted process that causes many cell types to repel each other upon collision. During development, this seemingly uncoordinated reaction is a critical driver of cellular dispersion within embryonic tissues. Here, we show that Drosophila hemocytes require a precisely orchestrated CIL response for their developmental dispersal. Hemocyte collision and subsequent repulsion involves a stereotyped sequence of kinematic stages that are modulated by global changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Tracking actin retrograde flow within hemocytes in vivo reveals synchronous reorganization of colliding actin networks through engagement of an inter-cellular adhesion. This inter-cellular actin-clutch leads to a subsequent build-up in lamellar tension, triggering the development of a transient stress fiber, which orchestrates cellular repulsion. Our findings reveal that the physical coupling of the flowing actin networks during CIL acts as a mechanotransducer, allowing cells to haptically sense each other and coordinate their behaviors. PMID:25799385

  7. A synthetic biology approach to understanding cellular information processing

    PubMed Central

    Riccione, Katherine A; Smith, Robert P; Lee, Anna J; You, Lingchong

    2012-01-01

    The survival of cells and organisms requires proper responses to environmental signals. These responses are governed by cellular networks, which serve to process diverse environmental cues. Biological networks often contain recurring network topologies called ‘motifs’. It has been recognized that the study of such motifs allows one to predict the response of a biological network, and thus cellular behavior. However, studying a single motif in complete isolation of all other network motifs in a natural setting is difficult. Synthetic biology has emerged as a powerful approach to understanding the dynamic properties of network motifs. In addition to testing existing theoretical predictions, construction and analysis of synthetic gene circuits has led to the discovery of novel motif dynamics such as how the combination of simple motifs can lead to autonomous dynamics or how noise in transcription and translation can affect the dynamics of a motif. Here, we review developments in synthetic biology as they pertain to increasing our understanding of cellular information processing. We highlight several types of dynamic behaviors that diverse motifs can generate, including the control of input/output responses, the generation of autonomous spatial and temporal dynamics, as well as the influence of noise in motif dynamics and cellular behavior. PMID:23411668

  8. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  9. The mitochondrial nucleoid: integrating mitochondrial DNA into cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert; Bravo, Liliana; Garcia, Iraselia; Gaytan, Norma; Herrera, Alan; Maldonado, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brandi

    2013-05-01

    The packaging of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into DNA-protein assemblies called nucleoids provides an efficient segregating unit of mtDNA, coordinating mtDNA's involvement in cellular metabolism. From the early discovery of mtDNA as "extranuclear" genetic material, its organization into nucleoids and integration into both the mitochondrial organellar network and the cell at large via a variety of signal transduction pathways, mtDNA is a crucial component of the cell's homeostatic network. The mitochondrial nucleoid is composed of a set of DNA-binding core proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance and transcription, and a range of peripheral factors, which are components of signaling pathways controlling mitochondrial biogenesis, metabolism, apoptosis, and retrograde mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling. The molecular interactions of nucleoid components with the organellar network and cellular signaling pathways provide exciting clues to the dynamic integration of mtDNA into cellular metabolic homeostasis.

  10. Genetic and functional characterization of HIV-1 Vif on APOBEC3G degradation: First report of emergence of B/C recombinants from North India

    PubMed Central

    Ronsard, Larance; Raja, Rameez; Panwar, Vaishali; Saini, Sanjesh; Mohankumar, Kumaravel; Sridharan, Subhashree; Padmapriya, Ramamoorthy; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai G; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is characterized by high genetic heterogeneity which is a challenge for developing therapeutics. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the extent of genetic variations that HIV is undergoing in North India. The objective of this study was to determine the role of genetic and functional role of Vif on APOBEC3G degradation. Vif is an accessory protein involved in counteracting APOBEC3/F proteins. Genetic analysis of Vif variants revealed that Vif C variants were closely related to South African Vif C whereas Vif B variants and Vif B/C showed distinct geographic locations. This is the first report to show the emergence of Vif B/C in our population. The functional domains, motifs and phosphorylation sites were well conserved. Vif C variants differed in APOBEC3G degradation from Vif B variants. Vif B/C revealed similar levels of APOBEC3G degradation to Vif C confirming the presence of genetic determinants in C-terminal region. High genetic diversity was observed in Vif variants which may cause the emergence of more complex and divergent strains. These results reveal the genetic determinants of Vif in mediating APOBEC3G degradation and highlight the genetic information for the development of anti-viral drugs against HIV. Importance: Vif is an accessory HIV-1 protein which plays significant role in the degradation of human DNA-editing factor APOBEC3G, thereby impeding the antiretroviral activity of APOBEC3G. It is known that certain natural polymorphisms in Vif could degrade APOBEC3G relatively higher rate, suggesting its role in HIV-1 pathogenesis. This is the first report from North India showcasing genetic variations and novel polymorphisms in Vif gene. Subtype C is prevalent in India, but for the first time we observed putative B/C recombinants with a little high ability to degrade APOBEC3G indicating adaptation and evolving nature of virus in our population. Indian Vif C variants were able to degrade APOBEC3G well in comparison to Vif B variants. These

  11. Capacity Limit, Link Scheduling and Power Control in Wireless Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Shan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid advancement of wireless technology has instigated the broad deployment of wireless networks. Different types of networks have been developed, including wireless sensor networks, mobile ad hoc networks, wireless local area networks, and cellular networks. These networks have different structures and applications, and require different…

  12. Structure at 1.6 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Simon T. M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Bitto, Eduard; Jeon, Won Bae; Phillips, George N.

    2005-01-01

    The gene product of At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana codes for a protein of unknown function. The crystal structure of the At3g22680 gene product was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined to an R factor of 16.0% (R free = 18.4%) at 1.60 Å resolution. The refined structure shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit, with one molecule of the non-denaturing detergent CHAPS {3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfon­ate} tightly bound. Protein At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformation space. PMID:16511118

  13. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  14. Spectrum survey for reliable communications of cognitive radio based smart grid network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah Aqilah, Wan; Jayavalan, Shanjeevan; Mohd Aripin, Norazizah; Mohamad, Hafizal; Ismail, Aiman

    2013-06-01

    The smart grid (SG) system is expected to involve huge amount of data with different levels of priorities to different applications or users. The traditional grid which tend to deploy propriety networks with limited coverage and bandwidth, is not sufficient to support large scale SG network. Cognitive radio (CR) is a promising communication platform for SG network by utilizing potentially all available spectrum resources, subject to interference constraint. In order to develop a reliable communication framework for CR based SG network, thorough investigations on the current radio spectrum are required. This paper presents the spectrum utilization in Malaysia, specifically in the UHF/VHF bands, cellular (GSM 900, GSM 1800 and 3G), WiMAX, ISM and LTE band. The goal is to determine the potential spectrum that can be exploit by the CR users in the SG network. Measurements was conducted for 24 hours to quantify the average spectrum usage and the amount of available bandwidth. The findings in this paper are important to provide insight of actual spectrum utilization prior to developing a reliable communication platform for CR based SG network.

  15. A study on the properties of the deposited metal by flux cored wires 40GMFR and 40H3G2MF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. I.; Kibko, N. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.; Popova, M. V.; Osetkovsky, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of chemical composition on the microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of the deposited layer of steels 40GMFR and 40H3G2MF was studied. The influence of the content of alloying elements in the examined steels on the structure of the deposited layer was defined, as well the influence of the structure of this layer on the hardness and abrasive wear. A comparative analysis of two steels was performed. Steel 40H3G2MF showed a greater efficacy for surfacing. It had higher hardness, a lower wear rate and a more fine-grained structure.

  16. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  17. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gresham, David; Lu, Charles; Caudy, Amy A; Dunham, Maitreya J; Broach, James R; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  18. Crystal structure of the protein At3g01520, a eukaryotic universal stress protein-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with AMP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Jin; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo; Phillips, George N

    2015-07-01

    Members of the universal stress protein (USP) family are conserved in a phylogenetically diverse range of prokaryotes, fungi, protists, and plants and confer abilities to respond to a wide range of environmental stresses. Arabidopsis thaliana contains 44 USP domain-containing proteins, and USP domain is found either in a small protein with unknown physiological function or in an N-terminal portion of a multi-domain protein, usually a protein kinase. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic USP-like protein encoded from the gene At3g01520. The crystal structure of the protein At3g01520 was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to an R factor of 21.8% (Rfree = 26.1%) at 2.5 Å resolution. The crystal structure includes three At3g01520 protein dimers with one AMP molecule bound to each protomer, comprising a Rossmann-like α/β overall fold. The bound AMP and conservation of residues in the ATP-binding loop suggest that the protein At3g01520 also belongs to the ATP-binding USP subfamily members.

  19. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  20. APOBEC3G Generates Nonsense Mutations in Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Proviral Genomes In Vivo ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Ma, Guangyong; Nosaka, Kisato; Tanabe, Junko; Satou, Yorifumi; Koito, Atsushi; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Matsuoka, Masao

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces cell proliferation after infection, leading to efficient transmission by cell-to-cell contact. After a long latent period, a fraction of carriers develop adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Genetic changes in the tax gene in ATL cells were reported in about 10% of ATL cases. To determine genetic changes that may occur throughout the provirus, we determined the entire sequence of the HTLV-1 provirus in 60 ATL cases. Abortive genetic changes, including deletions, insertions, and nonsense mutations, were frequent in all viral genes except the HBZ gene, which is transcribed from the minus strand of the virus. G-to-A base substitutions were the most frequent mutations in ATL cells. The sequence context of G-to-A mutations was in accordance with the preferred target sequence of human APOBEC3G (hA3G). The target sequences of hA3G were less frequent in the plus strand of the HBZ coding region than in other coding regions of the HTLV-1 provirus. Nonsense mutations in viral genes including tax were also observed in proviruses from asymptomatic carriers, indicating that these mutations were generated during reverse transcription and prior to oncogenesis. The fact that hA3G targets the minus strand during reverse transcription explains why the HBZ gene is not susceptible to such nonsense mutations. HTLV-1-infected cells likely take advantage of hA3G to escape from the host immune system by losing expression of viral proteins. PMID:20463074

  1. OTRA-THS MAC to reduce Power Outage Data Collection Latency in a smart meter network

    SciTech Connect

    Garlapati, Shravan K; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Buehrer, Richard M; Reed, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of advanced metering infrastructure by the electric utilities poses unique communication challenges, particularly as the number of meters per aggregator increases. During a power outage, a smart meter tries to report it instantaneously to the electric utility. In a densely populated residential/industrial locality, it is possible that a large number of smart meters simultaneously try to get access to the communication network to report the power outage. If the number of smart meters is very high of the order of tens of thousands (metropolitan areas), the power outage data flooding can lead to Random Access CHannel (RACH) congestion. Several utilities are considering the use of cellular network for smart meter communications. In 3G/4G cellular networks, RACH congestion not only leads to collisions, retransmissions and increased RACH delays, but also has the potential to disrupt the dedicated traffic flow by increasing the interference levels (3G CDMA). In order to overcome this problem, in this paper we propose a Time Hierarchical Scheme (THS) that reduces the intensity of power outage data flooding and power outage reporting delay by 6/7th, and 17/18th when compared to their respective values without THS. Also, we propose an Optimum Transmission Rate Adaptive (OTRA) MAC to optimize the latency in power outage data collection. The analysis and simulation results presented in this paper show that both the OTRA and THS features of the proposed MAC results in a Power Outage Data Collection Latency (PODCL) that is 1/10th of the 4G LTE PODCL.

  2. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  3. Molecular and cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2006-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion, and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins, and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  4. Molecular and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  5. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  6. Cellular energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, M.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on adenylate kinase which is an important enzyme in determining the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. An efficient method has been developed to clone mutant adenylate kinase genes in E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of the wild type gene also has been used to obtain forms of adenylate kinase with altered amino acids. The wild type and mutant forms of adenylate kinase have been overexpressed and large quantities were readily isolated. The kinetic and fluorescence properties of the different forms of adenylate kinase were characterized. This has led to a new model for the location of the AMP and ATP bindings sites on the enzyme and a proposal for the mechanism of substrate inhibition. Crystals of the wild type enzyme were obtained that diffract to at least 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Experiments were also initiated to determine the function of adenylate kinase in vivo. In one set of experiments, E. coli strains with mutations in adenylate kinase showed large changes in cellular nucleotides after reaching the stationary phase in a low phosphate medium. This was caused by selective proteolytic degradation of the mutant adenylate kinase caused by phosphate starvation.

  7. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  8. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  9. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  10. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  11. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  12. Physics of Cellular Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, Erich; Keber, Felix; Heinrich, Doris

    2010-04-01

    The survival of cells depends on perpetual active motions, including (a) bending excitations of the soft cell envelopes, (b) the bidirectional transport of materials and organelles between the cell center and the periphery, and (c) the ongoing restructuring of the intracellular macromolecular scaffolds mediating global cell changes associated with cell adhesion locomotion and phagocytosis. Central questions addressed are the following: How can this bustling motion of extremely complex soft structures be characterized and measured? What are the major driving forces? Further topics include (a) the active dynamic control of global shape changes by the interactive coupling of the aster-like soft scaffold of microtubules and the network of actin filaments associated with the cell envelope (the actin cortex) and (b) the generation of propulsion forces by solitary actin gelation waves propagating within the actin cortex.

  13. Elements of the cellular metabolic structure

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, which are able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by specific input stimuli. Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in covalent post-translational modulation, so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. The metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes), as well as the enzymatic covalent modifications of specific molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell. PMID:25988183

  14. Cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponka, P

    1999-03-01

    Iron is essential for oxidation-reduction catalysis and bioenergetics, but unless appropriately shielded, iron plays a key role in the formation of toxic oxygen radicals that can attack all biological molecules. Hence, specialized molecules for the acquisition, transport (transferrin), and storage (ferritin) of iron in a soluble nontoxic form have evolved. Delivery of iron to most cells, probably including those of the kidney, occurs following the binding of transferrin to transferrin receptors on the cell membrane. The transferrin-receptor complexes are then internalized by endocytosis, and iron is released from transferrin by a process involving endosomal acidification. Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). Under conditions of limited iron supply, IRP binding to iron-responsive elements (present in 5' untranslated region of ferritin mRNA and 3' untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA) blocks ferritin mRNA translation and stabilizes transferrin receptor mRNA. The opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. Moreover, IRP activities/levels can be affected by various forms of "oxidative stress" and nitric oxide. The kidney also requires iron for metabolic processes, and it is likely that iron deficiency or excess can cause disturbed function of kidney cells. Transferrin receptors are not evenly distributed throughout the kidney, and there is a cortical-to-medullary gradient in heme biosynthesis, with greatest activity in the cortex and least in the medulla. This suggests that there are unique iron/heme metabolism features in some kidney cells, but the specific aspects of iron and heme metabolism in the kidney are yet to be explained.

  15. Primary intranodal cellular angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Hes, Ondrej; Hora, Milan; Sima, Radek; Michal, Michal

    2005-01-01

    Angiolipoma is a distinct, benign soft tissue tumor that most commonly occurs in young males as multiple small, subcutaneous, tender to painful nodules with predilection for the forearms. We report a case of angiolipoma that developed within a lymph node. The patient was a 67-year-old man who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy with diagnostic pelvic lymphadenectomy because of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The prostate and 3 lymph nodes located in the obturator fossa were removed. On gross examination, the cut surface of 1 of the lymph nodes revealed an 8 x 5 mm, ovoid, sharply demarcated, nonencapsulated, gray lesion being suspicious for adenocarcinoma metastasis. Microscopically, the major portion of the lymph node was replaced by mature metaplastic adipose tissue. The angiolipoma was seen as a well-demarcated, nonencapsulated lesion composed of numerous small blood vessels lined by monomorphous flattened or spindled endothelial cells. Many vascular lumina were filled with fibrin thrombi. There were scanty mature adipocytes. Focally, areas with increased cellularity and a suggestion of solid growth of the endothelial cells were seen. Lymph nodes are known to be a rare primary site of various tumors usually occurring in other organs. The knowledge of these tumors is important in order not to interpret them as metastatic lesions. The most recognized examples are pigmented nevi, palisading myofibroblastoma, various benign epithelial inclusions, serous cystic tumors of borderline malignancy, and hyperplastic mesothelial inclusions. As we present in this report, angiolipoma is another neoplasm whose primary occurrence in the lymph node should not be misinterpreted as a metastatic tumor or malignant vascular tumor.

  16. Small but sturdy: small RNAs in cellular memory and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Stuwe, Evelyn; Tóth, Katalin Fejes; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in multicellular organisms have distinct identities characterized by their profiles of expressed genes. Cell identities can be stable over a long time and through multiple cellular divisions but are also responsive to extracellular signals. Since the DNA sequence is identical in all cells, a “cellular memory” of expression profiles is achieved by what are defined as epigenetic mechanisms. Two major molecular principles—networks of transcription factors and maintenance of cis-chromatin modifications—have been implicated in maintaining cellular memory. Here we describe recent studies demonstrating that short noncoding RNAs can also provide molecular signals that define epigenetic states of cells. Small RNAs can act independently or cooperate with chromatin modifications to achieve long-lasting effects necessary for cellular memory and transgenerational inheritance. PMID:24589774

  17. Taming the sphinx: Mechanisms of cellular sphingolipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Olson, D K; Fröhlich, F; Farese, R V; Walther, T C

    2016-08-01

    Sphingolipids are important structural membrane components of eukaryotic cells, and potent signaling molecules. As such, their levels must be maintained to optimize cellular functions in different cellular membranes. Here, we review the current knowledge of homeostatic sphingolipid regulation. We describe recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have provided insights into how cells sense changes in sphingolipid levels in the plasma membrane and acutely regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis by altering signaling pathways. We also discuss how cellular trafficking has emerged as an important determinant of sphingolipid homeostasis. Finally, we highlight areas where work is still needed to elucidate the mechanisms of sphingolipid regulation and the physiological functions of such regulatory networks, especially in mammalian cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26747648

  18. Cellular noise and information transmission.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Andre; Nemenman, Ilya

    2014-08-01

    The technological revolution in biological research, and in particular the use of molecular fluorescent labels, has allowed investigation of heterogeneity of cellular responses to stimuli on the single cell level. Computational, theoretical, and synthetic biology advances have allowed predicting and manipulating this heterogeneity with an exquisite precision previously reserved only for physical sciences. Functionally, this cell-to-cell variability can compromise cellular responses to environmental signals, and it can also enlarge the repertoire of possible cellular responses and hence increase the adaptive nature of cellular behaviors. And yet quantification of the functional importance of this response heterogeneity remained elusive. Recently the mathematical language of information theory has been proposed to address this problem. This opinion reviews the recent advances and discusses the broader implications of using information-theoretic tools to characterize heterogeneity of cellular behaviors.

  19. Solution structure of At3g04780.1-des15, an Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the C-terminal domain of human thioredoxin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Tyler, Robert C; Wrobel, Russell L; Frederick, Ronnie O; Vojtek, Frank C; Jeon, Won Bae; Lee, Min S; Markley, John L

    2005-04-01

    The structure of At3g04780.1-des15, an Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the C-terminal domain of human thioredoxin-like protein, was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure is dominated by a beta-barrel sandwich. A two-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet, which seals off one end of the beta-barrel, is flanked by two flexible loops rich in acidic amino acids. Although this fold often provides a ligand binding site, the structure did not reveal an appreciable cavity inside the beta-barrel. The three-dimensional structure of At3g04780.1-des15 provides an entry point for understanding its functional role and those of its mammalian homologs.

  20. Opsonin-independent ligation of Fc gamma receptors. The 3G8-bearing receptors on neutrophils mediate the phagocytosis of concanavalin A- treated erythrocytes and nonopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We report that phagocytosis by human neutrophils of Con A-treated erythrocytes (E-Con A) and nonopsonized Escherichia coli with mannose- binding adhesions is mediated by the Fc gamma receptor bearing the 3G8 epitope. Modulation of Fc receptors by pretreating with aggregated-IgG or with 3G8 anti-Fc gamma receptor mAb markedly inhibited internalization of E-Con A and E. coli without altering their cell surface attachment. Phagocytosis of these probes was specifically blocked by alpha-methylmannoside and D-mannose and not by other monosaccharides. Thus, recognition of E-Con A and E. coli by the Fc receptor is dependent upon the mannose-specific interaction with lectin or lectin-like adhesions. These data demonstrate that ligands other than the classical IgG opsonins can bind to classical immune receptors for IgG through lectin-carbohydrate interactions. PMID:2445895

  1. Comparison of Analysis Results Between 2D/1D Synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G in the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung Lim, Mi; Maeng, Young Jae; Fero, Arnold H.; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2016-02-01

    The 2D/1D synthesis methodology has been used to calculate the fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV) exposure to the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel. This method uses the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinates code and the BUGLE-96 cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI. RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation-Multiple 3D Geometries) which performs full 3D calculations was developed and is based on domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architecture. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor. Both methods are applied to surveillance test results for the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)-OPR (Optimized Power Reactor) 1000 MW. The objective of this paper is to compare the results of the KSNP surveillance program between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G. Each operating KSNP has a reactor vessel surveillance program consisting of six surveillance capsules located between the core and the reactor vessel in the downcomer region near the reactor vessel wall. In addition to the In-Vessel surveillance program, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry (EVND) program has been implemented. In order to estimate surveillance test results, cycle-specific forward transport calculations were performed by 2D/1D synthesis and by RAPTOR-M3G. The ratio between measured and calculated (M/C) reaction rates will be discussed. The current plan is to install an EVND system in all of the Korea PWRs including the new reactor type, APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400 MW. This work will play an important role in establishing a KSNP-specific database of surveillance test results and will employ RAPTOR-M3G for surveillance dosimetry location as well as positions in the KSNP reactor vessel.

  2. Strategy for tactical cellular connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Frederick R.

    2011-06-01

    This paper proposes a strategy to unify four disparate networks under an Internet Protocol (IP) umbrella. The first network is the Army Warfighter Information Network - Tactical (WIN-T) area common user system. The second network is an extension to the area common user system using the Mobile Ad Hoc Interoperability Networking Gateway (MAINGATE) system. The third network is the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMax) based wireless access network and the forth network is the 802.11 WiFi Network. It is the intent of this paper to propose a skeletal wireless strategy that at its core will create everything over IP (EoIP) and "Everything over IEEE" ("EoIEEE") standards at the tactical level of the battlefield.

  3. Rationale for the development of IMC-3G3, a fully human immunoglobulin G subclass 1 monoclonal antibody targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gaurav D; Loizos, Nick; Youssoufian, Hagop; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2010-02-15

    A large body of evidence suggests that the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family and associated receptors are potential targets in oncology therapeutic development because of their critical roles in the proliferation and survival of various cancers and in the regulation and growth of the tumor stroma and blood vessels. Several small molecules that nonspecifically target the PDGF signaling axis are in current use or development as anticancer therapies. However, for the majority of these agents, PDGF and its receptors are neither the primary targets nor the principal mediators of anticancer activity. IMC-3G3, a fully human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1, specifically binds to the human PDGF receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha) with high affinity and blocks PDGF ligand binding and PDGFRalpha activation. The results of preclinical studies and the frequent expression of PDGFRalpha in many types of cancer and in cancer-associated stroma support a rationale for the clinical development of IMC-3G3. Currently, IMC-3G3 is being evaluated in early clinical development for patients with several types of solid malignancies.

  4. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process. PMID:27111087

  5. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process.

  6. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L.; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H.; Püschel, Andreas W.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process. PMID:27111087

  7. Incomplete APOBEC3G/F Neutralization by HIV-1 Vif Mutants Facilitates the Genetic Evolution from CCR5 to CXCR4 Usage

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Claudia; Surdo, Matteo; Bellocchi, Maria Concetta; Saccomandi, Patrizia; Continenza, Fabio; Armenia, Daniele; Parrotta, Lucia; Carioti, Luca; Costa, Giosuè; Fourati, Slim; Di Santo, Fabiola; Scutari, Rossana; Barbaliscia, Silvia; Fedele, Valentina; Carta, Stefania; Balestra, Emanuela; Alcaro, Stefano; Marcelin, Anne Genevieve; Calvez, Vincent; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Artese, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete APOBEC3G/F neutralization by a defective HIV-1Vif protein can promote genetic diversification by inducing G-to-A mutations in the HIV-1 genome. The HIV-1 Env V3 loop, critical for coreceptor usage, contains several putative APOBEC3G/F target sites. Here, we determined if APOBEC3G/F, in the presence of Vif-defective HIV-1 virus, can induce G-to-A mutations at V3 positions critical to modulation of CXCR4 usage. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from 2 HIV-1-negative donors were infected with CCR5-using 81.A-VifWT virus (i.e., with wild-type [WT] Vif protein), 81.A-VifE45G, or 81.A-VifK22E (known to incompletely/partially neutralize APOBEC3G/F). The rate of G-toA mutations was zero or extremely low in 81.A-VifWT- and 81.A-VifE45G-infected PBMC from both donors. Conversely, G-to-A enrichment was detected in 81.A-VifK22E-infected PBMC (prevalence ranging from 2.18% at 7 days postinfection [dpi] to 3.07% at 21 dpi in donor 1 and from 10.49% at 7 dpi to 8.69% at 21 dpi in donor 2). A similar scenario was found in MDM. G-to-A mutations occurred at 8 V3 positions, resulting in nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions. Of them, G24E and E25K strongly correlated with phenotypically/genotypically defined CXCR4-using viruses (P = 0.04 and 5.5e−7, respectively) and increased the CXCR4 N-terminal binding affinity for V3 (WT, −40.1 kcal/mol; G24E, −510 kcal/mol; E25K, −522 kcal/mol). The analysis of paired V3 and Vif DNA sequences from 84 HIV-1-infected patients showed that the presence of a Vif-defective virus correlated with CXCR4 usage in proviral DNA (P = 0.04). In conclusion, incomplete APOBEC3G/F neutralization by a single Vif amino acid substitution seeds a CXCR4-using proviral reservoir. This can have implications for the success of CCR5 antagonist-based therapy, as well as for the risk of disease progression. PMID:26055363

  8. Incomplete APOBEC3G/F Neutralization by HIV-1 Vif Mutants Facilitates the Genetic Evolution from CCR5 to CXCR4 Usage.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Claudia; Surdo, Matteo; Bellocchi, Maria Concetta; Saccomandi, Patrizia; Continenza, Fabio; Armenia, Daniele; Parrotta, Lucia; Carioti, Luca; Costa, Giosuè; Fourati, Slim; Di Santo, Fabiola; Scutari, Rossana; Barbaliscia, Silvia; Fedele, Valentina; Carta, Stefania; Balestra, Emanuela; Alcaro, Stefano; Marcelin, Anne Genevieve; Calvez, Vincent; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Artese, Anna; Perno, Carlo Federico; Svicher, Valentina

    2015-08-01

    Incomplete APOBEC3G/F neutralization by a defective HIV-1Vif protein can promote genetic diversification by inducing G-to-A mutations in the HIV-1 genome. The HIV-1 Env V3 loop, critical for coreceptor usage, contains several putative APOBEC3G/F target sites. Here, we determined if APOBEC3G/F, in the presence of Vif-defective HIV-1 virus, can induce G-to-A mutations at V3 positions critical to modulation of CXCR4 usage. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from 2 HIV-1-negative donors were infected with CCR5-using 81.A-VifWT virus (i.e., with wild-type [WT] Vif protein), 81.A-VifE45G, or 81.A-VifK22E (known to incompletely/partially neutralize APOBEC3G/F). The rate of G-toA mutations was zero or extremely low in 81.A-VifWT- and 81.A-VifE45G-infected PBMC from both donors. Conversely, G-to-A enrichment was detected in 81.A-VifK22E-infected PBMC (prevalence ranging from 2.18% at 7 days postinfection [dpi] to 3.07% at 21 dpi in donor 1 and from 10.49% at 7 dpi to 8.69% at 21 dpi in donor 2). A similar scenario was found in MDM. G-to-A mutations occurred at 8 V3 positions, resulting in nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions. Of them, G24E and E25K strongly correlated with phenotypically/genotypically defined CXCR4-using viruses (P = 0.04 and 5.5e-7, respectively) and increased the CXCR4 N-terminal binding affinity for V3 (WT, -40.1 kcal/mol; G24E, -510 kcal/mol; E25K, -522 kcal/mol). The analysis of paired V3 and Vif DNA sequences from 84 HIV-1-infected patients showed that the presence of a Vif-defective virus correlated with CXCR4 usage in proviral DNA (P = 0.04). In conclusion, incomplete APOBEC3G/F neutralization by a single Vif amino acid substitution seeds a CXCR4-using proviral reservoir. This can have implications for the success of CCR5 antagonist-based therapy, as well as for the risk of disease progression.

  9. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  10. Dominating Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Milenković, Tijana; Memišević, Vesna; Bonato, Anthony; Pržulj, Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of “biologically central (BC)” genes (i.e., their protein products), such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network. To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC) role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs) in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its “spine” that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks. PMID:21887225

  11. D1((2)B2g) to D0((2)Au) Fluorescence from the Matrix-Isolated Perylene Cation Following Laser Excitation into the D5(2)B3g) and D2 ((2)B3g) Electronic States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chillier, Xavier D. F.; Stone, Bradley M.; Joblin, Christine; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra of the perylene cation, pumped by direct laser excitation via the D(sub 2)((2)B(sub 3g)) (left arrow) D(sub 0)((2)A(sub u)) and D(sub 5)(2)B(sub 3g)) (left arrow) D(sub 0)((2)A(sub u)) transitions, are presented. Direct excitation into the D5 or D2 states is followed by rapid non-radiative relaxation to D1 that, in turn,relaxes radiatively. Excitation spectroscopy across the D(sub 2)((2)B(sub 3g)) (left arrow) D(sub 0)((2)A(sub u)) transition near 730 nm shows that site splitting plays little or no role in determining the spectral substructure in the ion spectra. Tentative assignments for ground state vibrational frequencies are made by comparison of spectral intervals with calculated normal mode frequencies.

  12. D1(2B2g)→D0(2Au) fluorescence from the matrix-isolated perylene cation following laser excitation into the D5(2B3g) and D2(2B3g) electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillier, Xavier D. F.; Stone, Bradley M.; Joblin, Christine; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2002-04-01

    Fluorescence spectra of the perylene cation, isolated in an argon matrix and pumped by direct laser excitation via the D2(2B3g)←D0(2Au) and D5(2B3g)←D0(2Au) transitions, are presented. Direct excitation into the D5 or D2 states is followed by rapid nonradiative relaxation to D1 that, in turn, relaxes radiatively. Excitation spectroscopy across the D2(2B3g)←D0(2Au) transition near 731 nm shows that site splitting plays little or no role in determining the spectral substructure in the ion spectra. Tentative assignments for ground state vibrational frequencies are made by a comparison of spectral intervals with calculated normal mode frequencies, with the strongest IR bands leading to the most intense vibronic bands.

  13. A Course in Cellular Bioengineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    Gives an overview of a course in chemical engineering entitled "Cellular Bioengineering," dealing with how chemical engineering principles can be applied to molecular cell biology. Topics used are listed and some key references are discussed. Listed are 85 references. (YP)

  14. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors sh...

  15. Computational classification of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutner, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    We discuss attempts at the classification of cellular automata, in particular with a view towards decidability. We will see that a large variety of properties relating to the short-term evolution of configurations are decidable in principle, but questions relating to the long-term evolution are typically undecidable. Even in the decidable case, computational hardness poses a major obstacle for the automatic analysis of cellular automata.

  16. Cellular receptors and HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Tscherne, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    After attachment to specific receptors on the surfaces of target cells, hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles are thought to be internalized to endosomes, where low pH induces fusion between the viral and cellular membranes, delivering the HCV genome into the cytoplasm. Here, we describe methods to study the early events in HCV infection; the interactions with cellular receptors and the mechanism of entry.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research. PMID:27557541

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  19. Origin of cells and network information.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-04-26

    All cells are derived from one cell, and the origin of different cell types is a subject of curiosity. Cells construct life through appropriately timed networks at each stage of development. Communication among cells and intracellular signaling are essential for cell differentiation and for life processes. Cellular molecular networks establish cell diversity and life. The investigation of the regulation of each gene in the genome within the cellular network is therefore of interest. Stem cells produce various cells that are suitable for specific purposes. The dynamics of the information in the cellular network changes as the status of cells is altered. The components of each cell are subject to investigation.

  20. Origin of cells and network information

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    All cells are derived from one cell, and the origin of different cell types is a subject of curiosity. Cells construct life through appropriately timed networks at each stage of development. Communication among cells and intracellular signaling are essential for cell differentiation and for life processes. Cellular molecular networks establish cell diversity and life. The investigation of the regulation of each gene in the genome within the cellular network is therefore of interest. Stem cells produce various cells that are suitable for specific purposes. The dynamics of the information in the cellular network changes as the status of cells is altered. The components of each cell are subject to investigation. PMID:25914760

  1. No effects of a single 3G UMTS mobile phone exposure on spontaneous EEG activity, ERP correlates, and automatic deviance detection.

    PubMed

    Trunk, Attila; Stefanics, Gábor; Zentai, Norbert; Kovács-Bálint, Zsófia; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2013-01-01

    Potential effects of a 30 min exposure to third generation (3G) Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) mobile phone-like electromagnetic fields (EMFs) were investigated on human brain electrical activity in two experiments. In the first experiment, spontaneous electroencephalography (sEEG) was analyzed (n = 17); in the second experiment, auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) and automatic deviance detection processes reflected by mismatch negativity (MMN) were investigated in a passive oddball paradigm (n = 26). Both sEEG and ERP experiments followed a double-blind protocol where subjects were exposed to either genuine or sham irradiation in two separate sessions. In both experiments, electroencephalograms (EEG) were recorded at midline electrode sites before and after exposure while subjects were watching a silent documentary. Spectral power of sEEG data was analyzed in the delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. In the ERP experiment, subjects were presented with a random series of standard (90%) and frequency-deviant (10%) tones in a passive binaural oddball paradigm. The amplitude and latency of the P50, N100, P200, MMN, and P3a components were analyzed. We found no measurable effects of a 30 min 3G mobile phone irradiation on the EEG spectral power in any frequency band studied. Also, we found no significant effects of EMF irradiation on the amplitude and latency of any of the ERP components. In summary, the present results do not support the notion that a 30 min unilateral 3G EMF exposure interferes with human sEEG activity, auditory evoked potentials or automatic deviance detection indexed by MMN.

  2. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G{sub 0} conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-21

    Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, two additional features at ∼0.4 G{sub 0} and ∼1.3 G{sub 0} have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions. In order to understand such feature, here we investigate the electronic transport and mechanical properties of clean and oxygen-doped silver atomic contacts by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, unlike clean Ag single-atom contacts showing a conductance of 1 G{sub 0}, the low-bias conductance of oxygen-doped Ag atomic contacts depends on the number of oxygen impurities and their binding configuration. When one oxygen atom binds to an Ag monatomic chain sandwiched between two Ag electrodes, the low-bias conductance of the junction always decreases. In contrast, when the number of oxygen impurities is two and the O-O axis is perpendicular to the Ag-Ag axis, the transmission coefficients at the Fermi level are, respectively, calculated to be 1.44 for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes and 1.24 for that with Ag(100) electrodes, both in good agreement with the measured value of ∼1.3 G{sub 0}. The calculated rupture force (1.60 nN for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes) is also consistent with the experimental value (1.66 ± 0.09 nN), confirming that the measured ∼1.3 G{sub 0} conductance should originate from Ag single-atom contacts doped with two oxygen atoms in a perpendicular configuration.

  3. H3.3 G34R mutations in pediatric primitive neuroectodermal tumors of central nervous system (CNS-PNET) and pediatric glioblastomas: possible diagnostic and therapeutic implications?

    PubMed

    Gessi, Marco; Gielen, Gerrit H; Hammes, Jennifer; Dörner, Evelyn; Mühlen, Anja Zur; Waha, Andreas; Pietsch, Torsten

    2013-03-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas recently have been exon sequenced with evidence that approximately 30 % of cases harbour mutations of the histone H3.3 gene. Although studies to determinate their role in risk stratification are on-going, it remains to be determined whether H3.3 mutations could be found in other tumors such as pediatric primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) and whether the presence of H3.3 mutations in glioblastomas could be used as diagnostic tool in their differential diagnosis with CNS-PNETs. We performed a large mutational pyrosequencing-based screening on 123 pediatric glioblastomas and 33 CNS-PNET. The analysis revealed that 39/123 (31.7 %) glioblastomas carry H3.3 mutations. The K27M (AAG → ATG, lysine → methionine) mutation was found in 33 glioblastomas (26 %); the G34R (GGG → AGG, glycine → arginine) was observed in 6 glioblastomas (5.5 %). However, we also identified 4 of 33 cases (11 %) of CNS-PNETs harbouring a H3.3 G34R mutation. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis revealed PDGFR-alpha amplification and EGFR gain in two cases and N-Myc amplification in one case of H3.3 G34R mutated CNS-PNET. None of H3.3 mutated tumors presented a CDKN2A loss. In conclusion, because pediatric patients with glioblastoma and CNS-PNET are treated according to different therapeutic protocols, these findings may raise further concerns about the reliability of the histological diagnosis in the case of an undifferentiated brain tumor harbouring G34R H3.3 mutation. In this view, additional studies are needed to determine whether H3.3 G34 mutated CNS-PNET/glioblastomas may represent a defined tumor subtype. PMID:23354654

  4. Incentive Mechanism for P2P Content Sharing over Heterogenous Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenichiro; Hashimoto, Ryo; Yoshino, Makoto; Shinkuma, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Tatsuro

    In peer-to-peer (P2P) content sharing, users can share their content by contributing their own resources to one another. However, since there is no incentive for contributing contents or resources to others, users may attempt to obtain content without any contribution. To motivate users to contribute their resources to the service, incentive-rewarding mechanisms have been proposed. On the other hand, emerging wireless technologies, such as IEEE 802.11 wireless local area networks, beyond third generation (B3G) cellular networks and mobile WiMAX, provide high-speed Internet access for wireless users. Using these high-speed wireless access, wireless users can use P2P services and share their content with other wireless users and with fixed users. However, this diversification of access networks makes it difficult to appropriately assign rewards to each user according to their contributions. This is because the cost necessary for contribution is different in different access networks. In this paper, we propose a novel incentive-rewarding mechanism called EMOTIVER that can assign rewards to users appropriately. The proposed mechanism uses an external evaluator and interactive learning agents. We also investigate a way of appropriately controlling rewards based on the system service's quality and managing policy.

  5. Biomimetic superelastic graphene-based cellular monoliths.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Liu, Jeffery Z; Chang, Shery L Y; Wu, Yanzhe; Li, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Many applications proposed for graphene require multiple sheets be assembled into a monolithic structure. The ability to maintain structural integrity upon large deformation is essential to ensure a macroscopic material which functions reliably. However, it has remained a great challenge to achieve high elasticity in three-dimensional graphene networks. Here we report that the marriage of graphene chemistry with ice physics can lead to the formation of ultralight and superelastic graphene-based cellular monoliths. Mimicking the hierarchical structure of natural cork, the resulting materials can sustain their structural integrity under a load of >50,000 times their own weight and can rapidly recover from >80% compression. The unique biomimetic hierarchical structure also provides this new class of elastomers with exceptionally high energy absorption capability and good electrical conductivity. The successful synthesis of such fascinating materials paves the way to explore the application of graphene in a self-supporting, structurally adaptive and 3D macroscopic form. PMID:23212370

  6. Analytical Solution of Traffic Cellular Automata Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Hung

    2009-08-01

    Complex traffic system seems to be simulated successfully by cellular automaton (CA) models. Various models are developed to understand single-lane traffic, multilane traffic, lane-changing behavior and network traffic situations. However, the result of CA simulation can only be obtained after massive microscopic computation. Although, the mean field theory (MFT) has been studied to be the approximation of CA model, the MFT can only applied to the simple CA rules or small value of parameters. In this study, we simulate traffic flow by the NaSch model under different co