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Sample records for 3h-cyclic amp accumulation

  1. Characterization of histamine receptors coupled to /sup 3/H-cyclic AMP accumulation in a vesicular preparation of Guinea pig cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    The histamine-stimulated accumulation of /sup 3/H-cyclic AMP (formed by prelabeling with /sup 3/H-adenine) was characterized pharmacologically in a vesicular preparation of guinea pig cortex to identify the receptors mediating this response. Systematic variation of the preincubation time, vessel size, buffer composition, and /sup 3/H-adenine labeling time significantly influenced both the basal and histamine-stimulated /sup 3/H-cyclic AMP levels, and showed that individual prelabeling of aliquots in Kreb's-Ringer bicarbonate (15 mM) buffer yielded the most reproducible histamine responses. Characterization of this histamine response showed that the H/sub 2/-antagonist cimetidine maximally blocked 80% of the response, whereas only 45% of the response could be inhibited by H/sub 1/-antagonists. These findings show that both H/sub 1/- and H/sub 2/-receptors mediate the response, but 25% of the response may require concomitant activation of both receptors. A metactoid model was developed to account for the H/sub 2/-, H/sub 1/-, and adenosine components of the histamine response. The model hypothesizes that 55% of the response is due to direct H/sub 2/-receptor stimulation, 25% is dependent on the metactoid sensitization of the H/sub 2/-response by H/sub 1/-receptors, and 20% is due to an analogous sensitization of adenosine responses by H/sub 1/-receptors. These findings resolve previous controversies regarding the identity of the receptors mediating histamine-stimulated accumulation of cyclic AMP in brain. Furthermore, the vesicular preparation and metactoid model developed presently may be of benefit in other studies of neurotransmitter control of cyclic AMP dynamics.

  2. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B

  3. Phorbol esters modulate cyclic AMP accumulation in porcine thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, T.; Kasai, K.; Hiraiwa, M.; Shimoda, S.

    1988-01-01

    In cultured porcine thyroid cells, during 60 min incubation phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) had no effect on basal cyclic AMP accumulation and slightly stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or forskolin. Cholera toxin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was significantly stimulated by PMA. On the other hand, cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by prostaglandin E/sub 1/ or E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/) was markedly depressed by simultaneous addition of PMA. These opposing effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by PGE and cholera toxin were observed in a dose-related fashion, with half-maximal effect of around 10/sup -9/ M in either case. The almost same effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation in basal and stimulated conditions were also observed in freshly prepared thyroid cells. The present study was performed in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-iso-butyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), indicating that PMA affected adenylate cyclase activity. Therefore, it is suggested that PMA may modulate the production of cyclic AMP in response to different stimuli, possibly by affecting several sites in the adenylate cyclase complex in thyroid cells.

  4. Enhanced cAMP accumulation by a phorbol ester in cerebral cortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, J.F.; Davis, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) was found to be selective in its ability to alter cAMP accumulations in cultured rat cerebral cortical cells. Basal levels of cAMP in cultured neuronal and nonneuronal cells preincubated in the absence or presence of PMA were 14 pmol/mg protein and 16 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Adenosine increased cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. cAMP accumulation in response to low concentrations of adenosine was not significantly altered by pretreatment with PMA but marked potentiation of adenosine elicited accumulations was observed at 10 and 100 ..mu..M adenosine. Longer preincubation with PMA resulted in a decreased ability of PMA to enhance adenosine elicited accumulations of cAMP. PMA did not significantly alter cAMP accumulation by forskolin (FOR) and enhanced norepinephrine stimulated cAMP by only 2-fold. For similarly potentiated adenosine/sub 2/ (A/sub 2/)- receptor elicited accumulation of cAMP which could be further enhanced by PMA. These results suggest that the effects of the phorbol ester are more specific for potentiating adenosine stimulated cAMP accumulation and may occur as a result of a more efficient coupling between the A/sub 2/-receptor, N-protein and adenylate cyclase.

  5. Second Messenger Signaling in Bacillus subtilis: Accumulation of Cyclic di-AMP Inhibits Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gundlach, Jan; Rath, Hermann; Herzberg, Christina; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis produces the essential second messenger signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP. In B. subtilis and other bacteria, c-di-AMP has been implicated in diverse functions such as control of metabolism, cell division and cell wall synthesis, and potassium transport. To enhance our understanding of the multiple functions of this second messenger, we have studied the consequences of c-di-AMP accumulation at a global level by a transcriptome analysis. C-di-AMP accumulation affected the expression of about 700 genes, among them the two major operons required for biofilm formation. The expression of both operons was severely reduced both in the laboratory and a non-domesticated strain upon accumulation of c-di-AMP. In excellent agreement, the corresponding strain was unable to form complex colonies. In B. subtilis, the transcription factor SinR controls the expression of biofilm genes by binding to their promoter regions resulting in transcription repression. Inactivation of the sinR gene restored biofilm formation even at high intracellular c-di-AMP concentrations suggesting that the second messenger acts upstream of SinR in the signal transduction pathway. As c-di-AMP accumulation did not affect the intracellular levels of SinR, we conclude that the nucleotide affects the activity of SinR. PMID:27252699

  6. Cannabinoid receptor-regulated cyclic AMP accumulation in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Bidaut-Russell, M; Howlett, A C

    1991-11-01

    The present study demonstrates that desacetyllevonantradol, a synthetic cannabinoid analog, reduces cyclic AMP levels in rat striatal slices stimulated with vasoactive intestinal peptide or SKF 38393, a D1-dopamine agonist. Desacetyllevonantradol and the D2 agonist LY 171555 both inhibited D1-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in the striatum. Spiperone, a specific D2-dopamine antagonist, fully reversed the inhibitory effect of LY 171555 but not that of desacetyllevonantradol, indicating that this cannabinoid response is not occurring through a D2-dopaminergic mechanism. Morphine also inhibited cyclic AMP accumulation in striatal slices stimulated with either SKF 38393 or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Naloxone, an opioid antagonist, fully reversed the effect of morphine but not that of desacetyllevonantradol, indicating that cannabinoid drugs are not acting via a mechanism involving opioid receptors. The response to maximally effective concentrations of desacetyllevonantradol was not additive to that of maximally effective concentrations of either morphine or LY 171555, suggesting that dopaminergic, opioid, and cannabinoid receptors may be present on the same populations of cells.

  7. Stimulation of T-cells with OKT3 antibodies increases forskolin binding and cyclic AMP accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kvanta, A; Gerwins, P; Jondal, M; Fredholm, B B

    1990-01-01

    It has recently been shown that elevation of cAMP by adenosine receptor stimulation may be potentiated by stimulation of the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex on human T-cells with the monoclonal antibody OKT3, and that this is mimicked by activation of protein kinase C [Kvanta, A. et al. (1989) Naunyn-Schmeideberg's Arch. Pharmac. 340, 715-717]. In this study the diterpene forskolin, which binds to and activates the adenylate cyclase, has been used to examine further how the CD3 complex may influence the adenylate cyclase pathway. Stimulation with OKT3 alone was found to cause a small dose-dependent increase in basal cAMP accumulation. When combining OKT3 with a concentration of forskolin (10 microM), which by itself had little effect on the cyclase activity, the cAMP accumulation was markedly potentiated. This potentiation was paralleled by an increase in [3H]forskolin binding to saponine permeabilized Jurkat cells from 24 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells. The OKT3 effect on cAMP was blocked by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA or intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA and also by W-7, an inhibitor of calmodulin, but was unaffected by H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C. Even though OKT3 caused an increase in inositolphosphate turnover, and activated protein kinase C, neither phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (PDBu) nor the Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187 could mimic the OKT3 effect, whereas a combination of PDBu and A23187 at high concentrations could potentiate forskolin stimulated cyclase activity. Together, these results indicated that stimulation of the CD3 complex could influence the adenylate cyclase by two different mechanisms, one involving activation of protein kinase C and another which does not.

  8. Accumulation of cAMP augments dynamic vagal control of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, T; Kawada, T; Sugimachi, M; Miyano, H; Sato, T; Shishido, T; Yoshimura, R; Miyashita, H; Inagaki, M; Alexander, J; Sunagawa, K

    1998-08-01

    Recent investigations in our laboratory using a Gaussian white noise perturbation technique have shown that simultaneous sympathetic stimulation augmented the gain of the transfer function from vagal stimulation frequency to heart rate response. However, the mechanism of that augmentation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we examined in anesthetized rabbits how three pharmacological interventions known to cause intracellular accumulation of cAMP affected the transfer function. Isoproterenol (0.3 microg . kg-1 . min-1 iv) increased the dynamic gain of transfer function from 7.12 +/- 0.67 to 12.4 +/- 1.21 beats . min-1 . Hz-1 (P < 0.05) without changing the corner frequency or the lag time. Similar augmentations were observed when forskolin (5 microg . kg-1 . min-1 iv) or theophylline (20 mg/kg iv) was administered under conditions of beta-adrenergic blockade. These results suggest that the accumulation of cAMP at postjunctional effector sites contributes, at least in part, to the sympathetic augmentation of the dynamic vagal control of heart rate.

  9. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  10. Development and application of an LC-MS/MS method for measuring the effect of (partial) agonists on cAMP accumulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goutier, W; Spaans, P A; van der Neut, M A W; McCreary, A C; Reinders, J H

    2010-04-30

    Cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays an important role in cell signalling and is widely used as a marker for receptor activation and as a target for treating various diseases. In this paper we present the development and validation of a new method for the determination of cAMP and ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and other nucleotides in a biological system by combining zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The HILIC-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of cAMP and ATP, and was validated by assessment of linearity (over a range from 0.5 to 100nM for cAMP and 50 nM to 50 microM for ATP (r(2)>0.999)), resolution, limit of detection (0.5 and 50 nM for cAMP and ATP, respectively) and reproducibility. Furthermore, the method was validated and applied in vitro to determine cAMP accumulation in biological samples. The effect of several dopamine D(2) (partial) agonists and antagonists on cAMP accumulation was assessed by determination of the cAMP/ATP ratio in cells transfected with the human dopamine D(2L) receptor. Quinpirole, dopamine and ropinirole produced agonist effects on cAMP accumulation, with a potency of quinpirole>ropinirole>dopamine. Lisuride, terguride and bifeprunox were found to be partial agonists with efficacies of lisuride>terguride>bifeprunox. As expected, haloperidol, (-)-sulpiride and LY-741626 were antagonists. These results demonstrate that the present analytical method was robust, fast, sensitive, and selective. Moreover, it showed utility in determining cAMP/ATP in biological systems and the ability to study the effect of (partial) agonists and antagonists which makes it a useful tool for drug discovery.

  11. Accumulation of inositol phosphates and cyclic AMP in guinea-pig cerebral cortical preparations. Effects of norepinephrine, histamine, carbamylcholine and 2-chloroadenosine.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, E B; Daly, J W

    1985-11-20

    Norepinephrine and serotonin augment by about 2-fold the accumulation of cyclic [3H]AMP elicited by 2-chloroadenosine in [3H]adenine-labeled guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices. Histamine causes a 3-fold augmentation. The first two agents have no effect on cyclic AMP alone, while histamine has only a small effect alone. The augmentation of the 2-chloroadenosine response appears to be mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic, 5HT2-serotonergic and H2-histaminergic receptors. VIP-elicited accumulations of cyclic AMP are also augmented through stimulation of alpha 1-adrenergic, 5HT2-serotonergic and H1-histaminergic receptors. Activation of these amine receptors also increases the turnover of phosphatidylinositols in [3H]inositol-labeled guinea pig cerebral cortical slices. Norepinephrine causes a 5-fold, serotonin a 1.2-fold, and histamine a 2.5-fold increase in accumulations of [3H]inositol phosphates. 2-Chloroadenosine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, baclofen, and somatostatin have no effect on phosphatidylinositol turnover, nor do the last two agents augment accumulations of cyclic AMP elicited by 2-chloroadenosine. The data suggest a possible relationship between turnover of phosphatidylinositol and the augmentations of the cyclic AMP accumulations elicited by biogenic amines in brain slices.

  12. Cloned human 5-HT1A receptor pharmacology determined using agonist binding and measurement of cAMP accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Najam A; Drace, Colene D; Williams, Gary W; Crider, Julie Y

    2004-10-01

    Twenty agonists and nine antagonists were evaluated for their ability to compete for [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin ([3H]-8-OH-DPAT) binding to the cloned human serotonin-1A (ch-5-HT1A) receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and for their ability to alter adenylyl cyclase activity in the same cells. The most potent full agonists of high affinity included N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (pEC50=9.6 +/- 0.1), MDL 73005EF (pEC50=9.3 +/- 0.2), 5-methyl-urapidil (pEC50=9.2 +/- 0.1), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (pEC50=9.1 +/- 0.2), R(+)-8-OH-DPAT (pEC50=8.6 +/- 0.1) and BMY-7378 (pEC50=8.6 +/- 0.1). WB-4101 (pEC50=8.3 +/- 0.2; IA=79%), clozapine (pEC50=8.1 +/- 0.3; IA=29%), (buspirone (pEC50=7.6 +/- 0.2; IA=79%), quipazine (pEC50 <5; IA=45%) and R-DOI (pEC50 < 5; IA=31%) were weaker agonists with partial agonist properties. The most potent antagonists were WAY-100,635 (pKi=10.2 +/- 0.1), methiothepin (pKi=8.8 +/- 0.2), spiperone (pKi=8.7 +/- 0.2) and NAN-190 (pKi=8.5 +/- 0.2). The receptor affinities and functional potencies were well correlated (r=0.88; P <0.0001). Our binding data correlated well with the pharmacology of endogenous 5-HT1A receptors in the rabbit iris-ciliary body (r=0.91; P <0.001) and rat hippocampus (r=0.93, P <0.0001). Our functional cAMP data correlated well with other cAMP accumulation data (r=0.8, P <0.01 vs calf hippocampus) but less so with [35S]-GTPgammaS binding to the ch-5-HT(1A) receptor as a functional activity read-out (r=0.58, P <0.05). The present study provides a detailed pharmacological characterization of the ch-5-HT1A receptor using binding and functional assays.

  13. Cortisol rapidly reduces prolactin release and cAMP and sup 45 Ca sup 2+ accumulation in the cichlid fish pituitary in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Borski, R.J.; Helms, L.M.H.; Richman, N.H., III; Grau, E.G. )

    1991-04-01

    During in vitro incubation, prolactin release is inhibited in a dose-related manner by cortisol. This action is mimicked by the synthetic glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone but not by other steroids tested. Perifusion studies indicate that the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)prolactin release by cortisol occurs within 20 min. Cortisol (50 nM) also inhibits cAMP accumulation and reduces {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} accumulation in the tilapia rostral pars distalis within 15 min. Cortisol's action on prolactin release is blocked in the presence of either the Ca{sup 2+} ionophore A23187 or a combination of dibutyryl cAMP and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that cortisol may play a physiologically relevant role in the rapid modulation of prolactin secretion in vivo. These studies also suggest that the inhibition of prolactin release by cortisol is a specific glucocorticoid action that may be mediated, in part, through cortisol's ability to inhibit intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+} metabolism.

  14. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogues on cyclic AMP accumulation in cultured mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, A.; Lopez-Novoa, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. Changes in intracellular levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) were studied in rat isolated glomeruli and cultured glomerular mesangial cells exposed to adenosine and to the preferential A1 receptor agonist N6-R-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl adenosine (R-PIA), or the potent A2 adenosine receptor agonist 5-(N-ethylcarboxamide)adenosine (NECA). 2. Whereas NECA and adenosine triggered a dose-dependent increase in cyclic AMP values with EC50 values of approximately 10(-6) M and 3 x 10(-5) M respectively, R-PIA lowered cyclic AMP levels at concentrations of 10(-6) M or less and increased them at higher concentrations. 3. The time-course of the increase induced by 10(-6) M NECA was slower than that induced by 10(-4) M adenosine. Adenosine produced a maximal stimulation within the first minute, whereas the effect of NECA in both glomeruli and mesangial cells was noticeable only from the second minute of incubation. 4. The effects of the agonists R-PIA and NECA on the cyclic AMP system were blocked respectively by the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthihe (DPCPX) at 10(-6) M and the A2 antagonist N-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-N-methyl-4-(2, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydro-2,b-dioxo-1, 3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl) benzene sulphonamide (PD115,199) at 10(-6) M. Theophylline, a known antagonist of adenosine receptors, inhibited the action of adenosine on cyclic AMP in mesangial cells. Dipyridamole, an inhibitor of the uptake of adenosine by the cells, enhanced the response to adenosine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330173

  15. Histamine receptors coupled to (/sup 3/H)cAMP accumulation in brain: pharmacological characterization in a vesicular preparation of guinea pig cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, M.N.; Hough, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    The histamine-stimulated accumulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMP (formed by prelabeling with (/sup 3/H)adenine) was characterized pharmacologically in a vesicular preparation of guinea pig cortex. The H2 antagonist cimetidine maximally blocked 80% of the response, whereas only 45% of the response could be inhibited by H1 antagonists. A combination of H1 and H2 antagonists completely abolished the response. These and other findings show that both H1 and H2 receptors mediate the response, but 25% of the response may require simultaneous activation of both receptors. A role for adenosine as a mediator of the histamine response was investigated. Adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4., 2.5 units/ml) decreased basal (/sup 3/H)cAMP levels, abolished the cimetidine-resistant component of the histamine response, and reduced maximal H1 antagonism of the histamine response to 30%. Treatment with a combination of adenosine deaminase and the calcium chelator EGTA (2 mM) appeared to eliminate the H1 component completely. Under these latter conditions only H2 receptors appeared to mediate the histamine response. Thus, both H1 and H2 receptors stimulate (/sup 3/H)cAMP accumulation in the vesicular preparation, but the H1 response seems to require either concomitant adenosine or H2 receptor stimulation and may be calcium dependent. These findings differ from those found in broken cell membrane preparations, where only H2 receptors appear to be coupled to adenylate cyclase activation.

  16. Elevation of cAMP Levels Inhibits Doxorubicin-Induced Apoptosis in Pre- B ALL NALM- 6 Cells Through Induction of BAD Phosphorylation and Inhibition of P53 Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Ahmad; Kazemi, Ahmad; Kashiri, Meysam; Safa, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the molecular mechanisms of cAMP action against DNA damage-induced apoptosis can be useful to improve the efficacy of DNA damaging therapeutic agents. Considering the critical role of bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) and p53 proteins in DNA damage -induced apoptosis, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of cAMP-elevating agents on these proteins in doxorubicin-treated pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) NALM-6 cells.The pre-B ALL cell line NALM-6 was cultured and treated with doxorubicin in combination with or without cAMP-elevating agents forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Cell viability was measured by trypan blue staining and MTT assay. For evaluation of apoptosis, annexin-V staining by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay were used. Protein expression of p53, BAD and phoshorylated BAD was detected by western blotting analysis.cAMP-increasing agents diminished the doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity in NALM-6 cells as indicated by the viability assays. Annexin-V apoptosis assay showed that the cAMP-elevating agents decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, doxorubicin-induced caspase-3 activity was attenuated in the presence of cAMP-increasing agents. Western blot results revealed the reduced expression of p53 protein in cells treated with combination of cAMP-elevating agents and doxorubicin in contrast to cells treated with doxorubicin alone. Expression of total BAD protein was not affected by doxorubicin and cAMP-elevating agents. However, phosphorylation of BAD protein was induced in the presence of cAMP-elevating agents. Our study suggests that elevated cAMP levels inhibit doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in pre-B ALL cells through induction of BAD phosphorylation and abrogation of p53 accumulation.

  17. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent.

  18. cAMP inhibits migration, ruffling and paxillin accumulation in focal adhesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells: effects of PKA and EPAC.

    PubMed

    Burdyga, Alex; Conant, Alan; Haynes, Lee; Zhang, Jin; Jalink, Kees; Sutton, Robert; Neoptolemos, John; Costello, Eithne; Tepikin, Alexei

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrated that increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations result in the inhibition of migration of PANC-1 and other pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell types. The rise of cAMP was accompanied by rapid and reversible cessation of ruffling, by inhibition of focal adhesion turnover and by prominent loss of paxillin from focal adhesions. All these phenomena develop rapidly suggesting that cAMP effectors have a direct influence on the cellular migratory apparatus. The role of two primary cAMP effectors, exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) and protein kinase A (PKA), in cAMP-mediated inhibition of PDAC cell migration and migration-associated processes was investigated. Experiments with selective activators of EPAC and PKA demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of cAMP on migration, ruffling, focal adhesion dynamics and paxillin localisation is mediated by PKA, whilst EPAC potentiates migration.

  19. The combined inhibitory effect of the adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors on cAMP accumulation in the hippocampus is additive and independent of A1 receptor desensitization.

    PubMed

    Serpa, André; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Cascalheira, José F

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6±2.7 μM and an Emax of 31%±2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10-150 nM), an EC50 of 35±19 nM, and an Emax of 29%±5 were obtained. The combined inhibitory effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) and CPA (100 nM) on cAMP accumulation was 41%±6% (n=4), which did not differ (P>0.7) from the sum of the individual effects of each agonist (43%±8%) but was different (P<0.05) from the effects of CPA or WIN55212-2 alone. Preincubation with CPA (100 nM) for 95 min caused desensitization of adenosine A1 activity, which did not modify the effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) on cAMP accumulation. In conclusion, the combined effect of CB1 and A1 receptors on cAMP formation is additive and CB1 receptor activity is not affected by short-term A1 receptor desensitization.

  20. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and acetylcholine on accumulation of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Köhler, G; Lindl, T

    1980-02-01

    We investigated in vitro accumulation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine) and of guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (induced by acetylcholine) in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus. The response to 5-hydroxytryptamine exceeded that induced by equimolar concentrations of dopamine. 1-methyl lysergic acid, a 5-hydroxytryptamine-blocking agent, diminished the 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced increase of cyclic AMP level. This parallels the effect of this amine on the contracted muscle. Acetylcholine, which causes a tonic contraction of the muscle, increased intracellular levels of cyclic GMP in a dose-dependent (max. 45-fold at 10(-4) M ACh) manner. The time course of the rise in cyclic GMP level was rapid and transient (peak concentration of cyclic GMP at 2 min). Mytolon was the most effective of all cholinergic blockers tested. It was concluded that cyclic nucleotides may play a role in the modulatory process of the transmitters. A direct relation to the relaxation-contraction process could not be established.

  1. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  2. Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J. R.; Karigan, G. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An accumulator particularly adapted for use in controlling the pressure of a stream of fluid in its liquid phase utilizing the fluid in its gaseous phase was designed. The accumulator is characterized by a shell defining a pressure chamber having an entry throat for a liquid and adapted to be connected in contiguous relation with a selected conduit having a stream of fluid flowing through the conduit in its liquid phase. A pressure and volume stabilization tube, including an array of pressure relief perforations is projected into the chamber with the perforations disposed adjacent to the entry throat for accommodating a discharge of the fluid in either gaseous or liquid phases, while a gas inlet and liquid to gas conversion system is provided, the chamber is connected with a source of the fluid for continuously pressuring the chamber for controlling the pressure of the stream of liquid.

  3. Ex vivo study of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor agonists and antagonists on cAMP accumulation during memory formation and amnesia.

    PubMed

    Perez-García, G; Meneses, A

    2008-12-16

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a second messenger and a central component of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate a wide range of biological functions, including memory. Hence, in this work, firstly the time-course of memory formation was determined in an autoshaping learning task, which had allowed the identification of testing times for increases or decreases in performance. Next, untrained, trained and overtrained groups were compared in cAMP production. Moreover, selective stimulation and antagonism of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors during memory formation and cAMP production were determined. Finally, since there is scarce information about how pharmacological models of amnesia affect cAMP production, the cholinergic or glutamatergic antagonists, scopolamine and dizocilpine, were tested. The major findings of this work showed that when the time-course was determined inasmuch as training and testing sessions occurred, memory performance was graduate and progressive. Notably, for the fourth to seventh (i.e., 48-120 h following autoshaping training session) testing session performance was significantly higher from the previous ones. When animals received 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor agonists and antagonists or amnesic drugs significant increases or decrements in memory performance were observed at 24 and 48 h. Moreover, when ex vivo cAMP production from trained and overtrained groups were compared to untrained ones, significant differences were observed among groups and brain areas. Trained animals treated with 8-OHDPAT, AS19, 8-OHDPAT plus AS19, WAY100635, SB-269970, scopolamine or dizocilpine were compared to similar untrained groups, and eightfold-reduced cAMP production was evident, showing the importance of cAMP production in the signaling case in mammalian memory formation.

  4. Three Yersinia enterocolitica AmpD Homologs Participate in the Multi-Step Regulation of Chromosomal Cephalosporinase, AmpC

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Xin; Chen, Yuhuang; Hao, Huijing; Li, Xu; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Li, Chuchu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Shihe; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-01-01

    In many gram negative bacilli, AmpD plays a key role in both cell well-recycling pathway and β-lactamase regulation, inactivation of the ampD causes the accumulation of 1,6-anhydromuropeptides, and results in the ampC overproduction. In Yersinia enterocolitica, the regulation of ampC expression may also rely on the ampR-ampC system, the role of AmpD in this species is still unknown. In this study, three AmpD homologs (AmpD1, AmpD2, and AmpD3) have been identified in complete sequence of strain Y. enterocolitica subsp. palearctica 105.5R(r). To understand the role of three AmpD homologs, several mutant strains were constructed and analyzed where a rare ampC regulation mechanism was observed: low-effective ampD2 and ampD3 cooperate with the high-effective ampD1 in the three levels regulation of ampC expression. Enterobacteriaceae was used to be supposed to regulate ampC expression by two steps, three steps regulation was only observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we first reported that Enterobacteriaceae Y. enterocolitica can also possess a three steps stepwise regulation mechanism, regulating the ampC expression precisely. PMID:27588018

  5. Three Yersinia enterocolitica AmpD Homologs Participate in the Multi-Step Regulation of Chromosomal Cephalosporinase, AmpC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Xin; Chen, Yuhuang; Hao, Huijing; Li, Xu; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Li, Chuchu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Shihe; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-01-01

    In many gram negative bacilli, AmpD plays a key role in both cell well-recycling pathway and β-lactamase regulation, inactivation of the ampD causes the accumulation of 1,6-anhydromuropeptides, and results in the ampC overproduction. In Yersinia enterocolitica, the regulation of ampC expression may also rely on the ampR-ampC system, the role of AmpD in this species is still unknown. In this study, three AmpD homologs (AmpD1, AmpD2, and AmpD3) have been identified in complete sequence of strain Y. enterocolitica subsp. palearctica 105.5R(r). To understand the role of three AmpD homologs, several mutant strains were constructed and analyzed where a rare ampC regulation mechanism was observed: low-effective ampD2 and ampD3 cooperate with the high-effective ampD1 in the three levels regulation of ampC expression. Enterobacteriaceae was used to be supposed to regulate ampC expression by two steps, three steps regulation was only observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we first reported that Enterobacteriaceae Y. enterocolitica can also possess a three steps stepwise regulation mechanism, regulating the ampC expression precisely.

  6. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Wuethrich, Andrew J.; Hancock, Deana L.

    2002-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 uM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The B-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle Culture. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR Population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 uM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP Concentration above the. basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were

  7. Temporal changes in the calcium-dependence of the histamine H1-receptor-stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in guinea-pig cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J.; Brown, A. M.; Hill, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    1. 2-Chloroadenosine (2CA) causes a maintained rise in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices which is augmented by addition of histamine. We have investigated the temporal profile of the sensitivity of this response to calcium. 2. Rapid removal of extracellular calcium with EGTA (5 mM) at 2CA (30 microM)-induced steady state caused a slight increase in the cyclic AMP response to 2CA alone and completely abolished the augmentation produced by histamine (0.1 mM) added 20 min later. When EGTA was added only 2 min before histamine, the augmentation was reduced by 72%. 3. The calcium sensitivity of the histamine response was also indicated in studies in which EGTA was added 1 or 3 min after histamine at 2CA-induced steady state. Following addition of EGTA at either of these times, the augmentation was not maintained. 4. When calcium was rapidly removed with EGTA once a steady state level of cyclic AMP had been achieved with histamine, the augmentation response was maintained. This was despite the fact that EGTA had a similar effect on both extracellular free calcium and tissue calcium content when it was applied before or after histamine. 5. The 2CA response was augmented by phorbol esters (which mimic the actions of diacylglycerol) in a calcium-independent manner. 6. These results suggest that calcium is important for the initiation and early stages of the histamine-induced augmentation response. The apparent lack of calcium sensitivity of the response at later stages could mean that calcium is not involved in the maintenance of the response or that the intracellular machinery involved in the augmentation process becomes more sensitive to calcium as the response progresses, such that it becomes able to operate at a much lower level of intracellular calcium. A possible role for diacylglycerol in the maintenance of the response is discussed. PMID:2558762

  8. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  9. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  10. Bitter melon seed oil-attenuated body fat accumulation in diet-induced obese mice is associated with cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation and cell death in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Chen, Gou-Chun; Yang, Mei-Fang; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Shu-Han; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chyuan, Jong-Ho; Chao, Pei-Min

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antiadiposity effect of bitter melon seed oil (BMSO), which is rich in the cis-9, trans-11, trans-13 isomer of conjugated linolenic acid. In Expt. 1, C57BL/6J mice were fed a butter-based, high-fat diet [HB; 29% butter + 1% soybean oil (SBO)] for 10 wk to induce obesity. They then continued to receive that diet or were switched to an SBO-based, high-fat diet alone (HS; 30% SBO) or containing bitter melon seed oil (BMSO) (HBM; 15% SBO + 15% BMSO) for 5 wk. The body fat percentage was significantly lower in mice fed the HBM diet (21%), but not the HS diet, compared with mice fed the HB diet. In Expt. 2, mice were fed an SBO-based, high-fat diet containing 0 (HS), 5 (LBM), 10 (MBM), or 15% (HBM) BMSO for 10 wk. In the LBM, MBM, and HBM groups, the body fat percentage was significantly lower by 32, 35, and 65%, respectively, compared with the HS control. The reduction in the HBM group was significantly greater than that in the LBM or MBM group. BMSO administration increased phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, cAMP-activated protein kinase (PKA), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the white adipose tissue (WAT), suggesting that PKA and leptin signaling might be involved in the BMSO-mediated reduction in lipogenesis and increase in thermogenesis and lipolysis. However, compared with the HS control, the HBM group had a significantly higher TNFα concentration in the WAT accompanied by TUNEL-positive nuclei. We conclude that BMSO is effective in attenuating body fat accumulation through mechanisms associated with PKA activation and programmed cell death in the WAT, but safety concerns need to be carefully addressed.

  11. Co-transfection with protein kinase D confers phorbol-ester-mediated inhibition on glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation in COS cells transfected to overexpress glucagon receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, E S; Rozengurt, E; Connell, J M; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Glucagon elicited a profound increase in the intracellular cAMP concentration of COS-7 cells which had been transiently transfected with a cDNA encoding the rat glucagon receptor and under conditions where cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was fully inhibited. This was achieved in a dose-dependent fashion with an EC50 of 1.8+/-0.4 nM glucagon. In contrast with previous observations made using hepatocytes [Heyworth, Whetton, Kinsella and Houslay (1984) FEBS Lett. 170, 38-42], treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with PMA did not inhibit the ability of glucagon to increase intracellular cAMP levels. PMA-mediated inhibition was not conferred by treatment with okadaic acid, nor by co-transfecting cells with cDNAs encoding various protein kinase C isoforms (PKC-alpha, PKC-betaII and PKC-epsilon) or with the PMA-activated G-protein-receptor kinases GRK2 and GRK3. In contrast, PMA induced the marked inhibition of glucagon-stimulated cAMP production in COS-7 cells that had been co-transfected with a cDNA encoding protein kinase D (PKD). Such inhibition was not due to an action on the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase, as forskolin-stimulated cAMP production was unchanged by PMA treatment of COS cells that had been co-transfected with both the glucagon receptor and PKD. PKD transcripts were detected in RNA isolated from hepatocytes but not from COS-7 cells. Transcripts for GRK2 were present in hepatocytes but not in COS cells, whereas transcripts for GRK3 were not found in either cell type. It is suggested that PKD may play a role in the regulation of glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase. PMID:9291130

  12. AMPED Program Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Gur, Ilan

    2016-07-12

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  13. AMPED Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2014-03-04

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  14. Chemotactic responses of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to a cyclic AMP concentration gradient: evidence to support a spatial mechanism for sensing cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Naitoh, Y

    1999-01-01

    The motile responses of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to a cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration gradient were examined using a novel assay system. In this system, a cAMP concentration gradient was generated, while the overall cAMP concentration could be either increased or decreased in a chamber containing amoebae. The chemotactic responses of amoebae were examined immediately after they had been subjected to the cAMP concentration gradient. Amoebae moving in random directions in a reference solution ascended a cAMP concentration gradient after they had been exposed to the gradient irrespective of whether there was an increase or a decrease in the overall cAMP concentration. This strongly supports the idea that D. discoideum amoebae can sense a spatial cAMP gradient around them and that this causes their chemoaccumulation behavior. Ascending locomotion became less conspicuous when the amoebae were treated with a homogeneous cAMP solution for approximately 8 min before exposure to a cAMP gradient. This cAMP pretreatment reduced the sensitivity of the amoeba to a cAMP concentration gradient. The cAMP concentration gradient could be reversed in less than 30 s in this assay system, allowing the generation of a cAMP wave by accumulating amoebae to be mimicked. The ascending amoebae continued to move in the same direction for 1-2 min after the gradient had been reversed. This is consistent with the well-known observation that reversal of a cAMP concentration gradient experienced by the amoebae passing through a cAMP wave does not negate their chemotactic movement towards the accumulation center.

  15. Mutants of PC12 cells with altered cyclic AMP responses

    SciTech Connect

    Block, T.; Kon, C.; Breckenridge, B.M.

    1984-10-01

    PCl2 cells, derived from a rat pheochromocytoma, were mutagenized and selected in media containing agents known to elevate intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP (cAMP). More than 40 clones were isolated by selection with cholera toxin or 2-chloroadenosine or both. The variants that were deficient in accumulating cAMP were obtained by using a protocol in which 1 ..mu..m 8-bromo-cAMP was included in addition to the agonist. Certain of these variants were partially characterized with respect to the site of altered cAMP metabolism. The profiles of adenylate cyclase activity responsiveness of certain variants to guanosine-5'-(BETA,..gamma..-imido) triphosphate and to forskolin resembled those of UNC and cyc phenotypes of S49 lymphoma cells, which are functionally deficient in the GTP-sensitive coupling protein, N/sub s/. Other variants were characterized by increased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity at low substrate concentration. Diverse morphological traits were observed among the variants, but it was not possible to assign them to a particular cAMP phenotype. Two revertants of a PCl2 mutant were isolated and observed to have regained a cellular cAMP response to 2-chloroadenosine and to forskolin. It is hoped that these PCl2 mutants will have utility for defining cAMP-mediated functions, including any links to the action of nerve growth factor, in cells derived from the neural crest.

  16. cAMP and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Federica; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for metabolic adaptation. cAMP signaling and PKA phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins have just started to be investigated, and the presence of cAMP-generating enzymes and PKA inside mitochondria is still controversial. Here, we discuss the role of cAMP in regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics through protein phosphorylation and the evidence for soluble adenylyl cyclase as the source of cAMP inside mitochondria. PMID:23636265

  17. Activated cAMP receptors switch encystation into sporulation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Morio, Takahiro; James, John L; Prescott, Alan R; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Schaap, Pauline

    2009-04-28

    Metazoan embryogenesis is controlled by a limited number of signaling modules that are used repetitively at successive developmental stages. The development of social amoebas shows similar reiterated use of cAMP-mediated signaling. In the model Dictyostelium discoideum, secreted cAMP acting on 4 cAMP receptors (cARs1-4) coordinates cell movement during aggregation and fruiting body formation, and induces the expression of aggregation and sporulation genes at consecutive developmental stages. To identify hierarchy in the multiple roles of cAMP, we investigated cAR heterogeneity and function across the social amoeba phylogeny. The gene duplications that yielded cARs 2-4 occurred late in evolution. Many species have only a cAR1 ortholog that duplicated independently in the Polysphondylids and Acytostelids. Disruption of both cAR genes of Polysphondylium pallidum (Ppal) did not affect aggregation, but caused complete collapse of fruiting body morphogenesis. The stunted structures contained disorganized stalk cells, which supported a mass of cysts instead of spores; cAMP triggered spore gene expression in Ppal, but not in the cAR null mutant, explaining its sporulation defect. Encystation is the survival strategy of solitary amoebas, and lower taxa, like Ppal, can still encyst as single cells. Recent findings showed that intracellular cAMP accumulation suffices to trigger encystation, whereas it is a complementary requirement for sporulation. Combined, the data suggest that cAMP signaling in social amoebas evolved from cAMP-mediated encystation in solitary amoebas; cAMP secretion in aggregates prompted the starving cells to form spores and not cysts, and additionally organized fruiting body morphogenesis. cAMP-mediated aggregation was the most recent innovation.

  18. Control of biodegradative threonine dehydratase inducibility by cyclic AMP in energy-restricted Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A T; Egan, R M; Lewis, B

    1978-01-01

    To explain the requirement for anaerobic conditions in the induction of biodegradative L-threonine dehydratase in Escherichia coli, Crookes strain, measurements of cyclic AMP (cAMP) were made during aerobic and anaerobic growth and upon an aerobic-to-anaerobic transition. Internal cAMP levels were similar (5 to 10 muM) throughout exponential growth, whether aerobic or anaerobic, but only during anaerobiosis was threonine dehydratase synthesized. When an exponentially growing aerobic culture was made anaerobic, a sharp increase in internal cAMP was noted, reaching 300 muM within 10 min and declining thereafter to normal anaerobic levels. Threonine dehydratase synthesis was detected immediately after the attainment of peak cAMP levels and continued for several generations. A similar pattern but with less accumulation of cAMP and less threonine dehydratase production was also noted upon treatment of an aerobically growing culture with KCN. Pyruvate addition at the time of anaerobic shock severely affected both cAMP accumulation and threonine dehydratase synthesis; however, externally added cAMP could partially counter the pyruvate effect on enzyme synthesis. The conclusion was reached that conditions which resulted in a temporary energy deficit brought about the major accumulation of cAMP, and this elevated level served as a signal for initiation of threonine dehydratase synthesis to supply energy by the nonoxidative degradation of threonine. PMID:211115

  19. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Li, Yan Chun; Toback, F. Gary

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-α identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-α. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-α. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD. PMID:25919700

  20. Regulation of intracellular cyclic AMP in skeletal muscle cells involves the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely Oliveira; Costa-Jr, Valter Luiz

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the intracellular and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP in primary rat skeletal muscle cultures, after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Isoprenaline, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and forskolin induced a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP that peaked 5 min after onset stimulation. Under stimulation with isoprenaline or CGRP, the intracellular cyclic AMP initial rise was followed by an exponential decline, reaching 46 and 52% of peak levels in 10 min, respectively. Conversely, the forskolin-dependent accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP decreased slowly and linearly, reaching 49% of the peak level in 30 min. The loss of intracellular cyclic AMP from peak levels, induced by direct or receptor-induced activation of AC, was followed by an increase in the extracellular cyclic AMP. This effect was independent on PDEs, since it was obtained in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Besides, in isoprenaline treated cells, the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol reduced both intra- and extracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, whereas the organic anion transporter inhibitor probenecid reduced exclusively the extracellular accumulation. Together our data show that direct or receptor-dependent activation of skeletal muscle AC results in a transient increase in the intracellular cyclic AMP, despite the continuous presence of the stimulus. The temporal declining of intracellular cyclic AMP was not dependent on the cyclic AMP breakdown but associated to the efflux of cyclic nucleotide to the extracellular compartment, by an active transport since it was prevented by probenecid. PMID:12642402

  1. Stimulation of limb cartilage differentiation by cyclic AMP is dependent on cell density.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, B J; Kulyk, W M; Kosher, R A

    1989-12-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) has been implicated in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation. This study represents an attempt to clarify potential mechanisms by which cAMP might regulate chondrogenesis. We have found that the ability of cAMP to stimulate limb cartilage differentiation in vitro is dependent on cell density. Dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) elicits a striking increase in the accumulation of Alcian blue, pH 1.0-positive cartilage matrix, and a corresponding three- to fourfold increase in the accumulation of 35S-labeled glycosaminoglycans (GAG) by limb mesenchymal cells cultured in low serum medium at densities greater than confluence (i.e. micromass cultures established with 1-2 x 10(5) cells in 10 microliters of medium). Moreover, dbcAMP causes a striking (two- to fourfold) increase in the steady-state cytoplasmic levels of mRNAs for cartilage-characteristic type II collagen and the core protein of cartilage-specific sulfated proteoglycan in these high density, supraconfluent cultures. In contrast, cAMP does not promote the chondrogenesis of limb mesenchymal cells cultured at subconfluent densities (i.e. cultures initiated with 2.5-5 x 10(4) cells in 10 microliters of medium). In these low density cultures, dbcAMP does not promote the formation of cartilage matrix, sulfated GAG accumulation or the accumulation of cartilage-specific mRNAs. These observations suggest that cAMP may exert its regulatory effect in part by facilitating cell-cell communication during the critical condensation phase of chondrogenesis.

  2. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  3. The regulation of chemotaxis and chemokinesis in Dictyostelium amoebae by temporal signals and spatial gradients of cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G

    1994-02-01

    The tactic and kinetic locomotion of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae were examined in cyclic AMP (cAMP) spatial gradient and temporal signal fields. The distributions of migrating cells were examined within 150 microns-thick micropore filters after incubation with different cAMP concentrations, [cAMP], applied in three ways across the fields: as positively or negatively developing gradients, generated either by increasing or decreasing the [cAMP] on one side of the filter, respectively, or as static, linear gradients after negative development. Chemotaxis was only induced by oriented, temporally increasing [cAMP]. Pulses propagated by molecular diffusion or mechanical flow were equally effective. Negatively developing cAMP gradients had no initial effect on cell accumulation. However, if the subsequent static spatial gradient was maintained by an infusion system, some gradients also induced cell accumulation, whose degree and direction depended on the gradient [cAMP]. The basis of this new effect was examined by tracking individual cells by computer-assisted videomicroscopy during locomotion in different [cAMP]. Cells produced a triphasic [cAMP]-dependent response, with optimal cell motility induced by 10-30 nM. The results demonstrate that cell accumulation either up-field or down-field in spatial gradients is governed by the field locations of the attractant concentrations that induce the relative locomotory maxima and minima in the gradient field. Cells perceive the ambient [cAMP], but cannot read the spatial gradient orientation in static or yet steeper regions of developing gradients. Accumulation in static spatial gradients is a function of klino- and orthokinesis, but chemotaxis requires an oriented cAMP pulse or impulse.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Experiment definition studies for AMPS Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical charging of the space shuttle orbiter is discussed in relation to the AMPS Spacelab payload along with an operations research technique for the selection of AMPS Spacelab experiments. Experiments proposed for AMPS include: hydromagnetic wave experiments; bistatic sounder of AMPS wake; and an artificial meteor gun. Experiment objectives and instrument functions are given for all experiments.

  5. Regulating the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway via cAMP-signaling: neuroprotective potential

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Wang, Hu; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    The cAMP-signaling pathway has been under intensive investigation for decades. It is a wonder that such a small simple molecule like cAMP can modulate a vast number of diverse processes in different types of cells. The ubiquitous involvement of cAMP-signaling in a variety of cellular events requires tight spatial and temporal control of its generation, propagation, compartmentalization, and elimination. Among the various steps of the cAMP-signaling pathway, G-protein coupled receptors, adenylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, the two major cAMP targets, i.e. protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP, as well as the A-kinase anchoring proteins, are potential targets for drug development. Herein we review the recent progress on the regulation and manipulation of different steps of the cAMP-signaling pathway. We end by focusing on the emerging role of cAMP-signaling in modulating protein degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. New discoveries on the regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway by cAMP-signaling support the development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent proteotoxicity in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human disease conditions associated with impaired protein turnover by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and the accumulation of ubiquitin-protein aggregates. PMID:23686612

  6. Altered AMP deaminase activity may extend postmortem glycolysis.

    PubMed

    England, E M; Matarneh, S K; Scheffler, T L; Wachet, C; Gerrard, D E

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem energy metabolism drives hydrogen accumulation in muscle and results in a fairly constant ultimate pH. Extended glycolysis results in adverse pork quality and may be possible with greater adenonucleotide availability postmortem. We hypothesized that slowing adenonucleotide removal by reducing AMP deaminase activity would extend glycolysis and lower the ultimate pH of muscle. Longissimus muscle samples were incorporated into an in vitro system that mimics postmortem glycolysis with or without pentostatin, an AMP deaminase inhibitor. Pentostatin lowered ultimate pH and increased lactate and glucose 6-phosphate with time. Based on these results and that AMPK γ3(R200Q) mutated pigs (RN⁻) produce low ultimate pH pork, we hypothesized AMP deaminase abundance and activity would be lower in RN⁻ muscle than wild-type. RN⁻ muscle contained lower AMP deaminase abundance and activity. These data show that altering adenonucleotide availability postmortem can extend postmortem pH decline and suggest that AMP deaminase activity may, in part, contribute to the low ultimate pH observed in RN⁻ pork.

  7. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine receptor coupled to cyclic AMP formation expressed by rat mesenteric artery vascular smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A. S.; Bryson, S. E.; Vaughan, P. F.; Ball, S. G.; Balmforth, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. Mesenteric artery vascular smooth muscle cells derived from male Wistar rats and grown in culture were prelabelled with [3H]-adenine and exposed to a range of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Resultant [3H]-cyclic AMP formation was determined and concentration-effect curves constructed, in the presence of propranolol (10-6) M) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX (5 x 10(-4) M). 2. Ka apparent values for D1/DA1 dopamine receptor agonists SKF 38393, fenoldopam, 6,7-ADTN, and dopamine were 0.06, 0.59, 4.06 and 5.77 x 10(-6) M respectively. Although fenoldopam and SKF 38393 were more potent than dopamine, they were partial agonists with efficacies, relative to dopamine of approximately 48% and 24% respectively. 6,7-ADTN, in contrast, behaved as a full agonist. 3. Dopamine-stimulated cyclic AMP formation was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the D1/DA1 dopamine receptor selective antagonists, SCH 23390 and cis-flupenthixol (Ki values 0.53 and 36.1 x 10(-1) M respectively). In contrast, the D2/DA2 dopamine receptor selective antagonists, domperidone and (-)-sulpiride, were less potent (Ki values 2.06 and 5.82 x 10(-6) M respectively). Furthermore, the stereoisomers of SCH 23390 and cis-flupenthixol, SCH 23388 and trans-flupenthixol, were at least two orders of magnitude less potent (Ki values 0.14 and 13.2 x 10(-6) M respectively) indicating the stereoselective nature of this receptor. 4. Our results indicate that rat mesenteric artery vascular smooth muscle cells in culture express a dopamine receptor coupled to cyclic AMP formation, which has the pharmacological profile, characteristic of the D1 dopamine receptor subfamily. PMID:7902178

  8. AMP-18 protects barrier function of colonic epithelial cells: role of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh-Reitz, Margaret M.; Huang, Erick F.; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Martin, Terence E.; Kartha, Sreedharan; Toback, F. Gary

    2005-01-01

    AMP-18, a novel gastric antrum mucosal protein, and a synthetic peptide of amino acids 77-97, have mitogenic and motogenic properties for epithelial cells. The possibility that AMP-18 is also protective was evaluated in the colonic mucosa of mice and monolayer cultures of human colonic epithelial Caco2/bbe (C2) cells. Administration of AMP peptide to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic injury delayed the onset of bloody diarrhea, and reduced weight loss. Treatment of C2 cells with AMP peptide protected monolayers against decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) induced by the oxidant monochloramine, indomethacin, or DSS. A molecular mechanism for these barrier-protective effects was sought by asking if AMP peptide acted on specific tight junction (TJ) proteins. Immunoblots of detergent-insoluble fractions of C2 cells treated with AMP peptide exhibited increased accumulation of specific TJ proteins. Occludin immunoreactivity was also increased in detergent-insoluble fractions obtained from colonic mucosal cells of mice injected with AMP peptide. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (CF) supported the capacity of AMP peptide to enhance accumulation of occludin and ZO-1 in TJ domains of C2 cell monolayers, and together with immunoblot analysis showed that the peptide protected against loss of these TJ proteins following oxidant injury. AMP peptide also protected against a fall in TER during disruption of actin filaments by cytochalasin D, and stabilized perijunctional actin during oxidant injury when assessed by CF. These findings suggest that AMP-18 could protect the intestinal mucosal barrier by acting on specific TJ proteins and stabilizing perijunctional actin. PMID:15961882

  9. Inhibition of AMP deaminase as therapeutic target in cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Zabielska, Magdalena A; Borkowski, Tomasz; Slominska, Ewa M; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2015-08-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD; EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes hydrolysis of the amino group from the adenine ring of AMP resulting in production of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. This reaction helps to maintain healthy cellular energetics by removing excess AMP that accumulates in energy depleted cells. Furthermore, AMPD permits the synthesis of guanine nucleotides from the larger adenylate pool. This enzyme competes with cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (c5NT) for AMP. Adenosine, a product of c5NT is a vasodilator, antagonizes inotropic effects of catecholamines and exerts anti-platelet, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The ratio of AMPD/c5NT defines the amount of adenosine produced in adenine nucleotide catabolic pathway. Inhibition of AMPD could alter this ratio resulting in increased adenosine production. Besides the potential effect on adenosine production, elevation of AMP due to inhibition of AMPD could also lead to activation of AMP regulated protein kinase (AMPK) with myriad of downstream events including enhanced energetic metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and cytoprotection. While the benefits of these processes are well appreciated in cells such as skeletal or cardiac myocytes its role in protection of endothelium could be even more important. Therapeutic use of AMPD inhibition has been limited due to difficulties with obtaining compounds with adequate characteristics. However, endothelium seems to be the easiest target as effective inhibition of AMPD could be achieved at much lower concentration than in the other types of cells. New generation of AMPD inhibitors has recently been established and its testing in context of endothelial and organ protection could provide important basic knowledge and potential therapeutic tools.

  10. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  11. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kucka, Marek; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward cAMP

  12. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  13. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  14. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  15. AmpA protein functions by different mechanisms to influence early cell type specification and to modulate cell adhesion and actin polymerization in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cost, Hoa N; Noratel, Elizabeth F; Blumberg, Daphne D

    2013-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum ampA gene encodes a multifunctional regulator protein that modulates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions and actin polymerization during growth and is necessary for correct cell type specification and patterning during development. Insertional inactivation of the ampA gene results in defects that define two distinct roles for the ampA gene during development. AmpA is necessary in a non-cell autonomous manner to prevent premature expression of a prespore gene marker. It is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for the anterior like cells, which express the ampA gene, to migrate to the upper cup during culmination. It is also necessary to prevent excessive cell-cell agglutination when cells are developed in a submerged suspension culture. Here, we demonstrate that a supernatant source of AmpA protein, added extracellularly, can prevent the premature mis-expression of the prespore marker. Synthetic oligopeptides are used to identify the domain of the AmpA protein that is important for preventing cells from mis-expressing the prespore gene. We further demonstrate that a factor capable of inducing additional cells to express the prespore gene marker accumulates extracellularly in the absence of AmpA protein. While the secreted AmpA acts extracellularly to suppress prespore gene expression, the effects of AmpA on cell agglutination and on actin polymerization in growing cells are not due to an extracellular role of secreted AmpA protein. Rather, these effects appear to reflect a distinct cell autonomous role of the ampA gene. Finally, we show that secretion of AmpA protein is brought about by elevating the levels of expression of ampA so that the protein accumulates to an excessive level.

  16. A forskolin derivative, colforsin daropate hydrochloride, inhibits rat mesangial cell mitogenesis via the cyclic AMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Junichi; Minami, Kouichiro; Segawa, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Chieko; Kim, Sung-Teh; Shigematsu, Akio

    2003-11-01

    A forskolin derivative, colforsin daropate hydrochloride (CDH), has been introduced as an inotropic agent that acts directly on adenylate cyclase to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and ventricular contractility, resulting in positive inotropic activity. We investigated the effects of CDH on rat mesangial cell (MC) proliferation. CDH (10(-7)-10(-5) mol/l) inhibited [(3)H]thymidine incorporation into cultured rat MCs in a concentration-dependent manner. CDH (10(-7)-10(-5) mol/l) also decreased cell numbers in a similar manner, and stimulated cAMP accumulation in MCs in a concentration-dependent manner. A protein kinase A inhibitor, H-89, abolished the inhibitory effects of CDH on MC mitogenesis. These findings suggest that CDH would inhibit the proliferation of rat MCs via the cAMP pathway.

  17. A jack of all trades: the multiple roles of the unique essential second messenger cyclic di-AMP.

    PubMed

    Commichau, Fabian M; Dickmanns, Achim; Gundlach, Jan; Ficner, Ralf; Stülke, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Second messengers are key components of many signal transduction pathways. In addition to cyclic AMP, ppGpp and cyclic di-GMP, many bacteria use also cyclic di-AMP as a second messenger. This molecule is synthesized by distinct classes of diadenylate cyclases and degraded by phosphodiesterases. The control of the intracellular c-di-AMP pool is very important since both a lack of this molecule and its accumulation can inhibit growth of the bacteria. In many firmicutes, c-di-AMP is essential, making it the only known essential second messenger. Cyclic di-AMP is implicated in a variety of functions in the cell, including cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, DNA repair and the control of gene expression. To understand the molecular mechanisms behind these functions, targets of c-di-AMP have been identified and characterized. Interestingly, c-di-AMP can bind both proteins and RNA molecules. Several proteins that interact with c-di-AMP are required to control the intracellular potassium concentration. In Bacillus subtilis, c-di-AMP also binds a riboswitch that controls the expression of a potassium transporter. Thus, c-di-AMP is the only known second messenger that controls a biological process by interacting with both a protein and the riboswitch that regulates its expression. Moreover, in Listeria monocytogenes c-di-AMP controls the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, an enzyme that is required to replenish the citric acid cycle. Here, we review the components of the c-di-AMP signaling system.

  18. Interrogating cyclic AMP signaling using optical approaches.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jason Y; Falcone, Jeffrey L; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2017-03-01

    Optical reporters for cAMP represent a fundamental advancement in our ability to investigate the dynamics of cAMP signaling. These fluorescent sensors can measure changes in cAMP in single cells or in microdomains within cells as opposed to whole populations of cells required for other methods of measuring cAMP. The first optical cAMP reporters were FRET-based sensors utilizing dissociation of purified regulatory and catalytic subunits of PKA, introduced by Roger Tsien in the early 1990s. The utility of these sensors was vastly improved by creating genetically encoded versions that could be introduced into cells with transfection, the first of which was published in the year 2000. Subsequently, improved sensors have been developed using different cAMP binding platforms, optimized fluorescent proteins, and targeting motifs that localize to specific microdomains. The most common sensors in use today are FRET-based sensors designed around an Epac backbone. These rely on the significant conformational changes in Epac when it binds cAMP, altering the signal between FRET pairs flanking Epac. Several other strategies for optically interrogating cAMP have been developed, including fluorescent translocation reporters, dimerization-dependent FP based biosensors, BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer)-based sensors, non-FRET single wavelength reporters, and sensors based on bacterial cAMP-binding domains. Other newly described mammalian cAMP-binding proteins such as Popdc and CRIS may someday be exploited in sensor design. With the proliferation of engineered fluorescent proteins and the abundance of cAMP binding targets in nature, the field of optical reporters for cAMP should continue to see rapid refinement in the coming years.

  19. cAMP-COUPLED RIBOFLAVIN TRAFFICKING IN PLACENTAL TROPHOBLASTS

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Vanessa M.; Foraker, Amy B.; Free, R. Benjamin; Ray, Abhijit; Shapiro, Paul S.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Riboflavin (RF, vitamin B2), an essential micronutrient central to cellular metabolism through formation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors, is internalized, at least in part, via a proposed receptor-mediated endocytic (RME) process. The purpose of this study was to delineate the cellular RF distribution using human placental trophoblasts, and evaluate the regulatory role of cAMP in this process. Subcellular fractionation and 3-D confocal microscopy analyses were carried out to define the RF accumulation profile. Biochemical assays evaluating the cAMP dependence of this pathway were also performed. The present study records an intracellular RF distribution pattern that shows dynamic accumulation of the ligand predominantly, to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments and to a lesser extent to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, transferrin (TF) colocalizes rapidly within endosomes with minimal accumulation in the other organelles. Temporal and spatial distribution of RF and TF colocalized with unique markers of the endocytic machinery provide added morphological evidence in support of the RME process with ultimate translocation to the mitochondrial domain. Colocalized staining with the Golgi also suggests a possible recycling or exocytic mechanism for this ligand. Furthermore, this study demonstrates cAMP regulation of the putative ligand-bound RF receptor and its association into endocytic vesicles. Delineating the dynamics of the process governing cellular RF homeostasis presents an untapped resource that can be further exploited to improve our current understanding of nutritional biology and fetal growth and development, and perhaps target the endogenous system to develop novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:16681382

  20. Gene expression and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Y; Reich, E

    1985-01-01

    By comparing the 5'-flanking region of the porcine gene for the urokinase form of plasminogen activator with those of other cAMP-regulated genes, we identify a 29-nucleotide sequence that is tentatively proposed as the cAMP-regulatory unit. Homologous sequences are present (i) in the cAMP-regulated rat tyrosine aminotransferase, prolactin, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase genes and (ii) 5' to the transcription initiation sites of cAMP-regulated Escherichia coli genes. From this we conclude that the expression of cAMP-responsive genes in higher eukaryotes may be controlled, as in E. coli, by proteins that form complexes with cAMP and then show sequence-specific DNA-binding properties. The complex formed by cAMP and the regulatory subunit of the type II mammalian protein kinase might be one candidate for this function. Based on several homologies we suggest that this subunit may have retained both the DNA-binding specificity and transcription-regulating properties in addition to the nucleotide-binding domains of the bacterial cAMP-binding protein. If this were so, dissociation of protein kinase by cAMP would activate two processes: (i) protein phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit and (ii) transcription regulation by the regulatory subunit. PMID:2991882

  1. Termination of cAMP signals by Ca2+ and Gαi via extracellular Ca2+ sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gerbino, Andrea; Ruder, Warren C.; Curci, Silvana; Pozzan, Tullio; Zaccolo, Manuela; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2005-01-01

    Termination of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling via the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) was visualized in single CaR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells using ratiometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer–dependent cAMP sensors based on protein kinase A and Epac. Stimulation of CaR rapidly reversed or prevented agonist-stimulated elevation of cAMP through a dual mechanism involving pertussis toxin–sensitive Gαi and the CaR-stimulated increase in intracellular [Ca2+]. In parallel measurements with fura-2, CaR activation elicited robust Ca2+ oscillations that increased in frequency in the presence of cAMP, eventually fusing into a sustained plateau. Considering the Ca2+ sensitivity of cAMP accumulation in these cells, lack of oscillations in [cAMP] during the initial phases of CaR stimulation was puzzling. Additional experiments showed that low-frequency, long-duration Ca2+ oscillations generated a dynamic staircase pattern in [cAMP], whereas higher frequency spiking had no effect. Our data suggest that the cAMP machinery in HEK cells acts as a low-pass filter disregarding the relatively rapid Ca2+ spiking stimulated by Ca2+-mobilizing agonists under physiological conditions. PMID:16247029

  2. Actions of neuropoietic cytokines and cyclic AMP in regenerative conditioning of rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yi; Bo, Xuenong; Huang, Wenlong; Xiao, Fang; Zhang, Xinyu; Miao, Tizong; Magoulas, Charalambos; Subang, Maria C; Richardson, Peter M

    2007-03-01

    A conditioning lesion to peripheral axons of primary sensory neurons accelerates regeneration of their central axons in vivo or neurite outgrowth if the neurons are grown in vitro. Previous evidence has implicated neuropoietic cytokines and also cyclic AMP in regenerative conditioning. In experiments reported here, delivery through a lentivirus vector of ciliary neurotrophic factor to the appropriate dorsal root ganglion in rats was sufficient to mimic the conditioning effect of peripheral nerve injury on the regeneration of dorsal spinal nerve root axons. Regeneration in this experimental preparation was also stimulated by intraganglionic injection of dibutyryl cyclic AMP but the effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and dibutyryl cyclic AMP were not additive. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP injection into the dorsal root ganglion induced mRNAs for two other neuropoietic cytokines, interleukin-6 and leukemia inhibitory factor and increased the accumulation of phosphorylated STAT3 in neuronal nuclei. The in vitro conditioning action of dibutyryl cyclic AMP was partially blocked by a pharmacological inhibitor of Janus kinase 2, a neuropoietic cytokine signaling molecule. We suggest that the beneficial actions of increased cyclic AMP activity on axonal regeneration of primary sensory neurons are mediated, at least in part, through the induction of neuropoietic cytokine synthesis within the dorsal root ganglion.

  3. Constitutional abnormalities of chromosome 21 predispose to iAMP21-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire

    2016-03-01

    In addition to Down syndrome, individuals with other constitutional abnormalities of chromosome 21 have an increased risk of developing childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Specifically, carriers of the Robertsonian translocation between chromosomes 15 and 21, rob(15;21) (q10; q10)c, have ∼2,700 increased risk of developing ALL with iAMP21 (intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21). In these patients, chromosome 15 as well as chromosome 21 is involved in the formation of iAMP21, referred to here as der(21)(15;21). Individuals with constitutional ring chromosomes involving chromosome 21, r(21)c, are also predisposed to iAMP21-ALL, involving the same series of mutational processes as seen in sporadic- and der(21)(15;21)-iAMP21 ALL. Evidence is accumulating that the dicentric nature of the Robertsonian and ring chromosome is the initiating factor in the formation of the complex iAMP21 structure. Unravelling these intriguing predispositions to iAMP21-ALL may provide insight into how other complex rearrangements arise in cancer.

  4. Regulation of rhythmic melatonin production in pineal cells of chick embryo by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Macková, M; Lamosová, D; Zeman, M

    1998-05-01

    The pineal cells of chick embryos incubated in vitro exhibited a daily rhythm of melatonin synthesis under a 12:12 light:dark (LD) cycle at the embryonic days 16 and 19. In order to elucidate whether cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)--a component of the melatonin generating system--is already at work in the embryonic period, we measured the effects of forskolin and isobuthylmethylxantine (IBMX) on melatonin production, cAMP efflux and accumulation. Forskolin (after 10, 20, 30, 45, 60 and 90 min of administration) and IBMX (6 h), when applied during the light phase of LD cycle, stimulated melatonin production and cAMP efflux and accumulation during the embryonic period (at days 16 and 19 fo development). Our results suggest that the biochemical pathway involving cAMP, which controls melatonin production in the postnatal period, is developed before hatching and already on embryonic day 19 works in a way similar to that in post-hatched chicks. Differences in response to cAMP stimulation between 16- and 19-day-old pinealocytes seem to be mostly quantitative.

  5. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Epperson, L Elaine; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T; Rivard, Christopher J; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  6. Vv-AMP1, a ripening induced peptide from Vitis vinifera shows strong antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Abré; Vivier, Melané A

    2008-01-01

    Background Latest research shows that small antimicrobial peptides play a role in the innate defense system of plants. These peptides typically contribute to preformed defense by developing protective barriers around germinating seeds or between different tissue layers within plant organs. The encoding genes could also be upregulated by abiotic and biotic stimuli during active defense processes. The peptides display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. Their potent anti-pathogenic characteristics have ensured that they are promising targets in the medical and agricultural biotechnology sectors. Results A berry specific cDNA sequence designated Vv-AMP1, Vitis vinifera antimicrobial peptide 1, was isolated from Vitis vinifera. Vv-AMP1 encodes for a 77 amino acid peptide that shows sequence homology to the family of plant defensins. Vv-AMP1 is expressed in a tissue specific, developmentally regulated manner, being only expressed in berry tissue at the onset of berry ripening and onwards. Treatment of leaf and berry tissue with biotic or abiotic factors did not lead to increased expression of Vv-AMP1 under the conditions tested. The predicted signal peptide of Vv-AMP1, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP), showed that the signal peptide allowed accumulation of its product in the apoplast. Vv-AMP1 peptide, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.495 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry. Recombinant Vv-AMP1 was extremely heat-stable and showed strong antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, with very high levels of activity against the wilting disease causing pathogens Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The Vv-AMP1 peptide did not induce morphological changes on the treated fungal hyphae, but instead strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of Vv-AMP1 might be associated with altering the membrane permeability of the fungal

  7. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M.; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:26361388

  8. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  9. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  10. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  11. Histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the chick pineal gland: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Zawilska, J B; Woldan-Tambor, A; Nowak, J Z

    1997-08-15

    The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in histamine (HA)-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in intact chick pineal glands was investigated. In the pineal gland of chick HA, 2-methylHA, 4-methylHA, and N alpha, N alpha-dimethylHA potently increased cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of intact glands with PKC inhibitors, i.e. chelerythrine and stautosporine, reduced the stimulatory effect of the HA-ergic compounds on cyclic AMP formation. HA, 2-methylHA, 4-methylHA, and N alpha, N alpha-dimethylHA significantly increased inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) levels in intact chick pineal glands, indicating their activities on phospholipase C and 1,2-diacylglycerol formation. The stimulatory effect of HA on IP3 levels was antagonized by aminopotentidine, a potent blocker of H2-like HA receptors in avian pineal gland. Preincubation of chick pineal glands with a PKC activator, 4 beta-phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (4 beta-PDB), enhanced the accumulation of cyclic AMP elicited by HA, 2-methylHA, 4-methylHA, and N alpha, N alpha-dimethylHA. On the other hand, 4 beta-phorbol, inactive on the PKC, was ineffective. Our results point to the possibility that PKC is involved in the regulation by HA of cyclic AMP synthesis in the pineal gland of chick. Furthermore, the cyclic AMP response to pineal HA receptor stimulation can be positively modulated by a concomitant activation of the PKC pathway.

  12. C++ Coding Standards for the AMP Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M; Clarno, Kevin T

    2009-09-01

    This document provides an initial starting point to define the C++ coding standards used by the AMP nuclear fuel performance integrated code project and a part of AMP's software development process. This document draws from the experiences, and documentation [1], of the developers of the Marmot Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Much of the software in AMP will be written in C++. The power of C++ can be abused easily, resulting in code that is difficult to understand and maintain. This document gives the practices that should be followed on the AMP project for all new code that is written. The intent is not to be onerous but to ensure that the code can be readily understood by the entire code team and serve as a basis for collectively defining a set of coding standards for use in future development efforts. At the end of the AMP development in fiscal year (FY) 2010, all developers will have experience with the benefits, restrictions, and limitations of the standards described and will collectively define a set of standards for future software development. External libraries that AMP uses do not have to meet these requirements, although we encourage external developers to follow these practices. For any code of which AMP takes ownership, the project will decide on any changes on a case-by-case basis. The practices that we are using in the AMP project have been in use in the Denovo project [2] for several years. The practices build on those given in References [3-5]; the practices given in these references should also be followed. Some of the practices given in this document can also be found in [6].

  13. Depigmenting action of platycodin D depends on the cAMP/Rho-dependent signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Hwang, Wangtaek; Kim, Seungbeom; Kim, Young-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2011-12-01

    The overproduction and accumulation of melanin in the skin could lead to a pigmentary disorders, such as melasma, freckle, postinflammatory melanoderma and solar lentigo. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of platycodin D (PD) on melanogenesis and its action mechanisms. In this study, we found that PD significantly inhibited melanin synthesis at low concentrations. These effects were further demonstrated by the PD-induced inhibition of cAMP production, phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein and expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and its downstream genes, tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins-1 and Dct/tyrosinase-related proteins-2, suggesting that PD inhibits melanogenesis through the downregulation of cAMP signalling. Furthermore, PD induced significant morphological changes in melanocytes, namely, the retraction of dendrites. A small GTPase assays revealed that PD stimulated an increase in GTP-bound Rho content, one of downstream molecules of cAMP, but not in Rac or CDC42 content. Moreover, a Rho inhibitor (C3 exoenzyme) and a Rho kinase inhibitor (Y27632) attenuated the dendrite retraction induced by PD. Taken together, these findings indicate that PD inhibits melanogenesis by inhibiting the cAMP-protein kinase A pathway and also suppresses melanocyte dendricity through activation of the Rho signal that is mediated by PD-induced reduction in cAMP production. Therefore, these results suggest that PD exerts its inhibitory effects on melanogenesis and melanocyte dendricity via suppression of cAMP signalling and may be introduced as an inhibitor of hyperpigmentation caused by UV irradiation or pigmented skin disorders.

  14. AMP metabolism in the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens.

    PubMed

    Pickard, M A; Whelihan, J A; Knowles, C J

    1980-05-01

    The catabolism of AMP by preparations from Beneckea natriegens has been reexamined. In the absence of ATP, cell-free extracts catabolized AMP via adenosine to inosine. When ATP was present, adenylate kinase converted AMP to ADP, lowering the rate of AMP catabolism. Particle-free supernatants (225,000 x g) metabolized AMP alone slowly, but adenylate kinase was active when ATP was added. Washed particulate fractions contained AMP nucleotidase activity which converted AMP to adenosine; in the presence of ATP, adenosine formation was reduced by residual adenylate kinase associated with the particulate fraction. IMP was not detected as a metabolite in these experiments.

  15. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Small Molecules Targeting Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP (EPAC)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Wild, Christopher; Zhou, Xiaobin; Ye, Na; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    cAMP is a pivotal second messenger that regulates numerous biological processes under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart failure, inflammation and neurological disorders. In the past, all effects of cAMP were initially believed to be mediated by PKA and cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. Since the discovery of EPAC proteins in 1998, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the net cellular effects of cAMP are also regulated by EPAC. The pursuit of the biological functions of EPAC has benefited from the development and applications of a growing number of pharmacological probes targeting EPAC proteins. In this Perspective, we seek to provide a concise update on recent advances in the development of chemical entities including various membrane-permeable analogues of cAMP and newly discovered EPAC-specific ligands from high throughput assays and hit-to-lead optimizations. PMID:24256330

  16. Epac1 interacts with importin β1 and controls neurite outgrowth independently of cAMP and Rap1

    PubMed Central

    Baameur, Faiza; Singhmar, Pooja; Zhou, Yong; Hancock, John F.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP-1 (Epac1) is a cAMP sensor that regulates multiple cellular functions including cellular migration, proliferation and differentiation. Classically, Epac1 is thought to exert its effects through binding of cAMP leading to a conformational change in Epac1 and its accumulation at the plasma membrane (PM) where it activates Rap1. In search for regulators of Epac1 activity, we show here that importin β1 (impβ1) is an Epac1 binding partner that prevents PM accumulation of Epac1. We demonstrate that in the absence of impβ1, endogenous as well as overexpressed Epac1 accumulate at the PM. Moreover, agonist-induced PM translocation of Epac1 leads to dissociation of Epac1 from impβ1. Localization of Epac1 at the PM in the absence of impβ1, requires residue R82 in its DEP domain. Notably, the PM accumulation of Epac1 in the absence of impβ1 does not require binding of cAMP to Epac1 and does not result in Rap1 activation. Functionally, PM accumulation of Epac1, an Epac1 mutant deficient in cAMP binding, or an Epac1 mutant tethered to the PM, is sufficient to inhibit neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, we uncover a cAMP-independent function of Epac1 at the PM and demonstrate that impβ1 controls subcellular localization of Epac1. PMID:27808165

  17. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study. Volume 4. Part 1, AMPS program specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    The AMPS Program Specification delineates the AMPS Program requirements consistent with the resources defined in the AMPS Project Plan. All subsidiary specifications and requirements shall conform to the requirements presented. The requirements hierarchy for the AMPS program is illustrated. A brief description of each of the requirements documents and their intended use is provided.

  18. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of antimicrobial peptides, Cy-AMP1, Cy-AMP2, and Cy-AMP3, from the Cycad (Cycas revoluta) seeds.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Seiya; Kato, Kouji; Koba, Atsuko; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Yagi, Fumio

    2008-12-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Cy-AMP1, Cy-AMP2, and Cy-AMP3, were purified from seeds of the cycad (Cycas revoluta) by a CM cellulofine column, ion-exchange HPLC on SP COSMOGEL, and reverse-phase HPLC. They had molecular masses of 4583.2 Da, 4568.9 Da and 9275.8 Da, respectively, by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Half of the amino acid residues of Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2 were cysteine, glycine and proline, and their sequences were similar. The sequence of Cy-AMP3 showed high homology to various lipid transfer proteins. For Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2, the concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were 7.0-8.9 microg/ml. The Cy-AMP3 had weak antimicrobial activity. The structural and antimicrobial characteristics of Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2 indicated that they are a novel type of antimicrobial peptide belonging to a plant defensin family.

  19. Germanium accumulation-mode charge-injection-device process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. G.

    1981-01-01

    Gallium doped germanium is suitable for applications in the detection of far infrared radiation. Measurements were made on experimental photoconductors (PCs), accumulation mode charge injection devices (AMCIDs), and the SSPC (a switched, sampled PC alternative to the AMCID). The results indicate that the SSPC, which had a responsivity near 1.5 amp/watt, is desirable for use in two dimensional detector arrays.

  20. The localization and concentration of the PDE2-encoded high-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Liu, Enkai; Bai, Xiaojia; Zhang, Aili

    2010-03-01

    The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes two cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, a low-affinity one, Pde1, and a high-affinity one, Pde2. Pde1 has been ascribed a function for downregulating agonist-induced cAMP accumulation in a protein kinase A (PKA)-governed negative feedback loop, whereas Pde2 controls the basal cAMP level in the cell. Here we show that PKA regulates the localization and protein concentration of Pde2. Pde2 is accumulated in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing on glucose, or in strains with hyperactive PKA. In contrast, in derepressed wild-type cells or cells with attenuated PKA activity, Pde2 is distributed over the nucleus and cytoplasm. We also show evidence indicating that the Pde2 protein level is positively correlated with PKA activity. The increase in the Pde2 protein level in high-PKA strains and in cells growing on glucose was due to its increased half-life. These results suggest that, like its low-affinity counterpart, the high-affinity phosphodiesterase may also play an important role in the PKA-controlled feedback inhibition of intracellular cAMP.

  1. -Adrenergic receptors on rat ventricular myocytes: characteristics and linkage to cAMP metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    When incubated with purified cardiomyocytes from adult rat ventricle, the 1-antagonist (TH)prazosin binds to a single class of sites with high affinity. Competition for (TH)prazosin binding by the 2-selective antagonist yohimbine and the nonselective -antagonist phentolamine demonstrates that these receptors are of the 1-subtype. In addition, incubation of myocyte membranes with (TH)yohimbine results in no measurable specific binding. Agonist competition for (TH)prazosin binding to membranes prepared from purified myocytes demonstrates the presence of two components of binding: 28% of 1-receptors interact with norepinephrine with high affinity (K/sub D/ = 36 nM), whereas the majority of receptors (72%) have a low affinity for agonist (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). After addition of 10 M GTP, norepinephrine competes for (TH)prazosin binding to a single class of sites with lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). Incubation of intact myocytes for 2 min with 1 M norepinephrine leads to significantly less cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation than stimulation with either norepinephrine plus prazosin or isoproterenol. Likewise, incubation of intact myocytes with 10 W M norepinephrine leads to significantly less activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase than when myocytes are stimulated by both norepinephrine and the 1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin or the US -adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. They conclude that the cardiomyocyte 1 receptor is coupled to a guanine nucleotide-binding protein, that 1-receptors are functionally linked to decreased intracellular cAMP content, and that this change in cellular cAMP is expressed as described activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  2. Anti-tumor activity and mechanism of action for a cyanoaziridine-derivative, AMP423

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Lee; Samulitis, Betty K.; Landowski, Terry H.; Remers, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical studies evaluated the anti-tumor activity and mechanism of action of AMP423, a naphthyl derivative of 2-cyanoaziridine-1-carboxamide with structural similarity to the pro-oxidant anti-tumor agent imexon. Methods The cytotoxic potency was evaluated in vitro against a variety of human cancer cell lines. Mechanism-of-action studies were performed in the human 8226/S myeloma cell line and its imexon-resistant variant, 8226/IM10. In vivo activity was evaluated against human myeloma and lymphoma xenografts in SCID mice. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology were investigated in non-tumor-bearing mice. Results The 72-h IC50s for all cell types ranged from 2 to 36 μM, across a wide variety of human cancer cell lines. AMP423 was active in SCID mice bearing 8226/S myeloma and SU-DHL-6 B-cell lymphoma tumors, with a median tumor growth delay (T–C) of 21 days (P = 0.0002) and 5 days (P = 0.004), respectively, and a median tumor growth inhibition (T/C) of 33.3% (P = 0.03) and 82% (P = 0.01), respectively. In non-tumor-bearing mice, AMP423 was not myelosuppressive. Mechanistic studies show that AMP423’s mode of cell death is a mixture of necrosis and apoptosis, with generation of reactive oxygen species, inhibition of protein synthesis, and a decrease in reduced sulfhydryl levels, but no alkylation of nucleophiles. Unlike its structural analog imexon, which causes cell cycle arrest in G2/M, AMP423 induces the accumulation of cells in S-phase. Conclusions AMP423 has pro-oxidant effects similar to imexon, has greater cytotoxic potency in vitro, and has anti-tumor activity in hematologic tumors in vivo. PMID:22186884

  3. Effect of some new cAMP analogs on cAMP-dependent protein kinase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Szücs, K; Sági, G; Vereb, G

    1992-06-01

    1. Ten new cAMP analogs were synthesized by replacing the purine ring with with indazole, benzimidazole or benztriazole and/or their nitro and amino derivatives. 2. Each analog proved effective in activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase I (PK-I) purified from rabbit skeletal muscle and cAMP-dependent protein kinase II (PK-II) from bovine heart and chasing 8-[3H]cAMP bound to regulatory subunits in the half-maximal effective concentrations of 2 x 10(-8)-8 x 10(-6) M. 3. The N-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-indazole-3'5'-cyclophosphate(I) proved a very poor chaser and activator of both isoenzymes, but when indazole was attached at its N-2 to ribose (IV) or when its H at C-4 (equivalent to the position of amino-group in adenine) was substituted by an amino-(III) or especially nitro-group (II) its efficiency was dramatically increased. 4. Analogs containing benztriazole ring proved as powerful as cAMP irrespective of the presence of substituents (VII-X). 5. Benzimidazole derivatives with amino-(VI) or nitro-group (V) activated PK-II 3 and 20 times better than PK-I. 6. Attaching of ribose to N-2 of indazole or benztriazole increased the affinity to PK-II 10 and 4 times, respectively. 7. Chasing efficiency of cAMP analogs at half-saturating [3H]cAMP tended to correlate with activating potency only for PK-I but at saturating [3H]cAMP concentration for both isoenzymes. 8. On the basis of synergistic activation with 8-Br-cAMP a site 2-selective binding of nitro-benzimidazole (V) and unsubstituted benztriazole (VII) derivatives to PK-II is suggested.

  4. Coordination between proteasome impairment and caspase activation leading to TAU pathology: neuroprotection by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, M J; Huang, Q; Figueiredo-Pereira, M E

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main component of NFTs is TAU, a highly soluble microtubule-associated protein. However, when TAU is cleaved at Asp421 by caspases it becomes prone to aggregation leading to NFTs. What triggers caspase activation resulting in TAU cleavage remains unclear. We investigated in rat cortical neurons a potential coordination between proteasome impairment and caspase activation. We demonstrate that upon proteasome inhibition, the early accumulation of detergent-soluble ubiquitinated (SUb) proteins paves the way to caspase activation and TAU pathology. This occurs with two drugs that inhibit the proteasome by different means: the product of inflammation prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2) and epoxomicin. Our results pinpoint a critical early event, that is, the buildup of SUb proteins that contributes to caspase activation, TAU cleavage, TAU/Ub-protein aggregation and neuronal death. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that elevating cAMP in neurons with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or the lipophilic peptide PACAP27 prevents/diminishes caspase activation, TAU cleavage and neuronal death induced by PGJ2, as long as these PGJ2-induced changes are moderate. db-cAMP also stimulated proteasomes, and mitigated proteasome inhibition induced by PGJ2. We propose that targeting cAMP/PKA to boost proteasome activity in a sustainable manner could offer an effective approach to avoid early accumulation of SUb proteins and later caspase activation, and TAU cleavage, possibly preventing/delaying AD neurodegeneration. PMID:22717581

  5. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Cureri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  6. Altered beta-adrenergic receptor-stimulated cAMP formation in cultured skin fibroblasts from Alzheimer donors.

    PubMed

    Huang, H M; Gibson, G E

    1993-07-15

    An alteration in signal transduction systems in Alzheimer's disease would likely be of pathophysiological significance, because these steps are critical to normal brain function. Since dynamic processes are difficult to study in autopsied brain, the current studies utilized cultured skin fibroblasts. The beta-adrenergic-stimulated increase in cAMP was reduced approximately 80% in fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease compared with age-matched controls. The deficit in Alzheimer fibroblasts in response to various adrenergic agonists paralleled their beta-adrenergic potency, and enhancement of cAMP accumulation by a non-adrenergic agonist, such as prostaglandin E1, was similar in Alzheimer and control fibroblasts. Diminished adenylate cyclase activity did not underlie these abnormalities, since direct stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin elevated cAMP production equally in Alzheimer and control fibroblasts. Cholera toxin equally stimulated cAMP formation in Alzheimer and control fibroblasts. Moreover, cholera toxin partially reduced isoproterenol-induced cAMP deficit in Alzheimer fibroblasts. Pertussis toxin, on the other hand, did not alter the Alzheimer deficits. The results suggest either that the coupling of the GTP-binding protein(s) to the beta-adrenergic receptor is abnormal or that the sensitivity of receptor is altered with Alzheimer's disease. Further, any hypothesis about Alzheimer's disease must explain why a reduced beta-adrenergic-stimulated cAMP formation persists in tissue culture.

  7. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  8. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  9. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  10. Angiotensin II counteracts the effects of cAMP/PKA on NHE3 activity and phosphorylation in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Crajoinas, Renato O; Polidoro, Juliano Z; Carneiro de Morais, Carla P A; Castelo-Branco, Regiane C; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2016-11-01

    Binding of angiotensin II (ANG II) to the AT1 receptor (AT1R) in the proximal tubule stimulates Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) activity through multiple signaling pathways. However, the effects of ANG II/AT1R-induced inihibitory G protein (Gi) activation and subsequent decrease in cAMP accumulation on NHE3 regulation are not well established. We therefore tested the hypothesis that ANG II reduces cAMP/PKA-mediated phosphorylation of NHE3 on serine 552 and, in doing so, stimulates NHE3 activity. Under basal conditions, ANG II stimulated NHE3 activity but did not affect PKA-mediated NHE3 phosphorylation at serine 552 in opossum kidney (OKP) cells. However, in the presence of the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin (FSK), ANG II blocked FSK-induced NHE3 inhibition, reduced intracellular cAMP concentrations, lowered PKA activity, and prevented the FSK-mediated increase in NHE3 serine 552 phosphorylation. All effects of ANG II were blocked by pretreating OKP cells with the AT1R antagonist losartan, highlighting the contribution of the AT1R/Gi pathway in ANG II-mediated NHE3 upregulation under cAMP-elevating conditions. Accordingly, Gi inhibition by pertussis toxin treatment decreased NHE3 activity both in vitro and in vivo and, more importantly, prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II on NHE3 activity in rat proximal tubules. Collectively, our results suggest that ANG II counteracts the effects of cAMP/PKA on NHE3 phosphorylation and inhibition by activating the AT1R/Gi pathway. Moreover, these findings support the notion that NHE3 dephosphorylation at serine 552 may represent a key event in the regulation of renal proximal tubule sodium handling by ANG II in the presence of natriuretic hormones that promote cAMP accumulation and transporter phosphorylation.

  11. AMPS/PC - AUTOMATIC MANUFACTURING PROGRAMMING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The AMPS/PC system is a simulation tool designed to aid the user in defining the specifications of a manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. The domain of problems that AMPS/PC can simulate are manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. The user defines the problem domain by responding to the questions from the interface program. Based on the responses, the interface program creates an internal problem specification file. This file includes the manufacturing process network flow and the attributes for all stations, cells, and stock points. AMPS then uses the problem specification file as input for the automatic code generator program to produce a simulation program in the target language GPSS. The output of the generator program is the source code of the corresponding GPSS/PC simulation program. The system runs entirely on an IBM PC running PC DOS Version 2.0 or higher and is written in Turbo Pascal Version 4 requiring 640K memory and one 360K disk drive. To execute the GPSS program, the PC must have resident the GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The AMPS/PC program was developed in 1988.

  12. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  13. AMPS Supporting Research and Technology (SR and T) report. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A listing of candidate technology areas that require additional study is presented. These candidate tasks, identified during the AMPS Phase B studies, are requisites to the design, development, and operation of the AMPS concept selected for preliminary design.

  14. Detection of cyclic di-AMP using a competitive ELISA with a unique pneumococcal cyclic di-AMP binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Adam J.; Zhang, Yang; Metzger, Dennis W.; Bai, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a signaling molecule that has been shown to play important roles in bacterial physiology and infections. Currently, c-di-AMP detection and quantification relies mostly on the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of c-di-AMP was developed, which utilizes a novel pneumococcal c-di-AMP binding protein (CabP) and a newly commercialized c-di-AMP derivative. With this new method, c-di-AMP concentrations in biological samples can be quickly and accurately quantified. Furthermore, this assay is much more efficient than current methods as it requires less overall cost and training while processing many samples at once. Therefore, this assay can be extensively used in research into c-di-AMP signaling. PMID:25239824

  15. Functional status and relationships of melanocortin 1 receptor signaling to the cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathways in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Journé, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2012-12-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a major determinant of skin phototype frequently mutated in melanoma, is a Gs protein-coupled receptor that regulates pigment production in melanocytes. MC1R stimulation activates cAMP synthesis and the extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) ERK1 and ERK2. In human melanocytes, ERK activation by MC1R relies on cAMP-independent transactivation of the c-KIT receptor. Thus MC1R functional coupling to the cAMP and ERK pathways may involve different structural requirements giving raise to biased effects of skin cancer-associated mutations. We evaluated the impact of MC1R mutations on ERK activation, cAMP production and agonist binding. We found that MC1R mutations impair cAMP production much more often than ERK activation, suggesting less stringent requirements for functional coupling to the ERK pathway. We examined the crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL human melanoma cells (wild-type for MC1R, NRAS and BRAF). ERK activation by constitutively active upstream effectors or pharmacological inhibition had little effect on MC1R-stimulated cAMP synthesis. High cAMP levels were compatible with normal ERK activation but, surprisingly, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin abolished ERK activation by MC1R, most likely by a cAMP-independent mechanism. These results indicate little crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL melanoma cells. Finally, we studied cAMP accumulation in a panel of 22 human melanoma cell lines stimulated with MC1R agonists or forskolin. cAMP synthesis was often inhibited, even in cells wild-type for MC1R and NRAS. Therefore, the cAMP pathway is more frequently impaired in melanoma than could be predicted by the MC1R or NRAS genotype.

  16. The therapeutic applications of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): a patent review.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Cheolmin; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activities against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and viruses and cytotoxic activity on cancer cells, in addition to anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Therefore, AMPs have garnered interest as novel therapeutic agents. Because of the rapid increase in drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, AMPs from synthetic and natural sources have been developed using alternative antimicrobial strategies. This article presents a broad analysis of patents referring to the therapeutic applications of AMPs since 2009. The review focuses on the universal trends in the effective design, mechanism, and biological evolution of AMPs.

  17. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) Receptor Protein-cAMP Complex Regulates Heparosan Production in Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihui; Bao, Feifei; Zhao, Liping; Yu, Yanying; Tang, Jiaqin; Zhou, Xianxuan

    2015-11-01

    Heparosan serves as the starting carbon backbone for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin, a widely used clinical anticoagulant drug. The availability of heparosan is a significant concern for the cost-effective synthesis of bioengineered heparin. The carbon source is known as the pivotal factor affecting heparosan production. However, the mechanism by which carbon sources control the biosynthesis of heparosan is unclear. In this study, we found that the biosynthesis of heparosan was influenced by different carbon sources. Glucose inhibits the biosynthesis of heparosan, while the addition of either fructose or mannose increases the yield of heparosan. Further study demonstrated that the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex binds to the upstream region of the region 3 promoter and stimulates the transcription of the gene cluster for heparosan biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CRP binding site abolished its capability of binding CRP and eliminated the stimulative effect on transcription. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis was further performed to determine the Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) heparosan structure and quantify extracellular heparosan production. Our results add to the understanding of the regulation of heparosan biosynthesis and may contribute to the study of other exopolysaccharide-producing strains.

  18. p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K mediates cAMP-PKA and estrogens biological effects on growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Di Domenico, M; Porcellini, A; Cuozzo, C; De Gregorio, G; Santillo, M R; Agnese, S; Di Stasio, R; Feliciello, A; Migliaccio, A; Avvedimento, E V

    2007-03-29

    Cyclic adenosine 3'5' monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) cooperate with phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3K) signals in the control of growth and survival. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) involved, we identified and mutagenized a specific serine (residue 83) in p85alpha(PI3K), which is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by PKA. Expression of p85alpha(PI3K) mutants (alanine or aspartic substitutions) significantly altered the biological responses of the cells to cAMP. cAMP protection from anoikis was reduced in cells expressing the alanine version p85alpha(PI3K). These cells did not arrest in G1 in the presence of cAMP, whereas cells expressing the aspartic mutant p85D accumulated in G1 even in the absence of cAMP. S phase was still efficiently inhibited by cAMP in cells expressing both mutants. The binding of PI3K to Ras p21 was greatly reduced in cells expressing p85A in the presence or absence of cAMP. Conversely, expression of the aspartic mutant stimulated robustly the binding of PI3K to p21 Ras in the presence of cAMP. Mutation in the Ser 83 inhibited cAMP, but not PDGF stimulation of PI3K. Conversely, the p85D aspartic mutant amplified cAMP stimulation of PI3K activity. Phosphorylation of Ser 83 by cAMP-PKA in p85alpha(PI3K) was also necessary for estrogen signaling as expression of p85A or p85D mutants inhibited or amplified, respectively, the binding of estrogen receptor to p85alpha and AKT phosphorylation induced by estrogens. The data presented indicate that: (1) phosphorylation of Ser 83 in p85alpha(PI3K) is critical for cAMP-PKA induced G1 arrest and survival in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts; (2) this site is necessary for amplification of estrogen signals by cAMP-PKA and related receptors. Finally, these data suggest a general mechanism of PI3K regulation by cAMP, operating in various cell types and under different conditions.

  19. Modulation of signaling through GPCR-cAMP-PKA pathways by PDE4 depends on stimulus intensity: Possible implications for the pathogenesis of acrodysostosis without hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Motte, Emmanuelle; Le Stunff, Catherine; Briet, Claire; Dumaz, Nicolas; Silve, Caroline

    2017-02-15

    In acrodysostosis without hormone resistance, a disease caused by phosphodiesterase (PDE)-4D mutations, increased PDE activity leads to bone developmental defects but with normal renal responses to PTH. To identify potential mechanisms for these disparate responses, we compared the effect of PDE activity on hormone signaling through the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA pathway in cells from two lineages, HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing PTH1R (HEKpthr) and human dermal fibroblasts, including studies evaluating cAMP levels using an Epac-based BRET-sensor for cAMP (CAMYEL). For ligand-induced responses inducing strong cAMP accumulation, the inhibition of PDE4 activity resulted in relatively small further increases. In contrast, when ligand-induced cAMP accumulation was of lesser intensity, the inhibition of PDE4 had a more pronounced effect. Similar results were obtained evaluating downstream events (cellular CREB phosphorylation and CRE-luciferase activity). Thus, the ability of PDE4 to modulate signaling through GPCR-cAMP-PKA pathways can depend on the cell type and stimulus intensity.

  20. Fiscal Year 2011 Infrastructure Refactorizations in AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Berrill, Mark A.; Philip, Bobby; Sampath, Rahul S.; Allu, Srikanth; Barai, Pallab; Cochran, Bill; Clarno, Kevin T.; Dilts, Gary A.

    2011-09-01

    In Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11), the AMP (Advanced MultiPhysics) Nuclear Fuel Performance code [1] went through a thorough review and refactorization based on the lessons-learned from the previous year, in which the version 0.9 of the software was released as a prototype. This report describes the refactorization work that has occurred or is in progress during FY11.

  1. Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    market . Overall Program Summary The overall objective of the Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS) program was to develop and demonstrate...mode fiber, with alignment tolerances of several microns functions well for data communications , single mode fiber is required for several significant...in the laser/optics community . Boeing and MCNC have signed a memorandum of agreement for commercialization and are actively seeking partners for

  2. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) confers drug resistance against DNA damaging agents via PKAIA in CML cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Yi; Kan, Wai-Ming

    2017-01-05

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates many vital functions such as metabolism, proliferation, differentiation and death. Depending on cell types and stimulators, cAMP could either promote or attenuate cell death. cAMP signal can be transduced by protein kinase A (PKA) and/or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC). In CML cells, cAMP may suppress their proliferation and enhance their differentiation. However, the role of cAMP on DNA damaging agent toxicity and the mechanism involved has not been studied. In this study, we studied the effect of cAMP on the sensitivity of CML cells to DNA damaging agents. We observed that forskolin (FSK) and dibutyryl-cAMP (DBcAMP) decreased cisplatin and etoposide-induced cell death in K562 cells. Moreover, PKA activator prevented K562 cells from DNA damaging agent-induced cell death while EPAC activator had no effect. Furthermore, we found that the PKA subtype, PKAIA, was involved in cAMP-attenuated resistance in K562 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that increased cAMP level confers CML cells to acquire a novel mechanism against DNA damaging agent toxicity via PKAIA. Thus, PKAIA inhibitor may be helpful in overcoming the resistance to DNA damaging agents in CML cells.

  3. Copper Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chan, Jefferson; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Pendyala, Venkata S.; Jia, Shang; Aron, Allegra T.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Guan, Timothy; Smaga, Lukas P.; Farhi, Samouil L.; New, Elizabeth J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Chang, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling relies extensively on dynamic pools of redox-inactive metal ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc, but their redox-active transition metal counterparts such as copper and iron have been studied primarily as static enzyme cofactors. Here we report that copper is an endogenous regulator of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat, which is an essential process in maintaining the body's weight and energy stores. Utilizing a murine model of genetic copper misregulation, in combination with pharmacological alterations in copper status and imaging studies in a 3T3-L1 white adipocyte model, we demonstrate that copper regulates lipolysis at the level of the second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), by altering the activity of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase PDE3B. Biochemical studies of the copper-PDE3B interaction establish copper-dependent inhibition of enzyme activity and identify a key conserved cysteine residue within a PDE3-specific loop that is essential for the observed copper-dependent lipolytic phenotype. PMID:27272565

  4. The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael

    2012-07-24

    Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

  5. Phospholipid metabolism in zymosan stimulated human monocytes: modulation by cyclic AMP (cAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey R.W.; Manzi, R.M.; Hoffstein, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Oxygenated products of arachidonic acid (AA) are critical components in the development of the inflammatory response. Monocytes exposed to inflammatory stimuli are capable of converting free AA into these bioactive molecules. However, the limiting step in the formation of these compounds is thought to be the mechanism responsible for the release of esterified AA from phospholipids. When (/sup 3/H) AA labeled monocytes were challenged with opsonized zymosan, 28 +/- 2% of the incorporated counts were released compared to 8 +/- 1% for the control. Upon pretreatment with isobutyl methyl xanthine (IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) zymosan stimulated AA release was markedly reduced. The IC/sub 50/'s were 4 x 10/sup -4/M and 7 x 10/sup -4/M respectively. Analysis of (/sup 3/H) AA incorporation into cellular phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) were the primary pools labeled. Loss of label from both of these pools was evident after exposure to zymosan, however, pretreatment of cells with IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited release of (/sup 3/H)AA from the PC pool but not from the PI pool. The results show that human monocytes challenged with opsonized zymosan release arachidonic acid via cAMP-dependent and independent pathways. Furthermore, they suggest that a phospholipase activity (possibly A/sub 2/) against PC is modulated by cAMP.

  6. Inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP elevating agents on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability change in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Irie, K; Fujii, E; Ishida, H; Wada, K; Suganuma, T; Nishikori, T; Yoshioka, T; Muraki, T

    2001-05-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of cyclic AMP elevating agents were examined in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability change. Vascular permeability on the back skin was measured by the local accumulation of Pontamine sky blue (PSB) after subcutaneous injection of LPS (400 microg site-1) from Salmonella typhimurium. Dye leakage in the skin was significantly increased 2 h after injection of LPS. This LPS-induced dye leakage was suppressed by phosphodiesterase inhibitors, including pentoxifylline (160 mg kg-1), milrinone (5 - 10 mg kg-1), rolipram (0.5 - 10 mg kg-1) and zaprinast (5 - 10 mg kg-1). The dye leakage was also inhibited by beta-adrenoceptor agonists, including isoproterenol (0.5 - 5 mg kg-1) and salbutamol (0.05 - 5 mg kg-1), an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin (5 mg kg-1), and a cell permeable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP, 10 mg kg-1). LPS caused a transient increase in serum TNF-alpha level peaking at 1 h after the injection. This increase in serum TNF-alpha was completely blocked by a pretreatment with pentoxifylline (160 mg kg-1), milrinone (5 mg kg-1), rolipram (1 mg kg-1), zaprinast (10 mg kg-1), salbutamol (0.5 mg kg-1), forskolin (1 mg kg-1) and 8-Br-cAMP (10 mg kg-1). LPS caused an increase in serum IL-1alpha level peaking at 3 h after injection. This increase in serum IL-1alpha was not significantly suppressed by the cyclic AMP elevating agents. Our study suggests that cyclic AMP elevating agents attenuate LPS-induced microvascular permeability change by suppressing TNF-alpha up regulation.

  7. A1 adenosine receptors inhibit chloride transport in the shark rectal gland. Dissociation of inhibition and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Poeschla, E M; Barron, H V; Forrest, J N

    1990-01-01

    In the in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the adenosine analogue 2-chloroadenosine (2Clado) completely and reversibly inhibited forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion with an IC50 of 5 nM. Other A1 receptor agonists including cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine (NECA) and R-phenylisopropyl-adenosine (R-PIA) also completely inhibited forskolin stimulated chloride secretion. The "S" stereoisomer of PIA (S-PIA) was a less potent inhibitor of forskolin stimulated chloride secretion, consistent with the affinity profile of PIA stereoisomers for an A1 receptor. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyltheophylline completely blocked the effect of 2Clado to inhibit forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion. When chloride secretion and tissue cyclic (c)AMP content were determined simultaneously in perfused glands, 2Clado completely inhibited secretion but only inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation by 34-40%, indicating that the mechanism of inhibition of secretion by 2Clado is at least partially cAMP independent. Consistent with these results, A1 receptor agonists only modestly inhibited (9-15%) forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and 2Clado markedly inhibited chloride secretion stimulated by a permeant cAMP analogue, 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (8CPT cAMP). These findings provide the first evidence for a high affinity A1 adenosine receptor that inhibits hormone stimulated ion transport in a model epithelia. A major portion of this inhibition occurs by a mechanism that is independent of the cAMP messenger system. PMID:1970583

  8. Use of forskolin to study the relationship between cyclic AMP formation and bone resorption in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, U H; Fredholm, B B; Ransjö, M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin on bone resorption and cyclic AMP accumulation was studied in an organ-culture system by using calvarial bones from 6-7-day-old mice. Forskolin caused a rapid and fully reversible increase of cyclic AMP, which was maximal after 20-30 min. The phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram (30 mumol/l), enhanced the cyclic AMP response to forskolin (50 mumol/l) from a net cyclic AMP response of 1234 +/- 154 pmol/bone to 2854 +/- 193 pmol/bone (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). The cyclic AMP level in bones treated with forskolin (30 mumol/l) was significantly increased after 24 h of culture. Forskolin, at and above 0.3 mumol/l, in the absence and the presence of rolipram (30 mumol/l), caused a dose-dependent cyclic AMP accumulation with an calculated EC50 (concentration producing half-maximal stimulation) value at 8.3 mumol/l. In 24 h cultures forskolin inhibited spontaneous and PTH (parathyroid hormone)-stimulated 45Ca release with calculated IC50 (concentration producing half-maximal inhibition) values at 1.6 and 0.6 mumol/l respectively. Forskolin significantly inhibited the release of 3H from [3H]proline-labelled bones stimulated by PTH (10 nmol/l). The inhibitory effect by forskolin on PTH-stimulated 45Ca release was significant already after 3 h of culture. In 24 h cultures forskolin (3 mumol/l) significantly inhibited 45Ca release also from bones stimulated by prostaglandin E2 (1 mumol/l) and 1 alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol (0.1 mumol/l). The inhibitory effect of forskolin on spontaneous and PTH-stimulated 45Ca release was transient. A dose-dependent stimulation of basal 45Ca release was seen in 120 h cultures, at and above 3 nmol of forskolin/l, with a calculated EC50 value at 16 nmol/l. The stimulatory effect of forskolin (1 mumol/l) could be inhibited by calcitonin (0.1 unit/ml), but was insensitive to indomethacin (1 mumol/l). Forskolin increased the release of 3H from [3H]proline-labelled bones cultured for 120 h and

  9. Evidence for a substrate cycle between AMP and adenosine in isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps, F; Van den Berghe, G; Hers, H G

    1983-01-01

    The effect of adenosine on the metabolism of prelabeled adenine nucleotides was investigated in isolated hepatocytes. Adenosine caused an approximately equal to 2-fold increase in the ATP content of the cells. This effect was in part counteracted by an increased rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism that could be explained by a stimulation of both AMP deaminase (AMP aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.6) and the cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.5) because of the increased concentration of ATP. The unexpected finding that labeled adenosine was formed immediately after the addition of the unlabeled nucleoside could be explained by the trapping effect of adenosine. An accumulation of labeled adenosine was observed also in the presence of 5-iodotubercidin, a potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase (ATP:adenosine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.20). Under these conditions, there was a decrease in the concentration of ATP in the cell and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the rate of formation of allantoin. This formation of adenosine was only slightly decreased by inhibition of the membranous 5'-nucleotidase; it led to the accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine in the presence of coformycin and an excess of L-homocysteine. It was concluded that, under basal conditions, the cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase present in the liver cell continuously produces adenosine, which is immediately reconverted into AMP by adenosine kinase, without giving rise to allantoin. This futile cycle between AMP and adenosine amounts to at least 20 nmol/min per g of liver and, thus, exceeds the basic rate of allantoin formation. PMID:6304684

  10. Directed evolution of the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein at the cAMP pocket.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, Sanjiva M; Hicks, Matt N; Park, Jin; Brooks, Cory L; Serate, Jose; Saunders, Cameron V; Grover, Simranjeet K; Goto, Joy J; Lee, Jin-Won; Youn, Hwan

    2015-10-30

    The Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) requires cAMP binding to undergo a conformational change for DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. Two CRP residues, Thr(127) and Ser(128), are known to play important roles in cAMP binding through hydrogen bonding and in the cAMP-induced conformational change, but the connection between the two is not completely clear. Here, we simultaneously randomized the codons for these two residues and selected CRP mutants displaying high CRP activity in a cAMP-producing E. coli. Many different CRP mutants satisfied the screening condition for high CRP activity, including those that cannot form any hydrogen bonds with the incoming cAMP at the two positions. In vitro DNA-binding analysis confirmed that these selected CRP mutants indeed display high CRP activity in response to cAMP. These results indicate that the hydrogen bonding ability of the Thr(127) and Ser(128) residues is not critical for the cAMP-induced CRP activation. However, the hydrogen bonding ability of Thr(127) and Ser(128) was found to be important in attaining high cAMP affinity. Computational analysis revealed that most natural cAMP-sensing CRP homologs have Thr/Ser, Thr/Thr, or Thr/Asn at positions 127 and 128. All of these pairs are excellent hydrogen bonding partners and they do not elevate CRP activity in the absence of cAMP. Taken together, our analyses suggest that CRP evolved to have hydrogen bonding residues at the cAMP pocket residues 127 and 128 for performing dual functions: preserving high cAMP affinity and keeping CRP inactive in the absence of cAMP.

  11. cAMP Signaling Regulates Synchronised Growth of Symbiotic Epichloë Fungi with the Host Grass Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Voisey, Christine R.; Christensen, Michael T.; Johnson, Linda J.; Forester, Natasha T.; Gagic, Milan; Bryan, Gregory T.; Simpson, Wayne R.; Fleetwood, Damien J.; Card, Stuart D.; Koolaard, John P.; Maclean, Paul H.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The seed-transmitted fungal symbiont, Epichloë festucae, colonizes grasses by infecting host tissues as they form on the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of the seedling. How this fungus accommodates the complexities of plant development to successfully colonize the leaves and inflorescences is unclear. Since adenosine 3′, 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling is often essential for host colonization by fungal pathogens, we disrupted the cAMP cascade by insertional mutagenesis of the E. festucae adenylate cyclase gene (acyA). Consistent with deletions of this gene in other fungi, acyA mutants had a slow radial growth rate in culture, and hyphae were convoluted and hyper-branched suggesting that fungal apical dominance had been disrupted. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining of hyphae showed that cAMP disruption mutants were impaired in their ability to synthesize superoxide, indicating that cAMP signaling regulates accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Despite significant defects in hyphal growth and ROS production, E. festucae ΔacyA mutants were infectious and capable of forming symbiotic associations with grasses. Plants infected with E. festucae ΔacyA were marginally less robust than the wild-type (WT), however hyphae were hyper-branched, and leaf tissues heavily colonized, indicating that the tight regulation of hyphal growth normally observed in maturing leaves requires functional cAMP signaling. PMID:27833620

  12. cAMP Signaling Regulates Synchronised Growth of Symbiotic Epichloë Fungi with the Host Grass Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Voisey, Christine R; Christensen, Michael T; Johnson, Linda J; Forester, Natasha T; Gagic, Milan; Bryan, Gregory T; Simpson, Wayne R; Fleetwood, Damien J; Card, Stuart D; Koolaard, John P; Maclean, Paul H; Johnson, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The seed-transmitted fungal symbiont, Epichloë festucae, colonizes grasses by infecting host tissues as they form on the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of the seedling. How this fungus accommodates the complexities of plant development to successfully colonize the leaves and inflorescences is unclear. Since adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling is often essential for host colonization by fungal pathogens, we disrupted the cAMP cascade by insertional mutagenesis of the E. festucae adenylate cyclase gene (acyA). Consistent with deletions of this gene in other fungi, acyA mutants had a slow radial growth rate in culture, and hyphae were convoluted and hyper-branched suggesting that fungal apical dominance had been disrupted. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining of hyphae showed that cAMP disruption mutants were impaired in their ability to synthesize superoxide, indicating that cAMP signaling regulates accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Despite significant defects in hyphal growth and ROS production, E. festucae ΔacyA mutants were infectious and capable of forming symbiotic associations with grasses. Plants infected with E. festucae ΔacyA were marginally less robust than the wild-type (WT), however hyphae were hyper-branched, and leaf tissues heavily colonized, indicating that the tight regulation of hyphal growth normally observed in maturing leaves requires functional cAMP signaling.

  13. Modulation by cyclic AMP and phorbol myristate acetate of cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Y; Gemba, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) have been suggested to modulate the generation of free radicals. We investigated the effects of cAMP and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on cephaloridine (CER)-induced renal cell injury, which has been reported to be due to the generation of free radicals. Incubation of rat renal cortical slices with CER resulted in increases in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and in decreases in gluconeogenesis and p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat renal cortical slices, suggesting free radical-induced injury in slices exposed to CER. A derivative of cAMP ameliorated not only the increase in lipid peroxidation but also the renal cell damage induced by CER. This amelioration by a cAMP derivative of lipid peroxidation and renal cell damage caused by CER was blocked by KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Lipid peroxidation and the indices of cell injury were increased by PMA. PMA also enhanced CER-induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the slices. This enhancement by PMA of CER-induced injury was blocked by H-7, a PKC inhibitor. These results indicated that intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and PKC modulate free radical-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by CER.

  14. Overproduction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase blocks the differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M N; Driscoll, D; Mutzel, R; Part, D; Williams, J; Véron, M

    1989-01-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum extracellular cAMP is known to act as a chemotractant and as an inducer of cellular differentiation. However, its intracellular role as a second messenger remains obscure. We have constructed a fusion gene consisting of the cDNA encoding the regulatory subunit (R) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase fused to the promoter and N-terminal-proximal sequences of a Dictyostelium actin gene. Stable transformants, containing multiple copies of this gene, overproduce the R subunit which accumulates prematurely relative to the endogenous protein. These transformants fail to aggregate. Detailed analysis has shown that they are blocked at interphase, the period prior to aggregation, and that they are severely defective in most responses to cAMP including the induction of gene expression. Our observations suggest that intracellular cAMP acts, presumably by activation of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, to facilitate early development. Images PMID:2551673

  15. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-03-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects.

  16. cAMP and forskolin decrease. gamma. -aminobutyric acid-gated chloride flux in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Heuschneider, G.; Schwartz, R.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of the cyclic nucleotide cAMP on {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel function were investigated. The membrane-permeant cAMP analog N{sup 6}, O{sup 2{prime}}-dibutyryladenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake into rat cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of muscimol, with no change in potency. Similar effects were observed with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, 8-bromoadenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine. The effect of endogenous cAMP accumulation on the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated Cl{sup {minus}} channel was studied with forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Under identical conditions, in the intact synaptoneurosomes, forskolin inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake and generated cAMP with similar potencies. Surprisingly, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate cyclase, also inhibited the muscimol response, suggesting that forskolin and its lipophilic derivatives may interact with the Cl{sup {minus}} channel directly. The data suggest that {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor function in brain can be regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

  17. The regulatory repertoire of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC ß-lactamase regulator AmpR includes virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Smith, Roger; Narasimhan, Giri; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2012-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC, P. aeruginosa AmpR regulates the sigma factor AlgT/U and production of some quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors. In order to better understand the ampR regulon, we compared the transcriptional profile generated using DNA microarrays of the prototypic P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain with its isogenic ampR deletion mutant, PAOΔampR. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that the AmpR regulon is much more extensive than previously thought, with the deletion of ampR influencing the differential expression of over 500 genes. In addition to regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics via AmpC, AmpR also regulates non-β-lactam antibiotic resistance by modulating the MexEF-OprN efflux pump. Other virulence mechanisms including biofilm formation and QS-regulated acute virulence factors are AmpR-regulated. Real-time PCR and phenotypic assays confirmed the microarray data. Further, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrate that a functional AmpR is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. AmpR, a member of the core genome, also regulates genes in the regions of genome plasticity that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Further, we show differential regulation of other transcriptional regulators and sigma factors by AmpR, accounting for the extensive AmpR regulon. The data demonstrates that AmpR functions as a global regulator in P. aeruginosa and is a positive regulator of acute virulence while negatively regulating biofilm formation, a chronic infection phenotype. Unraveling this complex regulatory circuit will provide a better understanding of the bacterial response to antibiotics and how the

  18. The Regulatory Repertoire of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC ß-Lactamase Regulator AmpR Includes Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Smith, Roger; Narasimhan, Giri; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2012-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC, P. aeruginosa AmpR regulates the sigma factor AlgT/U and production of some quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors. In order to better understand the ampR regulon, we compared the transcriptional profile generated using DNA microarrays of the prototypic P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain with its isogenic ampR deletion mutant, PAOΔampR. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that the AmpR regulon is much more extensive than previously thought, with the deletion of ampR influencing the differential expression of over 500 genes. In addition to regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics via AmpC, AmpR also regulates non-β-lactam antibiotic resistance by modulating the MexEF-OprN efflux pump. Other virulence mechanisms including biofilm formation and QS-regulated acute virulence factors are AmpR-regulated. Real-time PCR and phenotypic assays confirmed the microarray data. Further, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrate that a functional AmpR is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. AmpR, a member of the core genome, also regulates genes in the regions of genome plasticity that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Further, we show differential regulation of other transcriptional regulators and sigma factors by AmpR, accounting for the extensive AmpR regulon. The data demonstrates that AmpR functions as a global regulator in P. aeruginosa and is a positive regulator of acute virulence while negatively regulating biofilm formation, a chronic infection phenotype. Unraveling this complex regulatory circuit will provide a better understanding of the bacterial response to antibiotics and how the

  19. Oscillations of cAMP with the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Coffelt, J; Sievers, R; Coffelt, R J; Parmley, W W

    1983-03-16

    Oscillations of cAMP with the cardiac cycle were demonstrated in the rat heart using a stimulator-triggered rapid freeze-clamp to decrease the temperature of the heart from 37 degrees C to -80 degrees C in 5 msec (20,000 degrees/sec) at a predetermined phase of the cardiac cycle. The nucleotide, cAMP, oscillated 60% with the cardiac cycle during normal working conditions, the higher cAMP value occurring during systole.

  20. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    PubMed Central

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability. PMID:26483685

  1. Mechanisms Restricting Diffusion of Intracellular cAMP.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shailesh R; Clancy, Colleen E; Harvey, Robert D

    2016-01-22

    Although numerous receptors stimulate cAMP production in a wide array of cells, many elicit distinct, highly localized responses, implying that the subcellular distribution of cAMP is not uniform. One often used explanation is that phosphodiesterases, which breakdown cAMP, act as functional barriers limiting diffusion. However, several studies refute the notion that this is sufficient, suggesting that phosphodiesterase-independent movement of cAMP must occur at rates slower than free diffusion. But, until now this has never been demonstrated. Using Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS), we measured the diffusion coefficient of a fluorescently-labeled cAMP derivative (φ450-cAMP) as well as other fluorescent molecules in order to investigate the role that molecular size, cell morphology, and buffering by protein kinase A (PKA) play in restricting cAMP mobility in different cell types. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic movement of cAMP is indeed much slower than the rate of free diffusion and that interactions with PKA, especially type II PKA associated with mitochondria, play a significant role. These findings have important implications with respect to cAMP signaling in all cells.

  2. c-di-AMP modulates Listeria monocytogenes central metabolism to regulate growth, antibiotic resistance and osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Aaron T; Garelis, Nicholas E; Peterson, Bret N; Choi, Philip H; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2017-04-01

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a conserved nucleotide second messenger critical for bacterial growth and resistance to cell wall-active antibiotics. In Listeria monocytogenes, the sole diadenylate cyclase, DacA, is essential in rich, but not synthetic media and ΔdacA mutants are highly sensitive to the β-lactam antibiotic cefuroxime. In this study, loss of function mutations in the oligopeptide importer (oppABCDF) and glycine betaine importer (gbuABC) allowed ΔdacA mutants to grow in rich medium. Since oligopeptides were sufficient to inhibit growth of the ΔdacA mutant we hypothesized that oligopeptides act as osmolytes, similar to glycine betaine, to disrupt intracellular osmotic pressure. Supplementation with salt stabilized the ΔdacA mutant in rich medium and restored cefuroxime resistance. Additional suppressor mutations in the acetyl-CoA binding site of pyruvate carboxylase (PycA) rescued cefuroxime resistance and resulted in a 100-fold increase in virulence of the ΔdacA mutant. PycA is inhibited by c-di-AMP and these mutations prompted us to examine the role of TCA cycle enzymes. Inactivation of citrate synthase, but not down-stream enzymes suppressed ΔdacA phenotypes. These data suggested that c-di-AMP modulates central metabolism at the pyruvate node to moderate citrate production and indeed, the ΔdacA mutant accumulated six times the concentration of citrate present in wild-type bacteria.

  3. Inhibition of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis by stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Henin, N; Vincent, M F; Gruber, H E; Van den Berghe, G

    1995-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is a multisubstrate protein kinase that, in liver, inactivates both acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. AICAR (5-amino 4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide, ZMP) was found to stimulate up to 10-fold rat liver AMP-activated protein kinase, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 5 mM. In accordance with previous observations, addition to suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes of 50-500 microM AICAriboside, the nucleoside corresponding to ZMP, resulted in the accumulation of millimolar concentrations of the latter. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent inactivation of both acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Addition of 50-500 microM AICAriboside to hepatocyte suspensions incubated in the presence of various substrates, including glucose and lactate/pyruvate, caused a parallel inhibition of both fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. With lactate/pyruvate (10/1 mM), half-maximal inhibition was obtained at approximately 100 microM, and near-complete inhibition at 500 microM AICAriboside. These findings open new perspectives for the simultaneous control of triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis by pharmacological stimulators of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  4. Cyclic AMP regulates the expression and nuclear translocation of RFC40 in MCF7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupte, Rakhee S. . E-mail: rakhee_gupte@nymc.edu; Sampson, Valerie; Traganos, Frank; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Lee, Marietta Y.W.T.

    2006-04-01

    We have previously shown that the regulatory subunit of PKA, RI{alpha}, functions as a nuclear transport protein for the second subunit of the replication factor C complex, RFC40, and that this transport appears to be crucial for cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. In this study, we found that N {sup 6}-monobutyryl cAMP significantly up-regulates the expression of RFC40 mRNA by 1.8-fold and its endogenous protein by 2.3-fold with a subsequent increase in the RI{alpha}-RFC40 complex formation by 3.2-fold. Additionally, the nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of RFC40 increased by 26% followed by a parallel increase in the percentage of S phase cells by 33%. However, there was reduction in the percentage of G1 cells by 16% and G2/M cells by 43% with a concurrent accumulation of cells in S phase. Interestingly, the higher percentage of S phase cells did not correlate with a parallel increase in DNA replication. Moreover, although cAMP did not affect the expression of the other RFC subunits, there was a significant decrease in the RFC40-37 complex formation by 81.3%, substantiating the decrease in DNA replication rate. Taken together, these findings suggest that cAMP functions as an upstream modulator that regulates the expression and nuclear translocation of RFC40.

  5. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-09-25

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of (TH)PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. (TH) PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux.

  6. Cyclic AMP Effectors Regulate Myometrial Oxytocin Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Yulia, Angela; Singh, Natasha; Lei, Kaiyu; Sooranna, Suren R; Johnson, Mark R

    2016-11-01

    The factors that initiate human labor are poorly understood. We have tested the hypothesis that a decline in cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) function leads to the onset of labor. Initially, we identified myometrial cAMP/PKA-responsive genes (six up-regulated and five down-regulated genes) and assessed their expression in myometrial samples taken from different stages of pregnancy and labor. We found that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was one of the cAMP-repressed genes, and, given the importance of OTR in the labor process, we studied the mechanisms involved in greater detail using small interfering RNA, chemical agonists, and antagonists of the cAMP effectors. We found that cAMP-repressed genes, including OTR, increased with the onset of labor. Our in vitro studies showed that cAMP acting via PKA reduced OTR expression but that in the absence of PKA, cAMP acts via exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) to increase OTR expression. In early labor myometrial samples, PKA levels and activity declined and Epac1 levels increased, perhaps accounting for the increase in myometrial OTR mRNA and protein levels at this time. In vitro exposure of myometrial cells to stretch and IL-1β increased OTR levels and reduced basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP and PKA activity, as judged by phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein levels, but neither stretch nor IL-1β had any effect on PKA or EPAC1 levels. In summary, there is a reduction in the activity of the cAMP/PKA pathway with the onset of human labor potentially playing a critical role in regulating OTR expression and the transition from myometrial quiescence to activation.

  7. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R.; Holmes, Andrew P.; Conde, Sílvia V.; Gauda, Estelle B.; Monteiro, Emília C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic carotid body (CB) activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio). Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review (1) provides an outline on the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, (2) presents recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and (3) discusses how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors) and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors). cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations. PMID:25389406

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide elevates cyclic AMP levels in chick skeletal muscle: possible neurotrophic role for a coexisting neuronal messenger.

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, R; Changeux, J P

    1987-01-01

    Recent immunocytochemical studies have shown that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) coexists with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in spinal motoneurons of the chick. Moreover, CGRP causes an increase in the number of acetylcholine receptors on the surface of cultured chick myotubes. CGRP might thus serve as one of the signals by which motoneurons regulate endplate development. In a search for the second messengers involved, we now demonstrate that CGRP stimulates accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in cultured chick myotubes. This effect is, at least in part, mediated by an increase in cAMP synthesis, as the peptide also activates adenylate cyclase in chick muscle membranes. Nanomolar concentrations of CGRP elicit significant increases in both cellular cAMP levels and acetylcholine receptor numbers. The present findings suggest that cAMP is one of the second messengers which mediate the increase in acetylcholine receptor number elicited by CGRP. Furthermore, CGRP might be implicated in other trophic actions mediated by cAMP in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:3036493

  9. Overexpression of the pepper antimicrobial protein CaAMP1 gene regulates the oxidative stress- and disease-related proteome in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-12-01

    Proteomics facilitates our understanding of cellular processes and network functions in the plant defense response during abiotic and biotic stresses. Here, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of the Capsicum annuum antimicrobial protein CaAMP1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confers enhanced tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress, which is accompanied by lower levels of lipid peroxidation. Quantitative comparative proteome analyses using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified some of the oxidative stress- and disease-related proteins that are differentially regulated by CaAMP1 overexpression in Arabidopsis leaves. Antioxidant- and defense-related proteins, such as 2-cys peroxiredoxin, L-ascorbate peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, glutathione S-transferase and copper homeostasis factor, were up-regulated in the CaAMP1 transgenic leaf tissues. In contrast, GSH-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase and WD-40 repeat family protein were down-regulated by CaAMP1 overexpression. In addition, CaAMP1 overexpression enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection and also H(2)O(2) accumulation in Arabidopsis. The identified antioxidant- and defense-related genes were differentially expressed during MV-induced oxidative stress and Pst DC3000 infection. Taken together, we conclude that CaAMP1 overexpression can regulate the differential expression of defense-related proteins in response to environmental stresses to maintain reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis.

  10. Changes in levels of argininosuccinate lyase mRNA during induction by glucagon and cyclic AMP in cultured foetal-rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, S; Buquet, C; Fairand, A; Benamar, M; Husson, A

    1993-01-01

    During the perinatal period, the activity of the urea-cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is regulated by glucocorticoids, glucagon and insulin. In this study, the effects of glucagon and cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogues were examined on the synthesis of ASL and on the level of its corresponding mRNA in cultured foetal hepatocytes. Northern-blot analysis revealed that these agents only gave a transient induction of ASL mRNA amount, which reached a peak at 6 h and declined thereafter. This induction preceded the increase in enzyme activity and amount which could be observed for 2 or 3 days of culture. Stimulation of ASL mRNA accumulation by a combination of cAMP analogues and dexamethasone was additive, indicating that glucocorticoids and cAMP are both necessary to promote hepatocyte differentiation and that inductions could occur via independent pathways. Induction by cAMP analogues could be abolished by actinomycin D, suggesting a control mechanism at the transcriptional level. Puromycin was without effect on ASL mRNA induction by cAMP, indicating that no ongoing protein synthesis was required in the stimulation process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8387274

  11. Resveratrol attenuates vascular endothelial inflammation by inducing autophagy through the cAMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Liang; Yi, Long; Jin, Xin; Liang, Xin-Yu; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ting; Xie, Qi; Zhou, Xi; Chang, Hui; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Qian-Yong; Mi, Man-Tian

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation participates centrally in all stages of atherosclerosis (AS), which begins with inflammatory changes in the endothelium, characterized by expression of the adhesion molecules. Resveratrol (RSV) is a naturally occurring phytoalexin that can attenuate endothelial inflammation; however, the exact mechanisms have not been thoroughly elucidated. Autophagy refers to the normal process of cell degradation of proteins and organelles, and is protective against certain inflammatory injuries. Thus, we intended to determine the role of autophagy in the antiinflammatory effects of RSV in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that RSV pretreatment reduced tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF/TNF?)-induced inflammation and increased MAP1LC3B2 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 ? 2) expression and SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. A bafilomycin A 1 (BafA1) challenge resulted in further accumulation of MAP1LC3B2 in HUVECs. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA), chloroquine as well as ATG5 and BECN1 siRNA significantly attenuated RSV-induced autophagy, which, subsequently, suppressed the downregulation of RSV-induced inflammatory factors expression. RSV also increased cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) content, the expression of PRKA (protein kinase A) and SIRT1 (sirtuin 1), as well as the activity of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). RSV-induced autophagy in HUVECs was abolished in the presence of inhibitors of ADCY (adenylyl cyclase, KH7), PRKA (H-89), AMPK (compound C), or SIRT1 (nicotinamide and EX-527), as well as ADCY, PRKA, AMPK, and SIRT1 siRNA transfection, indicating that the effects of RSV on autophagy induction were dependent on cAMP, PRKA, AMPK and SIRT1. In conclusion, RSV attenuates endothelial inflammation by inducing autophagy, and the autophagy in part was mediated through the activation of the cAMP-PRKA-AMPK-SIRT1 signaling pathway.

  12. Rp-cAMPS Prodrugs Reveal the cAMP Dependence of First-Phase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Frank; Chepurny, Oleg G; Kaufholz, Melanie; Bertinetti, Daniela; Leech, Colin A; Cabrera, Over; Zhu, Yingmin; Mei, Fang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E; Genieser, Hans-G; Herberg, Friedrich W; Holz, George G

    2015-07-01

    cAMP-elevating agents such as the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. However, a debate has existed since the 1970s concerning whether or not cAMP signaling is essential for glucose alone to stimulate insulin secretion. Here, we report that the first-phase kinetic component of GSIS is cAMP-dependent, as revealed through the use of a novel highly membrane permeable para-acetoxybenzyl (pAB) ester prodrug that is a bioactivatable derivative of the cAMP antagonist adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In dynamic perifusion assays of human or rat islets, a step-wise increase of glucose concentration leads to biphasic insulin secretion, and under these conditions, 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer, 4-acetoxybenzyl ester (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB) inhibits first-phase GSIS by up to 80%. Surprisingly, second-phase GSIS is inhibited to a much smaller extent (≤20%). Using luciferase, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays performed in living cells, we validate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB does in fact block cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Novel effects of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB to block the activation of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Epac1, Epac2) are also validated using genetically encoded Epac biosensors, and are independently confirmed in an in vitro Rap1 activation assay using Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. Thus, in addition to revealing the cAMP dependence of first-phase GSIS from human and rat islets, these findings establish a pAB-based chemistry for the synthesis of highly membrane permeable prodrug derivatives of Rp-cAMPS that act with micromolar or even nanomolar potency to inhibit cAMP signaling in living cells.

  13. Termination and activation of store-operated cyclic AMP production

    PubMed Central

    Maiellaro, Isabella; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2012-01-01

    Diverse pathophysiological processes (e.g. obesity, lifespan determination, addiction and male fertility) have been linked to the expression of specific isoforms of the adenylyl cyclases (AC1-AC10), the enzymes that generate cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our laboratory recently discovered a new mode of cAMP production, prominent in certain cell types, that is stimulated by any manoeuvre causing reduction of free [Ca2+] within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store. Activation of this ‘store-operated’ pathway requires the ER Ca2+ sensor, STIM1, but the identity of the enzymes responsible for cAMP production and how this process is regulated is unknown. Here, we used sensitive FRET-based sensors for cAMP in single cells combined with silencing and overexpression approaches to show that store-operated cAMP production occurred preferentially via the isoform AC3 in NCM460 colonic epithelial cells. Ca2+ entry via the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel, Orai1, suppressed cAMP production, independent of store refilling. These findings are an important first step towards defining the functional significance and to identify the protein composition of this novel Ca2+/cAMP crosstalk system. PMID:22681560

  14. Atmosphere, Magnetosphere and Plasmas in Space (AMPS). Spacelab payload definition study. Volume 3, book 2: AMPS equipment to Spacelab ICD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The interfaces between AMPS Payload No.(TBD) and Spacelab are described. The interfaces specified cover the AMPS physical, electrical, and thermal interfaces that are established to prescribe the standard Spacelab configuration required to perform the mission. If the configuration definition changes due to change of Spacelab equipment model, or serial numbers, then reidentification of the Labcraft payload may be required.

  15. Inhibitory action of certain cyclophosphate derivatives of cAMP on cAMP-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    de Wit, R J; Hekstra, D; Jastorff, B; Stec, W J; Baraniak, J; Van Driel, R; Van Haastert, P J

    1984-07-16

    A series cAMP derivatives with modifications in the adenine, ribose and cyclophosphate moiety were screened for their binding affinity for the two types of cAMP-binding sites in mammalian protein kinase type 1. In addition, the activation of the kinase by these analogs was monitored. The binding data indicate that cAMP is bound to both sites in a comparable manner: the adenine appears to have no hydrogen-bond interactions with the binding sites, whereas the ribose may be bound by three hydrogen bonds involving the 2', 3' and 5' positions of cAMP. The binding data are not conclusive about the nature of the interaction with the exocyclic oxygen atoms on phosphorus, though a charge interaction seems to be absent. The cAMP molecule seems to be bound in the syn conformation. The results of activation experiments show that modifications in the adenine and ribose moiety do not affect the maximal activation level, while alteration of the two exocyclic oxygen atoms may result in a reduced maximal activation level and in one case, (Rp)-adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphorothioate [Rp-cAMPS], in total absence of activation even at concentrations at which the analog saturates both binding sites. Since occupancy of the cAMP-binding sites by this derivative apparently did not lead to activation of the enzyme, we examined whether this compound could antagonize the activation by cAMP. Indeed (Rp)-cAMPS was found to inhibit cAMP stimulated kinase activity at concentrations compatible to its binding affinity. Also with mammalian protein kinase type II (Rp)-cAMPS showed antagonistic activity, while with a cAMP-dependent protein kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum partial agonistic activity was observed. Previously a mechanism for activation of protein kinase type I was proposed involving a charge interaction between the equatorial exocyclic oxygen atom and the binding site [De Wit et. al. (1982) Eur. J. Biochem 122, 95-99]. This was based on measurements with impure preparations of (Rp)-cAMPS

  16. Whi2p links nutritional sensing to actin-dependent Ras-cAMP-PKA regulation and apoptosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Leadsham, Jane E; Miller, Katherine; Ayscough, Kathryn R; Colombo, Sonia; Martegani, Enzo; Sudbery, Pete; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2009-03-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms by which eukaryotic cells coordinate environmental signals with intracellular ;fate' decisions, such as apoptosis, remains one of the important challenges facing cell biologists. It has recently emerged that the dynamic nature of the actin cytoskeleton is an important factor in the linkage of sensation of extracellular stimuli to signalling mechanisms that regulate programmed cell death. In yeast, actin has been shown to play a role in the regulation of apoptosis as cells prepare themselves for quiescence in the face of nutritional exhaustion, by facilitating the shutdown of Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway activity. Here, we demonstrate that the loss of Whi2p function, a protein known to influence cell cycle exit under conditions of nutritional stress, leads to cell death in yeast that displays the hallmarks of actin-mediated apoptosis. We show that actin-mediated apoptosis occurs as a result of inappropriate Ras-cAMP-PKA activity in Deltawhi2 cells. Cells lacking Whi2p function exhibit an aberrant accumulation of activated Ras2 at the mitochondria in response to nutritional depletion. This study provides evidence that the shutdown of cAMP-PKA signalling activity in wild-type cells involves Whi2p-dependent targeting of Ras2p to the vacuole for proteolysis. We also demonstrate for the first time that Whi2p-dependent regulation of cAMP-PKA signalling plays a physiological role in the differentiation of yeast colonies by facilitating elaboration of distinct zones of cell death.

  17. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  18. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-09

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  19. Involvement of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases in cyclic AMP-mediated vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Eckly-Michel, Anita; Martin, Viviane; Lugnier, Claire

    1997-01-01

    potentiated the relaxant effect of rolipram. This relaxation was decreased by H-89 and not significantly modified by Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS. Moreover, the association of the two PDE inhibitors significantly increased the activity ratio of PKA without changing the PKG ratio. The present findings show that PKA rather than PKG is involved in this type of vasorelaxation. The differences in the participation of PKA vs PKG observed when inhibitors of PDE3 and PDE4 were used alone or together could be due to differences in the degree of accumulation of cyclic AMP, resulting in the activation of PKA or PKG which are differently localized in the cell. These findings support a role for both PKA and PKG in cyclic AMP-mediated relaxation in rat aorta. Their involvement depends on the cellular pathway used to increase the cyclic AMP level. PMID:9298542

  20. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP. sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems which are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells. PMID:21490586

  1. Cyclic AMP and the regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Mats; Harvey, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a brief review of studies that have reported therapeutic benefits of elevated cAMP on plasticity and regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS). We also provide new data on the cellular mechanisms by which elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) promotes cytokine driven regeneration of adult CNS axons, using the visual system as the experimental model. cAMP is a second messenger for many intracellular signalling pathways. Elevation of cAMP in the eye by intravitreal injection of the cell permeant analogue (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate; CPT-cAMP), when added to recombinant ciliary neurotrophic factor (rCNTF), significantly enhances rCNTF-induced regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons into peripheral nerve (PN) grafted onto transected optic nerve. This effect is mediated to some extent by protein kinase A (PKA) signalling, but CPT-cAMP also acts via PI3K/Akt signalling to reduce suppressor of cytokine signalling protein 3 (SOCS3) activity in RGCs. Another target for cAMP is the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), which can also mediate cAMP-induced axonal growth. Here we describe some novel results and discuss to what extent the pro-regenerative effects of CPT-cAMP on adult RGCs are mediated via Epac as well as via PKA-dependent pathways. We used the established PN-optic nerve graft model and quantified the survival and regenerative growth of adult rat RGCs after intravitreal injection of rCNTF in combination with a selective activator of PKA and/or a specific activator of Epac. Viable RGCs were identified by βIII-tubulin immunohistochemistry and regenerating RGCs retrogradely labelled and quantified after an injection of fluorogold into the distal end of the PN grafts, 4 weeks post-transplantation. The specific agonists of either PKA or Epac were both effective in enhancing the effects of rCNTF on RGC axonal regeneration, but interestingly, injections

  2. Loss of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase rescues spore development in G protein mutant in dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Schwebs, David J; Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Miller, Jamison A; Hadwiger, Jeffrey A

    2014-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule for many G protein-mediated signaling pathways but the specificity of cAMP signaling in cells with multiple signaling pathways is not well-understood. In Dictyostelium, at least two different G protein signaling pathways, mediated by the Gα2 and Gα4 subunits, are involved with cAMP accumulation, spore production, and chemotaxis and the stimulation of these pathways results in the activation of ERK2, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that can down regulate the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase RegA. The regA gene was disrupted in gα2(−) and gα4(−) cells to determine if the absence of this phosphodiesterase rescues the development of these G protein mutants as it does for erk2(−) mutants. There gA(−) mutation had no major effects on developmental morphology but enriched the distribution of the Gα mutant cells to the prespore/prestalk border in chimeric aggregates. The loss of RegA function had no effect on Gα4- mediated folate chemotaxis. However, the regA gene disruption in gα4(−) cells, but not in gα2(−) cells, resulted in a substantial rescue and acceleration of spore production. This rescue in sporulation required cell autonomous signaling because the precocious sporulation could not be induced through intercellular signaling in chimeric aggregates. However, intercellular signals from regA(−) strains increased the expression of the prestalk gene ecmB and accelerated the vacuolization of stalk cells. Intercellular signaling from the gα4(−)regA(−) strain did not induce ecmA gene expression indicating cell-type specificity in the promotion of prestalk cell development. regA gene disruption in a Gα4(HC) (Gα4 overexpression) strain did not result in precocious sporulation or stalk cell development indicating that elevated Gα4 subunit expression can mask regA(−) associated phenotypes even when provided with wild-type intercellular signaling. These findings indicate that

  3. Regulation of cyclic AMP metabolism by prostaglandins in rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenburg, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    In the rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT), prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 2/) at 1 nM inhibit arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-induced water reabsorption, while 100 nM PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/ alone stimulate water reabsorption. Reported here are studies designed to investigate the molecular basis for the biphasic physiological action of PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/ in the collecting duct. In freshly isolated RCCT cells, PGE/sub 1/, PGE/sub 2/, and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE/sub 2/ (DM-PGE/sub 2/) stimulated cAMP synthesis at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 M. Other prostaglandins including the synthetic PGE/sub 2/ analogue, sulprostone, failed to stimulate cAMP synthesis. Moreover, sulprostone did not antagonize PGE/sub 2/-stimulated cAMP formation. In contrast, PGE/sub 2/ and sulprostone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, inhibited AVP-induced cAMP accumulation in freshly isolated RCCT cells. PGE/sub 2/, PGE/sub 1/, DM-PGE/sub 2/ and sulprostone at 100 nM were equally effective in inhibiting AVP-induced cAMP formation. Moreover sulprostone inhibited AVP-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results suggest that PGE derivatives mediate either inhibition or activation of adenylate cyclase by stimulating different PGE receptors. To further test this concept, PGE/sub 2/ binding to freshly isolated RCCT cell membranes was characterized. Two different classes of PGE/sub 2/ binding were detected. //sup 3/H/PGE/sub 2/ binding to the high affinity class of sites was increased by the GTP-analogue, GTP S, while pertussis toxin pretreatment blocked the stimulatory action. In contrast, //sup 3/H/ PGE/sub 2/ binding to the low affinity class of sites was decreased by GTP S; this inhibitory effect was not blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of cAMP on germination, antibiotic biosynthesis and morphological development in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Süsstrunk, U; Pidoux, J; Taubert, S; Ullmann, A; Thompson, C J

    1998-10-01

    In wild-type Streptomyces coelicolor MT1110 cultures, cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) was synthesized throughout the developmental programme with peaks of accumulation both during germination and later when aerial mycelium and actinorhodin were being produced. Construction and characterization of an adenylate cyclase disruption mutant (BZ1) demonstrated that cAMP facilitated these developmental processes. Although pulse-labelling experiments showed that a similar germination process was initiated in BZ1 and MT1110, germ-tube emergence was severely delayed in BZ1 and never occurred in more than 85% of the spores. Studies of growth and development on solid glucose minimal medium (SMMS, buffered or unbuffered) showed that MT1110 and BZ1 produced acid during the first rapid growth phase, which generated substrate mycelium. Thereafter, on unbuffered SMMS, only MT1110 resumed growth and produced aerial mycelium by switching to an alternative metabolism that neutralized its medium, probably by reincorporating and metabolizing extracellular acids. BZ1 was not able to neutralize its medium or produce aerial mycelium on unbuffered SMMS; these defects were suppressed by high concentrations (>1 mM) of cAMP during early growth or on buffered medium. Other developmental mutants (bldA, bldB, bldC, bldD, bldG) also irreversibly acidified this medium. However, these bald mutants were not suppressed by exogenous cAMP or neutralizing buffer. BZ1 also differentiated when it was cultured in close proximity to MT1110, a property observed in cross-feeding experiments between bald mutants and commonly thought to reflect diffusion of a discrete positively acting signalling molecule. In this case, MT1110 generated a more neutral pH environment that allowed BZ1 to reinitiate growth and form aerial mycelium. The fact that actinorhodin synthesis could be induced by concentrations of cAMP (< 20 microM) found in the medium of MT1110 cultures, suggested that it may serve as a

  5. Activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases and cAMP-binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenina, M.N.; Solenov, E.I.; Ivanova, L.N.

    1985-09-20

    The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the binding of cAMP, and the spectrum of cAMP-binding proteins in the cytosol of the renal papilla was studied in intact rats and in rats after 24 h on a water-deprived diet. It was found that the activation of protein kinases by 10/sup -6/ M cAMP is significantly higher in the experimental animals than in the intact animals. In chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, the positions of the peaks of specific reception of cAMP corresponded to the peaks of the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases of types I and II. In this case, in intact animals more than 80% of the binding activity was detected in peaks II, whereas in rats subjected to water deprivation, more than 60% of the binding was observed in peak I. The general regulatory activity of the cytosol was unchanged in the experimental animals in comparison with intact animals. It is suggested that during dehydration there is an induction of the synthesis of the regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the renal papilla.

  6. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study. Volume 3: Interface control documents. Part 2: AMPS payload to spacelab ICD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The AMPS to Spacelab Interface Control Document which is to be used as a guide for format and information content in generating specific AMPS Mission ICDs is presented. This document is meant to supplement the Spacelab Payload Accommodations Handbook in that it only defines interfaces which are not discussed in the handbook to the level required for design purposes. The AMPS Top Level Requirements Tree, illustrates this ICD by a shaded area and its relationship to the other AMPS technical documents. Other interface documents shown are the Level II, AMPS to Space Shuttle Vehicle ICD and the Level III, AMPS to Instruments ICD.

  7. Sustained antagonism of acute ethanol-induced ataxia following microinfusion of cyclic AMP and cpt-cAMP in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2011-05-01

    Ataxia is a conspicuous physical manifestation of alcohol consumption in humans and laboratory animals. Previously we reported possible involvement of cAMP in ethanol-induced ataxia. We now report a sustained antagonism of ataxia due to multiple ethanol injections following intracerebellar (ICB) cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion. Adenylyl cyclase drugs cAMP, cpt-cAMP, Sp-cAMP, Rp-cAMP, adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) and GABA(A) agonist muscimol were directly microinfused into the cerebellum of CD-1 male mice to evaluate their effect on ethanol (2 g/kg; i.p.) ataxia. Drug microinfusions were made via stereotaxically implanted stainless steel guide cannulas. Rotorod was used to evaluate the ethanol's ataxic response. Intracerebellar cAMP (0.1, 1, 10 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (0.5, 1, 2 fmol) 60 min before ethanol treatment, dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia in general agreement with previous observations. Intracerebellar microinfusion of cAMP (100 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (2 fmol) produced a sustained attenuation of ataxia following ethanol administration at 1, 4, 7 and 25 h or 31 h post-cAMP/cpt-cAMP microinfusion. At 31 h post-cAMP, the ataxic response of ethanol reappeared. Additionally, marked antagonism to the accentuation of ethanol-induced ataxia by adenosine A₁ and GABA(A) agonists, CHA (34 pmol) and muscimol (88 pmol), respectively, was noted 24h after cAMP and cpt-cAMP treatment. This indicated possible participation of AC/cAMP/PKA signaling in the co-modulation of ethanol-induced ataxia by A₁ adenosinergic and GABAergic systems. No change in normal motor coordination was noted when cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion was followed by saline. Finally, Rp-cAMP (PKA inhibitor, 22 pmol) accentuated ethanol-induced ataxia and antagonized its attenuation by cAMP whereas Sp-cAMP (PKA activator, 22 pmol) produced just the opposite effects, further indicating participation of cAMP-dependent PKA downstream. Overall, the results support a role of

  8. Dictyostelium discoideum lipids modulate cell-cell cohesion and cyclic AMP signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, D R; Luo, C S; Phillips, J C

    1991-01-01

    During Dictyostelium discoideum development, cell-cell communication is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced cAMP synthesis and secretion (cAMP signaling) and cell-cell contact. Cell-cell contact elicits cAMP secretion and modulates the magnitude of a subsequent cAMP signaling response (D. R. Fontana and P. L. Price, Differentiation 41:184-192, 1989), demonstrating that cell-cell contact and cAMP signaling are not independent events. To identify components involved in the contact-mediated modulation of cAMP signaling, amoebal membranes were added to aggregation-competent amoebae in suspension. The membranes from aggregation-competent amoebae inhibited cAMP signaling at all concentrations tested, while the membranes from vegetative amoebae exhibited a concentration-dependent enhancement or inhibition of cAMP signaling. Membrane lipids inhibited cAMP signaling at all concentrations tested. The lipids abolished cAMP signaling by blocking cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation. The membrane lipids also inhibited amoeba-amoeba cohesion at concentrations comparable to those which inhibited cAMP signaling. The phospholipids and neutral lipids decreased cohesion and inhibited the cAMP signaling response. The glycolipid/sulfolipid fraction enhanced cohesion and cAMP signaling. Caffeine, a known inhibitor of cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation, inhibited amoeba-amoeba cohesion. These studies demonstrate that endogenous lipids are capable of modulating amoeba-amoeba cohesion and cAMP-induced activation of the adenylyl cyclase. These results suggest that cohesion may modulate cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation. Because the complete elimination of cohesion is accompanied by the complete elimination of cAMP signaling, these results further suggest that cohesion may be necessary for cAMP-induced adenylyl cyclase activation in D. discoideum. PMID:1846024

  9. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.

  10. Production and release of cyclic AMP by Daphnia pulex: implications of grazing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-04-01

    Daphnia pulex, a common cladoceran zooplankton species, contains tissue cAMP concentrations similar to those found in algae, bacteria, and aquatic macrophytes. Daphnia release significant quantities of cAMP into the extracellular medium. Release of algal cellular cAMP as a result of digstive degradation of algal cells may also be an important source of dissolved cAMP in lakewater.

  11. Production and release of cyclic AMP by Daphnia pulex: implications of grazing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-04-01

    Daphnia pulex, a common cladoceran zooplankton species, contains tissue cAMP concentrations similar to those found in algae, bacteria, and aquatic macrophytes. Daphnia release significant quantities of cAMP into the extracellular medium. Release of algal cellular cAMP as a result of digestive degradation of algal cells may also be an important source of dissolved cAMP in lakewater.

  12. Why Ampère did not discover electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. Pearce

    1986-04-01

    In 1832, after Michael Faraday had announced his discovery of electromagnetic induction, Andre-Marie Ampère claimed that he had actually discovered the induction of one current by another in 1822. In fact, he had, but did not really publish the fact at that time. This article explores the reasons for Ampère's failure to lay claim to a discovery that would have guaranteed him scientific immortality.

  13. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  14. Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) data management overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, J.D.; Blough, D.K.; Daugherty, W.R.; Hucks, J.A.; Gerhardstein, L.H.; Meitzler, W.D.; Melton, R.B.; Shoemaker, S.V.

    1994-09-01

    An overview of the Data Management Plan for the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) pro-grain is provided in this document. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been assigned the responsibility of data management for the program, which includes defining procedures for data management and data quality assessment. Data management is defined as the process of planning, acquiring, organizing, qualifying and disseminating data. The AMPS program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (DOE/AN) and is integrated into the overall DOE AN-10.1 technology development program. Sensors used for collecting the data were developed under the on-site inspection, effluence analysis, and standoff sensor program, the AMPS program interacts with other technology programs of DOE/NN-20. This research will be conducted by both government and private industry. AMPS is a research and development program, and it is not intended for operational deployment, although the sensors and techniques developed could be used in follow-on operational systems. For a complete description of the AMPS program, see {open_quotes}Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) Program Plan{close_quotes}. The primary purpose of the AMPS is to collect high-quality multisensor data to be used in data fusion research to reduce interpretation problems associated with data overload and to derive better information than can be derived from any single sensor. To collect the data for the program, three wing-mounted pods containing instruments with sensors for collecting data will be flight certified on a U.S. Navy RP-3A aircraft. Secondary objectives of the AMPS program are sensor development and technology demonstration. Pod system integrators and instrument developers will be interested in the performance of their deployed sensors and their supporting data acquisition equipment.

  15. Allostery and Conformational Dynamics in cAMP-binding Acyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Siddiqui, Nida; Rebolj, Katja; Nambi, Subhalaxmi; Merzel, Franci; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria harbor unique proteins that regulate protein lysine acylation in a cAMP-regulated manner. These lysine acyltransferases from Mycobacterium smegmatis (KATms) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (KATmt) show distinctive biochemical properties in terms of cAMP binding affinity to the N-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain and allosteric activation of the C-terminal acyltransferase domain. Here we provide evidence for structural features in KATms that account for high affinity cAMP binding and elevated acyltransferase activity in the absence of cAMP. Structure-guided mutational analysis converted KATms from a cAMP-regulated to a cAMP-dependent acyltransferase and identified a unique asparagine residue in the acyltransferase domain of KATms that assists in the enzymatic reaction in the absence of a highly conserved glutamate residue seen in Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase-like acyltransferases. Thus, we have identified mechanisms by which properties of similar proteins have diverged in two species of mycobacteria by modifications in amino acid sequence, which can dramatically alter the abundance of conformational states adopted by a protein. PMID:24748621

  16. Allostery and conformational dynamics in cAMP-binding acyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Siddiqui, Nida; Rebolj, Katja; Nambi, Subhalaxmi; Merzel, Franci; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2014-06-06

    Mycobacteria harbor unique proteins that regulate protein lysine acylation in a cAMP-regulated manner. These lysine acyltransferases from Mycobacterium smegmatis (KATms) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (KATmt) show distinctive biochemical properties in terms of cAMP binding affinity to the N-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain and allosteric activation of the C-terminal acyltransferase domain. Here we provide evidence for structural features in KATms that account for high affinity cAMP binding and elevated acyltransferase activity in the absence of cAMP. Structure-guided mutational analysis converted KATms from a cAMP-regulated to a cAMP-dependent acyltransferase and identified a unique asparagine residue in the acyltransferase domain of KATms that assists in the enzymatic reaction in the absence of a highly conserved glutamate residue seen in Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase-like acyltransferases. Thus, we have identified mechanisms by which properties of similar proteins have diverged in two species of mycobacteria by modifications in amino acid sequence, which can dramatically alter the abundance of conformational states adopted by a protein.

  17. Histamine receptors on adult rat cardiomyocytes: antagonism of alpha/sub 1/-receptor stimulation of cAMP degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Bowen, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Incubation of intact cardiomyocytes with the histamine antagonist (/sup 3/H)mepyramine results in rapid reversible binding to a single class of high affinity sites (K/sub D/ = 1.2nM; 50,000 sites/myocyte). In membranes from purified myocytes histamine competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding (K/sub D/ = 300nM) is not altered by GTP (10..mu..M). Competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding by H-receptor subtype-selective antagonists suggests the presence of a single class of H/sub 1/-receptors. Incubation of intact myocytes with histamine (luM, H/sub 1/ receptor activation) plus norepinephrine (NE 1uM, alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ receptor activation) for 3 min leads to significantly more cAMP accumulation (36.5 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes) than NE alone (30 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes). Histamine alone does not alter basal cAMP = 10.4 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes, or beta/sub 1/ stimulation (isoproternol, 1uM) = 39.6 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes. Cyclic AMP accumulation with NE plus prazosin 10nM, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + alpha/sub 1/ blockade) is indistinguishable from NE + histamine, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + H/sub 1/) stimulation. Histamine competition for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding suggests that histamine does not block alpha/sub 1/ receptors on the myocyte. These data suggest that H/sub 1/ receptor activation leads to antagonism of the alpha/sub 1/ receptor mediated activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase the authors have recently described.

  18. Mutations in ampG and Lytic Transglycosylase Genes Affect the Net Release of Peptidoglycan Monomers from Vibrio fischeri▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adin, Dawn M.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Goldman, William E.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2009-01-01

    The light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri releases N-acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramylalanyl-γ-glutamyldiaminopimelylalanine, a disaccharide-tetrapeptide component of peptidoglycan that is referred to here as “PG monomer.” In contrast, most gram-negative bacteria recycle PG monomer efficiently, and it does not accumulate extracellularly. PG monomer can stimulate normal light-organ morphogenesis in the host squid Euprymna scolopes, resulting in regression of ciliated appendages similar to that triggered by infection with V. fischeri. We examined whether the net release of PG monomers by V. fischeri resulted from lytic transglycosylase activity or from defects in AmpG, the permease through which PG monomers enter the cytoplasm for recycling. An ampG mutant displayed a 100-fold increase in net PG monomer release, indicating that AmpG is functional. The ampG mutation also conferred the uncharacteristic ability to induce light-organ morphogenesis even when placed in a nonmotile flaJ mutant that cannot infect the light-organ crypts. We targeted five potential lytic transglycosylase genes singly and in specific combinations to assess their role in PG monomer release. Combinations of mutations in ltgA, ltgD, and ltgY decreased net PG monomer release, and a triple mutant lacking all three of these genes had little to no accumulation of PG monomers in culture supernatants. This mutant colonized the host as well as the wild type did; however, the mutant-infected squid were more prone to later superinfection by a second V. fischeri strain. We propose that the lack of PG monomer release by this mutant results in less regression of the infection-promoting ciliated appendages, leading to this propensity for superinfection. PMID:19074387

  19. Cyclic AMP and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    D'Ari, R; Jaffé, A; Bouloc, P; Robin, A

    1988-01-01

    We examined several aspects of cell division regulation in Escherichia coli which have been thought to be controlled by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its receptor protein (CAP). Mutants lacking adenyl cyclase (cya) or CAP (crp) were rod shaped, not spherical, during exponential growth in LB broth or glucose-Casamino Acids medium, and lateral wall elongation was normal; in broth, stationary-phase cells became ovoid. Cell mass was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, but it remained appropriate for their slower growth rate and thus probably does not reflect early (uncontrolled) septation. The slow growth did not seem to reflect a gross metabolic disorder, since the mutants gave a normal yield on limiting glucose; surprisingly, however, the cya mutant (unlike crp) was unable to grow anaerobically on glucose, suggesting a role for cAMP (but not for CAP) in the expression of some fermentation enzyme. Both cya and crp mutants are known to be resistant to mecillinam, an antibiotic which inhibits penicillin-binding protein 2 (involved in lateral wall elongation) and also affects septation. This resistance does not reflect a lack of PBP2. Furthermore, it was not simply the result of slow growth and small cell mass, since small wild-type cells growing in acetate remained sensitive. The cAMP-CAP complex may regulate the synthesis of some link between PBP2 and the septation apparatus. The ftsZ gene, coding for a cell division protein, was expressed at a higher level in the absence of cAMP, as measured with an ftsZ::lacZ fusion, but the amount of protein per cell, shown by others to be invariable over a 10-fold range of cell mass, was independent of cAMP, suggesting that ftsZ expression is not regulated by the cAMP-CAP complex. Images PMID:2826407

  20. Intracellular tortuosity underlies slow cAMP diffusion in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark; Lomas, Oliver; Jalink, Kees; Ford, Kerrie L.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Aims 3′,5′-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signals in the heart are often confined to concentration microdomains shaped by cAMP diffusion and enzymatic degradation. While the importance of phosphodiesterases (degradative enzymes) in sculpting cAMP microdomains is well established in cardiomyocytes, less is known about cAMP diffusivity (DcAMP) and factors affecting it. Many earlier studies have reported fast diffusivity, which argues against sharply defined microdomains. Methods and results [cAMP] dynamics in the cytoplasm of adult rat ventricular myocytes were imaged using a fourth generation genetically encoded FRET-based sensor. The [cAMP]-response to the addition and removal of isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) quantified the rates of cAMP synthesis and degradation. To obtain a read out of DcAMP, a stable [cAMP] gradient was generated using a microfluidic device which delivered agonist to one half of the myocyte only. After accounting for phosphodiesterase activity, DcAMP was calculated to be 32 µm2/s; an order of magnitude lower than in water. Diffusivity was independent of the amount of cAMP produced. Saturating cAMP-binding sites with the analogue 6-Bnz-cAMP did not accelerate DcAMP, arguing against a role of buffering in restricting cAMP mobility. cAMP diffused at a comparable rate to chemically unrelated but similar sized molecules, arguing for a common physical cause of restricted diffusivity. Lower mitochondrial density and order in neonatal cardiac myocytes allowed for faster diffusion, demonstrating the importance of mitochondria as physical barriers to cAMP mobility. Conclusion In adult cardiac myocytes, tortuosity due to physical barriers, notably mitochondria, restricts cAMP diffusion to levels that are more compatible with microdomain signalling. PMID:27089919

  1. F-ara-AMP is a substrate of cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II): HPLC and NMR studies of enzymatic dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars P; Cros, Emeline; Galmarini, Carlos M; Dumontet, Charles; Bretonnet, Anne-Sophie; Krimm, Isabelle; Lancelin, Jean-Marc; Gagnieu, Marie-Claude

    2006-03-01

    Intracellular accumulation of triphosphorylated derivatives is essential for the cytotoxic activity of nucleoside analogues. Different mechanisms opposing this accumulation have been described. We have investigated the dephosphorylation of monophosphorylated fludarabine (F-ara-AMP) by the purified cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase cN-II using HPLC and NMR. These studies clearly showed that cN-II was able to convert F-ara-AMP into its non phosphorylated form, F-ara-A, with a Km in the millimolar range and Vmax = 35 nmol/min/mg, with both methods. Cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase cN-II can degrade this clinically useful cytotoxic nucleoside analogue and its overexpression is thus likely to be involved in resistance to this compound.

  2. Neuronal activity promotes myelination via a cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Malone, Misti; Gary, Devin; Yang, In Hong; Miglioretti, Anna; Houdayer, Thierry; Thakor, Nitish; McDonald, John

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal activity promotes myelination in vivo and in vitro. However, the molecular events that mediate activity-dependent myelination are not completely understood. Seven, daily 1 h sessions of patterned electrical stimulation (ESTIM) promoted myelin segment formation in mixed cultures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs); the increase in myelination was frequency-dependent. Myelin segment formation was also enhanced following exposure of DRGs to ESTIM prior to OL addition, suggesting that ESTIM promotes myelination in a manner involving neuron-specific signaling. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in DRGs were increased three-fold following ESTIM, and artificially increasing cAMP mimicked the ability of ESTIM to promote myelination. Alternatively, inhibiting the cAMP pathway suppressed ESTIM-induced myelination. We used compartmentalized, microfluidic platforms to isolate DRG soma from OLs and assessed cell-type specific effects of ESTIM on myelination. A selective increase or decrease in DRG cAMP levels resulted in enhanced or suppressed myelination, respectively. This work describes a novel role for the cAMP pathway in neurons that results in enhanced myelination.

  3. AKAP18 contains a phosphoesterase domain which binds AMP

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Matthew G.; Smith, F. Donelson; Scott, John D.; Barford, David

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs), defined by their capacity to target the cAMP-dependent protein kinase to distinct sub-cellular locations, function as molecular scaffolds mediating the assembly of multi-component complexes to integrate and organise multiple signalling events. Despite their central importance in regulating cellular processes, little is known regarding their diverse structures and molecular mechanisms. Here, using bioinformatics and X-ray crystallography, we define a central domain of AKAP18δ (AKAP18CD) as a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family. The domain features two conserved His-x-Thr motifs positioned at the base of a groove located between two lobes related by pseudo two-fold symmetry. Nucleotide co-crystallisation screening revealed that this groove binds specifically to 5’AMP/CMP, with the affinity constant for AMP in the physiological concentration range. This is the first example of an AKAP capable of binding a small molecule. Our data generate two functional hypotheses for the AKAP18 central domain. It may act as a phosphoesterase, although we did not identify a substrate, or as an AMP sensor with the potential to couple intracellular AMP levels to PKA signalling events. PMID:18082768

  4. The regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S C; Woods, A; Jones, N A; Davison, M D; Carling, D

    2000-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade is activated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio within the cell. AMPK is regulated allosterically by AMP and by reversible phosphorylation. Threonine-172 within the catalytic subunit (alpha) of AMPK (Thr(172)) was identified as the major site phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) in vitro. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation of Thr(172) on AMPK activity. Mutation of Thr(172) to an aspartic acid residue (T172D) in either alpha1 or alpha2 resulted in a kinase complex with approx. 50% the activity of the corresponding wild-type complex. The activity of wild-type AMPK decreased by greater than 90% following treatment with protein phosphatases, whereas the activity of the T172D mutant complex fell by only 10-15%. Mutation of Thr(172) to an alanine residue (T172A) almost completely abolished kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation of Thr(172) accounts for most of the activation by AMPKK, but that other sites are involved. In support of this we have shown that AMPKK phosphorylates at least two other sites on the alpha subunit and one site on the beta subunit. Furthermore, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Thr(172) may be involved in the sensitivity of the AMPK complex to AMP. PMID:10642499

  5. Cyclic AMP stabilizes a class of developmentally regulated Dictyostelium discoideum mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Ceccarelli, A; Lodish, H F

    The stability of mRNA is an important facet of the regulation of protein synthesis. In mammalian cells most mRNAs have long half-lives (5-15 hours) but a substantial fraction are much less stable. There are few examples where the stability of a particular mRNA or class of mRNAs is specifically affected by environmental or developmental stimuli. Certain hormones cause specific stabilization of mRNAs species and preferential mRNA stability is important in the accumulation of globin and myosin mRNAs during the terminal stages of erythropoesis or myogenesis, respectively. Disaggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates induces the specific destabilization of a large class of developmentally regulated mRNAs; thus, this system is an excellent one in which to determine how such controls are effected. Here we show that addition of cyclic AMP to disaggregated cells specifically prevents the destabilization of these mRNAs.

  6. cAMP increases mitochondrial cholesterol transport through the induction of arachidonic acid release inside this organelle in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Duarte, Alejandra; Maloberti, Paula; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of arachidonic acid on cholesterol transport in intact cells or isolated mitochondria from steroidogenic cells and the effect of cyclic-AMP on the specific release of this fatty acid inside the mitochondria. We show for the first time that cyclic-AMP can regulate the release of arachidonic acid in a specialized compartment of MA-10 Leydig cells, e.g. the mitochondria, and that the fatty acid induces cholesterol transport through a mechanism different from the classical pathway. Arachidonic acid and arachidonoyl-CoA can stimulate cholesterol transport in isolated mitochondria from nonstimulated cells. The effect of arachidonoyl-CoA is inhibited by the reduction in the expression or in the activity of a mitochondrial thioesterase that uses arachidonoyl-CoA as a substrate to release arachidonic acid. cAMP-induced arachidonic acid accumulation into the mitochondria is also reduced when the mitochondrial thioesterase activity or expression is blocked. This new feature in the regulation of cholesterol transport by arachidonic acid and the release of arachidonic acid in specialized compartment of the cells could offer novel means for understanding the regulation of steroid synthesis but also would be important in other situations such as neuropathological disorders or oncology disorders, where cholesterol transport plays an important role.

  7. 1,N6-etheno-AMP and 1,N6-etheno-2'-deoxy-AMP as probes of the activator site of glycogen phosphorylase from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbunder, B; Morange, M; Buc, H

    1976-01-01

    Both 1,N6-etheno-AMP and 1,N6-etheno-2'-deoxy-AMP bind at the AMP site of phosphorylase b (1,4-alpha-D-glucan:orthophosphate alpha-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.1). Etheno-AMP induces the same activation as AMP, about 30-fold higher than the activation induced by etheno-dAMP. The fluorescence of etheno-AMP and etheno-dAMP is associated with the base moiety; therefore, when free in solution, the two derivatives have identical fluorescence properties. However, when bound to phosphorylase, the fluorescence of etheno-AMP is quenched more efficiently than the fluorescence of etheno-dAMP. This difference between the fluorescence properties of the bound nucleotides suggests that a modification in the ribose ring affects the position of the adenine in the AMP site of phosphorylase b. The observed quenching may be due to a stacking interaction between an aromatic residue and the base moiety of the bound nucleotide. PMID:1066682

  8. Phosphodiesterases and subcellular compartmentalized cAMP signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Alessandra; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases are key enzymes in the cAMP signaling cascade. They convert cAMP in its inactive form 5'-AMP and critically regulate the intensity and the duration of cAMP-mediated signals. Multiple isoforms exist that possess different intracellular distributions, different affinities for cAMP, and different catalytic and regulatory properties. This complex repertoire of enzymes provides a multiplicity of ways to modulate cAMP levels, to integrate more signaling pathways, and to respond to the specific needs of the cell within distinct subcellular domains. In this review we summarize key findings on phosphodiesterase compartmentalization in the cardiovascular system.

  9. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  10. Cyclic AMP Signaling: A Molecular Determinant of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Eric P.; Assi, Mazen; Pearse, Damien D.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of axonal integrity during injury to the peripheral nerve system (PNS) sets into motion a cascade of responses that includes inflammation, Schwann cell mobilization, and the degeneration of the nerve fibers distal to the injury site. Yet, the injured PNS differentiates itself from the injured central nervous system (CNS) in its remarkable capacity for self-recovery, which, depending upon the length and type of nerve injury, involves a series of molecular events in both the injured neuron and associated Schwann cells that leads to axon regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional restitution. Herein we discuss the essential function of the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP), in the PNS repair process, highlighting the important role the conditioning lesion paradigm has played in understanding the mechanism(s) by which cyclic AMP exerts its proregenerative action. Furthermore, we review the studies that have therapeutically targeted cyclic AMP to enhance endogenous nerve repair. PMID:25177696

  11. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence.

  13. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  14. AKAPs: The Architectural Underpinnings of Local cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is targeted to specific compartments in the cardiac myocyte by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), a diverse set of scaffold proteins that have been implicated in the regulation of excitation-contraction coupling and cardiac remodeling. AKAPs bind not only PKA, but also a large variety of structural and signaling molecules. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts underlying compartmentation of cAMP and PKA signaling, as well as a few of the individual AKAPs that have been shown to be functionally relevant in the heart. PMID:21600214

  15. “cAMP Sponge”: A Buffer for Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2009-01-01

    Background While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP). Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIβ of protein kinase A (PKA). Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named “cAMP sponge”) was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. Conclusions This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events. PMID:19888343

  16. Adiponectin and AMP kinase activator stimulate proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Yamaguchi, Toru; Yano, Shozo; Yamauchi, Mika; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2007-01-01

    Background Adiponectin is a key mediator of the metabolic syndrome that is caused by visceral fat accumulation. Adiponectin and its receptors are known to be expressed in osteoblasts, but their actions with regard to bone metabolism are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of adiponectin on the proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Results Adiponectin receptor type 1 (AdipoR1) mRNA was detected in the cells by RT-PCR. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMP kinase) was phosphorylated by both adiponectin and a pharmacological AMP kinase activator, 5-amino-imidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside (AICAR), in the cells. AdipoR1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection potently knocked down the receptor mRNA, and the effect of this knockdown persisted for as long as 10 days after the transfection. The transfected cells showed decreased expressions of type I collagen and osteocalcin mRNA, as determined by real-time PCR, and reduced ALP activity and mineralization, as determined by von Kossa and Alizarin red stainings. In contrast, AMP kinase activation by AICAR (0.01–0.5 mM) in wild-type MC3T3-E1 cells augmented their proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. BrdU assay showed that the addition of adiponectin (0.01–1.0 μg/ml) also promoted their proliferation. Osterix, but not Runx-2, appeared to be involved in these processes because AdipoR1 siRNA transfection and AICAR treatments suppressed and enhanced osterix mRNA expression, respectively. Conclusion Taken together, this study suggests that adiponectin stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of osteoblasts via the AdipoR1 and AMP kinase signaling pathways in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. PMID:18047638

  17. Plasmid-Encoded AmpC (pAmpC) in Enterobacteriaceae: epidemiology of microorganisms and resistance markers.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Daniela; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Quinteros, Mirta; Giovanakis, Marta; Vay, Carlos; Lascialandare, Silvana; Mutti, Daniel; Pagniez, Gastón; Almuzara, Marisa; Gutkind, Gabriel; Radice, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    CMY-2 Β-lactamase is an important cause of Β-lactam resistance in Enterobacteriaceae and constitutes the most widespread pAmpC. Although CMY-2 has been previously recognized in our region, the real prevalence and epidemiology of this resistance marker was uncertain. During August-October 2009, we conducted a multicenter, prospective study to determine pAmpC prevalence and to characterize CMY-2 producing Escherichia coli associated plasmids. Plasmid-encoded AmpC prevalence was 0.9 % in enterobacteria in this period, being CMY-2 prevalent and to a lesser extent DHA. Molecular typing of CMY-2- producing Escherichia coli isolates showed several lineages. Moreover, replicon typing of cmy-2- containing plasmids displayed a broad diversity in Inc/cmy-2 links. Therefore, association of cmy-2 with specific transposon elements may be responsible for the spread of this resistance marker in Enterobacteriaceae.

  18. Direct regulation of the natural competence regulator gene tfoX by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Zhao, Meng; Li, Jing; Gao, He; Kan, Biao; Liang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    TfoX (Sxy) and CRP are two important competence activators. The link between tfoX and CRP has been shown in H. influenza but lacking evidence of direct interaction. Recently a Sxy-dependent CRP (CRP-S) site autoregulating Sxy was reported in E. coli. Here, we show that the cAMP-CRP complex transcriptionally regulates tfoX expression through multiple canonical CRP (CRP-N) sites in Vibrios. This conclusion is supported by an analysis of the tfoX mRNA levels and tfoX transcriptional reporter fusions. The reduced expression of tfoXVC was restored by trans-complementation of crp in ∆crp and by exogenous cAMP in ∆cya. A promoter deletion analysis and the site-directed mutagenesis of the putative CRP-N sites revealed the presence of two functional CRP-N sites. The direct binding of cAMP-CRP to the tfoXVCpromoter was demonstrated by EMSA assays. Additionally, the transcriptional start site (TSS) of tfoXVF in V. fluvialis was determined, and −10/−35 regions were predicted. Further comparison of the tfoX promoter in Vibrios revealed the existence of similar −10 motifs and putative CRP-N sites, indicating the conserved mechanism of CRP regulation on tfoX. Our study demonstrates the direct binding of the cAMP-CRP complex to tfoX promoter, and broadens the understanding of the molecular mechanism regulating tfoX in Vibrios. PMID:26442598

  19. Field measurements and interpretation of TMI-2 instrumentation: YM-AMP-7023 and YM-AMP-7025

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J E; Smith, J T; Mathis, M V

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the measurement and results of the Loose Part Monitor Channels YM-AMP-7023 and YM-AMP-7025. These instruments consist of an Endevco Model 2276 accelerometer and a model 2652M4 charge amplifier connected to the Loose Parts Monitorng System terminals by approximately 400 feet (500 feet for 7025) of cable. The instruments were being incorporated into a B and W supplied system when the measurements were taken; therefore, the equipment was not expected to be fully operational.

  20. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein signaling system mediates resistance of Vibrio cholerae O1 strains to multiple environmental bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Waise, T M Zaved; Kamruzzaman, M; Ghosh, Amar N; Nair, G Balakrish; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2010-07-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the epidemic diarrheal disease cholera, interacts with diverse environmental bacteriophages. These interactions promote genetic diversity or cause selective enrichment of phage-resistant bacterial clones. To identify bacterial genes involved in mediating the phage-resistant phenotype, we screened a transposon insertion library of V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strain C6706 to identify mutants showing altered susceptibility to a panel of phages isolated from surface waters in Bangladesh. Mutants with insertion in cyaA or crp genes encoding adenylate cyclase or cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP), respectively, were susceptible to a phage designated JSF9 to which the parent strain was completely resistant. Application of the cyaA mutant as an indicator strain in environmental phage monitoring enhanced phage detection, and we identified 3 additional phages to which the parent strain was resistant. Incorporation of the cyaA or crp mutations into other V. cholerae O1 strains caused similar alterations in their phage susceptibility patterns, and the susceptibility correlated with the ability of the bacteria to adsorb these phages. Our results suggest that cAMP-CRP-mediated downregulation of phage adsorption may contribute to a mechanism for the V. cholerae O1 strains to survive predation by multiple environmental phages. Furthermore, the cyaA or crp mutant strains may be used as suitable indicators in monitoring cholera phages in the water.

  1. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of novel antimicrobial peptides, Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, from bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.).

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatoshi; Ideguchi, Mineo; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Tadera, Kenjiro

    2004-03-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, were purified from the bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) by chitin affinity chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). They bind to chitin in a reversible way. They were basic peptides having isoelectric points of over 12. Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 had molecular masses of 4,988 Da and 5,006 Da on MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and their extinction coefficients of 1% aqueous solutions at 280 nm were 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Half of all amino acid residues of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 were occupied by cysteine, arginine, lysine, and proline. The concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi were 2 to 20 microg/ml. The structural characteristics of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 indicated that they were novel thionin-like antimicrobial peptides, though Tu-AMP 2 was a heterodimer composes of two short peptides joined with disulfide bonds.

  2. Presence of free cyclic AMP receptor protein and regulation of its level by cyclic AMP in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, U; Costa, M R; Breakefield, X O; Greengard, P

    1979-01-01

    Neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells of line 108CC-5 were found to contain high levels of soluble adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity and high levels of two specific cAMP receptor proteins, RI and RII. Treatment of the hybrid cells with dibutyryl cAMP increased the level of RI but did not significantly affect the level either of RII or of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. The effect of dibutyryl cAMP could be mimicked by prostaglandin E1 and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, both of which are known to raise cAMP levels in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells. Both in control as well as in dibutyryl cAMP-treated cells, RII but not RI was associated with cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Several lines of evidence suggest that RI represents the free regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The presence of this regulatory subunit as free cAMP receptor protein in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells may be of significance with respect to the regulation of growth and differentiation in tumor cells. Images PMID:226964

  3. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. Spatial encoding of cyclic AMP signalling specificity by GPCR endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetanova, Nikoleta G.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well known to signal via cyclic AMP (cAMP) production at the plasma membrane, but it is now clear that various GPCRs also signal after internalization. Apart from its temporal impact through prolonging the cellular response, does the endosome-initiated signal encode any discrete spatial information? Using the beta2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) as a model, we show that endocytosis is required for the full repertoire of downstream cAMP-dependent transcriptional control. Next, we describe an orthogonal optogenetic approach to definitively establish that the location of cAMP production is indeed the critical variable determining the transcriptional response. Finally, our results suggest that this spatial encoding scheme helps cells functionally discriminate chemically distinct β2-AR ligands according to differences in their ability to promote receptor endocytosis. These findings reveal a discrete principle for achieving cellular signalling specificity, based on endosome-mediated spatial encoding of intracellular second messenger production and ‘location aware’ downstream transcriptional control. PMID:25362359

  9. Cell-cell contact mediates cAMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Fontana, D R; Price, P L; Phillips, J C

    1991-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and cell-cell contact regulate developmental gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum. Developing D. discoideum amoebae synthesize and secrete cAMP following the binding of cAMP to their surface cAMP receptor, a response called cAMP signaling. We have demonstrated two responses of developing D. discoideum amoebae to cell-cell contact. Cell-cell contact elicits cAMP secretion and alters the amount of cAMP secreted in a subsequent cAMP signaling response. Depending upon experimental conditions, bacterial-amoebal contact and amoebal-amoebal contact can enhance or diminish the amount of cAMP secreted during a subsequent cAMP signaling response. We have hypothesized that cell-cell contact regulates D. discoideum development by altering cellular and extracellular levels of cAMP. To begin testing this hypothesis, these responses were further characterized. The two responses to cell-cell contact are independent, i.e., they can each occur in the absence of the other. The responses to cell-cell contact also have unique temperature dependences when compared to each other, cAMP signaling, and phagocytosis. This suggests that these four responses have unique steps in their transduction mechanisms. The secretion of cAMP in response to cell-cell contact appears to be a non-specific response; contact between D. discoideum amoebae and Enterobacter aerogenes, latex beads, or other amoebae elicits cAMP secretion. Despite the apparent similarities of the effects of bacterial-amoebal and amoebal-amoebal contact on the cAMP signaling response, this contact-induced response appears to be specific. Latex beads addition does not alter the magnitude of a subsequent cAMP signaling response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-02-29

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  11. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  12. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of the Transmembrane Protein AmpG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peizhen; Ying, Jun; Yang, Guangjian; Li, Aifang; Wang, Jian; Lu, Junwan; Wang, Junrong; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Kewei; Jin, Shouguang; Bao, Qiyu; Zhang, Kaibo

    2016-01-01

    AmpG is a transmembrane protein with permease activity that transports meuropeptide from the periplasm to the cytoplasm, which is essential for the induction of the ampC encoding β-lactamase. To obtain new insights into the relationship between AmpG structure and function, comparative genomics analysis, secondary and tertiary structure modeling, site-directed mutational analyses and genetic complementation experiments were performed in this study. AmpGs from different genera of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae and Acinetobacter baumannii) could complement AmpG function in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) to ampicillin is 512 μg/ml for wild type strain PAO1, while it is 32 μg/ml for an ampG deletion mutant strain (PAO1ΔampG) with a corresponding decrease in the activity of the ampC-encoded β-lactamase. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved AmpG residues (G29, A129, Q131 and A197) resulted in a loss of function, resulting in a loss of resistance to ampicillin in PAO1ΔampG. The G29A, G29V, A129T, A129V, A129D, A197S and A197D mutants had lower resistance to ampicillin and significantly decreased activity of the AmpC β-lactamase. The G29A, G29V, A129V, A197S and A197D mutants had decreased ampG mRNA transcript levels. The A129T and A129D mutants had normal ampG mRNA transcript levels, but the function of the protein was drastically reduced. Our experimental results demonstrate that the conserved amino acids played essential roles in maintaining the function of AmpG. Combined with the AmpG structural information, these critical amino acids can be targeted for the development of new anti-bacterial agents. PMID:27959942

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cAMP-binding sites of the recombinant type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuno, T; Shuntoh, H; Sakaue, M; Saijoh, K; Takeda, T; Fukuda, K; Tanaka, C

    1988-06-30

    The type I regulatory subunit (R-I) of rat brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase was expressed in E. coli and site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute amino acids in the putative cAMP-binding sites. The wild-type recombinant R-I bound 2 mol of cAMP/mol subunit, while two mutant R-Is with a single amino acid substitution in one of the two intrachain cAMP-binding sites (clone N153:a glutamate for Gly-200, and clone C254:an aspartate for Gly-324) bound 1 mol of cAMP/mol subunit. When these two substitutions were made in one mutant, cAMP did not bind to this mutant, indicating that binding of cAMP to N153 or C254 was to their nonmutated sites. Competition experiments with site-selective analogs and dissociation of bound cAMP from mutant R-Is provided evidence for strong intrachain interactions between the two classes of cAMP-binding sites in R-I.

  15. Cyclic AMP and its functional relationship in Tetrahymena: a comparison between phagocytosis and glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Nagy, S U; Lantos, T

    1978-01-01

    In Tetrahymena, an increase in the level of cAMP is accompanied by an increased phagocytotic rate, whereas increased sugar uptake is parallelled by a decreased cAMP level. The increase in cAMP level seems to be decisive with respect to phagocytosis as a basic phenomenon of life. In the action of epinephrine, however, some mechanism other than cAMP mediation may be involved. Depending on concentration, one hormone may provoke either an increase or a decrease in cAMP level, and this in turn triggers the corresponding function.

  16. Control of helium accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, V.; Miley, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The fishbone like oscillations in ignited tokamaks are addressed in an exploratory manner. The effects of the strong m = 1 oscillations and the weak high-frequency oscillations are examined in order to explore the feasibility of utilizing these oscillations for alpha accumulation control. The prospects of achieving small scale continuous alpha removal from the plasma center by mild fishbone-like oscillations are examined.

  17. Pre-amp EDFA noise characterization for optimal optical receiver transmission performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Aisheh, Akram Ahmad

    In fiber optic communication systems, a pre-amp Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) is used at the input of the optical receiver to increase the receiver sensitivity by amplifying the photon detector incoming optical signal. As a result of this amplification process, the performance of the photon detector is degraded by the pre-amp noise. So, it is important to characterize the pre-amp noise at the optical receiver level and relate the pre-amp noise performance to the optical receiver transmission performance. In this dissertation, the pre-amp EDFA noise performance was characterized first at the pre-amp level through modeling using computer simulations. Then, the pre-amp noise performance was characterized experimentally at the optical receiver level. This dissertation demonstrates that simulations and experiments together provide the optimization of the pre-amp EDFA performance. The experimental work of this dissertation focused on the pre-amp EDFA noise performance characterization and analysis at the optical receiver level. This is the ultimate performance characterization method for the pre-amp EDFA, and it was performed through testing the optical receiver transmission performance under different pre-amp operating conditions.

  18. cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulate the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, H S; Li, B; Lin, Z; Huang, E; Liu, A Y

    1991-06-25

    The theme of this study is an evaluation of the involvement of cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in the regulation of the human heat shock protein (hsp) 70 gene promoter. Expression of a highly specific protein inhibitor of PKA (pRSVPKI) inhibited the basal as well as heat- and cadmium-induced expression of the cotransfected pHBCAT, a human hsp 70 promoter-driven reporter gene; this inhibition was dependent on the amount of pRSVPKI used. The effect of an expression vector of the RI regulatory subunit of PKA, pMTREV, was similar to that of pRSVPKI; pMTREV inhibited both the basal as well as the heat-induced expression of pHBCAT. The specificity of effects of these expression vectors was demonstrated by the lack of effect of a mutant PKI gene and by the unaffected expression of a reference gene (pRSV beta gal) under these conditions. Analysis of the effects of dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM), forskolin (10 microM), and 8-Br-cAMP (1 mM) on the transient expression of pHBCAT showed that these cAMP-elevating agents stimulated the hsp 70 promoter activity, whereas cAMP (1 mM) was without effect. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene constructs with truncated or mutated hsp 70 promoter were used to define the cis-acting DNA element(s) that confer this cAMP stimulation; the heat induced (42 degrees C) expression was used as a control. Mutation of the adenovirus transcription factor element (pLSN-40/-26) greatly reduced the basal level of expression; forskolin had little or no effect on this adenovirus transcription factor-minus promoter, although the promoter activity was very heat inducible. The absence of a functional heat shock consensus element (HSE) in the construct pLSPNWT rendered the promoter heat insensitive; this construct was forskolin responsive although the magnitude of this stimulation was reduced when compared with that of a control construct with HSE. These results were corroborated by studies using consensus sequence of ATF (ATFE) and HSE as competitors

  19. Altering cAMP levels within a central pattern generator modifies or disrupts rhythmic motor output.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Stefan; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2007-12-01

    Cyclic AMP is a second messenger that has been implicated in the neuromodulation of rhythmically active motor patterns. Here, we tested whether manipulating cAMP affects swim motor pattern generation in the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea. Inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC) with 9-cyclopentyladenine (9-CPA) slowed or stopped the swim motor pattern. Inhibiting phosphodiesterase with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) or applying dibutyryl-cAMP (dB-cAMP) disrupted the swim motor pattern, as did iontophoresing cAMP into the central pattern generator neuron C2. Additionally, during wash-in, IBMX sometimes temporarily produced extended or spontaneous swim motor patterns. Photolysis of caged cAMP in C2 after initiation of the swim motor pattern inhibited subsequent bursting. These results suggest that cAMP levels can dynamically modulate swim motor pattern generation, possibly shaping the output of the central pattern generator on a cycle-by-cycle basis.

  20. Selenium accumulation by plants

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate <100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and cannot tolerate greater tissue Se concentrations. However, some plant species have evolved tolerance to Se, and commonly accumulate tissue Se concentrations >100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000–15 000 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. Scope This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. Conclusions The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated

  1. Aerobic Methane Generation From Plants (AMP)? Yes, Mostly!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Ednie, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    In 2006, Keppler et al. (K) published an intriguing and revolutionary idea that aerobic methane is produced in plants (AMP) and released to the atmosphere. Their initial scaling calculations estimated the amount of AMP fluxing from living plants to range from 62-236 Tg/y and 1-7 Tg/y for plant litter. Houweling et al. (2006) (H) refined this flux to ca. 85 Tg/y PIH and 125 Tg/y present day. More recently, Dueck et al. (2007) (D) challenged the claim of AMP from intact plants. Their experiments cited "...No evidence for substantial aerobic methane emission by terrestrial plants..." (max. 0.4 ng/g h-1). Due to the significance of AMP in understanding present and palaeo-atmospheric budgets (e.g., Whiticar and Schaefer, 2007), we conducted a wide range of experiments to confirm or refute the existence and magnitude of AMP. For explanation, experiments of K were time-series batch samples measured by gas chromatography on purged and ambient samples, whereas D used continuous-flow cuvettes and measured by optical PAS with time series single injections. Our longer-term experiments with corn, wheat, tomato, red cedar, chestnut, moss and lichen (3-97 h, 32 °C) used a plant chamber, flow-through system with a GYRO, an optical spectrometer that enables continuous 1 Hz CH4 measurements with a precision of ca. 1 ppbv. We conducted over 100 chamber experiments on sterilized and non-sterilized (Cs-137 radiation) samples of: 1) intact living plants (IP), 2) fresh leaves (FL) and 3) dried leaves (DL); under both 1) high and 2) low light conditions (HL, LL), and with 1) ambient CH4 (AM, ca. 1.92 ppmv) and 2) purged methane (PM, 10 and 96 ppbv) levels. Our results demonstrate that IP-AMs have CH4 flux rates of 0.74-3.48 ng/g h-1. In contrast, IP-PMs show intense CH4 uptake rates of -28.5 to -57.9 ng/g h-1 (substantially different than K's reported emissions of 12-370 ng/g h-1 values). Our FL-AM-LL have CH4 flux rates of 0.36-2.05 ng/g h-1, whereas FL-AM-HL have significant CH4

  2. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2008-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been called "the metabolic master switch" because of its central role in regulating fuel homeostasis. AMPK, a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase composed of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, is activated by upstream kinases and by 5'-AMP in response to various nutritional and stress signals. Downstream effects include regulation of metabolism, protein synthesis, cell growth, and mediation of the actions of a number of hormones, including leptin. However, AMPK research represents a young and growing field; hence, there are many unanswered questions regarding the control and action of AMPK. This review presents evidence for the existence of AMPK signaling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, a genetically tractable model organism that has yet to be fully exploited to elucidate AMPK signaling mechanisms.

  3. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  4. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  5. Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse 3T3 cells: Role of cAMP, Ca sup 2+ , and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Zurier, B.B.; Kozma, M.; Sinnett-Smith, J.; Rozengurt, E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulated initiation of DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. The peptide stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin and either forskolin or an inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effect was obtained at 1 nM. At mitogenic concentrations, VIP stimulated a marked accumulation (eightfold) of cAMP. In contrast to other growth-promoting neuropeptides, VIP did not induce an increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} or the activation of protein kinase C. The authors conclude that neuropeptides can modulate long-term cell proliferation through multiple signaling pathways.

  6. Software Design Document for the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Clarno, Kevin T; Cochran, Bill

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the design of the AMP nuclear fuel performance code. It provides an overview of the decomposition into separable components, an overview of what those components will do, and the strategic basis for the design. The primary components of a computational physics code include a user interface, physics packages, material properties, mathematics solvers, and computational infrastructure. Some capability from established off-the-shelf (OTS) packages will be leveraged in the development of AMP, but the primary physics components will be entirely new. The material properties required by these physics operators include many highly non-linear properties, which will be replicated from FRAPCON and LIFE where applicable, as well as some computationally-intensive operations, such as gap conductance, which depends upon the plenum pressure. Because there is extensive capability in off-the-shelf leadership class computational solvers, AMP will leverage the Trilinos, PETSc, and SUNDIALS packages. The computational infrastructure includes a build system, mesh database, and other building blocks of a computational physics package. The user interface will be developed through a collaborative effort with the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Capability Transfer program element as much as possible and will be discussed in detail in a future document.

  7. mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells are heterogeneous, and cyclic AMP does not act directly to stabilize cell-type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Manrow, R E; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    We reevaluated the use of 32PO4 pulse-chases for analyzing mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium cells. We found that completely effective PO4 chases could not be obtained in developing cells and that, as a consequence, the decay rates exhibited by some mRNAs were influenced by the rates at which they were transcribed. In developing cells disaggregated in the presence of cyclic AMP, the poly(A)+ mRNA population turned over with an apparent half-life of 4 h, individual mRNA decay rates were heterogeneous, and some prestalk and prespore mRNAs appeared to decay with biphasic kinetics. In cells disaggregated in the absence of cyclic AMP, all prestalk and prespore mRNAs decayed with biphasic kinetics. During the first 1 to 1.5 h after disaggregation in the absence of cyclic AMP, the cell-type-specific mRNAs were selectively degraded, decaying with half-lives of 20 to 30 min; thereafter, the residual prestalk and prespore mRNA molecules decayed at rates that were similar to those measured in the presence of cyclic AMP. This short-term labilization of cell-type-specific mRNAs was observed even for those species not requiring cyclic AMP for their accumulation in developing cells. The observation that cell-type specific mRNAs can decay at similar rates in disaggregated cells with or without cyclic AMP indicates that this compound does not act directly to stabilize prestalk and prespore mRNAs during development and that its primary role in the maintenance of cyclic-AMP-dependent mRNAs is likely to be transcriptional. Images PMID:2847029

  8. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) mediates cAMP-dependent but protein kinase A-insensitive modulation of vascular ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Purves, Gregor I; Kamishima, Tomoko; Davies, Lowri M; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2009-07-15

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP (Epacs or cAMP-GEF) represent a family of novel cAMP-binding effector proteins. The identification of Epacs and the recent development of pharmacological tools that discriminate between cAMP-mediated pathways have revealed previously unrecognized roles for cAMP that are independent of its traditional target cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Here we show that Epac exists in a complex with vascular ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel subunits and that cAMP-mediated activation of Epac modulates KATP channel activity via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism involving the activation of Ca2+-sensitive protein phosphatase 2B (PP-2B, calcineurin). Application of the Epac-specific cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, at concentrations that activate Epac but not PKA, caused a 41.6 +/- 4.7% inhibition (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 7) of pinacidil-evoked whole-cell KATP currents recorded in isolated rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Importantly, similar results were obtained when cAMP was elevated by addition of the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in the presence of the structurally distinct PKA inhibitors, Rp-cAMPS or KT5720. Activation of Epac by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP caused a transient 171.0 +/- 18.0 nM (n = 5) increase in intracellular Ca2+ in Fura-2-loaded aortic myocytes, which persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Inclusion of the Ca2+-specific chelator BAPTA in the pipette-filling solution or preincubation with the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A or ascomycin, significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP to inhibit whole-cell KATP currents. These results highlight a previously undescribed cAMP-dependent regulatory mechanism that may be essential for understanding the physiological and pathophysiological roles ascribed to arterial KATP channels in the control of vascular tone and blood flow.

  9. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  10. A novel biosensor to study cAMP dynamics in cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shatanik; Jansen, Vera; Jikeli, Jan F; Hamzeh, Hussein; Alvarez, Luis; Dombrowski, Marco; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The cellular messenger cAMP regulates multiple cellular functions, including signaling in cilia and flagella. The cAMP dynamics in these subcellular compartments are ill-defined. We introduce a novel FRET-based cAMP biosensor with nanomolar sensitivity that is out of reach for other sensors. To measure cAMP dynamics in the sperm flagellum, we generated transgenic mice and reveal that the hitherto methods determining total cAMP levels do not reflect changes in free cAMP levels. Moreover, cAMP dynamics in the midpiece and principal piece of the flagellum are distinctively different. The sole cAMP source in the flagellum is the soluble adenylate cyclase (SACY). Although bicarbonate-dependent SACY activity requires Ca2+, basal SACY activity is suppressed by Ca2+. Finally, we also applied the sensor to primary cilia. Our new cAMP biosensor features unique characteristics that allow gaining new insights into cAMP signaling and unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliary function in vitro and in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14052.001 PMID:27003291

  11. Novel cAMP signalling paradigms: therapeutic implications for airway disease.

    PubMed

    Billington, Charlotte K; Hall, Ian P

    2012-05-01

    Since its discovery over 50 years ago, cAMP has been the archetypal second messenger introducing students to the concept of cell signalling at the simplest level. As explored in this review, however, there are many more facets to cAMP signalling than the path from Gs-coupled receptor to adenylyl cyclase (AC) to cAMP to PKA to biological effect. After a brief description of this canonical cAMP signalling pathway, a snapshot is provided of the novel paradigms of cAMP signalling. As in the airway the cAMP pathway relays the major bronchorelaxant signal and as such is the target for frontline therapy for asthma and COPD, particular emphasis is given to airway disease and therapy. Areas discussed include biased agonism, continued signalling following internalization, modulation of cAMP by AC, control of cAMP degradation, cAMP and calcium crosstalk, Epac-mediated signalling and finally the implications of altered genotypes will be considered. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Novel cAMP Signalling Paradigms. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-2.

  12. Antibacterial Mode of Action of Ib-AMP1 Against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Di, Rong; Matthews, Karl R

    2013-06-01

    Continual occurrence of foodborne outbreaks, along with the increase in antibiotic resistance which burdens clinical treatments, has urged scientists to search for other potential promising antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides are emerging as one of the potential alternatives. The mode of action of a given AMP is critical and essential for future application; however, it is still not completely known for many of these compounds. Ib-AMP1 is a plant-derived AMP, purified from seeds of Impatiens balsamina and has been shown to exert antibacterial and antifungal activity at the micromolar level. A study had shown that the therapeutic index of Ib-AMP1 against eight human pathogens is 23.5. The objective of the present study was to determine the in vivo mode of action of Ib-AMP1 against Escherichia coli O157:H7. A concentration-dependent effect of Ib-AMP1 on the E. coli O157:H7 cell membrane occurred. Ib-AMP1 treatments resulted in efflux of K(+) and ATP, suggesting pores of sufficient size to allow efflux of large molecules. Ib-AMP1 at sublethal concentrations exerts a greater effect at the intracellular level. In contrast, Ib-AMP1 at a lethal concentration permeabilizes cell membranes and may directly or indirectly inhibit intracellular macromolecule synthesis. Collectively, results of this study suggest Ib-AMP1 is bactericidal interfering within outer and inner membrane integrity permitting efflux of ATP and interfering with intracellular biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein.

  13. A novel biosensor to study cAMP dynamics in cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shatanik; Jansen, Vera; Jikeli, Jan F; Hamzeh, Hussein; Alvarez, Luis; Dombrowski, Marco; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2016-03-22

    The cellular messenger cAMP regulates multiple cellular functions, including signaling in cilia and flagella. The cAMP dynamics in these subcellular compartments are ill-defined. We introduce a novel FRET-based cAMP biosensor with nanomolar sensitivity that is out of reach for other sensors. To measure cAMP dynamics in the sperm flagellum, we generated transgenic mice and reveal that the hitherto methods determining total cAMP levels do not reflect changes in free cAMP levels. Moreover, cAMP dynamics in the midpiece and principal piece of the flagellum are distinctively different. The sole cAMP source in the flagellum is the soluble adenylate cyclase (SACY). Although bicarbonate-dependent SACY activity requires Ca(2+), basal SACY activity is suppressed by Ca(2+). Finally, we also applied the sensor to primary cilia. Our new cAMP biosensor features unique characteristics that allow gaining new insights into cAMP signaling and unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliary function in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Leveraging family-specific signatures for AMP discovery and high-throughput annotation

    PubMed Central

    Waghu, Faiza Hanif; Barai, Ram Shankar; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are diverse, biologically active, essential components of the innate immune system. As compared to conventional antibiotics, AMPs exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, reduced toxicity and reduced microbial resistance. They are widely researched for their therapeutic potential, especially against multi-drug resistant pathogens. AMPs are known to have family-specific sequence composition, which can be mined for their discovery and rational design. Here, we present a detailed family-based study on AMP families. The study involved the use of sequence signatures represented by patterns and hidden Markov models (HMMs) present in experimentally studied AMPs to identify novel AMPs. Along with AMPs, peptides hitherto lacking antimicrobial annotation were also retrieved and wet-lab studies on randomly selected sequences proved their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. CAMPSign, a webserver has been created for researchers to effortlessly exploit the use of AMP family signatures for identification of AMPs. The webserver is available online at www.campsign.bicnirrh.res.in. In this work, we demonstrate an optimised and experimentally validated protocol along with a freely available webserver that uses family-based sequence signatures for accelerated discovery of novel AMPs. PMID:27089856

  15. A novel cysteine-rich antifungal peptide ToAMP4 from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers.

    PubMed

    Astafieva, A A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Odintsova, T I; Kozlov, S A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A

    2013-09-01

    A novel peptide named ToAMP4 was isolated from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers by a combination of acetic acid extraction and different types of chromatography: affinity, size-exclusion, and RP-HPLC. The amino acid sequence of ToAMP4 was determined by automated Edman degradation. The peptide is basic, consists of 41 amino acids, and incorporates three disulphide bonds. Due to the unusual cysteine spacing pattern, ToAMP4 does not belong to any known plant AMP family, but classifies together with two other antimicrobial peptides ToAMP1 and ToAMP2 previously isolated from the dandelion flowers. To study the biological activity of ToAMP4, it was successfully produced in a prokaryotic expression system as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. The recombinant peptide was shown to be identical to the native ToAMP4 by chromatographic behavior, molecular mass, and N-terminal amino acid sequence. The peptide displays broad-spectrum antifungal activity against important phytopathogens. Two ToAMP4-mediated inhibition strategies depending on the fungus were demonstrated. The results obtained add to our knowledge on the structural and functional diversity of AMPs in plants.

  16. Cardiac myocyte–secreted cAMP exerts paracrine action via adenosine receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Yassine; Ahles, Andrea; Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Baqi, Younis; Lee, Sang-Yong; Husse, Britta; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Foinquinos, Ariana; Thum, Thomas; Müller, Christa E.; Dendorfer, Andreas; Laggerbauer, Bernhard; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Acute stimulation of cardiac β-adrenoceptors is crucial to increasing cardiac function under stress; however, sustained β-adrenergic stimulation has been implicated in pathological myocardial remodeling and heart failure. Here, we have demonstrated that export of cAMP from cardiac myocytes is an intrinsic cardioprotective mechanism in response to cardiac stress. We report that infusion of cAMP into mice averted myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis in a disease model of cardiac pressure overload. The protective effect of exogenous cAMP required adenosine receptor signaling. This observation led to the identification of a potent paracrine mechanism that is dependent on secreted cAMP. Specifically, FRET-based imaging of cAMP formation in primary cells and in myocardial tissue from murine hearts revealed that cardiomyocytes depend on the transporter ABCC4 to export cAMP as an extracellular signal. Extracellular cAMP, through its metabolite adenosine, reduced cardiomyocyte cAMP formation and hypertrophy by activating A1 adenosine receptors while delivering an antifibrotic signal to cardiac fibroblasts by A2 adenosine receptor activation. Together, our data reveal a paracrine role for secreted cAMP in intercellular signaling in the myocardium, and we postulate that secreted cAMP may also constitute an important signal in other tissues. PMID:25401477

  17. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  18. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  19. AmpH, a Bifunctional dd-Endopeptidase and dd-Carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Leiza, Silvia M.; de Pedro, Miguel A.; Ayala, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (LMM PBPs) are important for correct cell morphogenesis. These enzymes display dd-carboxypeptidase and/or dd-endopeptidase activities associated with maturation and remodeling of peptidoglycan (PG). AmpH has been classified as an AmpH-type class C LMM PBP, a group closely related to AmpC β-lactamases. AmpH has been associated with PG recycling, although its enzymatic activity remained uncharacterized until now. Construction and purification of His-tagged AmpH from E. coli permitted a detailed study of its enzymatic properties. The N-terminal export signal of AmpH is processed, but the protein remains membrane associated. The PBP nature of AmpH was demonstrated by its ability to bind the β-lactams Bocillin FL (a fluorescent penicillin) and cefmetazole. In vitro assays with AmpH and specific muropeptides demonstrated that AmpH is a bifunctional dd–endopeptidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. Indeed, the enzyme cleaved the cross-linked dimers tetrapentapeptide (D45) and tetratetrapeptide (D44) with efficiencies (kcat/Km) of 1,200 M−1 s−1 and 670 M−1 s−1, respectively, and removed the terminal d-alanine from muropeptides with a C-terminal d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptide. Both dd-peptidase activities were inhibited by 40 μM cefmetazole. AmpH also displayed a weak β-lactamase activity for nitrocefin of 1.4 × 10−3 nmol/μg protein/min, 1/1,000 the rate obtained for AmpC under the same conditions. AmpH was also active on purified sacculi, exhibiting the bifunctional character that was seen with pure muropeptides. The wide substrate spectrum of the dd-peptidase activities associated with AmpH supports a role for this protein in PG remodeling or recycling. PMID:22001512

  20. Identification of an Hsp90 mutation that selectively disrupts cAMP/PKA signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flom, Gary A; Langner, Ewa; Johnson, Jill L

    2012-06-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 cooperates with multiple cochaperone proteins as it promotes the folding and activation of diverse client proteins. Some cochaperones regulate the ATPase activity of Hsp90, while others appear to promote Hsp90 interaction with specific types of client proteins. Through its interaction with the adenylate cyclase Cyr1, the Sgt1 cochaperone modulates the activity of the cAMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A specific mutation in yeast Hsp90, hsc82-W296A, or a mutation in Sgt1, sgt1-K360E, resulted in altered transcription patterns genetically linked to the cAMP pathway. Hsp90 interacted with Cyr1 in vivo and the hsc82-W296A mutation resulted in reduced accumulation of Cyr1. Hsp90-Sgt1 interaction was altered by either the hsc82-W296A or sgt1-K360E mutation, suggesting defective Hsp90-Sgt1 cooperation leads to reduced Cyr1 activity. Microarray analysis of hsc82-W296A cells indicated that over 80 % of all transcriptional changes in this strain may be attributed to altered cAMP signaling. This suggests that a majority of the cellular defects observed in hsc82-W296A cells are due to altered interaction with one specific essential cochaperone, Sgt1 and one essential client, Cyr1. Together our results indicate that specific interaction of Hsp90 and Sgt1 with Cyr1 plays a key role in regulating gene expression, including genes involved in polarized morphogenesis.

  1. Up-regulation of M1 muscarinic receptors expressed in CHOm1 cells by panaxynol via cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wang; Xing-Jun, Wu; Yong-Yao, Cui; Liang, Zhu; Yang, Lu; Hong-Zhuan, Chen

    Loss of cholinergic neurons along with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in cerebral cortex and hippocampus is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent drug development for AD treatment focuses heavily on identifying M(1) receptor agonists. However, mAChRs undergo down-regulation in response to agonist-induced sustained activation. Therefore, therapeutic effectiveness wanes during continuous use. Thus, another potentially effective approach, which overcomes this drawback is to develop compounds, which instead up-regulate M(1) receptor expression. In the present study, we took this alternative approach and contrasted in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with human m(1) subtype gene (CHOm(1) cells) changes of M(1) receptor expression levels caused by muscarinic agonists and upregulators of its expression. The muscarinic agonists carbachol and pilocarpine reduced M(1) receptor number in CHOm(1) cells by 29 and 46%, respectively, at 100muM, whereas panaxynol, a polyacetylene compound isolated from the lipophilic fraction of Panax notoginseng, concentration-dependently up-regulated the M(1) receptor number after pre-incubation with CHOm(1) cells for 48 h, reaching a plateau at 1 microM, and was accompanied by enhanced M(1) mRNA levels. Moreover, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor RP-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic mono-phosphoro-thioate triethylamine salt (RP-cAMPs) 5 microM completely prevented panaxynol-induced up-regulation of M(1) receptors. Panaxynol (1muM) caused a significant and consistent stimulation of cAMP accumulation (27% increase above basal at 40 min). These results suggest that in CHOm(1) cells panaxynol up-regulates M(1) receptor number through cAMP pathway-mediated stimulation of gene transcription.

  2. Mogrol Derived from Siraitia grosvenorii Mogrosides Suppresses 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation by Reducing cAMP-Response Element-Binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increasing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Ishihara, Mikako; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Ito, Yuta; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Yasushi A.; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mogrol, an aglycone of mogrosides from Siraitia grosvenorii, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Mogrol, but not mogrosides, suppressed triglyceride accumulation by affecting early (days 0–2) and late (days 4–8), but not middle (days 2–4), differentiation stages. At the late stage, mogrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduced glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. At the early stage, mogrol promoted AMPK phosphorylation, inhibited the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ; a master regulator of adipogenesis), and reduced 3T3-L1 cell contents (e.g., clonal expansion). In addition, mogrol, but not the AMPK activator AICAR, suppressed the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which regulates C/EBPβ expression. These results indicated that mogrol suppressed adipogenesis by reducing CREB activation in the initial stage of cell differentiation and by activating AMPK signaling in both the early and late stages of this process. PMID:27583359

  3. AmpG Inactivation Restores Susceptibility of Pan-β-Lactam-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Laura; Reeve, Thomas M.; Juan, Carlos; Moyá, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive AmpC hyperproduction is the most frequent mechanism of resistance to the weak AmpC inducers antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Previously, we demonstrated that inhibition of the β-N-acetylglucosaminidase NagZ prevents and reverts this mechanism of resistance, which is caused by ampD and/or dacB (PBP4) mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we compared NagZ with a second candidate target, the AmpG permease for GlcNAc-1,6-anhydromuropeptides, for their ability to block AmpC expression pathways. Inactivation of nagZ or ampG fully restored the susceptibility and basal ampC expression of ampD or dacB laboratory mutants and impaired the emergence of one-step ceftazidime-resistant mutants in population analysis experiments. Nevertheless, only ampG inactivation fully blocked ampC induction, reducing the MICs of the potent AmpC inducer imipenem from 2 to 0.38 μg/ml. Moreover, through population analysis and characterization of laboratory mutants, we showed that ampG inactivation minimized the impact on resistance of the carbapenem porin OprD, reducing the MIC of imipenem for a PAO1 OprD mutant from >32 to 0.5 μg/ml. AmpG and NagZ targets were additionally evaluated in three clinical isolates that are pan-β-lactam resistant due to AmpC hyperproduction, OprD inactivation, and overexpression of several efflux pumps. A marked increase in susceptibility to ceftazidime and piperacillin-tazobactam was observed in both cases, while only ampG inactivation fully restored wild-type imipenem susceptibility. Susceptibility to meropenem, cefepime, and aztreonam was also enhanced, although to a lower extent due to the high impact of efflux pumps on the activity of these antibiotics. Thus, our results suggest that development of small-molecule inhibitors of AmpG could provide an excellent strategy to overcome the relevant mechanisms of resistance (OprD inactivation plus AmpC induction) to imipenem, the only currently available β-lactam not

  4. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  5. Changes of concentration of cyclic AMP in rat brain and plasma in the clinical death model.

    PubMed

    Kapuściński, A

    1991-01-01

    In the experimental model of clinical death in rats (Korpachev et al. 1982) cyclic AMP concentrations were evaluated in the brain and plasma at the end of 5-min clinical death, and 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after resuscitation. The cAMP 125I assay system has been used. At the end of clinical death the cAMP level decreased in the brain with normalization 15 min after resuscitation; the second decrease of the cAMP level was observed 30 min post resuscitation with normalization in later periods. In the plasma cAMP concentration did not change at the end of clinical death, followed by a significant increase 5 min after resuscitation. Later the level of plasma cAMP decreased being still above the control value after 2 hours. The possible role of endogenous catecholamines stimulation on adenylate cyclase activity is discussed.

  6. Complementation of growth defect in an ampC deletion mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R E; Weiner, J H

    1993-12-15

    beta-Lactamase genes of class-A (Rtem) and class-C (ampC) were placed under control of an inducible tac-promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of RTEM had no observable effect on the growth properties of E. coli strains HB101 (ampC+) or MI1443 (delta ampC). E. coli MI1443 exhibited a decline in growth rate at mid-exponential phase which could be delayed by expression of AmpC at early-exponential phase. AmpC expression otherwise inhibited growth, particularly during the transition into exponential phase where growth was prevented altogether. We suggest that the AmpC beta-lactamase, but not RTEM, may have an additional cellular function as a peptidoglycan hydrolase.

  7. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation in the control of biotransformation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, G; Garzó, T; Mészáros, G; Faragó, A; Antoni, F; Mandl, J

    1988-03-01

    The possibility of a short-term cAMP-dependent regulation of mixed-function oxidation and of glucuronide formation was investigated in isolated mouse hepatocytes and in mouse liver microsomal membranes. N6, O2-dibutyryl cAMP (in accordance with its increasing effect on gluconeogenesis) decreased aminopyrine oxidation and p-nitrophenol conjugation in isolated hepatocytes, while the phenolphthalein conjugation remained unaltered. Similar to dibutyryl cAMP the Ca2+ ionophore A 23187 also decreased aminopyrine oxidation. In cell-free systems the phosphorylation of isolated microsomal membranes by the exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase was inhibitory on aminopyrine oxidation and p-nitrophenol glucuronide formation but aniline oxidation and phenolphthalein glucuronidation were not affected. The correlation between the negative cAMP-dependent control of certain processes of biotransformation and the positive cAMP-dependent regulation of gluconeogenesis is discussed.

  8. cAMP signalling in the normal and tumorigenic pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Formosa, R; Vassallo, J

    2014-07-05

    cAMP signalling plays a key role in the normal physiology of the pituitary gland, regulating cellular growth and proliferation, hormone production and release. Deregulation of the cAMP signalling pathway has been reported to be a common occurrence in pituitary tumorigenesis. Several mechanisms have been implicated including somatic mutations, gene-gene interactions and gene-environmental interactions. Somatic mutations in G-proteins and protein kinases directly alter cAMP signalling, while malfunctioning of other signalling pathways such as the Raf/MAPK/ERK, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Wnt pathways which normally interact with the cAMP pathway may mediate indirect effects on cAMP and varying downstream effectors. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling pathway has been implicated in pituitary tumorigenesis and we review its role in general and specifically in relation to cAMP de-regulation.

  9. Early methyl donor deficiency alters cAMP signaling pathway and neurosteroidogenesis in the cerebellum of female rat pups

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Dreumont, Natacha; Willekens, Jérèmy; Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia; Jeannesson, Elise; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Early deficiency of the methyl donors folate and vitamin B12 produces hyperhomocysteinemia and cognitive and motor disorders in 21-day-old rat pups from dams fed a diet deficient in methyl donors during gestation and lactation. These disorders are associated with impaired neurogenesis and altered synaptic plasticity in cerebellum. We aimed to investigate whether these disorders could be related to impaired expression of neurosteroidogenesis-associated proteins, key regulator receptors, and some steroid content in the cerebellum. The methyl donor deficiency produced a decreased concentration of folate and vitamin B12, along with accumulation of homocysteine in Purkinje cells in both sexes, whereas the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio was reduced only in females. The transcription level and protein expression of StAR, aromatase, ERα, ERβ, and LH receptors were decreased only in females, with a marked effect in Purkinje cells, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Consistently, reduced levels of estradiol and pregnenolone were measured in cerebellar extracts of females only. The decreased expression levels of the transcriptional factors CREB, phospho-CREB, and SF-1, the lesser increase of cAMP concentration, and the lower level of phospho-PKC in the cerebellum of deficient females suggest that the activation of neurosteroidogenesis via cAMP-mediated signaling pathways associated with LHR activation would be altered. In conclusion, a gestational methyl donor deficiency impairs neurosteroidogenesis in cerebellum in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:25294213

  10. Expression and organization of BP74, a cyclic AMP-regulated gene expressed during Dictyostelium discoideum development.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, S B; Pollenz, R S; Drummond, I; Chisholm, R L

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized a cDNA and the corresponding gene for a cyclic AMP-inducible gene expressed during Dictyostelium development. This gene, BP74, was found to be first expressed about the time of aggregate formation, approximately 6 h after starvation. Accumulation of BP74 mRNA did not occur in Dictyostelium cells that had been starved in fast-shaken suspension cultures but was induced in similar cultures to which cyclic AMP pulses had been added. The BP74 cDNA and gene were characterized by DNA sequence analysis and transcriptional mapping. When the BP74 promoter region was fused with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene and reintroduced into Dictyostelium cells, the transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene displayed the same developmentally regulated pattern of expression as did the endogenous BP74 gene, suggesting that all of the cis-acting elements required for regulated expression were carried by a 2-kilobase cloned genomic fragment. On the basis of sequence analysis, the gene appeared to encode a protein containing a 20-residue hydrophobic sequence at the amino-terminal end and 26 copies of a 20-amino-acid repeat. Images PMID:2555685

  11. Impact of AmpC Derepression on Fitness and Virulence: the Mechanism or the Pathway?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gallego, Marcelo; Torrens, Gabriel; Castillo-Vera, Jane; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Hultenby, Kjell; Albertí, Sebastián; Mellroth, Peter; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Normark, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the interplay between antibiotic resistance and bacterial fitness and virulence is essential to guide individual treatments and improve global antibiotic policies. A paradigmatic example of a resistance mechanism is the intrinsic inducible chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC from multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major nosocomial pathogen. The regulation of ampC expression is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance is frequently mediated by inactivating mutations in ampD, encoding an N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase, affecting the levels of ampC-activating muropeptides. Here we dissect the impact of the multiple pathways causing AmpC hyperproduction on P. aeruginosa fitness and virulence. Through a detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the lack of all three P. aeruginosa AmpD amidases causes a dramatic effect in fitness and pathogenicity, severely compromising growth rates, motility, and cytotoxicity; the latter effect is likely achieved by repressing key virulence factors, such as protease LasA, phospholipase C, or type III secretion system components. We also show that ampC overexpression is required but not sufficient to confer the growth-motility-cytotoxicity impaired phenotype and that alternative pathways leading to similar levels of ampC hyperexpression and resistance, such as those involving PBP4, had no fitness-virulence cost. Further analysis indicated that fitness-virulence impairment is caused by overexpressing ampC in the absence of cell wall recycling, as reproduced by expressing ampC from a plasmid in an AmpG (muropeptide permease)-deficient background. Thus, our findings represent a major step in the understanding of β-lactam resistance biology and its interplay with fitness and pathogenesis. PMID:27795406

  12. Dynamics of β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling and morphological changes in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vardjan, Nina; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The morphology of astrocytes, likely regulated by cAMP, determines the structural association between astrocytes and the synapse, consequently modulating synaptic function. β-Adrenergic receptors (β-AR), which increase cytosolic cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i ), may affect cell morphology. However, the real-time dynamics of β-AR-mediated cAMP signaling in single live astrocytes and its effect on cell morphology have not been studied. We used the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensor Epac1-camps to study time-dependent changes in [cAMP]i ; morphological changes in primary rat astrocytes were monitored by real-time confocal microscopy. Stimulation of β-AR by adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline, a specific agonist of β-AR, rapidly increased [cAMP]i (∼15 s). The FRET signal response, mediated via β-AR, was faster than in the presence of forskolin (twofold) and dibutyryl-cAMP (>35-fold), which directly activate adenylyl cyclase and Epac1-camps, respectively, likely due to slow entry of these agents into the cytosol. Oscillations in [cAMP]i have not been recorded, indicating that cAMP-dependent processes operate in a slow time domain. Most Epac1-camps expressing astrocytes revealed a morphological change upon β-AR activation and attained a stellate morphology within 1 h. The morphological changes exhibited a bell-shaped dependency on [cAMP]i . The 5-10% decrease in cell cross-sectional area and the 30-50% increase in cell perimeter are likely due to withdrawal of the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region and the appearance of protrusions on the surface of astrocytes. Because astrocyte processes ensheath neurons, β-AR/cAMP-mediated morphological changes can modify the geometry of the extracellular space, affecting synaptic, neuronal, and astrocyte functions in health and disease.

  13. Is This Op-Amp Any Good?: Lab-Built Checker Removes All Doubt!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Electronics instructors and students find it very helpful to be able to check an operational amplifier at the proto-board stage. Most students lack the experience or knowledge that it takes to recognize whether an op-amp is operating normally or not. This article discusses a handy op-amp checker that allows one to check and/or test op-amps at the…

  14. Mathematical model of cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in constitutive and UV-induced melanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Peshkova, Anna Y.

    2002-07-01

    Cascade of reactions of cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in melanocytes is investigated by mathematical modeling. Model takes into account (alpha) -melanocyte stimulating hormone binding to melanocortin-1 receptor, adenylate cyclase activation by G-protein, increase of the intracellular cAMP concentration, PKA activation by cAMP, CREB phosphorylation by PKA, microphthalmia gene expression, microphthalmia binding to tyrosinase gene promoter, increase of tyrosinase synthesis. Positive and negative feedback loops of this system are analyzed.

  15. Nanomolar Inhibitors of AmpC [beta]-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, Federica; Caselli, Emilia; Morandi, Stefania; Focia, Pamela J.; Blazquez, Jesus; Shoichet, Brian K.; Prati, Fabio

    2010-03-08

    {beta}-lactamases are the most widespread resistance mechanism to {beta}-lactam antibiotics, such as the penicillins and the cephalosporins. In an effort to combat these enzymes, a combination of stereoselective organic synthesis, enzymology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography was used to design and evaluate new carboxyphenyl-glycylboronic acid transition-state analogue inhibitors of the class C {beta}-lactamase AmpC. The new compounds improve inhibition by over 2 orders of magnitude compared to analogous glycylboronic acids, with K{sub i} values as low as 1 nM. On the basis of the differential binding of different analogues, the introduced carboxylate alone contributes about 2.1 kcal/mol in affinity. This carboxylate corresponds to the ubiquitous C3(4)' carboxylate of {beta}-lactams, and this energy represents the first thermodynamic measurement of the importance of this group in molecular recognition by class C {beta}-lactamases. The structures of AmpC in complex with two of these inhibitors were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.72 and 1.83 {angstrom} resolution. These structures suggest a structural basis for the high affinity of the new compounds and provide templates for further design. The highest affinity inhibitor was 5 orders of magnitude more selective for AmpC than for characteristic serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin. This inhibitor reversed the resistance of clinical pathogens to the third generation cephalosporin ceftazidime; it may serve as a lead compound for drug discovery to combat bacterial resistance to {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  16. Amp-hour counting control for PV hybrid power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, T.D.; Thompson, B.

    1997-06-01

    The performance of an amp-hour (Ah) counting battery charge control algorithm has been defined and tested using the Digital Solar Technologies MPR-9400 microprocessor based PV hybrid charge controller. This work included extensive field testing of the charge algorithm on flooded lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. The test results after one-year have demonstrated that PV charge utilization, battery charge control, and battery state of charge (SOC) has been significantly improved by providing maximum charge to the batteries while limiting battery overcharge to manufacturers specifications during variable solar resource and load periods.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa global regulator AmpR.

    PubMed

    Caille, Olivier; Zincke, Diansy; Merighi, Massimo; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Kong, Kok-Fai; Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; Narasimhan, Giri; Schneper, Lisa; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dreaded pathogen in many clinical settings. Its inherent and acquired antibiotic resistance thwarts therapy. In particular, derepression of the AmpC β-lactamase is a common mechanism of β-lactam resistance among clinical isolates. The inducible expression of ampC is controlled by the global LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR. In the present study, we investigated the genetic and structural elements that are important for ampC induction. Specifically, the ampC (PampC) and ampR (PampR) promoters and the AmpR protein were characterized. The transcription start sites (TSSs) of the divergent transcripts were mapped using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR), and strong σ(54) and σ(70) consensus sequences were identified at PampR and PampC, respectively. Sigma factor RpoN was found to negatively regulate ampR expression, possibly through promoter blocking. Deletion mapping revealed that the minimal PampC extends 98 bp upstream of the TSS. Gel shifts using membrane fractions showed that AmpR binds to PampC in vitro whereas in vivo binding was demonstrated using chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR). Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis of the AmpR helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif identified residues critical for binding and function (Ser38 and Lys42) and critical for function but not binding (His39). Amino acids Gly102 and Asp135, previously implicated in the repression state of AmpR in the enterobacteria, were also shown to play a structural role in P. aeruginosa AmpR. Alkaline phosphatase fusion and shaving experiments suggest that AmpR is likely to be membrane associated. Lastly, an in vivo cross-linking study shows that AmpR dimerizes. In conclusion, a potential membrane-associated AmpR dimer regulates ampC expression by direct binding.

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Global Regulator AmpR

    PubMed Central

    Caille, Olivier; Zincke, Diansy; Merighi, Massimo; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Kong, Kok-Fai; Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; Narasimhan, Giri; Schneper, Lisa; Lory, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dreaded pathogen in many clinical settings. Its inherent and acquired antibiotic resistance thwarts therapy. In particular, derepression of the AmpC β-lactamase is a common mechanism of β-lactam resistance among clinical isolates. The inducible expression of ampC is controlled by the global LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR. In the present study, we investigated the genetic and structural elements that are important for ampC induction. Specifically, the ampC (PampC) and ampR (PampR) promoters and the AmpR protein were characterized. The transcription start sites (TSSs) of the divergent transcripts were mapped using 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR), and strong σ54 and σ70 consensus sequences were identified at PampR and PampC, respectively. Sigma factor RpoN was found to negatively regulate ampR expression, possibly through promoter blocking. Deletion mapping revealed that the minimal PampC extends 98 bp upstream of the TSS. Gel shifts using membrane fractions showed that AmpR binds to PampC in vitro whereas in vivo binding was demonstrated using chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR). Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis of the AmpR helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif identified residues critical for binding and function (Ser38 and Lys42) and critical for function but not binding (His39). Amino acids Gly102 and Asp135, previously implicated in the repression state of AmpR in the enterobacteria, were also shown to play a structural role in P. aeruginosa AmpR. Alkaline phosphatase fusion and shaving experiments suggest that AmpR is likely to be membrane associated. Lastly, an in vivo cross-linking study shows that AmpR dimerizes. In conclusion, a potential membrane-associated AmpR dimer regulates ampC expression by direct binding. PMID:25182487

  19. Genotypic Identification of AmpC β-Lactamases Production in Gram-Negative Bacilli Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Mona; Behiry, Iman; Younan, Mariam; El Guindy, Nancy; Mostafa, Sally; Abada, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Background: AmpC type β-lactamases are commonly isolated from extended-spectrum Cephalosporin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Also, resistance appeared in bacterial species not naturally producing AmpC enzymes. Therefore, a standard test for the detection of the plasmid-mediated AmpC enzyme and new breakpoints for extended spectrum Cephalosporins are urgently necessary. Objectives: To detect plasmid and chromosomal mediated AmpC-β-lactamases in Gram negative bacteria in community and hospital acquired infections. Materials and Methods: 1073 Gram negative clinical isolates were identified by the conventional methods and were screened for AmpC production using Cefoxitin discs. Confirmatory phenotypic identifications were done for the Cefoxitin-resistant isolates using Boronic Acid for combined and double disc synergy tests, Cloxacillin based double disc synergy test, and induction tests. The genotypic identification of plasmid-mediated AmpC was done using multiplex PCR. ESBL production was also screened by discs of Ceftazidime and Cefotaxime with and without Clavulanic Acid (10 μg). Results: The AmpC-producing isolates among all identified Gram negative bacilli were 5.8% (62/1073) as detected by screening disc diffusion methods, where 72% were positive for AmpC by combined disc method (Cefotetan and Boronic Acid), 56.5% were positive by each of Boronic Acid and Cloxacillin double disc synergy tests, 35.5% were positive by the induction test, and 25.8% were plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase producers by the multiplex PCR. Plasmid-mediated AmpC genes retrieved, belonged to the families (MOX, FOX, EBC and CIT). ESBL producers were found in 26 (41.9%) isolates, 15 (57%) of which also produced AmpC. Isolates caused hospital acquired infections were (53/62); of which (39/62) were AmpC producers. While only (8/62) of the isolates caused community-acquired infections, were AmpC producers, and (1.6%) (1/62) were non AmpC producer. Conclusions: The AmpC

  20. cAMP enhances BMP2-signaling through PKA and MKP1-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghayor, Chafik; Ehrbar, Martin; Miguel, Blanca San; Graetz, Klaus W.; Weber, Franz E.

    2009-04-03

    Recent studies suggest that the elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the activation of the protein kinase A regulate BMP-induced osteogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the enhancing effect of cAMP on BMP2 signaling were not completely revealed. In this study we investigated the effect of elevated cAMP level and PKA activation on the BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in pluripotent C2C12 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and its mRNA were consistently induced by BMP2 treatment. The pretreatment of C2C12 cells with Forskolin, a cAMP generating agent, dbcAMP, an analogue of cAMP, or IBMX (3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine), and a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases elicited further activation of alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, elevated intracellular cAMP level increased BMP2-induced MKP1. On the other hand, BMP2-induced Erk phosphorylation (p44/p42) and cell proliferation were suppressed in the presence of cAMP. Thus, cAMP might enhance BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation by a MKP1-Erk-dependent mechanism.

  1. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  2. The binding of tyrosinyl-5'-AMP to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (E.coli).

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, F; Krauss, G; Kownatzki, R; Maass, G

    1979-01-01

    The binding between tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (E.coli) and the alkylanalogue of the aminoacyladenylate, tyrosinyl-5'-AMP, has been investigated by fluorescence titrations and rapid mixing experiments. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase has two equivalent and independent binding sites for tyrosinyl-5'-AMP. The intrinsic binding constant is 4 x 10(7)M-1. The binding sites for tRNATyr and tyrosinyl-5'-AMP are independent of each other, the anticooperative mode of tRNA binding being preserved in the presence of tyrosinyl-5-AMP. PMID:377229

  3. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-22

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways.

  4. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  5. Structural basis for cAMP-mediated allosteric control of the catabolite activator protein.

    PubMed

    Popovych, Nataliya; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Tonelli, Marco; Ebright, Richard H; Kalodimos, Charalampos G

    2009-04-28

    The cAMP-mediated allosteric transition in the catabolite activator protein (CAP; also known as the cAMP receptor protein, CRP) is a textbook example of modulation of DNA-binding activity by small-molecule binding. Here we report the structure of CAP in the absence of cAMP, which, together with structures of CAP in the presence of cAMP, defines atomic details of the cAMP-mediated allosteric transition. The structural changes, and their relationship to cAMP binding and DNA binding, are remarkably clear and simple. Binding of cAMP results in a coil-to-helix transition that extends the coiled-coil dimerization interface of CAP by 3 turns of helix and concomitantly causes rotation, by approximately 60 degrees , and translation, by approximately 7 A, of the DNA-binding domains (DBDs) of CAP, positioning the recognition helices in the DBDs in the correct orientation to interact with DNA. The allosteric transition is stabilized further by expulsion of an aromatic residue from the cAMP-binding pocket upon cAMP binding. The results define the structural mechanisms that underlie allosteric control of this prototypic transcriptional regulatory factor and provide an illustrative example of how effector-mediated structural changes can control the activity of regulatory proteins.

  6. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F.; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways. PMID:26795422

  7. A-kinase anchoring proteins: cAMP compartmentalization in neurodegenerative and obstructive pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, W J; Muñoz-Llancao, P; González-Billault, C; Schmidt, M

    2014-01-01

    The universal second messenger cAMP is generated upon stimulation of Gs protein-coupled receptors, such as the β2-adreneoceptor, and leads to the activation of PKA, the major cAMP effector protein. PKA oscillates between an on and off state and thereby regulates a plethora of distinct biological responses. The broad activation pattern of PKA and its contribution to several distinct cellular functions lead to the introduction of the concept of compartmentalization of cAMP. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are of central importance due to their unique ability to directly and/or indirectly interact with proteins that either determine the cellular content of cAMP, such as β2-adrenoceptors, ACs and PDEs, or are regulated by cAMP such as the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. We report on lessons learned from neurons indicating that maintenance of cAMP compartmentalization by AKAP5 is linked to neurotransmission, learning and memory. Disturbance of cAMP compartments seem to be linked to neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease. We translate this knowledge to compartmentalized cAMP signalling in the lung. Next to AKAP5, we focus here on AKAP12 and Ezrin (AKAP78). These topics will be highlighted in the context of the development of novel pharmacological interventions to tackle AKAP-dependent compartmentalization. PMID:25132049

  8. Molecular imprinting of AMP by an ionic-noncovalent dual approach.

    PubMed

    Breton, Florent; Delépée, Raphaël; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2009-10-01

    In order to mimic recognition properties of adenylate kinase, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared for adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a substrate of the enzyme. Different functional monomers interacting with the phosphate moiety were tested, and the MIP giving the best specific binding of AMP was composed with one equivalent of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and ten equivalents of acrylamide compared to AMP. Packed into solid phase cartridge, this polymer showed similar characteristics than the enzyme, since it was specific for AMP toward other nucleotides.

  9. The concentration of cyclic AMP and the activity of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase and an inhibitor in the adipose tissue of rats fed lard or glucose diets.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, M M; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1978-08-01

    Measurements of tissue cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration, the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the level of the enzyme's thermostable, macromolecular inhibitor were made on preparations of rat epididymal fat pad from animals fed high fat or high carbohydrate diets. The cAMP concentration from rats adapted to a high lard diet for 14-15 days was 153 +/- 17.8 pmoles/mg protein as opposed to 76 +/- 6.0 found with high glucose diet. No significant difference in total cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity was observed among rats fed high glucose, high lard or laboratory chow, although the enzyme's activity ratio (-cAMP)(+cAMP) was significantly elevated with lard feeding (0.49 +/- 0.02) as opposed to glucose feeding (0.43 +/- 0.01). Crude preparations from lard and glucose fed animals were equivalent in inhibitory activity when tested with enzyme from chow fed animals. Agarose column chromatography separated holoenzyme and C subunit forms of the protein kinase when 500 mM NaCl was present in the elution buffer. Absence of the salt allowed subunit reassociation to occur. Direct addition of NaCl greater than or equal to 75 mM significantly inhibited protein kinase activity. The results indicate that the adipose tissue of rats fed a high lard diet has a higher concentration of cAMP and an increased protein kinase activity ratio than tissue from rats fed a fat free, high glucose diet. Total cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and the level of a thermostable macromolecular inhibitor remained unchanged.

  10. Cranberry Product Decreases Fat Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quancai; Yue, Yiren; Shen, Peiyi; Yang, Jeremy J; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-04-01

    Cranberry phenolic compounds have been linked to many health benefits. A recent report suggested that cranberry bioactives inhibit adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Thus, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of the cranberry product (CP) on lipid metabolism using the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) model. CP (0.016% and 0.08%) dose-dependently reduced overall fat accumulation in C. elegans (N2, wild type) by 43% and 74%, respectively, without affecting its pumping rates or locomotive activities. CP decreased fat accumulation in aak-2 (an ortholog of AMP-activated kinase α) and tub-1 (an ortholog of TUBBY) mutants significantly, but only minimal effects were observed in sbp-1 (an ortholog of sterol response element-binding protein-1) and nhr-49 (an ortholog of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α) mutant strains. We further confirmed that CP downregulated sbp-1, cebp, and hosl-1 (an ortholog of hormone-sensitive lipase homolog) expression, while increasing the expression of nhr-49 in wild-type C. elegans. These results suggest that CP could effectively reduce fat accumulation in C. elegans dependent on sbp-1, cebp, and nhr-49, but not aak-2 and tub-1.

  11. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Activation by Resveratrol Modulates Amyloid-β Peptide Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giliberto, Luca; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.; Janle, Elsa M.; Lobo, Jessica; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition into cerebral amyloid plaques. The natural polyphenol resveratrol promotes anti-aging pathways via the activation of several metabolic sensors, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Resveratrol also lowers Aβ levels in cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. Moreover, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the brain remains uncertain. Here we show that AMPK signaling controls Aβ metabolism and mediates the anti-amyloidogenic effect of resveratrol in non-neuronal and neuronal cells, including in mouse primary neurons. Resveratrol increased cytosolic calcium levels and promoted AMPK activation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β. Direct pharmacological and genetic activation of AMPK lowered extracellular Aβ accumulation, whereas AMPK inhibition reduced the effect of resveratrol on Aβ levels. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the AMPK target mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) to trigger autophagy and lysosomal degradation of Aβ. Finally, orally administered resveratrol in mice was detected in the brain where it activated AMPK and reduced cerebral Aβ levels and deposition in the cortex. These data suggest that resveratrol and pharmacological activation of AMPK have therapeutic potential against Alzheimer disease. PMID:20080969

  12. Role of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase in renal physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Hallows, Kenneth R; Mount, Peter F; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Power, David A

    2010-05-01

    The ultrasensitive energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) orchestrates the regulation of energy-generating and energy-consuming pathways. AMPK is highly expressed in the kidney where it is reported to be involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including ion transport, podocyte function, and diabetic renal hypertrophy. Sodium transport is the major energy-consuming process in the kidney, and AMPK has been proposed to contribute to the coupling of ion transport with cellular energy metabolism. Specifically, AMPK has been identified as a regulator of several ion transporters of significance in renal physiology, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC), and the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Identified regulators of AMPK in the kidney include dietary salt, diabetes, adiponectin, and ischemia. Activation of AMPK in response to adiponectin is described in podocytes, where it reduces albuminuria, and in tubular cells, where it reduces glycogen accumulation. Reduced AMPK activity in the diabetic kidney is associated with renal accumulation of triglyceride and glycogen and the pathogenesis of diabetic renal hypertrophy. Acute renal ischemia causes a rapid and powerful activation of AMPK, but the functional significance of this observation remains unclear. Despite the recent advances, there remain significant gaps in the present understanding of both the upstream regulating pathways and the downstream substrates for AMPK in the kidney. A more complete understanding of the AMPK pathway in the kidney offers potential for improved therapies for several renal diseases including diabetic nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  13. Activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase by self-DNA causes autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gao, Daxing; Li, Tuo; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Quan-Zhen; Wight-Carter, Mary; Chen, Zhijian J

    2015-10-20

    TREX1 is an exonuclease that digests DNA in the cytoplasm. Loss-of-function mutations of TREX1 are linked to Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome (AGS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in humans. Trex1(-/-) mice exhibit autoimmune and inflammatory phenotypes that are associated with elevated expression of interferon (IFN)-induced genes (ISGs). Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the IFN pathway. Upon binding to DNA, cGAS is activated to catalyze the synthesis of cGAMP, which functions as a second messenger that binds and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce IFNs and other cytokines. Here we show that genetic ablation of cGas in Trex1(-/-) mice eliminated all detectable pathological and molecular phenotypes, including ISG induction, autoantibody production, aberrant T-cell activation, and lethality. Even deletion of just one allele of cGas largely rescued the phenotypes of Trex1(-/-) mice. Similarly, deletion of cGas in mice lacking DNaseII, a lysosomal enzyme that digests DNA, rescued the lethal autoimmune phenotypes of the DNaseII(-/-) mice. Through quantitative mass spectrometry, we found that cGAMP accumulated in mouse tissues deficient in Trex1 or DNaseII and that this accumulation was dependent on cGAS. These results demonstrate that cGAS activation causes the autoimmune diseases in Trex1(-/-) and DNaseII(-/-) mice and suggest that inhibition of cGAS may lead to prevention and treatment of some human autoimmune diseases caused by self-DNA.

  14. Fatal infantile cardiac glycogenosis with phosphorylase kinase deficiency and a mutation in the gamma2-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Akman, Hasan O; Sampayo, James N; Ross, Fiona A; Scott, John W; Wilson, Gregory; Benson, Lee; Bruno, Claudio; Shanske, Sara; Hardie, D Grahame; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    A 10-wk-old infant girl with severe hypertrophy of the septal and atrial walls by cardiac ultrasound, developed progressive ventricular wall thickening and died of aspiration pneumonia at 5 mo of age. Postmortem examination revealed ventricular hypertrophy and massive atrial wall thickening due to glycogen accumulation. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed increased free glycogen and decreased activity of phosphorylase b kinase (PHK). The report of a pathogenic mutation (R531Q) in the gene (PRKAG2) encoding the gamma2 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in three infants with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage, and "pseudo PHK deficiency" prompted us to screen this gene in our patient. We found a novel (R384T) heterozygous mutation in PRKAG2, affecting an arginine residue in the N-terminal AMP-binding domain. Like R531Q, this mutation reduces the binding of AMP and ATP to the isolated nucleotide-binding domains, and prevents activation of the heterotrimer by metabolic stress in intact cells. The mutation was not found in DNA from the patient's father, the only available parent, and is likely to have arisen de novo. Our studies confirm that mutations in PRKAG2 can cause fatal infantile cardiomyopathy, often associated with apparent PHK deficiency.

  15. Specific inhibition by prostaglandins E2 and I2 of histamine-stimulated [14C]aminopyrine accumulation and cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation by isolated canine parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, A H

    1980-01-01

    The effects of prostaglandins E2 and I2 on accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine and the generation of cyclic AMP by fractions of dispersed canine gastric mucosal cells, enriched in their content of parietal cells, have been studied. The parietal cell content of the fractions was enriched to between 43 and 70% using an elutriator rotor. The accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine was used as the index of parietal cell response to stimulation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 0.1 nM-0.1 mM) inhibited histamine stimulated aminopyrine uptake but did not block the response to carbachol, gastrin, or dibuturyl cyclic AMP. PGE2 did, however, inhibit aminopyrine uptake stimulated by carbachol and gastrin when the response to these agents was potentiated by histamine. PGE2 (0.1 NM-0.1 mM) inhibited histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production in a dose-dependent fashion with maximal inhibition at 1 microM PGE2. Prostacyclin also inhibited both histamine-stimulated aminopyrine accumulation and histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production. In the absence of added histamine, PGE2 in concentrations above 1 microM and prostacyclin in concentrations above 10 microM stimulated cyclic AMP production, probably by acting on the nonparietal cells as shown in previous studies. These present data are consistent with the hypothesis that prostaglandins E2 and I2 inhibit the response of isolated parietal cells to histamine by specifically blocking histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production. PMID:6154063

  16. Reanalyzing the Ampère-Maxwell Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. Eric

    2011-09-01

    In a recent TPT article, I addressed a common miscommunication about Faraday's law, namely, that introductory texts often say the law expresses a causal relationship between the magnetic fields time variation and the electric fields circulation. In that article, I demonstrated that these field behaviors share a common cause in a time-varying current density. From that, many readers may have rightly guessed at a symmetric conclusion: while the Ampère-Maxwell law is commonly said to express a causal relation between the electric fields time variation and the magnetic fields circulation, these field behaviors share a distinct, common cause. Together, Faraday's law and the Ampère-Maxwell law constitute half of Maxwell's laws that form a foundation for almost all of electricity and magnetism. By misrepresenting these two laws, introductory texts not only present students with unnecessary conceptual hurdles early in their physics educations but also leave them with enduring misunderstandings about the very foundation of electricity and magnetism. Fortunately, compared to what is commonly taught, the actual cause of these field variations is conceptually simpler and more consistent with what the students will have already learned in the introductory texts' own earlier chapters.

  17. Solution structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Olah, G.A.; Walsh, D.A.; Mitchell, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Protein phosphorylation is well established as one of the most important mechanisms of signal transduction and cellular regulation. Two of the key enzymes that catalyze these phosphorylation reactions are the cAMP- (PKA) and cGMP- (PKG) dependent protein kinases. PKA has served as the prototypic model of this class of enzymes that now comprises in excess of 300 phylogenetically related proteins. A large number of these protein kinases are critical for the regulation of cell function and a full analysis of their similarities and differences is essential to understand their diverse physiological roles. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase has the subunit structure R2C2, in which C and R refer to the catalytic and regulatory subunits, respectively. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is highly homologous to PKA but is distinguished from it by having the regulatory and catalytic domains on a contiguous polypeptide. The studies described here use small-angle scattering and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to study domain movements and conformational changes in these enzymes in different functional states in order to elucidate the molecular bases for the regulation of their activities.

  18. Non-Enzymatic Oligomerization of 3', 5' Cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Timperio, Anna Maria; Šponer, Judit E; Šponer, Jiří; Nováková, Olga; Šedo, Ondrej; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies illustrate that short oligonucleotide sequences can be easily produced from nucleotide precursors in a template-free non-enzymatic way under dehydrating conditions, i.e. using essentially dry materials. Here we report that 3',5' cyclic AMP may also serve as a substrate of the reaction, which proceeds under moderate conditions yet with a lower efficiency than the previously reported oligomerization of 3',5' cyclic GMP. Optimally the oligomerization requires (i) a temperature of 80°C, (ii) a neutral to alkaline environment and (iii) a time on the order of weeks. Differences in the yield and required reaction conditions of the oligomerizations utilizing 3',5' cGMP and cAMP are discussed in terms of the crystal structures of the compounds. Polymerization of 3',5' cyclic nucleotides, whose paramount relevance in a prebiotic chemistry context has been widely accepted for decades, supports the possibility that the origin of extant genetic materials might have followed a direct uninterrupted path since its very beginning, starting from non-elaborately pre-activated monomer compounds and simple reactions.

  19. Cyclic GMP-AMP Displays Mucosal Adjuvant Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Škrnjug, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity – a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines. PMID:25295996

  20. Evidence that cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors suppress TNF alpha generation from human monocytes by interacting with a 'low-affinity' phosphodiesterase 4 conformer.

    PubMed Central

    Souness, J. E.; Griffin, M.; Maslen, C.; Ebsworth, K.; Scott, L. C.; Pollock, K.; Palfreyman, M. N.; Karlsson, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of RP 73401 (piclamilast) and rolipram against human monocyte cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) in relation to their effects on prostaglandin (PG)E2-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF alpha production and TNF alpha mRNA expression. 2. PDE4 was found to be the predominant PDE isoenzyme in the cytosolic fraction of human monocytes. Cyclic GMP-inhibited PDE (PDE3) was also detected in the cytosolic and particulate fractions. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of human monocyte poly (A+) mRNA revealed amplified products corresponding to PDE4 subtypes A and B of which the former was most highly expressed. A faint band corresponding in size to PDE4D was also observed. 3. RP 73401 was a potent inhibitor of cytosolic PDE4 (IC50: 1.5 +/- 0.6 nM, n = 3). (+/-)-Rolipram (IC50: 313 +/- 6.7 nM, n = 3) was at least 200 fold less potent than RP 73401. R-(-)-rolipram was approximately 3 fold more potent than S-(+)-rolipram against cytosolic PDE4. 4. RP 73401 (IC50: 9.2 +/- 2.1 nM, n = 6) was over 50 fold more potent than (+/-)-rolipram (IC50: 503 +/- 134 nM, n = 6) ) in potentiating PGE2-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. R-(-)-rolipram (IC50: 289 +/- 121 nM, n = 5) was 4.7 fold more potent than its S-(+)-enantiomer (IC50: 1356 +/- 314 nM, n = 5). A strong and highly-significant, linear correlation (r = 0.95, P < 0.01, n = 13) was observed between the inhibitory potencies of a range of structurally distinct PDE4 inhibitors against monocyte PDE4 and their ED50 values in enhancing monocyte cyclic AMP accumulation. A poorer, though still significant, linear correlation (r = 0.67, P < 0.01, n = 13) was observed between the potencies of the same compounds in potentiating PGE2-induced monocyte cyclic AMP accumulation and their abilities to displace [3H]-rolipram binding to brain membranes. 5. RP 73401 (IC50: 6.9 +/- 3.3 nM, n = 5) was 71 fold more potent than

  1. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    PubMed

    Paramonov, Valeriy M; Mamaeva, Veronika; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming-all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells), underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: (1) genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; (2) inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control-something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  2. Cyclic AMP Affects Oocyte Maturation and Embryo Development in Prepubertal and Adult Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Ulloa, Sandra Milena; Heinzmann, Julia; Herrmann, Doris; Hadeler, Klaus-Gerd; Aldag, Patrick; Winkler, Sylke; Pache, Dorit; Baulain, Ulrich; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Niemann, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    High cAMP levels during in vitro maturation (IVM) have been related to improved blastocyst yields. Here, we employed the cAMP/cGMP modulators, forskolin, IBMX, and cilostamide, during IVM to unravel the role of high cAMP in early embryonic development produced from prepubertal and adult bovine oocytes. Oocytes were collected via transvaginal aspiration and randomly assigned to three experimental groups: TCM24 (24h IVM/control), cAMP30 (2h pre-IVM (forskolin-IBMX), 30h IVM-cilostamide), and DMSO30 (Dimethyl Sulfoxide/vehicle control). After IVM, oocytes were fertilized in vitro and zygotes were cultured in vitro to blastocysts. Meiotic progression, cAMP levels, mRNA abundance of selected genes and DNA methylation were evaluated in oocytes. Blastocysts were used for gene expression or DNA methylation analyses. Blastocysts from the cAMP30 groups were transferred to recipients. The cAMP elevation delayed meiotic progression, but developmental rates were not increased. In immature oocytes, mRNA abundance of PRKACA was higher for cAMP30 protocol and no differences were found for PDE3A, SMAD2, ZAR1, PRDX1 and SLC2A8. EGR1 gene was up-regulated in prepubertal cAMP30 immature oocytes and down-regulated in blastocysts from all in vitro treatments. A similar gene expression profile was observed for DNMT3b, BCL2L1, PRDX1 and SLC2A8 in blastocysts. Satellite DNA methylation profiles were different between prepubertal and adult oocytes and blastocysts derived from the TCM24 and DMSO30 groups. Blastocysts obtained from prepubertal and adult oocytes in the cAMP30 treatment displayed normal methylation profiles and produced offspring. These data indicate that cAMP regulates IVM in prepubertal and adult oocytes in a similar manner, with impact on the establishment of epigenetic marks and acquisition of full developmental competency. PMID:26926596

  3. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Hua; Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  4. cAMP Signaling Prevents Podocyte Apoptosis via Activation of Protein Kinase A and Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP. PMID:24642777

  5. A reassessment of the modulatory role of cyclic AMP in catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Parramón, M; González, M P; Oset-Gasque, M J

    1995-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in the regulation of catecholamine (CA) secretion in chromaffin cells remains equivocal from previous studies. 2. In the present study the effect of this cyclic nucleotide on basal CA secretion, as well as on intracellular calcium and membrane potential has been examined. 3. Forskolin and the permeable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorphenylthio)-adenosine-3'-5' monophosphate cyclic (pClpcAMP), increased basal CA secretion in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50s were 0.43 +/- 0.10 microM for forskolin and 39 +/- 9 microM for pClpcAMP. Other agonists with adenylate cyclase activity such as stimulants of adenosine receptors, beta-adrenoceptors, GABAB receptors and intestinal vasoactive peptide (VIP), also increased basal CA secretion in a highly significant manner. However, when they were added together with forskolin, CA secretion was not affected although an additive increase in cyclic AMP levels was produced. 4. Statistical analysis of the correlation between cyclic AMP levels and CA secretion evoked by these cyclic AMP increasing compounds showed that a significant direct correlation between both parameters existed only when low levels of cyclic AMP were produced by secretagogue stimulation. When the increase in intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations exceeded approximately 8 times the basal cyclic AMP levels the correlation was not significant. These results indicate a dual dose-dependent effect of cyclic AMP on basal CA secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7881750

  6. Dose and Chemical Modification Considerations for Continuous Cyclic AMP Analog Delivery to the Injured CNS

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Karim; Ghosh, Mousumi; Vavrek, Romana; Tse, Arthur D.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this investigation, two cell-permeable synthetic analogs of cAMP, dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) and 8-bromo-cAMP, which are widely used to elevate intracellular cAMP levels under experimental conditions, were investigated for their ability to dose-dependently improve histological and functional outcomes following continuous delivery in two models of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The cAMP analogs were delivered via osmotic minipumps at 1–250 mM through an indwelling cortical cannula or by intrathecal infusion for up to 4 weeks after either a T8 unilateral over-hemisection or a C2-3 dorsolateral quadrant lesion, respectively. In both SCI models, continuous db-cAMP delivery was associated with histopathological changes that included sporadic micro-hemorrhage formation and cavitation, enhanced macrophage infiltration and tissue damage at regions beyond the immediate application site; no deleterious or beneficial effect of agent delivery was observed at the spinal injury site. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by pronounced behavioral deficits that included an absence of progressive locomotor recovery, increased extensor tone, paralysis, and sensory abnormalities. These deleterious effects were not observed in saline-treated animals, in animals in which the db-cAMP dose did not exceed 1 mM, or in those animals that received a high dose (250 mM) of the alternative cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP. These results demonstrate that, for continuous intraparenchymal or intrathecal administration of cAMP analogs for the study of biological or therapeutic effects within the central nervous system (CNS), consideration of the effective concentration applied as well as the potential toxicity of chemical moieties on the parent molecule and/or their activity needs to be taken into account. PMID:19397425

  7. SHC1 sensitizes cancer cells to the 8-Cl-cAMP treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Young; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Jeong Seon; Ahn, Young-Ho; Hong, Seung Hwan

    2015-08-07

    8-Chloro-cyclic AMP (8-Cl-cAMP) is a cyclic AMP analog that induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in a broad spectrum of cancer cells. Previously, we found that 8-Cl-cAMP-induced growth inhibition is mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). To identify downstream mediators of the 8-Cl-cAMP signaling, we performed co-immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry using the anti-AMPK or p38 MAPK antibodies. Through this approach, SHC1 was identified as one of the binding partners of p38 MAPK. SHC1 phosphorylation was suppressed by 8-Cl-cAMP in HeLa and MCF7 cancer cells, which was mediated by its metabolites, 8-Cl-adenosine and 8-Cl-ATP; however, 8-Cl-cAMP showed no effect on SHC1 phosphorylation in normal human fibroblasts. SHC1 siRNA induced AMPK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and growth inhibition in cancer cells, and SHC1 overexpression re-sensitized human foreskin fibroblasts to the 8-Cl-cAMP treatment. SHC1 phosphorylation was unaffected by Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor) and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor), which suggests that SHC1 is upstream of AMPK and p38 MAPK in the 8-Cl-cAMP-stimulated signaling cascade. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that SHC1 functions as a sensor during the 8-Cl-cAMP-induced growth inhibition in SHC1-overexpressing cancer cells.

  8. cAMP-mediated stabilization of fusion pores in cultured rat pituitary lactotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Calejo, Ana Isabel; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Kucka, Marek; Kreft, Marko; Gonçalves, Paula Polónia; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Zorec, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis mediates the release of hormones and transmitters. The last step of this process is represented by the merger between the vesicle and the plasma membranes, and the formation of a fusion pore. Once formed, the initially stable and narrow fusion pore may reversibly widen (transient exocytosis) or fully open (full-fusion exocytosis). Exocytosis is typically triggered by an elevation in cytosolic calcium activity. However, other second messengers, such as cyclic AMP (cAMP), have been reported to modulate secretion. The way in which cAMP influences the transitions between different fusion pore states remains unclear. Here, hormone release studies show that prolactin release from isolated rat lactotrophs stimulated by forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclases, and by membrane-permeable cAMP analog (dbcAMP), exhibit a biphasic concentration dependency. While at lower concentrations (2–10 μM forskolin and 2.5–5 mM dbcAMP) these agents stimulate prolactin release, an inhibition is measured at higher concentrations (50 μM forskolin and 10–15 mM dbcAMP). By using high-resolution capacitance (Cm) measurements, we recorded discrete increases in Cm, which represent elementary exocytic events. An elevation of cAMP leaves the frequency of full-fusion events unchanged, while increasing the frequency of transient events. These exhibited a wider fusion pore as measured by increased fusion pore conductance and a prolonged fusion pore dwell-time. The probability of observing rhythmic reopening of transient fusion pores was elevated by dbcAMP. In conclusion, cAMP-mediated stabilization of wide fusion pores prevents vesicles from proceeding to the full-fusion stage of exocytosis, which hinders vesicle content discharge at high cAMP concentrations. PMID:23637196

  9. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems

    PubMed Central

    Paramonov, Valeriy M.; Mamaeva, Veronika; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming—all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells), underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: (1) genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; (2) inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control—something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs. PMID:26441653

  10. Double electron–electron resonance reveals cAMP-induced conformational change in HCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Binding of 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels regulates their gating. cAMP binds to a conserved intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in the channel, increasing the rate and extent of activation of the channel and shifting activation to less hyperpolarized voltages. The structural mechanism underlying this regulation, however, is unknown. We used double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy to directly map the conformational ensembles of the CNBD in the absence and presence of cAMP. Site-directed, double-cysteine mutants in a soluble CNBD fragment were spin-labeled, and interspin label distance distributions were determined using DEER. We found motions of up to 10 Å induced by the binding of cAMP. In addition, the distributions were narrower in the presence of cAMP. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance studies revealed changes in mobility associated with cAMP binding, indicating less conformational heterogeneity in the cAMP-bound state. From the measured DEER distributions, we constructed a coarse-grained elastic-network structural model of the cAMP-induced conformational transition. We find that binding of cAMP triggers a reorientation of several helices within the CNBD, including the C-helix closest to the cAMP-binding site. These results provide a basis for understanding how the binding of cAMP is coupled to channel opening in HCN and related channels. PMID:24958877

  11. Isolation and characterization of cAMP-resistant mutants of the H-4 rat hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.Y.; Lin, Z.

    1987-05-01

    H-4 rat hepatoma cells were mutagenized with ethyl methane-sulfonate and the frequency of emergence of cAMP resistant mutant cells were evaluated by cloning the EMS-treated cells in a semi-solid agar medium that contained either 1-3 mM 8-bromo-cAMP plus 1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine or 5 ..mu..g/ml cholera toxin plus 1 mM IBMX. cAMP resistant mutants emerged at a frequency of 8 x 10/sup -5/. 15 colonies were isolated, recloned, grown in mass culture, and cell extracts were prepared. Analysis of cAMP-dependent protein kinase demonstrated that: (1) the type II enzyme is the only cAMP-dependent protein kinase detected in extracts of the hepatoma cells; (2) of the 15 cAMP resistant clonal cell lines examined, only one (H/sub 4/M/sub 18/) was found to be devoid of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. In another cell line (H/sub 4/M/sub 10/) the activity was 30% of that of the parental H-4 cells; (3) there was an increase (130-300%) in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in 13/15 of the mutant cell lines over that of the parental H-4 cells. Analysis of cAMP-phosphodiesterase demonstrated significant increases (150-370%) in the enzyme activity in extracts of the mutants over that of the H-4 parental line. Their results suggest that while a deficiency in cAMP-dependent protein kinase may confer resistance to the hepatoma cells against the cytostatic effects of 8-bromo-cAMP and cholera toxin, other events such as overexpression of phosphodiesterase may contribute to this phenotype.

  12. Genetic regulation of glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli: in vitro effects of cyclic AMP and guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate and analysis of in vivo transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, T; Preiss, J

    1989-01-01

    Glycogen accumulation in Escherichia coli is inversely related to the growth rate and occurs most actively when cells enter the stationary phase. The levels of the three biosynthetic enzymes undergo corresponding changes under these conditions, suggesting that genetic control of enzyme biosynthesis may account for at least part of the regulation (J. Preiss, Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 38:419-458, 1984). We have begun to explore the molecular basis of this control by identifying factors which affect the expression of the glycogen genes and by determining the 5'-flanking regions required to mediate the regulatory effects. The in vitro coupled transcription-translation of two of the biosynthetic genes, glgC (ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase) and glgA (glycogen synthase), was enhanced up to 26- and 10-fold, respectively, by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate stimulated the expression of these genes 3.6- and 1.8-fold, respectively. The expression of glgB (glycogen branching enzyme) was affected weakly or negligibly by the above-mentioned compounds. Assays which measured the in vitro formation of the first dipeptide of glgC showed that a restriction fragment which contained 0.5 kilobases of DNA upstream from the initiation codon supported cAMP-CRP-activated expression. Sequence-specific binding of cAMP-CRP to a 243-base-pair restriction fragment from the region upstream from glgC was observed by virtue of the altered electrophoretic mobility of the bound DNA. S1 nuclease protection analysis identified 5' termini of four in vivo transcripts within 0.5 kilobases of the glgC coding region. The relative concentrations of transcripts were higher in the early stationary phase than in the exponential phase. Two mutants which overproduced the biosynthesis enzymes accumulated elevated levels of specific transcripts. The 5' termini of three of the transcripts were mapped to a high resolution. Their upstream sequences showed weak

  13. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study. Volume 3: Interface control documents. Part 1: AMPS payload to shuttle ICD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Physical, functional, and operational interfaces between the space shuttle orbiter and the AMPS payload are described for the ground handling and test phases, prelaunch, launch and ascent, operational, stowage, and reentry and landing activities.

  14. Pharmacological implications of the Ca2+/cAMP signaling interaction: from risk for antihypertensive therapy to potential beneficial for neurological and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Caricati-Neto, Afonso; García, Antonio G; Bergantin, Leandro Bueno

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discussed pharmacological implications of the Ca2+/cAMP signaling interaction in the antihypertensive and neurological/psychiatric disorders therapies. Since 1975, several clinical studies have reported that acute and chronic administration of L-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (VACCs) blockers, such as nifedipine, produces reduction in peripheral vascular resistance and arterial pressure associated with an increase in plasma noradrenaline levels and heart rate, typical of sympathetic hyperactivity. Despite this sympathetic hyperactivity has been initially attributed to adjust reflex of arterial pressure, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this apparent sympathomimetic effect of the L-type VACCs blockers remained unclear for decades. In addition, experimental studies using isolated tissues richly innervated by sympathetic nerves (to exclude the influence of adjusting reflex) showed that neurogenic responses were completely inhibited by L-type VACCs blockers in concentrations above 1 μmol/L, but paradoxically potentiated in concentrations below 1 μmol/L. During almost four decades, these enigmatic phenomena remained unclear. In 2013, we discovered that this paradoxical increase in sympathetic activity produced by L-type VACCs blocker is due to interaction of the Ca2+/cAMP signaling pathways. Then, the pharmacological manipulation of the Ca2+/cAMP interaction produced by combination of the L-type VACCs blockers used in the antihypertensive therapy, and cAMP accumulating compounds used in the antidepressive therapy, could represent a potential cardiovascular risk for hypertensive patients due to increase in sympathetic hyperactivity. In contrast, this pharmacological manipulation could be a new therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26516591

  15. Uric acid-dependent inhibition of AMP kinase induces hepatic glucose production in diabetes and starvation: evolutionary implications of the uricase loss in hominids.

    PubMed

    Cicerchi, Christina; Li, Nanxing; Kratzer, James; Garcia, Gabriela; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Hunter, Brandi; Rivard, Christopher J; Sautin, Yuri Y; Gaucher, Eric A; Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Reduced AMP kinase (AMPK) activity has been shown to play a key deleterious role in increased hepatic gluconeogenesis in diabetes, but the mechanism whereby this occurs remains unclear. In this article, we document that another AMP-dependent enzyme, AMP deaminase (AMPD) is activated in the liver of diabetic mice, which parallels with a significant reduction in AMPK activity and a significant increase in intracellular glucose accumulation in human HepG2 cells. AMPD activation is induced by a reduction in intracellular phosphate levels, which is characteristic of insulin resistance and diabetic states. Increased gluconeogenesis is mediated by reduced TORC2 phosphorylation at Ser171 by AMPK in these cells, as well as by the up-regulation of the rate-limiting enzymes PEPCK and G6Pc. The mechanism whereby AMPD controls AMPK activation depends on the production of a specific AMP downstream metabolite through AMPD, uric acid. In this regard, humans have higher uric acid levels than most mammals due to a mutation in uricase, the enzyme involved in uric acid degradation in most mammals, that developed during a period of famine in Europe 1.5 × 10(7) yr ago. Here, working with resurrected ancestral uricases obtained from early hominids, we show that their expression on HepG2 cells is enough to blunt gluconeogenesis in parallel with an up-regulation of AMPK activity. These studies identify a key role AMPD and uric acid in mediating hepatic gluconeogenesis in the diabetic state, via a mechanism involving AMPK down-regulation and overexpression of PEPCK and G6Pc. The uricase mutation in the Miocene likely provided a survival advantage to help maintain glucose levels under conditions of near starvation, but today likely has a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes.

  16. Modulation of cAMP levels by high-fat diet and curcumin and regulatory effects on CD36/FAT scavenger receptor/fatty acids transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zingg, Jean-Marc; Hasan, Syeda T; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Canepa, Elisa; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Villacorta, Luis; Azzi, Angelo; Meydani, Mohsen

    2017-01-02

    Curcumin, a polyphenol from turmeric (Curcuma longa), reduces inflammation, atherosclerosis, and obesity in several animal studies. In Ldlr(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), curcumin reduces plasma lipid levels, therefore contributing to a lower accumulation of lipids and to reduced expression of fatty acid transport proteins (CD36/FAT, FABP4/aP2) in peritoneal macrophages. In this study, we analyzed the molecular mechanisms by which curcumin (500, 1000, 1500 mg/kg diet, for 4 months) may influence plasma and tissue lipid levels in Ldlr(-/-) mice fed an HFD. In liver, HFD significantly suppressed cAMP levels, and curcumin restored almost normal levels. Similar trends were observed in adipose tissues, but not in brain, skeletal muscle, spleen, and kidney. Treatment with curcumin increased phosphorylation of CREB in liver, what may play a role in regulatory effects of curcumin in lipid homeostasis. In cell lines, curcumin increased the level of cAMP, activated the transcription factor CREB and the human CD36 promoter via a sequence containing a consensus CREB response element. Regulatory effects of HFD and Cur on gene expression were observed in liver, less in skeletal muscle and not in brain. Since the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)/CREB pathway plays an important role in lipid homeostasis, energy expenditure, and thermogenesis by increasing lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, an increase in cAMP levels induced by curcumin may contribute to its hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(1):42-53, 2017.

  17. Quantitative Measurement of cAMP Concentration Using an Exchange Protein Directly Activated by a cAMP-Based FRET-Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salonikidis, Petrus S.; Zeug, André; Kobe, Fritz; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2008-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors for the quantitative analysis of intracellular signaling, including sensors for monitoring cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), are of increasing interest. The measurement of the donor/acceptor emission ratio in tandem biosensors excited at the donor excitation wavelength is a commonly used technique. A general problem, however, is that this ratio varies not only with the changes in cAMP concentration but also with the changes of the ionic environment or other factors affecting the folding probability of the fluorophores. Here, we use a spectral FRET analysis on the basis of two excitation wavelengths to obtain a reliable measure of the absolute cAMP concentrations with high temporal and spatial resolution by using an “exchange protein directly activated by cAMP”. In this approach, FRET analysis is simplified and does not require additional calibration routines. The change in FRET efficiency (E) of the biosensor caused by [cAMP] changes was determined as ΔE = 15%, whereas E varies between 35% at low and 20% at high [cAMP], allowing quantitative measurement of cAMP concentration in the range from 150 nM to 15 μM. The method described is also suitable for other FRET-based biosensors with a 1:1 donor/acceptor stoichiometry. As a proof of principle, we measured the specially resolved cAMP concentration within living cells and determined the dynamic changes of cAMP levels after stimulation of the Gs-coupled serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7). PMID:18708470

  18. cAMP-independent signal pathways stimulate hyphal morphogenesis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Parrino, Salvatore M; Si, Haoyu; Naseem, Shamoon; Groudan, Kevin; Gardin, Justin; Konopka, James B

    2017-03-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans can transition from budding to hyphal growth, which promotes biofilm formation and invasive growth into tissues. Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase to form cAMP induces hyphal morphogenesis. The failure of cells lacking adenylyl cyclase (cyr1Δ) to form hyphae has suggested that cAMP signaling is essential for hyphal growth. However, cyr1Δ mutants also grow slowly and have defects in morphogenesis, making it unclear whether hyphal inducers must stimulate cAMP, or if normal basal levels of cAMP are required to maintain cellular health needed for hyphal growth. Interestingly, supplementation of cyr1Δ cells with low levels of cAMP enabled them to form hyphae in response to the inducer N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), suggesting that a basal level of cAMP is sufficient for stimulation. Furthermore, we isolated faster-growing cyr1Δ pseudorevertant strains that can be induced to form hyphae even though they lack cAMP. The pseudorevertant strains were not induced by CO2 , consistent with reports that CO2 directly stimulates adenylyl cyclase. Mutational analysis showed that induction of hyphae in a pseudorevertant strain was independent of RAS1, but was dependent on the EFG1 transcription factor that acts downstream of protein kinase A. Thus, cAMP-independent signals contribute to the induction of hyphal responses.

  19. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  20. AKAP-mediated feedback control of cAMP gradients in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Kirill; Mehta, Sohum; Ramamurthy, Santosh; Ronnett, Gabriele V; Zhou, Feng-Quan; Zhang, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA), classical examples of spatially compartmentalized signaling molecules, are critical axon determinants that regulate neuronal polarity and axon formation, yet little is known about micro-compartmentalization of cAMP and PKA signaling and its role in developing neurons. Here, we revealed that cAMP forms a gradient in developing hippocampal neurons, with higher cAMP levels in more distal regions of the axon compared to other regions of the cell. Interestingly, this cAMP gradient changed according to the developmental stage and depended on proper anchoring of PKA by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAPs increased the cAMP gradient in early-stage neurons and led to enhanced axon elongation. Our results provide new evidence for a local negative-feedback loop, assembled by AKAPs, for the precise control of a growth-stage-dependent cAMP gradient to ensure proper axon growth.

  1. 78 FR 1264 - CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, MN; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, MN; Notice of Negative... workers of the subject firm (TA-W-80,399A; CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, Minnesota... Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, Minnesota to apply for TAA, the Department determines that...

  2. A Cell-Autonomous Molecular Cascade Initiated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Represses Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Houssein S.; Bergeron, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production. PMID:25225331

  3. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  4. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  5. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  6. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  7. AMP-Conjugated Quantum Dots: Low Immunotoxicity Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Liu, Lu; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles that possess special optical and electronic properties and have shown great promise for future biomedical applications. In this work, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a small biocompatible molecular, was conjugated to organic QDs to produce hydrophilic AMP-QDs. Using macrophage J774A.1 as the cell model, AMP-QDs exhibited both prior imaging property and low toxicity, and more importantly, triggered limited innate immune responses in macrophage, indicating low immunotoxicity in vitro. Using BALB/c mice as the animal model, AMP-QDs were found to be detained in immune organs but did not evoke robust inflammation responses or obvious histopathological abnormalities, which reveals low immunotoxicity in vivo. This work suggests that AMP is an excellent surface ligand with low immunotoxicity, and potentially used in surface modification for more extensive nanoparticles.

  8. Cell-to-cell coordination for the spontaneous cAMP oscillation in Dictyostelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Seido; Sakurai, Shunsuke

    2013-12-01

    We propose a new cellular dynamics scheme for the spontaneous cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium discoideum. Our scheme seamlessly integrates both receptor dynamics and G-protein dynamics into our previously developed cellular dynamics scheme. Extensive computer simulation studies based on our new cellular dynamics scheme were conducted in mutant cells to evaluate the molecular network. The validity of our proposed molecular network as well as the controversial PKA-dependent negative feedback mechanism was supported by our simulation studies. Spontaneous cAMP oscillations were not observed in a single mutant cell. However, multicellular states of various mutant cells consistently initiated spontaneous cAMP oscillations. Therefore, cell-to-cell coordination via the cAMP receptor is essential for the robust initiation of spontaneous cAMP oscillations.

  9. In vivo, cAMP stimulates growth and morphogenesis of mouse mammary ducts.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, G B; Strickland, P; Trumpbour, V; Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1984-08-01

    In culture, cAMP is known to be mitogenic for mammary cells and several other epithelia, but evidence for a similar role in vivo has been only correlative. We have used plastic implants to cause slow release of cholera toxin and other cAMP-active agents to local areas of mammary glands in ovariectomized mice. Elevated levels of intracellular cAMP around the implants promoted vigorous growth and normal ductal morphogenesis, while distant sites were unaffected. Local effects of cAMP included restoration of normal ductal caliber, formation of new end buds, and reinitiation of DNA synthesis in both epithelium and surrounding stroma. Thus, cAMP is both a mitogenic and a morphogenetic factor in this tissue.

  10. AMPed Up immunity: how antimicrobial peptides have multiple roles in immune defense

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yuping; Gallo, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely expressed and rapidly induced at epithelial surfaces to repel assault from diverse infectious agents including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Much information suggests that AMPs act by mechanisms that extend beyond their capacity to serve as gene-encoded antibiotics. For example, some AMPs alter the properties of the mammalian membrane or interact with its receptors to influence diverse cellular processes including cytokine release, chemotaxis, antigen presentation, angiogenesis and wound healing. These functions complement their antimicrobial action and favor resolution of infection and repair of damaged epithelia. Opposing this, some microbes have evolved mechanisms to inactivate or avoid AMPs and subsequently become pathogens. Thus, AMPs are multifunctional molecules that have a central role in infection and Inflammation. PMID:19217824

  11. Cyclic AMP Mimics the Anti-ageing Effects of Calorie Restriction by Up-Regulating Sirtuin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhang, Lu; Liang, Yaru; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Zhiyu; Zhang, Lang; Fuji, Ryosuke; Mu, Wei; Li, Liyuan; Jiang, Junjun; Ju, Yong; Wang, Zhao

    2015-07-08

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays an important role in many biological processes as a second messenger, and cAMP treatment has been reported to extend the lifespan of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster. Our study showed that exogenous cAMP improved ageing-related phenotypes by increasing the protein level of Sirtuins, which prevented metabolic disorders to mimic the effect of calorie restriction. Experiments in vitro showed that cAMP directly bound to SIRT1 and SIRT3 and consequently increased their activity. These findings suggest that cAMP slows the ageing process and is a good candidate to mimic calorie restriction. Our research provides a promising therapeutic strategy to target metabolic disorder-induced ageing-related diseases.

  12. Cellular regulation of basal and FSH-stimulated cyclic AMP production in irradiated rat testes

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasniemi, M.; Kaipia, A.; Toppari, J.; Mali, P.; Huhtaniemi, I.; Parvinen, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Basal and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) productions by seminiferous tubular segments from irradiated adult rats were investigated at defined stages of the epithelial cycle when specific spermatogenic cells were low in number. Seven days post-irradiation, depletion of spermatogonia did not influence the basal cAMP production, but FSH response increased in stages II-VIII. Seventeen days post-irradiation when spermatocytes were low in number, there was a small increase in basal cAMP level in stages VII-VIII and FSH-stimulated cAMP production increased in stages VII-XII and XIII-I. At 38 days when pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids (steps 1-6) were low in number, a decreased basal cAMP production was measured in stages II-VI and IX-XII. FSH-stimulated cAMP output increased in stages VII-XII but decreased in stages II-VI. At 52 days when all spermatids were low in number, basal cAMP levels decreased in all stages of the cycle, whereas FSH response was elevated only in stages VII-XII. All spermatogenic cell types seem to have an effect on cAMP production by the seminiferous tubule in a stage-specific fashion. Germ cells appear to regulate Sertoli cell FSH response in a paracrine way, and a part of cAMP may originate from spermatids stimulated by an unknown FSH-dependent Sertoli cell factor. The FSH-dependent functions may control such phenomena as spermatogonial proliferation, final maturation of spermatids, and onset of meiosis.

  13. Evidences for involvement of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses to Verticillium toxins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Fan, Ling Wen; Wu, Wei Hua

    2005-08-01

    Although there were reports suggesting the involvement of endogenous cAMP in plant defense signaling cascades, there is no direct evidence supporting this notion yet and the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we have used pathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Arabidopsis plants as a model system of plant-microb interaction to demonstrate the function of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses. Both V. dahliae inoculation and Verticillium toxins injection induced typical "wilt" symptoms in Arabidopsis seedlings. When either 8-Br-AMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) or salicylic acid (SA) was applied to Arabidopsis, the plants became resistant to V. dahliae toxins. However, addition of 8-Br-AMP did not increase the resistance of Arabidopsis transgenic plants deficient in SA to the toxins, suggesting that cAMP might act upstream of SA in plant defense signaling pathway. Indeed, 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, significantly stimulated the endogenous SA level in plants, whereas DDA, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase dramatically reduced toxin-induced SA increase. Both the endogenous cAMP and SA increased significantly in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with toxins. Furthermore, transcription level of pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene (PR1) was strongly induced by both 8-Br-cAMP and the toxin treatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that endogenous cAMP is involved in plant defense responses against Verticillium-secreted toxins by regulating the production of the known signal SA in plant defense pathway.

  14. Dibutyryl cAMP effects on thromboxane and leukotriene production in decompression-induced lung injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, T. M.; Butler, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Decompression-induced venous bubble formation has been linked to increased neutrophil counts, endothelial cell injury, release of vasoactive eicosanoids, and increased vascular membrane permeability. These actions may account for inflammatory responses and edema formation. Increasing the intracellular cAMP has been shown to decrease eicosanoid production and edema formation in various models of lung injury. Reduction of decompression-induced inflammatory responses was evaluated in decompressed rats pretreated with saline (controls) or dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP, an analog of cAMP). After pretreatment, rats were exposed to either 616 kPa for 120 min or 683 kPa for 60 min. The observed increases in extravascular lung water ratios (pulmonary edema), bronchoalveolar lavage, and pleural protein in the saline control group (683 kPa) were not evident with DBcAMP treatment. DBcAMP pretreatment effects were also seen with the white blood cell counts and the percent of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Urinary levels of thromboxane B2, 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and leukotriene E4 were significantly increased with the 683 kPa saline control decompression exposure. DBcAMP reduced the decompression-induced leukotriene E4 production in the urine. Plasma levels of thromboxane B2, 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and leukotriene E4 were increased with the 683-kPa exposure groups. DBcAMP treatment did not affect these changes. The 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 and leukotriene E4 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage were increased with the 683 kPa exposure and were reduced with the DBcAMP treatment. Our results indicate that DBcAMP has the capability to reduce eicosanoid production and limit membrane permeability and subsequent edema formation in rats experiencing decompression sickness.

  15. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  16. Aip regulates cAMP signalling and GH secretion in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Formosa, R; Xuereb-Anastasi, A; Vassallo, J

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been linked to predisposition to pituitary adenomas. However, the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. AIP interacts with a number of interesting proteins, including members of the cAMP signalling pathway that has been shown to be consistently altered in pituitary tumours. The functional role of Aip was investigated using both over-expression and knock down of Aip in GH3 cells. cAMP signalling and its downstream effectors, including GH secretion, were then investigated. cAMP signalling was analysed using cAMP assays, cAMP-response element-promoter luciferase reporter assays, real-time PCR and finally secreted GH quantification. Over-expression of wild-type (WT)-Aip reduced forskolin-induced cAMP signalling at the total cAMP level, luciferase reporter activity and target gene expression, when compared with empty vector and the non-functional R304X mutant. Additionally, GH secretion was reduced in WT-Aip over-expressing GH3 cells treated with forskolin. Knock down of endogenous Aip resulted in increased cAMP signalling but a decrease in GH secretion was also noted. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity using general and selective inhibitors did not completely ablate the effect of Aip on forskolin-augmented cAMP signalling. A mechanism by which Aip acts as a tumour suppressor, by maintaining a low cAMP signalling and concentration, is suggested. Mutations of Aip render the protein incapable of such activity. This effect appears not to be mediated by the AIP-PDE interaction, suggesting the involvement of other interacting partners in mediating this outcome.

  17. Complex Regulation Pathways of AmpC-Mediated β-Lactam Resistance in Enterobacter cloacae Complex.

    PubMed

    Guérin, François; Isnard, Christophe; Cattoir, Vincent; Giard, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC), an opportunistic pathogen causing numerous infections in hospitalized patients worldwide, is able to resist β-lactams mainly by producing the AmpC β-lactamase enzyme. AmpC expression is highly inducible in the presence of some β-lactams, but the underlying genetic regulation, which is intricately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, is still poorly understood. In this study, we constructed different mutant strains that were affected in genes encoding enzymes suspected to be involved in this pathway. As expected, the inactivation of ampC, ampR (which encodes the regulator protein of ampC), and ampG (encoding a permease) abolished β-lactam resistance. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments combined with phenotypic studies showed that cefotaxime (at high concentrations) and cefoxitin induced the expression of ampC in different ways: one involving NagZ (a N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and another independent of NagZ. Unlike the model established for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inactivation of DacB (also known as PBP4) was not responsible for a constitutive ampC overexpression in ECC, whereas it caused AmpC-mediated high-level β-lactam resistance, suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation mechanism. Global transcriptomic analysis by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of a dacB deletion mutant confirmed these results. Lastly, analysis of 37 ECC clinical isolates showed that amino acid changes in the AmpD sequence were likely the most crucial event involved in the development of high-level β-lactam resistance in vivo as opposed to P. aeruginosa where dacB mutations have been commonly found. These findings bring new elements for a better understanding of β-lactam resistance in ECC, which is essential for the identification of novel potential drug targets.

  18. Complex Regulation Pathways of AmpC-Mediated β-Lactam Resistance in Enterobacter cloacae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, François; Isnard, Christophe; Giard, Jean Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC), an opportunistic pathogen causing numerous infections in hospitalized patients worldwide, is able to resist β-lactams mainly by producing the AmpC β-lactamase enzyme. AmpC expression is highly inducible in the presence of some β-lactams, but the underlying genetic regulation, which is intricately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, is still poorly understood. In this study, we constructed different mutant strains that were affected in genes encoding enzymes suspected to be involved in this pathway. As expected, the inactivation of ampC, ampR (which encodes the regulator protein of ampC), and ampG (encoding a permease) abolished β-lactam resistance. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments combined with phenotypic studies showed that cefotaxime (at high concentrations) and cefoxitin induced the expression of ampC in different ways: one involving NagZ (a N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase) and another independent of NagZ. Unlike the model established for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inactivation of DacB (also known as PBP4) was not responsible for a constitutive ampC overexpression in ECC, whereas it caused AmpC-mediated high-level β-lactam resistance, suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation mechanism. Global transcriptomic analysis by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of a dacB deletion mutant confirmed these results. Lastly, analysis of 37 ECC clinical isolates showed that amino acid changes in the AmpD sequence were likely the most crucial event involved in the development of high-level β-lactam resistance in vivo as opposed to P. aeruginosa where dacB mutations have been commonly found. These findings bring new elements for a better understanding of β-lactam resistance in ECC, which is essential for the identification of novel potential drug targets. PMID:26438498

  19. PKA and Epac activation mediates cAMP-induced vasorelaxation by increasing endothelial NO production.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Verónica; Cuíñas, Andrea; Elíes, Jacobo; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Vascular relaxation induced by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent, although the underlying signaling pathways are not fully understood. Aiming to uncover potential mechanisms, we performed contraction-relaxation experiments on endothelium-denuded and intact rat aorta rings and measured NO levels in isolated human endothelial cells using single cell fluorescence imaging. The vasorelaxant effect of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, was decreased after selective inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), a cAMP-activated kinase, or L-NAME, an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, only in intact aortic rings. Both selective activation of PKA with 6-Bnz-cAMP and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) with 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly relaxed phenylephrine-induced contractions. The vasorelaxant effect of the Epac activator, but not that of the PKA activator, was reduced by endothelium removal. Forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (a cAMP analogue), 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP increased NO levels in endothelial cells and the forskolin effect was significantly inhibited by inactivation of both Epac and PKA, and eNOS inhibition. Our results indicate that the endothelium-dependent component of forskolin/cAMP-induced vasorelaxation is partially mediated by an increase in endothelial NO release due to an enhanced eNOS activity through PKA and Epac activation in endothelial cells.

  20. cap alpha. /sub 2/-Adrenergic receptor-mediated sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Toews, M.L.; Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-03-01

    Preincubation of HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists resulted in a 10- to 20-fold increase in forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production as compared to cells preincubated without agonist. Similar results were obtained using either a (/sup 3/H)adenine prelabeling assay or a cyclic AMP radioimmunoassay to measure cyclic AMP levels. This phenomenon, which is termed sensitization, is ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-mediated and rapid in onset and reversal. Yohimbine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-selective antagonist, blocked norepinephrine-induced sensitization, whereas prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic) and sotalol (..beta..-adrenergic) did not. The time for half-maximal sensitization was 5 min and the half-time for reversal was 10 min. Only a 2-fold sensitization of cyclic AMP production stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide was observed, indicating that sensitization is relatively selective for forskolin. Sensitization reflects an increased production of cyclic AMP and not a decreased degradation of cyclic AMP, since incubation with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and forskolin did not mimic sensitization. Increasing the levels of cyclic AMP during the preincubation had no effect on sensitization, indicating that sensitization is not caused by decreased cyclic AMP levels during the preincubation. This rapid and dramatic sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is a previously unreported effect that can be added to the growing list of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic responses that are not mediated by a decrease in cyclic AMP.

  1. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-01-01

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients. PMID:23449452

  2. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-02-28

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients.

  3. AMP-deaminase from thymus of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rybakowska, I; Szydłowska, M; Szrok, S; Bakuła, S; Kaletha, K

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized clinically by skeletal muscle fatigue following the excessive exercise. Interestingly most of MG patients manifest parallely also some abnormalities of the thymus.AMP-deaminase (AMPD) from human thymus was not a subject of studies up to now. In this paper, mRNA expression and some physico-chemical and immunological properties of AMPD purified from the thymus of MG patients were described. Experiments performed identified the liver isozyme (AMPD2) as the main isoform of AMPD expressed in this organ. The activity of AMPD found in this organ was higher than in other human non-(skeletal) muscle tissues indicating on role the enzyme may play in supplying of guanylates required for the intensive multiplication of thymocytes.

  4. Functional modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by cereblon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Jo, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyunyoung; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in cereblon (CRBN), a substrate binding component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cause a form of mental retardation in humans. However, the cellular proteins that interact with CRBN remain largely unknown. Here, we report that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK α1) and inhibits the activation of AMPK activation. The ectopic expression of CRBN reduces phosphorylation of AMPK α1 and, thus, inhibits the enzyme in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, AMPK α1 can be potently activated by suppressing endogenous CRBN using CRBN-specific small hairpin RNAs. Thus, CRBN may act as a negative modulator of the AMPK signaling pathway in vivo.

  5. Polynomial solutions of the Monge-Ampère equation

    SciTech Connect

    Aminov, Yu A

    2014-11-30

    The question of the existence of polynomial solutions to the Monge-Ampère equation z{sub xx}z{sub yy}−z{sub xy}{sup 2}=f(x,y) is considered in the case when f(x,y) is a polynomial. It is proved that if f is a polynomial of the second degree, which is positive for all values of its arguments and has a positive squared part, then no polynomial solution exists. On the other hand, a solution which is not polynomial but is analytic in the whole of the x, y-plane is produced. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of polynomial solutions of degree up to 4 are found and methods for the construction of such solutions are indicated. An approximation theorem is proved. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  7. Mechanisms of lung neutrophil activation after hemorrhage or endotoxemia: roles of reactive oxygen intermediates, NF-kappa B, and cyclic AMP response element binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1999-07-15

    Acute inflammatory lung injury occurs frequently in the setting of severe infection or blood loss. Accumulation of activated neutrophils in the lungs and increased pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine levels are major characteristics of acute lung injury. In the present experiments, we examined mechanisms leading to neutrophil accumulation and activation in the lungs after endotoxemia or hemorrhage. Levels of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 mRNA were increased in lung neutrophils from endotoxemic or hemorrhaged mice compared with those present in lung neutrophils from control mice or in peripheral blood neutrophils from endotoxemic, hemorrhaged, or control mice. The transcriptional regulatory factors NF-kappa B and cAMP response element binding protein were activated in lung but not blood neutrophils after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Xanthine oxidase inhibition, achieved by feeding allopurinol or tungsten-containing diets, did not affect neutrophil trafficking to the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Xanthine oxidase inhibition did prevent hemorrhage- but not endotoxemia-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression among lung neutrophils. Hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-associated activation of NF-kappa B in lung neutrophils was not affected by inhibition of xanthine oxidase. cAMP response element binding protein activation was increased after hemorrhage, but not endotoxemia, in mice fed xanthine oxidase-inhibiting diets. Our results indicate that xanthine oxidase modulates cAMP response element binding protein activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in lung neutrophils after hemorrhage, but not endotoxemia. These findings suggest that the mechanisms leading to acute inflammatory lung injury after hemorrhage differ from those associated with endotoxemia.

  8. Activation of Exchange Protein Activated by Cyclic-AMP Enhances Long-Lasting Synaptic Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelinas, Jennifer N.; Banko, Jessica L.; Peters, Melinda M.; Klann, Eric; Weeber, Edwin J.; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    cAMP is a critical second messenger implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory in the mammalian brain. Substantial evidence links increases in intracellular cAMP to activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and subsequent phosphorylation of downstream effectors (transcription factors, receptors, protein kinases) necessary for long-term…

  9. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  10. Strain accumulation in quasicrystalline solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nori, Franco; Ronchetti, Marco; Elser, Veit

    1988-01-01

    The relaxation of two-dimensional quasicrystalline elastic networks when their constituent bonds are perturbed homogeneously is studied. Whereas ideal, quasi-periodic networks are stable against such perturbations, significant accumulations of strain in a class of disordered networks generated by a growth process are found. The grown networks are characterized by root mean square phason fluctuations which grow linearly with system size. The strain accumulation observed in these networks also grows linearly with system size. Finally, dependence of strain accumulation on cooling rate is found.

  11. Fibrotic lung fibroblasts show blunted inhibition by cAMP due to deficient cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2005-11-01

    Pulmonary fibroblasts regulate extracellular matrix production and degradation; thus, they are critical for maintenance of lung structure, function, and repair. In pulmonary fibrosis, fibroblasts produce excess collagen and form fibrotic foci that eventually impair lung function, but the mechanisms responsible for these alterations are not known. Receptors coupled to the stimulation of cAMP production can inhibit activation of fibroblasts and thereby are antifibrotic. To test whether this signaling pathway is altered in pulmonary fibrosis, we compared the ability of normal adult human pulmonary fibroblasts to generate and respond to cAMP with that of cells isolated from lungs with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Serum- and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-stimulated cell proliferation was inhibited approximately 50% by forskolin and approximately 100% by prostaglandin (PG) E(2) in the normal cells but substantially less in the diseased cells. Collagen synthesis was also inhibited >50% by the same drugs in the normal cells but significantly less so in the diseased cells, despite responding with similar increases in cAMP production. Although expression of protein kinase A (PKA) and cAMP-stimulated PKA activity were similar in both the normal and diseased cell types, forskolin- and PGE(2)-stimulated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was decreased in the diseased cell lines compared with the normal cells. cAMP-mediated activation and TGF-beta-mediated inhibition of CREB DNA binding was also diminished in the diseased cells. Thus, pulmonary fibroblasts derived from patients with pulmonary fibrosis are refractory to the inhibition by cAMP due to altered activity of components distal to the activity of PKA, in particular the phosphorylation of CREB.

  12. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  13. Linking cellular actin status with cAMP signaling in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Zou, Hao; Fang, Hao-Ming; Zhu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans has a remarkable ability to switch growth forms. Particularly, the yeast-to-hyphae switch is closely linked with its virulence. A range of chemicals and conditions can promote hyphal growth including serum, peptidoglycan, CO2, neutral pH, and elevated temperature. All these signals act essentially through the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 that synthesizes cAMP. Cells lacking Cyr1 are completely defective in hyphal growth. Recently, cellular actin status is found to influence cAMP synthesis. However, how Cyr1 senses and processes multiple external and internal signals to produce a contextually proper level of cAMP remains unclear. We hypothesized that Cyr1 itself possesses multiple sensors for different signals and achieves signal integration through a combined allosteric effect on the catalytic center. To test this hypothesis, we affinity-purified a Cyr1-containing complex and found that it could enhance cAMP synthesis upon treatment with serum, peptidoglycan or CO2 in vitro. The data indicate that the complex is an essentially intact sensor/effector apparatus for cAMP synthesis. The complex contains two more subunits, the cyclase-associated protein Cap1 and G-actin. We discovered that G-actin plays a regulatory role, rendering cAMP synthesis responsive to actin dynamics. These findings shed new lights on the mechanisms that regulate cAMP-mediated responses in fungi.

  14. Crystal structure of a c-di-AMP riboswitch reveals an internally pseudo-dimeric RNA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a second messenger that is essential for growth and homeostasis in bacteria. A recently discovered c-di-AMP-responsive riboswitch controls the expression of genes in a variety of bacteria, including important pathogens. To elucidate the molecular basis for specific binding of c-di-AMP by a gene-regulatory mRNA domain, we have determined the co-crystal structure of this riboswitch. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals an internally pseudo-symmetric RNA in which two similar three-helix-junction elements associate head-to-tail, creating a trough that cradles two c-di-AMP molecules making quasi-equivalent contacts with the riboswitch. The riboswitch selectively binds c-di-AMP and discriminates exquisitely against other cyclic dinucleotides, such as c-di-GMP and cyclic-AMP-GMP, via interactions with both the backbone and bases of its cognate second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments indicate that global folding of the riboswitch is induced by the two bound cyclic dinucleotides, which bridge the two symmetric three-helix domains. This structural reorganization likely couples c-di-AMP binding to gene expression. PMID:25271255

  15. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  16. Spatiotemporal Coupling of cAMP Transporter to CFTR Chloride Channel Function in the Gut Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C.; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L.; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J.; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, is functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. MRP4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea. PMID:18045536

  17. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  18. Spatiotemporal coupling of cAMP transporter to CFTR chloride channel function in the gut epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J; Schuetz, John D; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2007-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here, we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. Mrp4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea.

  19. Effects of selective phosphodiesterase inhibition on cyclic AMP hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortical slices.

    PubMed Central

    Challiss, R. A.; Nicholson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of selective inhibition of phosphodiesterase activities on the concentration and rate of hydrolysis of adenosine 3':5' cyclic-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in rat cerebral cortical slices has been studied. 2. Isoprenaline caused a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in cyclic AMP concentration to new steady-state levels (basal: 7.1 +/- 0.7; 10 microM isoprenaline: 14.3 +/- 1.4 pmol mg-1 protein). Addition of a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist to isoprenaline-stimulated cerebral cortical slices caused a rapid decrease in cyclic AMP concentration to basal levels (t1/2: 58 +/- 18 s). 3. Preincubation of slices for 30 min with the phosphodiesterase inhibitors 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine, denbufylline, rolipram or Ro20,1724 caused concentration-dependent increases in basal and isoprenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP concentrations and decreased the rate of cyclic AMP hydrolysis measured after addition of a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. However, SKF 94120 and zaprinast had none of these effects. 4. The results are discussed with respect to previous studies of phosphodiesterase isozymic activities isolated from cerebrum and it is suggested that the Ca2+/calmodulin-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase isozyme, which is selectively inhibited by denbufylline, rolipram and Ro20,1724, and is present in cerebrum is of critical importance to the regulation of cyclic AMP concentration in this tissue. PMID:2158837

  20. Cyclic-AMP regulation of calcium-dependent K channels in an insect central neurone.

    PubMed

    David, J A; Pitman, R M

    1996-01-26

    In the cockroach fast coxal depressor motoneurone, either the muscarinic agonist McN-A-343 or dibutyryl cAMP (Db-cAMP) induced a reduction in voltage-dependent outward current. The response to McN is due to suppression of a calcium-dependent potassium current (IK,Ca) produced secondarily to a reduction in voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa). The response to Db-cAMP was investigated in order to establish whether cAMP might mediate the response to McN. ICa was suppressed by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) but not by Db-cAMP. The effects of IBMX were therefore unlikely to be the result of phosphodiesterase inhibition. Since caffeine also suppressed ICa, the observed effect of IBMX is probably due to release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. IK,Ca, evoked by injection of Ca2+, was reduced by Db-cAMP or forskolin but not by McN. These results indicate that the electrical response to McN in this neurone is not mediated by changes in cAMP.

  1. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  2. Activation of f-channels by cAMP analogues in macropatches from rabbit sino-atrial node myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bois, P; Renaudon, B; Baruscotti, M; Lenfant, J; DiFrancesco, D

    1997-01-01

    1. The action of the two diastereometric phosphorothioate derivatives of cAMP, Rp-cAMPs and Sp-cAMPs, was investigated on hyperpolarization-activated 'pacemaker' current (i(f)) recorded in inside-out macropatches from rabbit sino-atrial (SA) node myocytes. 2. When superfused on the intracellular side of f-channels at the concentration of 10 microM, both cAMP derivatives accelerated i(f) activation; their action was moderately less pronounced than that due to the same concentration of cAMP. 3. The measurement of the i(f) conductance-voltage relation by voltage ramp protocols indicated that both cAMP analogues shift the activation curve of i(f) to more positive voltages with no change in maximal (fully activated) conductance. 4. Dose-response relationships of the shift of the i(f) activation curve showed that both Rp-cAMPs and Sp-cAMPs act as agonists in the cAMP-dependent direct f-channel activation. Fitting data to the Hill equation resulted in maximal shifts of 9.6 and 9.5 mV, apparent dissociation constants of 0.82 and 5.4 microM, and Hill coefficients of 0.82 and 1.12 for Sp-cAMPs and Rp-cAMPs, respectively. 5. The activating action of Rp-cAMPs, a known antagonist of cAMP in the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, confirms previously established evidence that f-channel activation does not involve phosphorylation. These results also suggest that the cAMP binding site of f-channels may be structurally similar to the cyclic nucleotide binding site of olfactory receptor channels. PMID:9218217

  3. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  4. The Extract of Herbal Medicines Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye-Yeon; Chung, SaeYeon; Kim, Soon Re; Lee, Ji-Hye; Seo, Hye-Sook; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated whether the extract of six herbal medicines (OB-1) has an inhibitory effect on obesity. High-fat diet-(HFD-) induced rats and controls were treated with 40 mg/100 g body weight of OB-1 or saline once a day for 5 weeks. After significant changes in body weight were induced, OB-1 and saline were administered to each subgroup of HFD and control groups for additional 5 weeks. No statistically significant decrease of body weight in OB-1-treated rats was found compared to controls. However, OB-1-treated rats were found to be more active in an open-field test and have a reduction in the size of adipocytes compared to controls. We observed no changes in the mRNA expressions of leptin and adiponectin from adipocytes between OB-1- and saline-treated rats with HFD-induced obesity group. However, OB-1 treatments were shown to be inversely correlated with accumulation of lipid droplets in liver tissue, suggesting that OB-1 could inhibit a lipid accumulation by blocking the pathway related to lipid metabolism. Moreover, the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was significantly increased in OB-1-treated rats with HFD compared to controls. These results suggest that OB-1 has no direct antiobesity effect and, however, could be a regulator of cellular metabolism. PMID:23533517

  5. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  6. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  7. Intraocular injection of dibutyryl cyclic AMP promotes axon regeneration in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Monsul, Nicholas T; Geisendorfer, Abram R; Han, Paul J; Banik, Rudrani; Pease, Mary Ellen; Skolasky, Richard L; Hoffman, Paul N

    2004-04-01

    The optic nerve is a CNS pathway containing molecules capable of inhibiting axon elongation. The growth program in embryonic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neurons enables axons to regenerate in the optic nerve through at least two mechanisms. Namely, high cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels abrogate the ability of CNS molecules to inhibit elongation, and the pattern of gene expression enables axons to undergo rapid, sustained, and lengthy elongation. In adult mammals, recovery of visual function after optic nerve injury is limited by both the death of most RGC neurons and the inability of surviving axons to regenerate. We now report that a single intraocular injection of the membrane-permeable cAMP analogue dibutyryl cAMP (db cAMP) promotes the regeneration of RGC axons in the optic nerves of adult rats, but does not prevent the death of RGC neurons. This regeneration in optic nerves crushed within the orbit (2 mm from the eye) was equally effective either 1 day before or 1 day after db cAMP injection. The number of regenerating axons, which was maximal 14 days after crush, declined with increasing time after injury (i.e., 28, 56, and 112 days) and distance beyond the crush site (i.e., 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mm). Thus, db cAMP promotes optic nerve regeneration without increasing the survival of axotomized RGC neurons. Furthermore, since db cAMP does not enable axons to undergo rapid, sustained, and lengthy elongation, strategies that increase survival and promote these changes in elongation may critically complement the ability of db cAMP to promote regeneration.

  8. Role of cyclic AMP in pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism with special emphasis on benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, V.H.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis was intended to investigate the role of the intracellular regulator, cAMP, on pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism using the well-studied carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene (BP) as a representative xenobiotic. Lung slices from rats administered N/sup 6/, O/sup 2/', dibutyryl cAMP (DcAMP), theophylline or forskolin, all of which elevated biologically reactive cAMP levels in the lung, showed an increased ability to metabolize (/sup 3/H)-BP. This effect occurred beyond 6 hr following treatment and reached a maximum at 12 hr, at a time when cAMP content had already peaked and returned to basal levels. The perfusion of BP through the isolated lungs of animals administered DcAMP in vivo indicated that the BP metabolites primarily responsible for the cyclic nucleotide-induced increase in metabolism were the 3-hydroxy BP, 9-hydroxy BP, BP 9, 10 diol, BP-glucuronides and BP-glutathione conjugates. Kinetic analysis indicated that the Km component of these reactions was altered without a corresponding change in Vmax, suggesting that elevated pulmonary cAMP content may be affecting the detoxication enzymes, UDP-glucuronyltransferase and sulfotransferase. Studies with pulmonary microsomes from DcAMP-treated animals indicated that the cyclic nucleotide not only enhanced the hydroxylation of BP but also the cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylation of coumarin. This is supported by the fact that DcAMP administration in vivo also enhanced phosphorylation of two classes of nuclear proteins, histones and nuclear acidic proteins, believed to play a role in the transcription of RNA and DNA.

  9. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  10. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase regulates basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated but not phorbol ester-stimulated transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Tinti, C; Song, B; Cubells, J F; Joh, T H

    1994-09-01

    To define the precise role of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, we performed transient cotransfection analyses of a reporter construct containing the upstream 2,400 bp sequence of the rat TH gene with expression plasmids encoding a heat-stable specific inhibitor of PKA (PKI), a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA, or the catalytic subunit of PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of either PKI or mutant regulatory subunit blocked cAMP-stimulated induction and reduced basal transcription of the TH-reporter construct. Expression of the catalytic subunit of PKA induced the expression of the TH-reporter construct up to 50-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Primer extension analysis confirmed that PKA-mediated induction of TH-reporter expression occurred at the correct transcription initiation site. Expression of PKI did not affect induction following phorbol ester treatment, suggesting that PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) induce TH transcription by independent mechanisms. Finally, a double mutation within the cAMP response element (CRE) of TH2400-CAT diminished its basal and forskolin-stimulated transcription to the level of the promoterless plasmid, pBLCAT3, but did not alter the induction following treatment with phorbol ester, indicating that the CRE is not required for PKC-mediated transcriptional induction. Our results indicate that PKA, via the CRE, plays a crucial role for basal and cAMP-inducible transcription of the TH gene.

  11. cAMP analogs and their metabolites enhance TREK-1 mRNA and K+ current expression in adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, Judith A; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, John J

    2010-03-01

    bTREK-1 K(+) channels set the resting membrane potential of bovine adrenal zona fasciculata (AZF) cells and function pivotally in the physiology of cortisol secretion. Adrenocorticotropic hormone controls the function and expression of bTREK-1 channels through signaling mechanisms that may involve cAMP and downstream effectors including protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein 2 directly activated by cAMP (Epac2). Using patch-clamp and Northern blot analysis, we explored the regulation of bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current expression by cAMP analogs and several of their putative metabolites in bovine AZF cells. At concentrations sufficient to activate both PKA and Epac2, 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP enhanced the expression of both bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current. N(6)-Benzoyladenosine-cAMP, which activates PKA but not Epac, also enhanced the expression of bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current measured at times from 24 to 96 h. An Epac-selective cAMP analog, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP), potently stimulated bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current expression, whereas the nonhydrolyzable Epac activator 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP, Sp-isomer was ineffective. Metabolites of 8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP, including 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-5'-O-monophosphate and 8CPT-2'-OMe-adenosine, promoted the expression of bTREK-1 transcripts and ion current with a temporal pattern, potency, and effectiveness resembling that of the parent compound. Likewise, at low concentrations, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8CPT-cAMP; 30 microM) but not its nonhydrolyzable analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP, Sp-isomer, enhanced the expression of bTREK-1 mRNA and current. 8CPT-cAMP metabolites, including 8CPT-adenosine and 8CPT-adenine, also increased bTREK-1 expression. These results indicate that cAMP increases the expression of bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current through a cAMP-dependent but Epac2-independent mechanism. They further demonstrate that one or more metabolites of 8

  12. Phase A conceptual design study of the Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The 12 month Phase A Conceptual Design Study of the Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) payload performed within the Program Development Directorate of the Marshall Space Flight Center is presented. The AMPS payload makes use of the Spacelab pressurized module and pallet, is launched by the space shuttle, and will have initial flight durations of 7 days. Scientific instruments including particle accelerators, high power transmitters, optical instruments, and chemical release devices are mounted externally on the Spacelab pallet and are controlled by the experimenters from within the pressurized module. The capability of real-time scientist interaction on-orbit with the experiment is a major characteristic of AMPS.

  13. Compartmentation of cAMP signalling in cardiomyocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perera, R K; Nikolaev, V O

    2013-04-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger critically involved in the regulation of heart function. It has been shown to act in discrete subcellular signalling compartments formed by differentially localized receptors, phosphodiesterases and protein kinases. Cardiac diseases such as hypertrophy or heart failure are associated with structural and functional remodelling of these microdomains which leads to changes in cAMP compartmentation. In this review, we will discuss recent key findings which provided new insights into cAMP compartmentation in cardiomyocytes with a particular focus on its alterations in heart disease.

  14. Analysis of Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard; Soeder, James F.; Beach, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) project is developing a modular approach to spacecraft power systems for exploration beyond Earth orbit. AMPS is intended to meet the need of reducing the cost of design development, test and integration and also reducing the operational logistics cost of supporting exploration missions. AMPS seeks to establish modular power building blocks with standardized electrical, mechanical, thermal and data interfaces that can be applied across multiple exploration vehicles. The presentation discusses the results of a cost analysis that compares the cost of the modular approach against a traditional non-modular approach.

  15. The cAMP Pathway as Therapeutic Target in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena Katharina; Becker, Christian; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling molecules contribute to the regulation of cellular pathways. In the immune system, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is well established as a potent regulator of innate and adaptive immune cell functions. Therapeutic strategies to interrupt or enhance cAMP generation or effects have immunoregulatory potential in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Here, we provide an overview of the cyclic AMP axis and its role as a regulator of immune functions and discuss the clinical and translational relevance of interventions with these processes. PMID:27065076

  16. Strategies Targeting cAMP Signaling in the Treatment of Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a leading cause of ESRD worldwide. In PKD, excessive cell proliferation and fluid secretion, pathogenic interactions of mutated epithelial cells with an abnormal extracellular matrix and alternatively activated interstitial macrophages, and the disruption of mechanisms controlling tubular diameter contribute to cyst formation. Studies with animal models suggest that several diverse pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulation of intracellular calcium levels and cAMP signaling, mediate these cystogenic mechanisms. This article reviews the evidence implicating calcium and cAMP as central players in a network of signaling pathways underlying the pathogenesis of PKD and considers the therapeutic relevance of treatment strategies targeting cAMP signaling. PMID:24335972

  17. A cyclic AMP-activated K+ channel in Drosophila larval muscle is persistently activated in dunce.

    PubMed

    Delgado, R; Hidalgo, P; Diaz, F; Latorre, R; Labarca, P

    1991-01-15

    Single-channel recording from longitudinal ventrolateral Drosophila larval muscle reveals the presence of a potassium-selective channel that is directly and reversibly activated by cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. Activation is specific and it cannot be mimicked by a series of agents that include AMP, cGMP, ATP, inositol trisphosphate, and Ca2+. Channel current records obtained from larval muscle in different dunce mutants possessing abnormally high levels of cAMP show that, in the mutants, the channel displays an increased probability of opening.

  18. A cyclic AMP-activated K+ channel in Drosophila larval muscle is persistently activated in dunce.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, R; Hidalgo, P; Diaz, F; Latorre, R; Labarca, P

    1991-01-01

    Single-channel recording from longitudinal ventrolateral Drosophila larval muscle reveals the presence of a potassium-selective channel that is directly and reversibly activated by cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. Activation is specific and it cannot be mimicked by a series of agents that include AMP, cGMP, ATP, inositol trisphosphate, and Ca2+. Channel current records obtained from larval muscle in different dunce mutants possessing abnormally high levels of cAMP show that, in the mutants, the channel displays an increased probability of opening. PMID:1846445

  19. Fractional activation of accumulation-mode particles in warm continental stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, N.V.; Daum, P.H.; Schwartz, S.E.; Leaitch, W.R.; Strapp, J.W.; Isaac, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    The degree of activation of accumulation-mode particles (AMP) in clouds has been studied using continuous (1 second average) aircraft measurements of the number concentrations of cloud droplets (N{sub cd}, 2 to 35 {mu}m diameter) and of unactivated AMP (N{sub amp}, 0.17 to 2.07 {mu}m diameter) in cloud interstitial air. The magnitude and spatial variation of the activated fraction (F) of all measured particles (defined as F {triple_bond} N{sub cd}/N{sub tot}, where N{sub tot} = N{sub cd} + N{sub amp}) are investigated, based on measurements made during ten aircraft flights in non-precipitating warm continental stratiform clouds near Syracuse NY in the fall of 1984. Based on instantaneous observations throughout the clouds, the spatial distribution of F was found to be quite nonuniform. In general, F was low in cloud edges and where total particle loading was high and/or cloud convective activity was low. In the interior of clouds, the value of F exceeded 0.9 for 36% of the data, but was below 0.6 for 28%. Factors influencing F the most were the total particle loading (N{sub tot}) and the thermal stability of the cloud layer. The dependence of F on N{sub tot} in cloud interior was characterized by two distinct regimes. For N{sub tot} < 600 cm{sup {minus}3}, F was generally close to unity and relatively insensitive to N{sub tot}. For N{sub tot} > 800 cm{sup {minus}3}, F tended to decrease with increasing N{sub tot}. This decrease was greatest in a stable stratus deck embedded in a warm moist airmass. The results suggest that, in warm continental stratiform clouds, the process of particle activation becomes nonlinear and self-limiting at high particle loading. The degree of this nonlinearity depends on cloud convective activity (thermal instability).

  20. Fractional activation of accumulation-mode particles in warm continental stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, N.V. Associates, Inc., St. Louis, MO ); Daum, P.H.; Schwartz, S.E. ); Leaitch, W.R.; Strapp, J.W.; Isaac, G.A. . Cloud Physics Research Div.)

    1991-07-01

    The degree of activation of accumulation-mode particles (AMP) in clouds has been studied using continuous (1 second average) aircraft measurements of the number concentrations of cloud droplets (N[sub cd], 2 to 35 [mu]m diameter) and of unactivated AMP (N[sub amp], 0.17 to 2.07 [mu]m diameter) in cloud interstitial air. The magnitude and spatial variation of the activated fraction (F) of all measured particles (defined as F [triple bond] N[sub cd]/N[sub tot], where N[sub tot] = N[sub cd] + N[sub amp]) are investigated, based on measurements made during ten aircraft flights in non-precipitating warm continental stratiform clouds near Syracuse NY in the fall of 1984. Based on instantaneous observations throughout the clouds, the spatial distribution of F was found to be quite nonuniform. In general, F was low in cloud edges and where total particle loading was high and/or cloud convective activity was low. In the interior of clouds, the value of F exceeded 0.9 for 36% of the data, but was below 0.6 for 28%. Factors influencing F the most were the total particle loading (N[sub tot]) and the thermal stability of the cloud layer. The dependence of F on N[sub tot] in cloud interior was characterized by two distinct regimes. For N[sub tot] < 600 cm[sup [minus]3], F was generally close to unity and relatively insensitive to N[sub tot]. For N[sub tot] > 800 cm[sup [minus]3], F tended to decrease with increasing N[sub tot]. This decrease was greatest in a stable stratus deck embedded in a warm moist airmass. The results suggest that, in warm continental stratiform clouds, the process of particle activation becomes nonlinear and self-limiting at high particle loading. The degree of this nonlinearity depends on cloud convective activity (thermal instability).

  1. HeLa human cervical cancer cell migration is inhibited by treatment with dibutyryl-cAMP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jiyoung; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates both protein kinase A (PKA) and guanine-nucleotide exchange factor exchange protein directly activated by CAMP (EPAC)-mediated Ras-related Protein1 (RAP1) GTPase that regulates various cellular functions including cell migration. Herein, we investigated whether cAMP-mediated PKA and EPAC1/RAP1 pathways differentially control HeLa cervical cancer cell migration. Although HeLa cell migration was reduced by dibutyryl-cAMP, we observed an increase in cAMP/PKA, cAMP/EPAC1/RAP1-GTPase, and RAC1-GTPase. HeLa cell migration and RAC1-GTPase were increased by treatment with 8-(4-chloro-phenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cAMP analogue to activate EPAC-specific signaling pathways. When HeLa cells were treated with H-89, a PKA inhibitor, cell migration was enhanced but RAC1-GTPase was inhibited. In addition, cell migration induced by dibutyryl-cAMP was reversed but the activity of Rac1-GTPase was inhibited by H-89 treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC1/RAP1-GTPase might inversely control cervical cancer cell migration, although both signaling pathways may up-regulate RAC1-GTPase. It also suggests that cAMP-mediated cancer cell migration was independent of RAC1-GTPase activation.

  2. Removal characteristics of CO2 using aqueous MEA/AMP solutions in the absorption and regeneration process.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Joon; Seo, Jong-Beom; Jang, Sang-Yong; Jung, Jong-Hyeon; Oh, Kwang-Joong

    2009-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) removal efficiency, reaction rate, and CO2 loading into aqueous blended monoethanolamine (MEA) + 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) solutions to enhance absorption characteristics of MEA and AMP were carried out by the absorption/regeneration process. As a result, compared to aqueous MEA and AMP solutions, aqueous blended MEA + AMP solutions have a higher CO2 loading than MEA and a higher reaction rate than AMP. The CO2 loading of rich amine of aqueous 18 wt.% MEA + 12 wt.% AMP solution was 0.62 mol CO2/mol amine, which is 51.2% more than 30 wt.% MEA (0.41 mol CO2/mol amine). Consequently, blending MEA and AMP could be an effective way to design considering economical efficiency and used to operate absorber for a long time.

  3. The cAMP analogs have potent anti-proliferative effects on medullary thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dicitore, Alessandra; Grassi, Elisa Stellaria; Caraglia, Michele; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Gaudenzi, Germano; Hofland, Leo J; Persani, Luca; Vitale, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic activation of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene has a main role in the pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Several lines of evidence suggest that RET function could be influenced by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity. We evaluated the in vitro anti-tumor activity of 8-chloroadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP) and PKA type I-selective cAMP analogs [equimolar combination of the 8-piperidinoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-PIP-cAMP) and 8-hexylaminoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-HA-cAMP) in MTC cell lines (TT and MZ-CRC-1)]. 8-Cl-cAMP and the PKA I-selective cAMP analogs showed a potent anti-proliferative effect in both cell lines. In detail, 8-Cl-cAMP blocked significantly the transition of TT cell population from G2/M to G0/G1 phase and from G0/G1 to S phase and of MZ-CRC-1 cells from G0/G1 to S phase. Moreover, 8-Cl-cAMP induced apoptosis in both cell lines, as demonstrated by FACS analysis for annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide, the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. On the other hand, the only effect induced by PKA I-selective cAMP analogs was a delay in G0/G1-S and S-G2/M progression in TT and MZ-CRC-1 cells, respectively. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that cAMP analogs, particularly 8-Cl-cAMP, significantly suppress in vitro MTC proliferation and provide rationale for a potential clinical use of cAMP analogs in the treatment of advanced MTC.

  4. Dual contradictory roles of cAMP signaling pathways in hydroxyl radical production in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Hara, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Masamune; Kuriiwa, Fumi; Mukai, Toshiji; Mizukami, Hajime

    2012-03-15

    Studies have suggested that cAMP signaling pathways may be associated with the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we examined how modifications in cAMP signaling affected the production of hydroxyl radicals in rat striatum using microdialysis to measure extracellular 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA), which is a hydroxyl radical adduct of salicylate. Up to 50 nmol of the cell-permeative cAMP mimetic 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) increased 2,3-DHBA in a dose-dependent manner (there was no additional increase in 2,3-DHBA at 100 nmol). Another cAMP mimetic, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), caused a nonsignificant increase in 2,3-DHBA at 50 nmol and a significant decrease at 100 nmol. Up to 20 nmol of forskolin, which is a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, increased 2,3-DHBA, similar to the effect of 8-Br-cAMP; however, forskolin resulted in a much greater increase in 2,3-DHBA. A potent inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), H89 (500 μM), potentiated the 8-Br-cAMP- and forskolin-induced increases in 2,3-DHBA and antagonized the inhibitory effect of 100 nmol of db-cAMP. Interestingly, the administration of 100 nmol of 8-bromo-cGMP alone or in combination with H89 had no significant effect on 2,3-DHBA levels. Doses of 100 nmol of a preferential PKA activator (6-phenyl-cAMP) or a preferential PKA inhibitor (8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothionate, Rp-isomer; Rp-8-Br-cAMPS), which also inhibits the cAMP-mediated activation of Epac (the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP), suppressed or enhanced, respectively, the formation of 2,3-DHBA. Up to 100 nmol of 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-cAMP, which is a selective activator of Epac, dose-dependently stimulated the formation of 2,3-DHBA. These findings suggest that cAMP signaling plays contradictory roles (stimulation and inhibition) in the production of hydroxyl radicals in rat striatum by differential actions of Epac and PKA. These roles might contribute to the production of

  5. Antitumor Trans Platinum Adducts of GMP and AMP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangzhong; Sivo, Maria F.; Natile, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that several analogues of the clinically ineffective trans-DDP exhibit antitumor activity comparable to that of cis-DDP. The present paper describes the binding of antitumor trans-[PtCl2(E-iminoether)2] (trans-EE) to guanosinemonophosphate (GMP) and adenosinemonophosphate (AMP). We have used HPLC and 1H and 15N NMR to characterize the different adducts. In the case of a 1:1 mixture of trans-EE and GMP, at an early stage of the reaction, a monofunctional adduct is formed which, subsequently, is partly converted into a monosolvated monofunctional species. After about 70 hours an equilibrium is established between chloro and solvato monofunctional adducts at a ratio of 30/70. In the presence of excess GMP (4:1) the initially formed monofunctional adducts react further to give two bifunctional adducts, one with the iminoether ligands in their original E configurations and the other with the iminoether ligands having one E and the other, Z configurations. The coordination geometry obtained by energy minimization calculations is in qualitative agreement with 2D NMR data. PMID:18475942

  6. Effects of AMP-activated protein kinase in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine threonine kinase that is highly conserved through evolution. AMPK is found in most mammalian tissues including the brain. As a key metabolic and stress sensor/effector, AMPK is activated under conditions of nutrient deprivation, vigorous exercise, or heat shock. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that changes in AMPK activation not only signal unmet metabolic needs, but also are involved in sensing and responding to 'cell stress', including ischemia. The downstream effect of AMPK activation is dependent on many factors, including the severity of the stressor as well as the tissue examined. This review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed in the brain/neuronal cells and vasculature that have contributed to our understanding of AMPK in stroke. Recent data on the potential role of AMPK in angiogenesis and neurogenesis and the interaction of AMPK with 3-hydroxy-3-methy-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) agents are highlighted. The interaction between AMPK and nitric oxide signaling is also discussed.

  7. Effects of AMP-activated protein kinase in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine threonine kinase that is highly conserved through evolution. AMPK is found in most mammalian tissues including the brain. As a key metabolic and stress sensor/effector, AMPK is activated under conditions of nutrient deprivation, vigorous exercise, or heat shock. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that changes in AMPK activation not only signal unmet metabolic needs, but also are involved in sensing and responding to ‘cell stress', including ischemia. The downstream effect of AMPK activation is dependent on many factors, including the severity of the stressor as well as the tissue examined. This review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed in the brain/neuronal cells and vasculature that have contributed to our understanding of AMPK in stroke. Recent data on the potential role of AMPK in angiogenesis and neurogenesis and the interaction of AMPK with 3-hydroxy-3-methy-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) agents are highlighted. The interaction between AMPK and nitric oxide signaling is also discussed. PMID:20010958

  8. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-08

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD.

  9. A possible mechanism for improvement by a cognition-enhancer nefiracetam of spatial memory function and cAMP-mediated signal transduction system in sustained cerebral ischaemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Satoshi; Niimura, Makiko; Miyake-Takagi, Keiko; Nagakura, Akira; Fukatsu, Tomoko; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Hara, Junko

    2003-02-01

    1. Accumulated evidence indicates that the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) signal transduction system may be linked to learning and memory function. 2. The effects of nefiracetam, which has been developed as a cognition enhancer, on spatial memory function and the AC/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction system in rats with sustained cerebral ischaemia were examined. 3. Microsphere embolism (ME)-induced sustained cerebral ischaemia was produced by injection of 700 microspheres (48 micro m in diameter) into the right hemisphere of rats. Daily oral administration of nefiracetam (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was started from 15 h after the operation. 4. The delayed treatment with nefiracetam attenuated the ME-induced prolongation of the escape latency in the water maze task that was examined on day 7 to 9 after ME, but it did not reduce the infarct size. 5. ME decreased Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated AC (AC-I) activity, cAMP content, cytosolic PKA Cbeta level, nuclear PKA Calpha and Cbeta levels, and reduced the phosphorylation and DNA-binding activity of CREB in the nucleus in the right parietal cortex and hippocampus on day 3 after ME. The ME-induced changes in these variables did not occur by the delayed treatment with nefiracetam. 6. These results suggest that nefiracetam preserved cognitive function, or prevented cognitive dysfunction, after sustained cerebral ischaemia and that the effect is, in part, attributable to the prevention of the ischaemia-induced impairment of the AC/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway.

  10. Automated image analysis of FRET signals for subcellular cAMP quantification.

    PubMed

    Leavesley, Silas J; Nakhmani, Arie; Gao, Yi; Rich, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    A variety of FRET probes have been developed to examine cAMP localization and dynamics in single cells. These probes offer a readily accessible approach to measure localized cAMP signals. However, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of most FRET probes and the dynamic nature of the intracellular environment, there have been marked limitations in the ability to use FRET probes to study localized signaling events within the same cell. Here, we outline a methodology to dissect kinetics of cAMP-mediated FRET signals in single cells using automated image analysis approaches. We additionally extend these approaches to the analysis of subcellular regions. These approaches offer an unique opportunity to assess localized cAMP kinetics in an unbiased, quantitative fashion.

  11. [Vibrational spectra of monoclinic diphosphates of formula AMP2O7].

    PubMed

    Serghini Idrissi, M; Rghioui, L; Nejjar, R; Benarafa, L; Saidi Idrissi, M; Lorriaux, A; Wallart, F

    2004-07-01

    The monoclinic pyrophosphates with AMP2O7 formula were synthesized. Their infrared and Raman spectra have been reported and analysed. The results of a force field calculation for CaCuP2O7 are presented.

  12. N-Acetyl-D- and L-esters of 5'-AMP hydrolyze at different rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Lacey, J. C. Jr; Lacey JC, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the properties of aminoacyl derivatives of 5'-AMP are aimed at understanding the origin of the process of protein synthesis. Aminoacyl (2',3') esters of 5'-AMP can serve as models of the 3'-terminus of aminoacyl tRNA. We report here on the relative rates of hydrolysis of Ac-D- and L-Phe AMP esters as a function of pH. At all pHs above 3, the rate constant of hydrolysis of the Ac-L-Phe ester is 1.7 to 2.1 times that of Ac-D-Phe ester. The D-isomer seems partially protected from hydrolysis by a stronger association with the adenine ring of the 5'-AMP.

  13. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study, appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    An equipment list, instrument baseline data, engineering drawings, mass properties computer printouts, electrical energy management, and control and display functional analysis pertinent to the AMPS (Satellite Payload) are presented.

  14. Use of phenylthiocarbamide for assessing cAMP-dependent resistance to anoxia in animals.

    PubMed

    Bolekhan, E A; Semenov, D G; Gerasimova, I A; Samoilov, M O

    1997-01-01

    The responses of cats with different levels of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) bitters to five-minute hypoxia were studied; PTC sensitivity is a genetic marker of the activity of the cAMP system. Animals able to perceive PTC showed a number of functional differences, with higher levels of resistance to anoxia, than those which could not perceive PTC. The groups showed significant differences in the basal cAMP content in the cerebral cortex, and in the time course of changes in the cAMP level during anoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. It is suggested that these differences result from genetically determined features of the cAMP system, which is involved in forming adaptive responses.

  15. A QM/MM study of the 5‧-AMP DNA hydrolysis of aprataxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaoka, Kyohei; Tanaka, Wataru; Kayanuma, Megumi; Shoji, Mitsuo

    2015-07-01

    Aprataxin is a DNA repair enzyme that hydrolyzes the abnormal 5‧-AMP termini of broken DNAs. Based on quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations, we found that the catalytic reaction proceeds in three steps; substrate protonation, DNA deadenylation and histidine-AMP intermediate hydrolysis. The calculated activation energies for the second and third reactions are 19.0 and 10.5 kcal mol-1, which can be attributed to a penta-coordinated AMP-phosphoryl formation and closing of a water molecule, respectively. We also found that a histidine-AMP intermediate is hydrolyzed easily in the third step when a water molecule closes within 3 Å to the phosphorus nucleus.

  16. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki . E-mail: yk-kim@korea.ac.kr

    2007-05-18

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.

  17. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study, technical summary document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Some 60 instrument candidates and 80 possible science investigations were evaluated. The early analysis emphasized the science aspect in terms of the functional requirements for each of the potential experiments identified by the AMPS science working group. These requirements were then used for the grouping of instruments into practical payloads which would fit the capabilities of the Shuttle/Spacelab. This analysis resulted in the definition of eleven different AMPS configurations. The data were then used to define a typical set of requirements for a flexible AMPS laboratory. The data gathered to this point showed that a planned sequential buildup of the laboratory would be necessary to meet both physical and funding limitations. This led to the definition of five strawman payloads by the science working group, which were used to establish a conceptual laboratory and to define preliminary design of a configuration which could satisfy AMPS needs during the early program period.

  18. Big defensins and mytimacins, new AMP families of the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; De Moro, Gianluca; Manfrin, Chiara; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play a fundamental role in the innate immunity of invertebrates, preventing the invasion of potential pathogens. Mussels can express a surprising abundance of cysteine-rich AMPs pertaining to the defensin, myticin, mytilin and mytimycin families, particularly in the circulating hemocytes. Based on deep RNA sequencing of Mytilus galloprovincialis, we describe the identification, molecular diversity and constitutive expression in different tissues of five novel transcripts pertaining to the macin family (named mytimacins) and eight novel transcripts pertaining to the big defensins family (named MgBDs). The predicted antimicrobial peptides exhibit a N-terminal signal peptide, a positive net charge and a high content in cysteines, allegedly organized in intra-molecular disulfide bridges. Mytimacins and big defensins therefore represent two novel AMP families of M. galloprovincialis which extend the repertoire of cysteine-rich AMPs in this bivalve mollusk.

  19. Is a decrease in cyclic AMP a necessary and sufficient signal for maturation of amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gelerstein, S.; Shapira, H.; Dascal, N.; Yekuel, R.; Oron, Y.

    1988-05-01

    Acetylcholine rapidly lowered the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in stage 5 and 6 Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine alone did not induce oocyte maturation, though it did accelerate maturation induced by progesterone. The effect of acetylcholine on oocyte maturation was independent of extracellular calcium concentration. Adenosine increased cyclic AMP and abolished the progesterone-induced decrease in cyclic AMP levels in follicles and in denuded oocytes. This effect of adenosine was blocked by the Ra purinergic receptor antagonist, theophylline. Despite those effects, adenosine alone induced maturation in stage 6 oocytes and accelerated progesterone-induced maturation in both stage 5 and 6 cells. Adenosine also induced a significant increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca efflux from oocytes in the presence and the absence of external calcium. We suggest that the activation of cell surface receptors involved in the release of calcium from cellular stores may induce or accelerate oocyte maturation independently of small changes in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration.

  20. Selective Phosphonylation of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate (5'-AMP) via Pyrophosphite [PPi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Karl; Bryant, David E.; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Ohara, Shohei; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Kee, Terence P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here experiments which demonstrate the selective phospho-transfer from a plausibly prebiotic condensed phosphorus (P) salt, pyrophosphite [H2P2O5 2-; PPi(III)], to the phosphate group of 5'-adenosine mono phosphate (5'-AMP). We show further that this P-transfer process is accelerated both by divalent metal ions (M2+) and by organic co-factors such as acetate (AcO-). In this specific case of P-transfer from PPi(III) to 5'-AMP, we show a synergistic enhancement of transfer in the combined presence of M2+ & AcO-. Isotopic labelling studies demonstrate that hydrolysis of the phosphonylated 5'-AMP, [P(III)P(V)-5'-AMP], proceeds via nuceophilic attack of water at the Pi(III) terminus.

  1. Measurement of cAMP in an undergraduate teaching laboratory, using ALPHAscreen technology.

    PubMed

    Bartho, Joseph D; Ly, Kien; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-02-14

    Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is a cellular second messenger with central relevance to pharmacology, cell biology, and biochemistry teaching programs. cAMP is produced from adenosine triphosphate by adenylate cyclase, and its production is reduced or enhanced upon activation of many G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, the measurement of cAMP serves as an indicator of receptor activity. Although there are many assays available for measuring cAMP, few are suitable for large class teaching, and even fewer seem to have been adapted for this purpose. Here, we describe the use of bead-based ALPHAscreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogenous Assay) technology for teaching a class of more than 300 students the practical aspects of detecting signal transduction. This technology is applicable to the measurement of many different signaling pathways. This resource is designed to provide a practical guide for instructors and a useful model for developing other classes using similar technologies.

  2. Quercetin promotes neurite growth through enhancing intracellular cAMP level and GAP-43 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Liao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of quercetin on neurite growth in N1E-115 cells and the underlying mechanisms. Quercetin was evaluated for its effects on cell numbers of neurites, neurite length, intracellular cAMP content, and Gap-43 expression in N1E-115 cells in vitro by use of microscopy, LANCE(tm) cAMP 384 kit, and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that quercetin could increase the neurite length in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no effect on the numbers of cells. Quercetin significantly increased the expression of cellular cAMP in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The Gap-43 expression was up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, quercetin could promote neurite growth through increasing the intracellular cAMP level and Gap-43 expression.

  3. NMR studies of the AMP-binding site and mechanism of adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1987-03-24

    NMR has previously been used to determine the conformation of enzyme-bound MgATP and to locate the MgATP-binding site on adenylate kinase [Fry, D. C., Kuby, S. A., & Mildvan, A. S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. To determine the conformation and location of the other substrate, AMP, distances have been measured from Cr3+AMPPCP, a linear competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP, to six protons and to the phosphorus atom of AMP on adenylate kinase, with the paramagnetic probe-T1 method. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) have been used to measure five interproton distances on enzyme-bound AMP. These distances were used to determine the conformation of bound AMP in addition to its position with respect to metal-ATP. Enzyme-bound AMP exhibits a high anti-glycosyl torsional angle (chi = 110 +/- 10 degrees), a 3'-endo,2'-exo ribose pucker (delta = 105 +/- 10 degrees), and gauche-trans orientations about the C4'-C5' bond (gamma = 180 +/- 10 degrees) and the C5'-O5' bond (beta = 170 +/- 20 degrees). The distance from Cr3+ to the phosphorus of AMP is 5.9 +/- 0.3 A, indicating a reaction coordinate distance of approximately 3 A, which is consistent with an associative SN2 mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer. Ten intermolecular NOEs, from protons of the enzyme to those of AMP, were detected, indicating the proximity of at least three hydrophobic amino acids to bound AMP. These constraints, together with the conformation of AMP and the intersubstrate distances, were used to position AMP into the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase. The AMP binding site is found to be near (less than or equal to 4 A from) Leu-116, Arg-171, Val-173, Val-182, and Leu-190; all of these residues have been found to be invariant in muscle-type rabbit, calf, human, porcine [Kuby, S. A., Palmieri, R. H., Frischat, A., Fischer, A. H., Wu, L. H., Maland, L., & Manship, M. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2393-2399], and chicken adenylate kinase [Kishi, F., Maruyama, M., Tanizawa, Y

  4. Structural mechanisms in the abolishment of VEGF-induced microvascular hyperpermeability by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bingmei M; Shen, Shang; Chen, Bin

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the structural mechanisms by which elevation of the intraendothelial cAMP levels abolishes or attenuates the transient increase in microvascular permeability by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), we examined cAMP effect on VEGF-induced hyperpermeability to small solute sodium fluorescein (Stokes radius = 0.45 nm) P(sodium fluorescein), intermediate-sized solute alpha-lactalbumin (Stokes radius = 2.01 nm) P(alpha-lactalbumin), and large solute albumin (BSA, Stokes radius = 3.5 nm) P(BSA) on individually perfused microvessels of frog mesenteries. After 20 min pretreatment of 2 mM cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, the initial increase by 1 nM VEGF was completely abolished in P(sodium fluorescein) (from a peak increase of 2.6+/-0.37 times control with VEGF alone to 0.96+/-0.07 times control with VEGF and cAMP), in P(alpha-lactalbumin) (from a peak increase of 2.7+/-0.33 times control with VEGF alone to 0.76+/-0.07 times control with VEGF and cAMP), and in P(BSA) (from a peak increase of 6.5+/-1.0 times control with VEGF alone to 0.97+/-0.08 times control with VEGF and cAMP). Based on these measured data, the prediction from our mathematical models suggested that the increase in the number of tight junction strands in the cleft between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall is one of the mechanisms for the abolishment of VEGF-induced hyperpermeability by cAMP.

  5. Ghrelin Attenuates cAMP-PKA Signaling to Evoke Insulinostatic Cascade in Islet β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dezaki, Katsuya; Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Sone, Hideyuki; Dyachok, Oleg; Tengholm, Anders; Gylfe, Erik; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Masashi; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ghrelin reportedly restricts insulin release in islet β-cells via the Gαi2 subtype of G-proteins and thereby regulates glucose homeostasis. This study explored whether ghrelin regulates cAMP signaling and whether this regulation induces insulinostatic cascade in islet β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin release was measured in rat perfused pancreas and isolated islets and cAMP production in isolated islets. Cytosolic cAMP concentrations ([cAMP]i) were monitored in mouse MIN6 cells using evanescent-wave fluorescence imaging. In rat single β-cells, cytosolic protein kinase-A activity ([PKA]i) and Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were measured by DR-II and fura-2 microfluorometry, respectively, and whole cell currents by patch-clamp technique. RESULTS Ghrelin suppressed glucose (8.3 mmol/L)-induced insulin release in rat perfused pancreas and isolated islets, and these effects of ghrelin were blunted in the presence of cAMP analogs or adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Glucose-induced cAMP production in isolated islets was attenuated by ghrelin and enhanced by ghrelin receptor antagonist and anti-ghrelin antiserum, which counteract endogenous islet-derived ghrelin. Ghrelin inhibited the glucose-induced [cAMP]i elevation and [PKA]i activation in MIN6 and rat β-cells, respectively. Furthermore, ghrelin potentiated voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channel currents without altering Ca2+ channel currents and attenuated glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increases in rat β-cells in a PKA-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS Ghrelin directly interacts with islet β-cells to attenuate glucose-induced cAMP production and PKA activation, which lead to activation of Kv channels and suppression of glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increase and insulin release. PMID:21788571

  6. Cyclic AMP-inducible genes respond uniformly to seasonal lighting conditions in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Spessert, R; Gupta, B B P; Rohleder, N; Gerhold, S; Engel, L

    2006-12-01

    The encoding of photoperiodic information ensues in terms of the daily profile in the expression of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible genes such as the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin formation. In the present study, we compared the influence of the photoperiodic history on the cAMP-inducible genes AA-NAT, inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER), fos-related antigen-2 (FRA-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), nerve growth factor inducible gene-A (NGFI-A) and nerve growth factor inducible gene-B (NGFI-B) in the pineal gland of rats. For this purpose, we monitored the daily profiles of each gene in the same pineal gland under a long (light/dark 16:8) and a short (light/dark 8:16) photoperiod by measuring the respective mRNA amounts by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. We found that, for all genes under investigation, the duration of increased nocturnal expression is lengthened and, in relation to light onset, the nocturnal rise is earlier under the long photoperiod (light/dark 16:8). Furthermore, with the exception of ICER, all other cAMP-inducible genes tend to display higher maximum expression under light/dark 8:16 than under light/dark 16:8. Photoperiod-dependent changes persist for all of the cAMP-inducible genes when the rats are kept for two cycles under constant darkness. Therefore, all cAMP-inducible genes are also influenced by the photoperiod of prior entrained cycles. Our study indicates that, despite differences regarding the expressional control and the temporal phasing of the daily profile, cAMP-inducible genes are uniformly influenced by photoperiodic history in the rat pineal gland.

  7. Cyclic AMP-modulated phosphorylation of intermediate filament proteins in cultured avian myogenic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gard, D L; Lazarides, E

    1982-01-01

    The intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin and the muscle tropomyosins were the major protein phosphate acceptors in 8-day-old myotubes incubated for 4 h in medium containing radiolabeled phosphate. The addition of isoproterenol or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (BrcAMP) resulted in a two- to threefold increase in incorporation of 32PO4 into both desmin and vimentin, whereas no changes in the incorporation of 32PO4 into tropomyosin or other cellular proteins were observed. The BrcAMP- or hormonally induced increase in 32PO4 incorporation into desmin and vimentin was independent of protein synthesis and was not caused by stimulation of protein phosphate turnover. In addition, BrcAMP did not induce significant changes in the specific activity of the cellular ATP pool. These data suggest that the observed increase in 32PO4 incorporation represented an actual increase in phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin. Two-dimensional tryptic analysis of desmin from 8-day-old myotubes revealed five phosphopeptides of which two showed a 7- to 10-fold increase in 32PO4 incorporation in BrcAMP-treated myotubes. Four of the phosphopeptides identified in desmin labeled in vivo were also observed in desmin phosphorylated in vitro by bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Although phosphorylation of desmin and vimentin was apparent in myogenic cells at all stages of differentiation, BrcAMP- and isoproterenol-induced increases in phosphorylation of these proteins were restricted to mature myotubes. These data strongly suggest that in vivo phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin is catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinases and that such phosphorylation may be regulated during muscle differentiation. Images PMID:6294504

  8. Blockade of beta-adrenoceptors enhances cAMP signal transduction in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the blockade of beta-adrenoceptors would enhance cAMP-mediated signal transduction processes in vivo. The administration of the membrane permeable cAMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP, 10 micromol/kg, i.v.) produced an increase in heart rate (+27 +/- 2%, P < 0.05), a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (-21 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) and falls in hindquarter (-12 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) and mesenteric (-32 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) vascular resistances in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. The beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.) lowered heart rate (-12 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) but did not affect mean arterial blood pressure or vascular resistances. The tachycardia, hypotension and vasodilation produced by 8-CPT-cAMP were exaggerated after administration of propranolol (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). The nitric oxide-donor, sodium nitroprusside (2 microg/kg, i.v.), produced falls in mean arterial blood pressure and vascular resistances of similar magnitude to those produced by 8-CPT-cAMP. These sodium nitroprusside-induced responses were unaffected by propranolol (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Sodium nitroprusside also produced a minor increase in heart rate (+5 +/- 1%, P < 0.05) which was abolished by propranolol. These findings suggest that 8-CPT-cAMP directly increases heart rate and that blockade of beta-adrenoceptors enhances the potency of cAMP within the heart and vasculature.

  9. SCAP/SREBP pathway is required for the full steroidogenic response to cyclic AMP

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Van Yserloo, Brian; Golkowski, Martin G.; Ong, Shao-En; Beavo, Joseph A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates steroidogenesis largely through a surge in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Steroidogenic rates are also critically dependent on the availability of cholesterol at mitochondrial sites of synthesis. This cholesterol is provided by cellular uptake of lipoproteins, mobilization of intracellular lipid, and de novo synthesis. Whether and how these pathways are coordinated by cAMP are poorly understood. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites in MA10 Leydig cells suggested that cAMP regulates multiple steps in these processes, including activation of the SCAP/SREBP pathway. SCAP [sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] acts as a cholesterol sensor responsible for regulating intracellular cholesterol balance. Its role in cAMP-mediated control of steroidogenesis has not been explored. We used two CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) knockout approaches to test the role of SCAP in steroidogenesis. Our results demonstrate that SCAP is required for progesterone production induced by concurrent inhibition of the cAMP phosphodiesterases PDE4 and PDE8. These inhibitors increased SCAP phosphorylation, SREBP2 activation, and subsequent expression of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, whereas SCAP deficiency largely prevented these effects. Reexpression of SCAP in SCAP-deficient cells restored SREBP2 protein expression and partially restored steroidogenic responses, confirming the requirement of SCAP–SREBP2 in steroidogenesis. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase and isoprenylation attenuated, whereas exogenously provided cholesterol augmented, PDE inhibitor-induced steroidogenesis, suggesting that the cholesterol substrate needed for steroidogenesis is provided by both de novo synthesis and isoprenylation-dependent mechanisms. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel role for LH/cAMP in SCAP

  10. Estradiol increases cAMP in the oviductal secretory cells through a nongenomic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Oróstica, María L; Lopez, John; Rojas, Israel; Rocco, Jocelyn; Díaz, Patricia; Reuquén, Patricia; Cardenas, Hugo; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Orihuela, Pedro A

    2014-09-01

    In the rat oviduct, estradiol (E2) accelerates egg transport by a nongenomic action that requires previous conversion of E2 to methoxyestrogens via catechol-O-methyltranferase (COMT) and activation of estrogen receptor (ER) with subsequent production of cAMP and inositol triphosphate (IP3). However, the role of the different oviductal cellular phenotypes on this E2 nongenomic pathway remains undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of E2 on the levels of cAMP and IP3 in primary cultures of secretory and smooth muscle cells from rat oviducts and determine the mechanism by which E2 increases cAMP in the secretory cells. In the secretory cells, E2 increased cAMP but not IP3, while in the smooth muscle cells E2 decreased cAMP and increased IP3. Suppression of protein synthesis by actinomycin D did not prevent the E2-induced cAMP increase, but this was blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182 780 and the inhibitors of COMT OR 486, G protein-α inhibitory (Gαi) protein pertussis toxin and adenylyl cyclase (AC) SQ 22536. Expression of the mRNA for the enzymes that metabolizes estrogens, Comt, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1 was found in the secretory cells, but this was not affected by E2. Finally, confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that E2 induced colocalization between ESR1 (ERα) and Gαi in extranuclear regions of the secretory cells. We conclude that E2 differentially regulates cAMP and IP3 in the secretory and smooth muscle cells of the rat oviduct. In the secretory cells, E2 increases cAMP via a nongenomic action that requires activation of COMT and ER, coupling between ESR1 and Gαi, and stimulation of AC.

  11. Cyclic AMP functions as a primary sexual signal in gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pasquale, S M; Goodenough, U W

    1987-11-01

    When Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gametes of opposite mating type are mixed together, they adhere by a flagella-mediated agglutination that triggers three rapid mating responses: flagellar tip activation, cell wall loss, and mating structure activation accompanied by actin polymerization. Here we show that a transient 10-fold elevation of intracellular cAMP levels is also triggered by sexual agglutination. We further show that gametes of a single mating type can be induced to undergo all three mating responses when presented with exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP). These events are also induced by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous cAMP levels and act synergistically with db-cAMP. Non-agglutinating mutants of opposite mating type will fuse efficiently in the presence of db-cAMP. No activation of mating events is induced by calcium plus ionophores, 8-bromo-cGMP, dibutyryl-cGMP, nigericin at alkaline pH, phorbol esters, or forskolin. H-8, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase, inhibits mating events in agglutinating cells and antagonizes the effects of cAMP on non-agglutinating cells. Adenylate cyclase activity was detected in both the gamete cell body and flagella, with the highest specific activity displayed in flagellar membrane fractions. The flagellar membrane adenylate cyclase is preferentially stimulated by Mn++, unresponsive to NaF, GTP, GTP gamma S, AlF4-, and forskolin, and is inhibited by trifluoperazine. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is also present in flagella. Our observations indicate that cAMP is a sufficient initial signal for all of the known mating reaction events in C. reinhardtii, and suggest that the flagellar cyclase and/or phosphodiesterase may be important loci of control for the agglutination-stimulated production of this signal.

  12. Cooperation between cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, T; Takahashi, T; Takahashi, H; Seino, S

    2014-09-01

    Although glucose is physiologically the most important regulator of insulin secretion, glucose-induced insulin secretion is modulated by hormonal and neural inputs to pancreatic β-cells. Most of the hormones and neurotransmitters evoke intracellular signals such as cAMP, Ca²⁺ , and phospholipid-derived molecules by activating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In particular, cAMP is a key second messenger that amplifies insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner. The action of cAMP on insulin secretion is mediated by both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and Epac2A-dependent mechanisms. Many of the proteins expressed in β-cells are phosphorylated by PKA in vitro, but only a few proteins in which PKA phosphorylation directly affects insulin secretion have been identified. On the other hand, Epac2A activates the Ras-like small G protein Rap in a cAMP-dependent manner. Epac2A is also directly activated by various sulfonylureas, except for gliclazide. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analogue, and glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea, synergistically activate Epac2A and Rap1, whereas adrenaline, which suppresses cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells, blocks activation of Epac2A and Rap1 by glibenclamide. Thus, cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea cooperatively activate Epac2A and Rap1. This interaction could account, at least in part, for the synergistic effects of incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas in insulin secretion. Accordingly, clarification of the mechanism of Epac2A activation may provide therapeutic strategies to improve insulin secretion in diabetes.

  13. Maximum likelihood decoding analysis of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-Accumulate (RA) codes are the simplest turbo-like codes that achieve good performance. However, they cannot compete with Turbo codes or low-density parity check codes (LDPC) as far as performance is concerned. The Accumulate Repeat Accumulate (ARA) codes, as a subclass of LDPC codes, are obtained by adding a pre-coder in front of RA codes with puncturing where an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. These codes not only are very simple, but also achieve excellent performance with iterative decoding. In this paper, the performance of these codes with (ML) decoding are analyzed and compared to random codes by very tight bounds. The weight distribution of some simple ARA codes is obtained, and through existing tightest bounds we have shown the ML SNR threshold of ARA codes approaches very closely to the performance of random codes. We have shown that the use of precoder improves the SNR threshold but interleaving gain remains unchanged with respect to RA code with puncturing.

  14. Functional roles of arcA, etrA, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein, and cya in the arsenate respiration pathway in Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Julie N; Durbin, K James; Saltikov, Chad W

    2009-02-01

    Microbial arsenate respiration can enhance arsenic release from arsenic-bearing minerals--a process that can cause arsenic contamination of water. In Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, the arsenate respiration genes (arrAB) are induced under anaerobic conditions with arsenate and arsenite. Here we report how genes that encode anaerobic regulator (arcA and etrA [fnr homolog]) and carbon catabolite repression (crp and cya) proteins affect arsenate respiration in ANA-3. Transcription of arcA, etrA, and crp in ANA-3 was similar in cells grown on arsenate and cells grown under aerobic conditions. ANA-3 strains lacking arcA and etrA showed minor to moderate growth defects, respectively, with arsenate. However, crp was essential for growth on arsenate. In contrast to the wild-type strain, arrA was not induced in the crp mutant in cultures shifted from aerobic to anaerobic conditions containing arsenate. This indicated that cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cyclic AMP receptor (CRP) activates arr operon transcription. Computation analysis for genome-wide CRP binding motifs identified a putative binding motif within the arr promoter region. This was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with cAMP-CRP and several DNA probes. Lastly, four putative adenylate cyclase (cya) genes were identified in the genome. One particular cya-like gene was differentially expressed under aerobic versus arsenate respiration conditions. Moreover, a double mutant lacking two of the cya-like genes could not grow with arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor; exogenous cAMP could complement growth of the double cya mutant. It is concluded that the components of the carbon catabolite repression system are essential to regulating arsenate respiratory reduction in Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3.

  15. Extensive facial damage caused by a blast injury arising from a 6 volt lead accumulator.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Jain, P; Sinha, J K

    1999-03-01

    Low-voltage electrical injuries are relatively uncommon. Injury caused by flow of heavy current due to short-circuiting a low-voltage battery has not been described in the English literature. A 9-year-old boy connected two thin household electrical wires to the two terminals of a 6 volt (lead accumulator) battery and pressed the other two ends between his teeth. This resulted in a blast causing a compound comminuted fracture of the mandible and extensive tissue damage in the oral cavity. The low internal resistance of a lead accumulator (approximately 0.03 ohms) permits the flow of a heavy current (approximately 200 amps) when short-circuited. This instantaneously vaporises a minuscule portion of wire at approximately 2000 K resulting in a sudden rise of intraoral pressure to 30 kg cm-2 leading to tissue damage.

  16. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  17. Eviprostat activates cAMP signaling pathway and suppresses bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Yao, Jian; Chi, Yuan; Sawada, Norifumi; Araki, Isao; Kitamura, Masanori; Takeda, Masayuki

    2013-06-06

    Eviprostat is a popular phytotherapeutic agent for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). At present, the signaling mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are still poorly understood. Given that cAMP has been reported to suppress cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy in various pathological situations, we asked whether the effect of Eviprostat could be ascribed to the activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. In the study, exposure of cAMP response element (CRE)-secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) (CRE-SEAP)-reporter cells to Eviprostat elevated SEAP secretion, which was associated with an increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as enhanced expression of CRE-regulated protein connexin43, indicating an activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. Consistent with these observations, Eviprostat-induced expression of Cx43 was abolished in the presence of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or PKA inhibitor H89, whereas it was mimicked by adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin. Further analysis demonstrated that Eviprostat significantly potentiated the effect of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, but not that of PDE4 inhibitor, on CRE activation. Moreover, Eviprostat suppressed PDGF-induced activation of ERK and Akt and inhibited cell proliferation and hillock formation in both mesangial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. Collectively, activation of the cAMP signaling pathway could be an important mechanism by which Eviprostat exerts its therapeutic effects for LUTS.

  18. Reactive oxygen species mediate phorbol ester-stimulated cAMP response in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Ezeamuzie, Charles I; Taslim, Najla

    2006-08-14

    Recently, we showed that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) can cause a direct, PKC-dependent, stimulation of intracellular cAMP in human eosinophils. Since PMA also stimulates the release of reactive oxygen species in these cells, we have investigated whether reactive oxygen species are involved in the cAMP response. Provided eosinophils were incubated for <20 min at 37 degrees C before stimulation, PMA potently stimulated cAMP generation that surpassed that of histamine. Pre-treatment of the cells with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and apocynin, strongly inhibited the cAMP production induced by PMA, but not that induced by histamine. This treatment also strongly inhibited the release of superoxide anions (O(2)(-)). The cAMP response was also inhibited by pre-treatment with the specific peroxide scavenger, ebselen, but not superoxide dismutase, or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), thus, suggesting the possible involvement of a peroxide rather than O(2)(-) or nitric oxide (NO). These results reveal a novel involvement of intracellular reactive oxygen species in protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent stimulation of cAMP production in human eosinophils.

  19. The effect of hypoxia on PGE2-stimulated cAMP generation in HMEC-1.

    PubMed

    Wiktorowska-Owczarek, Anna; Owczarek, Jacek

    2015-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is generated in various cells, including endothelial cells, and is responsible for various functions, such as vascular relaxation and angiogenesis. Effects of PGE2 are mediated via receptors EP1-EP4, among which EP2 and EP4 are coupled to Gs protein which activates adenylate cyclase (AC) and cAMP synthesis. The aim of this work was to study the ability of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) to synthesize cAMP in the presence of PGE2, and to determine the effect of hypoxia on the PGE2- stimulated cAMP level. It was decided to evaluate the effect of PGE2 on the secretion of VEGF, an inducer of angiogenesis. In summary, our findings show that PGE2 induces cAMP production, but hypoxia may impair PGE2-stimulated activity of the AC-cAMP signaling pathway. These results suggest that the cardioprotective effect of PGE2/EP4/cAMP may be attenuated during ischemia. Furthermore, this study indicates that the pro-angiogenic effect of PGE2 is not associated with VEGF secretion in HMEC-1 cells.

  20. Regulation of cAMP Intracellular Levels in Human Platelets Stimulated by 2-Arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Signorello, Maria Grazia; Leoncini, Giuliana

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated that in human platelets the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) decreased dose- and time-dependently cAMP intracellular levels. No effect on cAMP decrease induced by 2-AG was observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 as well in platelets pretreated with the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548 or with aspirin, inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway. An almost complete recovering of cAMP level was measured in platelets pretreated with the specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A, milrinone. In platelets pretreated with LY294002 or MK2206, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT pathway, and with U73122, inhibitor of phospholipase C pathway, only a partial prevention was shown. cAMP intracellular level depends on synthesis by adenylate cyclase and hydrolysis by PDEs. In 2-AG-stimulated platelets adenylate cyclase activity seems to be unchanged. In contrast PDEs appear to be involved. In particular PDE3A was specifically activated, as milrinone reversed cAMP reduction by 2-AG. 2-AG enhanced PDE3A activity through its phosphorylation. The PI3K/AKT pathway and PKC participate to this PDE3A phosphorylation/activation mechanism as it was greatly inhibited by platelet pretreatment with LY294002, MK2206, U73122, or the PKC specific inhibitor GF109203X. Taken together these data suggest that 2-AG potentiates its power of platelet agonist reducing cAMP intracellular level.

  1. Cyclic AMP relaxes swine arterial smooth muscle predominantly by decreasing cell Ca2+ concentration.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, N L; Rembold, C M; Richard, H M; Murphy, R A

    1991-01-01

    1. Our objective was to evaluate the mechanism of cyclic AMP-dependent arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Cyclic AMP-dependent relaxation has been proposed to result from either (a) a decrease in intracellular [Ca2+] or (b) a decrease in [Ca2+] sensitivity of myosin light chain kinase by protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation of myosin kinase. 2. We evaluated these proposed mechanisms by examining forskolin-induced changes in aequorin-estimated myoplasmic [Ca2+], [cyclic AMP], myosin phosphorylation and stress generation in agonist-stimulated or KCl-depolarized swine common carotid media tissues. 3. Forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, increased [cyclic AMP] and reduced [Ca2+], myosin phosphorylation and stress in tissues pre-contracted with phenylephrine or histamine. This relaxation was not associated with an alteration of the [Ca2+] sensitivity of phosphorylation, nor the dependence of stress on phosphorylation. 4. Forskolin pre-treatment attenuated, but did not abolish, agonist-induced increases in [Ca2+] and stress. 5. These results suggest that cyclic AMP-induced relaxation of the agonist-stimulated swine carotid media is primarily caused by cyclic AMP-mediated decreases in myoplasmic [Ca2+]. PMID:1654411

  2. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  3. Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling controls the human trophoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Taskén, Kjetil; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    During human placentation, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts fuse to form multinucleated syncytia ensuring hormonal production and nutrient exchanges between the maternal and fetal circulation. Syncytial formation is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and for fetal growth. The cAMP signaling pathway is the major route to trigger trophoblast fusion and its activation results in phosphorylation of specific intracellular target proteins, in transcription of fusogenic genes and assembly of macromolecular protein complexes constituting the fusogenic machinery at the plasma membrane. Specificity in cAMP signaling is ensured by generation of localized pools of cAMP controlled by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and by discrete spatial and temporal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) in supramolecular signaling clusters inside the cell organized by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and by organization of signal termination by protein phosphatases (PPs). Here we present original observations on the available components of the cAMP signaling pathway in the human placenta including PKA, PDE, and PP isoforms as well as AKAPs. We continue to discuss the current knowledge of the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling triggering trophoblast fusion. PMID:26441659

  4. Identification of Novel Genes Responsible for Overexpression of ampC in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Yuko; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The development of resistance to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins mediated by the chromosomal ampC gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of clinical importance. We isolated piperacillin-resistant mutants derived from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and analyzed two mutants that had an insertion in mpl and nuoN. One mutant, YT1677, was resistant to piperacillin and ceftazidime and had an insertion in mpl, which encodes UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanyl-γ-d-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate ligase. The other mutant, YT7988, showed increased MICs of piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefoperazone, and the insertion was mapped to nuoN, which encodes NADH dehydrogenase I chain N. Complementation experiments demonstrated that these mutations resulted in higher levels of resistance to β-lactams. The expression of genes reported to be involved in β-lactam resistance was examined by real-time PCR in YT1677 and YT7988 mutants. Overexpression was observed for only ampC, and other genes were expressed normally. Deletion of the ampR gene in YT1677 and YT7988 resulted in decreased expression of ampC, indicating that the mutations in YT1677 and YT7988 affected the expression of ampC through the function of AmpR. PMID:24041903

  5. Cyclic AMP enhances calcium-dependent potassium current in Aplysia neurons.

    PubMed

    Ewald, D; Eckert, R

    1983-12-01

    The effect on the Ca-dependent potassium current, IK(Ca), of procedures that increase intracellular cAMP levels was studied in Aplysia neurons using three different pharmacological approaches. Exposure to cAMP analogues which were either resistant to or protected from phosphodiesterase hydrolysis caused an increase in IK(Ca) from 30 to 50% in 10 min. The degree of reversibility of this effect varied from complete with db cAMP to very little with pcpt cAMP. Exposure to cholera toxin, which stimulates the synthesis of endogenous cAMP, increased IK(Ca) 25% in 10 min and the effect was not reversible. Both approaches were effective in all seven neuron types studied. Application of serotonin plus phosphodiesterase inhibitor caused an increase in IK(Ca) in neuron R15 but not in the other neuron types. Application of pentylene tetrazole (PTZ) led to a decrease in IK(Ca). It is proposed that elevation of cyclic AMP mediates an increased sensitivity of the IK(Ca) channel to Ca ions.

  6. Rutin inhibits oleic acid induced lipid accumulation via reducing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Hsueh-Chun; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2011-03-01

    Excessive lipid accumulation within liver has been proposed to cause obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Rutin, a common dietary flavonoid that is consumed in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, has various biological functions, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. However, a hypolipidemic effect of rutin on fatty liver disease has not been reported. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on reducing lipid accumulation in hepatic cells. Hepatocytes were treated with oleic acid (OA) containing with or without rutin to observe the lipid accumulation by Nile red stain. The result showed rutin suppressed OA-induced lipid accumulation and increased adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in hepatocytes. The expression of critical molecule involved in lipid synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1 (SREBP-1), was attenuated in rutin-treated cells. Moreover, long-term incubation of rutin inhibited the transcriptions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-coenzyme carboxylase (ACC). Besides, we also found out the antioxidative effect of rutin by increasing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and antioxidative enzymes. Taken together, our findings suggest rutin could attenuate lipid accumulation by decreasing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocyte.

  7. The inner and outer compartments of mitochondria are sites of distinct cAMP/PKA signaling dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leronni, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent phosphorylation has been reported to exert biological effects in both the mitochondrial matrix and outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). However, the kinetics, targets, and effectors of the cAMP cascade in these organellar domains remain largely undefined. Here we used sensitive FRET-based sensors to monitor cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity in different mitochondrial compartments in real time. We found that cytosolic cAMP did not enter the matrix, except during mitochondrial permeability transition. Bicarbonate treatment (expected to activate matrix-bound soluble adenylyl cyclase) increased intramitochondrial cAMP, but along with membrane-permeant cAMP analogues, failed to induce measureable matrix PKA activity. In contrast, the OMM proved to be a domain of exceptionally persistent cAMP-dependent PKA activity. Although cAMP signaling events measured on the OMM mirrored those of the cytosol, PKA phosphorylation at the OMM endured longer as a consequence of diminished control by local phosphatases. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondria host segregated cAMP cascades with distinct functional and kinetic signatures. PMID:23897891

  8. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  9. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein–coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Claro, Paula A.; Senin, Sergio A.; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein–dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP. PMID:27402953

  10. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein-coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Inda, Carolina; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Bonfiglio, Juan J; Senin, Sergio A; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-07-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP.

  11. Binding of the auxiliary subunit TRIP8b to HCN channels shifts the mode of action of cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Santoro, Bina; Saponaro, Andrea; Liu, Haiying; Moroni, Anna; Siegelbaum, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated cation (HCN) channels generate the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih present in many neurons. These channels are directly regulated by the binding of cAMP, which both shifts the voltage dependence of HCN channel opening to more positive potentials and increases maximal Ih at extreme negative voltages where voltage gating is complete. Here we report that the HCN channel brain-specific auxiliary subunit TRIP8b produces opposing actions on these two effects of cAMP. In the first action, TRIP8b inhibits the effect of cAMP to shift voltage gating, decreasing both the sensitivity of the channel to cAMP (K1/2) and the efficacy of cAMP (maximal voltage shift); conversely, cAMP binding inhibits these actions of TRIP8b. These mutually antagonistic actions are well described by a cyclic allosteric mechanism in which TRIP8b binding reduces the affinity of the channel for cAMP, with the affinity of the open state for cAMP being reduced to a greater extent than the cAMP affinity of the closed state. In a second apparently independent action, TRIP8b enhances the action of cAMP to increase maximal Ih. This latter effect cannot be explained by the cyclic allosteric model but results from a previously uncharacterized action of TRIP8b to reduce maximal current through the channel in the absence of cAMP. Because the binding of cAMP also antagonizes this second effect of TRIP8b, application of cAMP produces a larger increase in maximal Ih in the presence of TRIP8b than in its absence. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the wide variability in the effects of modulatory transmitters on the voltage gating and maximal amplitude of Ih reported for different neurons in the brain.

  12. The Role of Type 4 Phosphodiesterases in Generating Microdomains of cAMP: Large Scale Stochastic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Terrin, Anna; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Cannon, Robert C.; Koh, Wonryull; Kim, MyungSook; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its main effector Protein Kinase A (PKA) are critical for several aspects of neuronal function including synaptic plasticity. Specificity of synaptic plasticity requires that cAMP activates PKA in a highly localized manner despite the speed with which cAMP diffuses. Two mechanisms have been proposed to produce localized elevations in cAMP, known as microdomains: impeded diffusion, and high phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. This paper investigates the mechanism of localized cAMP signaling using a computational model of the biochemical network in the HEK293 cell, which is a subset of pathways involved in PKA-dependent synaptic plasticity. This biochemical network includes cAMP production, PKA activation, and cAMP degradation by PDE activity. The model is implemented in NeuroRD: novel, computationally efficient, stochastic reaction-diffusion software, and is constrained by intracellular cAMP dynamics that were determined experimentally by real-time imaging using an Epac-based FRET sensor (H30). The model reproduces the high concentration cAMP microdomain in the submembrane region, distinct from the lower concentration of cAMP in the cytosol. Simulations further demonstrate that generation of the cAMP microdomain requires a pool of PDE4D anchored in the cytosol and also requires PKA-mediated phosphorylation of PDE4D which increases its activity. The microdomain does not require impeded diffusion of cAMP, confirming that barriers are not required for microdomains. The simulations reported here further demonstrate the utility of the new stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithm for exploring signaling pathways in spatially complex structures such as neurons. PMID:20661441

  13. AmpG is required for BlaXc beta-lactamase expression in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. 17.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Chen, Tzu-Fan; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Hu, Rouh-Mei

    2013-03-01

    The chromosomal ampR(Xc) -bla(Xc) module is essential for the β-lactam resistance of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Bla(Xc) β-lactamase is expressed at a high basal level in the absence of an inducer and its expression can be further induced by β-lactam. In enterobacteria, ampG encodes an inner membrane facilitator involved in the recycling of murein degradation compounds. An isogenic ampG mutant (XcampG) of X. campestris pv. campestris str. 17 (Xc17) was constructed to investigate the link between murein recycling and bla(Xc) expression. Our data demonstrate that (1) XcampG is susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics; (2) AmpG(Xc) is essential for expression of bla(Xc) ; (3) AmpGs of Xc17, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KJ (SmKJ) and Escherichia coli DH5α can complement the defect of XcampG; (4) overexpression of AmpG(X) (c) significantly increased bla(Xc) expression; and (5) AmpG(Xc) from Xc17 is able to restore β-lactamase induction of the ampN(Xc) -ampG(Xc) double mutant of SmKJ. In Xc17, ampG(Xc) can be expressed from the promoter residing in the intergenic region of ampN(Xc) -ampG(Xc) and the expression is independent of β-lactam induction. AmpN, which is required for β-lactamases induction in SmKJ, is not required for the β-lactam antibiotic resistance of Xc17.

  14. Ion Trapping in the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1985-02-18

    The beam space charge (- for {bar p}'s) will attract positive ions. In the absence of additional fields (clearing electrodes, e.g.) these ions will be trapped in the beam potential well. The depth of this potential well has been calculated for some geometries relevant for the accumulator.

  15. Effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on the hormonal stimulation and inhibition of cAMP formation in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Haslam, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Washed platelets, labelled by preincubation with (/sup 3/H)adenine and (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, were studied in the presence of indomethacin, phosphocreatine and creatine phosphokinase to block thromboxane A/sub 2/ formation and inhibitory effects of released ADP. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol (diC/sub 8/) decreased the initial rate of accumulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMP observed with PGE/sub 1/ and 3-isobutyl 1- methylxanthine. Maximal decreases of 31% (1 ..mu..M PMA) and 42% (100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/) were obtained. Also, the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)cAMP formation by epinephrine (5 ..mu..M) was decreased from 68% to 16% and 31% by 1..mu..M PMA and 100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/, respectively. The effects of increasing concentrations of PMA and diC/sub 8/ on the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMp formation by PGE/sub 1/ and on the inhibitory action of epinephrine correlated with increases in /sup 32/P incorporation into the major substrate of PKC (P47) and into two other polypeptides (P41 and P20). These results suggested that activation of PKC might explain the failure of some aggregating agents (e.g. PAF and vasopressin) to inhibit adenylate cyclase in intact platelets, although they are inhibitory with isolated membranes. However, comparison of the effects of PMA and these aggregating agents on the phosphorylation of platelet polypeptides indicated that activation of PKC by aggregating agents is inadequate to block their inhibitory effects on adenylate cyclase, when PGE/sub 1/ is present.

  16. Forskolin's effect on transient K current in nudibranch neurons is not reproduced by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Coombs, J; Thompson, S

    1987-02-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene extracted from Coleus forskolii, stimulates the production of cAMP in a variety of cells and is potentially an important tool for studying the role of cAMP in the modulation of neuronal excitability. We studied the effects of forskolin on neurons of nudibranch molluscs and found that it caused characteristic, reversible changes in the amplitude and waveform of the transient K current, IA, and also activated an inward current similar to the cAMP-dependent inward current previously described in molluscan neurons. Forskolin altered the time course of IA activation and inactivation but did not affect the voltage dependence or the reversal potential of the current. IA normally inactivates exponentially, but in forskolin the time course of inactivation can be fit by the sum of 2 exponentials with an initial rate that is faster than the control and a final rate that is much slower. On depolarization in forskolin, IA begins to activate at the normal rate, but a slower component of activation is also seen. The changes in IA in the nudibranch cells were qualitatively different than the changes caused by forskolin in Aplysia bag cell neurons (Strong, 1984). Experiments were performed to determine whether these effects of forskolin require cAMP. Intracellular injection of cAMP, application of membrane-permeable analogs of cAMP, application of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and intracellular injection of the active catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase did not affect the amplitude or waveform of IA. Also, the changes in IA that are caused by forskolin were not prevented or reversed by intracellular injection of an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Cyclic AMP did, however, activate inward current at voltages near the resting potential. We conclude that the changes in IA and the activation of inward current represent separate affects of forskolin. The inward current appears to depend on an increase in intracellular cAMP, while the

  17. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study. Volume 3: Interface control documents. Part 3: AMPS payload to instruments ICD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    General physical, functional, and operational interface control requirements for instruments on the first AMPS payload are presented. Interface specifications are included to satisfy ground handling, prelaunch, launch, stowage, operation, and landing activities. Applicable supporting documentation to implement the information is also given.

  18. Phosphorylation of Rap1 by cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA) Creates a Binding Site for KSR to Sustain ERK Activation by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Maho; Li, Yanping; Dillon, Tara J; Stork, Philip J S

    2017-01-27

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important mediator of hormonal stimulation of cell growth and differentiation through its activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Two small G proteins, Ras and Rap1 have been proposed to mediate this activation. Using HEK293 cells as a model system, we have recently shown that both Ras and Rap1 are required for cAMP signaling to ERKs. However, cAMP-dependent Ras signaling to ERKs is transient and rapidly terminated by PKA phosphorylation of the Raf isoforms C-Raf and B-Raf. In contrast, cAMP-dependent Rap1 signaling to ERKs and Rap1 is potentiated by PKA. We show that this is due to sustained binding of B-Raf to Rap1. One of the targets of PKA is Rap1 itself, directly phosphorylating Rap1a on serine 180 and Rap1b on serine 179. We show that these phosphorylations create potential binding sites for the adaptor protein 14-3-3 that links Rap1 to the scaffold protein KSR. These results suggest that Rap1 activation of ERKs requires PKA phosphorylation and KSR binding. Because KSR and B-Raf exist as heterodimers within the cell, this binding also brings B-Raf to Rap1, allowing Rap1 to couple to ERKs through B-Raf binding to Rap1 independently of its Ras-binding domain.

  19. The cAMP-producing agonist beraprost inhibits human vascular smooth muscle cell migration via exchange protein directly activated by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    McKean, Jenny S.; Murray, Fiona; Gibson, George; Shewan, Derryck A.; Tucker, Steven J.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims During restenosis, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migrate from the vascular media to the developing neointima. Preventing VSMC migration is therefore a therapeutic target for restenosis. Drugs, such as prostacyclin analogues, that increase the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can inhibit VSMC migration, but the mechanisms via which this occurs are unknown. Two main downstream mediators of cAMP are protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). This study has examined the effects of the prostacyclin analogue beraprost on VSMC migration and investigated the intracellular pathways involved. Methods and results In a chemotaxis chamber, human saphenous vein VSMC migrated towards a platelet-derived growth-factor-BB (PDGF) chemogradient. Incubation with therapeutically relevant concentrations of cAMP-producing agonist beraprost significantly decreased PDGF-induced migration. Direct activation of either PKA or Epac inhibited migration whereas inhibition of PKA did not prevent the anti-migratory effect of beraprost. Direct activation of Epac also prevented hyperplasia in ex vivo serum-treated human veins. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrated that beraprost activated Epac but not PKA. The mechanisms of this Epac-mediated effect involved activation of Rap1 with subsequent inhibition of RhoA. Cytoskeletal rearrangement at the leading edge of the cell was consequently inhibited. Interestingly, Epac1 was localized to the leading edge of migrating VSMC. Conclusions These results indicate that therapeutically relevant concentrations of beraprost can inhibit VSMC migration via a previously unknown mechanism involving the cAMP mediator Epac. This may provide a novel target that could blunt neointimal formation. PMID:26092100

  20. Influence of cAMP on reporter bioassays for dioxin and dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Ayumi; Yao, Jian; Yamauchi, Kozue; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Meng, Yiman; Maeda, Shuichiro; Kitamura, Masanori

    2006-02-15

    In reporter assays for detection of dioxins, the dioxin-responsive element (DRE) is generally used as a sensor sequence. In several systems, the CYP1A1 promoter containing DREs (DRE(cyp)) is inserted into a part of the long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (LTR(MMTV)) to improve sensitivity of assays. We found that DRE(cyp)-LTR(MMTV) responds not only to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds but also to forskolin, a cAMP-elevating agent. This effect was dose-dependent and reproduced by other cAMP-elevating agents including 8-bromo-cAMP and 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine. The cAMP response element (CRE) and CRE-like sequences were absent in DRE(cyp)-LTR(MMTV) and not involved in this process. In contrast to the effect of dioxin, the activation of DRE(cyp)-LTR(MMTV) by cAMP was independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor for DRE. Furthermore, neither DRE(cyp), LTR(MMTV) nor the consensus sequence of DRE alone was activated in response to cAMP. These data elucidated for the first time that the combination of DRE(cyp) with LTR(MMTV) causes a peculiar response to cAMP and suggested that use of AhR antagonists is essential to exclude false-positive responses of DRE(cyp)-LTR(MMTV)-based bioassays for detection and quantification of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.

  1. Methionine adenosyltransferase:adrenergic-cAMP mechanism regulates a daily rhythm in pineal expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-So; Coon, Steven L; Blackshaw, Seth; Cepko, Constance L; Møller, Morten; Mukda, Sujira; Zhao, Wan-Qian; Charlton, Clivel G; Klein, David C

    2005-01-07

    (S)-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is a critical element of melatonin synthesis as the methyl donor in the last step of the pathway, the O-methylation of N-acetyl 5-hydroxytryptamine by hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. The activity of the enzyme that synthesizes SAM, methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT), increases 2.5-fold at night in the pineal gland. In this study, we found that pineal MAT2A mRNA and the protein it encodes, MAT II, also increase at night, suggesting that the increase in MAT activity is caused by an increase in MAT II gene products. The night levels of MAT2A mRNA in the pineal gland were severalfold higher than in other neural and non-neural tissues examined, consistent with the requirement for SAM in melatonin synthesis. Related studies indicate that the nocturnal increase in MAT2A mRNA is caused by activation of a well described neural pathway that mediates photoneural-circadian regulation of the pineal gland. MAT2A mRNA and MAT II protein were increased in organ culture by treatment with norepinephrine (NE), the sympathetic neurotransmitter that stimulates the pineal gland at night. NE is known to markedly elevate pineal cAMP, and here it was found that cAMP agonists elevate MAT2A mRNA levels by increasing MAT2A mRNA synthesis and that drugs that block cAMP activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase block effects of NE. Therefore, the NE-cAMP dependent increase in pineal MAT activity seems to reflect an increase in MAT II protein, which occurs in response to cAMP-->protein kinase-dependent increased MAT2A expression. The existence of this MAT regulatory system underscores the importance that MAT plays in melatonin biogenesis. These studies also point to the possibility that SAM production in other tissues might be regulated through cAMP.

  2. G beta gamma signaling reduces intracellular cAMP to promote meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gill, Arvind; Hammes, Stephen R

    2007-02-01

    In nearly every vertebrate species, elevated intracellular cAMP maintains oocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Prior to ovulation, gonadotropins trigger various intra-ovarian processes, including the breakdown of gap junctions, the activation of EGF receptors, and the secretion of steroids. These events in turn decrease intracellular cAMP levels in select oocytes to allow meiotic progression, or maturation, to resume. Studies suggest that cAMP levels are kept elevated in resting oocytes by constitutive G protein signaling, and that the drop in intracellular cAMP that accompanies maturation may be due in part to attenuation of this inhibitory G protein-mediated signaling. Interestingly, one of these G protein regulators of meiotic arrest is the Galpha(s) protein, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise intracellular cAMP in two important animal models of oocyte development: Xenopus leavis frogs and mice. In addition to G(alpha)(s), constitutive Gbetagamma activity similarly stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise cAMP and prevent maturation in Xenopus oocytes; however, the role of Gbetagamma in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes has not been examined. Here we show that Gbetagamma does not contribute to the maintenance of murine oocyte meiotic arrest. In fact, contrary to observations in frog oocytes, Gbetagamma signaling in mouse oocytes reduces cAMP and promotes oocyte maturation, suggesting that Gbetagamma might in fact play a positive role in promoting oocyte maturation. These observations emphasize that, while many general concepts and components of meiotic regulation are conserved from frogs to mice, specific differences exist that may lead to important insights regarding ovarian development in vertebrates.

  3. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter T; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; O'Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Sikkel, Markus B; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A; Lyon, Alexander R; Harding, Sian E; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors.

  4. Influence of cAMP on reporter bioassays for dioxin and dioxin-like compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Ayumi; Yao, Jian; Yamauchi, Kozue; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Meng, Yiman; Maeda, Shuichiro; Kitamura, Masanori . E-mail: masanori@yamanashi.ac.jp

    2006-02-15

    In reporter assays for detection of dioxins, the dioxin-responsive element (DRE) is generally used as a sensor sequence. In several systems, the CYP1A1 promoter containing DREs (DRE{sup cyp}) is inserted into a part of the long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (LTR{sup MMTV}) to improve sensitivity of assays. We found that DRE{sup cyp}-LTR{sup MMTV} responds not only to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds but also to forskolin, a cAMP-elevating agent. This effect was dose-dependent and reproduced by other cAMP-elevating agents including 8-bromo-cAMP and 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine. The cAMP response element (CRE) and CRE-like sequences were absent in DRE{sup cyp}-LTR{sup MMTV} and not involved in this process. In contrast to the effect of dioxin, the activation of DRE{sup cyp}-LTR{sup MMTV} by cAMP was independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor for DRE. Furthermore, neither DRE{sup cyp}, LTR{sup MMTV} nor the consensus sequence of DRE alone was activated in response to cAMP. These data elucidated for the first time that the combination of DRE{sup cyp} with LTR{sup MMTV} causes a peculiar response to cAMP and suggested that use of AhR antagonists is essential to exclude false-positive responses of DRE{sup cyp}-LTR{sup MMTV}-based bioassays for detection and quantification of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.

  5. Replenishing the cyclic-di-AMP pool: regulation of diadenylate cyclase activity in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Huong; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Marcellin, Esteban; Turner, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria can sense environmental cues and alter their physiology accordingly through the use of signal transduction pathways involving second messenger nucleotides. One broadly conserved second messenger is cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) which regulates a range of processes including cell wall homeostasis, potassium uptake, DNA repair, fatty acid synthesis, biofilm formation and central metabolism in bacteria. The intracellular pool of c-di-AMP is maintained by the activities of diadenylate cyclase (DAC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, as well as possibly via c-di-AMP export. Whilst extracellular stimuli regulating c-di-AMP levels in bacteria are poorly understood, recent work has identified effector proteins which directly interact and alter the activity of DACs. These include the membrane bound CdaR and the phosphoglucosamine mutase GlmM which both bind directly to the membrane bound CdaA DAC and the recombination protein RadA which binds directly to the DNA binding DisA DAC. The genes encoding these multiprotein complexes are co-localised in many bacteria providing further support for their functional connection. The roles of GlmM in peptidoglycan synthesis and RadA in Holliday junction intermediate processing suggest that c-di-AMP synthesis by DACs will be responsive to these cellular activities. In addition to these modulatory interactions, permanent dysregulation of DAC activity due to suppressor mutations can occur during selection to overcome growth defects, rapid cell lysis and osmosensitivity. DACs have also been investigated as targets for the development of new antibiotics and several small compound inhibitors have recently been identified. This review aims to provide an overview of how c-di-AMP synthesis by DACs can be regulated.

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates L-arginine mediated cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior study revealed the loss in short-term L-Arginine (ARG) therapeutic efficacy after continuous exposure; resulting in tolerance development, mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) down-regulation, secondary to oxidative stress and induced glucose accumulation. However, the potential factor regulating ARG cellular response is presently unknown. Method Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 100 μM ARG for 2 h in buffer (short-term or acute), or for 7 days in culture medium and challenged for 2 h in buffer (continuous or chronic), in the presence or absence of other agents. eNOS activity was determined by analyzing cellular nitrite/nitrate (NO2–/NO3–), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity was assayed using SAMS peptide. 13C6 glucose was added to medium to measure glucose uptake during cellular treatments, which were determined by LC-MS/MS. Cellular glucose was identified by o-toluidine method. Superoxide (O2•–) was identified by EPR-spin-trap, and peroxynitrite (ONOO–) was measured by flow-cytometer using aminophenyl fluorescein dye. Results Short-term incubation of cells with 100 μM ARG in the presence or absence of 30 μM L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 30 μM AMPK inhibitor (compound C, CMP-C) increased cellular oxidative stress and overall glucose accumulation with no variation in glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), or AMPK activity from control. The increase in total NO2–/NO3– after 2 h 100 μM ARG exposure, was suppressed in cells co-incubated with 30 μM CMP-C or L-NAME. Long-term exposure of ARG with or without CMP-C or L-NAME suppressed NO2–/NO3–, glucose uptake, GLUT-1, AMPK expression and activity below control, and increased overall cellular glucose, O2•– and ONOO–. Gluconeogenesis inhibition with 30 μM 5-Chloro-2-N-2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido-benzoxazole (CDB) during ARG exposure for 2 h maintained overall cellular glucose to control, but increased

  7. The β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam (NXL104) does not induce ampC β-lactamase in Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Miossec, Christine; Claudon, Monique; Levasseur, Premavathy; Black, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Induction of ampC β-lactamase expression can often compromise antibiotic treatment and is triggered by several β-lactams (such as cefoxitin and imipenem) and by the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid. The novel β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam (NXL104) is a potent inhibitor of both class A and class C enzymes. The potential of avibactam for induction of ampC expression in Enterobacter cloacae was investigated by ampC messenger ribonucleic acid quantitation. Cefoxitin and clavulanic acid were confirmed as ampC inducers, whereas avibactam was found to exert no effect on ampC expression. Thus, avibactam is unlikely to diminish the activity of any partner β-lactam antibiotic against AmpC-producing organisms. PMID:24348054

  8. Glucose and GLP-1 Stimulate cAMP Production via Distinct Adenylyl Cyclases in INS-1E Insulinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Zippin, Jonathan Hale; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    In β cells, both glucose and hormones, such as GLP-1, stimulate production of the second messenger cAMP, but glucose and GLP-1 elicit distinct cellular responses. We now show in INS-1E insulinoma cells that glucose and GLP-1 produce cAMP with distinct kinetics via different adenylyl cyclases. GLP-1 induces a rapid cAMP signal mediated by G protein–responsive transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). In contrast, glucose elicits a delayed cAMP rise mediated by bicarbonate, calcium, and ATP-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This glucose-induced, sAC-dependent cAMP rise is dependent upon calcium influx and is responsible for the glucose-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. These results demonstrate that sAC-generated and tmAC-generated cAMP define distinct signaling cascades. PMID:18695009

  9. Thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulates increases in inositol phosphates as well as cyclic AMP in the FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J B; Ealey, P A; Marshall, N J; Cockcroft, S

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; thyrotropin), a hormone known to increase cytosol concentrations of cyclic AMP, also stimulates the formation of inositol phosphates in thyroid cells. TSH and noradrenaline both stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate formation in a concentration-dependent manner in the rat thyroid cell line, FRTL-5 cells, which had been prelabelled with [3H]inositol. The threshold concentration of TSH required to stimulate inositol phosphate formation was more than 20 munits/ml, which is approx. 10(3)-fold greater than that required for cyclic AMP accumulation and growth in these cells. We also demonstrate that membranes prepared from FRTL-5 cells possess a guanine nucleotide-activatable polyphosphoinositide phosphodiesterase, which suggests that activation of inositide metabolism in these cells may be coupled to receptors by the G-protein, Gp. Our findings suggest that two second-messenger systems exist to mediate the action of TSH in the thyroid. PMID:2827631

  10. The Popeye domain containing protein family – A novel class of cAMP effectors with important functions in multiple tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Popeye domain containing (Popdc) proteins are a unique family, which combine several different properties and functions in a surprisingly complex fashion. They are expressed in multiple tissues and cell types, present in several subcellular compartments, interact with different classes of proteins, and are associated with a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Moreover, Popdc proteins bind the second messenger cAMP with high affinity and it is thought that they act as a novel class of cAMP effector proteins. Here, we will review the most important findings about the Popdc family, which accumulated since its discovery about 15 years ago. We will be focussing on Popdc protein interaction and function in striated muscle tissue. However, as a full picture only emerges if all aspects are taken into account, we will also describe what is currently known about the role of Popdc proteins in epithelial cells and in various types of cancer, and discuss these findings with regard to their relevance for cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:26772438

  11. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polekhina, Galina Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  12. Bacterial accumulation in viscosity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waisbord, Nicolas; Guasto, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Cell motility is greatly modified by fluid rheology. In particular, the physical environments in which cells function, are often characterized by gradients of viscous biopolymers, such as mucus and extracellular matrix, which impact processes ranging from reproduction to digestion to biofilm formation. To understand how spatial heterogeneity of fluid rheology affects the motility and transport of swimming cells, we use hydrogel microfluidic devices to generate viscosity gradients in a simple, polymeric, Newtonian fluid. Using video microscopy, we characterize the random walk motility patterns of model bacteria (Bacillus subtilis), showing that both wild-type ('run-and-tumble') cells and smooth-swimming mutants accumulate in the viscous region of the fluid. Through statistical analysis of individual cell trajectories and body kinematics in both homogeneous and heterogeneous viscous environments, we discriminate passive, physical effects from active sensing processes to explain the observed cell accumulation at the ensemble level.

  13. Metal accumulating plants: Medium's role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabier, J.; Prudent, P.; Szymanska, B.; Mevy, J.-P.

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate phytoremediation potentialities by metal accumulation in tolerant plants, trials are carried out using in vitro cultures. Organie compounds influence on metal accumulation is studied with metals supplemented media. The tested compounds on zinc and lead absorption by Brassica juncea, are chelating agents (EDTA, citric acid) and soluble organic fractions of compost. EDTA seems to enhance the transfer of lead in plant but it is the opposite in the case of zinc. Citric acid stimulates root absorption for both zinc and lead. For the aqueous extracts of compost, variable effects are obtained according to the origin of compost (green wastes and food wastes). In'all tested conditions of cultures, zinc is mainly exported towards shoot while lead is stored in root.

  14. Genetically-encoded yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator with an expanded dynamic range for dual-color imaging.

    PubMed

    Odaka, Haruki; Arai, Satoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP is a ubiquitous second messenger, which mediates many cellular responses mainly initiated by activation of cell surface receptors. Various Förster resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric cAMP indicators have been created for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of cAMP at the single-cell level. However, single fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicators have been poorly developed, with improvement required for dynamic range and brightness. Based on our previous yellow fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicator, Flamindo, we developed an improved yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator named Flamindo2. Flamindo2 has a 2-fold expanded dynamic range and 8-fold increased brightness compared with Flamindo by optimization of linker peptides in the vicinity of the chromophore. We found that fluorescence intensity of Flamindo2 was decreased to 25% in response to cAMP. Live-cell cAMP imaging of the cytosol and nucleus in COS7 cells using Flamindo2 and nlsFlamindo2, respectively, showed that forskolin elevated cAMP levels in each compartment with different kinetics. Furthermore, dual-color imaging of cAMP and Ca2+ with Flamindo2 and a red fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, R-GECO, showed that cAMP and Ca2+ elevation were induced by noradrenaline in single HeLa cells. Our study shows that Flamindo2, which is feasible for multi-color imaging with other intracellular signaling molecules, is useful and is an alternative tool for live-cell imaging of intracellular cAMP dynamics.

  15. Outward currents in Drosophila larval neurons: dunce lacks a maintained outward current component downregulated by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Delgado, R; Davis, R; Bono, M R; Latorre, R; Labarca, P

    1998-02-15

    Outward current modulation by cAMP was investigated in wild type (wt) and dunce (dnc) Drosophila larval neurons. dnc is deficient in a cAMP phosphodiesterase and has altered memory. Outward current modulation by cAMP was investigated by acute or chronic exposure to cAMP analogs. The analysis included a scrutiny of outward current modulation by cAMP in neurons from the mushroom bodies (mrb). In Drosophila, the mrb are the centers of olfactory acquisition and retention. Based on outward current patterns, neurons were classified into four types. Downmodulation of outward currents induced by acute application of cAMP analogs was reversible and found only in type I and type IV neurons. In the general wt neuron population, approximately half of neurons exhibited cAMP-modulated, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive currents. On the other hand, a significantly larger fraction of mrb neurons in wt (70%) was endowed with cAMP-modulated, 4-AP-sensitive currents. Only 30% of the dnc neurons displayed outward currents modulated by cAMP. The deficit of cAMP-modulated outward currents was most severe in neurons derived from the mrb of dnc individuals. Only 4% of the mrb neurons of dnc were cAMP-modulated. The dnc defect can be induced by chronic exposure of wt neurons to cAMP analogs. These results document for the first time a well defined electrophysiological neuron phenotype in correlation with the dnc defect. Moreover, this study demonstrates that in dnc mutants such a deficiency affects most severely neurons in brain centers of acquisition and retention.

  16. Characterization of chromosomal qnrB and ampC alleles in Citrobacter freundii isolates from different origins.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoping; Fang, Liangxing; Li, Liang; Sun, Jian; Li, Xingping; Chen, Muya; Deng, Hui; Yang, Qiu'e; Li, Xue; Liu, Yahong

    2015-10-01

    The association of ESBLs (extended-spectrum beta-lactamases)/pAmpCs (plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases) with PMQR (plasmid mediated quinolone resistance) in gram-negative bacteria has been of great concern. The present study was performed to characterize the diversity, gene location, genetic context, and evolution of ampC and qnrB alleles in isolates of Citrobacter freundii. Fifteen isolates of C. freundii were identified from a total of 788 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae derived from humans, animals, animal food products, and the environment between 2010 and 2012. Co-existence of qnrB/ΔqnrB with ampC was detected in all C. freundii isolates. Both ampC and qnrB genes were found to be located on the chromosome, but were distantly separated on the chromosome. Seven and six novel alleles were discovered for the 10 ampC and qnrB variants detected in this study, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the new alleles differed a little from the variants of ampC/qnrB previously described in this genus. The genetic context surrounding ampC genes was AmpR-AmpC-Blc-SugE. However, five different genetic contexts surrounding qnrB/ΔqnrB genes were observed, but they occurred in all cases between the pspF and sapA genes. Additionally, cloning experiments showed that the regions containing different qnrB alleles, even with different genetic contexts, contributed to the reduction of quinolone susceptibility. Our results showed that the chromosomal ampC and qnrB alleles are closely related to C. freundii. However, unlike ampC, qnrB alleles seemed to be related to the genetic contexts surrounding them. The evolution of these two genes in C. freundii isolates might be through different pathways.

  17. cAMP Promotes Cell Migration Through Cell Junctional Complex Dynamics and Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling: Implications in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; Ryu, Jung Min; Suh, Han Na; Park, Soo Hyun; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells have attracted great interest for their therapeutic capacity in tissue regeneration. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), existing in high concentration at wound sites, mediated various signaling pathways such as cytoskeleton dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration in stem cells, which suggest the critical roles of cAMP in the wound healing process through functional regulation of stem cells. However, the mechanisms behind the effect of cAMP on mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) motility and its roles on skin wound healing remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, 8-Bromo cAMP-treated mESCs showed significant wound closure and improved neovascularization. Moreover, 8-Bromo cAMP stimulated mESC migration into the wound bed. 8-Bromo cAMP also increased ESC motility in in vitro migration assay. 8-Bromo cAMP induced myosin light chain phosphorylation through Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling, which were involved in 8-Bromo cAMP-induced decrease in expression of junction proteins (connexin 43, E-cadherin, and occludin) at the plasma membrane. Subsequently, 8-Bromo cAMP induced the disruption of cell junctions (including gap junctions, adherens junctions, and tight junctions), which reduced the function of the gap junctions and cell adhesion. In addition, 8-Bromo cAMP-induced Rac1 and Cdc42 activation increased Arp3, TOCA, PAK, and N-WASP expression, but decreased cofilin phosphorylation level, which elicited actin cytoskeleton remodeling. In contrast to the control, 8-Bromo cAMP evoked a substantial migration of cells into the denuded area, which was blocked by the small interfering RNAs of the signaling pathway-related molecules or by inhibitors. In conclusion, cAMP enhanced the migration of mESCs through effective coordination of junctional disruption and actin cytoskeleton remodeling, which increased the wound healing capacity of ESCs.

  18. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD. PMID:26819531

  19. 5-HT induces cAMP production in crypt colonocytes at a 5-HT4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, F C; Smith, E H; Kellum, J M

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that both 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) induce chloride efflux from crypt colonocytes in the rat distal colon; antagonist studies suggest that the 5-HT response is mediated primarily by the 5-HT4 receptor. Since this receptor is known to be positively coupled to adenylate cyclase, we postulated that 5-HT should induce generation of cAMP, which should be inhibited by 5-HT4 antagonists. Method. Mucosal cells from rat distal colon were taken by a sequential calcium chelation technique for enrichment of crypt cells. Cytokeratin stains demonstrated that >99% of cells were colonocytes. [3H]Thymidine uptake studies demonstrate a fivefold increased incorporation in this cell preparation compared to earlier fractions. 3-Isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX, 100 microM) was added to all cell suspensions in order to prevent cAMP metabolism. Cell suspensions were incubated for 2 min at 37 degreesC with different concentrations of 5-HT (n = 7). cAMP was measured by enzyme immunoassay. In another series of experiments, 5-HT (0.3 microM) stimulation of cAMP was similarly measured in the presence and absence of 5-HT receptor antagonists: 10 microM 5-HTP-DP (5-HT1P; n = 4), 0.1 microM ketanserin (5-HT2A; n = 4), 0.3 microM ondansetron (5-HT3; n = 4), 3 microM tropisetron (5-HT3 and 5-HT4; n = 4), and 10 nM GR-113808 (5-HT4; n = 5). Results. 5-HT produced a dose-dependent increase in cAMP. The increase was significant at concentrations >/=0.3 microM when compared to cells incubated with IBMX alone. In the second series of experiment, 5-HT-induced generation of cAMP at a dose of 0.3 microM was significantly inhibited in the presence of GR-113808 and tropisetron. Conclusion. 5-HT acts at a 5-HT4 receptor to induce production of cAMP in rat distal crypt colonocytes.

  20. Activation of cyclic amp/protein kinase: a signaling pathway enhances osteoblast cell adhesion on biomaterials for regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Ashe, Keshia M; Kan, Ho Man; Lee, Duron A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2011-04-01

    Osteoblast cell adhesion on biomaterials is an important goal for implants to be useful in bone regeneration technologies. The adhesion of osteoblastic cells to biomaterials has been investigated in the field of bone regenerative engineering. Previous work from our group demonstrated that osteoblastic cells adhering to biodegradable biomaterials require the expression of integrins on the cell surface. However, the underlying molecular signaling mechanism is still not fully clear. We report here that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a small signaling molecule, regulates osteoblast cell adhesion to biomaterial surfaces. We used an in vitro cell adhesion assay to demonstrate that at 0.1 mM, 8-Br-cAMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog, significantly enhances osteoblast-like cells' (MC3T3-E1) adherence to biomaterials. Moreover, we demonstrate that a commonly used cAMP-elevating agent, forskolin, promotes cell adhesion similar to that of the cell permeable cAMP analog. By using different target-specific cAMP analogs: 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP which specifically activates exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), and 6-Bnz-cAMP which specifically activates protein kinase A (PKA), we observed that the PKA signaling pathway plays a dominant role in this process. Thus, this report suggests a new method to enhance osteoblast cell adhesion on biodegradable biomaterials for bone regenerative engineering applications.

  1. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-induced histone hyperacetylation contributes to its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seungwan; Lee, Yong Gyu; Kim, Ji Hye; Byeon, Se Eun; Rho, Ho Sik; Cho, Jae Youl; Hong, Sungyoul

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation is linked to the control of chromatin remodeling, which is involved in cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It is not fully understood whether cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a representative differentiation-inducing molecule, is able to modulate histone acetylation as part of its anticancer activity. In the present study, we aimed to address this issue using cell-permeable cAMP, i.e. dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and C6 glioma cells. As reported previously, under the conditions of our studies, treatment with dbcAMP clearly arrested C6 cell proliferation and altered their morphology. Its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activity in C6 glioma cells involved upregulation of p219WAF/CIP), p27(kip1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and Cx43, as well as downregulation of vimentin. Furthermore, dbcAMP modulated the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt in a time-dependent manner and altered the colocalization pattern of phospho-Src and the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, dbcAMP upregulated the enzyme activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and, in parallel, enhanced cellular acetyllysine levels. Finally, the hyperacetylation-inducing compound, sodium butyrate (NaB), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, displayed similar anticancer activity to dbcAMP. Therefore, our data suggest that antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of dbcAMP may be generated by its enhanced hyperacetylation function.

  2. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  3. [Isolation and study of the properties of the regulator subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase].

    PubMed

    Iurkiv, V A; Severin, E S; Petukhov, S P; Bulargina, T V

    1982-12-01

    The regulatory subunit of type II cAMP-dependent proteinkinase was isolated from cytosol of the rabbit small intestinal mucosa by affinity chromatography. The preparation contained 3 proteolytic enzymes and occurred in two forms differing as regards cAMP affinity. The cAMP-binding capacity of the preparation was equal to 17 nmol cAMP/mg protein. To study the topography of the cAMP-binding center, use was made of cAMP analogs. It was demonstrated that introduction of the substituents into the 8th position of the purine ring and substitution with respect to the N6-exoaminogroup affected insignificantly the analog affinity for the cAMP-binding center. At the same time the substituents introduced into the first position of the adenine base, into the area of the 2'-hydroxyl group of ribose and into the cyclophosphate part of the cAMP molecule considerably decreased the analog affinity for the regulatory center of type II cAMP-dependent proteinkinase.

  4. Innate hemocyte responses of Malacosoma disstria larvae (C. Insecta) to antigens are modulated by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Gulii, Vladislav; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2009-08-01

    Invertebrate intracellular hemocyte signaling pathways affecting cellular-antigen responses, although defined for molluscs and some arthropods including dipteran insects, is less known for lepidopterans. Hemocytic-antigen responses of the arboreal pest lepidopteran Malacosoma disstria are linked to cAMP-dependent protein kinase A implicating cAMP in cellular hemocyte immune responses. The purpose in the present study was to determine intracellular cAMP effects on larval M. disstria hemocytes adhering to slides and bacteria. Altering adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities as well as cAMP levels in vitro and in vivo changed hemocyte responses to antigens. Quiescent hemocytes had high cAMP levels due to adenylate cyclase activity and possibly low phosphodiesterase (type 4) activity. Antigen contact diminished hemocytic cAMP levels. Inhibiting adenylate cyclase increased hemocyte-antigen and hemocyte-hemocyte adhesion, the latter producing nodules in vivo without bacterial antigens. Inhibiting phosphodiesterase type 4 produced the reverse effects. Pharmacologically increasing intracellular cAMP in attached hemocytes caused many of the cells to detach. Diminished intracellular cAMP changed hemograms in vivo in bacteria-free larvae comparable to changes induced by the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, by producing nodules. Lowering cAMP enhanced also the removal of Xenorhabdus nematophila and B. subtilisin vivo.

  5. Intraocular elevation of cyclic AMP potentiates ciliary neurotrophic factor-induced regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qi; Yip, Henry K; Zhao, Robert C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Harvey, Alan R

    2003-01-01

    In vitro, cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevation alters neuronal responsiveness to diffusible growth factors and myelin-associated inhibitory molecules. Here we used an established in vivo model of adult central nervous system injury to investigate the effects of elevated cAMP on neuronal survival and axonal regeneration. We studied the effects of intraocular injections of neurotrophic factors and/or a cAMP analogue (CPT-cAMP) on the regeneration of axotomized rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons into peripheral nerve autografts. Elevation of cAMP alone did not significantly increase RGC survival or the number of regenerating RGCs. Ciliary neurotrophic factor increased RGC viability and axonal regrowth, the latter effect substantially enhanced by coapplication with CPT-cAMP. Under these conditions over 60% of surviving RGCs regenerated their axons. Neurotrophin-4/5 injections also increased RGC viability, but there was reduced long-distance axonal regrowth into grafts, an effect partially ameliorated by cAMP elevation. Thus, cAMP can act cooperatively with appropriate neurotrophic factors to promote axonal regeneration in the injured adult mammalian central nervous system.

  6. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na/sup +/ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-09-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 ..mu..g/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37/sup 0/C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na/sup +/ entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na/sup +/ influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na/sup +/ transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP.

  7. The central role of cAMP in regulating Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Dawn, Amrita; Singh, Shailja; More, Kunal R; Siddiqui, Faiza Amber; Pachikara, Niseema; Ramdani, Ghania; Langsley, Gordon; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2014-12-01

    All pathogenesis and death associated with Plasmodium falciparum malaria is due to parasite-infected erythrocytes. Invasion of erythrocytes by P. falciparum merozoites requires specific interactions between host receptors and parasite ligands that are localized in apical organelles called micronemes. Here, we identify cAMP as a key regulator that triggers the timely secretion of microneme proteins enabling receptor-engagement and invasion. We demonstrate that exposure of merozoites to a low K+ environment, typical of blood plasma, activates a bicarbonate-sensitive cytoplasmic adenylyl cyclase to raise cytosolic cAMP levels and activate protein kinase A, which regulates microneme secretion. We also show that cAMP regulates merozoite cytosolic Ca2+ levels via induction of an Epac pathway and demonstrate that increases in both cAMP and Ca2+ are essential to trigger microneme secretion. Our identification of the different elements in cAMP-dependent signaling pathways that regulate microneme secretion during invasion provides novel targets to inhibit blood stage parasite growth and prevent malaria.

  8. cAMP and EPAC Signaling Functionally Replace OCT4 During Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Ashley L; Adil, Maroof M; Mao, Sunnie R; Schaffer, David V

    2015-05-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells--generated via the ectopic overexpression of reprogramming factors such as OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and C-MYC (OSKM) in a differentiated cell type--has enabled groundbreaking research efforts in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug discovery. Although initial studies have focused on the roles of nuclear factors, increasing evidence highlights the importance of signal transduction during reprogramming. By utilizing a quantitative, medium-throughput screen to initially identify signaling pathways that could potentially replace individual transcription factors during reprogramming, we initially found that several pathways--such as Notch, Smoothened, and cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling--were capable of generating alkaline phosphatase positive colonies in the absence of OCT4, the most stringently required Yamanaka factor. After further investigation, we discovered that cAMP signal activation could functionally replace OCT4 to induce pluripotency, and results indicate that the downstream exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) signaling pathway rather than protein kinase A (PKA) signaling is necessary and sufficient for this function. cAMP signaling may reduce barriers to reprogramming by contributing to downstream epithelial gene expression, decreasing mesenchymal gene expression, and increasing proliferation. Ultimately, these results elucidate mechanisms that could lead to new reprogramming methodologies and advance our understanding of stem cell biology.

  9. Retromer terminates the generation of cAMP by internalized PTH-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Timothy N.; Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Ardura, Juan; Wheeler, David S.; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Gardella, Thomas J.; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Generation of cAMP by G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) and its termination is currently thought to occur exclusively at the plasma membrane of cells. Under existing models of receptor regulation, this signal is primarily restricted by desensitizationof the receptors through their binding to β-arrestins. However, this paradigm is not consistent with recent observations that the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) continues to stimulate cAMP production even after receptor internalization, as β-arrestins are known to rapidly bind and internalize activated PTHR. Here we show that β-arrestin1 binding prolongs rather than terminates cAMP generation by PTHR, and that cAMP generation correlates with the persistence of arrestin-receptor complexes on endosomes. We found that PTHR signaling is instead turned-off by the retromer complex, which regulates traffic of internalized receptor from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. Thus, binding by the retromer complex regulates sustained cAMP generation triggered by an internalized GPCR. PMID:21445058

  10. cAMP regulates axon outgrowth and guidance during optic nerve regeneration in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Rodger, J; Goto, H; Cui, Q; Chen, P B; Harvey, A R

    2005-11-01

    Increased cAMP improves neuronal survival and axon regeneration in mammals. Here, we assess cAMP levels and identify activated pathways in a spontaneously regenerating central nervous system. Following optic nerve crush in goldfish, almost all retinal ganglion cells (RGC) survive and regenerate retinotectal topography. Goldfish received injections of a cAMP analogue (CPT-cAMP), a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (KT5720), both compounds combined, or PBS (control). RGC survival in experimental groups was unaffected at any stage. The rate of axon regeneration was accelerated by the activator and decelerated both by the inhibitor and by combined injections, suggesting a PKA-dependent pathway. In addition, errors in regenerate retinotectal topography were observed when agents were applied in vivo and RGC response to the guidance cue ephrin-A5 in vitro was altered by the inhibitor. Our results highlight that therapeutic manipulation of cAMP levels to enhance axonal regeneration in mammals must ensure that topography, and consequently function, is not disrupted.

  11. Cyclic AMP, Protein Kinase A, and Phosphodiesterases: Proceedings of an International Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Stratakis, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are part of almost all major cellular signaling pathways. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that regulate the intracellular levels of cAMP and cGMP. Protein kinase A or cAMP-dependent protein kinase mediates most cAMP effects in the cell. Over the last 25 years, various components of this group of molecules have been involved in human diseases, both genetic and acquired. Lately, the PDEs attract more attention. The pharmacological exploitation of the PDE’s ability to regulate cGMP and cAMP, and through them, a variety of signaling pathways, has led to a number of new drugs for diverse applications from the treatment of erectile dysfunction to heart failure, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We present the abstracts (available online) and selected articles from the proceedings of a meeting that took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, June 8–10, 2011. PMID:22951901

  12. Modulation of cAMP metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its effect on host infection.

    PubMed

    Barba, Jeannette; Alvarez, Angel H; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the single most relevant bacterial infectious agent as Tuberculosis is estimated to affect one-third of the world population. Like other microorganisms, M. tuberculosis needs to sense and adapt to changes in the several niches where it is found, ranging from the environment to a number of host-adapted programs, including infection of cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, epithelial cells and adipocytes. A strategy commonly used by cells to respond to such changes consists of producing small molecules known as second messengers. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the best-studied second messengers in many organisms, and in recent years its participation during the M. tuberculosis infection cycle has just begun to be thoroughly considered. In this work, we aimed to provide a perspective of how cAMP metabolism proceeds in M. tuberculosis, which genes are activated in response to cAMP signaling in this organism, and discuss the evidence for bacterially produced cAMP use during infection. Furthermore, key issues needing to be addressed for better understanding cAMP physiology in slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria are presented.

  13. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-01-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8622971

  14. Epac2 Mediates cAMP-Dependent Potentiation of Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Herman B; Riordan, Sean; Nomura, Toshihiro; Remmers, Christine L; Kraniotis, Stephen; Marshall, John J; Kukreja, Lokesh; Vassar, Robert; Contractor, Anis

    2015-04-22

    Presynaptic terminal cAMP elevation plays a central role in plasticity at the mossy fiber-CA3 synapse of the hippocampus. Prior studies have identified protein kinase A as a downstream effector of cAMP that contributes to mossy fiber LTP (MF-LTP), but the potential contribution of Epac2, another cAMP effector expressed in the MF synapse, has not been considered. We investigated the role of Epac2 in MF-CA3 neurotransmission using Epac2(-/-) mice. The deletion of Epac2 did not cause gross alterations in hippocampal neuroanatomy or basal synaptic transmission. Synaptic facilitation during short trains was not affected by loss of Epac2 activity; however, both long-term plasticity and forskolin-mediated potentiation of MFs were impaired, demonstrating that Epac2 contributes to cAMP-dependent potentiation of transmitter release. Examination of synaptic transmission during long sustained trains of activity suggested that the readily releasable pool of vesicles is reduced in Epac2(-/-) mice. These data suggest that cAMP elevation uses an Epac2-dependent pathway to promote transmitter release, and that Epac2 is required to maintain the readily releasable pool at MF synapses in the hippocampus.

  15. cAMP-activated chloride currents in amphibian retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, B A; Segawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of cAMP on whole-cell currents in isolated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the bullfrog and marine toad was investigated by means of the perforated patch clamp technique. 2. Superfusing cells with either cAMP or forskolin led to the development of a time-independent current that had a linear current-voltage (I-V) relationship. The reversal potential of (Vrev) of the cAMP-activated current was unaffected by the removal of either Na+ or HCO3- from the external and internal solutions or by the addition of extracellular barium, but it was near the Cl- equilibrium potential (ECl) over a wide range of extracellular Cl- concentrations, suggesting the presence of a Cl(-)-selective channel. 3. The anion permeability sequence of the cAMP-activated conductance calculated from biionic reversal potentials was NO3- = I- > Br- > Cl- >> HCO3- > methanesulphonate. 4. The conductance was blocked by a variety of Cl- transport inhibitors, including 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS), 4,4'-dinitro-2,2'- stilbene disulphonic acid (DNDS), frusemide, N-phenylanthranilic acid (DPC) and niflumic acid. 5. The present study demonstrates that cAMP activates a Cl(-)-selective channel that most probably resides in the basolateral membrane. PMID:8410715

  16. Opposing actions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and GMP on temperature in conscious guinea-pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williaes, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the intracerebroventricular administration of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) induced hyperthermia in guinea pigs which was not mediated through prostaglandins or norepinephrine since a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor and an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocking agent did not antagonize the hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to Db-cAMP was attenuated by the central administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, which indicates that cAMP may be involved, through beta-adrenergic receptors, in the central regulation of heat production and conservation. The central administration of Db-cGMP produced hypothermia which was not mediated via histamine H1 or H2 receptors and serotonin. The antagonism of hypothermia induced by Db-cGMP and acetylcholine + physostigmine by central administration of a cholinergic muscarine receptor antagonist and not by a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist suggests that cholinoceptive neurons and endogenous cGMP may regulate heat loss through cholinergic muscarine receptors. It is concluded that these results indicate a regulatory role in thermoregulation provided by a balance between opposing actions of cAMP and cGMP in guinea pigs.

  17. cAMP signalling in mushroom bodies modulates temperature preference behaviour in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Tae; Bang, Sunhoe; Hyun, Seogang; Kang, Jongkyun; Jeong, Kyunghwa; Paik, Donggi; Chung, Jongkyeong; Kim, Jaeseob

    2008-08-07

    Homoiotherms, for example mammals, regulate their body temperature with physiological responses such as a change of metabolic rate and sweating. In contrast, the body temperature of poikilotherms, for example Drosophila, is the result of heat exchange with the surrounding environment as a result of the large ratio of surface area to volume of their bodies. Accordingly, these animals must instinctively move to places with an environmental temperature as close as possible to their genetically determined desired temperature. The temperature that Drosophila instinctively prefers has a function equivalent to the 'set point' temperature in mammals. Although various temperature-gated TRP channels have been discovered, molecular and cellular components in Drosophila brain responsible for determining the desired temperature remain unknown. We identified these components by performing a large-scale genetic screen of temperature preference behaviour (TPB) in Drosophila. In parallel, we mapped areas of the Drosophila brain controlling TPB by targeted inactivation of neurons with tetanus toxin and a potassium channel (Kir2.1) driven with various brain-specific GAL4s. Here we show that mushroom bodies (MBs) and the cyclic AMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway are essential for controlling TPB. Furthermore, targeted expression of cAMP-PKA pathway components in only the MB was sufficient to rescue abnormal TPB of the corresponding mutants. Preferred temperatures were affected by the level of cAMP and PKA activity in the MBs in various PKA pathway mutants.

  18. Cyclic AMP restores a normal phenotype to sis oncogene transformed cells and inhibits inositol phospholipid turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.K.; Lazarus, A.; Pendergas, M.; Lockwood, A.H.

    1987-05-01

    The sis oncogene encodes the A chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). NIH3T3 fibroblasts transfected with the cloned sis oncogene display a malignant phenotype and have enhanced turnover of the regulatory phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5 biphosphate (PIP2). They have found that elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP can restore many aspects of normal growth and morphology to sis-transformed cells. Cells rapidly become less refractile, flatten on the substratum, develop actomyosin bundles, and acquire a more tranquil membrane. Growth rate and saturation density are reduced. Cultures become contact-inhibited and, at confluence, assume a normal fibrobastic morphology. The ability to grow in low serum or suspension is lost. Following addition of 8-Br-cAMP, cellular levels of PIP and PIP2 increase to those in untransformed cells. Concurrently, the steady-state levels of inositol phosphates are reduced to normal values. They have found a similar effect of cAMP on inositol phospholipid metabolism in cells transformed by the human H-ras oncogene. These results suggest that cAMP, acting through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, antagonizes ras and sis oncogene expression by inhibiting polyphosphoinositide turnover. Such action might occur by phosphorylation of the PDGF (sis) receptor or of a ras-stimulated phospholipase C.

  19. Identification of ATP diphosphohydrolase activity in human term placenta using a novel assay for AMP.

    PubMed

    Papamarcaki, T; Tsolas, O

    1990-09-03

    Human term placenta contains an ATP diphosphohydrolase activity which hydrolyses ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate and ADP to AMP and a second mole of inorganic phosphate. The activity has a pH optimum between 8.0 and 8.5. Magnesium or calcium ions are required for maximum activity. Other nucleoside phosphates, p-nitrophenyl phosphate or sodium pyrophosphate, are not hydrolysed. The activity is not due to ATPases, or to myokinase, as determined by the use of inhibitors. NaF and NaN3 were found to inhibit strongly the activity thus identifying it as an ATP diphosphohydrolase. A sensitive enzymatic assay for measurement of AMP, one of the products of the reaction, was established, based on the strong inhibition of muscle fructose 1,6-biphosphatase by AMP. The range of the assay was 0.05-0.8 microM AMP. ATP diphosphohydrolase was found to have a rate of AMP production from ADP twice the rate from ATP. Under the same conditions, the assay for Pi release, on the other hand, gave velocities similar to each other for the two substrates. The activity appears to be identical to the ADP-hydrolysing activity in placenta reported by others.

  20. Renal Epithelial Cyst Formation and Enlargement in vitro: Dependence on cAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangoo-Karim, Roberto; Uchic, Marie; Lechene, Claude; Grantham, Jared J.

    1989-08-01

    Cysts, a common abnormality of kidneys, are collections of urine-like fluid enclosed by a continuous layer of epithelial cells. Renal cysts derive from nephrons and collecting ducts and progressively enlarge as a consequence of epithelial proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion. The initiation of cyst formation and the factors that control cyst enlargement are unknown. We used an in vitro model of renal cysts to explore the role of the cAMP signal transduction system in the formation and expansion of cysts. MDCK cells, cultured in hydrated-collagen gel, produced polarized monolayered epithelial cysts when intracellular cAMP was increased by prostaglandin E1, arginine vasopressin, cholera toxin, forskolin, or 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. All agonists were potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor. The cell proliferation component of cyst enlargement was accelerated by cAMP agonists, as shown by the increased growth of MDCK cells in subconfluent monolayers. The fluid secretion component, reflected by the transepithelial movement of fluid across polarized monolayers of MDCK cells grown on permeable supports, was stimulated by cAMP agonists in the basolateral medium. Chloride levels were higher in the cyst fluid and the secreted fluid than in the bathing medium. We conclude that the development of MDCK cysts is dependent on cAMP. This signal transduction system may be an important modulator of epithelial cell proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion in the kidney.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene by glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.J.; Harrington, C.A.; Chikaraishi, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    Glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP increase tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and mRNA levels in pheochromocytoma cultures. The transcriptional activity of the TH gene, as measured by nuclear run-on assay, is also increased when cultures are treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone or agents that increase intracellular cyclic AMP, such as forskolin and 8-BrcAMP. Both inducers effect transcriptional changes within 10 min after treatment and are maximal after 30 min for forskolin and after 60 min for dexamethasone. The 5' flanking sequences of the TH gene were fused to the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), and the hybrid gene was transfected into pheochromocytoma cultures and GH/sub 4/ pituitary cells. In both cell lines, a region of the TH gene containing bases -272 to +27 conferred induction of CAT by cyclic AMP, but not by glucocorticoid. The same results were found when a region of the TH gene containing -773 to + 27 was used. Thus, the sequences required for induction of TH by cyclic AMP are contained within 272 bases of 5' flanking sequence, but sequences sufficient for glucocorticoid regulation are not contained with 773 bases.

  2. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  3. The role of ventral striatal cAMP signaling in stress-induced behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Florian; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Hernandez, Adan; Benavides, David R.; Tassin, Tara C.; Tan, Chunfeng; Day, Jonathan; Fina, Maggy W.; Yuen, Eunice Y.; Yan, Zhen; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Nestler, Eric J.; Taussig, Ronald; Nishi, Akinori; Houslay, Miles D.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP/PKA signaling cascade is a ubiquitous pathway acting downstream of multiple neuromodulators. We found that the phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) by cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) facilitates cAMP degradation and homeostasis of cAMP/PKA signaling. In mice, loss of Cdk5 throughout the forebrain elevated cAMP levels and increased PKA activity in striatal neurons, and altered behavioral responses to acute or chronic stressors. Ventral striatum- or D1 dopamine receptor-specific conditional knockout of Cdk5, or ventral striatum infusion of a small interfering peptide that selectively targets the regulation of PDE4 by Cdk5, all produced analogical effects on stress-induced behavioral responses. Together, our results demonstrate that altering cAMP signaling in medium spiny neurons of the ventral striatum can effectively modulate stress-induced behavioral states. We propose that targeting the Cdk5 regulation of PDE4 could be a new therapeutic approach for clinical conditions associated with stress, such as depression. PMID:26192746

  4. cAMP-Signalling Regulates Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte Deformability Required for Malaria Parasite Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Eloise; Breil, Florence; Lorthiois, Audrey; Dupuy, Florian; Cummings, Ross; Duffier, Yoann; Corbett, Yolanda; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Vernick, Kenneth; Taramelli, Donatella; Baker, David A.; Langsley, Gordon; Lavazec, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Blocking Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes has been designated a strategic objective in the global agenda of malaria elimination. Transmission is ensured by gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (GIE) that sequester in the bone marrow and at maturation are released into peripheral blood from where they are taken up during a mosquito blood meal. Release into the blood circulation is accompanied by an increase in GIE deformability that allows them to pass through the spleen. Here, we used a microsphere matrix to mimic splenic filtration and investigated the role of cAMP-signalling in regulating GIE deformability. We demonstrated that mature GIE deformability is dependent on reduced cAMP-signalling and on increased phosphodiesterase expression in stage V gametocytes, and that parasite cAMP-dependent kinase activity contributes to the stiffness of immature gametocytes. Importantly, pharmacological agents that raise cAMP levels in transmissible stage V gametocytes render them less deformable and hence less likely to circulate through the spleen. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors that raise cAMP levels in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, such as sildenafil, represent new candidate drugs to block transmission of malaria parasites. PMID:25951195

  5. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR: an acute–chronic switch regulator

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most intractable human pathogens that pose serious clinical challenge due to extensive prevalence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. Armed with abundant virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, it is a major etiologic agent in a number of acute and chronic infections. A complex and intricate network of regulators dictates the expression of pathogenicity factors in P. aeruginosa. Some proteins within the network play key roles and control multiple pathways. This review discusses the role of one such protein, AmpR, which was initially recognized for its role in antibiotic resistance by regulating AmpC β-lactamase. Recent genomic, proteomic and phenotypic analyses demonstrate that AmpR regulates expression of hundreds of genes that are involved in diverse pathways such as β-lactam and non-β-lactam resistance, quorum sensing and associated virulence phenotypes, protein phosphorylation, and physiological processes. Finally, ampR mutations in clinical isolates are reviewed to shed light on important residues required for its function in antibiotic resistance. The prevalence and evolutionary implications of AmpR in pathogenic and nonpathogenic proteobacteria are also discussed. A comprehensive understanding of proteins at nodal positions in the P. aeruginosa regulatory network is crucial in understanding, and ultimately targeting, the pathogenic stratagems of this organism. PMID:25066236

  7. Increase in levels of cyclic AMP during avian limb chondrogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Reiter, R; Ahrens, P B; Pratt, R M

    1979-01-01

    In the present study the level of cAMP was measured during in vitro chondrogenesis of wing mesenchyme of stage 24 chick embryos and was found to increase significantly from 6.3 pmol/mg protein at the end of the first day of culture to 9.7 pmol/mg protein on the second day, when chondrogenic expression is first detected by the appearance of an Alcian blue staining extracellular matrix. Nonchondrogenic cultures derived from wings of stage 19 embryos had a lower level of cAMP (4.4 +/- 0.07 pmol/mg protein). The level of cAMP in intact wings was 4.5 +/- 0.4 pmol/mg protein and did not change between stages 19 through 25. The correlatin between increased levels of cAMP and the onset of chondrogenesis is consistent with a role of cAMP in the expression of differentiated functions in chondrocytes, as well as in some other cell types.

  8. Cyclic AMP-receptor protein activates aerobactin receptor IutA expression in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choon-Mee; Kim, Seong-Jung; Shin, Sung-Heui

    2012-04-01

    The ferrophilic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus can utilize the siderophore aerobactin of Escherichia coli for iron acquisition via its specific receptor IutA. This siderophore piracy by V. vulnificus may contribute to its survival and proliferation, especially in mixed bacterial environments. In this study, we examined the effects of glucose, cyclic AMP (cAMP), and cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) on iutA expression in V. vulnificus. Glucose dose-dependently repressed iutA expression. A mutation in cya encoding adenylate cyclase required for cAMP synthesis severely repressed iutA expression, and this change was recovered by in trans complementing cya or the addition of exogenous cAMP. Furthermore, a mutation in crp encoding Crp severely repressed iutA expression, and this change was recovered by complementing crp. Accordingly, glucose deprivation under iron-limited conditions is an environmental signal for iutA expression, and Crp functions as an activator that regulates iutA expression in response to glucose availability.

  9. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  10. Liver AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Is Unnecessary for Gluconeogenesis but Protects Energy State during Nutrient Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Hasenour, Clinton M.; Ridley, D. Emerson; James, Freyja D.; Hughey, Curtis C.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Viollet, Benoit; Foretz, Marc; Young, Jamey D.; Wasserman, David H.

    2017-01-01

    AMPK is an energy sensor that protects cellular energy state by attenuating anabolic and promoting catabolic processes. AMPK signaling is purported to regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis and substrate oxidation; coordination of these processes is vital during nutrient deprivation or pathogenic during overnutrition. Here we directly test hepatic AMPK function in regulating metabolic fluxes that converge to produce glucose and energy in vivo. Flux analysis was applied in mice with a liver-specific deletion of AMPK (L-KO) or floxed control littermates to assess rates of hepatic glucose producing and citric acid cycle (CAC) fluxes. Fluxes were assessed in short and long term fasted mice; the latter condition is a nutrient stressor that increases liver AMP/ATP. The flux circuit connecting anaplerosis with gluconeogenesis from the CAC was unaffected by hepatic AMPK deletion in short and long term fasting. Nevertheless, depletion of hepatic ATP was exacerbated in L-KO mice, corresponding to a relative elevation in citrate synthase flux and accumulation of branched-chain amino acid-related metabolites. L-KO mice also had a physiological reduction in flux from glycogen to G6P. These results demonstrate AMPK is unnecessary for maintaining gluconeogenic flux from the CAC yet is critical for stabilizing liver energy state during nutrient deprivation. PMID:28107516

  11. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside and AMP-activated protein kinase inhibit signalling through NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Katerelos, Marina; Mudge, Stuart J; Stapleton, David; Auwardt, Russell B; Fraser, Scott A; Chen, C-G; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2010-10-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the most important pro-inflammatory mechanisms in disease. In this study, we show that 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), an intermediate in nucleoside metabolism, inhibits signalling by NF-κB in three cell types, including bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). The block in the NF-κB signalling pathway occurred beyond degradation of IκB-α and movement of p65 into the nucleus of BAEC. There was, however, reduced binding of NF-κB from AICAR-treated cells to a κB-consensus oligonucleotide, suggesting that part of the mechanism was a reduction in NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Although AICAR is metabolized to ZMP and then adenosine, adenosine had no effect on activation of an NF-κB reporter. ZMP, however, activates the metabolic stress-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transfection of active AMPK into BAEC reduced NF-κB reporter activity compared with a kinase-dead mutant, suggesting that part of the ability of AICAR to inhibit NF-κB signalling is due to activation of AMPK. Inhibition of NF-κB signalling may be important in the anti-inflammatory action of drugs such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate, which led to the accumulation of AICAR within target cells.

  12. Adiponectin inhibits neutrophil apoptosis via activation of AMP kinase, PKB and ERK 1/2 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Lord, Janet M

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in the immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die by apoptosis following activation and uptake of microbes and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter a pathogen. Adiponectin exerts anti-inflammatory effects on neutrophil antimicrobial functions, but whether this abundant adipokine influences neutrophil apoptosis is unknown. Here we report that adiponectin in the physiological range (1-10 μg/ml) reduced apoptosis in resting neutrophils, decreasing caspase-3 cleavage and maintaining Mcl-1 expression by stabilizing this anti-apoptotic protein. We show that adiponectin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), protein kinase B (PKB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, PKB and ERK 1/2 ablated the pro-survival effects of adiponectin and treatment of neutrophils with an AMPK specific activator (AICAR) and AMPK inhibitor (compound C) respectively decreased and increased apoptosis. Finally, activation of AMPK by AICAR or adiponectin also decreased ceramide accumulation in the neutrophil cell membrane, a process involved in the early stages of spontaneous apoptosis, giving another possible mechanism downstream of AMPK activation for the inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis.

  13. Enhancement of β-catenin activity by BIG1 plus BIG2 via Arf activation and cAMP signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Chun; Le, Kang; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional β-catenin, with critical roles in both cell–cell adhesion and Wnt-signaling pathways, was among HeLa cell proteins coimmunoprecipitated by antibodies against brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factors 1 and 2 (BIG1 or BIG2) that activate ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) by accelerating the replacement of bound GDP with GTP. BIG proteins also contain A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) sequences that can act as scaffolds for multimolecular assemblies that facilitate and limit cAMP signaling temporally and spatially. Direct interaction of BIG1 N-terminal sequence with β-catenin was confirmed using yeast two-hybrid assays and in vitro synthesized proteins. Depletion of BIG1 and/or BIG2 or overexpression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factor inactive mutant, but not wild-type, proteins interfered with β-catenin trafficking, leading to accumulation at perinuclear Golgi structures. Both phospholipase D activity and vesicular trafficking were required for effects of BIG1 and BIG2 on β-catenin activation. Levels of PKA-phosphorylated β-catenin S675 and β-catenin association with PKA, BIG1, and BIG2 were also diminished after BIG1/BIG2 depletion. Inferring a requirement for BIG1 and/or BIG2 AKAP sequence in PKA modification of β-catenin and its effect on transcription activation, we confirmed dependence of S675 phosphorylation and transcription coactivator function on BIG2 AKAP-C sequence. PMID:27162341

  14. Amyloid-β Oligomers Transiently Inhibit AMP-activated kinase and Cause Metabolic Defects in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Seixas da Silva, Gisele S; Melo, Helen M; Lourenco, Mychael V; Lyra E Silva, Natalia de M; de Carvalho, Marcelo B; Alves-Leon, Soniza; de Souza, Jorge M; Klein, William L; da-Silva, Wagner S; Ferreira, Sergio T; De Felice, Fernanda G

    2017-03-16

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a key player in energy sensing and metabolic reprogramming under cellular energy restriction. Several studies have linked impaired AMPK function to peripheral metabolic diseases such as diabetes. However, the impact of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), on AMPK function and downstream effects of altered AMPK activity on neuronal metabolism have been investigated only recently. Here, we report the impact of A β oligomers (AβOs), synaptotoxins that accumulate in AD brains, on neuronal AMPK activity. Short-term exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons or ex vivo human cortical slices to AβOs transiently decreased intracellular ATP levels and AMPK activity, as evaluated by its phosphorylation at threonine residue 172 (AMPKpThr172). The AβO-dependent reduction in AMPKpThr172 levels was mediated by glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype, and resulted in removal of glucose transporters (GLUTs) from the surfaces of dendritic processes in hippocampal neurons. Importantly, insulin prevented the AβO-induced inhibition of AMPK. Our results establish a novel toxic impact of A βOs on neuronal metabolism and suggest that AβO-induced, NMDA receptor-mediated AMPK inhibition may play a key role in early brain metabolic defects in AD.

  15. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Polekhina, Galina; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein. PMID:16508085

  16. Folic acid supplementation during high-fat diet feeding restores AMPK activation via an AMP-LKB1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sid, Victoria; Wu, Nan; Sarna, Lindsei K; Siow, Yaw L; House, James D; O, Karmin

    2015-11-15

    AMPK is an endogenous energy sensor that regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Our recent study showed that folic acid supplementation attenuated hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of folic acid on hepatic AMPK during high-fat diet feeding and the mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (10% kcal fat), a high-fat diet (60% kcal fat), or a high-fat diet supplemented with folic acid (26 mg/kg diet) for 5 wk. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited hyperglycemia, hepatic cholesterol accumulation, and reduced hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Folic acid supplementation restored AMPK phosphorylation (activation) and reduced blood glucose and hepatic cholesterol levels. Activation of AMPK by folic acid was mediated through an elevation of its allosteric activator AMP and activation of its upstream kinase, namely, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the liver. Consistent with in vivo findings, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (bioactive form of folate) restored phosphorylation (activation) of both AMPK and LKB1 in palmitic acid-treated HepG2 cells. Activation of AMPK by folic acid might be responsible for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase, leading to reduced hepatic cholesterol synthesis during high-fat diet feeding. These results suggest that folic acid supplementation may improve cholesterol and glucose metabolism by restoration of AMPK activation in the liver.

  17. Association of Novel Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in ampD with Cephalosporin Resistance and Phylogenetic Variations in ampC, ampR, ompF, and ompC in Enterobacter cloacae Isolates That Are Highly Resistant to Carbapenems

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Matthew J.; Hopkins, Katie L.; Turton, Jane F.; Doumith, Michel; Loy, Richard; Staves, Peter; Hinic, Vladimira; Frei, Reno; Woodford, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In Enterobacter cloacae, the genetic lesions associated with derepression of the AmpC β-lactamase include diverse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and/or indels in the ampD and ampR genes and SNPs in ampC, while diverse SNPs in the promoter region or SNPs/indels within the coding sequence of outer membrane proteins have been described to alter porin production leading to carbapenem resistance. We sought to define the underlying mechanisms conferring cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance in a collection of E. cloacae isolates with unusually high carbapenem resistance and no known carbapenemase and, in contrast to many previous studies, considered the SNPs we detected in relation to the multilocus sequence type (MLST)-based phylogeny of our collection. Whole-genome sequencing was applied on the most resistant isolates to seek novel carbapenemases, expression of ampC was measured by reverse transcriptase PCR, and porin translation was detected by SDS-PAGE. SNPs occurring in ampC, ampR, ompF, and ompC genes (and their promoter regions) were mostly phylogenetic variations, relating to the isolates' sequence types, whereas nonsynonymous SNPs in ampD were associated with derepression of AmpC and cephalosporin resistance. The additional loss of porins resulted in high-level carbapenem resistance, underlining the clinical importance of chromosomal mutations among carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae. PMID:26856839

  18. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  19. New insights into the mechanism of light modulated signaling by heterotrimeric G-proteins: ENVOY acts on gna1 and gna3 and adjusts cAMP levels in Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina)

    PubMed Central

    Tisch, Doris; Kubicek, Christian P.; Schmoll, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Sensing of environmental signals is often mediated by G-protein coupled receptors and their cognate heterotrimeric G-proteins. In Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) the signals transmitted via the G-protein alpha subunits GNA1 and GNA3 cause considerable modulation of cellulase transcript levels and the extent of this adjustment is dependent on the light status. We therefore intended to elucidate the underlying mechanism connecting light response and heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. Analysis of double mutant strains showed that constitutive activation of GNA1 or GNA3 in the absence of the PAS/LOV domain protein ENVOY (ENV1) leads to the phenotype of constitutive G-alpha activation in darkness. In light, however the deletion-phenotype of Δenv1 was observed with respect to growth, conidiation and cellulase gene transcription. Additionally deletion of env1 causes decreased intracellular cAMP accumulation, even upon constitutive activation of GNA1 or GNA3. While supplementation of cAMP caused an even more severe growth phenotype of all strains lacking env1 in light, addition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor caffeine rescued the growth phenotype of these strains. ENV1 is consequently suggested to