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Sample records for 3he ionization chambers

  1. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  2. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  3. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  4. Ionization of polarized 3He+ ions in EBIS trap with slanted electrostatic mirror.

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin,A.; Zelenski, A.; Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Prelee, K.; Raparia, D.

    2007-09-10

    Methods of producing the nuclear polarized {sup 3}He{sup +} ions and their ionization to {sup 3}H{sup ++} in ion trap of the electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) are discussed. Computer simulations show that injection and accumulation of {sup 3}He{sup +} ions in the EBIS trap with slanted electrostatic mirror can be very effective for injection times longer than the ion traversal time through the trap.

  5. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  6. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  7. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  8. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  9. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  10. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  11. Ionization Chamber for Prompt Fission Neutron Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Sedyshev, P.; Shvetsov, V.

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy measurement. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of FF in respect to the axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical formulae provided for FF angles measured in respect to the coordinate axes. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event-by-event analysis of individual fission reactions from non- point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron-imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  12. A Fast Ionization Chamber for GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, R. T.; Lipman, A. S.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Pain, S. D.; Kozub, R. L.

    2014-09-01

    Transfer reactions are among the main methods used in nuclear physics to probe the structure of nuclei. Such information is needed to constrain nuclear models and to understand various nucleosynthesis processes. In many cases, the nuclear level densities are too high to be resolved in transfer reactions via charged particle detection alone. This problem and issues arising from contaminants in radioactive beams can be addressed by using particle- γ coincidence techniques along with heavy recoil identification in inverse kinematics. A device to accomplish these tasks is Gammasphere ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS), currently being commissioned for the ATLAS facility at ANL. We are currently building a compact, tilted grid ionization chamber for GODDESS to detect and identify beam-like recoils near zero degrees in the lab. The tilt (30 degrees off normal to the beam) helps the ion pairs to be detected quickly, after drifting only a short distance away from the beam axis. This reduces the response time, allowing counting rates of ~500,000/s. The design and current status of the project will be presented. Research supported by the U. S. DOE.

  13. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève).

  14. The Analysis of Ionization Chambers Used for Detecting Smoke Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlej, Z. (Bish).

    Ionization type cells using a radioactive source of primary ions have been used as fire detectors for many years. They have proven sufficiently sensitive to give an alarm when exposed to the relatively small concentration of smoke particles that occur during the early stages of combustion when control of a fire is still possible. In this work the charging of smoke particles in ionization chambers such as typically employed in ionization smoke detectors are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The ionization chambers investigated in this work have parallel plate and spherical electrode geometries. In the absence of smoke particles, the ionization chambers were operated at some ambient electrode current, which depends upon the ion generation rate, the electrode geometries, the potential difference between the electrodes, and the thermodynamic properties of the gas within the chamber volume. When smoke particles are introduced into the ionization chamber they act as an additional sink for the ions, so that the ion current is reduced. The smoke particles in the experiment performed in this work were transferred from the particle generator to the volume surrounding the ionization chamber and allowed to diffuse inside the ionization chamber. An Aitken nuclei counter was employed to measure the concentration of smoke particles inside the ionization chamber. The electric current flowing through the ionization chamber was recorded as a function of time and concentration of the smoke particles inside the chamber. The current loss due to the particles present inside the chamber was calculated and compared with the experimental results. It was found that at the certain level of ambient electrode current, the current loss due to the smoke particles assumes a maximum value. This optimum operating electrode current was predicted by the mathematical model employed in this work. In the light of this model experimental ionization chambers of both parallel and spherical

  15. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  16. Construction and commissioning of a position-sensitive ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, M. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Kim, A.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    A position-sensitive ionization chamber has been constructed and commissioned at the Physics Department of Sungkyunkwan University to extract position information on incident charged particles for future nuclear reaction measurements. By utilizing the newly-designed position-sensitive anodes and the previously-commissioned portable gas-filled ionization chamber by Chae et al., position information on incident particles could be obtained. The device was tested with an 241Am α-emitting source, and the standard deviation of the fitted Gaussian distribution was measured to be 1.76 mm when a collimator with a 2 mm hole was used.

  17. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.

  18. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping.

    PubMed

    Perini, Ana P; Neves, Lucio P; Vivolo, Vitor; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement.

  19. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  20. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. H.; Tang, S. W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C. G.; Yang, H. R.; Wang, S. T.; Yu, Y. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z. Y.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, B. H.

    2015-09-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4-0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV.

  1. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  2. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a recent calibration at the LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers were compared to beams of 26Fe, 36 Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79 Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z squared scaling.

  3. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  4. Characterization tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber for use in electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonato, Fernanda B. C.; Sakuraba, Roberto K.; da Cruz, José Carlos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    Linear accelerators with electron beams are used in several Brazilian hospitals. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for parallel-plate ionization chambers, to be utilized for dosimetry of electron beams. In Brazil, the commercial ionization chambers utilized are imported. The ionization chambers have usually a simple construction, using different materials and geometries. A homemade ionization chamber was developed to be used in electron beams of linear accelerator. The ionization chamber body is made of acrylic and the collecting electrode is painted with graphite powder mixed with nail polish. Several tests were applied, and the results showed values better than the limits established by the international recommendations, except for the polarity effect test, but the response of the developed ionization chamber, for this test, is similar in relation to the response of other commercial ionization chambers from the literature.

  5. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)<1 MeV and same was verified using (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (204)Tl beta sources. However, for beta particles having energy >1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  6. Development and Application of a Pulsed Ionization Chamber-Based Multiprobe Plasma Diagnostic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Won Young

    An experimental system based on the Pulsed Ionization Chamber (PIC) technique was developed and applied to the investigation of the characteristics of nuclear-generated plasmas, which are related to critical engineering design parameters of uranium fluoride based gas-core reactor/MHD converter systems. Plasma parameters measured included ionization production rate, recombinational loss coefficient, electron density, mobility, and electrical conductivity for plasmas containing various concentrations of UF _6 and rare gases such as He, Ar and Xe. The measurements demonstrated the advantage of the PIC technique in obtaining multiple plasmas simultaneously. The PIC system was subsequently upgraded to the Multi-Probe Ionization Chamber (MPIC) to improve its capabilities and to extend its range of measurement to higher plasma densities and temperatures by providing it with additional measurement features in the form of conductivity and Langmuir probes. To accommodate these additional capabilities and to obtain complete automation of experiment, a technique was developed for remote switching between several GPIB instruments controlled by a software system. Performance tests of the MPIC system using both ^{60}Co and ^3 He(n,p)T ionization sources showed that the chamber functions according to design. Of particular importance, leakage current, the limiting factor in high temperature chamber operation, was negligible at temperature of 1000 K due to the new electrode design. In addition, the responses of the three measurement features (PIC, Conductivity, Langmuir) exhibit regions of overlap under high plasma density conditions with good agreement and reproducibility. At higher pressures and for electronegative species such as UF_6, evidence of cluster formation was observed with an approximate T^ {-4} plasma loss temperature dependence. The measured electrical conductivity of 1 atm He (1% UF _6) gas was in the range of 5times10 ^{-7} to 1times10 ^{-4} (S/m) over the thermal

  7. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Vandevelde, F; Reynaert, N

    2013-04-21

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse(-1), the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects.

  8. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Vandevelde, F; Reynaert, N

    2013-04-21

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse(-1), the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects. PMID:23514761

  9. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Harder, D.; Willborn, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The σ-values of the

  10. Amplitude distribution of ionization jerks in ionization-chamber ASK-1 according long-term measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    As part of the Yakut complex systems by measuring the intensity of cosmic rays has a unique device spherical - ionization chamber ASK-1 with a lead screen thickness of 12 cm. The camera allows you to explore the physical characteristics of the so-called "ionization jerks " - sharp increases ionization current caused by the passage through the device much ionizing particles of cosmic origin. Due to a large increase in current nuclear cascade "showers", formed mainly by particles of cosmic rays in the camera screen. Over the entire period of observation (50 years old) camera ASK-1 was registered 59125 aftershocks. Their nature and properties still does not sufficiently studied, especially in medium and large amplitudes.

  11. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed.

  12. Development of the Position Sensitive Ionization Chamber for ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Blackmon, Jeff; Deibel, Catherine; Gardiner, Emily; Lai, Jianping; Lauer, Amber; Linhardt, Laura; Macon, Kevin; Rasco, Charlie; Baby, Lagy; Koshchiy, Yevegn; Rogachev, Grigory; Santiago-Gonzales, Daniel; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Bardayan, Dan; Matos, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array developed for reaction studies using radioactive ion beams to help improve understanding of the nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. A gas-filled ionization chamber with two position-sensitive anode wire grid planes read out in 32 channels, and 12 alternating anode/cathode planes was developed and tested for use with ANASEN to identify the kinematic trajectory and atomic number of recoiling heavy ions by their relative energy loss. The position sensitive grids are arranged perpendicularly to each other in order to determine the x-y position of each ion with better than 4 mm resolution. This ionization chamber was tested using a stable beam of 12C at FSU. We report on the performance of this test experiment and plans for measurements with radioactive ion beams at FSU. Two other versions of the detector have been constructed and are now in place at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and at the ATLAS accelerator facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  13. Parallel plate ionization chamber in low pressure helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Qian, J.; Casperson, R. J.; Terry, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    A parallel plate ionization chamber was constructed for beam intensity monitoring. The chamber is placed in a gas-filled volume 1.5m upstream from the gas-filled separator SASSYER. Its output current will be used to determine absolute reaction cross sections. In a dedicated test experiment with a 100 MeV ^32S beam and an applied potential of 300V, the signal current had an average standard deviation of 0.4%, and demonstrated a linear relationship (R^2 = 0.9894) with the beam intensity. Also, at an intensity of 6 particle nanoamperes, the current exhibited a linear dependence (R^2 = 0.9813) on voltage, indicating that the chamber was operating in the proportional counter region. Our results agreed well with predictions made using extrapolated Townsend coefficients, though we observed a constant systematic and constant deviation between these estimates and our output current. This work was supported under US DOE grant number DE-FG0291ER-40609 and the Yale College Dean's Fellowship for Research in the Sciences.

  14. An automated ionization chamber for secondary radioactivity standards.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2010-01-01

    I report on the operation and characterization of a new ionization chamber system, "AUTOIC", featuring a commercial digital electrometer and a commercial robotic sample changer. The relative accuracy of the electrometer was improved significantly beyond the manufacturer's specifications through an in-house calibration of the various ranges, applied via software. The measurement precision and repeatability of the system have been determined by measuring multiple samples of the same radionuclide over the span of two or three years. The linearity of the system was examined by following the decay of (99m)Tc, (99)Mo and (133)Xe sources for up to 19 half-lives and determining half-life values. All of these values agree with the accepted literature values, within their combined uncertainties.

  15. NIST Ionization Chamber "A" Sample-Height Corrections.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber "A" (PIC "A") to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10(-5) to 10(-3) per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC "A". In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures.

  16. NIST Ionization Chamber “A” Sample-Height Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber “A” (PIC “A”) to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10−5 to 10−3 per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC “A”. In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures. PMID:26900515

  17. Polarity correction factor for flattening filter free photon beams in several cylindrical ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Masao; Tsudou, Shinji; Masutani, Takashi; Okayama, Takanobu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the polarity correction factor in ionization chambers for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams and flattening filter (FF) beams. Measurements were performed with both 6 and 10 MV FFF and FF beams. Five commercial ionization chambers were evaluated: PTW TN30013; IBA Dosimetry CC01, CC04, and CC13; and Exradin A12S. Except for the CC01 ionization chamber, the other four chambers showed less than a 0.3 % difference in the polarity effect between the FFF and the FF beams. The CC01 chamber showed a strong field-size-dependence, unlike the other chambers. The polarity effect for all chambers with FFF beams did not change with the dose rate. Except in the case of the CC01 chamber, the difference in the polarity effect between FFF and FF beams was not significant.

  18. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  19. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  20. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  1. A double faced ionization chamber for quality control in diagnostic radiology beams.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonas O; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    The development of new radiation detectors of low cost but with adequate materials is a very important task for countries that have to import ionization chambers such as Brazil. A special double faced ionization chamber was developed for use in conventional diagnostic radiology beams and computed tomography energy ranges. The results show that this new chamber present applicability in conventional diagnostic radiology and computed tomography quality control programs.

  2. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  3. A new mini gas ionization chamber for IBA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A. M.; Cassimi, A.; Döbeli, M.; Mallepell, M.; Monnet, I.; Simon, M. J.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.

    2011-12-01

    Novel prototypes of high resolution gas ionization chambers ( GIC) were designed with increased compactness and simplicity of the setup. They have no Frisch-grid and a simple anode wire. Under certain operating conditions these mini detectors have an energy resolution comparable with that of state-of-the-art GICs of much higher complexity. They can be operated both under vacuum and atmospheric pressure. First measurements were made with protons in the energy range of 0.3-1.0 MeV. For protons at 0.3 MeV an energy resolution of about 12 keV was achieved. With a 72 MeV 129Xe beam a relative resolution of 1.4% was obtained. Due to their versatility and reduced size the detectors can easily be applied in the field of ion beam analysis ( IBA) and accelerator mass spectrometry ( AMS) . Since they are almost completely insensitive to radiation damage they are especially suited for use in high fluence applications such as scanning transmission ion microscopy ( STIM). A comparison of the radiation hardness of the mini GIC with a Si PIN diode was therefore performed. The GIC showed no peak shift or change in energy resolution at all after collecting 10 15 protons per cm 2 while the performance of the Si detector clearly started to degrade at 10 12 particles per cm 2.

  4. Simulation of detector signals in n+3 He --> p + t

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Christopher; n3He Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The parity violating proton directional asymmetry from the capture of polarized neutrons on 3He is being measured with a pulsed neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The target is an ion chamber with 3He at approximately half an atmosphere. Signal wires at different locations in the chamber have different sensitivities to the physics asymmetry, which are determined by the geometry and configuration of the experiment. These geometry factors must be determined by simulation. In addition, a simulation can estimate the statistical precision of the experiment, optimize configuration variables, and assist with error analysis. To achieve the most accurate simulation of the detector signals, a custom simulation was written in C++ using weighted variables and taking advantage of parallel execution. The inputs used to construct the simulation came from measurements of the neutron phase space, ENDF cross sections, and PSTAR ionization data. A cell model was used to combine this physics to produce an accurate simulation of the experimental data. This simulation can be used to calculate accurate and tunable geometry factors, and to produce desired quanities for use in optimization and analysis.

  5. Low-level measurements of Ra-226/Rn-222 by pulse ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Daoushy, Fand; Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of two ionization chambers have been studied and the chambers utilized for 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements for more than ten years. The results obtained show that coating of internal surfaces with a pure and thin Ag-layer enhances the background of ionization chambers in spite of some improvements at the early stages of operation. In addition to previously known parameters influencing the accuracy in routine measurements, new correction factors are suggested. 226Ra impurities in the body of ionization chambers are found to act not only as a permanent, but also as a temperature-dependent source of background. Earlier accuracies of 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements have been considerably improved by assuring long-term mechanical and thermal stability of the ionization chambers.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Chen; Shuming, Peng; Dan, Meng; Yuehong, He; Heyi, Wang

    2014-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements has been theoretically studied using Monte Carlo code MCNP 5. The influence of many factors, including carrier gas, chamber size, wall materials and gas pressure, has been evaluated in the simulations. It is found that β rays emitted by tritium deposit much more energy into chambers flowing through with argon than with deuterium in them, as much as 2.7 times higher at pressure 100 Pa. As chamber size gets smaller, energy deposition decreases sharply. For an ionization chamber of 1 mL, β rays deposit less than 1% of their energy at pressure 100 Pa and only 84% even if gas pressure is as high as 100 kPa. It also indicates that gold plated ionization chamber results in the highest deposition ratio while aluminum one leads to the lowest. In addition, simulations were validated by comparison with experimental data. Results show that simulations agree well with experimental data.

  7. a High Resolution Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.; Hecht, A. A.; Mader, D.

    2014-09-01

    An ionization chamber for measuring the energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed as a component of the the new SPIDER detector. Design criteria included energy resolutions of <1% for high energy resolution and increased charge resolution. The ionization chamber will be combined with a high resolution time-of-flight detector to achieve fragment yield measurements with mass and nuclear charge resolutions of 1 amu and Z=1. The present status of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  8. Calibration of ionization chamber for ¹⁸F and ⁶⁸Ga.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos J; de Oliveira, Estela M; Iwahara, A; Delgado, José U; Poledna, R; de Oliveira, Antônio E; Moreira, Denise S; da Silva, Ronaldo L; Gomes, Regio dos Santos; de Veras, Eduardo V

    2014-05-01

    In order to maintain the results of primary activity standardizations carried out in 2011 the LNMRI has determined the calibration factors for a pressurized 4π-ionization chamber for the nuclides (18)F and (68)Ga. This ionization chamber is coupled to a 6517A Keithley electrometer which is controlled by a homemade LabVIEW program. This paper will describe the main issues related to the calibration of an ionization chamber system for positron emitters and short half-life radionuclides such as timing, current measurement, background, decay, and (226)Ra check source measurements.

  9. Calibration of ionization chamber for ¹⁸F and ⁶⁸Ga.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos J; de Oliveira, Estela M; Iwahara, A; Delgado, José U; Poledna, R; de Oliveira, Antônio E; Moreira, Denise S; da Silva, Ronaldo L; Gomes, Regio dos Santos; de Veras, Eduardo V

    2014-05-01

    In order to maintain the results of primary activity standardizations carried out in 2011 the LNMRI has determined the calibration factors for a pressurized 4π-ionization chamber for the nuclides (18)F and (68)Ga. This ionization chamber is coupled to a 6517A Keithley electrometer which is controlled by a homemade LabVIEW program. This paper will describe the main issues related to the calibration of an ionization chamber system for positron emitters and short half-life radionuclides such as timing, current measurement, background, decay, and (226)Ra check source measurements. PMID:24361323

  10. Polarity effect of the thimble-type ionization chamber at a low dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Kyun; Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Han-Soo; Kang, Sang-Mook; Ha, Jang-Ho; Chung, Chong-Eun; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Kim, J. K.

    2005-11-01

    It is known that the current collected from an ionization chamber exposed to a constant radiation intensity changes in magnitude when the polarity of the collecting potential is reversed. It is called the polarity effect of the ionization chamber. There are many possible causes that induce the polarity effect and one of them can be a field distortion due to a potential difference between the guard electrode and the collector. We studied how much the polarity effect depends on the design of the electrodes in the thimble-type ionization chamber. Two thimble-type ionization chambers, which had different electrode structures, were designed and fabricated at KAERI. We calculated the field distortions due to the potential difference between the guard electrode and the collector for the two ionization chambers. MAXWELL and Garfield were employed to calculate the electron drift lines inside the chamber. The polarity effects of the two ionization chambers were measured, and they were consistent with the field calculation. We could conclude that the polarity effect is mostly induced from the field distortion due to the potential difference between the guard electrode and the collector in our experiment and it depends significantly on the design of the electrodes.

  11. The 3He Supply Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-05-01

    One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

  12. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  13. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of an ionization chamber in a 60Co beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, A. P.; Neves, L. P.; Santos, W. S.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently a special parallel-plate ionization chamber was developed and characterized at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The operational tests presented results within the recommended limits. In order to determine the influence of some components of the ionization chamber on its response, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out. The experimental and simulation results pointed out that the dosimeter evaluated in the present work has favorable properties to be applied to 60Co dosimetry at calibration laboratories.

  14. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  15. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  ‑0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (‑1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  16. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  17. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program. PMID:27164479

  18. Possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose measurements in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose (PDD) measurements in high-energy clinical electron beams. Methods: The cavity correction factor, P{sub cav}, for cylindrical chambers with various diameters was calculated as a function of depth from the surface to R{sub 50}, in the energy range of 6-18 MeV electrons with the EGSnrc C ++ -based user-code CAVITY. The results were compared with those for IBA NACP-02 and PTW Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers. The effective point of measurement (EPOM) for the cylindrical chamber and the parallel-plate chamber was positioned according to the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The overall correction factor, P{sub Q}, and the percent depth-ionization (PDI) curve for a PTW30013 Farmer-type chamber were also compared with those of NACP-02 and Roos chambers. Results: The P{sub cav} values at depths between the surface and R{sub 50} for cylindrical chambers were all lower than those with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth for cylindrical chambers equal to or less than 4 mm in diameter was equivalent to or smaller than that for parallel-plate chambers. The P{sub Q} values for the PTW30013 chamber mainly depended on P{sub cav}, and for parallel-plate chambers depended on the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, rather than P{sub cav}. P{sub Q} at depths from the surface to R{sub 50} for the PTW30013 chamber was consequently a lower value than that with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth was equivalent to that of parallel-plate chambers at electron energies equal to or greater than 9 MeV. The shift to match calculated PDI curves for the PTW30013 chamber and water (perturbation free) varied from 0.65 to 0 mm between 6 and 18 MeV beams. Similarly, the shifts for NACP-02 and Roos chambers were 0.5-0.6 mm and 0.2-0.3 mm, respectively, and were nearly independent of electron energy. Conclusions: Calculated PDI curves for PTW

  19. Beam tests of ionization chambers for the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Zwaska et al.

    2003-09-25

    We have conducted tests at the Fermilab Booster of ionization chambers to be used as monitors of the NuMI neutrino beamline. The chambers were exposed to proton fluxes of up to 10{sup 12} particles/cm{sup 2}/1.56 {micro}s. We studied space charge effects which can reduce signal collection from the chambers at large charged particle beam intensities.

  20. [Influence on measurements of pre-irradiation due to differences in ionization chamber shape or frequency in use].

    PubMed

    Shimono, Tetsunori; Nambu, Hidekazu; Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Gomi, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Ionization chamber measurements in radiation therapy should be repeatedly performed until a stable reading is obtained. Ionization chambers exhibit a response which depends on time elapsed since the previous irradiation. In this study, we investigated the response of a set of two Farmer-style, one Plane parallel, and seven small ionization chambers, which are exposed to 4, 6, 10, and 14 MV. The results show that Farmer-style and Plane parallel ionization chambers settle quickly within 9-20 min. On the other hand, small ionization chambers exhibit settling times of 12-33 min for 6, 10, and 14 MV. It will take longer for a settling time of 4 MV. The settling time showed time dependent irradiation. The first reading was up to 0.76% lower in the Farmer-style and Plane parallel ionization chambers. The small ionization chambers had a 2.60% lower first reading and more gradual response in reaching a stable reading. In this study, individual ionization chambers can vary significantly in their settling behavior. Variation of the responses on ionization chambers were confirmed not only when radiation was not used for a week but also when it was halted for a month. Pre-irradiation of small ionization chambers is clearly warranted for eliminating inadvertent error in the calibration of radiation beams.

  1. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  2. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of beta particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10(5) Bq/m(3).

  3. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of β particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7×105 Bq/m3.

  4. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhilin; Chang Ruiming; Mu Long; Song Guoyang; Wang Heyi; Wu Guanyin; Wei Xiye

    2010-07-15

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of {beta} particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10{sup 5} Bq/m{sup 3}.

  5. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Harty, P. D.; Butler, D. J.; Crosbie, J. C.; Livingstone, J.; Poole, C. M.; Ramanathan, G.; Wright, T.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3-5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties.

  6. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Harty, P D; Butler, D J; Crosbie, J C; Livingstone, J; Poole, C M; Ramanathan, G; Wright, T; Stevenson, A W

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3-5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties. PMID:27192396

  7. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Harty, P. D.; Butler, D. J.; Crosbie, J. C.; Livingstone, J.; Poole, C. M.; Ramanathan, G.; Wright, T.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3–5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties.

  8. Development of an Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    The ionization chamber component of the SPIDER detector has been designed to measure energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission with energy resolutions of <1% and a time-dependent signal collection. Important design elements implemented are an axial configuration of the electrodes for improved energy loss and measurement and a thin silicon nitride entrance window to minimize both energy loss and energy straggling of the incoming fragments. High energy resolution and improved charge resolution from the ionization chamber are combined with the high precision of the upstream time-of-flight component of SPIDER to achieve resolutions in mass and nuclear charge of 1 AMU and Z=1. A discussion of the present resolution capabilities of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  9. Calibration of KRISS reference ionization chamber for key comparison of (99m)Tc measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Man; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Park, Tae Soon

    2012-09-01

    KRISS, as the national metrology institute of Korea, has used a reference ionization chamber system to certify the activity of (99m)Tc aqueous sources, but could only recently participate in a comparison exercise by the BIPM (BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m) to secure the international equivalence of (99m)Tc radioactivity measurement by way of the BIPM transfer instrument (SIRTI). The KRISS ionization chamber system was calibrated about 100 days before the comparison with a (99m)Tc solution source standardized by the 4πβ(LS)-γ(NaI(Tl)) coincidence counting method. During the comparison, beginning with a higher activity mother solution, the KRISS ionization chamber measured its specific activity without a dilution. The activity of a diluted-solution source was measured by the SIRTI at the same time.

  10. Dosimetric application of a special pencil ionization chamber in radiotherapy X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Cassola, Vagner F.; Kramer, Richard; Khoury, Helen J.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the performance of a pencil ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of only 1.06 cm3 and a length of 3.0 cm, developed at the Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN, in very low-energy radiotherapy X-ray beams. These beams are still used for certain skin cancer treatments due to their rapid attenuation in tissue. The dosimeter performance was evaluated in some tests proposed by the IEC 60731 standard: short- and long-term stability and linearity of response. For a complete analysis of the dosimeter response, the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation was utilized to investigate the influence of its different parts on the ionization chamber response. All results of the tests were in accordance with the recommended limits, and this work shows that it is possible to extend the application of this pencil-type ionization chamber developed at the LCI.

  11. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Maysa C.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN.

  12. Response and Monte Carlo evaluation of a reference ionization chamber for radioprotection level at calibration laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Vivolo, Vitor; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-07-01

    A special parallel plate ionization chamber, inserted in a slab phantom for the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) determination, was developed and characterized in this work. This ionization chamber has collecting electrodes and window made of graphite, and the walls and phantom made of PMMA. The tests comprise experimental evaluation following international standards and Monte Carlo simulations, employing the PENELOPE code to evaluate the design of this new dosimeter. The experimental tests were conducted employing the radioprotection level quality N-60 established at the IPEN, and all results were within the recommended standards.

  13. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of ~700,000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  14. Update of NIST half-life results corrected for ionization chamber source-holder instability.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2014-05-01

    As reported at the ICRM 2011, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) was not stable. This has affected a large number of half-life measurement results previously reported and used in compilations of nuclear data. Corrections have been made on all of the half-life data based on the assumption that the changes to the ionization chamber response were gradual. The corrections are energy dependent and therefore radionuclide specific. This presentation will review our results and present the recommended changes in half-life values and/or uncertainties.

  15. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, N. F.; Xavier, M.; Vivolo, V.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition.

  16. Development and testing of a Monte Carlo code system for analysis of ionization chamber responses

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    To predict the perturbation of interactions between radiation and material by the presence of a detector, a differential Monte Carlo computer code system entitled MICAP was developed and tested. This code system determines the neutron, photon, and total response of an ionization chamber to mixed field radiation environments. To demonstrate the ability of MICAP in calculating an ionization chamber response function, a comparison was made to 05S, an established Monte Carlo code extensively used to accurately calibrate liquid organic scintillators. Both code systems modeled an organic scintillator with a parallel beam of monoenergetic neutrons incident on the scintillator. (LEW)

  17. A multiple sampling time projection ionization chamber for nuclear fragment tracking and charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Chance, J. C.; Christie, W. F.; Gilkes, M.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Müller, Walter F. J.; Romero, J. L.; Sann, H.; Tull, C. E.; Warren, P.

    1997-02-01

    A detector has been developed for the tracking and charge measurement of the projectile fragment nuclei produced in relativistic nuclear collisions. This device, MUSIC II, is a second generation Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC), and employs the principles of ionization and time projection chambers. It provides unique charge determination for charges Z≥6, and excellent track position measurement. MUSIC II has been used most recently with the EOS (Equation of State) TPC and other EOS Collaboration detectors. Earlier it was used with other systems in experiments at the Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the ALADIN spectrometer at GSI.

  18. A comparative study of three ionizing chambers for measurements of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.; Cardoso, J.; Silva, H.

    2015-11-01

    A comparative study of three ionization chambers which directly measure the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(10), was performed. Results show that the ratio between the response (air kerma) determined by Monte Carlo and the experimental response (collected charge) normalized by the monitor unit is the same whatever is the chamber and that this ratio is proportional to the conversion coefficients for air kerma from photon fluence.

  19. Comparison of experimental and calculated calibration coefficients for a high sensitivity ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Amiot, M N; Mesradi, M R; Chisté, V; Morin, M; Rigoulay, F

    2012-09-01

    The response of a Vacutec 70129 ionization chamber was calculated using the PENELOPE-2008 Monte Carlo code and compared to experimental data. The filling gas mixture composition and its pressure have been determined using IC simulated response adjustment to experimental results. The Monte Carlo simulation revealed a physical effect in the detector response to photons due to the presence of xenon in the chamber. A very good agreement is found between calculated and experimental calibration coefficients for 17 radionuclides.

  20. Pulse mode readout techniques for use with non-gridded industrial ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Vladimir E.; Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2011-10-01

    Highly sensitive readout technique for precision long-term radiation measurements has been developed and tested in the Radiation Control Department at Jefferson Lab. The new electronics design is used to retrieve ionization data in a pulse mode. The dedicated data acquisition system works with M=Audio Audiophile 192 High-Definition 24-bit/192 kHz audio cards, taking data in continuous waveform recording mode. The on-line data processing algorithms extract signals of the ionization events from the data flow and measure the ionization value for each event. Two different ion chambers are evaluated. The first is a Reuter-Stokes Argon-filled (at 25 atm) High Pressure Ionization Chamber (HPIC), commonly used as a detector part in many GE Reuter-Stokes instruments of the RSS series. The second is a VacuTec Model 70181, 5 atm Xenon-filled ionization chamber. Results for both chambers indicate that the techniques allow using industrial ICs for high sensitivity and precision long-term radiation measurements, while at the same time providing information about spectral characteristics of the radiation fields.

  1. Investigation of thermal and temporal responses of ionization chambers in radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    AlMasri, Hussein; Funyu, Akira; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2012-07-01

    The ionization chamber is a primary dosimeter that is used in radiation dosimetry. Generally, the ion chamber response requires temperature/pressure correction according to the ideal gas law. However, this correction does not consider the thermal volume effect of chambers. The temporal and thermal volume effects of various chambers (CC01, CC13, NACP parallel-plate, PTW) with different wall and electrode materials have been studied in a water phantom. Measurements were done after heating the water with a suitable heating system, and chambers were submerged for a sufficient time to allow for temperature equilibrium. Temporal results show that all chambers equilibrate quickly in water. The equilibration time was between 3 and 5 min for all chambers. Thermal results show that all chambers expanded in response to heating except for the PTW, which contracted. This might be explained by the differences in the volumes of all chambers and also by the difference in wall material composition of PTW from the other chambers. It was found that the smallest chamber, CC01, showed the greatest expansion. The magnitude of the expansion was ~1, 0.8, and 0.9% for CC01, CC13, and parallel-plate chambers, respectively, in the temperature range of 295-320 K. The magnitude of the detected contraction was <0.3% for PTW in the same temperature range. For absolute dosimetry, it is necessary to make corrections for the ion chamber response, especially for small ion chambers like the CC01. Otherwise, room and water phantom temperatures should remain within a close range. PMID:22467281

  2. Assessment of small volume ionization chambers as reference dosimeters in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, M.; de Carlan, L.; Delaunay, F.; Donois, M.; Fournier, P.; Ostrowsky, A.; Vouillaume, A.; Bordy, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    LNE-LNHB is involved in a European project aiming at establishing absorbed dose-to-water standards for photon-radiation fields down to 2 × 2 cm2. This requires the calibration of reference ionization chambers of small volume. Twenty-four ionization chambers of eight different types with volume ranging from 0.007 to 0.057 cm3 were tested in a 60Co beam. For each chamber, two major characteristics were investigated: (1) the stability of the measured current as a function of the irradiation time under continuous irradiation. At LNE-LNHB, the variation of the current should be less than ±0.1% in comparison with its first value (over a 16 h irradiation time); (2) the variation of the ionization current with the applied polarizing voltage and polarity. Leakage currents were also measured. Results show that (1) every tested PTW (31015, 31016 and 31014) and Exradin A1SL chambers demonstrate a satisfying stability under irradiation. Other types of chambers have a stability complying with the stability criterion for some or none of them. (2) IBA CC01, IBA CC04 and Exradin A1SL show a proper response as a function of applied voltage for both polarities. PTW, Exradin A14SL and Exradin A16 do not. Only three types of chambers were deemed suitable as reference chambers according to LNE-LNHB requirements and specifications from McEwen (2010 Med. Phys. 37 2179-93): Exradin A1SL chambers (3/3), IBA CC04 (2/3) and IBA CC01 (1/3). The Exradin A1SL type with an applied polarizing voltage of 150 V was chosen as an LNE-LNHB reference chamber type in 2 × 2 cm2 radiation fields.

  3. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  4. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  5. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  6. Calibration coefficient of reference brachytherapy ionization chamber using analytical and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D

    2010-06-01

    A cylindrical graphite ionization chamber of sensitive volume 1002.4 cm(3) was designed and fabricated at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for use as a reference dosimeter to measure the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The air kerma calibration coefficient (N(K)) of this ionization chamber was estimated analytically using Burlin general cavity theory and by the Monte Carlo method. In the analytical method, calibration coefficients were calculated for each spectral line of an HDR (192)Ir source and the weighted mean was taken as N(K). In the Monte Carlo method, the geometry of the measurement setup and physics related input data of the HDR (192)Ir source and the surrounding material were simulated using the Monte Carlo N-particle code. The total photon energy fluence was used to arrive at the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) using mass energy absorption coefficients. The energy deposition rates were used to simulate the value of charge rate in the ionization chamber and N(K) was determined. The Monte Carlo calculated N(K) agreed within 1.77 % of that obtained using the analytical method. The experimentally determined RAKR of HDR (192)Ir sources, using this reference ionization chamber by applying the analytically estimated N(K), was found to be in agreement with the vendor quoted RAKR within 1.43%.

  7. a Solution for Dosimetry and Quality Assurance in Imrt and Hadrontherapy:. the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Coda, S.; Nastasi, U.; Belletti, S.; Ghedi, B.; Boriano, A.; Cirio, R.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Donetti, M.; Madon, E.; Trevisiol, E.; Urgesi, A.

    2002-11-01

    The new radiotherapy techniques require new detectors to monitor and measure the clinical field. The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques like step and shoot, sliding window, dynamic wedge or scanning beam add the time variable to the treatment field. In this case the water phantom with a single ionization chamber moving inside the field needs very long measurement time. Linear arrays of ionization chambers or diodes measure the field only along a line. 2D detectors like radiographic or gafchromic film are not suitable to be used as on line detectors. We have developed, built and tested an ionization chamber segmented in pixels that measure the dose in a plane at several points. Every channel has a dedicated electronic chain that digitizes the collected charge and data from all the channels are sent to the computer that performs the data acquisition. One read out cycle is very fast allowing to measure in real time the fluency and the shape of the field. The chamber can be used in two different ways, as monitor chamber and as relative dosemeter. A description of the detector, the electronics, and test results with both photon and hadron beams will be reported.

  8. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  9. Stability of A-150 plastic ionization chamber response over a ~30 year period

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Lennox, Arlene J.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    At the NIU Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab, the clinical tissue-equivalent ionization chamber response is measured every treatment day using a cesium source that was configured to match readings obtained at the National Bureau of Standards. Daily measurements are performed in air using the air-to-tissue dose conversion factors given in AAPM Report no. 7. The measured exposure calibration factors have been tabulated and graphed as a function of time from 1978 to present. For A-150 plastic ionization chambers, these factors exhibit a sinusoidal variation with a period of approximately one year and amplitude of {+-} 1%. This variation, attributable to the hygroscopic nature of A-150 plastic, is correlated with the relative humidity of the facility, and is greater than the humidity corrections for gas described in the literature. Our data suggest that chamber calibration should be performed at least weekly to accommodate these variations.

  10. The time response of glass Resistive Plate Chambers to heavily ionizing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Booth, C.; Borghi, S.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera–Villanueva, A.; Chimenti, P.; Dumarchez, J.; Gastaldi, U.; Giani, S.; Gómez–Cadenas, J. J.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Grossheim, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kolev, D.; Meurer, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Panman, J.; Piperov, S.; Popov, B.; Radicioni, E.; Schroeter, R.; Temnikov, P.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsenov, R.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.

    2007-10-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the RPC chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.

  11. Performance evaluation of multi sampling ionization chamber for heavy ion beams by comparison with GEANT4 simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanke, Yuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities, multi sampling ionization chambers are often used for the identification of the atomic number Z by detecting the energy deposit in it. In the study at GSI, the picture of the escape of secondary electrons, δ rays, from the ionization chamber explains the experimental data of pulse-height resolution. If this picture is correct, the pulse-height resolution should depend on the effective area of the ionization chamber. The experiment have been performed at NIRS-HIMAC. The pulse-height resolutions of two ionization chambers with different effective area were compared by using a 400-MeV/u Ni beam and their fragments. The difference in the pulse-height resolutions was observed. By comparison with the GEANT4 simulation including the δ-rays emission, the performance of the ionization chamber have been evaluated.

  12. Ionization chamber volume determination and quality assurance using micro-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNiven, Andrea L.; Umoh, Joseph; Kron, Tomas; Holdsworth, David W.; Battista, Jerry J.

    2008-09-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry requires a high degree of precision, at all steps within the dosimetric process, in order to ensure accurate dose measurements. This work presents a novel technique for ion chamber volume determination and quality assurance, using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Four nominally identical Exradin A1SL chambers (0.056 cm3) (Standard Imaging, WI, USA) were imaged using a micro-CT system (GE Locus, GE Healthcare, London, Ontario) and irradiated in a 6 MV x-ray reference field. Air volumes were calculated from the CT datasets using 3D analysis software (Microview 2.1.1, General Electric Healthcare, London, Ontario). Differences in the volumes of each chamber determined using micro-CT images agreed with differences in the ionization response within 1% for each chamber. Calibration coefficients were then compared through cross-calibration with a calibrated ion chamber and from the CT-measured volumes. The average ratio of these values was found to be 0.958 ± 0.009 indicating good correlation. The results demonstrate the promise of using micro-CT imaging for the absolute volumetric characterization of ion chambers. The images have the potential to be an important clinical tool for quality assurance of ion chamber construction and integrity after routine clinical usage.

  13. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  14. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, O; Pachoud, M; Bochud, F O; Moeckli, R

    2012-07-21

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □D(w,Q,V1)(low) averaged over a scoring volume V₁ for a geometry where V₁ is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □D(w,QV2)(low) averaged over a volume V₂ for a geometry where V₂ is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □D(w,QV2)(low) is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  15. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  16. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953. PMID:23938362

  17. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  18. Improving the accuracy of ionization chamber dosimetry in small megavoltage x-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNiven, Andrea L.

    The dosimetry of small x-ray fields is difficult, but important, in many radiation therapy delivery methods. The accuracy of ion chambers for small field applications, however, is limited due to the relatively large size of the chamber with respect to the field size, leading to partial volume effects, lateral electronic disequilibrium and calibration difficulties. The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the use of ionization chambers for the purpose of dosimetry in small megavoltage photon beams with the aim of improving clinical dose measurements in stereotactic radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy. A new method for the direct determination of the sensitive volume of small-volume ion chambers using micro computed tomography (muCT) was investigated using four nominally identical small-volume (0.56 cm3) cylindrical ion chambers. Agreement between their measured relative volume and ionization measurements (within 2%) demonstrated the feasibility of volume determination through muCT. Cavity-gas calibration coefficients were also determined, demonstrating the promise for accurate ion chamber calibration based partially on muCT. The accuracy of relative dose factor measurements in 6MV stereotactic x-ray fields (5 to 40mm diameter) was investigated using a set of prototype plane-parallel ionization chambers (diameters of 2, 4, 10 and 20mm). Chamber and field size specific correction factors ( CSFQ ), that account for perturbation of the secondary electron fluence, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation methods (BEAM/EGSnrc simulations). These correction factors (e.g. CSFQ = 1.76 (2mm chamber, 5mm field) allow for accurate relative dose factor (RDF) measurement when applied to ionization readings, under conditions of electronic disequilibrium. With respect to the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy, a novel application of the ion chambers was developed to characterize the fan beam size and effective dose rate. Characterization was based on an adaptation of the

  19. Gridded ionization chamber for detection of x-ray wave activity in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. A.; Hill, K. W.; Moshey, E. A.; Sauthoff, N. R.; von Goeler, S.

    1985-03-01

    In order to carry out x-ray observations of magnetohydrodynamic wave activity of the plasma during DD and DT (deuterium-beam-heated deuterium and tritium plasmas, respectively) operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), we will need detectors not susceptible to nuclear radiation damage. We have investigated the use of gridded ionization chambers as fast nondamageable x-ray detectors. A prototype chamber is described which was tested on the PDX tokamak. These tests and laboratory tests with a pulsed x-ray source suggest that the detector has sufficient sensitivity and speed for the required measurements.

  20. Gridded ionization chamber for detecion of x-ray wave activity in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.A.; Hill, K.W.; Moshey, E.A.; Sauthoff, N.R.; von Goeler, S.

    1982-11-01

    In order to carry out X-ray observations of magnetohydrodynamic wave activity of the plasma during DD and DT (deuterium-beam-heated deuterium and tritium plasmas, respectively) operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), we will need detectors not susceptible to nuclear radiation damage. We have investigated the use of gridded ionization chambers as fast nondamageable X-ray detectors. A prototype chamber is described, which was tested on the PDX tokamak. These tests and laboratory tests with a pulsed X-ray source suggest that the detector has sufficient sensitivity and speed for the required measurements.

  1. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  2. Total diesel exhaust particulate length measurements using a modified household smoke alarm ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of various means to combat the negative health effects of ultrafine particles emitted by internal combustion engines, a reliable, low-cost instrument for dynamic measurements of the exhaust emissions of ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is needed. In this study, an ordinary ionization-type building smoke detector was modified to serve as a measuring ionization chamber and utilized for dynamic measurements of PM emissions from diesel engines. When used with diluted exhaust, the readings show an excellent correlation with total particulate length. The instrument worked well with raw and diluted exhaust and with varying emission levels and is well suitable for on-board use.

  3. Total diesel exhaust particulate length measurements using a modified household smoke alarm ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of various means to combat the negative health effects of ultrafine particles emitted by internal combustion engines, a reliable, low-cost instrument for dynamic measurements of the exhaust emissions of ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is needed. In this study, an ordinary ionization-type building smoke detector was modified to serve as a measuring ionization chamber and utilized for dynamic measurements of PM emissions from diesel engines. When used with diluted exhaust, the readings show an excellent correlation with total particulate length. The instrument worked well with raw and diluted exhaust and with varying emission levels and is well suitable for on-board use. PMID:21387930

  4. Development of a thermodynamic model for a cold cycle 3He-4He dilution refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, B. W.; Miller, F. K.

    2016-10-01

    A thermodynamic model of a 3He-4He cold cycle dilution refrigerator with no actively-driven mechanical components is developed and investigated. The refrigerator employs a reversible superfluid magnetic pump, passive check valves, a phase separation chamber, and a series of recuperative heat exchangers to continuously circulate 3He-4He and maintain a 3He concentration gradient across the mixing chamber. The model predicts cooling power and mixing chamber temperature for a range of design and operating parameters, allowing an evaluation of feasibility for potential 3He-4He cold cycle dilution refrigerator prototype designs. Model simulations for a prototype refrigerator design are presented.

  5. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring. PMID:25479432

  6. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring.

  7. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  8. PTRAC File Utilization for Calculation of Free-Air Ionization Chamber Correction Factors by MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2014-06-01

    A free-air ionization chamber is used as a standard of photon air-kerma. Several correction factors are applied to the air-kerma value. Correction factors for electron loss (kloss) and for additional ionization current caused by photon scatter (ksc), photon fluorescence (kfl), photon transmission through diaphragm edge (kdtr), and photon scatter from the surface of the diaphragm aperture (kdsc) were determined by the MCNPX code utilizing information stored in Particle Track (PTRAC) output files. Individual steps of the procedure are described and the calculated values of the correction factors are presented. The values are in agreement with the correction factors published in a literature for similar free-air chambers.

  9. Source self-attenuation in ionization chamber measurements of (57)Co solutions.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Jeffrey T; Golas, Daniel B; Bergeron, Denis E

    2016-03-01

    Source self-attenuation for solutions of (57)Co of varying density and carrier concentration was measured in nine re-entrant ionization chambers maintained at NIST. The magnitude of the attenuation must be investigated to determine whether a correction is necessary in the determination of the activity of a source that differs in composition from the source used to calibrate the ionization chamber. At our institute, corrections are currently made in the measurement of (144)Ce, (109)Cd, (67)Ga, (195)Au, (166)Ho, (177)Lu, and (153)Sm. This work presents the methods used as recently applied to (57)Co. A range of corrections up to 1% were calculated for dilute to concentrated HCl at routinely used carrier concentrations.

  10. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  11. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, O. Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  12. Hard disk drive based microsecond X-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Müller, O; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper. PMID:25832273

  13. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  14. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T. S. Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B.; Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J.; Harder, D.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  16. Comments on 'Ionization chamber volume determination and quality assurance using micro-CT imaging'.

    PubMed

    Ross, C K

    2009-03-21

    The authors of a recent paper (McNiven et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 5029-43) measured the volume of a particular type of a small ionization chamber using CT images. Using four Exradin A1SL chambers, they find that the volume measured using CT imaging is, on average, 4.3% larger than the value derived from the chamber calibration coefficient. Although they point out that the effective chamber volume is defined by electric field lines between the collector and the chamber body, they do not estimate how the mechanical volume might differ from the effective volume. We have used a commercial software package to calculate the electric field in the cavity and we show that the field lines define a volume that is about 11% smaller than the mechanical volume. We also show that the effective volume is very sensitive to small changes in the chamber geometry near the base of the collector. We conclude that simply determining the mechanical volume without careful consideration of the electric field lines within the cavity is not a useful dosimetric technique.

  17. Air-kerma determination using a variable-volume cavity ionization chamber standard.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C; Roger, P

    2007-12-01

    A graphite-walled cavity ionization chamber of modular design and variable volume has been used to determine the air-kerma rate in the reference 60Co field at the BIPM. The chamber can be configured in five sizes. High-accuracy mechanical measurements of the volume of the air cavity were made for each configuration using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Ionization current measurements were made for each configuration and corrected for the effects of ion recombination and diffusion, stem scatter and chamber orientation. Monte Carlo calculations of cavity dose were made to evaluate the correction factors kwall and kan. A reproducibility of the ionization current per mass of 1.5 parts in 10(4) was achieved on the repeated assembly of each configuration. The results show an air-kerma rate determination that increases with volume, the total change being around 8 parts in 10(4). When analysed differentially, the air-kerma rate relative to the BIPM standard is Kdiff/KBIPM = 1.0026(6). A detailed uncertainty budget is presented. Possible reasons for the observed behaviour are discussed that might have consequences for all existing standards for air-kerma.

  18. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  19. A numerical model of initial recombination for high-LET irradiation: Application to liquid-filled ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of initial recombination in media irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) ions, which relies on an amorphous track model of ionization of high LET particles, and diffusion, drift and recombination of ionized charge carriers. The model has fundamental applications for the study of recombination in non-polar liquids, as well as practical ones, like in modelling hadrontherapy dosimetry with ionization chambers. We have used it to study the response of liquid-filled ionization chambers to hadrontherapy beams: dependence of initial recombination on ion species, energy and applied external electric field.

  20. Theoretical study of Jesse effect in tritium measurements using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Lu, Hanghang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Wang, Heyi; Long, Xingui; Masao, Matsuyama

    2016-01-01

    Jesse effect caused by impurities in helium might enhance the output signal significantly in tritium measurements with ionization chamber, which will lead to overestimation of tritium concentration in experiments. A theoretical method was proposed to evaluate Jesse effect quantitatively. Results indicate that besides Penning ionization, sub-excitation electrons also place very important influence on ionization enhancement by Jesse effect. An experiential expression about the relationship between enhancement factor and impurity concentration was established, in which second order of it fits experimental results very well. Theoretical calculation method in this paper is also applicable to evaluate Jesse effect in other kinds of mixtures besides hydrogen as impurities in helium. In addition, Jesse effects about tritium molecules as impurities have also been investigated.

  1. Calibration of the KRISS reference ionization chamber for certification of ²²²Rn gaseous sources.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Oh, P J; Park, T S; Kim, B C; Lee, M S

    2013-11-01

    A primary measurement system for gaseous (222)Rn based on the defined solid angle counting method has recently been constructed at KRISS and the reference ionization chamber used to measure the activities of gamma-emitting single radionuclides was adopted as a secondary standard for gaseous (222)Rn. A 20 mL flame-sealed glass ampoule source from the primary measurement system was used to calibrate the ionization chamber for (222)Rn. The (222)Rn efficiency of the ionization chamber was compared with that calculated by using a photon energy-dependent efficiency curve and that measured by using a standard (226)Ra solution. From the comparisons we draw the conclusion that the reference ionization chamber for gamma-emitting radionuclides can be a suitable secondary measurement system for gaseous (222)Rn sources.

  2. The Panofsky ratio in 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corriveau, F.; Hasinoff, M. D.; Measday, D. F.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Salomon, M.

    1987-11-01

    The branching ratios have been measured for γ-ray channels produced by π- stopping in liquid 3He. The results for the Panofsky ratio are P3 = ω( π-3He → π0t)/ ω( π-3He → γt) = 2.83 ± 0.07, and for the ratio of the radiative breakup channels, B3 = ω)( π-3He → γnd + γnnp)/ ω( π-3He → γt) = 1.35 ±0.11.

  3. A liquid-filled ionization chamber for high precision relative dosimetry.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, D M; Gómez, F; Brualla, L; Roselló, J V; Planes, D; Sánchez, M; Pombar, M

    2011-04-01

    Radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments are based on the delivery of narrow and/or irregularly shaped megavoltage photon beams. This kind of beams present both lack of charged particle equilibrium and steep dose gradients. Quality assurance (QA) measurements involved in these techniques must therefore be carried out with a dosimeter featuring high small volume. In order to obtain a good signal to noise ratio, a relatively dense material is needed as active medium. Non-polar organic liquids were proposed as active mediums with both good tissue equivalence and showing high signal to noise ratio. In this work, a liquid-filled ionization chamber is presented. Some results acquired with this detector in relative dosimetry are studied and compared with results obtained with unshielded diode. Medium-term stability measurements were also carried out and its results are shown. The liquid-filled ionization chamber presented here shows its ability to perform profile measurements and penumbrae determination with excellent accuracy. The chamber features a proper signal stability over the period studied.

  4. Proton beam dosimetry: a comparison between a plastic scintillator, ionization chamber and Faraday cup.

    PubMed

    Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Afarideh, Hossein; Ghannadi, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh, Ahmad; Aslani, Golam Reza; Boghrati, Behzad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a comparison was made between a plastic scintillator (BC400), a Faraday Cup (FC) and an ionization chamber (IC) used for routine proton dosimetry. Thin scintillators can be applied to proton dosimetry and consequently to proton therapy as relative dosimeters because of their water-equivalent nature, high energy-light conversion efficiency, low dimensions and good proportionality to the absorbed dose at low stopping powers. To employ such scintillators as relative dosimeters in proton therapy, the corrective factors must be applied to correct the quenching luminescence at the Bragg peak. A fine linear proportionality between the luminescence light yield Y and the proton flux in a thin (0.5 mm) scintillator for the 20 and 30 MeV proton beams were observed. The experimental peak/plateau ratios of Bragg Curve for 2, 1 and 0.5 mm scintillators with an accuracy of 0.5% were obtained to be 1.87, 1.91 and 2.30, respectively. With combination of the Markus chamber and the CR-39 detector, the peak/plateau ratio was improved to 3.26. The obtained data of the luminescence yield as a function of the specific energy loss is in agreement with the Craun-Birk's theory. Results show that the FC and Markus ionization chamber are in agreement within 4%, while the FC gives a lower dose evaluation. For a defined beam, the data for the fluence measurements are reproducible within a good accuracy.

  5. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  6. Influence of field size on a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber's response

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Villar, H.P.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2004-12-01

    The response of a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber, both in air and in phantom, was evaluated for x-ray tube potentials between 30 and 100 kV and radiation field diameters ranging from 30 to 70 mm. The experiments were performed with a calibrated Pantak x-ray machine and made use of the same set of x-ray qualities adopted by the PTB primary laboratory for the calibration of such chambers. A Plexiglas registered phantom (1.18 g cm{sup -3}) 110 mm long, 110 mm wide, and 80 mm deep was used for phantom measurements. X-ray qualities were characterized by using 99.99% pure aluminum filters. On the basis of the IAEA's TRS 398, the article discusses the dependence of the plane-parallel ionization chamber readings with field size in air and in phantom, its implication with regard to clinical dosimetry, cross-calibration, and dissemination of calibration factors.

  7. Tritium/ 3He dating of shallow groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Peter; Stute, Martin; Dörr, Helmut; Sonntag, Christian; Münnich, Karl Otto

    1988-08-01

    Combined tritium/ 3He data from three multi-level sampling wells (DFG 1, DFG 4, DFG 7) located at Liedern/ Bocholt, West Germany, are presented and principles of the tritium/ 3He method in shallow groundwater studies are discussed. The 3He excess produced by radioactive decay of bomb tritium (released mainly between 1952 and 1963) is clearly reflected in the data. The tritiogenic 3He signal can be detected with a good resolution (signal/1σ error: ≈ 350). The confinement of the tritiogenic 3He is estimated to approximately 77-85% at site DFG 4. For the bomb tritium peak the deviation of the tritium/ 3He age from the age determined by identifying the groundwater layer recharged between 1962 and 1965 is about 3 years (15%). The deviation can be explained by diffusive 3He loss across the groundwater table and by flow dispersion.

  8. Analysis of dose perturbation factors of a NACP-02 ionization chamber in clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Chin, E; Palmans, H; Shipley, D; Bailey, M; Verhaegen, F

    2009-01-21

    For well-guarded plane-parallel ionization chambers, international dosimetry protocols recommend a value of unity for electron perturbation factors in water. However, recent data published by various groups have challenged this. Specifically for the NACP-02 chamber, non-unity electron perturbation factors have already been published by Verhaegen et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1221-35) and Buckley and Rogers (2006 Med. Phys. 33 1788-96). Recently it was found that the mass thickness of the front chamber window can be 35% greater than is listed in the IAEA's TRS-398 absorbed dose protocol (Chin et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 N119-26). This study therefore recalculated NACP-02 electron perturbation correction factors for energies 4-18 MeV at depths z(ref) and R(50) to determine the effect of the chamber model change. Results showed that perturbation factors at z(ref) are fairly stable for similar chamber models but become highly sensitive to small changes at deeper depths. The results also showed some dependence on using 1 keV versus 10 keV for the transport cut-off. Additional investigations revealed that the wall perturbation factor, p(wall), is strongly influenced by the chamber back wall at z(ref) and at larger depths small changes in the positioning of the effective point of measurement cause large fluctuations in the final value. Finally, the cavity perturbation factor, p(cav), was found to be primarily influenced by electron backscatter.

  9. Monte Carlo calculations of correction factors for plane-parallel ionization chambers in clinical electron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio

    2008-09-15

    Recent standard dosimetry protocols recommend that plane-parallel ionization chambers be used in the measurements of depth-dose distributions or the calibration of low-energy electron beams with beam quality R{sub 50}<4 g/cm{sup 2}. In electron dosimetry protocols with the plane-parallel chambers, the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, in water is assumed to be unity and the replacement correction factor, P{sub repl}, is taken to be unity for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers, at all measurement depths. This study calculated P{sub wall} and P{sub repl} for NACP-02, Markus, and Roos plane-parallel chambers in clinical electron dosimetry using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. The P{sub wall} values for the plane-parallel chambers increased rapidly as a function of depth in water, especially at lower energy. The value around R{sub 50} for NACP-02 was about 10% greater than unity at 4 MeV. The effect was smaller for higher electron energies. Similarly, P{sub repl} values with depth increased drastically at the region with the steep dose gradient for lower energy. For Markus P{sub repl} departed more than 10% from unity close to R{sub 50} due to the narrow guard ring width. P{sub repl} for NACP-02 and Roos was close to unity in the plateau region of depth-dose curves that includes a reference depth, d{sub ref}. It was also found that the ratio of the dose to water and the dose to the sensitive volume in the air cavity for the plane-parallel chambers, D{sub w}/[D{sub air}]{sub pp}, at d{sub ref} differs significantly from that assumed by electron dosimetry protocols.

  10. Effects of thoron on a radon detector of pulse-ionization chamber type.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T

    2004-01-01

    A radon detector of pulse-ionization chamber (PIC) type could have some sensitivity for thoron. Thus, the presence of thoron could interfere with precise measurement of radon. In the present study, effects of thoron on the most common type of PIC detector (commercial name AlphaGUARD) were investigated using an exposure chamber. The AlphaGUARD was exposed to a mixture of radon and thoron, together with a radon/thoron discriminative monitor that employs a silicon solid-state detector. The thoron sensitivity of the PIC detector was estimated by comparing the two detectors. As a result, the thoron sensitivity was about 10% compared with the radon sensitivity. In other words, the radon concentration (Bq m(-3)) measured with the PIC detector was approximately the sum of the actual radon concentration (Bq m(-3)) and 10% of the thoron concentration (Bq m(-3)). The sensitivity to thoron should be considered in measurements in thoron-enhanced areas. PMID:15103062

  11. Characterization of a new ionization chamber in radiotherapy beams: angular dependence and variation of response with distance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonas O; Linda V E, Caldas

    2012-10-01

    A new double faced ionization chamber was constructed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. It has different collecting electrode materials: aluminum and graphite. It was irradiated in standard radiotherapy beams ((60)Co and X-rays). The response variation with distance and the angular dependence of this ionization chamber were evaluated. It was verified that the chamber response follows the inverse square law within a maximum variation of 11.2% in relation to the reference value. For the angular dependence it showed good agreement with international standards.

  12. Detection and measurement of delay in the yield of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. G.; Khvostenko, O. G.; Tuimedov, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    The times of extraction of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer have been measured. The obtained values amount to several dozen microseconds or above—that is, significantly exceed the time of free ion escape from the chamber. It is established that ions are retained in the ionization chamber because of their adsorption on the inner surface. This leads to distortion of the experimentally measured lifetimes of negative ions that become unstable with respect to autodetachment of the excess electron.

  13. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  14. IFIN-HH ionization chamber calibration and its validation; electrometric system improvement.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Wätjen, A C; Luca, A; Ivan, C

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the calibration of the CENTRONIC IG12/20A ionization chamber for 18 gamma ray emitters, and its improvement with a Keithley 6517A electrometer. The calibration figures were determined either directly in pA MBq(-1) units, or calculated from old units, by using the system capacity value. The calibration figures, determined with RML's standards, are compared with those deduced from the KCRV or the mean of the comparisons, and the values determined at PTB-Germany.

  15. Calibration and efficiency curve of SANAEM ionization chamber for activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Yeltepe, Emin; Kossert, Karsten; Dirican, Abdullah; Nähle, Ole; Niedergesäß, Christiane; Kemal Şahin, Namik

    2016-03-01

    A commercially available Fidelis ionization chamber was calibrated and assessed in PTB with activity standard solutions. The long-term stability and linearity of the system was checked. Energy-dependent efficiency curves for photons and beta particles were determined, using an iterative method in Excel™, to enable calibration factors to be calculated for radionuclides which were not used in the calibration. Relative deviations between experimental and calculated radionuclide efficiencies are of the order of 1% for most photon emitters and below 5% for pure beta emitters. The system will enable TAEK-SANAEM to provide traceable activity measurements.

  16. Diamond solid state ionization chambers for x-ray absorption spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Sio, A.; Bocci, A.; Pace, E.; Castellano, C.; Cinque, G.; Tartoni, N.; D'Acapito, F.

    2008-08-25

    The photoresponse of a diamond detector has been compared with a standard ionization chamber in x-ray absorption spectroscopy applications. A photoconductive device based on a nitrogen-doped single crystal diamond has been tested by synchrotron radiation. Time stability and linearity have been studied by x rays at 10 keV to assess its performances. Finally, extended x-ray absorption fine structure at the Fe K-edge was carried on a standard iron target using both the diamond device and the IC. Spectroscopical results have been compared including references to literature.

  17. Application of patent BR102013018500-0 in well type ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, C. H. S.; Peixoto, J. G. P.

    2016-07-01

    The definition of the radioactive sample position in a well type ionization chamber is the largest source of uncertainty in the measurement of quantity activity. The determination of this parameter in two activimeters helped to improve their accuracies, from 2.62 and 2.59% to 3.87 and 1.74%, with and without the use of the positioning device, concluding, that with their use has reached an uncertainty of U =2276 and 0.2677% (k = 2) 95.45%.

  18. Development and characterization of a graphite-walled ionization chamber as a reference dosimeter for 60Co beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    A graphite-walled ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 6.4 cm3 was developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI) to determine the air kerma rate of a 60Co source. This new prototype was developed to be a simple chamber, without significant nongraphite components and with a simple set-up, which allows the determination of its various required correction factors by Monte Carlo simulations. This new ionization chamber was characterized according to the IEC 60731 standard, and all results were obtained within its limits. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to obtain the correction factors involved with the air kerma determination. The air kerma rate obtained with the graphite-walled ionization chamber was compared with that from the reference dosimeter at the LCI, a PTW ionization chamber (model TN30002). The results obtained showed good agreement within the statistical uncertainties. A graphite ionization chamber was assembled and characterized as a reference dosimeter. The characterization test results were within recommended limits. Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to obtain the correction factors. The air kerma rate of a 60Co source was obtained with satisfactory results.

  19. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, S.; Sharma, S. D.

    2010-01-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference 137Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference 137Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference 137Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the 137Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within ±0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than ±0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years. PMID:20589119

  20. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Vandana, S; Sharma, S D

    2010-04-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference (137)Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the (137)Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within +/-0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than +/-0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  1. Charge collection efficiency in ionization chambers exposed to electron beams with high dose per pulse.

    PubMed

    Laitano, R F; Guerra, A S; Pimpinella, M; Caporali, C; Petrucci, A

    2006-12-21

    The correction for charge recombination was determined for different plane-parallel ionization chambers exposed to clinical electron beams with low and high dose per pulse, respectively. The electron energy was nearly the same (about 7 and 9 MeV) for any of the beams used. Boag's two-voltage analysis (TVA) was used to determine the correction for ion losses, k(s), relevant to each chamber considered. The presence of free electrons in the air of the chamber cavity was accounted for in determining k(s) by TVA. The determination of k(s) was made on the basis of the models for ion recombination proposed in past years by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk to account for the presence of free electrons. The absorbed dose measurements in both low-dose-per-pulse (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high-dose-per-pulse (20-120 mGy per pulse range) electron beams were compared with ferrous sulphate chemical dosimetry, a method independent of the dose per pulse. The results of the comparison support the conclusion that one of the models is more adequate to correct for ion recombination, even in high-dose-per-pulse conditions, provided that the fraction of free electrons is properly assessed. In this respect the drift velocity and the time constant for attachment of electrons in the air of the chamber cavity are rather critical parameters because of their dependence on chamber dimensions and operational conditions. Finally, a determination of the factor k(s) was also made by zero extrapolation of the 1/Q versus 1/V saturation curves, leading to the conclusion that this method does not provide consistent results in high-dose-per-pulse beams. PMID:17148826

  2. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  3. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Yuya; Nishio, Teiji; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  4. Assessment of ionization chamber correction factors in photon beams using a time saving strategy with PENELOPE code.

    PubMed

    Reis, C Q M; Nicolucci, P

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Monte Carlo-based perturbation and beam quality correction factors for ionization chambers in photon beams using a saving time strategy with PENELOPE code. Simulations for calculating absorbed doses to water using full spectra of photon beams impinging the whole water phantom and those using a phase-space file previously stored around the point of interest were performed and compared. The widely used NE2571 ionization chamber was modeled with PENELOPE using data from the literature in order to calculate absorbed doses to the air cavity of the chamber. Absorbed doses to water at reference depth were also calculated for providing the perturbation and beam quality correction factors for that chamber in high energy photon beams. Results obtained in this study show that simulations with phase-space files appropriately stored can be up to ten times shorter than using a full spectrum of photon beams in the input-file. Values of kQ and its components for the NE2571 ionization chamber showed good agreement with published values in the literature and are provided with typical statistical uncertainties of 0.2%. Comparisons to kQ values published in current dosimetry protocols such as the AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 showed maximum percentage differences of 0.1% and 0.6% respectively. The proposed strategy presented a significant efficiency gain and can be applied for a variety of ionization chambers and clinical photon beams.

  5. Anisotropice superfluid fraction of3He A1 phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, M.; Kojima, H.

    1995-11-01

    The superfluid fraction of3He a1 phase is computed from measurements of the velocity of spin/entropy waves induced in a cylindrical chamber, for two different directions of the magnetic field: parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the chamber. The ratio of the superfluid fractions in the parallel and perpendicular orientations is 1.85, and does not depend on the field between 1 and 5 Tesla. We adapt a theoretical texture model to account for the superfluid flow, and the results are consistent with the above ratio and direct estimates of superfluid velocity.

  6. Tritiogenic 3He in shallow groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Peter; Stute, Martin; Sonntag, Christian; Otto Münnich, Karl

    1989-09-01

    Tritium, helium isotope and neon data from a multi-level sampling well (DFG 7) at Liedern/Bocholt (West Germany) are presented and discussed. The presence of a radiogenic helium component leads to 3He/ 4He ratios below that of atmospheric helium ( minimumδ 3He values≈ -60% ) below about 20 m depth. The 3He profile can be corrected for the nucleogenic 3He component using the neon measurements. Based on the "Vogel" model of a shallow aquifer the tritium/ 3He distributions are simulated for the years 1987, 2000 and 2025. The model results show that under favourable conditions the tritiogenic 3He peak will be detectable in shallow aquifers for at least the next 4 decades. The influence of the vertical flow velocity and the transversal dispersion coefficient on simulated distributions are estimated. 3He confinement is calculated as a function of the vertical flow velocity and the transversal dispersion coefficient. There is a critical value of the vertical flow velocity (about 0.25-0.5 m/year) below which the 3He loss increases rapidly to high values.

  7. DNP for polarizing liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Uemtasu, H.; Iwata, T.; Kato, S.; Michigami, T.; Ohizumi, S.; Shishido, T.; Tanaka, A.; Toyama, K.; Tajima, Y.; Yoshida, H. Y.; Kuriyama, N.

    2008-02-06

    Using DNP with zeolite powders and TEMPO, we have developed a method to enhance polarization of liquid {sup 3}He. At magnetic field of 2.5 T and a temperature of around 1.5 K, we have obatined polarization enhancement of liquid {sup 3}He, 2.34 and -1.59 for positive and negative enhancements, respectively.

  8. Vortices in rotating superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Lounasmaa, O V; Thuneberg, E

    1999-07-01

    In this review we first present an introduction to 3He and to the ROTA collaboration under which most of the knowledge on vortices in superfluid 3He has been obtained. In the physics part, we start from the exceptional properties of helium at millikelvin temperatures. The dilemma of rotating superfluids is presented. In 4He and in 3He-B the problem is solved by nucleating an array of singular vortex lines. Their experimental detection in 3He by NMR is described next. The vortex cores in 3He-B have two different structures, both of which have spontaneously broken symmetry. A spin-mass vortex has been identified as well. This object is characterized by a flow of spins around the vortex line, in addition to the usual mass current. A great variety of vortices exist in the A phase of 3He; they are either singular or continuous, and their structure can be a line or a sheet or fill the whole liquid. Altogether seven different types of vortices have been detected in 3He by NMR. We also describe briefly other experimental methods that have been used by ROTA scientists in studying vortices in 3He and some important results thus obtained. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of experiments and theory of 3He to particle physics and cosmology. In particular, we report on experiments where superfluid 3He-B was heated locally by absorption of single neutrons. The resulting events can be used to test theoretical models of the Big Bang at the beginning of our universe.

  9. Vortices in rotating superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Lounasmaa, O V; Thuneberg, E

    1999-07-01

    In this review we first present an introduction to 3He and to the ROTA collaboration under which most of the knowledge on vortices in superfluid 3He has been obtained. In the physics part, we start from the exceptional properties of helium at millikelvin temperatures. The dilemma of rotating superfluids is presented. In 4He and in 3He-B the problem is solved by nucleating an array of singular vortex lines. Their experimental detection in 3He by NMR is described next. The vortex cores in 3He-B have two different structures, both of which have spontaneously broken symmetry. A spin-mass vortex has been identified as well. This object is characterized by a flow of spins around the vortex line, in addition to the usual mass current. A great variety of vortices exist in the A phase of 3He; they are either singular or continuous, and their structure can be a line or a sheet or fill the whole liquid. Altogether seven different types of vortices have been detected in 3He by NMR. We also describe briefly other experimental methods that have been used by ROTA scientists in studying vortices in 3He and some important results thus obtained. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of experiments and theory of 3He to particle physics and cosmology. In particular, we report on experiments where superfluid 3He-B was heated locally by absorption of single neutrons. The resulting events can be used to test theoretical models of the Big Bang at the beginning of our universe. PMID:10393895

  10. A new standard cylindrical graphite-walled ionization chamber for dosimetry in 60Co beams at calibration laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    60Co sources are used mostly at dosimetry laboratories for calibration of ionization chambers utilized for radiotherapy dosimetry, mainly in those laboratories where there is no linear accelerator available. In this work, a new cylindrical ionization chamber was developed and characterized to be used as a reference dosimeter at the Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN. The characterization tests were performed according to the IEC 60731 standard, and all tests presented results within its recommended limits. Furthermore, the correction factors for the wall, stem, central collecting electrode, nonaxial uniformity and the mass-energy absorption coefficient were determined using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The air kerma rate determined with this new dosimeter was compared to the one obtained with the IPEN standard, presenting a difference of 1.5%. Therefore, the new ionization chamber prototype developed and characterized in this work presents potential use as a primary standard dosimeter at radiation metrology laboratories.

  11. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-01

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields. We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method. The determined correction factors (k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} ) were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} was calculated to be 1.125 for a PTW 31010 chamber and 1.022 for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well. We devised a method for determining k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  12. Measurement of polarization of 3He with mobile polarized 3He neutron spin filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, T.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, M. W.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, S. W.; Skoy, V. R.

    2014-03-01

    A mobile polarized 3He neutron spin filter was developed for both optical pumping and transportation, and the polarization of 3He was measured with cold neutrons of HANARO in KAERI. The progress of polarization build-up during the optical pumping of the 3He cell was observed by adiabatic fast-passage NMR system. The 3He cell was made of an alumino-silicate glass GE-180 with a cylindrical shape of 40 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length from KEK. A cell contained 5.74 barṡcm of 3He gas. The whole installation after 8 h pumping was transported to the general-purpose test station of the HANARO research reactor and the polarization of 3He was measured with cold neutrons. The measured polarization of 3He was 0.18 ± 0.01 by measuring the neutron transmission through the 3He cell.

  13. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  14. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. PMID:24625540

  15. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation in the Optimization of a Free-Air Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Control in Medical Digital Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A.; Piñera, I.; Montaño, L. M.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.

    2008-08-01

    During the earliest tests of a free-air ionization chamber a poor response to the X-rays emitted by several sources was observed. Then, the Monte Carlo simulation of X-rays transport in matter was employed in order to evaluate chamber behavior as X-rays detector. The photons energy deposition dependence with depth and its integral value in all active volume were calculated. The obtained results reveal that the designed device geometry is feasible to be optimized.

  17. Comparison of pencil-type ionization chamber calibration results and methods between dosimetry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Costas J; Büermann, Ludwig; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Csete, Istvan; Delis, Harry; Gomola, Igor; Persson, Linda; Novak, Leos; Petkov, Ivailo; Toroi, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of calibration results and procedures in terms of air kerma length product, PKL, and air kerma, K, was conducted between eight dosimetry laboratories. A pencil-type ionization chamber (IC), generally used for computed tomography dose measurements, was calibrated according to three calibration methods, while its residual signal and other characteristics (sensitivity profile, active length) were assessed. The results showed that the "partial irradiation method" is the preferred method for the pencil-type IC calibration in terms of PKL and it could be applied by the calibration laboratories successfully. Most of the participating laboratories achieved high level of agreement (>99%) for both dosimetry quantities (PKL and K). Estimated relative standard uncertainties of comparison results vary among laboratories from 0.34% to 2.32% depending on the quantity, beam quality and calibration method applied. Detailed analysis of the assigned uncertainties have been presented and discussed.

  18. A new multi-strip ionization chamber used as online beam monitor for heavy ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiguo; Mao, Ruishi; Duan, Limin; She, Qianshun; Hu, Zhengguo; Li, He; Lu, Ziwei; Zhao, Qiecheng; Yang, Herun; Su, Hong; Lu, Chengui; Hu, Rongjiang; Zhang, Junwei

    2013-11-01

    A multi-strip ionization chamber has been built for precise and fast monitoring of the carbon beam spatial distribution at Heavy Ion Researched Facility of Lanzhou Cooling Storing Ring (HIRFL-CSR). All the detector's anode, cathode and sealed windows are made by 2 μm aluminized Mylar film in order to minimize the beam lateral deflection. The sensitive area of the detector is (100×100) mm2, with the anode segmented in 100 strips, and specialized front-end electronics has been developed for simplifying the data acquisition and quick feedback of the relevant parameters to beam control system. It can complete one single beam profile in 200 μs.

  19. Spin Duality on the Neutron ($^3$He)

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Solvignon

    2006-02-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility experiment E01-012 measured the ^3He spin structure functions and virtual photon asymmetries in the resonance region in the range 1.03He and the neutron. Preliminary results for A_1^3He are presented as well as an overview of the experimental and theoretical developments.

  20. Spin Duality on the Neutron (^3He)

    SciTech Connect

    Solvignon, Patricia

    2007-02-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility experiment E01-012 measured the 3He spin structure functions and virtual photon asymmetries in the resonance region in the momentum transfer range 1.0 < Q2 < 4.0 (GeV/c)2. Our date, when compared with existing deep inelastic scattering data, can be used to test quark-hadron duality in g1 and A1 for 3He and the neutron. Preliminary results for A{sub 1}{sup {sup 3}He} are presented, as well as some details about the experiment.

  1. Quality assurance of proton beams using a multilayer ionization chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Sahoo, Narayan; Kerr, Matthew; Taylor, M. Brad; Summers, Paige; Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The measurement of percentage depth-dose (PDD) distributions for the quality assurance of clinical proton beams is most commonly performed with a computerized water tank dosimetry system with ionization chamber, commonly referred to as water tank. Although the accuracy and reproducibility of this method is well established, it can be time-consuming if a large number of measurements are required. In this work the authors evaluate the linearity, reproducibility, sensitivity to field size, accuracy, and time-savings of another system: the Zebra, a multilayer ionization chamber system.Methods: The Zebra, consisting of 180 parallel-plate ionization chambers with 2 mm resolution, was used to measure depth-dose distributions. The measurements were performed for scattered and scanned proton pencil beams of multiple energies delivered by the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron-based delivery system. For scattered beams, the Zebra-measured depth-dose distributions were compared with those measured with the water tank. The principal descriptors extracted for comparisons were: range, the depth of the distal 90% dose; spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) length, the region between the proximal 95% and distal 90% dose; and distal-dose fall off (DDF), the region between the distal 80% and 20% dose. For scanned beams, the Zebra-measured ranges were compared with those acquired using a Bragg peak chamber during commissioning.Results: The Zebra demonstrated better than 1% reproducibility and monitor unit linearity. The response of the Zebra was found to be sensitive to radiation field sizes greater than 12.5 × 12.5 cm; hence, the measurements used to determine accuracy were performed using a field size of 10 × 10 cm. For the scattered proton beams, PDD distributions showed 1.5% agreement within the SOBP, and 3.8% outside. Range values agreed within −0.1 ± 0.4 mm, with a maximum deviation of 1.2 mm. SOBP length values agreed within 0 ± 2 mm, with a maximum deviation of 6 mm. DDF

  2. Unexpected bias in NIST 4πγ ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2012-09-01

    In January of 2010, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) has not been stable. The positioning ring that determines the height of the sample in the reentrant tube of the IC has slowly shifted during 35 years of use. This has led to a slow change in the calibration factors for the various radionuclides measured by this instrument. The changes are dependent on γ-ray energy and the time the IC was calibrated for a given radionuclide. A review of the historic data with regard to when the calibrations were done has enabled us to approximate the magnitude of the changes with time. This requires a number of assumptions, and corresponding uncertainty components, including whether the changes in height were gradual or in steps as will be shown in drawings of sample holder. For calibrations the changes in calibration factors have been most significant for low energy gamma emitters such as (133)Xe, (241)Am, (125)I and (85)Kr. The corrections to previous calibrations can be approximated and the results corrected with an increase in the overall uncertainty. At present we are recalibrating the IC based on new primary measurements of the radionuclides measured on the IC. Likewise we have been calibrating a new automated ionization-chamber system. A bigger problem is the significant number of half-life results NIST has published over the last 35 years that are based on IC measurements. The effect on half-life is largest for long-lived radionuclei, especially low-energy γ-ray emitters. This presentation will review our results and recommend changes in values and/or uncertainties. Any recommendation for withdrawal of any results will also be undertaken.

  3. A comparison of different experimental methods for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Gómez, Faustino; Jäkel, Oliver; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-11-01

    Radiation dosimetry of highly modulated dose distributions requires a detector with a high spatial resolution. Liquid filled ionization chambers (LICs) have the potential to become a valuable tool for the characterization of such radiation fields. However, the effect of an increased recombination of the charge carriers, as compared to using air as the sensitive medium has to be corrected for. Due to the presence of initial recombination in LICs, the correction for general recombination losses is more complicated than for air-filled ionization chambers. In the present work, recently published experimental methods for general recombination correction for LICs are compared and investigated for both pulsed and continuous beams. The experimental methods are all based on one of two approaches: either measurements at two different dose rates (two-dose-rate methods), or measurements at three different LIC polarizing voltages (three-voltage methods). In a comparison with the two-dose-rate methods, the three-voltage methods fail to achieve accurate corrections in several instances, predominantly at low polarizing voltages and dose rates. However, for continuous beams in the range of polarizing voltages recommended by the manufacturer of the LICs used, the agreement between the different methods is generally within the experimental uncertainties. For pulsed beams, the agreement between the methods is poor. The inaccuracies found in the results from the three-voltage methods are associated with numerical difficulties in solving the resulting equation systems, which also make these methods sensitive to small variations in the experimental data. These issues are more pronounced for the case of pulsed beams. Furthermore, the results suggest that the theoretical modelling of initial recombination used in the three-voltage methods may be a contributing factor to the deviating results observed.

  4. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  5. Scintillation properties of N2 and CF4 and performances of a scintillating ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehaut, G.; Salvador, S.; Fontbonne, J.-M.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Perronnel, J.; Vandamme, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we studied the emission yields, decay times and coincidence resolving times (CRT) of two gases, nitrogen (N2) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4), used for particle detection in the context of fission products measurement. The set-up was made of an ionization chamber and two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) placed front-to-front on each side of the active zone of the chamber. Using the photomultiplier tubes, the number of photoelectrons (phe) converted at the photocathodes from the scintillation processes in each gas was quantified and the scintillation time spectra were recorded. A scintillation emission yield of 24 phe MeV-1 with a decay time of τd = 2.5 ns in N2, and 225 phe MeV-1 with τd = 6.2 ns for CF4, has been measured. With our set-up, the coincidence resolving time (σ values) between the two PMTs have been measured using alpha particles at 1.4 ns and 0.34 ns for N2 and CF4, respectively.

  6. A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) for measuring the charge of relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, W. B.; Romero, J. L.; Brady, F. P.; Tull, C. E.; Castaneda, C. M.; Barasch, E. F.; Webb, M. L.; Drummond, J. R.; Crawford, H. J.; Flores, I.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Sann, H.; Young, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    A large area (1 m × 2 m) multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) has been constructed and tested. The MUSIC detector makes multiple measurements of energy "loss", d E/d x, for a relativistic heavy ion. Given the velocity, the charge of the ion can be extracted from the energy loss distributions. The widths of the distributions we observe are much narrower than predicted by Vavilov's theory for energy loss while agreeing well with the theory of Badhwar which deals with the energy deposited. The versatile design of MUSIC allows a variety of anode configurations which results in a large dynamic range of charge. In our tests to date we have observed charge resolutions of 0.25e fwhm for 727 MeV/nucleon40A and 0.30e fwhm for 1.08 GeV/nucleon139La and139La fragments. Vertical position and multiple track determination are obtained by using time projection chamber electronics. Preliminary tests indicate that the position resolution is also very good with α ≅ 100 μm.

  7. A gridded ionization chamber with a movable cathode for precise measurements of W-values in highly purified rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shinichi; Miyajima, Mitsuhiro; Katoh, Kazuaki; Takebe, Masahiro; Seto, Kunio

    1987-04-01

    A single gridded ionization chamber with a movable cathode was constructed in order to measure W-values in highly purified rare gases without ambiguity. The chamber gases were continuously purified with a purifier filled with many pellets of titanium-barium getter. The purifier proved to be so powerful as to reduce impurities in rare gases to the level of 1 ppb or less. Performance tests of the chamber were made by measurements of W-values of argon-methane mixtures relative to that of argon. The measurements were made with a precision of ±0.14%.

  8. Description of ARCAL XXXIV Project: Repair and Calibration of Electrometers and Ionization Chambers Used in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Estrada, P.; Ramírez-Jiménez, F. J.; Villaverde-Lozano, A.

    2003-09-01

    The technological tools for the diagnosis of diseases and treatment of cancer are based mostly on the use of ionizing radiations. This situation worries to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which has implemented programs of technical cooperation for the protection of the human health. One of these programs is running in Latin America under the ARCAL project (Regional Agreement of Cooperation for the Promotion of the Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean). One objective of the ARCAL XXXIV project is the establishment of three Regional Centres for the repair, maintenance and electrical calibration of clinical dosimeters, in Mexico we have one of these centres. Some other objectives of the project are: the generation of calibration procedures, the release of training courses in the region, the establishment of an inter-comparison network for the region in the control of standards of calibration with electrometers and the design of low current sources that simulates the ionization chamber and can serve as field standards for each of the participant countries. A description of the results of the project is presented in this work.

  9. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  10. Ionization chamber measurements of the half-lives of 24Na, 42K, 76As and 198Au.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Lindstrom, R M

    2004-01-01

    Samples of 24Na, 42K, 76As and 198Au were produced by irradiation in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reactor, and examined for impurities before and after measurement. Half-life measurements were carried out in the NIST 4pigamma pressurized ionization chamber. The results are compared to presently accepted values and previous NIST measurements. PMID:14987662

  11. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-01

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  12. Determinations of the correction factors for small fields in cylindrical ionization chambers based on measurement and numerical calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine the correction factors in a small photon field for a given chamber. We measured output factors with several cylindrical ionization chambers, and by using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution, we modeled the non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of the chamber. The parameters in the exposure function and the correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations that we had developed by using the measured data and the geometry of the given chamber. The correction factors (CFs) were very similar to those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For example, the CFs in this study were found to be 1.116 for PTW31010 and 1.0225 for PTW31016 while the CFs obtained from MC simulations were reported as being approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010 and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in a 6-MV photon beam of 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, the method of deconvolution combined with the MC result for the chamber's response function showed a similar CF for PTW 30013, which was reported as 2.29 and 1.54 for a 1 × 1 cm2 and a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 field size, respectively. The CFs from our method were similar, 2.42 and 1.54. In addition, we report CFs for PTW30013, PTW31010, PTW31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13. As a consequence, we suggest the use of our method to measure the correct output factor by using the fact that an inhomogeneous exposure causes a volume averaging effect in the cavity of air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber. The result obtained by using our method is very similar to that obtained from MC simulations. The method we developed can easily be applied in clinics.

  13. Time-resolved dosimetry using a pinpoint ionization chamber as quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, Robert J. W. Satherley, Thomas; Day, Rebecca A.; Greig, Lynne; Wendling, Markus; Monshouwer, René

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a method to verify the dose delivery in relation to the individual control points of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an ionization chamber. In addition to more effective problem solving during patient-specific quality assurance (QA), the aim is to eventually map out the limitations in the treatment chain and enable a targeted improvement of the treatment technique in an efficient way. Methods: Pretreatment verification was carried out for 255 treatment plans that included a broad range of treatment indications in two departments using the equipment of different vendors. In-house developed software was used to enable calculation of the dose delivery for the individual beamlets in the treatment planning system (TPS), for data acquisition, and for analysis of the data. The observed deviations were related to various delivery and measurement parameters such as gantry angle, field size, and the position of the detector with respect to the field edge to distinguish between error sources. Results: The average deviation of the integral fraction dose during pretreatment verification of the planning target volume dose was −2.1% ± 2.2% (1 SD), −1.7% ± 1.7% (1 SD), and 0.0% ± 1.3% (1 SD) for IMRT at the Radboud University Medical Center (RUMC), VMAT (RUMC), and VMAT at the Wellington Blood and Cancer Centre, respectively. Verification of the dose to organs at risk gave very similar results but was generally subject to a larger measurement uncertainty due to the position of the detector at a high dose gradient. The observed deviations could be related to limitations of the TPS beam models, attenuation of the treatment couch, as well as measurement errors. The apparent systematic error of about −2% in the average deviation of the integral fraction dose in the RUMC results could be explained by the limitations of the TPS beam model in the calculation of the beam penumbra. Conclusions: This

  14. Nuclear electric dipole moment of 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, Ionel; Friar, J L; Hayes, A C; Liu, C P; Navratil, P

    2008-01-01

    In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

  15. Coherent Photoproduction of pi^+ from 3/^He

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhsha Nasseripour, Barry Berman

    2011-03-01

    We have measured the differential cross section for the $\\gamma$$^3$He$\\rightarrow \\pi^+ t$ reaction. This reaction was studied using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. Real photons produced with the Hall-B bremsstrahlung tagging system in the energy range from 0.50 to 1.55 GeV were incident on a cryogenic liquid $^3$He target. The differential cross sections for the $\\gamma$$^3$He$\\rightarrow \\pi^+ t$ reaction were measured as a function of photon-beam energy and pion-scattering angle. Theoretical predictions to date cannot explain the large cross sections except at backward angles, showing that additional components must be added to the model.

  16. Superfluid 3He in ``nematically ordered'' aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Liquid 3He immersed in aerogel allows investigation of the influence of impurities on unconventional superfluidity. In most of such experiments silica aerogels are used. These aerogels consist of thin strands which form a ``wisp.'' Although it is established that superfluid phases of 3He in silica aerogels (A-like and B-like) have the same order parameters as A and B phases of bulk 3He, many new phenomena were observed. In particular, it was found that global anisotropy of aerogel (e.g. caused by squeezing or stretching) can orient the order parameter. Depending on prehistory and on the type of the anisotropy the A-like phase may be homogeneous or in a state with random orbital part of the order parameter. Theory predicts that a large stretching anisotropy may even influence the order parameter structure: polar phase (or A phase with polar distortion), which are not realized in bulk 3He, may become more favorable than pure A phase. Large stretching anisotropy is hardly achievable in silica aerogel. Therefore in experiments described in the talk we used a new type of aerogel, consisting of Al2O3 . H2O strands which are parallel to each other, i.e. this aerogel may be considered as infinitely stretched. We found that the superfluid phase diagram of 3He in such ``nematically ordered'' aerogel is different from the case of 3He in silica aerogel and that both observed A and B phases have large polar distortion. This distortion is larger at low pressures and grows on warming. There are indications that a pure polar phase appears near the superfluid transition temperature. Recent results will be also presented.

  17. Dressed spin of {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Esler, A.; Peng, J. C.; Chandler, D.; Howell, D.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Liu, C. Y.; Torgerson, J. R.

    2007-11-15

    We report a measurement of dressed spin effects of polarized {sup 3}He atoms from a cold atomic source traversing a region of a constant magnetic field B{sub 0} and a transverse oscillatory dressing field B{sub d}cos{omega}{sub d}t. The observed effects are compared with a numerical simulation using the Bloch equation as well as a calculation based on the dressed atom formalism. An application of the dressed spin of {sup 3}He for a proposed neutron electric dipole moment measurement is also discussed.

  18. The multiuniverse transition in superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Bunkov, Yury

    2013-10-01

    The symmetry-breaking phase transitions of the universe and of superfluid (3)He may lead to the formation of different states with different order parameters. In both cases the energy potential below the transition temperature has a complicated multidimensional profile with many local minima and saddle points, which correspond to different states. Consequently, not only topological defects, but also islands of different metastable states can be created. Using (3)He we can analyse the properties and experimental consequences of such transitions and, in particular, the first-order phase transition between the two low symmetry states. PMID:24026020

  19. Liquid ionization chamber initial recombination dependence on LET for electrons and photons.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Lennart; Tölli, Heikki

    2013-06-21

    The possibility of indirect measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) with a liquid ionization chamber (LIC) has been investigated by studying initial recombination losses at different applied voltages. A linear fit is made to the voltage-signal curve and the intersection point of the fit and the voltage-axis is shown to correlate with LET. The LIC applied voltages were 100-700 V, which corresponds to electric field strengths between 0.3 and 2.0 MV m(-1). Several different photon and electron beams have been studied, and by using MCNPX™ the respective LET spectra have been determined. The beam qualities in this study were found to have a fluence averaged LET between 0.17 and 1.67 keV µm(-1) and a corresponding dose averaged LET between 0.97 and 4.62 keV µm(-1). For the experimental data in this study the linear fit method yields consistent results with respect to Monte Carlo simulated LET values. A calibration curve for LET determination is provided for the LIC used in the present work.

  20. Quantitative Verification of Dynamic Wedge Dose Distribution Using a 2D Ionization Chamber Array.

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Tarek; Farhat, Leila; Mtibaa, Anis; Besbes, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel

    2015-10-01

    The accuracy of two calculation algorithms of the Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system (TPS)--the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and pencil-beam convolution (PBC)--in modeling the enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) was investigated. Measurements were carried out for 6 and 18 MV photon beams using a 2D ionization chamber array. Accuracy of the TPS was evaluated using a gamma index analysis with the following acceptance criteria for dose differences (DD) and distance to agreement (DTA): 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm. The TPS models the dose distribution accurately except for 20×20 cm(2) field size, 60 (°) and 45 (°) wedge angles using PBC at 6 MV photon energy. For these latter fields, the pass rate and the mean value of gamma were less than 90% and more than 0.5, respectively at the (3%/3 mm) acceptance criteria. In addition, an accuracy level of (2%/2 mm) was achieved using AAA with better agreement for 18 MV photon energy.

  1. Detecting MLC errors in stereotactic radiotherapy plans with a liquid filled ionization chamber array.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick; Seshadri, Venkatakrisnan; Charles, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy demands the use of equipment with the highest resolution and sensitivity available. This study examines the sensitivity of a commercially available liquid-filled ionization chamber array--the Octavius 1000 SRS (PTW, Frieburg, Germany) for detecting small (sub-millimetre) multi-leaf collimator (MLC) alignment errors in static square fields (side length 16-40 mm). Furthermore, the effectiveness of detecting small MLC errors in clinical stereotactic radiotherapy patient plans using the device was also evaluated. The commonly used gamma pass rate metric (of the measurements compared with treatment planning system generated results) was used. The gamma pass rates were then evaluated as a function of MLC position error (MLC error size 0.1-2.5 mm). The detector array exhibited a drop in pass rate between plans without error and those which had MLC errors induced. For example a drop in pass rate of 4.5% (gamma criteria 3%, 1 mm) was observed when a 0.8 mm error was introduced into a 16 mm square field. Furthermore the drop in pass rate increased as the MLC position error increased. This study showed that the Octavius 1000 SRS array could be a useful tool for applications requiring the detection of small geometric delivery uncertainties.

  2. Dose verifications by use of liquid ionization chamber of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Tateoka, Kunihiko; Oouchi, Atsushi; Nakata, Kensei; Hareyama, Masato

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of an L-EPID to verify rectangular and irregular fields and to measure the transmitted exit doses. With respect to the beam profile of rectangular and irregular fields and the doses transmitted through an inhomogeneous phantom, the L-EPID dose obtained from the L-EPID measurement was compared with the conventional dose measured by use of a 0.12-cc ionization chamber and a 3D water phantom. In the comparison of the rectangular and irregular fields, the difference in the off-center ratio (OCR) between the L-EPID dose and the conventional dose was approximately 3% in the steep-dose-gradient region (penumbra regions, >30%/cm) and approximately +/-0.5% in the gentle-dose-gradient region (5%/cm). On the other hand, the dose differences between the L-EPID and the measured doses were less than approximately 2% in the gentle-dose-gradient region. In addition, in the steep-dose-gradient region, the maximum difference was 30%. However, the differences in the distance-to-agreement (DTA) were less than approximately +/-1 mm and were unrelated to the dose gradient. These results suggest that dose verification by L-EPID is very useful in clinical applications.

  3. Large-Area Neutron Detector based on Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Makela, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    Prototypes of a Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber (LiPMIC) have been in development for the past two years for the purpose of providing large-area neutron detector. this system would be suitable for remote deployment for homeland security and counterterrorism needs at borders, ports, and nuclear facilities. A prototype of LiPMIC is expected to provide a similar level of performance to the current industry-standard, He-3 proportional counters, while keeping the initial cost of procurement down by an order of magnitude, especially where large numbers of detectors are required. The overall design aspect and the efficiency optimization process is discussed. Specifically, the MCNP simulations of a single-cell prototype were performed and benchmarked with the experimental results. MCNP simulations of a three dimensional array design show intrinsic efficiency comparable to that of an array of He-3 proportional counters. LiPMIC has shown steady progress toward fulfilling the design expectations and future design modification and optimization are discussed.

  4. The control system of the multi-strip ionization chamber for the HIMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Y. J.; Mao, R. S.; Xu, Z. G.; Li, Peng; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhang, Nong

    2015-03-01

    Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) is a carbon ion cancer treatment facility which is being built by the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in China. In this facility, transverse profile and intensity of the beam at the treatment terminals will be measured by the multi-strip ionization chamber. In order to fulfill the requirement of the beam position feedback to accomplish the beam automatic commissioning, less than 1 ms reaction time of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) of this detector must be achieved. Therefore, the control system and software framework for DAQ have been redesigned and developed with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (CompactRIO) instead of PXI 6133. The software is Labview-based and developed following the producer-consumer pattern with message mechanism and queue technology. The newly designed control system has been tested with carbon beam at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) and it has provided one single beam profile measurement in less than 1 ms with 1 mm beam position resolution. The fast reaction time and high precision data processing during the beam test have verified the usability and maintainability of the software framework. Furthermore, such software architecture is easy-fitting to applications with different detectors such as wire scanner detector.

  5. Determination of absorbed dose in high-energy electron and photon radiation by means of an uncalibrated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Klevenhagen, S C

    1991-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a dosimetric method based on an ionization chamber which has an uncalibrated sensitive volume but which behaves as a Bragg-Gray cavity in high-energy radiation. The new type of chamber developed in the course of this study has a variable volume and is constructed from water-similar materials. It can be used in a water phantom directly in a beam of a therapy megavoltage machine under clinical conditions. The chamber allows absorbed dose to be determined from first principles, overcoming many of the problems encountered with conventional dosimetry based on calibrated chambers. The study involved an intercomparison of the performance of the new chamber in high-energy electron and photon radiation with the conventional calibrated chambers employed according to the established dosimetry protocols. Good agreement was found between these dosimetric methods and it may therefore be concluded that the method developed in this work can be successfully employed for absolute dosimetry. The new chamber is a promising device for research in various aspects of dosimetry.

  6. Effect of the calibration in water and the build-up cap on the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Hyvönen, H; Uusi-Simola, J; Jokelainen, I; Kosunen, A; Kortesniemi, M; Seppälä, T; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium-walled argon gas flow ionization chamber (Mg(Ar)) is used for photon dose measurements in the epithermal neutron beam of FiR 1 reactor in Finland. In this study, the photon dose measurements were re-evaluated against calculations applying a new chamber calibration factor defined in water instead of in air. Also, effect of the build-up cap on the measurements was investigated. The new calibration factor provides improved agreement between measured and calculated photon dose. Use of the build-up cap does not affect the measured signal in water in neutron beam.

  7. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Syam Kumar, S.A.; Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2012-01-01

    The recalculation of 1 fraction from a patient treatment plan on a phantom and subsequent measurements have become the norms for measurement-based verification, which combines the quality assurance recommendations that deal with the treatment planning system and the beam delivery system. This type of evaluation has prompted attention to measurement equipment and techniques. Ionization chambers are considered the gold standard because of their precision, availability, and relative ease of use. This study evaluates and compares 5 different ionization chambers: phantom combinations for verification in routine patient-specific quality assurance of RapidArc treatments. Fifteen different RapidArc plans conforming to the clinical standards were selected for the study. Verification plans were then created for each treatment plan with different chamber-phantom combinations scanned by computed tomography. This includes Medtec intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom with micro-ionization chamber (0.007 cm{sup 3}) and pinpoint chamber (0.015 cm{sup 3}), PTW-Octavius phantom with semiflex chamber (0.125 cm{sup 3}) and 2D array (0.125 cm{sup 3}), and indigenously made Circular wax phantom with 0.6 cm{sup 3} chamber. The measured isocenter absolute dose was compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) plan. The micro-ionization chamber shows more deviations when compared with semiflex and 0.6 cm{sup 3} with a maximum variation of -4.76%, -1.49%, and 2.23% for micro-ionization, semiflex, and farmer chambers, respectively. The positive variations indicate that the chamber with larger volume overestimates. Farmer chamber shows higher deviation when compared with 0.125 cm{sup 3}. In general the deviation was found to be <1% with the semiflex and farmer chambers. A maximum variation of 2% was observed for the 0.007 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber, except in a few cases. Pinpoint chamber underestimates the calculated isocenter dose by a maximum of 4.8%. Absolute dose

  8. Neutron Polarizers Based on Polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Snow

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this work, which is a collaborative effort between Indiana University, NIST, and Hamilton College, is to extend the technique of polarized neutron scattering into new domains by the development and application of polarized 3He-based neutron spin filters. After the IPNS experiment which measured Zeeman sp[litting in surface scattered neutrons using a polarized 3He cell as a polarization analyzer transporterd by car from Bloomington to Chicago, the Indiana work focused on technical developments to improve the 3He polarization of the Indiana compression system. The compression system was rebuilt with a new valve system which allows gas trapped in the dead volume of the compressors at the end of the piston stroke to be exhausted and conducted back to the optical pumping cell where it can be repolarized. We also incorporated a new intermediate storage volume made at NIST from 1720 glass which will reduce polarization losses between the compressors. Furthermore, we improved the stability of the 1083 nm laser by cooling the LMA rod. We achieved 60% 3he polarization in the optical pumping cell and 87% preservation of the polarization during compression. In parallel we built a magnetically-shielded transport solenoid for use on neutron scattering instruments such as POSY which achieves a fractional field uniformity of better than 10-3 per cm. The field was mapped using an automated 3D field mapping system for in-situ measurement of magnetic field gradients Diluted magnetic semiconductors offer many exciting opportunities for investigation of spintronic effects in solids and are certain to be one of the most active areas of condensed matter physics over then next several years. These materials can act as efficient spin injectors for devices that make use of spin-dependent transport phenomena. We just (late July 2002) finished a neutron reflectivity experiment at NIST on a GaMnAs trilayer film. This material is a ferromagnetic semiconductor which is of interest

  9. A standard Fricke dosimeter compared to an ionization chamber used for dosimetric characterization of 60Co photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussous, Ouiza; Medjadj, Toufik

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the Fricke dosimeter water equivalent system for measurement of dosimetric parameters for photon beam. The parameters measured with the Fricke dosimeter were compared to those obtained with an ionization chamber. In this work characteristics for 60Co γ-rays of field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 cm2 to 20 × 20 cm2 are reported. The measurements were carried out in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory using a collimated 60Co gamma source therapy unit. The 60Co beam output in terms of absorbed dose to water was obtained as per IAEA TRS 398 recommendations using cylindrical ionization chamber, whose ND,w has been supplied by the IAEA's reference laboratory. Specific quantities measured include: output factors, peak scatter factor, lateral beam profiles and percentage depth dose. The Fricke dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom using the suitable poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA stand. Our results demonstrate that Fricke dosimeter and ionization chamber agree with each other.

  10. Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors in proton beams using detailed simulation of ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomà, Carles; Andreo, Pedro; Sempau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    This work calculates beam quality correction factors (k Q ) in monoenergetic proton beams using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of ionization chambers. It uses the Monte Carlo code penh and the electronic stopping powers resulting from the adoption of two different sets of mean excitation energy values for water and graphite: (i) the currently ICRU 37 and ICRU 49 recommended {{I}\\text{w}}=75~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=78~\\text{eV} and (ii) the recently proposed {{I}\\text{w}}=78~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=81.1~\\text{eV} . Twelve different ionization chambers were studied. The k Q factors calculated using the two different sets of I-values were found to agree with each other within 1.6% or better. k Q factors calculated using current ICRU I-values were found to agree within 2.3% or better with the k Q factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398, and within 1% or better with experimental values published in the literature. k Q factors calculated using the new I-values were also found to agree within 1.1% or better with the experimental values. This work concludes that perturbation correction factors in proton beams—currently assumed to be equal to unity—are in fact significantly different from unity for some of the ionization chambers studied.

  11. Surface tension maximum of liquid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Hasegawa, Syuichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Okuda, Yuichi

    2000-07-01

    The surface tension of liquid 3He was measured using the capillary-rise method. Suzuki et al. have reported that its temperature dependence was almost quenched below 120 mK. Here we have examined it with higher precision and found that it has a small maximum around 100 mK. The amount of the maximum is about 3×10 -4 as a fraction of the surface tension at 0 K. The density of liquid 3He increases with temperature by about 5×10 -4 in Δ ρ/ ρ between 0 and 100 mK. This density change could be one of the reasons of the surface tension maximum around 100 mK.

  12. General collection efficiency in liquid iso-octane and tetramethylsilane used as sensitive media in a thimble ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Bengt Erik; Bahar-Gogani, Jalil; Wickman, Göran

    1999-09-01

    The general collection efficiency in the dielectric liquids iso-octane (C8H18; 2-2-4 trimethylpentane) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4), used as sensitive media in a thimble liquid ionization chamber (LIC) with a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm, has been studied. Measurements were made for continuous radiation at varying dose rates using 140 keV photons from the decay of 99mTc for chamber polarizing voltages of 50, 100 and 500 V. The maximum dose rate in each measurement session was about 150 mGy min-1. The experimental results were compared with theoretical general collection efficiencies calculated by the equation for the general collection efficiency in gases. The results show that the general collection efficiency in a thimble LIC for continuous radiation can be calculated with the equation for the general collection efficiency in gas ionization chambers, using the same chamber geometry correction factors and analogous characteristic ion recombination parameters for the dielectric liquids.

  13. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baeumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-01-01

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXX(Evolution) but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXX(Evolution), a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXX(Evolution) can be up to 4%, it is < 1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXX(Evolution) should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be > 1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended.

  14. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baeumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-01-01

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXX(Evolution) but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXX(Evolution), a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXX(Evolution) can be up to 4%, it is < 1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXX(Evolution) should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be > 1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended. PMID:26103492

  15. First detection of 3He+ in the planetary nebula IC 418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Rizzo, J. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.; García-Miró, C.; Morisset, C.; Gray, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    The 3He isotope is important to many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution, chemical evolution, and cosmology. The isotope is produced in low-mass stars which evolve through the planetary nebula (PN) phase. 3He abundances in PNe can help test models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We present the detection of the 3He+ emission line using the single dish Deep Space Station 63, towards the PN IC 418. We derived a 3He/H abundance in the range 1.74 ± 0.8 × 10-3 to 5.8 ± 1.7 × 10-3, depending on whether part of the line arises in an outer ionized halo. The lower value for 3He/H ratio approaches values predicted by stellar models which include thermohaline mixing, but requires that large amounts of 3He are produced inside low-mass stars which enrich the interstellar medium (ISM). However, this overpredicts the 3He abundance in H II regions, the ISM, and protosolar grains, which is known to be of the order of 10-5. This discrepancy questions our understanding of the evolution of the 3He, from circumstellar environments to the ISM.

  16. Coupling between Solid 3He on Aerogel and Superfluid 3He in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Whitehead, R. C. V.; Skyba, P.

    2006-09-07

    We have cooled liquid 3He contained in a 98% open aerogel sample surrounded by bulk superfluid 3He-B at zero pressure to below 120 {mu}K. The aerogel sample is placed in a quasiparticle blackbody radiator cooled by a Lancaster-style nuclear cooling stage to {approx}200 {mu}K. We monitor the temperature of the 3He inside the blackbody radiator using a vibrating wire resonator. We find that reducing the magnetic field on the aerogel sample causes substantial cooling of all the superfluid inside the blackbody radiator. We believe this is due to the demagnetization of the solid 3He layers on the aerogel strands. This system has potential for achieving extremely low temperatures in the confined fluid.

  17. Effects of ionization chamber construction on dose measurements in a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mauceri, T.; Kase, K.

    1987-07-01

    Traditionally, measurements have been made in heterogeneous phantoms to determine the factors which should be applied to dose calculations, when calculating a dose to a heterogeneous medium. Almost all measurements have relied on relatively thin-walled ion chambers, with no attempt to match ion chamber wall material to the measuring medium. The recent AAPM dosimetry protocol has established that a mismatch between ion chamber wall and phantom material can have an effect on dose measurement. To investigate the affect of this mismatch of ion chamber wall material to phantom material, two parallel-plate ion chambers were constructed. One ion chamber from solid water, for measurements in a solid water phantom and the other from plastic lung material, for measurements in a plastic lung material phantom. Correction factors measured by matching ion chamber to media were compared to correction factors measured by using a thin-walled cavity ion chamber with no regard for matching wall and media for cobalt-60, 6-, 10- and 20-MV photon beams. The results demonstrated that the matching of ion chamber to measuring media can be ignored, provided that a small, approximately tissue-equivalent, thin-walled ion chamber is used for measuring the correction factors.

  18. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  19. Intense polarized /sup 3/He ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodrian, R.J.; Bertrand, R.; Grioux, J.; Labrie, R.; Lapainte, R.; Meunier, J.F.; Pigeon, G.; Pouliot, L.; Rioux, C.; Roy, R.

    1985-10-01

    This source is based on the atomic polarization of the 2/sup 3/S/sub 1/ metastable state of the neutral atom. A version suitable for operation on the high voltage terminal of a CN Van de Graaff has been constructed, bench tested and installed in the terminal of a 7.5 MV machine. The polarization of the atomic beam is higher than 90%. It is now fully operational and a current of /sup 3/He/sup +/ of 300 nA has been measured after acceleration.

  20. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ∼2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a ±1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 2×2cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 1×1cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this

  1. Characterization of Recombination Effects in a Liquid Ionization Chamber Used for the Dosimetry of a Radiosurgical Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Antoine; Crop, Frederik; Lacornerie, Thomas; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Most modern radiation therapy devices allow the use of very small fields, either through beamlets in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or via stereotactic radiotherapy where positioning accuracy allows delivering very high doses per fraction in a small volume of the patient. Dosimetric measurements on medical accelerators are conventionally realized using air-filled ionization chambers. However, in small beams these are subject to nonnegligible perturbation effects. This study focuses on liquid ionization chambers, which offer advantages in terms of spatial resolution and low fluence perturbation. Ion recombination effects are investigated for the microLion detector (PTW) used with the Cyberknife system (Accuray). The method consists of performing a series of water tank measurements at different source-surface distances, and applying corrections to the liquid detector readings based on simultaneous gaseous detector measurements. This approach facilitates isolating the recombination effects arising from the high density of the liquid sensitive medium and obtaining correction factors to apply to the detector readings. The main difficulty resides in achieving a sufficient level of accuracy in the setup to be able to detect small changes in the chamber response. PMID:24835586

  2. Characterization of recombination effects in a liquid ionization chamber used for the dosimetry of a radiosurgical accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Antoine; Crop, Frederik; Lacornerie, Thomas; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Most modern radiation therapy devices allow the use of very small fields, either through beamlets in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or via stereotactic radiotherapy where positioning accuracy allows delivering very high doses per fraction in a small volume of the patient. Dosimetric measurements on medical accelerators are conventionally realized using air-filled ionization chambers. However, in small beams these are subject to nonnegligible perturbation effects. This study focuses on liquid ionization chambers, which offer advantages in terms of spatial resolution and low fluence perturbation. Ion recombination effects are investigated for the microLion detector (PTW) used with the Cyberknife system (Accuray). The method consists of performing a series of water tank measurements at different source-surface distances, and applying corrections to the liquid detector readings based on simultaneous gaseous detector measurements. This approach facilitates isolating the recombination effects arising from the high density of the liquid sensitive medium and obtaining correction factors to apply to the detector readings. The main difficulty resides in achieving a sufficient level of accuracy in the setup to be able to detect small changes in the chamber response.

  3. Electron beam quality correction factors for plane-parallel ionization chambers: Monte Carlo calculations using the PENELOPE system.

    PubMed

    Sempau, Josep; Andreo, Pedro; Aldana, Judith; Mazurier, Jocelyne; Salvat, Francesc

    2004-09-21

    Simulations of three plane-parallel ionization chambers have been used to determine directly the chamber- and quality-dependent factors fc,Q, instead of the product (Sw,air p)Q, and kQ,Q0 (or kQ,Q,int) for a broad range of electron beam qualities (4-20 MeV) using divergent monoenergetic beams and phase-space data from two accelerators. An original calculation method has been used which circumvents the weakness of the so far assumed independence between stopping-power ratios and perturbation factors. Very detailed descriptions of the geometry and materials of the chambers have been obtained from the manufacturers, and prepared as input to the PENELOPE 2003 Monte Carlo system using a computer code that includes correlated sampling and particle splitting. Values of the beam quality factors have been determined for the case of an electron reference beam. The calculated values have been compared with those in the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol and the differences analysed. The results for a NACP-02 chamber show remarkably good agreement with TRS-398 at high electron beam qualities but differ slightly at low energies. Arguments to explain the differences include questioning the undemonstrated assumption that the NACP is a 'perturbation-free' chamber even at very low electron beam energies. Results for Wellhöfer PPC-40 and PPC-05 chambers cannot be compared with data from others for these chambers because no calculations or reliable experimental data exist. It has been found that the results for the PPC-40 are very close to those of a Roos chamber, but the values for the PPC-05 are considerably different from those of a Markus chamber, and rather approach those of a Roos chamber. Results for monoenergetic electrons and accelerator phase-space data have been compared to assess the need for detailed and costly simulations, finding very small differences. This questions the emphasis given in recent years to the use of 'realistic' source data for accurate electron beam

  4. Nuclear Electric Dipole Moment of 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I; P.Liu, C; Friar, J L; Hayes, A C; Navratil, P

    2008-04-08

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a physical system would require time-reversal (T) violation, which is equivalent to charge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation by CPT invariance. Experimental programs are currently pushing the limits on EDMs in atoms, nuclei, and the neutron to regimes of fundamental theoretical interest. Nuclear EDMs can be studied at ion storage rings with sensitivities that may be competitive with atomic and neutron measurements. Here we calculate the magnitude of the CP-violating EDM of {sup 3}He and the expected sensitivity of such a measurement to the underlying CP-violating interactions. Assuming that the coupling constants are of comparable magnitude for {pi}-, {rho}-, and {omega}-exchanges, we find that the pion-exchange contribution dominates. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of the {sup 3}He EDM is complementary to the planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and could provide a powerful constraint for the theoretical models of the pion-nucleon P,T-violating interaction.

  5. Nuclear Electric Dipole Moment of ^{3}_He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Liu, C.-P.; Friar, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Navratil, P.

    2008-01-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a physical system would require time-reversal (T) violation, which is equivalent to charge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation by CPT invariance. Experimental programs are currently pushing the limits on EDMs in atoms, nuclei, and the neutron to regimes of fundamental theoretical interest. Nuclear EDMs can be studied at ion storage rings with sensitivities that may be competitive with atomic and neutron measurements. Here we calculate the magnitude of the CP-violating EDM of ^{3}_He and the expected sensitivity of such a measurement to the underlyng CP-violating interactions. Assuming that the coupling constants are of comparable magnitude for {\\pi}-, {\\rho}-, and {\\omega}-exchanges, we find that the pion-exchange contribution dominates. Our results suggest that a measurement of the ^{3}_He EDM is complementary to the planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and could provide a powerful constraint for the theoretical models of the pion-nucleon P,T-violating interaction.

  6. A Liquid Xenon Ionization Chamber in an All-fluoropolymer Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    LePort, F.; Pocar, A.; Bartoszek, L.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Flatt, B.; Gratta, G.; Green, M.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O'Sullivan, K.; Wodin, J.; Woisard, D.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Applied Plastics Technology, Bristol /Neuchatel U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Alabama U. /Moscow, ITEP

    2007-02-26

    A novel technique has been developed to build vessels for liquid xenon ionization detectors entirely out of ultra-clean fluoropolymer. We describe the advantages in terms of low radioactivity contamination, provide some details of the construction techniques, and show the energy resolution achieved with a prototype all-fluoropolymer ionization detector.

  7. An experimental study of recombination and polarity effect in a set of customized plane parallel ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Kron, T; McNiven, A; Witruk, B; Kenny, M; Battista, J

    2006-12-01

    Plane parallel ionization chambers are an important tool for dosimetry and absolute calibration of electron beams used for radiotherapy. Most dosimetric protocols require corrections for recombination and polarity effects, which are to be determined experimentally as they depend on chamber design and radiation quality. Both effects were investigated in electron beams from a linear accelerator (Varian 21CD) for a set of four tissue equivalent plane parallel ionization chambers customized for the present research by Standard Imaging (Madison WI). All four chambers share the same design and air cavity dimensions, differing only in the diameter of their collecting electrode and the corresponding width of the guard ring. The diameters of the collecting electrodes were 2 mm, 4 mm, 10 mm and 20 mm. Measurements were taken using electron beams of nominal energy 6 to 20 MeV in a 10 cm x 10 cm field size with a SSD of 100 cm at various depths in a Solid Water slab phantom. No significant variation of recombination effect was found with radiation quality, depth of measurement or chamber design. However, the polarity effect exceeded 5% for the chambers with small collecting electrode for an effective electron energy below 4 MeV at the point of measurement. The magnitude of the effect increased with decreasing electron energy in the phantom. The polarity correction factor calculated following AAPM protocol TG51 ranged from approximately 1.00 for the 20.0 mm chamber to less than 0.95 for the 2 mm chamber at 4.1 cm depth in a electron beam of nominally 12 MeV. By inverting the chamber it could be shown that the polarity effect did not depend on the polarity of the electrode first traversed by the electron beam. Similarly, the introduction of an air gap between the overlying phantom layer and the chambers demonstrated that the angular distribution of the electrons at the point of measurement had a lesser effect on the polarity correction than the electron energy itself. The

  8. Evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of multi-leaf and conventional collimated radiation fields using a scanning liquid ionization chamber EPID.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, M; Bezak, E

    2008-12-01

    The characteristics of radiation fields set up using conventional and Multi-Leaf collimators were investigated using a Scanning Liquid Ionization Chamber Electronic Portal Imaging Device (SLIC-EPID). Results showed that the radiation fields set up using MLCs are generally larger than those set up using conventional collimators. A significant difference was observed between the penumbra width for conventional and MLC radiation fields. SLIC-EPID was found to be a sensitive device to evaluate the characteristics of the radiation fields generated with MLCs.

  9. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between overall

  10. Discovery of multiple, ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions and a new mode of operation for drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Ifft, Daniel P.

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the surprising discovery of multiple species of ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions in gas mixtures containing electronegative CS{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, identified by their slightly different drift velocities. Data are presented to understand the formation mechanism and identity of these new anions. Regardless of the micro-physics, however, this discovery offers a new, trigger-less mode of operation for the drift chambers. A demonstration of trigger-less operation is presented.

  11. {sup 3}He melting pressure thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.; Adams, E.D.

    1995-10-01

    High-precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature have been made from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK using a {sup 60}Co nuclear orientation primary thermometer and a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer. Temperatures for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A}=2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB}=1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N}=0.934 mK. These fixed points and a functional form for P(T) constitute a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  12. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of /sup 3/He gas. I. Pure /sup 3/He

    SciTech Connect

    Lusher, C.P.; Secca, M.F.; Richards, M.G.

    1988-07-01

    Longitudinal relaxation times T/sub 1/ have been measured in /sup 3/He gas, using pulsed NMR, for number densities between 3 /times/ 10/sup 23/ and 6 /times/ 10/sup 25/ spins m/sup /minus/3/ and temperatures between 0.6 and 15 K. Relaxation takes place on or near the walls of the Pyrex sample cells and measurements of T/sub 1/ give information about the surface phases. A cryogenic wall coating of solid molecular hydrogen was found to delay the formation of a /sup 3/He monolayer on cooling, and T/sub 1/ measurements were consistent with a binding energy of approx. 13 K for a /sup 3/He atom to a hydrogen surface. At temperatures below approx. 2 K a completed /sup 3/He monolayer forms on the H/sub 2/ coating. No variation of the areal density of monolayer completion with bulk number density at fixed temperature could be observed and the completed /sup 3/He monolayer is thought to be a dense fluid. Baking the Pyrex sample cells under vacuum and using an rf discharge in /sup 3/He gas to clean the walls before sealing in the sample gas were found to increase the observed T/sub 1/'s by up to three orders of magnitude. Once a /sup 3/He monolayer has formed on the H/sub 2/ surface in these cleaned, sealed cells, the dipolar interaction between adsorbed spins is thought to be the dominant source of longitudinal relaxation. The data are consistent with a dipolar relaxation model with a correlation time of approx. 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/9/ sec. This time is long compared to the value of 10/sup /minus/11/ or 10/sup /minus/12/ sec in the 3D fluid. This suggests that if the surface phase is a 2D fluid and the dipolar mechanism is indeed the dominant one, then the atoms in the 2D fluid are less mobile than in three dimensions. This is consistent with recent susceptibility measurements.

  13. Positioning of a plane-parallel ionization chamber in clinical electron beams and the impact on perturbation factors.

    PubMed

    Zink, K; Wulff, J

    2009-04-21

    Current dosimetry protocols recommend the use of plane-parallel ionization chambers for the dosimetry of clinical electron beams. The necessary perturbation corrections p(wall) and p(cav) are assumed to be unity, independent of the depth of measurement and the energy of the primary electrons. To verify these assumptions detailed Monte Carlo studies of a Roos chamber in clinical electron beams with energies in the range of 6-21 MeV are performed at different depths in water and analyzed in terms of Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Separate simulations for the perturbation corrections p(wall) and p(cav) indicate quite different properties of both correction factors with depth. Dose as well as fluence calculations show a nearly depth-independent wall correction factor for a shift of the Roos chamber Deltaz = -0.017 cm toward the focus. This value is in good agreement with the positioning recommendation given in all dosimetry protocols. Regarding the fluence perturbation p(cav) the simulation of the electron fluence inside the air cavity in comparison to water unambiguously reveals an in-scattering of low energy electrons, despite the fact, that the cavity is 'well guarded'. For depths beyond the reference depth z(ref) this effect is superimposed by an increased loss of primary electrons from the beam resulting in p(cav) > 1. This effect is largest for low electron energies but present for all electron energies involved in this study. Based on the different depth dependences of p(wall) and p(cav) it is possible to choose a chamber shift Deltaz in a way to minimize the depth dependence of the overall perturbation factor p. For the Roos chamber this shift is Deltaz = -0.04 cm independent of electron energy.

  14. The change of response of ionization chambers in the penumbra and transmission regions: impact for IMRT verification.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, D; Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Hartmann, G H; Gómez, F; Leal, A

    2008-04-01

    Significant deviations from the expected dose have been reported in the absolute dosimetry validation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment when individual segments are analyzed. However, when full treatment is considered and all segment doses are added together, these discrepancies fade out, leading to overall dose deviations below a 5% action level. This contradictory behavior may be caused by a partial compensation between detector over-responding and under-responding for measurement conditions far from radiation equilibrium. We consider three treatment verification scenarios that may lead to ionization chamber miss-responding, namely: narrow beam irradiation, field penumbra location and multi-leaf collimator transmission contribution. In this work we have analyzed the response of three different ionization chambers with different active volume under these conditions by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods. Correction factors needed to convert the detector readout into actual dose to water were calculated by inserting the specific detector geometry (carefully modeled) into the simulations. This procedure required extensive use of parallel computing resources in order to achieve the desired level of uncertainty in the final results. The analysis of the simulations shows the relative contribution of each of the three previously mentioned miss-responding scenarios. Additionally, we provide some evidence on dose deviation compensation in multi-segment radiotherapy treatment verification.

  15. Dosimetric parameters for small field sizes using Fricke xylenol gel, thermoluminescent and film dosimeters, and an ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzmán; de Oliveira, Lucas N; de Almeida, Carlos E; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2007-03-01

    Dosimetric measurements in small therapeutic x-ray beam field sizes, such as those used in radiosurgery, that have dimensions comparable to or smaller than the build-up depth, require special care to avoid incorrect interpretation of measurements in regions of high gradients and electronic disequilibrium. These regions occur at the edges of any collimated field, and can extend to the centre of small fields. An inappropriate dosimeter can result in an underestimation, which would lead to an overdose to the patient. We have performed a study of square and circular small field sizes of 6 MV photons using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) and film dosimeters. PMMA phantoms were employed to measure lateral beam profiles (1 x 1, 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 cm2 for square fields and 1, 2 and 4 cm diameter circular fields), the percentage depth dose, the tissue maximum ratio and the output factor. An ionization chamber (IC) was used for calibration and comparison. Our results demonstrate that high resolution FXG, TLD and film dosimeters agree with each other, and that an ionization chamber, with low lateral resolution, underestimates the absorbed dose. Our results show that, when planning small field radiotherapy, dosimeters with adequate lateral spatial resolution and tissue equivalence are required to provide an accurate basic beam data set to correctly calculate the absorbed dose in regions of electronic disequilibrium.

  16. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  17. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  18. Experimental investigation of the effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in ⁶⁰Co radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2011-11-21

    In the late 1970s, Johansson et al (1978 Int. Symp. National and International Standardization of Radiation Dosimetry (Atlanta 1977) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 243-70) reported experimentally determined displacement correction factors (p(dis)) for cylindrical ionization chamber dosimetry in ⁶⁰Co and high-energy photon beams. These p(dis) factors have been implemented and are currently in use in a number of dosimetry protocols. However, the accuracy of these factors has recently been questioned by Wang and Rogers (2009a Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1609-20), who performed Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments performed by Johansson et al. They reported that the inaccuracy of the p(dis) factors originated from the normalization procedure used by Johansson et al. In their experiments, Johansson et al normalized the measured depth-ionization curves at the depth of maximum ionization for each of the different ionization chambers. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of air cavity size of cylindrical ionization chambers in a PMMA phantom and ⁶⁰Co γ-beam. Two different pairs of air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical construction and materials but different air cavity volume (diameter). A 20 MeV electron beam was utilized to determine the ratio of the mass of air in the cavity of the two chambers in each pair. This ratio of the mass of air in each pair was then used to compare the ratios of the ionizations obtained at different depths in the PMMA phantom and ⁶⁰Co γ-beam using the two pairs of chambers. The diameter of the air cavity of cylindrical ionization chambers influences both the depth at which the maximum ionization is observed and the ionization per unit mass of air at this depth. The correction determined at depths of 50 mm and 100 mm is smaller than the correction currently used in many dosimetry protocols. The results presented here agree with the findings of Wang and Rogers

  19. Experimental investigation of the effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in 60Co radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2011-11-01

    In the late 1970s, Johansson et al (1978 Int. Symp. National and International Standardization of Radiation Dosimetry (Atlanta 1977) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 243-70) reported experimentally determined displacement correction factors (pdis) for cylindrical ionization chamber dosimetry in 60Co and high-energy photon beams. These pdis factors have been implemented and are currently in use in a number of dosimetry protocols. However, the accuracy of these factors has recently been questioned by Wang and Rogers (2009a Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1609-20), who performed Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments performed by Johansson et al. They reported that the inaccuracy of the pdis factors originated from the normalization procedure used by Johansson et al. In their experiments, Johansson et al normalized the measured depth-ionization curves at the depth of maximum ionization for each of the different ionization chambers. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of air cavity size of cylindrical ionization chambers in a PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam. Two different pairs of air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical construction and materials but different air cavity volume (diameter). A 20 MeV electron beam was utilized to determine the ratio of the mass of air in the cavity of the two chambers in each pair. This ratio of the mass of air in each pair was then used to compare the ratios of the ionizations obtained at different depths in the PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam using the two pairs of chambers. The diameter of the air cavity of cylindrical ionization chambers influences both the depth at which the maximum ionization is observed and the ionization per unit mass of air at this depth. The correction determined at depths of 50 mm and 100 mm is smaller than the correction currently used in many dosimetry protocols. The results presented here agree with the findings of Wang and Rogers' Monte Carlo

  20. Use of a two-dimensional ionization chamber array for proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Gillin, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Two-dimensional ion chamber arrays are primarily used for conventional and intensity modulated radiotherapy quality assurance. There is no commercial device of such type available on the market that is offered for proton therapy quality assurance. We have investigated suitability of the MatriXX, a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array detector for proton therapy QA. This device is designed to be used for photon and electron therapy QA. The device is equipped with 32 x 32 parallel plate ion chambers, each with 4.5 mm diam and 7.62 mm center-to-center separation. A 250 MeV proton beam was used to calibrate the dose measured by this device. The water equivalent thickness of the buildup material was determined to be 3.9 mm using a 160 MeV proton beam. Proton beams of different energies were used to measure the reproducibility of dose output and to evaluate the consistency in the beam flatness and symmetry measured by MatriXX. The output measurement results were compared with the clinical commissioning beam data that were obtained using a 0.6 cc Farmer chamber. The agreement was consistently found to be within 1%. The profiles were compared with film dosimetry and also with ion chamber data in water with an excellent agreement. The device is found to be well suited for quality assurance of proton therapy beams. It provides fast two-dimensional dose distribution information in real time with the accuracy comparable to that of ion chamber measurements and film dosimetry.

  1. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, B.; Zamani Zeinali, H.; Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A.; Shahvar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm3 dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  2. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  3. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  4. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the

  5. sup 3 He- sup 3 He dating: A case for mixing of young and old groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kamensky, I.L.; Tolstikhin, I.N. ); Tokarev, I.V. )

    1991-10-01

    {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He and {sup 20}Ne/{sup 4}He ratios were measured in shallow underground waters (opened by water-supplying wells) of the Large Vud-Javr intramountain artesian basin in the Khibiny alkaline massif, the Kola Peninsula. The ratios vary from 1.321 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.065 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and from 1.412 to 2.941, respectively, and a well-defined correlation is observed between them. Both these ratios in aquifers are known to be time-dependent, the former increases with time due to accumulation of {sup 3}He, produced in waters by {sup 3}H {beta}-decay; the latter decreases due to migration of helium from water-bearing rocks into the waters. The correlation is interpreted as a result of the mixing of two different types of waters. The approximation line enables the authors to estimate the isotopic ratios for the endmembers participating in the mixing and the mean residence time ({tau}) of tritigenic helium-3 in the water: (1) {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 3.655 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, {sup 20}Ne/{sup 4}He = 4.03, and taking into consideration {sup 3}H concentrations in the well waters, {sup 3}H = 31.1 TU (practically the same for all samples), {tau} = 15.8 {plus minus} 1.5 years for the young water; (2) {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 0.20 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, {sup 20}Ne/{sup 4}He = 0.18 and T = 0.11 Ma for the old one, the contribution of the old water being less than 10%. In one well a considerable contribution of modern-day meteoric water, about 16%, is observed.

  6. Characterization of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber with the Valencia lodgment for (125)I seed verification.

    PubMed

    Tornero-López, Ana M; Torres Del Río, Julia; Ruiz, Carmen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Guirado, Damián; Lallena, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    In brachytherapy using (125)I seed implants, a verification of the air kerma strength of the sources used is required. Typically, between 40 and 100 seeds are implanted. Checking all of them is unaffordable, especially when seeds are disposed in sterile cartridges. Recently, a new procedure allowing the accomplishment of the international recommendations has been proposed for the seedSelectron system of Elekta Brachytherapy. In this procedure, the SourceCheck ionization chamber is used with a special lodgment (Valencia lodgment) that allows to measure up to 10 seeds simultaneously. In this work we analyze this procedure, showing the feasibility of the approximations required for its application, as well as the effect of the additional dependence with the air density that shows the chamber model used. Uncertainty calculations and the verification of the approximation needed to obtain a calibration factor for the Valencia lodgment are carried out. The results of the present work show that the chamber dependence with the air density is the same whether the Valencia lodgment is used or not. On the contrary, the chamber response profile is influenced by the presence of the lodgment. The determination of this profile requires various measurements due to the nonnegligible variability found between different experiments. If it is considered, the uncertainty in the determination of the air-kerma strength increases from 0.5% to 1%. Otherwise, a systematic additional uncertainty of 1% would occur. This could be relevant for the comparison between user and manufacturer measurements that is mandatory in the case studied here.

  7. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-21

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  8. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  9. Intelligent monitor functional model with ionization chamber for mixed nuclear radiation field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valcov, N.; Purghel, L.; Celarel, A.

    1998-12-31

    By using the statistical discrimination technique, the components of an ionization current, due to a mixed radiation field, may be simultaneously measured. A functional model, including a series manufactured gamma-ray ratemeter was done, as an intermediate step in the design of specialized nuclear instrumentation, in order to check the concept of statistical discrimination method. The obtained results are in good agreement with the estimations of the statistical discrimination method.

  10. Multi-concentric-ring open-air ionization chamber for high-intensity X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2014-11-01

    An ionization chamber with four concentric ring electrodes was used to measure doses of white, 10, 15 and 20 keV synchrotron X-ray beams. The ring-shaped electrodes, which had diameters less than 11.8 mm, collected charges independently only around the beam, excluding strong in-beam charges when the beams passed through a small hole in the electrode centers. As a result, under low saturation voltages, the measured dose rates were confirmed to correlate with the beam intensity when conversion factors calculated with a Monte Carlo code were employed. The influence of the assumed beam sizes and incident positions on the current was almost negligible, with the exception of the incident position dependence at 10 keV.

  11. A method to increase the nominal range resolution of a stack of parallel-plate ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, I.; Brons, S.; Jäkel, O.; Voss, B.; Parodi, K.

    2014-09-01

    A detector prototype based on a stack of 61 parallel-plate ionisation chambers (PPIC) interleaved with absorber plates of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was assembled for transmission imaging purposes in ion beam therapy. The thickness of the absorber sheets in the PPIC stack determines the nominal range resolution of the detector. In the current set-up, 3 mm PMMA slabs are used. The signal of the 61 active channels of the stack thereby provides a discrete approximation of the Bragg curve in the detector. In this work, a data processing method to increase the range resolution (MIRR) in a stack of ionization chambers is presented. In the MIRR the position of the maximum of the Bragg curve is deduced from the ratio of measured signals in adjacent PPIC channels. The method is developed based on Bragg curves obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and validated with experimental data of a wedge-shaped PMMA phantom acquired with the PPIC stack using carbon ion beams. The influence of the initial beam energy and of phantom inhomogeneities on the MIRR is quantitatively evaluated. Systematic errors as well as inaccuracies related to signal noise are discussed and quantified. It is shown that with the MIRR an increased range resolution of 0.7 mm PMMA equivalent or 0.8 mm water equivalent thickness is achieved for the considered experimental data.

  12. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, C.; Boissonnat, G.; Brusasco, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Marchand, B.; Mertens, T.; de Neuter, S.; Peronnel, J.

    2014-02-01

    Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, we developed an ionization chamber in collaboration with the IBA (Ion Beam Applications) company. This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBA universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Here we present the characterization of the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and flux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBA cyclotron able to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initial specifications needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative uncertainty lower than 1% in the range from 0.5 Gy/min to 8 Gy/min while the spatial resolution is better than 250 μm. The technology has been patented and five IC2/3 chambers were delivered to IBA. Nowadays, IBA produces the IC2/3 beam monitoring device as a part of its Proteus 235 product.

  13. Studies of 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Rosenberg, Michael; Rinderknecht, Hans; Petrasso, Richard; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yong Ho; Hale, Gerry; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2014-10-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He γ-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during BBN as an explanation to the high observed values in primordial material. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p +D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  14. Electron beam quality kQ,Q0 factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with penelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erazo, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code penelope/penEasy have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor fc,Q for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a 60Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2 have been considered. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} factors have been calculated as the ratio between fc,Q and {{f}\\text{c,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} . Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors.

  15. Electron beam quality k(Q,Q0) factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Erazo, F; Brualla, L; Lallena, A M

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor k(Q,Q0) for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code PENELOPE/PENEASY have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor f(c,Q) for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a (60)Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm(2) and 20 × 20 cm(2) have been considered. The k(Q,Q0) factors have been calculated as the ratio between f(c,Q) and f(c,Q0). Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The k(Q,Q0) values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors. PMID:25325343

  16. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator: the impact of a magnetic field on the response of a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Meijsing, I; Raaymakers, B W; Raaijmakers, A J E; Kok, J G M; Hogeweg, L; Liu, B; Lagendijk, J J W

    2009-05-21

    The UMC Utrecht is constructing a 1.5 T MRI scanner integrated with a linear accelerator (Lagendijk et al 2008 Radiother. Oncol. 86 25-9). The goal of this device is to facilitate soft-tissue contrast based image-guided radiotherapy, in order to escalate the dose to the tumour while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator has to be performed in the presence of a magnetic field. This paper investigates the feasibility of using a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber for absolute dosimetry. The impact of the mcagnetic field on the response of this ionization chamber has been measured and simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. Two orientations of the ionization chamber with respect to the incident beam and the magnetic field which are feasible in the MRI accelerator configuration are taken into account. Measurements are performed using a laboratory magnet ranging from 0 to 1.2 T. In the simulations a range from 0 to 2 T is used. For both orientations, the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty of the measurements and simulations. In conclusion, the response of the ionization chamber as a function of the magnetic field is understood and can be simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. /sup 3/He functions in tokamak-pumped laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    /sup 3/He placed in an annular cell around a tokamak fusion generator can convert moderated fusion neutrons to energetic ions by the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction, and thereby excite gaseous lasants mixed with the /sup 3/He while simultaneously breeding tritium. The total /sup 3/He inventory is about 4 kg for large tokamak devices. Special configurations of toroidal-field magnets, neutron moderators and beryllium reflectors are required to permit nearly uniform neutron current into the laser cell with minimal attenuation. The annular laser radiation can be combined into a single output beam at the top of the tokamak.

  18. NOTE: Determination of the recombination correction factor kS for some specific plane-parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggmoser, G.; Saum, R.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Schmid, F.; Schüle, E.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown from an evaluation of the inverse reading of the dosemeter (1/M) against the inverse of the polarizing voltage (1/V), obtained with a number of commercially available ionization chambers, using dose per pulse values between 0.16 and 5 mGy, that a linear relationship between the recombination correction factor kS and dose per pulse (DPP) can be found. At dose per pulse values above 1 mGy the method of a general equation with coefficients dependent on the chamber type gives more accurate results than the Boag method. This method was already proposed by Burns and McEwen (1998, Phys. Med. Biol. 43 2033) and avoids comprehensive and time-consuming measurements of Jaffé plots which are a prerequisite for the application of the multi-voltage analysis (MVA) or the two-voltage analysis (TVA). We evaluated and verified the response of ionization chambers on the recombination effect in pulsed accelerator beams for both photons and electrons. Our main conclusions are: (1) The correction factor kS depends only on the DPP and the chamber type. There is no influence of radiation type and energy. (2) For all the chambers investigated there is a linear relationship between kS and DPP up to 5 mGy/pulse, and for two chambers we could show linearity up to 40 mGy/pulse. (3) A general formalism, such as that of Boag, characterizes chambers exclusively by the distance of the electrodes and gives a trend for the correction factor, and therefore (4) a general formalism has to reflect the influence of the chamber construction on the recombination by the introduction of chamber-type dependent coefficients.

  19. Cosmogenic 3He in igneous and fossil tooth enamel fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Cerling, T. E.; Fitzgerald, P. G.

    2001-02-01

    Igneous fluorapatite samples from a suite of six granitic rocks from the Transantarctic Mountains have high 3He concentrations (to 5×10 9 atoms g -1) and high 3He/ 4He ratios (to 9×10 -7). These values are far higher than those found in several hundred igneous apatites from elsewhere around the world and are higher than can be attributed to nuclear reactions on 6Li. This 3He is almost certainly derived from cosmic ray reactions in rocks with high exposure ages at high latitude and elevation. Several samples of fossil tooth enamel fluorapatite from the Turkana Basin of Kenya are similarly rich in 3He, with up to 1×10 7 atoms 3He g -1 and 3He/ 4He ratios up to 4×10 -6. Again, this 3He is most logically attributed to cosmic ray reactions. Provided that cosmogenic 3He, like radiogenic 4He, is quantitatively retained in fluorapatite under Earth surface conditions, routine 3He exposure dating of this common phase may be possible. Based on its chemical composition, the 3He production rate in fluorapatite is about 100 atoms g -1 yr -1 at sea level and high latitude. Using this rate the apatites from the Transantarctic Mountains have apparent exposure ages of 0.5-6.2 Myr, in agreement with values elsewhere in the range. The fossil tooth enamel samples have apparent exposure ages ranging from a few up to 130 kyr. Such high exposure ages suggest some of these fossils may be lag deposits with a very long residence time at or near the Earth's surface. 3He exposure ages can provide insights to the depositional and reworking history of enamel-bearing fossils. At present the major limitations to 3He exposure dating of fluorapatite are purification of sufficient amounts of material and measurement of small amounts of 3He in the presence of large quantities of 4He. In addition, further work is necessary to establish the nucleogenic 3He background in fluorapatite.

  20. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  1. Experimental determination of the absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton beam using a water calorimeter and an ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnebin, Solange; Twerenbold, Damian; Pedroni, Eros; Meer, David; Zenklusen, Silvan; Bula, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose to water is the reference physical quantity for the energy absorbed in tissue when exposed to beams of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. The SI unit of absorbed dose to water is the gray (Gy = 1 J/kg). Ionization chambers are used as the dosimeters of choice in the clinical environment because they show a high reproducibility and are easy to use. However, ionization chambers have to be calibrated in order to convert the measured electrical charge into absorbed dose to water. In addition, protocols require these conversion factors to be SI traceable to a primary standard of absorbed dose to water. We present experimental results where the ionization chamber used for the dosimetry for the scanned proton beam facility at PSI is compared with the direct determination of absorbed dose to water from the METAS primary standard water calorimeter. The agreement of 3.2% of the dose values measured by the two techniques are within their respective statistical uncertainties.

  2. A two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber array prototype for small-field verification: characterization and first clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Vicedo, Aurora; González-Castaño, Diego M; Gago-Arias, Araceli; Pazos, Antonio; Zapata, Martín; Roselló, Joan V; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-08-21

    In this work we present the design, characterization and first clinical tests of an in-house developed two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber prototype for the verification of small radiotherapy fields and treatments containing such small fields as in radiosurgery, which consists of 2 mm × 2 mm pixels arranged on a 16×8 rectangular grid. The ionization medium is isooctane. The characterization of the device included the study of depth, field-size and dose-rate dependences, which are sufficiently moderate for a good operation at therapy radiation levels. However, the detector presents an important anisotropic response, up to ≃ 12% for front versus near-lateral incidence, which can impact the verification of full treatments with different incidences. In such a case, an anisotropy correction factor can be applied. Output factors of small square fields measured with the device show a small systematic over-response, less than 1%, when compared to unshielded diode measurements. An IMRT radiosurgery treatment has been acquired with the liquid-filled ionization chamber device and compared with film dosimetry by using the gamma method, showing good agreement: over 99% passing rates for 1.2% and 1.2 mm for an incidence-per-incidence analysis; 100% passing rates for tolerances 1.8% and 1.8 mm when the whole treatment is analysed and the anisotropy correction factor is applied. The point dose verification for each incidence of the treatment performed with the liquid-filled ionization chamber agrees within 1% with a CC01 ionization chamber. This prototype has shown the utility of this kind of technology for the verification of small fields/treatments. Currently, a larger device covering a 5 cm × 5 cm area is under development.

  3. On the interpretation of current-voltage curves in ionization chambers using the exact solution of the Thomson problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Gonçalves, J. A. C.; Bueno, C. C.

    2015-09-01

    The I - ΔV characteristic curve of a well type ionization chamber irradiated with 192Ir sources (0.75 Ci-120 Ci) was fitted using the exact solution of the Thomson problem. The recombination coefficient and saturation current were estimated using this new approach. The saturation current was compared with the results of the conventional method based on Boag-Wilson formula. It was verified that differences larger than 1% between both methods only occurred at activities higher than 55 Ci. We concluded that this new approach is recommended for a more accurate estimate of the saturation current when it is not possible to measure currents satisfying the condition I /Isat > 0.95. From the calibration curve the average value of pairs of carriers created per unit volume was estimated to be equal to η = 8.1 ×10-3cm-3s-1 Bq-1 and from that value it was estimated that ~ 17 pairs were created on average per second for each decay of the source.

  4. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm2 Si3N4 window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Jaakko; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight-energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm2 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100-1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface.

  5. Dressed spin of polarized {sup 3}He in a cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.-H.; Esler, A. M.; Peng, J. C.; Beck, D. H.; Chandler, D. E.; Clayton, S.; Williamson, S.; Yoder, J.; Hu, B.-Z.; Ngan, S. Y.; Sham, C. H.; So, L. H.

    2011-08-15

    We report a measurement of the modification of the effective precession frequency of polarized {sup 3}He atoms in response to a dressing field in a room-temperature cell. The {sup 3}He atoms were polarized using the metastability spin-exchange method. An oscillating dressing field was then applied perpendicular to the constant magnetic field. Modification of the {sup 3}He effective precession frequency was observed over a broad range of the amplitude and frequency of the dressing field. The observed effects are compared with calculations based on quantum optics formalism.

  6. Recent Advances of Polarized 3He Target at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Qiang

    2011-10-01

    Polarized {sup 3}He target has been widely used in nuclear and particle experiments to study the neutron structure in the spin degree of freedom, as most of the {sup 3}He spin is carried by the unpaired neutron. Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) process is used in Jefferson Lab Hall A to polarize its {sup 3}He target. Through developments in recent years, both the performance and corresponding polarimetry of such a target were greatly improved. Several experiments recently carried out in Hall A benefited remarkably from this target for the record highest figure of merit.

  7. Neutron Detection Alternatives to 3He for National Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Stromswold, David C.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-11-21

    One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Large radiation detection systems deployed for homeland security and proliferation detection applications use such systems. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security and basic research, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This has led to the search for an alternative technology to replace the use of 3He-based neutron detectors. In this paper, we review the testing of currently commercially available alternative technologies for neutron detection in large systems used in various national security applications.

  8. Polarized 3He- ion source with hyperfine state selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Morozov, V.; Dudnikov, A.

    2015-04-01

    High beam polarization is essential to the scientific productivity of a collider. Polarized 3He ions are an essential part of the nuclear physics programs at existing and future ion-ion and electron-ion colliders such as BNL's RHIC and eRHIC and JLab's ELIC. Ion sources with performance exceeding that achieved today are a key requirement for the development of these next generation high-luminosity high-polarization colliders. The development of high-intensity high-brightness arc-discharge ion sources at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) has opened up an opportunity for realization of a new type of a polarized 3He- ion source. This report discusses a polarized 3He- ion source based on the large difference of extra-electron auto-detachment lifetimes of the different 3He- ion hyperfine states. The highest momentum state of 5/2 has the largest lifetime of τ ˜ 350 µs while the lower momentum states have lifetimes of τ ~ 10 µs. By producing 3He- ion beam composed of only the |5/2, ±5/2> hyperfine states and then quenching one of the states by an RF resonant field, 3He- beam polarization of 90% can be achieved. Such a method of polarized 3He- production has been considered before; however, due to low intensities of the He+ ion sources existing at that time, it was not possible to produce any interesting intensity of polarized 3He- ions. The high-brightness arc-discharge ion source developed at BINP can produce a high-brightness 3He+ beam with an intensity of up to 2 A allowing for selection of up to ˜1-4 mA of 3He- ions with ˜90% polarization. The high gas efficiency of an arc-discharge source is important due to the high cost of 3He gas. Some features of such a PIS as well as prototype designs are considered. An integrated 3He- ion source design providing high beam polarization could be prepared using existing BNL equipment with incorporation of new designs of the 1) arc discharge plasma generator, 2) extraction system, 3) charge exchange jet, and 4

  9. Gas gain operations with single photon resolution using an integrating ionization chamber in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, R. H.; Sarvestani, A.; Besch, H. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Amenitsch, H.; Bernstorff, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. Initially, MicroCAT was thought of as a shielding grid (Frisch-grid) but later was used as an active electron amplification device that enables single X-ray photon resolution measurements at low fluxes even with integrating readout electronics. Moreover, the adjustable gas gain that continuously covers the entire range from pure ionization chamber mode up to high gas gains (30 000 and more) provides stable operation yielding a huge dynamic range of about 10 8 and more. First measurements on biological samples using small angle X-ray scattering techniques with synchrotron radiation will be presented.

  10. Gamow-Teller unit cross sections for (t,{sup 3}He) and ({sup 3}He,t) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Perdikakis, G.; Austin, Sam M.; Galaviz, D.; Tur, C.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Deaven, J. M.; Guess, C. J.; Hitt, G. W.; Meharchand, R.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Caesar, C.; Herlitzius, C.; Gade, A.; Howard, M. E.; Smith, E. E.; Noji, S.; Sakai, H.; Shimbara, Y.

    2011-05-15

    The proportionality between differential cross sections at vanishing linear momentum transfer and Gamow-Teller transition strength, expressed in terms of the unit cross section ({sigma}{sub GT}), was studied as a function of target mass number for (t,{sup 3}He) and ({sup 3}He,t) reactions at 115A MeV and 140A MeV, respectively. Existing ({sup 3}He,t) and (t,{sup 3}He) data on targets with mass number 12{<=}A{<=}120 were complemented with new and reevaluated (t,{sup 3}He) data on proton, deuteron, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 12}C targets. It was found that in spite of the small difference in beam energies between the two probes, the unit cross sections have a nearly identical and simple dependence on target mass number A, for A{>=}12: {sigma}{sub GT}=109/A{sup 0.65}. The factorization of the unit cross sections in terms of a kinematical factor, a distortion factor, and the strength of the effective spin-isospin transfer nucleus-nucleus interaction was investigated. Simple phenomenological functions depending on mass number A were extracted for the latter two. By comparison with plane and distorted-wave Born approximation calculations, it was found that the use of a short-range approximation for knock-on exchange contributions to the transition amplitude results in overestimated cross sections for reactions involving the composite ({sup 3}He,t) and (t,{sup 3}He) probes.

  11. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric measurements of SO2 emissions from jet engines in flight and test chamber operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Borghetti, J. F.; Federico, G. S.; Miller, T. M.; Thorn, W. F.; Viggiano, A. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Cofer, W. R.; McDougal, D. S.; Wey, C. C.

    2000-11-01

    We report the results of two measurements of the concentrations and emission indices of gas-phase sulfur dioxide (EI(SO2)) in the exhaust of an F100-200E turbofan engine. The broad goals of both experiments were to obtain exhaust sulfur speciation and aerosol properties as a function of fuel sulfur content. In the first campaign, an instrumented NASA T-39 Sabreliner aircraft flew in close formation behind several F-16 fighter aircraft to obtain near-field plume composition and aerosol properties. In the second, an F-100 engine of the same type was installed in an altitude test chamber at NASA Glenn Research Center where gas composition and nonvolatile aerosol concentrations and size distributions were obtained at the exit plane of the engine. In both experiments, SO2 concentrations were measured with the Air Force Research Laboratory chemical ionization mass spectrometer as a function of altitude, engine power, and fuel sulfur content. A significant aspect of the program was the use of the same fuels, the same engine type, and many of the same diagnostics in both campaigns. Several different fuels were purchased specifically for these experiments, including high-sulfur Jet A (˜1150 ppmm S), low-sulfur Jet A (˜10 ppmm S), medium-sulfur mixtures of these two fuels, and military JP-8+100 (˜170 and ˜300 ppmm S). The agreement between the flight and test cell measurements of SO2 concentrations was excellent, showing an overall precision of better than ±10% and an estimated absolute accuracy of ±20%. The EI(SO2) varied from 2.49 g SO2/kg fuel for the high-sulfur fuel in the test chamber to less than 0.01 g/kg for the lowest-sulfur fuel. No dependence of emission index on engine power, altitude or simulated altitude, separation distance or plume age, or the presence of contrails was observed. In all experiments the measured EI(SO2) was consistent with essentially all of the fuel sulfur appearing as gas-phase SO2 in the exhaust. However, accurate determination of S

  12. Ultrasound Attenuation in Liquid ^3He/High Porosity Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H. C.; Mulders, N.

    2005-11-01

    High porosity silica aerogels have been extensively used to study the influence of disorder in p-wave superfluid ^3He. Experimental investigations performed during the last decade revealed three distinct superfluid phases in liquid ^3He /98% aerogel system. The three phases found in this system are called as A, B, and A1-like phases (using the same nomenclature as in the bulk), although only the spin component of the order parameter has been studied and found to resemble that of corresponding bulk phases. A complete understanding of the microscopic structure of the p-wave superfluid phases requires identification of both orbital and spin components of the order parameter. Until now, there is no experimental attempt to directly probe the orbital structure in ^3He/aerogel system. To resolve this issue, we performed acoustic measurements by direct transmission of ultrasound through the ^3He/98% aerogel sample. We will present and discuss our preliminary results.

  13. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Chung, Kiwhan; Makela, Mark F.

    2009-06-30

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  14. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Robert; Konefał, Adam; Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method.

  15. Fermi liquid parameters of a 2D 3He film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusher, C. P.; Saunders, J.; Cowan, B. P.

    1990-08-01

    A temperature independent magnetic susceptibility has been observed for the second layer of 3He on graphite for second layer surface densities less than 0.055 Å -2, consistent with 2D Fermi liquid behaviour. The Landau parameter Foa is determined using known values of m ∗/m. The relative dependence of these two parameters is in good agreement with almost localised Fermion theory, as is the case in bulk liquid 3He.

  16. Polar Phase of Superfluid (3)He in Anisotropic Aerogel.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, V V; Senin, A A; Soldatov, A A; Yudin, A N

    2015-10-16

    We report the first observation of the polar phase of superfluid (3)He. This phase appears in (3)He confined in a new type of aerogel with a nearly parallel arrangement of strands which play the role of ordered impurities. Our experiments qualitatively agree with theoretical predictions and suggest that in other systems with unconventional Cooper pairing (e.g., in unconventional superconductors) similar phenomena may be found in the presence of anisotropic impurities.

  17. sup 3 He and methane in the Gulf of Aden

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Alaux, G. ); Belviso, S.; Nguyen, B.C.; Mihalopoulos, N. )

    1990-01-01

    During the OCEAT cruise (July, 1987), the vertical and spatial distributions of {sup 3}He and methane were measured at six stations over the West Sheba Ridge (Gulf of Aden). The results show significant {delta}{sup 3}He anomalies (up to 49%). The authors conclude that the origin of this signal is independent from the well known Red Sea hydrothermal {sup 3}He (of the Red Sea Brines). Thus, active hydrothermalism occurs in this extensional basin associated with spreading along an incipient mid-ocean ridge. The {sup 3}He input from the Gulf of Aden accounts for the S-N positive gradient in {sup 3}He concentration observed in the western part of the Indian Ocean. Several methane anomalies are also present (up to 664 nl/l,i.e., 25 times the regional methane background), but the CH{sub 4} and {sup 3}He signals are not systematically correlated, suggesting complex production and consumption mechanisms of methane in these areas. The authors results confirm previous observations in the South West Pacific Ocean.

  18. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  19. SU-D-213-04: Accounting for Volume Averaging and Material Composition Effects in An Ionization Chamber Array for Patient Specific QA

    SciTech Connect

    Fugal, M; McDonald, D; Jacqmin, D; Koch, N; Ellis, A; Peng, J; Ashenafi, M; Vanek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study explores novel methods to address two significant challenges affecting measurement of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) with IBA’s Matrixx Evolution™ ionization chamber array. First, dose calculation algorithms often struggle to accurately determine dose to the chamber array due to CT artifact and algorithm limitations. Second, finite chamber size and volume averaging effects cause additional deviation from the calculated dose. Methods: QA measurements were taken with the Matrixx positioned on the treatment table in a solid-water Multi-Cube™ phantom. To reduce the effect of CT artifact, the Matrixx CT image set was masked with appropriate materials and densities. Individual ionization chambers were masked as air, while the high-z electronic backplane and remaining solid-water material were masked as aluminum and water, respectively. Dose calculation was done using Varian’s Acuros XB™ (V11) algorithm, which is capable of predicting dose more accurately in non-biologic materials due to its consideration of each material’s atomic properties. Finally, the exported TPS dose was processed using an in-house algorithm (MATLAB) to assign the volume averaged TPS dose to each element of a corresponding 2-D matrix. This matrix was used for comparison with the measured dose. Square fields at regularly-spaced gantry angles, as well as selected patient plans were analyzed. Results: Analyzed plans showed improved agreement, with the average gamma passing rate increasing from 94 to 98%. Correction factors necessary for chamber angular dependence were reduced by 67% compared to factors measured previously, indicating that previously measured factors corrected for dose calculation errors in addition to true chamber angular dependence. Conclusion: By comparing volume averaged dose, calculated with a capable dose engine, on a phantom masked with correct materials and densities, QA results obtained with the Matrixx Evolution™ can be significantly

  20. Dynamics of vortex nucleation in sup 3 He- A flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N.B.; Soininen, P.I.; Salomaa, M.M. )

    1992-03-01

    Quantum phase slippage in superfluid {sup 3}He flow is simulated numerically in rectangular slab geometries. Assuming that the flow is confined to a channel having horizontal surfaces close to each other, the spatial problem reduces to the two transverse dimensions; we report time-dependent computer simulations of superfluid {sup 3}He flow in 2+1 dimensions using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. The quantum-dynamic processes of phase slippage in {sup 3}He are demonstrated to be associated with superfluid vortex nucleation; we thus confirm Anderson's assumption for phase slippage through vortex motion in superfluids. We also find several other phase-slip scenarios involving vortices, phase-slip lines, and combinations thereof for the coupled multicomponent order-parameter amplitudes. We consider both diffuse and specular boundary conditions at the side walls and demonstrate that our results are essentially independent of the boundaries. We compute the critical current for vortex nucleation as a function of the channel width, and compare it with existing theories of vortex nucleation; we also discuss our calculations in connection with experiments on phase slippage in {sup 3}He flow. One of our most important results is that the superfluid order parameter for the vortices generated in the computer simulations does not vanish anywhere; i.e., the vortices possess superfluid core structures; hence the processes of phase slip for superfluid {sup 3}He are nonlocal in space-time.

  1. Solar source regions of 3HE-rich particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Lin, R. P.; Reames, D. V.; Stone, R. G.; Liggett, M.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen alpha X-ray, and metric and kilometric radio data to examine the solar sources of energetic 3He-rich particle events observed near earth in association with impulsive 2 to 100 keV electron events were applied. Each 3He/electron event is associated with a kilometric type 3 burst belonging to a family of such bursts characterized by similar interplanetary propagation paths from the same solar active region. The 3He/electron events correlate very well with the interplanetary low frequency radio brightnesses of these events, but progressively worse with signatures from regions closer to the Sun. When H alpha brightnings can be associated with 3He/electron events, they have onsets coinciding to within 1 min of that of the associated metric type 3 burst but are often too small to be reported. The data are consistent with the earlier idea that many type 3 bursts, the 3He/electron events, are due to particle acceleration in the corona, well above the associated H alpha and X-ray flares.

  2. Nuclear electric dipole moment of {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Friar, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Liu, C.-P.; Navratil, P.

    2009-01-28

    In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

  3. Strong-Coupling and the Stripe Phase of ^3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiman, Joshua J.; Sauls, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    Thin films of superfluid 3He were predicted, based on weak-coupling BCS theory, to have a stable phase which spontaneously breaks translational symmetry in the plane of the film. This crystalline superfluid, or "stripe" phase, develops as a one-dimensional periodic array of domain walls separating degenerate B phase domains. We report calculations of the phases and phase diagram for superfluid 3He in thin films using a strong-coupling Ginzburg-Landau theory that accurately reproduces the bulk 3He superfluid phase diagram. We find that the stability of the Stripe phase is diminished relative to the A phase, but the Stripe phase is stable in a large range of temperatures, pressures, confinement, and surface conditions.

  4. Surface Waves on the Superfluids ^3He and ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, M. S.; Ranni, A.; Rysti, J.; Todoshchenko, I. A.; Tuoriniemi, J. T.

    2016-06-01

    Free surface waves were examined both in superfluids ^3He and ^4He with the premise that these inviscid media would represent ideal realizations for this fluid dynamics problem. The work in ^3He is one of the first of its kind, but in ^4He, it was possible to produce a much more complete set of data for meaningful comparison with theoretical models. Most measurements were performed at the zero temperature limit, meaning T< 100 mK for ^4He and T˜ 100 μ K for ^3He. Dozens of surface wave resonances, including up to 11 overtones, were observed and monitored as the liquid depth in the cell was varied. Despite of the wealth of data, perfect agreement with the constructed theoretical models could not be achieved.

  5. Quark-Hadron Duality in Neutron (3He) Spin Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solvignon, Patricia; Liyanage, Nilanga; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Aniol, Konrad; Averett, Todd; Boeglin, Werner; Camsonne, Alexandre; Cates, Gordon; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chudakov, Eugene; Craver, Brandon; Cusanno, Francesco; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Dipangkar; Ent, Rolf; Feuerbach, Robert; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Glashausser, Charles; Gorbenko, Viktor; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Ibrahim, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelly, J.; Keppel, Cynthia; Kim, Wooyoung; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kramer, Kevin; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Ma, Bin; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; McCormick, Kathy; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Munoz-Camacho, Carlos; Paschke, Kent; Reitz, Bodo; Saha, Arunava; Sheyor, Ran; Singh, Jaideep; Slifer, Karl; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Wang, Kebin; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Woo, Seungtae; Yang, Jae-Choon; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-10-01

    We present experimental results of the first high-precision test of quark-hadron duality in the spin-structure function g_1 of the neutron and $^3$He using a polarized 3He target in the four-momentum-transfer-squared range from 0.7 to 4.0 (GeV/c)^2. Global duality is observed for the spin-structure function g_1 down to at least Q^2 = 1.8 (GeV/c)^2 in both targets. We have also formed the photon-nucleon asymmetry A_1 in the resonance region for 3He and found no strong Q^2-dependence above 2.2 (GeV/c)^2.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  7. Rotational quenching of CS in ultracold 3He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum mechanical scattering calculations of rotational quenching of CS (v = 0) collision with 3He are performed at ultracold temperatures and results are compared with isotopic 4He collision. Rotational quenching cross sections and rate coefficients have been calculated in the ultracold region for rotational levels up to j = 10 using the He-CS potential energy surface computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. The quenching cross sections are found to be two orders of magnitude larger for the 3He than the 4He isotope under ultracold conditions. Wigner threshold law is found to be valid below 10-3 K temperature.

  8. Anisotropic phases of superfluid ^{3}he in compressed aerogel.

    PubMed

    Li, J I A; Zimmerman, A M; Pollanen, J; Collett, C A; Halperin, W P

    2015-03-13

    It has been shown that the relative stabilities of various superfluid states of ^{3}He can be influenced by anisotropy in a silica aerogel framework. We prepared a suite of aerogel samples compressed up to 30% for which we performed pulsed NMR on ^{3}He imbibed within the aerogel. We identified A and B phases and determined their magnetic field-temperature phase diagrams as a function of strain. From these results, we infer that the B phase is distorted by negative strain forming an anisotropic superfluid state more stable than the A phase.

  9. Correction factors for A1SL ionization chamber dosimetry in TomoTherapy: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Rodriguez-Romero, Ruth; Sanchez-Rubio, Patricia; Miguel Gonzalez-Castano, Diego; Gomez, Faustino; Nunez, Luis; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, an international working group on nonstandard fields presented a new formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Alfonso et al., Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] which has been adopted by AAPM TG-148. This work presents an experimental determination of the correction factors for reference dosimetry with an Exradin A1SL thimble ionization chamber in a TomoTherapy unit, focusing on: (i) machine-specific reference field, (ii) plan-class-specific reference field, and (iii) two clinical treatments. Methods: Ionization chamber measurements were performed in the TomoTherapy unit for intermediate (machine-specific and plan-class-specific) calibration fields, based on the reference conditions defined by AAPM TG-148, and two clinical treatments (lung and head-and-neck). Alanine reference dosimetry was employed to determine absorbed dose to water at the point of interest for the fields under investigation. The corresponding chamber correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber measurements ratios. Results: Two different methods of determining the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for the A1SL ionization chamber in this TomoTherapy unit, where reference conditions for conventional beam quality determination cannot be met, result in consistent values. The observed values of overall correction factors obtained for intermediate and clinical fields are consistently around 0.98 with a typical expanded relative uncertainty of 2% (k = 2), which when considered make such correction factors compatible with unity. However, all of them are systematically lower than unity, which is shown to be significant when a hypothesis test assuming a t-student distribution is performed (p=1.8x10{sup -2}). Correction factors k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}} and k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s

  10. [Experimental investigation of the collection efficiency of a PTW Roos ionization chamber irradiated with pulsed beams at high pulse dose with different pulse lengths].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Richter, Christian; Pawelke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In gas-filled ionization chambers as radiation detectors, the collection of the charge carriers is affected by the recombination effect. In dosimetry this effect must be accounted for by the saturation correction factor k(S). The physical description of the correction factor by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk for pulsed radiation is well established. However, this description is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared to the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this work experimental investigations of the saturation correction factor have been made for pulses of 4 μ s up to pulse doses of about 230 mGy, and the theory of Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk was again confirmed. For longer pulses, however, the correction factor decreases and at a pulse duration of about 200μs reaches 75% of the value valid for short pulses. This reduced influence of the ion recombination is interpreted by the reaction kinetics of ion recombination as a second-order reaction. This effect is negligible for PTW Roos chambers at clinical linear accelerators with 4 μ s pulse duration for pulse doses up to 120 mGy.

  11. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  12. Acoustic Spectroscopy of Superfluid 3He in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. P.; Choi, H.; Pollanen, J.; Halperin, W. P.

    2006-09-07

    We have designed an experiment to study the role of global anisotropic quasiparticle scattering on the dirty aerogel superfluid 3He system. We observe significant regions of two stable phases at temperatures below the superfluid transition at a pressure of 25 bar for a 98% aerogel.

  13. Minimal mass size of a stable {sup 3}He cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, R.; Navarro, J.

    2005-03-01

    The minimal number of {sup 3}He atoms required to form a bound cluster has been estimated by means of a diffusion Monte Carlo procedure within the fixed-node approximation. Several importance sampling wave functions have been employed in order to consider different shell-model configurations. The resulting upper bound for the minimal number is 32 atoms.

  14. Progress in Polarized 3He Ion Source at RCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Shimoda, T.; Yasui, S.; Yosoi, M.; Takahisa, K.; Shimakura, N.; Plis, Yu. A.; Donets, E. D.

    2007-06-13

    A long history on the polarized 3He ion source developed at RCNP is presented. We started with an 'OPPIS' (Optical Pumping Polarized Ion Source) and later found the fundamental difficulties in the OPPIS. To overcome them an 'EPPIS' (Electron Pumping Polarized Ion Source) was proposed and its validity was experimentally proven. However, a serious technical disadvantage was also found in the EPPIS. To avoid this disadvantage we proposed a new concept, 'SEPIS' (Spin Exchange Polarized Ion Source), which uses an enhanced spin-exchange cross section theoretically expected at low 3He+ incident energies in the 3He+ + Rb system. Next, we describe the present status of the SEPIS development: construction of a bench test device allowing the measurements of not only the spin-exchange cross sections {sigma}se but also the electron capture cross sections {sigma}ec for the 3He+ + Rb system. The latest experimental data on {sigma}ec are presented and compared with other previous experimental data and the theoretical calculations.Finally, a design study of the SEPIS for practical use in nuclear (cyclotron) and particle physics (synchrotron) is shortly mentioned.

  15. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M(s). The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M(s). Analytically calculated values of M(s) were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K(sc)). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K(sc) to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K(sc) were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations.

  16. Symmetry protected topological superfluid (3)He-B.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Takeshi; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Sato, Masatoshi; Machida, Kazushige

    2015-03-25

    Owing to the richness of symmetry and well-established knowledge of bulk superfluidity, the superfluid (3)He has offered a prototypical system to study intertwining of topology and symmetry. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the topological superfluidity of (3)He in a multifaceted manner, including symmetry considerations, the Jackiw-Rebbi's index theorem, and the quasiclassical theory. Special focus is placed on the symmetry protected topological superfuidity of the (3)He-B confined in a slab geometry. The (3)He-B under a magnetic field is separated to two different sub-phases: the symmetry protected topological phase and non-topological phase. The former phase is characterized by the existence of symmetry protected Majorana fermions. The topological phase transition between them is triggered by the spontaneous breaking of a hidden discrete symmetry. The critical field is quantitatively determined from the microscopic calculation that takes account of magnetic dipole interaction of the (3)He nucleus. It is also demonstrated that odd-frequency even-parity Cooper pair amplitudes are emergent in low-lying quasiparticles. The key ingredients, symmetry protected Majorana fermions and odd-frequency pairing, bring an important consequence that the coupling of the surface states to an applied field is prohibited by the hidden discrete symmetry, while the topological phase transition with the spontaneous symmetry breaking is accompanied by anomalous enhancement and anisotropic quantum criticality of surface spin susceptibility. We also illustrate common topological features between topological crystalline superconductors and symmetry protected topological superfluids, taking UPt3 and Rashba superconductors as examples.

  17. Standardization of 64Cu and 68Ga by the 4π(PC)β-γ coincidence method and calibration of the ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Luca, A; Antohe, A; Ivan, C

    2012-09-01

    The paper treats the application of the 4π(PC)β-γ coincidence method for the standardization of the radionuclides (64)Cu and (68)Ga. The general coincidence equations are written. Two types of extrapolation were described and used in measurement: the positron-annihilation coincidence, and the counting of all emitted radiations; both methods are compared with respect to results, advantages and drawbacks. The impurities' content correction was applied. The standardized solutions were used to calibrate the ionization chamber CENTRONIC IG12/20A and to determine the gamma-rays emission intensities.

  18. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  19. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI). PMID:26774395

  20. Analytic And Monte Carlo Study Of The Perturbation Factor kp For A Standard Of Dw Through An Ka Standard Ionization Chamber BEV-CC01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Verdesoto, M. X.; Álvarez Romero, J. T.

    2003-09-01

    To characterize an ionization chamber BEV-CC01 as a standard of absorbed dose to water Dw at SSDL-Mexico, the approach developed by the BIPM for 60Co gamma radiation, [1] has been chosen. This requires the estimation of a factor kp, which stems from the perturbation introduced by the presence of the ionization chamber in the water phantom, and due to finite size of the cavity. This factor is the product of four terms: ψw,c, (μen/ρ)w,c, (1 + μ'.ȳ)w,c and kcav. Two independent determinations are accomplished using a combination of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C in ITS mode [2,3] and analytic methods: one kp∥=1.1626 ± uc=: 0.90% for the chamber axis parallel to the beam axis; and another kp =1.1079± uc=0.89% for the chamber axis perpendicular to the beam axis. The variance reduction techniques: splitting-Russian roulette, source biasing and forced photon collisions are employed in the simulations to improve the calculation efficiency. The energy fluence for the 60Co housing-source Picker C/9 is obtained by realistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, it is verified by comparison of MC calculated and measured beam output air kerma factors, and percent depth dose curves in water, PDD. This spectrum is considered as input energy for a point source (74% is from primary photons and the rest 26% is from scattered radiation) in the determination of the kp factors. Details of the calculations are given together with the theoretical basis of the ionometric standard employed.

  1. Heat Capacity of Dilute 3He-4He Monolayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Masashi

    2016-05-01

    The heat capacities of a small amount of 3He dissolved in monolayer 4He films are measured to clarify natures of monolayer 4He films. With increasing areal density, the measured heat capacities gradually increase and subsequently gradually decrease. With further increase in areal density, the measured heat capacity rapidly decreases to zero over a very narrow areal density range near that of the sqrt{3} × sqrt{3} phase. These slightly complex areal-density variations and dependence on 3He concentration are discussed from the viewpoint of the known properties of 4He films. The behaviors can be explained. However, the expected two-dimensional gas-liquid or gas-solid coexistence is not observed in this study.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Spin-Polarized Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sawkey, D.; Puech, L.; Wolf, P.E.

    2006-06-02

    We present the first measurements of the thermal conductivity of spin-polarized normal liquid {sup 3}He. Using the rapid melting technique to produce nuclear polarizations up to 0.7, and a vibrating wire both as a heater and a thermometer, we show that, unlike the viscosity, the conductivity increases much less than predicted for s-wave scattering. We suggest that this might be due to a small probability for head-on collisions between quasiparticles.

  3. NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR ISOTOPIC SEPARATION OF 3HE/4HE

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, L.; Nigg, H.; Watson, H.

    2012-09-04

    The research outlined below established theoretical proof-of-concept using ab initio calculations that {sup 3}He can be separated from {sup 4}He by taking advantage of weak van der Waals interactions with other higher molecular weight rare gases such as xenon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only suggested method that exploits the physical differences of the isotopes using a chemical interaction.

  4. Density of liquid 3He in 8 T magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Hasegawa, Syuichi; Okuda, Yuichi

    2000-07-01

    We report a precise measurement of the density of liquid 3He in a 8 T field. Measurements performed at saturated vapour pressure between 30 and 300 mK show a field-induced increase of density. The relative change is about 1×10 -5 in this temperature range. These results are in agreement with a calculation based on a Maxwell relation and the pressure dependence of the susceptibility.

  5. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Groetz, J-E; Ounoughi, N; Mavon, C; Belafrites, A; Fromm, M

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™ and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  6. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetz, J.-E.; Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Fromm, M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  7. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Groetz, J.-E. Mavon, C.; Fromm, M.; Ounoughi, N.; Belafrites, A.

    2014-08-15

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  8. Characteristics of a miniature parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for measuring the intensity of synchrotron radiation from an undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2004-09-01

    In order to develop an absolute intensity monitor for synchrotron radiation from an undulator, the characteristics of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber with a plate separation of 4.2 mm, which was considered to be as narrow as possible, were investigated using 8-30 keV monoenergetic photons at SPring-8. Using a Si-PIN photodiode as the reference monitor, saturation was confirmed at 8-30 keV at a photon intensity of an order of 1013 photons/s. The collection efficiency became almost unity at 8 and 10 keV within 3.8% and 1.1%, respectively, which gradually decreased with increasing energy and attained 0.52 at 30 keV because some of the high-energy electrons escaped from the sensitive volume. When the pair of electrodes was transferred from the upper and lower sides to the left and right sides of the beam axis in order to investigate the influence of linear polarization of synchrotron radiation, a decrease in the collection efficiency was observed. Monte Carlo simulations considering linear polarization showed that the plate separation required for no electron loss was 26, 14, and 8 mm for 30, 20, and 15 keV photons, respectively. For 20 keV photons, saturation characteristics were investigated using an ionization chamber with 14 mm plate separation.

  9. High Efficiency Spin Flipper for the n3He Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Christopher; n3He Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The n3He experiment, constructed on the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source, is designed to measure the parity violating (PV) proton asymmetry Ap in the capture reaction n +3 He -->3 H + p + 765 keV The asymmetry has an estimated value Ap ~ - 1 ×10-7 and is directly related to the weak isospin conserved couplings hρ0 and ωρ0 which are of fundamental interest in the verification of the meson exchange model of low energy NN intereactions. Data production for the n3He experiment began in February 2015 and is scheduled to continue thru December 2015 - reaching a statistical sensitivity δAp ~10-8 or better. I will discuss the spin flipper which is designed using the theory of double cosine-theta coils, and capable of flipping neutron spins with an efficiency approaching its maximum value ɛsf = 1 . I will also discuss the theory of Spin Magnetic Resonance (SMR) and how it is employed by the spin flipper to flip 60 Hz pulses of cold neutrons over a range of wavelengths.

  10. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Rogers, Jeremy L.; Schweppe, John E.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-07-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in a configuration typically used for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. The specific application selected for boron-lined tube replacement in this project was one of the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) designs. This report, providing results for model development of a UNCL, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project. The current UNCL instruments utilize 3He tubes. As the first step in developing and optimizing a boron-lined proportional counter based version of the UNCL, models of eight different 3He-based UNCL detectors currently in use were developed and evaluated. A comparison was made between the simulated results and measured efficiencies for those systems with values reported in the literature. The reported experimental measurements for efficiencies and die-away times agree to within 10%.

  11. Noise Studies of Polarimetry Systems for Polarized 3 He Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katugampola, Sumudu K.; Matyas, Daniel J.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Wang, Yunxiao; Cates, Gordon D.

    2015-04-01

    The NMR technique of adiabatic fast passage (AFP) plays an important role in 3 He targets polarized using spin-exchange optical pumping. Since AFP signals before amplification are generally small, identifying these signals amidst noise caused by external electromagnetic interference and micro-phonics can be challenging. When using thermally polarized water samples for absolute calibration of AFP signals, electromagnetic and micro-phonic noise can easily dominate. Although both types of interference have often been cited as the predominant sources of noise during AFP, few studies of these effects have been done under the conditions that are typical for a polarized 3 He target. This talk will describe studies of electromagnetic and micro-phonic noise using a small-scale prototype NMR system similar to those we use to study polarized 3 He targets. We will describe the effect of using aluminum metal shielding and other methods to minimize noise. We are using these studies to inform the design of a full-scale set up that will be used to test next-generation targets for use at Jefferson Lab, and measure atomic parameters relevant to polarimetry.

  12. Enhancement of Magnetization in Liquid 3He at Aerogel Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, A.; Kondo, K.; Kato, C.; Obara, K.; Yano, H.; Ishikawa, O.; Hata, T.

    2013-05-01

    A novel feature of condensate state in liquid 3He is predicted theoretically, which consists of spin triplet s-wave Cooper pairs (Higashitani et al. in J. Low. Temp. Phys. 155:83-97, 2009). Such a spin triplet s-wave state will appear inside aerogel near the surface boundary contacting with superfluid 3He-B, and the enhancement of magnetization due to s-wave state is theoretically expected (Nagato et al. in J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 78:123603, 2009; Higashitani et al. in Phys. Rev. B 85:024524, 2012). In order to detect this proximity effect, we made the interface in columnar glass tube which coated with 2.5 layer 4He, and set a saddle shape NMR coil very near the interface. At 7 bar, we found that superfluidity in liquid 3He inside aerogel never occurred, even at considerably low temperatures. At 24 bar below T/ T c =0.392, we observed no decrease of magnetization with decreasing temperatures. This phenomenon might be due to spin triplet s-wave Cooper pairs.

  13. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  14. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  15. 3He Spin-Dependent Cross Sections and Sum Rules

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Auerbach, Leonard; Averett, Todd; Berthot, J.; Bertin, Pierre; Bertozzi, William; Black, Tim; Brash, Edward; Brown, D.; Burtin, Etienne; Calarco, John; Cates, Gordon; Chai, Zhengwei; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Ciofi, Claudio; Cisbani, Evaristo; De Jager, Cornelis; Deur, Alexandre; DiSalvo, R.; Dieterich, Sonja; Djawotho, Pibero; Finn, John; Fissum, Kevin; Fonvieille, Helene; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Garibaldi, Franco; Gasparian, Ashot; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Glashausser, Charles; Glockle, W.; Golak, J.; Goldberg, Emma; Gomez, Javier; Gorbenko, Viktor; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Hersman, F.; Holmes, Richard; Huber, Garth; Hughes, Emlyn; Humensky, Thomas; Incerti, Sebastien; Iodice, Mauro; Jensen, S.; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, C.; Jones, G.; Jones, Mark; Jutier, Christophe; Kamada, H.; Ketikyan, Armen; Kominis, Ioannis; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kramer, Kevin; Kumar, Krishna; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Kuss, Michael; Lakuriqi, Enkeleida; Laveissiere, Geraud; LeRose, John; Liang, Meihua; Liyanage, Nilanga; Lolos, George; Malov, Sergey; Marroncle, Jacques; McCormick, Kathy; McKeown, Robert; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mitchell, Joseph; Nogga, Andreas; Pace, Emanuele; Papandreou, Zisis; Pavlin, Tina; Petratos, Gerassimos; Pripstein, David; Prout, David; Ransome, Ronald; Roblin, Yves; Rowntree, David; Rvachev, Marat; Sabatie, Franck; Saha, Arunava; Salme, Giovanni; SCOPETTA, S.; Skibinski, R.; Souder, Paul; Saito, Teijiro; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Takahashi, Kazunori; Todor, Luminita; Tsubota, Hiroaki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Urciuoli, Guido; van der Meer, Rob; Vernin, Pascal; Voskanyan, Hakob; Witala, Henryk; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Xiong, Feng; Xu, Wang; Yang, Jae-Choon; Zhang, Bin; Zolnierczuk, Piotr

    2008-07-01

    We present a measurement of the spin-dependent cross sections for the \\vec{^3He}(\\vec{e},e')X} reaction in the quasielastic and resonance regions at four-momentum transfer 0.1 < Q^2< 0.9 GeV^2. The spin-structure functions have been extracted and used to evaluate the nuclear Burkhardt--Cottingham and extended GDH sum rules for the first time. Impulse approximation and exact three-body Faddeev calculations are also compared to the data in the quasielastic region.

  16. NMR Studies of 3He Films on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of NMR studies of the dynamics of 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. These studies can identify the phase transitions of the 2D films as a function of temperature. A thermally activated temperature dependence is observed for 2.6 < T < 8 K compared to a linear temperature dependence for 0.7 < T < 2.6 K. This linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in a fluid for coverages of 0.4 - 0.6 of a monolayer.

  17. High-pressure /sup 3/He gas scintillation neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Slaughter, D.R.; Prussin, S.G.

    1985-10-01

    A high-pressure, /sup 3/He-Xe gas scintillation spectrometer has been developed for neutron spectroscopy on D-D fusion plasmas. The spectrometer exhibits an energy resolution of (121 +- 20 keV) keV (FWHM) at 2.5 MeV and an efficiency of (1.9 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -3/ (n/cm/sup 2/)/sup -1/. The contribution to the resolution (FWHM) from counting statistics is only (22 +- 3 keV) and the remainder is due predominantly to the variation of light collection efficiency with location of neutron events within the active volume of the detector.

  18. Hard Photodisintegration of Proton Pairs in {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Piasetzky, Eli; Pomerantz, Ishay; Higinbotham, D.; Strauch, S.; Gilman, R.

    2008-10-13

    Hard deuteron photodisintegration has been investigated for 20 years, as its cross section follows the constituent counting rule and it provides insight into the interplay between hadronic and quark-gluon degrees of freedom in high-momentum transfer exclusive reactions. We have now measured for the first time hard pp-pair disintegration in the reaction {gamma}{sup 3}He{yields}pp+n, using kinematics corresponding to a spectator neutron. Cross sections were measured for 90 deg. c.m. at 8 beam energies, from 0.8 to 4.7 GeV. Preliminary results will be presented and compared to the hard deuteron photodisintegration data.

  19. Fermion Monte Carlo Calculations on Liquid-3He

    SciTech Connect

    Kalos, M H; Colletti, L; Pederiva, F

    2004-03-16

    Methods and results for calculations of the ground state energy of the bulk system of {sup 3}He atoms are discussed. Results are encouraging: they believe that they demonstrate that their methods offer a solution of the ''fermion sign problem'' and the possibility of direct computation of many-fermion systems with no uncontrolled approximations. Nevertheless, the method is still rather inefficient compared with variational or fixed-node approximate methods. There appears to be a significant populations size effect. The situation is improved by the inclusion of ''Second Stage Importance Sampling'' and of ''Acceptance/Rejection'' adapted to their needs.

  20. Two years experience with quality assurance protocol for patient related Rapid Arc treatment plan verification using a two dimensional ionization chamber array

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To verify the dose distribution and number of monitor units (MU) for dynamic treatment techniques like volumetric modulated single arc radiation therapy - Rapid Arc - each patient treatment plan has to be verified prior to the first treatment. The purpose of this study was to develop a patient related treatment plan verification protocol using a two dimensional ionization chamber array (MatriXX, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Method Measurements were done to determine the dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, beam direction, and field size. Also the reproducibility of the measurements was checked. For the patient related verifications the original patient Rapid Arc treatment plan was projected on CT dataset of the MatriXX and the dose distribution was calculated. After irradiation of the Rapid Arc verification plans measured and calculated 2D dose distributions were compared using the gamma evaluation method implemented in the measuring software OmniPro (version 1.5, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results The dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, field size and beam direction has shown a passing rate of 99% for field sizes between 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm for measurements of single arc. For smaller and larger field sizes than 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm the passing rate was less than 99%. The reproducibility was within a passing rate of 99% and 100%. The accuracy of the whole process including the uncertainty of the measuring system, treatment planning system, linear accelerator and isocentric laser system in the treatment room was acceptable for treatment plan verification using gamma criteria of 3% and 3 mm, 2D global gamma index. Conclusion It was possible to verify the 2D dose distribution and MU of Rapid Arc treatment plans using the MatriXX. The use of the MatriXX for Rapid Arc treatment plan verification in clinical routine is reasonable. The passing rate should be 99% than the verification

  1. [Influence of position of ionization chamber and leaf-end on verification value in IMRT verification for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Harumitsu; Nagano, Hisato; Katou, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Masanori; Watanabe, Motoi; Shimo, Takahiro; Ichinose, Tsukasa; Agawa, Mutsumi; Tashima, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-20

    In IMRT for prostate cancer, MU verification is performed by the actual measurement. We have experienced a remarkable improvement in results, once succeeding in finding out the more suitable and optimal evaluation dose point in some cases even though the deviation between a designed MU score and our actual record gained at the iso-center was more than 3%. In this study, we tried to demonstrate how much influence would be given to the point dose verification by the 3D arrangement between an ion chamber and tips of the MLC. The five cases in which the bias between each actual datum and planed MU score showed that about 3% were picked up and through these MLC configurations, 8 leaf-ends around the chamber were highlighted as the influential ones. After each distance from 4 pairs, a total of 8 leaves to the axis (the mid-line) of our ion chamber were mapped. The indexes (PlanLeafScores) were computed through these distances and segmental MU scores. The ratio of these scores and results obtained at the 12 sites within 1 cm from the iso-center were carried out by single regression analysis. In all cases the ratios of planed MU values to the actual ones tended to go down in inverse proportion to the increase in PlanLeafScores (r<-0.77, p<0.002). As the dimensional arrangement between the ion chamber and the edges of the MLC were thought to determine the result of the verification. PlanLeafScores will enable us to determine the optimal evaluation of the dose point.

  2. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  3. Textural domain walls in superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takeshi

    Owing to the richness of symmetry, the superfluid 3He serves as a rich repository of topological quantum phenomena. This includes the emergence of surface Majorana fermions and their quantum mass acquisition at the topological critical point. Furthermore, the marriage of the prototype topological superfluid with nanofabrication techniques brings about a rich variety of spontaneous symmetry breaking, such as the formation of the stripe order and nontrivial domain walls. In this work, we examine the possible formation of textural domain walls in the superfluid 3He-B confined to a thin slab with a sub-micron thickness. When an applied magnetic field is much higher than the dipolar field, two nearly degenerate ground states appear, which are characterized by the Ising order associated with the spontaneous breaking of a magnetic order-two symmetry, lcirc;z = + 1 and - 1 . We here discuss the structure of the textural domain wall formed by the spatial modulation of the Ising order, such as low-lying quasiparticle excitations and spontaneous spin current. We also report bosonic modes bound to the textural domain wall.

  4. Effective theory of 3H and 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Sebastian; Grießhammer, Harald W.; Hammer, H.-W.; van Kolck, U.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new perturbative expansion for pionless effective field theory with Coulomb interactions in which at leading order (LO) the spin-singlet nucleon-nucleon channels are taken in the unitarity limit. Presenting results up to next-to-leading order for the Phillips line and the neutron-deuteron doublet-channel phase shift, we find that a perturbative expansion in the inverse {}1{S}0 scattering lengths converges rapidly. Using a new systematic treatment of the proton-proton sector that isolates the divergence due to one-photon exchange, we renormalize the corresponding contribution to the {}3{{H}} -{}3{He} binding energy splitting and demonstrate that the Coulomb force in pionless EFT is a completely perturbative effect in the trinucleon bound-state regime. In our new expansion, the LO is exactly isospin-symmetric. At next-to-leading order, we include isospin breaking via the Coulomb force and two-body scattering lengths, and find for the energy splitting {({E}B{(}3{He})-{E}B{(}3{{H}}))}{NLO}\\quad =(-0.86+/- 0.17)\\quad {MeV}.

  5. First observation of two hyperfine transitions in antiprotonic 3He

    PubMed Central

    Friedreich, S.; Barna, D.; Caspers, F.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Hori, M.; Horváth, D.; Juhász, B.; Kobayashi, T.; Massiczek, O.; Sótér, A.; Todoroki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first experimental results for microwave spectroscopy of the hyperfine structure of p¯3He+. Due to the helium nuclear spin, p¯3He+ has a more complex hyperfine structure than p¯4He+, which has already been studied before. Thus a comparison between theoretical calculations and the experimental results will provide a more stringent test of the three-body quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory. Two out of four super-super-hyperfine (SSHF) transition lines of the (n,L)=(36,34) state were observed. The measured frequencies of the individual transitions are 11.12559(14) GHz and 11.15839(18) GHz, less than 1 MHz higher than the current theoretical values, but still within their estimated errors. Although the experimental uncertainty for the difference of these frequencies is still very large as compared to that of theory, its measured value agrees with theoretical calculations. This difference is crucial to be determined because it is proportional to the magnetic moment of the antiproton. PMID:21822351

  6. Liquid and Solid Phases of ^{3}He on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, M C; Boronat, J

    2016-04-01

    Recent heat-capacity experiments show quite unambiguously the existence of a liquid ^{3}He phase adsorbed on graphite. This liquid is stable at an extremely low density, possibly one of the lowest found in nature. Previous theoretical calculations of the same system, and in strictly two dimensions, agree with the result that this liquid phase is not stable and the system is in the gas phase. We calculated the phase diagram of normal ^{3}He adsorbed on graphite at T=0 using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Considering a fully corrugated substrate, we observe that at densities lower than 0.006  Å^{-2} the system is a very dilute gas that, at that density, is in equilibrium with a liquid of density 0.014  Å^{-2}. Our prediction matches very well the recent experimental findings on the same system. On the contrary, when a flat substrate is considered, no gas-liquid coexistence is found, in agreement with previous calculations. We also report results on the different solid structures, and on the corresponding phase transitions that appear at higher densities.

  7. Liquid and Solid Phases of 3He on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Boronat, J.

    2016-04-01

    Recent heat-capacity experiments show quite unambiguously the existence of a liquid 3He phase adsorbed on graphite. This liquid is stable at an extremely low density, possibly one of the lowest found in nature. Previous theoretical calculations of the same system, and in strictly two dimensions, agree with the result that this liquid phase is not stable and the system is in the gas phase. We calculated the phase diagram of normal 3He adsorbed on graphite at T =0 using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Considering a fully corrugated substrate, we observe that at densities lower than 0.006 Å-2 the system is a very dilute gas that, at that density, is in equilibrium with a liquid of density 0.014 Å-2 . Our prediction matches very well the recent experimental findings on the same system. On the contrary, when a flat substrate is considered, no gas-liquid coexistence is found, in agreement with previous calculations. We also report results on the different solid structures, and on the corresponding phase transitions that appear at higher densities.

  8. Effective theory of 3H and 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Sebastian; Grießhammer, Harald W.; Hammer, H.-W.; van Kolck, U.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new perturbative expansion for pionless effective field theory with Coulomb interactions in which at leading order (LO) the spin-singlet nucleon–nucleon channels are taken in the unitarity limit. Presenting results up to next-to-leading order for the Phillips line and the neutron–deuteron doublet-channel phase shift, we find that a perturbative expansion in the inverse {}1{S}0 scattering lengths converges rapidly. Using a new systematic treatment of the proton–proton sector that isolates the divergence due to one-photon exchange, we renormalize the corresponding contribution to the {}3{{H}} –{}3{He} binding energy splitting and demonstrate that the Coulomb force in pionless EFT is a completely perturbative effect in the trinucleon bound-state regime. In our new expansion, the LO is exactly isospin-symmetric. At next-to-leading order, we include isospin breaking via the Coulomb force and two-body scattering lengths, and find for the energy splitting {({E}B{(}3{He})-{E}B{(}3{{H}}))}{NLO}\\quad =(-0.86+/- 0.17)\\quad {MeV}.

  9. Double-quantum vortex in superfluid 3He-A

    PubMed

    Blaauwgeers; Eltsov; Krusius; Ruohio; Schanen; Volovik

    2000-03-30

    Linear defects are generic in continuous media. In quantum systems they appear as topological line defects which are associated with a circulating persistent current. In relativistic quantum field theories they are known as cosmic strings, in superconductors as quantized flux lines, and in superfluids and low-density Bose-Einstein condensates as quantized vortex lines. A conventional quantized vortex line consists of a central core around which the phase of the order parameter winds by 27(pi)n, while within the core the order parameter vanishes or is depleted from the bulk value. Usually vortices are singly quantized (that is, have n = 1). But it has been theoretically predicted that, in superfluid 3He-A, vortex lines are possible that have n = 2 and continuous structure, so that the orientation of the multicomponent order parameter changes smoothly throughout the vortex while the amplitude remains constant. Here we report direct proof, based on high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, that the most common vortex line in 3He-A has n = 2. One vortex line after another is observed to form in a regular periodic process, similar to a phase-slip in the Josephson effect. PMID:10761908

  10. Polarized liquid3He in a4He circulating dilution refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre; Vermeulen, Gerard

    1995-10-01

    We have used a4He circulating dilution refrigerator to produce cold liquid3He with a steady state out-of-equilibrium nuclear spin polarization. Polarizations on the order of 15% (more than 7 times higher than the equilibrium polarization in the external field of 6.6 T) have been obtained in the mixing chamber of the refrigerator at temperatures between 10 and 15 mK. The polarization is enhanced at high pressure because the molar susceptibility of concentrated3He is larger than that of the dilute phase. The polarization exchange between the dilute and concentrated phases (in direct contact in the heat exchanger of the refrigerator) amplifies the enhancement. The polarization diminishes below a pressure of 2.6 bar. This allows us to scale and reinterpret susceptibility data of the dilute phase1 in combination with the effective mass deduced from osmotic pressure measurements2. We find 1+F{0/a} = 0.89±1% on the phase separation line in the pressure range 0 20 bar.

  11. Comparison of dosimeter response: ionization chamber, TLD, and Gafchromic EBT2 film in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT techniques for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitriandini, A.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    This research was conducted by measuring point dose in the target area (lungs), heart, and spine using four dosimeters (PTW N30013, Exradin A16, TLD, and the Gafchromic EBT2 film). The measurement was performed in CIRS 002LFC thorax phantom. The main objective of this study was to compare the dosimetry of those different systems. Dose measurements performed only in a single fraction of irradiation. The measurements result shown that TLD has the least accuracy and precision. As the effect of volume averaging, ionization chamber reaches the discrepancy value up to -13.30% in the target area. EBT2 film has discrepancy value of <1% in the 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. This dosimeter is proposed to be an appropriate alternative dosimeter to be used at point dose verification.

  12. The FiR 1 photon beam model adjustment according to in-air spectrum measurements with the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Schmitz, T; Hippeläinen, E; Liu, Y-H; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2014-06-01

    The mixed neutron-photon beam of FiR 1 reactor is used for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland. A beam model has been defined for patient treatment planning and dosimetric calculations. The neutron beam model has been validated with an activation foil measurements. The photon beam model has not been thoroughly validated against measurements, due to the fact that the beam photon dose rate is low, at most only 2% of the total weighted patient dose at FiR 1. However, improvement of the photon dose detection accuracy is worthwhile, since the beam photon dose is of concern in the beam dosimetry. In this study, we have performed ionization chamber measurements with multiple build-up caps of different thickness to adjust the calculated photon spectrum of a FiR 1 beam model.

  13. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  14. Quantum Phase Transition of 3He in Aerogel at a Nonzero Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Porto, J. V.; Pollack, L.; Smith, E. N.; Ho, T. L.; Parpia, J. M.

    1997-07-01

    We present evidence for a nonzero pressure, T = 0 superfluid phase transition of 3He in 98.2% open aerogel. Unlike bulk 3He which is a superfluid at T = 0 at all pressures (densities) between zero and the melting pressure, 3He in aerogel is not superfluid unless the 3He density exceeds a critical value ρc. About 90% of the 3He added above ρc contributes to the superfluid density.

  15. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo; Massillon-JL, Guerda

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism1. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  16. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  17. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  18. A dynamic model for power deposition in 3He lasers pumped by 3He(n,p) 3H reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Füsun

    2004-07-01

    The coupled variation of power density with gas density in a nuclear-pumped laser, which is excited by 3He(n,p) 3H reaction products, is considered. In the literature, volumetric excitation by reaction products of 3He(n,p) 3H is only considered for the case in which gas density is uniform and does not change during the pumping. In this work, a time-dependent model describing the coupled fluid dynamic and particle transport behaviour of the gas has been developed. In modelling charge particle transport behaviour, a previously reported energy deposition model for a constant gas density is extended for a variable gas density by taking into account variations in the particle range, macroscopic cross sections and neutron flux depending on density field of the gas. The coupled equations, which are obtained by using the power deposition density expression obtained for variable gas density in the acoustically filtered equations of motion of the gas, are solved numerically. Spatial and temporal variations of power deposition density and gas density during the pumping pulse are determined for various operating pressures ranging from 0.5 to 10 atm. In the calculations, the characteristics of I.T.U TRIGA Mark-II Reactor are used and it is assumed that laser tube is placed in the centre of the reactor core. Obtained results are presented and examined.

  19. Measurements of miniature ionization chamber currents in the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor demonstrate the importance of the delayed contribution to the photon field in nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Barbot, Loïc; Villard, Jean-François; Kaiba, Tanja; Gašper, Žerovnik; Snoj, Luka

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of experimental locations of a research nuclear reactor implies the determination of neutron and photon flux levels within, with the best achievable accuracy. In nuclear reactors, photon fluxes are commonly calculated by Monte Carlo simulations but rarely measured on-line. In this context, experiments were conducted with a miniature gas ionization chamber (MIC) based on miniature fission chamber mechanical parts, recently developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) irradiated in the core of the Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The aim of the study was to compare the measured MIC currents with calculated currents based on simulations with the MCNP6 code. A discrepancy of around 50% was observed between the measured and the calculated currents; in the latter taking into consideration only the prompt photon field. Further experimental measurements of MIC currents following reactor SCRAMs (reactor shutdown with rapid insertions of control rods) provide evidence that over 30% of the total measured signal is due to the delayed photon field, originating from fission and activation products, which are untreated in the calculations. In the comparison between the measured and calculated values, these findings imply an overall discrepancy of less than 20% of the total signal which is still unexplained.

  20. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-01

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  1. {sup 3}He target for Hall C at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.; Zeuli, A.

    1995-08-01

    A major fraction of the physics program for Hall C involves scattering from cryogenic targets of the lightest nuclei, i.e. H, D, and {sup 3,4}He. Argonne is constructing the He target that will consist of a 4cm cylinder, operating at a pressure of 10 atmospheres and a temperature of {approximately}5.2 degrees Kelvin. CEBAF is currently constructing a cryo-target system for liquid H and D cells and the cooled, pressurized helium targets. The He target system includes cell loop, the He supply systems, and the additional equipment needed to ensure minimum loss of {sup 3}He in the event of target rupture. Some of the major components have been completed, while the balance of the system will be ready for installation this fiscal year.

  2. X-rays from antiprotonic3He and4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Bacher, R.; Blüm, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Kunold, W.; Rohmann, D.; Egger, J.; Simons, L. M.; Elsener, K.

    1991-06-01

    Antiprotonic X-rays from the helium isotopes have been observed at pressures of 36, 72, 375 and 600 mbar. The antiproton beam from LEAR with momenta of 309 and 202 MeV/c has been stopped at these pressures using the cyclotron trap. The X-rays were detected with Si (Li) and intrinsic Ge semiconductor detectors. Absolute X-ray yields were determined and the strong-interaction 2p shifts and the 2p and 3d broadenings measured to be ɛ2p=(-17±4) eV, Γ2p=(25±9) eV and Γ3d=(2.14 ±0.18) meV for ¯p3He and ɛ2p=(-18±2) eV, Γ2p =(45±5) eV and Γ3d=(2.36±0.10) meV for ¯p4He.

  3. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  4. Polarimetries for the Polarized 3 He Target at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ton, Nguyen; Jefferson Lab Polarized 3 He Target Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a Polarized 3 He Target has been used as an effective polarized neutron target for studying nucleon spin structure. For the 12 GeV program at JLab, the first stage upgrade of the target aim to increase luminosity by a factor of 2 (to luminosity ~ 2 ×1036 cm-2s-1) while keep maximum in-beam polarization at 60 % with 30 μA beam current and reach a systematic uncertainty of polarimetry below 3 %. During the 6 GeV era, the target polarization was measured by two polarimetries: adiabatic fast passage-nuclear magnetic resonance (AFP-NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). With the upgrade, a new polarimetry, Pulse-NMR, is being studied in the lab for the up-coming metal coated target. In this talk, we will discuss the detail study of AFP-NMR, EPR, Pulsed-NMR measurements and their corresponding uncertainties.

  5. Electrodisintegration of 3He below and above deuteron breakup threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucci, L. E.; Viviani, M.; Schiavilla, R.; Kievsky, A.; Rosati, S.

    2005-02-01

    Recent advances in the study of electrodisintegration of 3He are presented and discussed. The pair-correlated hyperspherical harmonics method is used to calculate the initial and final state wave functions, with a realistic Hamiltonian consisting of the Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon interactions. The model for the nuclear current and charge operators retains one- and many-body contributions. Particular attention is made in the construction of the two-body current operators arising from the momentum-dependent part of the two-nucleon interaction. Three-body current operators are also included so that the full current operator is strictly conserved. The present model for the nuclear current operator is tested comparing theoretical predictions and experimental data of pd radiative capture cross section and spin observables.

  6. APT {sup 3}He target/blanket. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The {sup 3}He target/blanket (T/B) preconceptual design for the 3/8-Goal facility is based on a 1000-MeV, 200-mA accelerator to produce a high-intensity proton beam that is expanded and then strikes one of two T/B modules. Each module consists of a centralized neutron source made of tungsten and lead, a proton beam backstop region made of zirconium and lead, and a moderator made of D{sub 2}O. Helium-3 gas is circulated through the neutron source region and the blanket to create tritium through neutron capture. The gas is continually processed to extract the tritium with an online separation process.

  7. Zero Sound Mode in Normal Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Albergamo, F.; Verbeni, R.; Huotari, S.; Vanko, G.; Monaco, G.

    2007-11-16

    Inelastic x-ray scattering has been utilized to study the elementary excitations of normal liquid {sup 3}He at the temperature T=1.10{+-}0.05 K and saturated vapor pressure in the wave vector range 0.15{<=}Q{<=}3.15 A{sup -1}. The present data provide direct information on the zero-sound mode in the mesoscopic wave vector range where it was expected to decay into particle-hole excitations. The obtained results show no evidence of such a decay: the zero-sound mode remains well defined in the whole explored wave number range, thus witnessing a continuous transition of the atom dynamics from the collective to the single particle regime similarly to what is usually found in simple liquids.

  8. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp (3)He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with (129)Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp (83)Kr MRI is discussed.

  9. Homolytic Reactive Mass Spectrometry of Fullerenes: Peculiarities of the Reactions of C60 with Aromatic Compounds in the Ionization Chambers of Mass Spectrometers and in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovetsky, Yury I.; Shilova, Elena A.; Belokon, Alexander I.; Panz, Larisa I.; Tumanskii, Boris L.

    2013-04-01

    C60 reacted with PhH, PhCl, BnH, BnNH2, and o-C2H2B10H10 in the electron impact (EI) ion source of a mass spectrometer at 300 °C forming phenyl, benzyl, and o-carboranyl adducts, respectively, stabilized by hydrogen addition and loss. Besides, the additions to C60 of methyl and phenyl radicals for toluene, and a phenyl radical for benzylamine were observed. A homolytic reaction mechanism was suggested involving the reaction of the radicals formed from the aromatics under EI with C60 at the ionization chamber walls. While the ion/molecule reaction of C60 with benzene performed by Sun et al. under chemical ionization conditions at 200 °C afforded the complex C60•PhH+•, quite a different isomer, HC60Ph+•, was detected in the present study as a sequence of the different reaction mechanisms. C60 also reacted with benzyl bromide in the laser desorption/ionization (LDI) source of a mass spectrometer to give C60CPh+. Phenyl and benzyl derivatives of C60 were found, respectively, when the reactions of the fullerene with PhCl, BnH, and BnBr were performed in solution under ultra violet irradiation. For the reaction with toluene, the strong chemically induced dynamic electron polarization of the intermediate benzylfullerenyl radical with the reverse phase effect was found. The coincidence of the results of the mass spectrometry and solution reactions of C60 with aromatics, even though incomplete, additionally supports the hypothesis, formulated earlier, that the former results can predict the latter ones to a significant extent and shows that this conclusion is valid for both EI and LDI initiated reactions in mass spectrometers.

  10. Assaying multiple 125I seeds with the well-ionization chamber SourceCheck4π 33005 and a new insert

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide a practical solution that can be adopted in clinical routine to fulfill the AAPM-ESTRO recommendations regarding quality assurance of seeds used in prostate permanent brachytherapy. The aim is to design a new insert for the well-ionization chamber SourceCheck4π 33005 (PTW, Germany) that allows evaluating the mean air-kerma strength of up to ten 125I seeds with one single measurement instead of measuring each seed individually. Material and methods The material required is: a) the SourceCheck4π 33005 well-ionization chamber provided with a PTW insert to measure the air-kerma strength S K of one single seed at a time; b) a newly designed insert that accommodates ten seeds in one column, which allows measuring the mean S K of the ten seeds in one single measurement; and c) a container with ten seeds from the same batch and class of the seeds used for the patient implant, and a set of nine non-radioactive seeds. The new insert is characterized by determining its calibration coefficient, used to convert the reading of the well-chamber when ten seeds are measured to their mean S K. The proposed method is validated by comparing the mean S K of the ten seeds obtained from the new insert with the individual measurement of S K of each seed, evaluated with the PTW insert. Results The ratio between the calibration coefficient of the new insert and the calibration coefficient of the PTW insert for the SourceCheck4π 33005 is 1.135 ± 0.007 (k = 1). The mean S K of a set of ten seeds evaluated with this new system is in agreement with the mean value obtained from measuring independently the S K of each seed. Conclusions The new insert and procedure allow evaluating the mean S K of ten seeds prior to the implant in a single measurement. The method is faster and more efficient from radiation protection point of view than measuring the individual S K of each seed. PMID:26816507

  11. Monte Carlo study of conversion factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in solid slab phantoms for MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-wook; Lee, Jai-ki

    2016-08-01

    For high energy photon beams, solid phantom to water dose conversion factors were calculated by using a Monte Carlo method, and the result were compared with measurements and published data. Based on the absorbed dose to water dosimetry protocol, the conversion factor was theoretically divided into stopping powers ratios, perturbation factors and ratios of absorbed dose to water and that to solid phantom. Data for a Farmer-type chamber and a solid phantom based on polystyrene which is one of the most common material were applied to calculate the conversion factors for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. All measurements were conducted after 10 Gy pre-irradiation and thermal equilibrium had been established with solid slabs in a treatment room. The calculated and the measured conversion factors were in good agreement and could be used to confirm the feasibility of the solid phantom as a substitute for water for high energy photon beam.

  12. Exploration of kinetic and multiple-ion-fluids effects in D3He and T3He gas-filled ICF implosions using multiple nuclear reaction histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sio, Hong; Rinderknecht, Hans; Rosenberg, Michael; Zylstra, Alex; Séguin, Fredrick; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Li, Chikang; Petrasso, Richard; Hoffman, Nelson; Kagan, Krigory; Molvig, Kim; Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Wilks, Scott; Stoeckl, Christian; Glebov, Vladimir; Betti, Riccardo; Sangster, Thomas; Katz, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    To explore kinetic and multi-ion-fluid effects in D3He and T3He gas-filled shock-driven implosions, multiple nuclear reaction histories were measured using the upgraded Particle Temporal Diagnostic (PTD) on OMEGA. For D3He gas-filled implosions, the relative timing of the DD and D3He reaction histories were measured with 20 ps precision. For T3He gas-filled implosions (with 1-2% deuterium), the relative timing of the DT and D3He reaction histories were measured with 10 ps precision. The observed differences between the reaction histories on these two OMEGA experiments are contrasted to 1-D single-ion hydro simulations for different gas-fill pressure and gas mixture. This work is supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL, LLE, and NNSA SSGF.

  13. Measurements of asymmetries of pion single charge exchange on polarized 3He at 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Burleson, G.; Blanchard, S.; Chang, T.; Gibbs, W.; Haas, J.; Park, B.; Whitton, M.; Espy, M.; Dehnhard, D.; Larson, B.; O'donnell, J.; Palarczyk, M.; Cummings, W.; Delheij, P.; Häusser, O.; Pasyuk, E.; Gostkin, M.; Amann, J.; Boudrie, R.; Riedel, C.; Morris, C.; Pentillä, S.; Swenson, D.; Tupa, D.; Comfort, J.; Gaulard, C.; Maeda, K.; Glass, G.; Supek, I.

    1999-08-01

    Asymmetries for the (π-,π0) reaction on polarized 3He were measured using a 200-MeV pion beam at LAMPF. The π0's were detected with the neutral meson spectrometer in coincidence with the recoiling tritons. A recoil triton detector, consisting of scintillation-counter telescopes and a wire chamber, was used to measure the time-of-flight, energy loss, and direction of the tritons. The polarized gaseous 3He target, developed at TRIUMF, was modified to run with two diode lasers; the polarization reached 65%. The asymmetries between θlab=60° and 105° were found to be strongly angle dependent. The results are compared with theoretical calculations.

  14. Are high 3He/4He ratios in oceanic basalts an indicator of deep-mantle plume components?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meibom, A.; Anderson, D.L.; Sleep, N.H.; Frei, R.; Chamberlain, C.P.; Hren, M.T.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of a primordial, undegassed lower mantle reservoir characterized by high concentration of 3He and high 3He/4He ratios is a cornerstone assumption in modern geochemistry. It has become standard practice to interpret high 3He/4He ratios in oceanic basalts as a signature of deep-rooted plumes. The unfiltered He isotope data set for oceanic spreading centers displays a wide, nearly Gaussian, distribution qualitatively similar to the Os isotope (187Os/188 Os) distribution of mantle-derived Os-rich alloys. We propose that both distributions are produced by shallow mantle processes involving mixing between different proportions of recycled, variably aged radiogenic and unradiogenic domains under varying degrees of partial melting. In the case of the Re-Os isotopic system, radiogenic mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-rich and unradiogenic (depleted mantle residue) endmembers are constantly produced during partial melting events. In the case of the (U+Th)-He isotope system, effective capture of He-rich bubbles during growth of phenocryst olivine in crystallizing magma chambers provides one mechanism for 'freezing in' unradiogenic (i.e. high 3He/4He) He isotope ratios, while the higher than chondritic (U+Th)/He elemental ratio in the evolving and partially degassed MORB melt provides the radiogenic (i.e. low 3He/4He) endmember. If this scenario is correct, the use of He isotopic signatures as a fingerprint of plume components in oceanic basalts is not justified. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Neutron multiplicity ,easurements With 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Meade, John A.; Detweiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard J.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Guss, Paul P.; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as “ship effect”) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. In this study, a prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called “straws” that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions ofmore » neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and developed a data acquisition (DAQ) system to collect

  16. Andreev reflection in rotating superfluid {sup 3}He-B

    SciTech Connect

    Eltsov, V. B.; Hosio, J. J.; Krusius, M. Mäkinen, J. T.

    2014-12-15

    Andreev reflection of quasiparticle excitations from quantized line vortices is reviewed in the isotropic B phase of superfluid {sup 3}He in the temperature regime of ballistic quasiparticle transport at T ≤ 0.20T{sub c}. The reflection from an array of rectilinear vortices in solid-body rotation is measured with a quasiparticle beam illuminating the array mainly in the orientation along the rotation axis. The result is in agreement with the calculated Andreev reflection. The Andreev signal is also used to analyze the spin-down of the superfluid component after a sudden impulsive stop of rotation from an equilibrium vortex state. In a measuring setup where the rotating cylinder has a rough bottom surface, annihilation of the vortices proceeds via a leading rapid turbulent burst followed by a trailing slow laminar decay, from which the mutual friction dissipation can be determined. In contrast to the currently accepted theory, it is found to have a finite value in the zero-temperature limit: α(T→0) = (5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup −4}.

  17. The development of new devices for accurate radiation dose measurement: A guarded liquid ionization chamber and an electron sealed water calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kristin J.

    In this work we developed two new devices that aim to improve the accuracy of relative and reference dosimetry for radiation therapy: a guarded liquid ionization chamber (GLIC) and an electron sealed water (ESW) calorimeter. With the GLIC we aimed to develop a perturbation-free energy-independent detector with high spatial resolution for relative dosimetry. We achieved sufficient stability for short-term measurements using the GLIC-03, which has a sensitive volume of approximately 2 mm3. We evaluated ion recombination in pulsed photon beams using a theoretical model and also determined a new empirical method to correct for relative differences in general recombination which could be used in cases where the theoretical model was not applicable. The energy dependence of the GLIC-03 was 1.1% between 6 and 18 MV photon beams. Measurements in the build-up region of an 18 MV beam indicated that this detector produces minimal perturbation to the radiation field and confirmed the validity of the empirical recombination correction. The ESW calorimeter was designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams. We obtained reproducible measurements for 6 to 20 MeV beams. We determined corrections for perturbations to the radiation field caused by the glass calorimeter vessel and for conductive heat transfer due to the dose gradient and non-water materials. The overall uncertainty on the ESW calorimeter dose was 0.5% for the 9 to 20 MeV beams and 1.0% for 6 MeV, showing for the first time that the development of a water-calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over a wide range of energies is feasible. Comparison between measurements with the ESW calorimeter and the NRC photon beam standard calorimeter in a 6 MeV beam revealed a discrepancy of 0.7+/-0.2% which is still under investigation. Absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors in electron beams were measured using the ESW calorimeter for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers

  18. Comment on "Deep mixing of 3He: reconciling Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis".

    PubMed

    Balser, Dana S; Rood, Robert T; Bania, T M

    2007-08-31

    Eggleton et al. (Reports, 8 December 2006, p. 1580) reported on a deep-mixing mechanism in low-mass stars caused by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that destroys all of the helium isotope 3He produced during the star's lifetime. Observations of 3He in planetary nebulae, however, indicate that some stars produce prodigious amounts of 3He. This is inconsistent with the claim that all low-mass stars should destroy 3He.

  19. Comment on "Deep mixing of 3He: reconciling Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis".

    PubMed

    Balser, Dana S; Rood, Robert T; Bania, T M

    2007-08-31

    Eggleton et al. (Reports, 8 December 2006, p. 1580) reported on a deep-mixing mechanism in low-mass stars caused by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that destroys all of the helium isotope 3He produced during the star's lifetime. Observations of 3He in planetary nebulae, however, indicate that some stars produce prodigious amounts of 3He. This is inconsistent with the claim that all low-mass stars should destroy 3He. PMID:17761865

  20. Transfer Excitation Processes Observed in N3+-He and O3+-He Collisions at Elab = 33 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yoh

    2016-09-01

    We measured the relative state-selective differential cross sections (DCSs) for one-electron capture reactions using a crossed-beam apparatus. The scattering angle θlab studied in the laboratory frame ranged from -3.0 to 22° and the laboratory collision energy Elab was 33 eV. Only the transfer excitation processes, i.e., the electron capture reactions with the simultaneous excitation of the projectile, were observed. The DCSs were determined for the following reactions: N3+ (1s2 2s2 1S) + He (1s2 1S) → N2+ (1s2 2s2p2 2D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 10.3 eV, O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) + He+ (1s 2S) + 12.7 eV, and O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 15.5 eV. In the N3+-He system, the DCSs for the reaction are zero at the center-of-mass angle θcm = 0 and show a peak at a certain angle and a shoulder at a larger angle. In the O3+-He system, the DCSs are again zero at θcm = 0. The capture process to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) state is mainly observed at smaller scattering angles, and the reaction to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) state becomes dominant with increasing scattering angle. A classical trajectory analysis within the two-state approximation based on the ab initio potentials for (NHe)3+ revealed that the transfer excitation of a two-electron process takes place through a single crossing of the relevant potentials.

  1. Temporal Variability in the Accretion Rate of Interplanetary Dust Using (3)He as a Tracer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    The research supported by this grant falls under three topics: 1) Weekly Interplanetary Dust Sampling via (3)He; 2) Extraterrestrial (3)He at Major Impact Boundaries; 3) Completing a Moderately-High Resolution Record of Extraterrestrial (3)He Flux: A Major Asteroidal Break up Event at 8.2 Ma.

  2. Electron screening and stellar rates in the {sup 3}He({sup 3}He,2p){sup 4}He and {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Messahel, L.; Ouichaoui, S.; Belhout, A.; Fouka, M.; Trabelsi, A.

    2008-05-12

    The astrophysical S(E) factor experimental data available over the energy region E (C.M.)<1.0 MeV for the {sup 3}He({sup 3}He,2p){sup 4}He and {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He fusion reactions are analyzed using a polynomial expression and the R-Matrix formalism, respectively. The reaction thermonuclear rates for bare nuclei are determined and compared to previous ones after a precise assessment of the electron screening factors. New level parameter values are deduced for the {sup 5}Li nucleus.

  3. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum.

  4. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum. PMID:27548518

  5. Evaluation of relative transmitted dose for a step and shoot head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Bezak, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The dose delivery verification for a head and neck static intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) case using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device (SLIC-EPID) was investigated. Acquired electronic portal images were firstly converted into transmitted dose maps using an in-house developed method. The dose distributions were then compared with those calculated in a virtual EPID using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS). Using gamma evaluation with the ΔDmax and DTA criteria of 3%/2.54 mm, an excellent agreement was observed between transmitted dose measured using SLIC-EPID and that calculated by TPS (gamma score approximately 95%) for large MLC fields. In contrast, for several small subfields, due to SLIC-EPID image blurring, significant disagreement was found in the gamma results. Differences between EPID and TPS dose maps were also observed for several parts of the radiation subfields, when the radiation beam passed through air on the outside of tissue. The transmitted dose distributions measured using portal imagers such as SLIC-EPID can be used to verify the dose delivery to a patient. However, several aspects such as accurate calibration procedure and imager response under different conditions should be taken into the consideration. In addition, SLIC-EPID image blurring is another important issue, which should be considered if the SLIC-EPID is used for clinical dosimetry verification. PMID:22363108

  6. Evaluation of relative transmitted dose for a step and shoot head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Bezak, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The dose delivery verification for a head and neck static intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) case using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device (SLIC-EPID) was investigated. Acquired electronic portal images were firstly converted into transmitted dose maps using an in-house developed method. The dose distributions were then compared with those calculated in a virtual EPID using the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system (TPS). Using gamma evaluation with the ΔD(max) and DTA criteria of 3%/2.54 mm, an excellent agreement was observed between transmitted dose measured using SLIC-EPID and that calculated by TPS (gamma score approximately 95%) for large MLC fields. In contrast, for several small subfields, due to SLIC-EPID image blurring, significant disagreement was found in the gamma results. Differences between EPID and TPS dose maps were also observed for several parts of the radiation subfields, when the radiation beam passed through air on the outside of tissue. The transmitted dose distributions measured using portal imagers such as SLIC-EPID can be used to verify the dose delivery to a patient. However, several aspects such as accurate calibration procedure and imager response under different conditions should be taken into the consideration. In addition, SLIC-EPID image blurring is another important issue, which should be considered if the SLIC-EPID is used for clinical dosimetry verification.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Advances in the determination of absorbed dose to water in clinical high-energy photon and electron beams using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiful Huq, M.; Andreo, Pedro

    2004-02-01

    During the last two decades, absorbed dose to water in clinical photon and electron beams was determined using dosimetry protocols and codes of practice based on radiation metrology standards of air kerma. It is now recommended that clinical reference dosimetry be based on standards of absorbed dose to water. Newer protocols for the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, ND,w, in a standards laboratory's reference quality beam, have been published by several national or regional scientific societies and international organizations. Since the publication of these protocols multiple theoretical and experimental dosimetry comparisons between the various ND,w based recommendations, and between the ND,w and the former air kerma (NK) based protocols, have been published. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the dosimetry protocols based on these standards and of the intercomparisons of the different protocols published in the literature, discussing the reasons for the observed discrepancies between them. A summary of the various types of standards of absorbed dose to water, together with an analysis of the uncertainties along the various steps of the dosimetry chain for the two types of formalism, is also included. It is emphasized that the NK-ND,air and ND,w formalisms have very similar uncertainty when the same criteria are used for both procedures. Arguments are provided in support of the recommendation for a change in reference dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water.

  8. Nonlinear development of strong current-driven instabilities and selective acceleration of ^3He ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Mieko; Okumura, Hayato

    2003-10-01

    In some solar flares, the abundance of high-energy ^3He ions is extremely increased. As a mechanism for these ^3He rich events, current-driven instabilities are believed to be important. Nonlinear development of the strong current-driven instabilities and associated energy transfer to ^3He ions are studied theoretically and numerically [1]. First, by means of a two-dimensional, electrostatic, particle simulation code, it is demonstrated that ^3He ions are selectively accelerated by fundamental H cyclotron waves with frequencies ω ≃ 2Ω_3He (Ω_3He is the cyclotron frequency of ^3He). Then, from the analysis of the dispersion relation of these waves, it is found that the ω ≃ 2 Ω_ 3He waves have the greatest growth rate, if Te > 10 T_H. Energies of the ^3He ions are also discussed. Theoretical expression for the maximum ^3He energy is presented, which is in good agreement with the simulation results. Based on this theory, it is shown that when the initial electron drift energy is of the order of 10 keV, many ^3He ions can be accelerated to energies of the order of MeV/n. [1] M. Toida and H. Okumura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72,1098 (2003)

  9. Low-temperature instability of uniform spin precession in the B phase of pure {sup 3}He and {sup 3}He in an aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Surovtsev, E. V. Fomin, I. A.

    2010-08-15

    The magnetic-field dependences of the threshold temperature of the low-temperature instability of uniform spin precession in pure {sup 3}He-B and {sup 3}He-B in an aerogel have been determined for the bulk mechanism. These dependences appear to be different. The theoretical dependence of the threshold temperature for the pure case has been compared with the experimental dependence. The threshold temperature of the instability for {sup 3}He in the aerogel has been estimated for typical experimental conditions.

  10. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  11. Development of D+3He Fusion Electric Thrusters and Power Supplies for Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Thomas M.

    1994-07-01

    Development of D+3He Fusion Electric Thrusters (FET) and Power Supplies (FPS) should occur at a lunar base because of the following: availability of helium-3, a vacuum better than on Earth, low K in shade reachable by radiant cooling, supply of ``high temp'' superconducting ceramic-metals, and a low G environment. The early FET will be much smaller than an Apollo engine, with specific impulse of 10,000-100,000-s. Solar power and low G will aid early development. To counter the effect of low G on humans, centrifuges will be employed for sleeping and resting. Work will be done by telerobotic view control. The FPS will be of comparable size, and will generate power mainly by having replaceable rectennas, resonant to the fusion synchrotron radiation. FPSs are used for house keeping power and initiating superconduction. Spaceships will carry up to ten FETs and two FPSs. In addition to fusion fuel, the FET will inject H or Li low mass propellant into the fusion chamber. Developing an FET would be difficult on Earth. FET spaceships will park between missions in L1, and an FET Bus will fetch humans/supplies from Moon and Earth. Someday FETs, with rocket assist, will lift spaceships from Earth, and make space travel to planets far cheaper, faster, and safer, than at present. Too long a delay due to the space station, or the huge cost of getting into space by current means, will damage the morale of the space program.

  12. A possible in situ 3H and 3He source in Earth's interior: an alternative explanation of origin of 3He in deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Songsheng; Liu, Jing; He, Ming

    2010-07-01

    Origin of (3)He in the Earth is a mystery. Lacking a production mechanism, scientists assume (3)He was trapped in the Earth, when the Earth was formed. In contrast to this assumption, we have found (3)He and (3)H concentrations in excess of the atmospheric values in the deep waters of the volcanic Lakes Pavin (France), Laacher (Germany) and Nemrut (Turkey). This paper reports the result of finding (3)H in these three volcanic lakes that appear to originate from the mantle. Because (3)H has a half-life of 12.3 years, this (3)H and the resulting (3)He must have formed recently in the mantle and not be part of a primordial reservoir. The nuclear reactions that generate tritium might be a source of "missing" energy in the interior of the Earth.

  13. Experimental study of fusion neutron and proton yields produced by petawatt-laser-irradiated D2-3He or CD4-3He clustering gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Quevedo, H. J.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Barbarino, M.; Kimura, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-09-01

    We report on experiments in which the Texas Petawatt laser irradiated a mixture of deuterium or deuterated methane clusters and helium-3 gas, generating three types of nuclear fusion reactions: D(d,3He)n, D(d,t)p, and 3He(d,p)4He. We measured the yields of fusion neutrons and protons from these reactions and found them to agree with yields based on a simple cylindrical plasma model using known cross sections and measured plasma parameters. Within our measurement errors, the fusion products were isotropically distributed. Plasma temperatures, important for the cross sections, were determined by two independent methods: (1) deuterium ion time of flight and (2) utilizing the ratio of neutron yield to proton yield from D(d,3He)n and 3He(d,p)4He reactions, respectively. This experiment produced the highest ion temperature ever achieved with laser-irradiated deuterium clusters.

  14. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, R.L.; VanDenburg, J.W.; Prinja, A.K.; Kirby, T.; Busch, R.; Hong-Nian Jow

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm{sup 3} active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response.

  15. The 3He long-counter TETRA at the ALTO ISOL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testov, D.; Verney, D.; Roussière, B.; Bettane, J.; Didierjean, F.; Flanagan, K.; Franchoo, S.; Ibrahim, F.; Kuznetsova, E.; Li, R.; Marsh, B.; Matea, I.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.; Pai, H.; Smirnov, V.; Sokol, E.; Stefan, I.; Suzuki, D.; Wilson, J. N.

    2016-04-01

    A new β-decay station (BEDO) has been installed behind the PARRNe mass separator operated on-line at the electron-driven ALTO ISOL facility. The station is equipped with a movable tape collector allowing the creation of the radioactive sources of interest at the very center of a modular detection system. The mechanical structure was designed to host various assemblies of detectors in compact geometry. We report here the first on-line use of this system equipped with the 4π 3He neutron counter TETRA built at JINR Dubna associated with HPGe and plastic 4π β detectors. The single neutron detection efficiency achieved is 53(2)% measured using the 252Cf source. For β-delayed neutron measurements the neutron detection efficiency was derived from the comparison of gated γ-spectra. The on-line commissioning of the TETRA setup was performed with laser-ionized gallium beams. β and neutron events were recorded as a function of time. From these data we report P1n(82Ga)=22(2)% and T1/2(82Ga)=0.604(11) s in good agreement with values available in the literature. The new detection system will be used in other experiments aimed at investigations of β-decay properties of neutron-rich isotopes produced at ALTO.

  16. Near threshold two meson production with the pd→3Heπ+π- and pd→3HeK+K- reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellemann, F.; Berg, A.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bohlscheid, G.; Ernst, J.; Henrich, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Ibald, R.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Joosten, R.; Kozela, A.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Munkel, J.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Schnitker, H.; Scho, K.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Tölle, R.; Wilkin, C.

    2000-06-01

    Near threshold two meson production via the reactions pd→3Heπ+π- and pd→3HeK+K- was measured kinematically complete with the MOMO experiment at COSY. The obtained two pion invariant mass spectra and angular distributions depict a remarkable deviation from phase space. The two kaon data are consistent with phase space topped by a clear signal of the φ meson.

  17. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  18. Isobar separation of 93Zr and 93Nb at 24 MeV with a new multi-anode ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martschini, Martin; Buchriegler, Josef; Collon, Philippe; Kutschera, Walter; Lachner, Johannes; Lu, Wenting; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    93Zr with a half-life of 1.6 Ma is produced with high yield in nuclear fission, and thus should be present as a natural or anthropogenic trace isotope in all compartments of the general environment. Sensitive measurements of this isotope would immediately find numerous applications, however, its detection at sufficiently low levels has not yet been achieved. AMS measurements of 93Zr suffer from the interference of the stable isobar 93Nb. At the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator VERA a new multi-anode ionization chamber was built. It is optimized for isobar separation in the medium mass range and is based on the experience from AMS experiments of 36Cl at our 3-MV tandem accelerator facility. The design provides high flexibility in anode configuration and detector geometry. After validating the excellent energy resolution of the detector with 36S, it was recently used to study iron-nickel and zirconium-niobium-molybdenum isobar separation. To our surprise, the separation of 94Zr (Z = 40) from 94Mo (Z = 42) was found to be much better than that of 58Fe (Z = 26) from 58Ni (Z = 28), despite the significantly larger ΔZ/Z of the latter pair. This clearly contradicts results from SRIM-simulations and suggests that differences in the stopping behavior may unexpectedly favor identification of 93Zr. At 24 MeV particle energy, a 93Nb (Z = 41) suppression factor of 1000 is expected based on a synthetic 93Zr spectrum obtained by interpolation between experimental spectra from the two neighboring stable isotopes 92Zr and 94Zr. Assuming realistic numbers for chemical niobium reduction, a detection level of 93Zr/Zr below 10-9 seems feasible.

  19. Hybrid plan verification for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX--a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Dobler, Barbara; Streck, Natalia; Klein, Elisabeth; Loeschel, Rainer; Haertl, Petra; Koelbl, Oliver

    2010-01-21

    The 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX (IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) has been developed for absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for perpendicular beam incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of I'mRT MatriXX for oblique beam incidence and hybrid plan verification of IMRT with original gantry angles. For the assessment of angular dependence, open fields with gantry angles in steps of 10 degrees were calculated on a CT scan of I'mRT MatriXX. For hybrid plan verification, 17 clinical IMRT plans and one rotational plan were used. Calculations were performed with pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, which had been previously validated. Measurements were conducted on an Elekta SynergyS linear accelerator. To assess the potential and limitations of the system, gamma evaluation was performed with different dose tolerances and distances to agreement. Hybrid plan verification passed the gamma test with 4% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement in all cases, in 82-88% of the cases for tolerances of 3%/3 mm, and in 59-76% of the cases if 3%/2 mm were used. Separate evaluation of the low dose and high dose regions showed that I'mRT MatriXX can be used for hybrid plan verification of IMRT plans within 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement with a relaxed dose tolerance of 4% in the low dose region outside the multileaf collimator (MLC).

  20. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  1. A 3He Cryostat for Scientific Measurements in Pulsed High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaoliang; Li, Liang; Liu, Mengyu; Zuo, Huakun; Peng, Tao

    A top loading 3He cryostat has been developed for scientific experiments with a 60 T pulsed magnetic field facility at Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The cryostat consists of a 4He bath cryostat, a 3He insert and a closed circulation system for 3He gas handling. To eliminate the eddy current heating during the pulse, the tail of the 3He insert with a vacuum space at the bottom is made from fiberglass tubing coated with epoxy. The 3He bath is separated from the 4He bath with the vacuum space. The 4He bath cryostat provides cooling power to condense 3He gas by a neck tube on top of the tail. Experimental results have shown that the sample can be cooled down to 385 mK and kept cold for more than 150 second by one-shot cooling, which is sufficiently long for an experiment in a pulsed high magnetic field.

  2. Polarized {sup 3}He gas compression system using metastability-exchange optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Hussey, D.S.; Rich, D.R.; Belov, A.S.; Tong, X.; Yang, H.; Bailey, C.; Keith, C.D.; Hartfield, J.; Hall, G.D.R.; Black, T.C.; Snow, W.M.; Gentile, T.R.; Chen, W.C.; Jones, G.L.; Wildman, E.

    2005-05-15

    Dense samples (10-100 bar cm) of nuclear spin polarized {sup 3}He are utilized in high energy physics, neutron scattering, atomic physics, and magnetic resonance imaging. Metastability exchange optical pumping can rapidly produce high {sup 3}He polarizations ({approx_equal}80%) at low pressures (few mbar). We describe a polarized {sup 3}He gas compressor system which accepts 0.26 bar l h{sup -1} of {sup 3}He gas polarized to 70% by a 4 W neodymium doped lanthanum magnesium hexaluminate (Nd:LMA) laser and compresses it into a 5 bar cm target with final polarization of 55%. The spin relaxation rates of the system's components have been measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and a model of the {sup 3}He polarization loss based on the measured relaxation rates and the gas flow is in agreement with a {sup 3}He polarization measurement using neutron transmission.

  3. Realization of a 3He-4He Vapor-Pressure Thermometer for Temperatures Between 0.65 K and 5 K at LNE-CNAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparasci, F.; Pitre, L.; Truong, D.; Risegari, L.; Hermier, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In the temperature range between 0.65 K and 5 K, the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is based on 3He and 4He vapor-pressure thermometers. Between 0.65 K and 1 K, the ITS-90 overlaps with the Provisional Low Temperature Scale of 2000 (PLTS-2000), defined in term of the melting pressure of 3He. Some differences, up to more than 1 mK, exist between the two scales in the overlapping interval. The LNE-CNAM has recently started the construction of a 3He-4He vapor-pressure thermometer to realize the ITS-90 in its lowest subrange at the highest degree of accuracy. The device is provided with two separate vapor-pressure chambers, one for 3He and the other for 4He, built in a single copper block, and is installed in the experimental space of a dilution refrigerator. The vapor-pressure thermometer is designed to accommodate on the same copper block several transfer standards, an acoustic thermometer, and the 3He melting-pressure thermometer. This configuration is intended for realizing calibrations of transfer standards down to 0.65 K, for investigating the possibility to extend the acoustic thermometer below 4 K, and to perform a direct comparison between the ITS-90 and the PLTS-2000 in the overlapping temperature range, in order to study their differences. The realization of the system has been recently accomplished, and this report illustrates the characteristics of such an experimental device.

  4. NMR Studies of Texture in the B-like Phase of 3He in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, V. V.; Zavjalov, V. V.; Zmeev, D. E.; Mulders, N.

    2006-09-07

    Continuous wave NMR experiments have been performed in the B-like phase of 3He in a 98% open aerogel. The results allow us to get information about the texture of the 3He order parameter inside the aerogel. We conclude that in the B-like phase the boundary between the bulk 3He and the aerogel orients the vector of orbital anisotropy (L) parallel to it. Two stable textures and textural transition between them were observed in our sample.

  5. Fermion zero modes at the boundary of superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2009-11-01

    Superfluid 3He-B belongs to the important special class of time-reversal invariant topological superfluids. It has Majorana fermions as edge states on the surface of bulk 3He-B. On the rough wall these fermion zero modes have finite density of states at E = 0. It is possible that Lancaster experiments with a wire vibrating in 3He-B have already probed Majorana fermions living on the surface of the wire.

  6. Impulsive 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events detected with EPHIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; del Peral, L.; Sequeiros, J.; Kunow, H.; Mueller-Mellin, R.

    2001-08-01

    We report observation of 3 He-rich solar energetic particles (SEP) events detected by Electron Proton and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. EPHIN has been detecting Helium isotopes in the energy range 4-53 MeV/n since December 1995 using a ˜E-E sensor system with solid-state detectors. In this paper we concentrate on observations of SEP with excess in the 3 He abundance. The abundances 3 He/4 He and 4 He/1 H have been obtained and compared among different events. Energy spectra of protons, 3 He, 4 He have been studied.

  7. The influence of restricted geometry of diamagnetic nanoporous media on 3He relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakshin, E. M.; Gazizulin, R. R.; Zakharov, M. Yu.; Klochkov, A. V.; Morozov, E. V.; Salikhov, T. M.; Safin, T. R.; Safiullin, K. R.; Tagirov, M. S.; Shabanova, O. B.

    2015-01-01

    This is an experimental study of the spin kinetics of 3He in contact with diamagnetic samples of inverse opals SiO2, and LaF3 nanopowder. It is demonstrated that the nuclear magnetic relaxation of the absorbed 3He occurs due to the modulation of dipole-dipole interaction by the quantum motion in the two-dimensional film. It is found that the relaxation of liquid 3He occurs through a spin diffusion to the absorption layer, and that the restricted geometry of diamagnetic nanoporous media has an influence on the 3He relaxation.

  8. Model formalism of liquid /sup 3/He-B at equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1980-04-01

    The approximate formal treatment of the nuclear spin system of normal liquid /sup 3/He given some time ago is extended to the ordered /sup 3/He phase. The formalism leads to the prediction of normal thermal behavior of /sup 3/He-B at lower pressures and at temperatures approaching its phase-boundary temperatures. In contrast to the disordered normal liquid phase, which is thermally anomalous, the entropy of the /sup 3/He-B decreases on isothermal compression, or its isobaric volume expansion coefficient is positive. The equilibrium thermal behavior of ordered /sup 3/He-B is thus qualitatively different from that of disordered liquid /sup 3/He. Experimental control of these aspects of the liquid /sup 3/He phase transformation is lacking at the present time. Both early and new /sup 3/He-B paramagnetic susceptibility data, extended recently over a wide reduced-temperature range, disclose a fundamental competition between the spontaneous ordering mechanism responsible for the existence of /sup 3/He-B and the specific ordering process imposed upon this phase on application of an external constant and uniform magnetic field. As a consequence, magnetized /sup 3/He-B will be shown to increase its entropy on isothermal magnetization and to cool on adiabatic magnetization. The magnetocaloric effect is, however, only moderate. The competition of the ordering process leads to the delay or possibly even to the suppression of the formation of the ordered phase, a state of affairs foreseen in our earlier work. At low or moderate magnetic field strengths, the zero-field phase-boundary temperatures are shown to shift toward lower temperatures while, simultaneously, the order of the phase change decreases, from second order, in the absence of the field, to first order. Although of model-theoretic character, involving limitations of various types, the rich physical content of /sup 3/He-B at equilibrium clearly emerges in the present work.

  9. Temperature Measurements of Fusion Plasmas Produced by Laser-Irradiated D2-3 He or CD4-3 He Clustering Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Ditmire, T.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Donovan, M.; Gaul, E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Hagel, K.; Natowitz, J. B.

    2014-10-01

    We report on experiments in which a mixture of D2 or CD4 clusters and 3He gas was irradiated by a petawatt-laser pulse, generating nuclear fusion reactions such as D(d, 3He) n, D(d, t) p , and 3He(d, p)4He. We measured the yields of fusion neutrons and protons from these reactions and found them to agree with yields based on a simple cylindrical plasma model. The plasma temperature was determined by two different methods. In the first, it was derived from time-of-flight data of deuterium ions ejected from exploding D2 or CD4 clusters. In the second, it was measured from the ratio of neutron yield to proton yield from D(d, 3He) n and 3He(d, p)4He reactions, respectively. The temperatures determined by these two methods agree well, indicating (i) the ion energy distribution is not significantly distorted when ions travel in the disassembling plasma; (ii) the kinetic energy of deuterium ions, especially the hottest part responsible for nuclear fusion, is well described by a near-Maxwellian distribution.

  10. Measurement of fast minority /sub 3/He/sup + +/ energy distribution during ICRF heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, D.E. Jr.; Grisham, L.R.; Medley, S.S.

    A method and means for measuring the fast /sub 3/He/sup + +/ distribution during /sub 3/He/sup + +/ minority Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating is disclosed. The present invention involves the use of 10 to 100 keV beams of neutral helium atoms to neutralize the fast /sub 3/He/sup + +/ ions in a heated plasma by double charge exchange (/sub 3/He/sup + +/ + /sub 4/He/sup 0/ ..-->.. /sub 3/He/sup 0/ + /sub 4/He/sup + +/). The neutralized fast /sub 3/He/sup 0/ atoms then escape from the hot plasma confined by a magnetic field and are detected by conventional neutral particle analyzing means. This technique permits the effectiveness of the coupling of the ion cyclotron waves to the /sub 3/He/sup + +/ minority ions to be accurately measured. The present invention is particularly adapted for use in evaluating the effectiveness of the intermediate coupling between the RF heating and the /sub 3/He/sup + +/ in an energetic toroidal plasma.

  11. Fusion product studies via fast ion D-D and D-3He fusion on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Hellsten, T.; Kiptily, V. G.; Craciunescu, T.; Eriksson, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Girardo, J.-B.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Johnson, T.; Kazakov, Y.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Monakhov, I.; Nabais, F.; Nocente, M.; Perez von Thun, C.; Rimini, F.; Santala, M.; Schneider, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Tsalas, M.; Yavorskij, V.; Zoita, V.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Dedicated fast ion D-D and D-3He fusion experiments were performed on JET with carbon wall (2008) and ITER-like wall (2014) for testing the upgraded neutron and energetic ion diagnostics of fusion products. Energy spectrum of D-D neutrons was the focus of the studies in pure deuterium plasmas. A significant broadening of the energy spectrum of neutrons born in D-D fast fusion was observed, and dependence of the maximum D and D-D neutron energies on plasma density was established. Diagnostics of charged products of aneutronic D-3He fusion reactions, 3.7 MeV alpha-particles similar to those in D-T fusion, and 14.6 MeV protons, were the focus of the studies in D-3He plasmas. Measurements of 16.4 MeV gamma-rays born in the weak secondary branch of D(3He, γ)5Li reaction were used for assessing D-3He fusion power. For achieving high yield of D-D and D-3He reactions at relatively low levels of input heating power, an acceleration of D beam up to the MeV energy range was used employing 3rd harmonic (f=3{{f}CD} ) ICRH technique. These results were compared to the techniques of D beam injection into D-3He mixture, and 3He-minority ICRH in D plasmas.

  12. On the connection between the 3HE-enrichment and spectral index of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, L. G.; Dvoryanchikov, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented which explains the observed tendency of events with large 3He/4He ratios to have steeper spectra. In this model preferential injection of 3He, acceleration by Alfven waves and Coulomb deceleration of ions are considered simultaneously. The observed tendency may be obtained as a result of competition between injection and acceleration processes.

  13. Detection of D-^3He Fusion γ-Rays using Gas Cherenkov Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Cahill, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Grafil, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Miller, E. Kirk

    2012-10-01

    The high-energy γ-ray from ^3He(d,γ)^5Li reactions has drawn the attention of the nuclear physics and fusion community as a diagnostic signature to study the ^5Li nuclear structure and the D-^3He fusion reaction. In the past, the D-^3He γ-rays have been measured via accelerator-based beam-target experiments and recently in tokamak-based fusion reactors. In this work, we report the detection of D-^3He fusion γ-rays generated from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. The γ-ray signal observed using Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) is proportional to the independently measured 14.7-MeV fusion proton yield and provides a high-bandwidth alternative to fusion protons for D-^3He burn-history measurements. By comparing γ-rays from D-^3He and D-T implosions, we were able to examine (1) similarities in the γ-ray spectra of D-^3He and D-T and (2) disparities in the γ-to-particle branching ratios of D-^3He and D-T. This experimental work motivates further theoretical investigation of the multichannel ^5Li- and ^5He-system.

  14. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  15. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron

  16. Nuclear georeactor origin of oceanic basalt 3He/4He, evidence, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear georeactor numerical simulation results yield substantial 3He and 4He production and 3He/4He ratios relative to air (RA) that encompass the entire 2-SD (2σ) confidence level range of tabulated measured 3He/4He ratios of basalts from along the global spreading ridge system. Georeactor-produced 3He/4He ratios are related to the extent of actinide fuel consumption at time of production and are high near the end of the georeactor lifetime. Georeactor numerical simulation results and the observed high 3He/4He ratios measured in Icelandic and Hawaiian oceanic basalts indicate that the demise of the georeactor is approaching. Within the present level of uncertainty, one cannot say precisely when georeactor demise will occur, whether in the next century, in a million years, or in a billion years from now. PMID:12615991

  17. Burnup of fusion produced tritons and /sup 3/He ions in PLT and PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Chrien, R.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    The d(d,p)t and d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reactions produce 1 MeV tritons and 0.8 MeV /sup 3/He ions which can subsequently undergo d(t,n)..cap alpha.. and d(/sup 3/He,p)..cap alpha.. fusion reactions. The magnitude of this triton and /sup 3/He ion burnup was measured on the PLT and PDX tokamaks by detection of the 14 MeV neutron and 15 MeV proton emission. In discharges with B/sub phi/ greater than or equal to 2 T, the measured /sup 3/He burnup agrees well with predictions based on classical theories of ion confinement and slowing down, while the triton burnup was about four times lower than theoretically predicted. In discharges with weaker toroidal fields, the burnup of both ions fell by more than a factor of ten.

  18. SU-E-T-552: Monte Carlo Calculation of Correction Factors for a Free-Air Ionization Chamber in Support of a National Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, M; Bergstrom, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To use Monte Carlo radiation transport methods to calculate correction factors for a free-air ionization chamber in support of a national air-kerma standard for low-energy, miniature x-ray sources used for electronic brachytherapy (eBx). Methods: The NIST is establishing a calibration service for well-type ionization chambers used to characterize the strength of eBx sources prior to clinical use. The calibration approach involves establishing the well-chamber’s response to an eBx source whose air-kerma rate at a 50 cm distance is determined through a primary measurement performed using the Lamperti free-air ionization chamber. However, the free-air chamber measurements of charge or current can only be related to the reference air-kerma standard after applying several corrections, some of which are best determined via Monte Carlo simulation. To this end, a detailed geometric model of the Lamperti chamber was developed in the EGSnrc code based on the engineering drawings of the instrument. The egs-fac user code in EGSnrc was then used to calculate energy-dependent correction factors which account for missing or undesired ionization arising from effects such as: (1) attenuation and scatter of the x-rays in air; (2) primary electrons escaping the charge collection region; (3) lack of charged particle equilibrium; (4) atomic fluorescence and bremsstrahlung radiation. Results: Energy-dependent correction factors were calculated assuming a monoenergetic point source with the photon energy ranging from 2 keV to 60 keV in 2 keV increments. Sufficient photon histories were simulated so that the Monte Carlo statistical uncertainty of the correction factors was less than 0.01%. The correction factors for a specific eBx source will be determined by integrating these tabulated results over its measured x-ray spectrum. Conclusion: The correction factors calculated in this work are important for establishing a national standard for eBx which will help ensure that dose

  19. Electron bubbles and Weyl fermions in chiral superfluid 3He-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, Oleksii; Sauls, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Electrons embedded in liquid 3He form mesoscopic bubbles with large radii compared to the interatomic distance between 3He atoms, voids of Nbubble≈200 3He atoms, generating a negative ion with a large effective mass that scatters thermal excitations. Electron bubbles in chiral superfluid 3He-A also provide a local probe of the ground state. We develop a scattering theory of Bogoliubov quasiparticles by negative ions embedded in 3He-A that incorporates the broken symmetries of 3He-A , particularly broken symmetries under time reversal and mirror symmetry in a plane containing the chiral axis l ̂. Multiple scattering by the ion potential, combined with branch conversion scattering by the chiral order parameter, leads to a spectrum of Weyl fermions bound to the ion that support a mass current circulating the electron bubble—a mesoscopic realization of chiral edge currents in superfluid 3He-A films. A consequence is that electron bubbles embedded in 3He-A acquire angular momentum, L ≈-(Nbubble/2 ) ℏ l ̂ , inherited from the chiral ground state. We extend the scattering theory to calculate the forces on a moving electron bubble, both the Stokes drag and a transverse force, FW=e/c v ×BW , defined by an effective magnetic field, BW∝l ̂ , generated by the scattering of thermal quasiparticles off the spectrum of Weyl fermions bound to the moving ion. The transverse force is responsible for the anomalous Hall effect for electron bubbles driven by an electric field reported by the RIKEN group. Our results for the scattering cross section, drag, and transverse forces on moving ions are compared with experiments and shown to provide a quantitative understanding of the temperature dependence of the mobility and anomalous Hall angle for electron bubbles in normal and superfluid 3He-A . We also discuss our results in relation to earlier work on the theory of negative ions in superfluid 3He.

  20. T(T,4He)2n and 3He(3He,4He)2p Reactions and the Energy Dependence of Their Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Dennis; Brune, Carl; Sayre, Dan; Hale, Gerry; Frenje, Johan; Gatu Johnson, Maria

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the T(T,alpha)2n reaction because it is the charge symmetric analog to the 3He(3He,alpha)2p reaction which completes the most direct mode of the p-p chain in stellar interiors. These reactions lead to three-body final states whose energy spectrum shapes are dominated by the strong nucleon-alpha interaction and the weaker nucleon-nucleon interaction. These experiments were done at OMEGA at the University of Rochester and at the NIF at Lawrence Livermore Lab. We will focus on two features: (1) the excitation energy dependence of the reaction mechanism and (2) the center-of-mass energy dependence of the reaction mechanism. At stellar energies (OMEGA and the NIF) we find that the shape of the neutron spectrum peaks in the middle. The n-alpha 1/2-excited state is about two times stronger than the n-alpha 3/2-ground state. For the 3He+3He reaction (at CalTech), the proton spectrum peaks at the high end. The p-alpha 3/2-state is about two times stronger than the 1/2-state. This difference in the spectrum shape is explained by theoretical models which include the interference between the two identical fermions in the final state. At CalTech we have angular distributions of the 3He+3He reaction from 2 MeV to 18 MeV. We see the p-wave strength increasing.

  1. Calorimetric determination of kQ factors for NE 2561 and NE 2571 ionization chambers in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Achim; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter

    2007-10-01

    The relative uncertainty of the ionometric determination of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, in the reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams is in the order of 1.5% and is dominated by the uncertainty of the calculated chamber- and energy-dependent correction factors kQ. In the present investigation, kQ values were determined experimentally in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV bremsstrahlung by means of a water calorimeter operated at 4 °C. Ionization chambers of the types NE 2561 and NE 2571 were calibrated directly in the water phantom of the calorimeter. The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factor of a single ionization chamber can be measured with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. No significant variations of kQ were found for the different lateral sizes of the radiation fields used in this investigation.

  2. Search for anomalous deuterons in the reaction /sup 3/He+C. -->. d+X at p3He = 10. 8 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Ableev, V.G.; Vorob'ev, G.G.; Gasparyan, A.P.; Grigalashvili, N.S.; Dzhmukhadze, S.V.; Zaporozhets, S.A.; Nomofilov, A.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Sitnik, I.M.; Strokovskii, E.A.

    1985-07-01

    The Alpha apparatus in a beam of 10.78-GeV/c /sup 3/He nuclei has been used to search for anomalous deuterons (demons) in the reaction /sup 3/He+C ..-->.. d+X. The deuteron yield was measured at angles theta< or approx. =20 mrad as a function of the target thickness, which varied from 0.6 to 70 cm. The data obtained exclude the production of demons in this reaction over a wide range of expected values of the cross sections for their production and interaction with matter. The technique used can be applied also to beams of relativistic nuclei in experiments to search for anomalons.

  3. The injection of ten electron/3He-rich SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua; Mason, Glenn; Krucker, Samuel; Li, Gang

    2016-07-01

    We have derived the particle injections at the Sun for ten good electron/ ^{3}He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events, using a 1.2 AU particle path length (suggested by analysis of the velocity dispersion). The inferred solar injections of high-energy (˜10 to 300 keV) electrons and of ˜MeV/nucleon ions (carbon and heavier) start with a delay of 17±3 minutes and 75±±14 minutes, respectively, after the injection of low-energy (˜0.4 to 9 keV) electrons. The injection duration (averaged over energy) ranges from ˜200 to 550 minutes for ions, from ˜90 to 160 minutes for low-energy electrons, and from ˜10 to 30 minutes for high-energy electrons. Most of the selected events have no reported H_{α} flares or GOES SXR bursts, but all have type III radio bursts that typically start after the onset of a low-energy electron injection. All nine events with SOHO/LASCO coverage have a relatively fast (>570km/s), mostly narrow (≲30°), west-limb coronal mass ejection (CME) that launches near the start of the low-energy electron injection, and reaches an average altitude of ˜1.0 and 4.7 R _{S} , respectively, at the start of the high-energy electron injection and of the ion injection. The electron energy spectra show a continuous power law extending across the transition from low to high energies, suggesting that the low-energy electron injection may provide seed electrons for the delayed high-energy electron acceleration. The delayed ion injections and high ionization states may suggest an ion acceleration along the lower altitude flanks, rather than at the nose of the CMEs.

  4. The injection of ten electron/3He-rich SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Mason, Glenn M.; Lin, Robert P.; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    We have derived the particle injections at the Sun for ten good electron/3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events, using a 1.2 AU particle path length (suggested by analysis of the velocity dispersion). The inferred solar injections of high-energy (~10 to 300 keV) electrons and of ~MeV/nucleon ions (carbon and heavier) start with a delay of 17 ± 3 min and 75 ± 14 min, respectively, after the injection of low-energy (~0.4 to 9 keV) electrons. The injection duration (averaged over energy) ranges from ~200 to 550 min for ions, from ~90 to 160 min for low-energy electrons, and from ~10 to 30 min for high-energy electrons. Most of the selected events have no reported Hα flares or GOES SXR bursts, but all have type III radio bursts that typically start after the onset of a low-energy electron injection. All nine events with SOHO/LASCO coverage have a relatively fast (>570 km s-1), mostly narrow (≲30°), west-limb coronal mass ejection (CME) that launches near the start of the low-energy electron injection, and reaches an average altitude of ~1.0 and 4.7 RS, respectively, at the start of the high-energy electron injection and of the ion injection. The electron energy spectra show a continuous power law extending across the transition from low to high energies, suggesting that the low-energy electron injection may provide seed electrons for the delayed high-energy electron acceleration. The delayed ion injections and high ionization states may suggest an ion acceleration along the lower altitude flanks, rather than at the nose of the CMEs.

  5. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  6. PREFACE: JCNS Workshop on Modern Trends in Production and Applications of Polarized 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, Alexander; Babcock, Earl; Gutberlet, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Polarized neutron scattering techniques are an indispensable and highly requested tool for studying magnetic phenomena in condensed matter. The different coherent and incoherent scattering of isotopes such as protons and deuterons also allows applications of polarized neutrons in soft matter and biological studies of molecular and macromolecular dynamics. One method to polarize neutrons is to use polarized 3He gas which absorbs, or filters, one spin state of the neutron beam as it passes through it. Only about ten years ago, early polarized neutron scattering experiments using such 3He neutron spin filters (3He NSF) were being conducted using starting 3He polarizations of 55%. Currently there are two different commonly used methods to polarize high quantities of 3He. These methods both collisionally transfer spin polarization to ground state 3He nucleuses; one method uses optical pumping of an excited metastable state of 3He atoms, and the other uses optical pumping of the ground state of an alkali-metal vapour. Within the last decade immense progress in both methods has resulted in 3He polarizations of up to 80% being reported in atmosphere-pressure 3He cells by the world's leading labs. This progress in optical pumped 3He promises to give rise to much more efficient and novel polarized neutron scattering experiments as and also impacts other areas of science. Polarized 3He is additionally applied in research fields such as particle physics, fundamental studies and medicine. Thus not only the techniques and methods of polarization, but the research groups themselves exploring polarized 3He, have a large breadth and diversity spanning different fields of science and locations in the world. Given this diversity, it is rare for this community to meet as a group at any one meeting or conference. Because it is crucial to discuss new developments in 3He polarization in a multi-disciplinary international setting, an international workshop on "Modern Trends in Production

  7. The cosmological density of baryons from observations of 3He+ in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Bania, T M; Rood, Robert T; Balser, Dana S

    2002-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis after the Big Bang can be constrained by the abundances of the light elements and isotopes 2H, 3He, 4He and 7Li (ref. 1). The standard theory of stellar evolution predicts that 3He is also produced by solar-type stars, so its abundance is of interest not only for cosmology, but also for understanding stellar evolution and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The 3He abundance in star-forming (H II) regions agrees with the present value for the local interstellar medium, but seems to be incompatible with the stellar production rates inferred from observations of planetary nebulae, which provide a direct test of stellar evolution theory. Here we develop our earlier observations, which, when combined with recent theoretical developments in our understanding of light-element synthesis and destruction in stars, allow us to determine an upper limit for the primordial abundance of 3He relative to hydrogen: 3He/H = (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-5). The primordial density of all baryons determined from the 3He data is in excellent agreement with the densities calculated from other cosmological probes. The previous conflict is resolved because most solar-mass stars do not produce enough 3He to enrich the interstellar medium significantly. PMID:11780112

  8. Multi-spacecraft observations of recurrent {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bučík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Mall, U.; Korth, A.; Mason, G. M.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2014-05-01

    We study the origin of {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particles (<1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) that are observed consecutively on STEREO-B, Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), and STEREO-A spacecraft when they are separated in heliolongitude by more than 90°. The {sup 3}He-rich period on STEREO-B and STEREO-A commences on 2011 July 1 and 2011 July 16, respectively. The ACE {sup 3}He-rich period consists of two sub-events starting on 2011 July 7 and 2011 July 9. We associate the STEREO-B July 1 and ACE July 7 {sup 3}He-rich events with the same sizeable active region (AR) producing X-ray flares accompanied by prompt electron events, when it was near the west solar limb as seen from the respective spacecraft. The ACE July 9 and STEREO-A July 16 events were dispersionless with enormous {sup 3}He enrichment, lacking solar energetic electrons and occurring in corotating interaction regions. We associate these events with a small, recently emerged AR near the border of a low-latitude coronal hole that produced numerous jet-like emissions temporally correlated with type III radio bursts. For the first time we present observations of (1) solar regions with long-lasting conditions for {sup 3}He acceleration and (2) solar energetic {sup 3}He that is temporarily confined/re-accelerated in interplanetary space.

  9. Recent advances in polarized 3 He based neutron spin filter development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wangchun; Gentile, Thomas; Erwin, Ross; Watson, Shannon; Krycka, Kathryn; Ye, Qiang; NCNR NIST Team; University of Maryland Team

    2015-04-01

    Polarized 3 He neutron spin filters (NSFs) are based on the strong spin-dependence of the neutron absorption cross section by 3 He. NSFs can polarize large area, widely divergent, and broadband neutron beams effectively and allow for combining a neutron polarizer and a spin flipper into a single polarizing device. The last capability utilizes 3 He spin inversion based on the adiabatic fast passage (AFP) nuclear magnetic resonance technique. Polarized 3 He NSFs are significantly expanding the polarized neutron measurement capabilities at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). Here we present an overview of 3 He NSF applications to small-angle neutron scattering, thermal triple axis spectrometry, and wide-angle polarization analysis. We discuss a recent upgrade of our spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) systems that utilize chirped volume holographic gratings for spectral narrowing. The new capability allows us to polarize rubidium/potassium hybrid SEOP cells over a liter in volume within a day, with 3 He polarizations up to 88%, Finally we discuss how we can achieve nearly lossless 3 He polarization inversion with AFP.

  10. The cosmological density of baryons from observations of 3He+ in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Bania, T M; Rood, Robert T; Balser, Dana S

    2002-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis after the Big Bang can be constrained by the abundances of the light elements and isotopes 2H, 3He, 4He and 7Li (ref. 1). The standard theory of stellar evolution predicts that 3He is also produced by solar-type stars, so its abundance is of interest not only for cosmology, but also for understanding stellar evolution and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The 3He abundance in star-forming (H II) regions agrees with the present value for the local interstellar medium, but seems to be incompatible with the stellar production rates inferred from observations of planetary nebulae, which provide a direct test of stellar evolution theory. Here we develop our earlier observations, which, when combined with recent theoretical developments in our understanding of light-element synthesis and destruction in stars, allow us to determine an upper limit for the primordial abundance of 3He relative to hydrogen: 3He/H = (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-5). The primordial density of all baryons determined from the 3He data is in excellent agreement with the densities calculated from other cosmological probes. The previous conflict is resolved because most solar-mass stars do not produce enough 3He to enrich the interstellar medium significantly.

  11. Gas cells for 3He hyperpolarized via spin-exchange optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Tan, J. A.; Woo, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a device for the production of hyperpolarized 3He, which is widely used in spinrelated nuclear physics research. Spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) is employed to polarize 3He enclosed in a circular borosilicate glass cell suitable not only for the production of polarized gas but also for its storage. The portable glass cell can, thus, be transported to any other research facility. The glass cell can be refilled several times. Special attention is given to the preparation and the filling of the cell to minimize the impurities on its walls and in the gas. We employ glass tubes with shorter lengths and larger diameters in the gas-filling system to achieve the improvement in the air flow necessary to obtain purer polarized 3He samples. The cell is prepared, and after it has been filled with rubidium (Rb) and 3He-N2 mixture, it is sealed under high vacuum conditions. The cell containing the mixture is exposed to circularly-polarized laser light with a wavelength of 795 nm at temperatures of 180 - 220 °C for SEOP. The polarization of 3He is measured via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We obtained 40% polarized 3He in less than 15 hours and 50% in about 25 hours. The longitudinal relaxation time T 1 of the polarized 3He we measured was about 58 hours.

  12. Multi-spacecraft Observations of Recurrent 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bučík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Mall, U.; Korth, A.; Mason, G. M.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2014-05-01

    We study the origin of 3He-rich solar energetic particles (<1 MeV nucleon-1) that are observed consecutively on STEREO-B, Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), and STEREO-A spacecraft when they are separated in heliolongitude by more than 90°. The 3He-rich period on STEREO-B and STEREO-A commences on 2011 July 1 and 2011 July 16, respectively. The ACE 3He-rich period consists of two sub-events starting on 2011 July 7 and 2011 July 9. We associate the STEREO-B July 1 and ACE July 7 3He-rich events with the same sizeable active region (AR) producing X-ray flares accompanied by prompt electron events, when it was near the west solar limb as seen from the respective spacecraft. The ACE July 9 and STEREO-A July 16 events were dispersionless with enormous 3He enrichment, lacking solar energetic electrons and occurring in corotating interaction regions. We associate these events with a small, recently emerged AR near the border of a low-latitude coronal hole that produced numerous jet-like emissions temporally correlated with type III radio bursts. For the first time we present observations of (1) solar regions with long-lasting conditions for 3He acceleration and (2) solar energetic 3He that is temporarily confined/re-accelerated in interplanetary space.

  13. Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Langenbrunner, James R; Mack, Joseph M; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Douglas C; Evans, Scott C; Sedillo, Tom J; Kyrala, George A; Caldwell, Stephen E; Young, Carlton A; Nobile, Arthur; Wermer, Joseph R; Paglieri, Stephen N; Mcevoy, Aaron M; Kim, Yong Ho; Batha, Steven H; Horsfield, Colin J; Drew, Dave; Garbett, Warren; Rubery, Michael; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Roberts, Samuel; Frenje, Johan A

    2008-01-01

    Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

  14. The Upper Limit on 3He Fluence in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, G. C.; Roelof, E. C.; Mason, G. M.

    2005-03-01

    We investigated 201 3He-rich (3He/4He > 0.004 at 0.2-2.0 MeV nucleon-1) solar energetic particle (SEP) events from 1997 September through 2003 December using the Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer on the A dvanced Composition E xplorer. Both ``impulsive'' (flare-related) and ``gradual'' (CME-related) events are included. The 3He fluences varied only by a factor of 100 above our instrument sensitivity threshold, while the 4He fluences varied by factor of 10,000 above the same threshold. Moreover, there appears to be no significant correlation between the 3He and 4He fluences. We find it striking that with more than 6 years of continuous SEP data, we could not find any SEP event that has 3He fluence higher than 2.0×105 particles (cm2 sr MeV nucleon-1)-1, while the largest 4He fluence observed was 7.0×107 particles (cm2 sr MeV nucleon-1)-1. To the approximation that the event fluence is to first order proportional the number of particles released from the Sun, the observed upper limit for the 3He fluence seems to indicate that only a limited number of 0.2-2 MeV nucleon-1 3He can be released from the Sun in an SEP event.

  15. Third sound and stability of 3He-4He mixture films

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. H.; Krotscheck, E.; Miller, M. D.

    2006-09-07

    We study third sound and the interaction between 3He adatoms in two thin 3He-4He mixture films from a first-principles, microscopic theory. Utilizing the variational, hypernetted-chain Euler-Lagrange (HNC-EL) theory as applied to inhomogeneous boson systems, we calculate chemical potentials for both the 4He superfluid film and the physisorbed 3He. Numerical density derivatives of the chemical potentials lead to the sought-after third sound speeds that clearly reflect a layered structure of at least seven oscillations. In this paper, we report third sound on model substrates: Nuclepore, and sodium. We find that the effect of the 3He depends sensitively on the particular 4He film coverage. Our most important result is that, with the addition of 3He, the third sound speed can either increase or decrease. In fact, in some regimes, the added 3He destabilizes the film and can drive ''layering transitions'', leading to fairly complicated geometric structures of the film in which the outermost layer is predicted to consist of phase-separated regions of 3He and 4He.

  16. Practical method for determination of air kerma by use of an ionization chamber toward construction of a secondary X-ray field to be used in clinical examination rooms.

    PubMed

    Maehata, Itsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Takegami, Kazuki; Okino, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Yuki; Tominaga, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new practical method for the construction of an accurate secondary X-ray field using medical diagnostic X-ray equipment. For accurate measurement of the air kerma of an X-ray field, it is important to reduce and evaluate the contamination rate of scattered X-rays. To determine the rate quantitatively, we performed the following studies. First, we developed a shield box in which an ionization chamber could be set at an inner of the box to prevent detection of the X-rays scattered from the air. In addition, we made collimator plates which were placed near the X-ray source for estimation of the contamination rate by scattered X-rays from the movable diaphragm which is a component of the X-ray equipment. Then, we measured the exposure dose while changing the collimator plates, which had diameters of 25-90 mm(ϕ). The ideal value of the exposure dose was derived mathematically by extrapolation to 0 mm(ϕ). Tube voltages ranged from 40 to 130 kV. Under these irradiation conditions, we analyzed the contamination rate by the scattered X-rays. We found that the contamination rates were less than 1.7 and 2.3 %, caused by air and the movable diaphragm, respectively. The extrapolated value of the exposure dose has been determined to have an uncertainty of 0.7 %. The ionization chamber used in this study was calibrated with an accuracy of 5 %. Using this kind of ionization chamber, we can construct a secondary X-ray field with an uncertainty of 5 %.

  17. Determination of cosmogenic production rates of 10Be, 3He and 3H in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Erik T.; Trull, Thomas W.; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Raisbeck, Grant; Bourlès, Didier; Yiou, Françoise; Marty, Bernard

    2000-10-01

    To improve our understanding of present-day cosmogenic production systematics of 10Be, 3H and 3He, we exposed three sets of targets of purified water at altitudes of 620, 3810 and 4745 m in the Mont Blanc Massif of the French Alps. In addition, tanks were stored 1780 m underground to quantify 3He contributions from decay of "inherited" tritium initially present in the water. After analyses of 3He and 10Be, both the summit and tunnel 3H- 3He tanks were re-degassed and stored underground for an additional year. The stored summit tanks were then analyzed to determine cosmogenic 3H levels by the 3He ingrowth method, and the tunnel tanks used to re-determine inherited tritium. Production rates (in atoms per g H 2O per year) for direct production of 3He and 10Be were 1824±52 and 112±9; 1013±16 and 70±5; and 134±58 and 5.9±0.7 at the three elevations, respectively. We determined production ratios of 0.32±0.08 for 3H: 3He and 20.2±1.5 for ( 3H+ 3He): 10Be. Our 10Be production rates, when normalized for inter-laboratory calibration and for differences in geomagnetic latitude of exposure, are somewhat lower than results of a similar experiment undertaken by Nishiizumi et al. (1996). Our 3H: 3He ratio is consistent with theoretical and meteorite estimates (Kruger and D. Heymann, 1968), but considerably lower than values assumed in many exposure age studies of igneous rocks (e.g., (Kurz, 1986; Trull et al., 1995)).

  18. Investigation of the {sup 3}He wave function by quasifree scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Hansen, J.O.; Bloch, C.

    1995-08-01

    The analysis of the data from the CE25 experiment at IUCF, which measured the target and beam analyzing powers and the spin correlation parameter in {sup 3}He(p,2p) and {sup 3}He(p,pn) quasielastic scattering, is nearing completion. At low missing momentum, the extracted polarization of the neutron and proton in {sup 3}He are consistent with Faddeev calculations. Two papers, one reporting the physics results and one describing the experiment, were published. The data from this experiment indicates that for q {>=} 500 MeV/c the plane wave impulse approximation is valid.

  19. Polarized {sup 3}He{sup −} ion source with hyperfine state selection

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Morozov, V.; Dudnikov, A.

    2015-04-08

    High beam polarization is essential to the scientific productivity of a collider. Polarized {sup 3}He ions are an essential part of the nuclear physics programs at existing and future ion-ion and electron-ion colliders such as BNL's RHIC and eRHIC and JLab's ELIC. Ion sources with performance exceeding that achieved today are a key requirement for the development of these next generation high-luminosity high-polarization colliders. The development of high-intensity high-brightness arc-discharge ion sources at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) has opened up an opportunity for realization of a new type of a polarized {sup 3}He{sup −} ion source. This report discusses a polarized {sup 3}He{sup −} ion source based on the large difference of extra-electron auto-detachment lifetimes of the different {sup 3}He{sup −} ion hyperfine states. The highest momentum state of 5/2 has the largest lifetime of τ ∼ 350 µs while the lower momentum states have lifetimes of τ ~ 10 µs. By producing {sup 3}He{sup −} ion beam composed of only the |5/2, ±5/2> hyperfine states and then quenching one of the states by an RF resonant field, {sup 3}He{sup −} beam polarization of 90% can be achieved. Such a method of polarized {sup 3}He{sup −} production has been considered before; however, due to low intensities of the He{sup +} ion sources existing at that time, it was not possible to produce any interesting intensity of polarized {sup 3}He{sup −} ions. The high-brightness arc-discharge ion source developed at BINP can produce a high-brightness {sup 3}He{sup +} beam with an intensity of up to 2 A allowing for selection of up to ∼1-4 mA of {sup 3}He{sup −} ions with ∼90% polarization. The high gas efficiency of an arc-discharge source is important due to the high cost of {sup 3}He gas. Some features of such a PIS as well as prototype designs are considered. An integrated {sup 3}He{sup −} ion source design providing high beam polarization could be

  20. Explanation of 3He and triton rates in the alpha breakup inclusive cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, R.; Baur, G.; Budzanowski, A.; Bojowald, J.; Dabrowski, H.; Mayer-Böricke, C.; Oelert, W.; Riepe, G.; Rogge, M.; Turek, P.; Rösel, F.; Trautmann, D.

    1983-05-01

    (α, 3He) and (α, t) continuum inclusive spectra are measured on target nuclei ranging from 58Ni to 209Bi. Systematic differences in the absolute magnitudes of the 3He and triton spectra are found. To explain these differences the distorted-wave Born approximation calculations in the post form for inclusive breakup reactions are performed. It is shown that Coulomb effects are responsible for these differences. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (α, t), (α, 3He) breakup reactions: measured d2σd Ω dE; targets: 58Ni, 90Zr, 120Sn, 209Bi; post form DWBA breakup theory.

  1. Comment on ''Few-atom /sup 3/He--/sup 4/He mixed molecules''

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.

    1983-02-15

    It is pointed out that a recent work by Nakaichi et al. on few-atom /sup 3/He--/sup 4/He mixed molecules is based on incorrect values of THETA/sup 2//M/sub 3/ and THETA/sup 2//M/sub 4/, where M/sub 3/ and M/sub 4/ are the masses of the /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He atoms. This is shown to affect their conclusion on the /sup 3/He(/sup 4/He)/sub 2/ system seriously.

  2. The heavy ion composition in 3HE-rich solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Reames, D. V.; Hovestadt, D.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1985-01-01

    The 3He-rich flares show a tendency to be enriched in heavy ions, and that this enrichment covers the charge range through Fe. The discovery of this association was responsible, in part, for the discarding of 3He enrichment models which involved spallation or thermonuclear reactions, since such models were unable to produce heavy nuclei enhancement. Results of a survey of heavy nucleus abundances observed in 66 3He-rich flares which occurred over the period October 1978 to June 1982 are presented.

  3. About 3He Ions Predominant Acceleration During the January 20, 2005 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. V.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.

    We have studied some properties of the powerful solar flare of January 20, 2005 by methods of nuclear lines analysis. The results of temporal profiles investigation in corresponding to neutron capture energy bands allow the supposition about predominant acceleration of 3He ions in the corona, their subsequent propagation to the low chromosphere and the photosphere where the area of 2.223 MeV γ-line effective productions is located. The characteristics of accelerated 3He ions propagation processes and the basic explanation of observable properties of this solar flare due to the variations of 3He content are discussed in the presented article.

  4. Fragmentation of D- and L-enantiomers of amino acids through interaction with 3He2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, O. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Boitsov, V. M.; Vyaz'min, S. Yu.; Orbeli, A. L.; Dubina, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    The relative cross section of processes attendant on the capture of an electron by 12-keV 3He2+ ions are measured by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for leucine (C6H13NO2), methionine (C5H11NO2S), and glutmic acid (C5H9NO4) molecules. No differences between the formation relative cross sections of different fragment ions for the D- and L-enantiomeric forms of the amino acids are revealed. The spectrum of glutamic acid fragments taken at temperatures above 110°C is explained by decomposition of the acid with the formation of pyroglutamic acid (C5H7NO3) and water. The results are compared with published data on fragmentation of the same molecules via electron-impact ionization.

  5. Direct measurement of air kerma rate in air from CDCS J-type caesium-137 therapy sources using a Farmer ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Poynter, A J

    2000-04-01

    A simple method for directly measuring the reference air kerma rate from J-type 137Cs sources using a Farmer 2571 chamber has been evaluated. The method is useful as an independent means of verifying manufacturers' test data.

  6. Unusual Doppler effect in superfluid and nonanalyticity of {sup 4}He-{sup 3}He hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nepomnyashchy, Y.A.; Gov, N.; Mann, A.

    1995-08-01

    The authors investigate the influence of {sup 3}He admixture on the Doppler shift of different sounds in superfluid {sup 4}He with internal motion. This influence proves to be very strong in the whole region of the nontrivial temperature behavior of the Doppler shift and implies in particular an unexpected amplification of certain Doppler anomalies. They explain origin of the features of the internal Doppler effect in pure {sup 4}He and {sup 4}He-{sup 3}He mixture and notice an interesting peculiarity of the {sup 4}He-{sup 3}He two-fluid hydrodynamics: its nonanalyticity at low temperature and small {sup 3}He concentration: T{yields}0, X{yields}0.

  7. Magnetization and spin diffusion of liquid {sup 3}He in aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Sauls, J. A.; Bunkov, Yu.M.; Collin, E.; Godfrin, H.; Sharma, P.

    2005-07-01

    We report theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the normal-state spin diffusion coefficient of {sup 3}He in aerogel, including both elastic and inelastic scattering of {sup 3}He quasiparticles, and compare these results with data for {sup 3}He in 98% porous silica aerogel. This analysis provides a determination of the elastic mean free path within the aerogel. Measurements of the magnetization of the superfluid phase in the same aerogel samples provide a test of the theory of pairbreaking and magnetic response of low-energy excitations in the 'dirty' B phase of {sup 3}He in aerogel. A consistent interpretation of the data for the spin-diffusion coefficient, magnetization, and superfluid transition temperature is obtained by including correlation effects in the aerogel density.

  8. Case studies of multi-day 3He-rich solar energetic particle periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-hwa; Bučík, Radoslav; Innes, Davina E.; Mason, Glenn M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Impulsive solar energetic particle events in the inner heliosphere show the long-lasting enrichment of 3He. Aims: We study the source regions of long-lasting 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events Methods: We located the responsible open magnetic field regions, we combined potential field source surface extrapolations with the Parker spiral, and compared the magnetic field of the identified source regions with in situ magnetic fields. The candidate open field regions are active region plages. The activity was examined by using extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and STEREO together with radio observations from STEREO and WIND. Results: Multi-day periods of 3He-rich SEP events are associated with ion production in single active region. Small flares or coronal jets are their responsible solar sources. We also find that the 3He enrichment may depend on the occurrence rate of coronal jets.

  9. Recent advancements of wide-angle polarization analysis with 3He neutron spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C.; Gentile, T. R.; Ye, Q.; Kirchhoff, A.; Watson, S. M.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Qiu, Y.; Broholm, C.

    2016-09-01

    Wide-angle polarization analysis with polarized 3He based neutron spin filters (NSFs) has recently been employed on the Multi-Axis Crystal Spectrometer (MACS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). Over the past several years, the apparatus has undergone many upgrades to address the fundamental requirements for wide angle polarization analysis using spin exchange optical pumping based 3He NSFs. In this paper, we report substantial improvements in the on-beam-line performance of the apparatus and progress toward routine user capability. We discuss new standard samples used for 3He NSF characterization and the flipping ratio measurement on MACS. We further discuss the management of stray magnetic fields produced by operation of superconducting magnets on the MACS instrument, which can significantly reduce the 3He polarization relaxation time. Finally, we present the results of recent development of horseshoe-shaped wide angle cells.

  10. 3He and 3H bound state for the Reid soft-core potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, T.; Okuno, H.; Sawada, T.

    1981-02-01

    The perturbational approach that has been used for the calculation of the triton bound state is applied to 3He. The Coulomb potential is fully taken into account within the limitation of the Reid soft-core-3 potential. We obtain 5.775 MeV as the binding energy of 3He. The Coulomb energy difference with 3H is 0.625 MeV. The Coulomb effects to the charge form factor and the two-body correlation function are calculated. Qualitative discussions are given for the complex behavior of the Faddeev components expressed in terms of the spectator momentum and the relative distance of the interacting pair. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 3He and 3H bound state. Exact solution of the Faddeev equation by a perturbative approach. Binding energy of 3He: 5.775 MeV. Coulomb energy difference with triton: 0.625 MeV. Coulomb effects to charge form factor and correlation function.

  11. 3He spin filters for a thermal neutron triple axis spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C.; Armstrong, G.; Chen, Y.; Collett, B.; Erwin, R.; Gentile, T. R.; Jones, G. L.; Lynn, J. W.; McKenney, S.; Steinberg, J. E.

    2007-07-01

    We have tested two 3He neutron spin filters (NSF), one for the polarizer and one for the analyzer, in conjunction with a doubly focusing pyrolytic graphite (PG) monochromator on the state-of-the-art BT-7 thermal triple axis spectrometer (TAS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). This system will provide significantly better neutronic performance for polarization analysis over a conventional TAS with Heusler crystals. We discuss the scheme for employing NSFs on the TAS instrument, including the 3He cell design, spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) of these large 3He cells, and the holding fields on the spectrometer. Using Rb/K hybrid SEOP, we have produced 75% 3He polarization for the 11 cm diameter cells for TAS in less than two days.

  12. Entrance and exit channel phenomena in d- and 3He-induced preequilibrium decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissem, H. H.; Georgi, R.; Scobel, W.; Ernst, J.; Kaba, M.; Rao, J. Rama; Strohe, H.

    1980-10-01

    Activation techniques were used to measure more than 30 excitation functions for single and multiple nucleon and/or α particle emission for d+64,66Zn, 89Y with Ed=9-26 MeV and 3He+63,65Cu, 93Nb with E(3He)=10-44 MeV. The excitation functions are generally in agreement with the results of a combined equilibrium and preequilibrium hybrid model calculation applying initial exciton numbers n0=3 for d and n0=4 for 3He reactions. The composite system 66Ga has been produced via d+64Zn and 3He+63Cu at excitation energies between 22 and 36 MeV. An entrance channel dependence shows up in the yields for single p- and n-emission when compared in the double ratio R=[σ(3He, p)σ(3He, n)][σ(d, p)σ(d, n)]. It approaches a value of about 2, indicating enhanced p emission for the 3He-induced reaction. This value disagrees with the equilibrium isospin formalism and is best reproduced by initial particle exciton numbers n0p=n0n=1.5 for d and n0p=2.5, n0n=1.5 for 3He projectiles, indicating conservation of charge asymmetry in the entrance channel. Isomeric ratios have been measured for 89Y(d, 2n)89Zr and 93Nb(3He, xn)96-xTc (x=1, 2, 3). Calculations with a full statistical model fail to reproduce σgσm as well as σg and σm for reasonable values of the spin cutoff parameter. Inclusion of a preequilibrium decay mode improves the fit, in particular if the angular momentum depletion of the composite system due to preequilibrium decay is increased over that of the equilibrium decay at the same channel energy. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 64,66Zn, 89Y(d, xnypzα), Ed=9-26 MeV, 63,65Cu, 93Nb(3He, xnypzα), E3He=10-44 MeV, x<=4, y<=1, z<=2 measured σ(E) by activation, enriched targets. Statistical model analysis including preequilibrium decay, deduced reaction mechanism, charge asymmetry conservation, spin depletion.

  13. A compact SEOP 3He neutron spin filter with AFP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, Takashi; Arimoto, Yasushi; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Sakaguchi, Yoshifumi; Sakai, Kenji; Kira, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Takenao; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Kakurai, Kazuhisa; Chang, Lieh-Jeng

    2012-02-01

    We developed AFP NMR in an aluminum container for polarized noble gas nuclei. The radio frequency magnetic field inside the aluminum container was designed from computer simulations. The polarization loss by the AFP spin flip of 3He was measured to be as low as 3.8×10-4. With this technique, a compact in-situ polarizing 3He neutron spin filter with AFP NMR is demonstrated.

  14. Distal airways in humans: dynamic hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging--feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Hong, Kwan Soo; McKinstry, Erin L.; Costello, Philip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the human airways is achieved by using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence during inhalation. The resulting dynamic images show differential contrast enhancement of both distal airways and the lung periphery, unlike static hyperpolarized 3He MR images on which only the lung periphery is seen. With this technique, up to seventh-generation airway branching can be visualized. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  15. The mean ionic charge of silicon in 3HE-rich solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhn, A.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, E.; Moebius, E.

    1985-01-01

    Mean ionic charge of iron in 3He-rich solar flares and the average mean charge of Silicon for 23 #He-rich periods during the time interval from September 1978 to October 1979 were determined. It is indicated that the value of the mean charge state of Silicon is higher than the normal flare average by approximately 3 units and in perticular it is higher then the value predicted by resonant heating models for 3He-rich solar flares.

  16. Optimised adiabatic fast passage spin flipping for 3He neutron spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKetterick, T. J.; Boag, S.; Stewart, J. R.; Frost, C. D.; Skoda, M. W. A.; Parnell, S. R.; Babcock, E.

    2011-06-01

    We describe here a method of performing adiabatic fast passage (AFP) spin flipping of polarized 3He used as a neutron spin filter (NSF) to polarize neutron beams. By reversing the spin states of the 3He nuclei the polarization of a neutron beam can be efficiently reversed allowing for the transmission of a neutron beam polarized in either spin state. Using an amplitude modulated frequency sweep lasting 500 ms we can spin flip a polarized 3He neutron spin filter with only 1.8×10-5 loss in 3He polarization. The small magnetic fields (10-15 G) used to house neutron spin filters mean the 3He resonant frequencies are low enough to be generated using a computer with a digital I/O card. The versatility of this systems allows AFP to be performed on any beamline or in any laboratory using 3He neutron spin filters and polarization losses can be minimised by adjusting sweep parameters.

  17. Polarized 3He+2 ions in the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron to RHIC transfer line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; Méot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will allow the collisions of 20 GeV polarized electrons with 250 GeV polarized protons, or 100 GeV /n polarized 3He+2 ions, or other unpolarized ion species. The large value of the anomalous magnetic moment of the 3He nucleus GHe=(g -2 )/2 =-4.184 (where g is the g -factor of the 3He nuclear spin) combined with the peculiar layout of the transfer line which transports the beam bunches from the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) makes the transfer and injection of polarized 3He ions from AGS to RHIC (AtR) a special case as we explain in the paper. Specifically in this paper we calculate the stable spin direction of a polarized 3He beam at the exit of the AtR line which is also the injection point of RHIC, and we discuss a simple modifications of the AtR beam-transfer-line, to perfectly match the stable spin direction of the injected polarized 3He beam to that of the circulating beam, at the injection point of RHIC.

  18. Compressing Spin-Polarized 3He With a Modified Diaphragm Pump

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, T. R.; Rich, D. R.; Thompson, A. K.; Snow, W. M.; Jones, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear spin-polarized 3He gas at pressures on the order of 100 kPa (1 bar) are required for several applications, such as neutron spin filters and magnetic resonance imaging. The metastability-exchange optical pumping (MEOP) method for polarizing 3He gas can rapidly produce highly polarized gas, but the best results are obtained at much lower pressure (~0.1 kPa). We describe a compact compression apparatus for polarized gas that is based on a modified commercial diaphragm pump. The gas is polarized by MEOP at a typical pressure of 0.25 kPa (2.5 mbar), and compressed into a storage cell at a typical pressure of 100 kPa. In the storage cell, we have obtained 20 % to 35 % 3He polarization using pure 3He gas and 35 % to 50 % 3He polarization using 3He-4He mixtures. By maintaining the storage cell at liquid nitrogen temperature during compression, the density has been increased by a factor of four. PMID:27500044

  19. Terrestrial cosmogenic 3He: where are we 30 years after its discovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Pik, Raphaël; Farley, Kenneth A.; Lavé, Jérôme; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-04-01

    It is now 30 years since cosmogenic 3He has been detected for the first time in a terrestrial sample (Kurz, 1986). 3He is now a widely used geochemical tool in many fields of Earth sciences: volcanology, tectonics, paleoclimatology. 3He has the advantage to have a high "production rate" to "detection limit" ratio, allowing surfaces as young as hundred of years to be dated. Although its nuclear stability implies several limitations, it moreover represents a useful alternative to 10Be in mafic environments. This contribution is a review of the progresses that have been accomplished since this discovery, and discuss strategies to improve both the accuracy and the precision of this geochronometer. 1) Measurement of cosmogenic 3He Correction of magmatic 3He. To estimate the non-cosmogenic magmatic 3He, Kurz (1986) invented a two steps method involving crushing of phenocrysts (to analyze the isotopic ratio of the magmatic component), followed by a subsequent melting of the sample, to extract the remaining components, including the cosmogenic 3He: 3Hec = 3Hemelt ‑4Hemelt x (3He/4He)magmatic (1) Several studies suggested that the preliminary crushing may induce a loss of cosmogenic 3He (Hilton et al., 1993; Yokochi et al., 2005; Blard et al., 2006), implying an underestimate of the cosmogenic 3He measurement. However, subsequent work did not replicate these observations (Blard et al., 2008; Goerhing et al., 2010), suggesting an influence of the used apparatus. An isochron method (by directly melting several phenocrysts aliquots) is an alternative to avoid the preliminary crushing step (Blard and Pik, 2008). Atmospheric contamination. Protin et al. (in press) provides robust evidences for a large and irreversible contamination of atmospheric helium on silicate surfaces. This unexpected behavior may reconcile the contrasted observations about the amplitude of crushing loss. This undesirable atmospheric contamination is negligible if grain fractions smaller than 150 mm are

  20. Terrestrial cosmogenic 3He: where are we 30 years after its discovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Pik, Raphaël; Farley, Kenneth A.; Lavé, Jérôme; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-04-01

    It is now 30 years since cosmogenic 3He has been detected for the first time in a terrestrial sample (Kurz, 1986). 3He is now a widely used geochemical tool in many fields of Earth sciences: volcanology, tectonics, paleoclimatology. 3He has the advantage to have a high "production rate" to "detection limit" ratio, allowing surfaces as young as hundred of years to be dated. Although its nuclear stability implies several limitations, it moreover represents a useful alternative to 10Be in mafic environments. This contribution is a review of the progresses that have been accomplished since this discovery, and discuss strategies to improve both the accuracy and the precision of this geochronometer. 1) Measurement of cosmogenic 3He Correction of magmatic 3He. To estimate the non-cosmogenic magmatic 3He, Kurz (1986) invented a two steps method involving crushing of phenocrysts (to analyze the isotopic ratio of the magmatic component), followed by a subsequent melting of the sample, to extract the remaining components, including the cosmogenic 3He: 3Hec = 3Hemelt -4Hemelt x (3He/4He)magmatic (1) Several studies suggested that the preliminary crushing may induce a loss of cosmogenic 3He (Hilton et al., 1993; Yokochi et al., 2005; Blard et al., 2006), implying an underestimate of the cosmogenic 3He measurement. However, subsequent work did not replicate these observations (Blard et al., 2008; Goerhing et al., 2010), suggesting an influence of the used apparatus. An isochron method (by directly melting several phenocrysts aliquots) is an alternative to avoid the preliminary crushing step (Blard and Pik, 2008). Atmospheric contamination. Protin et al. (in press) provides robust evidences for a large and irreversible contamination of atmospheric helium on silicate surfaces. This unexpected behavior may reconcile the contrasted observations about the amplitude of crushing loss. This undesirable atmospheric contamination is negligible if grain fractions smaller than 150 mm are

  1. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  2. Minority and mode conversion heating in (3He)-H JET plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Johnson, T. J.; Hellsten, T.; Ongena, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Frigione, D.; Sozzi, C.; Calabro, G.; Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P.; Blackman, T.; Brennan, D.; Brett, A.; Cecconello, M.; Coffey, I.; Coyne, A.; Crombe, K.; Czarnecka, A.; Felton, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Giroud, C.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Jacquet, P.; Kazakov, Ye; Kiptily, V.; Knipe, S.; Krasilnikov, A.; Lin, Y.; Maslov, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Nocente, M.; Pangioni, L.; Proverbio, I.; Stamp, M.; Studholme, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Versloot, T. W.; Vdovin, V.; Whitehurst, A.; Wooldridge, E.; Zoita, V.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2012-07-01

    Radio frequency (RF) heating experiments have recently been conducted in JET (3He)-H plasmas. This type of plasmas will be used in ITER's non-activated operation phase. Whereas a companion paper in this same PPCF issue will discuss the RF heating scenario's at half the nominal magnetic field, this paper documents the heating performance in (3He)-H plasmas at full field, with fundamental cyclotron heating of 3He as the only possible ion heating scheme in view of the foreseen ITER antenna frequency bandwidth. Dominant electron heating with global heating efficiencies between 30% and 70% depending on the 3He concentration were observed and mode conversion (MC) heating proved to be as efficient as 3He minority heating. The unwanted presence of both 4He and D in the discharges gave rise to 2 MC layers rather than a single one. This together with the fact that the location of the high-field side fast wave (FW) cutoff is a sensitive function of the parallel wave number and that one of the locations of the wave confluences critically depends on the 3He concentration made the interpretation of the results, although more complex, very interesting: three regimes could be distinguished as a function of X[3He]: (i) a regime at low concentration (X[3He] < 1.8%) at which ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating is efficient, (ii) a regime at intermediate concentrations (1.8 < X[3He] < 5%) in which the RF performance is degrading and ultimately becoming very poor, and finally (iii) a good heating regime at 3He concentrations beyond 6%. In this latter regime, the heating efficiency did not critically depend on the actual concentration while at lower concentrations (X[3He] < 4%) a bigger excursion in heating efficiency is observed and the estimates differ somewhat from shot to shot, also depending on whether local or global signals are chosen for the analysis. The different dynamics at the various concentrations can be traced back to the presence of 2 MC layers and their

  3. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  4. A new method for determining the 3He/4He ratio in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Ferlet, R.

    1993-06-01

    We propose here an original method for estimating the 3He/4 Heratio in the local diffuse interstellar medium at a low cost from an observational point of view. The main idea is to measure the shift in radial velocity of the 4He λ537Å and λ584Å lines due to the presence of 3He in the red wing of these lines, and to compare the observed shift to the shifts obtained through numerical simulations for different 3He/4He ratios. We performed such simulations in order to reveal the efficiency of this method, using typical astrophysical conditions and instrumental parameters corresponding to the Lyman-FUSE mission. We find that this method should yield the 3He/4He ratio with a 1 σ uncertainty ˜50% at a spectral resolving power R=30 000 and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N=50. This method thus appears more adapted to a forehand estimation of the interstellar 3He/4He ratio than the standard profile fitting method, which should yield a 1 σ uncertainty of 10% at R=30 000 and S/N ≃ 290 (Hurwitz & Bowyer, t985). Finally, our method should be able to settle the evolutionary status of 3He if 3He has been significantly enhanced or depleted in the last 4.6 Gyr. Combined with the measurement of the deuterium abundance on the same line of sight (already programmed on HST), this might yield very important constraint on Big-Bang nucleosynthesis consistency.

  5. Grand Comore Island: A well-constrained “low 3He/4He” mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, Cornelia; Goldstein, Steven L.; Stute, Martin; Kurz, Mark D.; Schlosser, Peter

    2005-05-01

    We report He isotope ( 3He/ 4He) variations in samples from alkali basaltic and basanitic lava flows from Grande Comore Island complemented by existing [1,2] [C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, Plume-lithosphere interactions in the ocean basins: constraints from the source mineralogy. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 150 (1997) 245-260, C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, R. Altherr, P. Bachèchlery, The process of plume-lithosphere interaction in the ocean basins—the case of Grande Comore. J. Petrol., 39 (5) (1998) 881-903] and new Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios and major and trace element abundances. He isotope data in samples from Tristan da Cunha and Gough islands and the Huri Hills in Kenya are reported also. Grande Comore 3He/ 4He ratios vary between 5.05 and 7.08 RA ( 4He/ 3He ≈ 141,000-101,000). Chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic variations of Grande Comore lavas were previously shown to reflect melts derived from the deep mantle plume and the shallow lithospheric mantle [1-3] [C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, Plume-lithosphere interactions in the ocean basins: constraints from the source mineralogy. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 150 (1997) 245-260, C. Class, S.L. Goldstein, R. Altherr, P. Bachèchlery, The process of plume-lithosphere interaction in the ocean basins-the case of Grande Comore. J. Petrol., 39 (5) (1998) 881-903, C. Claude-Ivanaj, B. Bourdon, C.J. Allègre, Ra-Th-Sr isotope systematics in Grande Comore Island: a case study of plume-lithosphere interaction. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 164 (1998) 99-117]. The lithosphere-dominated end-member (La Grille volcano) shows uniform 3He/ 4He ratios within error of 6.75-7.08 RA ( 4He/ 3He ≈ 106,000-101,000) over a range of [He] = 36-428 × 10 - 9 ccSTP/g. The plume end-member (of the Karthala volcano suite), as constrained by Sr, Nd, Pb isotope ratios, shows uniformly lower 3He/ 4He ratios with 5.05-5.41 RA ( 4He/ 3He ≈ 141,000-132,000) over a range of [He] = 11-136 × 10 - 9 ccSTP/g. All samples show good correlations between Sr-Nd-He isotope

  6. ^3He Polarization by Rb Spin Exchange in a Multistage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, K. P.; Chupp, T. E.; Smith, T. B.; Welsh, R. C.; Zerger, J. N.

    1999-10-01

    Polarization of ^3He by spin exchange with optically pumped Rb has benefited greatly from the use of high powered laser diode arrays. Efficient use of these lasers requires operation of cells with high ^3He densities to match better the pressure broadened Rb absorption line to the wide laser spectral profile. However, lower delivery pressures are often required. For example, for low energy neutron spin filters the optimum ^3He thickness (for practical polarizations) would produce impractically thin cells. A multistage system is practical for applications requiring high ^3He polarization delivered at variable pressure because the optical pumping stage can be separated from the delivery/refilling stages. Additionally, operation can be improved by choosing the appropriate glass for each stage. We have constructed a multistage system that consists of a 70 cc pump cell (Corning 7056 glass), a transition region (Pyrex Glass), and a 350 cc receiving cell (Cs-coated Fused Silica). The cells are connected using commercial Viton-rubber o-ring sealed Pyrex glass valves and ball and socket joints. The transition region is connected to a vacuum pump and gas fill system so that cells may be refilled in situ. Both pump cells and receiving cells have exhibited intrinsic ^3He relaxation times of >35 hours. We will report on tests of this prototype system.

  7. Provision of hyperpolarized {sup 3}He-vectore and its application in MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Bachert, P.; Bock, M.; Knopp, M. W.; Schad, L. R.; Becker, J.; Bermuth, J.; Deninger, A.; Ebert, M.; Grossmann, T.; Heil, W.; Hofmann, D.; Lauer, L.; Otten, E. W.; Surkau, R.; Kauczor, H. U.; Kreitner, K. F.; Nilgens, H.; Roberts, T.; Thelen, M.; Leduc, M.

    1998-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) usually relies on magnetization of hydrogen nuclei (protons) in water or molecules in tissue as source of the signal. Biological environments with low proton content, notably the lungs, are difficult to image. Inhaling of hyperpolarized {sup 3}He gas opens the possibility to investigate ventilated spaces by MRI. To overcome the loss in signal due to the low density of the gas the nuclear polarization of the {sup 3}He spins is greatly enhanced by laser Optical Pumping. For more than three decades Optical Pumping of noble gases has been investigated, using spin exchange scattering (SE) or metastability exchange scattering (ME). Since powerful resonant laser light is available for Optical Pumping, large quantities of {sup 3}He gas can be operated. The original interest was the development of dense spin polarized targets for fundamental research in physics. As a spin off, the possibility of MRI of lung tissue filled with hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xenon was demonstrated in 1994. Later {sup 3}He was used for MRI in a guineapig. While these authors have used the SE method to polarize noble gases, more recently {sup 3}He MRI in human lungs was reported by our group where the ME method is in use.

  8. Observations of EUV Waves in 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bučík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Small 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events with their anomalous abundances, markedly different from the solar system, provide evidence for a unique acceleration mechanism that operates routinely near solar active regions. Although the events are sometimes accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), it is believed that mass and isotopic fractionation is produced directly in the flare sites on the Sun. We report on a large-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) coronal wave observed in association with 3He-rich SEP events. In the two examples discussed, the observed waves were triggered by minor flares and appeared concurrently with EUV jets and type III radio bursts, but without CMEs. The energy spectra from one event are consistent with so-called class-1 (characterized by power laws) 3He-rich SEP events, while the other with class-2 (characterized by rounded 3He and Fe spectra), suggesting different acceleration mechanisms in the two. The observation of EUV waves suggests that large-scale disturbances, in addition to more commonly associated jets, may be responsible for the production of 3He-rich SEP events.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF EUV WAVES IN {sup 3}He-RICH SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bucík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2015-10-10

    Small {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events with their anomalous abundances, markedly different from the solar system, provide evidence for a unique acceleration mechanism that operates routinely near solar active regions. Although the events are sometimes accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), it is believed that mass and isotopic fractionation is produced directly in the flare sites on the Sun. We report on a large-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) coronal wave observed in association with {sup 3}He-rich SEP events. In the two examples discussed, the observed waves were triggered by minor flares and appeared concurrently with EUV jets and type III radio bursts, but without CMEs. The energy spectra from one event are consistent with so-called class-1 (characterized by power laws) {sup 3}He-rich SEP events, while the other with class-2 (characterized by rounded {sup 3}He and Fe spectra), suggesting different acceleration mechanisms in the two. The observation of EUV waves suggests that large-scale disturbances, in addition to more commonly associated jets, may be responsible for the production of {sup 3}He-rich SEP events.

  10. Observation of a new superfluid phase for 3He embedded in nematically ordered aerogel

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, N.; Reichl, M.; Abhilash, T. S.; Smith, E. N.; Nguyen, K. X.; Mueller, E. J.; Parpia, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    In bulk superfluid 3He at zero magnetic field, two phases emerge with the B-phase stable everywhere except at high pressures and temperatures, where the A-phase is favoured. Aerogels with nanostructure smaller than the superfluid coherence length are the only means to introduce disorder into the superfluid. Here we use a torsion pendulum to study 3He confined in an extremely anisotropic, nematically ordered aerogel consisting of ∼10 nm-thick alumina strands, spaced by ∼100 nm, and aligned parallel to the pendulum axis. Kinks in the development of the superfluid fraction (at various pressures) as the temperature is varied correspond to phase transitions. Two such transitions are seen in the superfluid state, and we identify the superfluid phase closest to Tc at low pressure as the polar state, a phase that is not seen in bulk 3He. PMID:27669660

  11. Green's function theory for the Cheng-Schick model of 3He-4He mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemann, R. P.; Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we outline a theory for the thermodynamic properties of 3He-4He mixtures in the neighborhood of the critical line and the tricritical point (TCP). The theory utilizes the Cheng-Schick (CS) lattice gas model where both the 3He and 4He atoms are treated as quantum particles on a lattice. The analysis is based on Green's function approach. Results are presented for the ordering susceptibility and the thermal averages of the occupation numbers of 3He and 4He atoms. We derive a self-consistent equation for the ordering susceptibility and use it to calculate the critical line and locate the TCP. Our findings are compared with the predictions obtained from high temperature series expansions, mean field theory and the random phase approximation (RPA).

  12. Phase Diagram for 3He Films on Boron Nitride: NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yibing; Sullivan, Neil

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies of the thermodynamic properties of 3He films on graphite have revealed the existence of a previously undetected self-bound liquid phase at low density coverages. We report the results of NMR relaxation time studies for 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride designed to explore the dynamics of the adsorbed 3He atoms in order to identify the phase boundaries as a function of temperature. A steep thermally activated temperature dependence is observed at high temperatures (T > 2 . 6) K, followed by a linear dependence for 0 . 77 < T < 2 . 6 K. The linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in the self-bound liquid state. The research was supported in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation, DMR-1303599.

  13. Heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory approach to thermal neutron capture on {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Park, Tae-Sun

    2011-03-15

    The cross section for radiative thermal neutron capture on {sup 3}He ({sup 3}He+n{yields}{sup 4}He+{gamma}; known as the hen reaction) is calculated based on heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The relevant M1 operators are derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N{sup 3}LO). The initial and final nuclear wave functions are obtained from the rigorous Faddeev-Yakubovski equations for five sets of realistic nuclear interactions. Up to N{sup 3}LO, the M1 operators contain two low-energy constants, which appear as the coefficients of nonderivative two-nucleon contact terms. After determining these two constants using the experimental values of the magnetic moments of the triton and {sup 3}He, we carry out a parameter-free calculation of the hen cross section. The results are in good agreement with the data.

  14. Longitudinal assessment of treatment effects on pulmonary ventilation using 1H/3He MRI multivariate templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tustison, Nicholas J.; Contrella, Benjamin; Altes, Talissa A.; Avants, Brian B.; de Lange, Eduard E.; Mugler, John P.

    2013-03-01

    The utitlity of pulmonary functional imaging techniques, such as hyperpolarized 3He MRI, has encouraged their inclusion in research studies for longitudinal assessment of disease progression and the study of treatment effects. We present methodology for performing voxelwise statistical analysis of ventilation maps derived from hyper­ polarized 3He MRI which incorporates multivariate template construction using simultaneous acquisition of IH and 3He images. Additional processing steps include intensity normalization, bias correction, 4-D longitudinal segmentation, and generation of expected ventilation maps prior to voxelwise regression analysis. Analysis is demonstrated on a cohort of eight individuals with diagnosed cystic fibrosis (CF) undergoing treatment imaged five times every two weeks with a prescribed treatment schedule.

  15. Asymmetries in electron-induced breakup of polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sirca, Simon

    2011-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab Experiment E05-102 "Measurement of A{sub x}' and A{sub z}' asymmetries in the quasi-elastic {sup 3}He(e,e'd) reaction" was performed in Hall A in 2009. The main physics motivation of the experiment was to investigate the effects of small components of the {sup 3}He ground-state wave-function by a simultaneous measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in quasi-elastic kinematics for three exclusive channels, (e,e'd), (e,e'p), and (e,e'n), at almost identical momentum transfers, as well as for (e,e'). This experiment will help map the spin structure of the {sup 3}He nucleus onto the picture of the "free" polarized neutron. As such, it is of great relevance to the polarized-neutron programs at Jefferson Lab and beyond.

  16. Transfer of polarized 3He ions in the AtR beam transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    In addition to collisions of electrons with various unpolarized ion species as well as polarized protons, the proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) will facilitate the collisions of electrons with polarized {sup 3}He ions. The AGS is the last acceleration stage, before injection into one of the RHIC's collider ring for final acceleration. The AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line will be utilized to transport the polarized {sup 3}He ions from AGS into one of the RHIC's collider rings. Some of the peculiarities of the AtR line's layout (simultaneous horizontal and vertical bends) may degrade the matching of the stable spin direction of the AtR line with that of RHIC's. In this paper we discuss possible simple modifications of the AtR line to accomplish a perfect matching of the stable spin direction of the injected {sup 3}He beam with the stable spin direction at the injection point of RHIC.

  17. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and {3}He.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Kievsky, A; Rosati, S; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2012-02-01

    The muon-capture reactions {2}H(μ{-},ν{μ})nn and {3}He(μ{-},ν{μ}){3}H are studied with nuclear potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LECs) c{D} and c{E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The muon-capture rates on deuteron and {3}He are predicted to be 399±3  sec{-1} and 1494±21  sec{-1}, respectively. The spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity, as well as uncertainties in the LECs and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction.

  18. Comparative study of nuclear effects in polarized electron scattering from 3 He

    DOE PAGES

    Ethier, J. J.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of nuclear effects in inclusive electron scattering from polarized 3He nuclei for polarization asymmetries, structure functions and their moments, both in the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions. We compare the results of calculations within the weak binding approximation at finite Q2 with the effective polarization ansatz often used in experimental data analyses, and explore the impact of Δ components in the nuclear wave function and nucleon off-shell corrections on extractions of the free neutron structure. Using the same framework we also make predictions for the Q2 dependence of quasielastic scattering from polarized 3He, data onmore » which can be used to constrain the spin-dependent nuclear smearing functions in 3He.« less

  19. Nuclear spin-spin relaxation in 3He-Ne films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Neil S.; Stachiowak, Piotr; Parks, Charles

    2003-05-01

    NMR measurements of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation times are reported for commensurate monolayers of 3He and 3He-Ne films on boron nitride for temperatures 0.13He atoms. The effective exchange rates were observed to change significantly on replacing a fraction of the helium atoms with relatively immobile neon atoms. This is understood if there is a significant 3-particle term in the exchange Hamiltonian that is of opposite sign to that of the 2-spin exchange term. Values of the vacancy formation energy for the monolayer coverage and the atom-vacancy exchange rate are also obtained from the experimental observations.

  20. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Hwang, David Q.; Hovey, Jane

    1986-04-22

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  1. Progress Towards the Detection of Faraday Rotation on Spin Polarized 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abney, Joshua; Broering, Mark; Korsch, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Off-resonance Faraday rotation can offer a method to measure the nuclear spin optical rotation of the 3 He nucleus and gain access to new information about the atomic polarizability of the Helium atom. The interaction of the polarization state of light with the nuclear spin of the helium atom is very weak and has never been detected. A sensitive triple modulation technique has been developed which can detect the expected rotation angle on the order of 100 nrad. Once a Faraday rotation signal is observed, the next step is to separate the magnetic and electric contributions to the rotation by utilizing their different frequency dependencies. Recent studies involved optimizing several parameters which impact 3 He target polarization. Progress towards detecting nuclear spin optical rotation on 3 He will be reported. This research is supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER41101.

  2. Observation of a new superfluid phase for 3He embedded in nematically ordered aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelev, N.; Reichl, M.; Abhilash, T. S.; Smith, E. N.; Nguyen, K. X.; Mueller, E. J.; Parpia, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In bulk superfluid 3He at zero magnetic field, two phases emerge with the B-phase stable everywhere except at high pressures and temperatures, where the A-phase is favoured. Aerogels with nanostructure smaller than the superfluid coherence length are the only means to introduce disorder into the superfluid. Here we use a torsion pendulum to study 3He confined in an extremely anisotropic, nematically ordered aerogel consisting of ~10 nm-thick alumina strands, spaced by ~100 nm, and aligned parallel to the pendulum axis. Kinks in the development of the superfluid fraction (at various pressures) as the temperature is varied correspond to phase transitions. Two such transitions are seen in the superfluid state, and we identify the superfluid phase closest to Tc at low pressure as the polar state, a phase that is not seen in bulk 3He.

  3. The Effect Of Neutron Attenuation On Power Deposition In Nuclear Pumped 3He-Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Füsun

    2007-04-01

    Nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) are driven by the products of nuclear reactions and directly convert the nuclear energy to directed optical energy. Pumping gas lasers by nuclear reaction products has the advantage of depositing large energies per reaction. The need for high laser power output implies high operating pressure. In the case of volumetric excitation by 3He(n, p)3H reactions, however, operation at high pressure (more than a few atm) causes excessive neutron attenuation in the 3He gas. This fact adversely effects on energy deposition and, hence, laser output power and beam quality. Here, spatial and temporal variations of neutron flux inside a closed 3He -filled cylindrical laser tube have been numerically calculated for various tube radii and operating pressures by using a previously reported dynamic model for energy deposition. Calculations are made by using ITU TRIGA Mark II Reactor as the neutron source. The effects of neutron attenuation on power deposition are examined.

  4. Modelling the effect of 3He in direct drive capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbett, W. J.; Horsfield, C. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Cooley, J. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Drew, D.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Frenje, J.; Glebov, V. Yu

    2010-08-01

    D3He fuels are often used in ICF implosion experiments, either as a surrogate for DT to restrict the output neutron yield, or to produce protons for use in diagnosis of core conditions. Recent experiments have suggested that capsules filled with D3He do not behave as expected, but that both proton and neutron yields are anomalously degraded relative to the pure D2 case. We have performed direct drive implosion experiments using the Omega laser to examine the effect of 3He on DT-filled glass capsules. The use of DT fuel allows reaction history measurements to be obtained using the Gas Cherenkov diagnostic (GCD). It was hoped that the detailed information provided by GCD measurements would complement existing measurements to constrain modelling. We present recent modelling and analysis of the experiments using radiation-hydrocode simulations, and explore some of the hypotheses proposed to explain the results.

  5. Characterizing a sewage plume using the 3H-3He dating technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Stephanie Dunkle; LeBlanc, Denis; Schlosser, Peter; Ludin, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    An extensive 3H-3He study was performed to determine detailed characteristics of a regional flow system and a sewage plume over a distance of 4 km in a sand and gravel aquifer at Otis Air Base in Falmouth, Massachusetts. 3H-3He ages increase with depth in individual piezometer clusters and with distance along flowpaths. However, the age gradient with depth (Δt/Δz) is smaller in the plume than that in the regional waters, due to the intense recharge in the infiltration beds. The 1960s bomb peak of tritium in precipitation is archived longitudinally along a flowline through the main axis of the plume and vertically in individual piezometer clusters. On the eastern side of the sampling area, where water from Ashumet Pond forces plume water deeper into the flow system, 3H-3He ages are young at depth because the 3H-3He "clock" is reset due to outgassing of helium in the pond. A reconstruction of the tritium input functions for the regional and plume samples shows that there is no offset in the peak [3H]+[3Hetrit] concentrations for the plume and regional water, indicating that the water from supply wells for use on the base is young. The 3H-3He ages and detergent concentrations in individual wells are consistent with the beginning of use of detergents and the time period when their concentrations in sewage would have been greatest. Ages and hydraulic properties calculated using the 3H-3He data compare well with those from previous investigations and from particle-tracking simulations.

  6. (3)He MRI in healthy volunteers: preliminary correlation with smoking history and lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Guenther, D; Eberle, B; Hast, J; Lill, J; Markstaller, K; Puderbach, M; Schreiber, W G; Hanisch, G; Heussel, C P; Surkau, R; Grossmann, T; Weiler, N; Thelen, M; Kauczor, H U

    2000-06-01

    MRI with hyperpolarized helium-3 ((3)He) provides high-resolution imaging of ventilated airspaces. The first aim of this (3)He-study was to compare observations of localized signal defects in healthy smokers and non-smokers. A second aim was to describe relationships between parameters of lung function, volume of inspired (3)He and signal-to-noise ratio. With Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, 12 healthy volunteers (seven smokers and five non-smokers) were studied. Imaging was performed in a 1.5 T scanner using a two-dimensional FLASH sequence at 30V transmitter amplitude (TR/TE/alpha = 11 ms/4.2 ms/<10 degrees ). Known amounts of (3)He were inhaled from a microprocessor-controlled delivery device and imaged during single breath-holds. Images were evaluated visually, and scored using a prospectively defined 'defect-index'. Signal-to-noise ratio of the images were correlated with localization, (3)He volumes and static lung volumes. Due to poor image quality studies of two smokers were not eligible for the evaluation. Smokers differed from non-smokers in total number and size of defects: the 'defect-index' of smokers ranged between 0.8 and 6.0 (median = 1.1), that of non-smokers between 0.1 and 0.8 (median = 0.4). Intraindividually, an anteroposterior gradient of signal-to-noise ratio was apparent. Signal-to-noise ratio correlated with the estimated amount of hyperpolarization administered (r = 0. 77), but not with static lung volumes. We conclude that (3)He MRI is a sensitive measure to detect regional abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation in clinically healthy persons with normal pulmonary function tests.

  7. Bi-layer ^3He: a simple two dimensional heavy fermion system with quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, John

    2008-03-01

    Two dimensional helium films provide simple model systems for the investigation of quantum phase transitions in two dimensions. Monolayer ^3He absorbed on graphite, with various pre-platings, behaves as a two dimensional Mott-Hubbard system, complete with a density driven ``metal-insulator'' transition [1, 2] into what appears to be a gapless spin-liquid. In two dimensions the corrections to the temperature dependence of the fluid heat capacity, beyond the term linear in T, are anomalous and attributed to quasi-1D scattering [3]. On the other hand, bi-layer ^3He films adsorbed on the surface of graphite show evidence of two-band heavy-fermion behavior and quantum criticality [4, 5]. The relevant control parameter is the total density of the ^3He film. The ^3He bilayer system can be driven toward a quantum critical point (QCP) at which the effective mass appears to diverge, the effective inter-band hybridization vanishes, and a local moment state appears. A theoretical model in terms of a ``Kondo breakdown selective Mott transition'' has recently been suggested [6]. * In collaboration with: A Casey, M Neumann, J Nyeki, B Cowan. [1] Evidence for a Mott-Hubbard Transition in a Two-Dimensional ^3He Fluid Monolayer, A. Casey, H. Patel, J. Ny'eki, B. P. Cowan, and J. Saunders Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 115301 (2003) [2] D Tsuji et al. J. Low Temp. Phys. 134, 31 (2004) [3] A V Chubukov et al. Phys. Rev. B71, 205112 (2005) [4] Bilayer ^3He; a simple two dimensional heavy fermion system with quantum criticality, Michael Neumann, Jan Nyeki, Brian Cowan, John Saunders. Science 317, 1356 (2007) [5] Heavy fermions in the original Fermi liquid. Christopher A Hooley and Andrew P Mackenzie. Science 317, 1332 (2007) [6] C Pepin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 206401 (2007) and A Benlagra and C Pepin, arXiv: 0709.0354

  8. Two-body pion absorption on {sup 3}He at threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Kiang, L.L.; Riska, D.O.

    1995-08-01

    We showed that a drastic reduction of the ratio of the rates of the reactions {sup 3}He({pi}{sup -},nn) and {sup 3}He({pi}{sup -},np) for stopped pions is obtained once the effect of the short-range two-nucleon components of the axial charge operator for nuclear systems is taken into account. In a calculation using realistic models of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the construction of these short-range components of the axial charge operator, the predicted ratios can be brought to within 10-20% of the empirical value. A paper describing our results was published.

  9. Resonance transition 795-nm Rubidium laser using 3He buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S S; Soules, T F; Page, R H; Mitchell, S C; Kanz, V K; Beach, R J

    2007-08-02

    We report the first demonstration of a 795-nm Rubidium resonance transition laser using a buffer gas consisting of pure {sup 3}He. This follows our recent demonstration of a hydrocarbon-free 795-nm Rubidium resonance laser which used naturally-occurring He as the buffer gas. Using He gas that is isotopically enriched with {sup 3}He yields enhanced mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He buffer gas pressure, improving thermal management in high average power Rb lasers and enhancing the power scaling potential of such systems.

  10. Development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized 3He targets for electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep T.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Averett, T. D.; Kelleher, A.; Mooney, K. E.; Nelyubin, V. V.; Wang, Yunxiao; Zheng, Yuan; Cates, G. D.

    2015-05-01

    Background: Polarized 3He targets have been used as effective polarized neutron targets for electron scattering experiments for over twenty years. Over the last ten years, the effective luminosity of polarized 3He targets based on spin-exchange optical pumping has increased by over an order of magnitude. This has come about because of improvements in commercially-available lasers and an improved understanding of the physics behind the polarization process. Purpose: We present the development of high-performance polarized 3He targets for use in electron scattering experiments. Improvements in the performance of polarized 3He targets, target properties, and operating parameters are documented. Methods: We utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping to polarize the 3He targets. Spectrally narrowed diode lasers used for the optical pumping greatly improved the performance. A simulation of the alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping process was developed to provide guidance in the design of the targets. Data was collected during the characterization of 24 separate glass target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. Results: From the data obtained we made determinations of the so-called X -factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorly understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable 3He polarization to well under 100%. The presence of the X -factor spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. Good agreement between the simulation and the actual target performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Included in our results is a measurement of the K -3He spin-exchange rate coefficient kseK=(7.46 ±0.62 ) ×10-20cm3/s over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K. Conclusions: In order to achieve high performance under the operating conditions described in this paper

  11. SOHO/EPHIN observations of impulsive 3He-rich solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Herrero, R.; del Peral, L.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Sequeiros, J.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Kunow, H.; Sierks, H.

    2002-03-01

    We report observations of 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events made with EPHIN instrument aboard SOHO spacecraft during the rising phase of the 23rd solar cycle. EPHIN detects electrons between 250 keV and 10.3 MeV, and hydrogen and helium isotopes between 4.3 and 53 MeV/n. Spectral indices, abundance ratios and temporal profiles have been obtained and compared for a sample of 13 3He-rich events detected by EPHIN between 1997 and 2000.

  12. B phase with polar distortion in superfluid {sup 3}He in “ordered” aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, V. V. Senin, A. A.; Soldatov, A. A.; Surovtsev, E. V.; Yudin, A. N.

    2014-12-15

    The properties of the low-temperature superfluid phase of {sup 3}He in “nematically ordered” aerogel in which strands are almost parallel to one another are investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Such a strong anisotropy of the aerogel affects the phase diagram of {sup 3}He and the structure of superfluid phases. A theoretical model of the B phase with polar distortion is developed. It is shown that this model successfully describes the observed properties of the low-temperature phase.

  13. Pressure dependence of wall relaxation in polarized {sup 3}He gaseous cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, W.; Gao, H.; Ye, Q.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-06-15

    We have observed a linear pressure dependence of longitudinal relaxation time T{sub 1} at 4.2 and 295 K in gaseous {sup 3}He cells made of either bare Pyrex glass or Cs- or Rb-coated Pyrex due to paramagnetic sites in the cell wall. The paramagnetic wall relaxation is previously thought to be independent of {sup 3}He pressure. We develop a model to interpret the observed wall relaxation by taking into account the diffusion process, and our model gives a good description of the data.

  14. SEOP polarized 3He Neutron Spin Filters for the JCNS user program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Earl; Salhi, Zahir; Theisselmann, Tobias; Starostin, Denis; Schmeissner, Johann; Feoktystov, Artem; Mattauch, Stefan; Pistel, Patrick; Radulescu, Aurel; Ioffe, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Over the past several years the JCNS has been developing in-house applications for neutron polarization analysis (PA). These methods include PA for separation of incoherent from coherent scattering in soft matter studies (SANS), and online polarization for analysis for neutron reflectometry, SANS, GISANS and eventually spectroscopy. This paper will present an overview of the user activities at the JCNS at the MLZ and gives an overview of the polarization 3He methods and devices used. Additionally we will summarise current projects which will further support the user activities using polarised 3He spin filters.

  15. A validation of the 3H/3He method for determining groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, D. K.; Schiff, S. L.; Poreda, R. J.; Clarke, W. B.

    1993-09-01

    Tritium and He isotopes have been measured at a site where groundwater flow is nearly vertical for a travel time of 100 years and where recharge rates are spatially variable. Because the mid-1960s 3H peak (arising from aboveground testing of thermonuclear devices) is well-defined, the vertical groundwater velocity is known with unusual accuracy at this site. Utilizing 3H and its stable daughter 3He to determine groundwater ages, we compute a recharge rate of 0.16 m/yr, which agrees to within about 5% of the value based on the depth of the 3H peak (measured both in 1986 and 1991) and two-dimensional modeling in an area of high recharge. Zero 3H/3He age occurs at a depth that is approximately equal to the average depth of the annual low water table, even though the capillary fringe extends to land surface during most of the year at the study site. In an area of low recharge (0.05 m/yr) where the 3H peak (and hence the vertical velocity) is also well-defined, the 3H/3He results could not be used to compute recharge because samples were not collected sufficiently far above the 3H peak; however, modeling indicates that the 3H/3He age gradient near the water table is an accurate measure of vertical velocities in the low-recharge area. Because 3H and 3He have different diffusion coefficients, and because the amount of mechanical mixing is different in the area of high recharge than in the low-recharge area, we have separated the dispersive effects of mechanical mixing from molecular diffusion. We estimate a longitudinal dispersivity of 0.07 m and effective diffusion coefficients for 3H (3HHO) and 3He of 2.4×10-5 and 1.3×10-4 m2/day, respectively. Although the 3H/3He age gradient is an excellent indicator of vertical groundwater velocities above the mid-1960s 3H peak, dispersive mixing and diffusive loss of 3He perturb the age gradient near and below the 3H peak.

  16. Polarisation and compression of {sup 3}He for Magnetic Resonance Imaging purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Geurts, D. G.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J.; Poolman, H. R.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Nicolay, K.

    1998-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is often used in medical science as a diagnostic tool for the human body. Conventional MRI uses the NMR signal from the protons of water molecules in tissue to image the interior of the patient's body. However, for certain areas such as the lungs and airways, the usage of a highly polarised gas yields better results. We are currently constructing an apparatus that uses polarised {sup 3}He gas to produce detailed images of those signal-deficient moyeties. We also plan to study possible uptake of polarised {sup 3}He gas by the circulatory system to image other organs.

  17. Degassing of 3H/3He, CFCs and SF6 by denitrification: measurements and two-phase transport simulations.

    PubMed

    Visser, Ate; Schaap, Joris D; Broers, Hans Peter; Bierkens, Marc F P

    2009-01-26

    The production of N2 gas by denitrification may lead to the appearance of a gas phase below the water table prohibiting the conservative transport of tracer gases required for groundwater dating. We used a two-phase flow and transport model (STOMP) to study the reliability of 3H/3He, CFCs and SF6 as groundwater age tracers under agricultural land where denitrification causes degassing. We were able to reproduce the amount of degassing (R2=69%), as well as the 3H (R2=79%) and 3He (R2=76%) concentrations observed in a 3H/3He data set using simple 2D models. We found that the TDG correction of the 3H/3He age overestimated the control 3He/3He age by 2.1 years, due to the accumulation of 3He in the gas phase. The total uncertainty of degassed 3H/3He ages of 6 years (+/-2 sigma) is due to the correction of degassed 3He using the TDG method, but also due to the travel time in the unsaturated zone and the diffusion of bomb peak 3He. CFCs appear to be subject to significant degradation in anoxic groundwater and SF6 is highly susceptible to degassing. We conclude that 3H/3He is the most reliable method to date degassed groundwater and that two-phase flow models such as STOMP are useful tools to assist in the interpretation of degassed groundwater age tracer data.

  18. Degassing of 3H/ 3He, CFCs and SF 6 by denitrification: Measurements and two-phase transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Ate; Schaap, Joris D.; Broers, Hans Peter; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2009-01-01

    The production of N 2 gas by denitrification may lead to the appearance of a gas phase below the water table prohibiting the conservative transport of tracer gases required for groundwater dating. We used a two-phase flow and transport model (STOMP) to study the reliability of 3H/ 3He, CFCs and SF 6 as groundwater age tracers under agricultural land where denitrification causes degassing. We were able to reproduce the amount of degassing ( R2 = 69%), as well as the 3H ( R2 = 79%) and 3He* ( R2 = 76%) concentrations observed in a 3H/ 3He data set using simple 2D models. We found that the TDG correction of the 3H/ 3He age overestimated the control 3He/ 3He age by 2.1 years, due to the accumulation of 3He* in the gas phase. The total uncertainty of degassed 3H/ 3He ages of 6 years (± 2 σ) is due to the correction of degassed 3He* using the TDG method, but also due to the travel time in the unsaturated zone and the diffusion of bomb peak 3He*. CFCs appear to be subject to significant degradation in anoxic groundwater and SF 6 is highly susceptible to degassing. We conclude that 3H/ 3He is the most reliable method to date degassed groundwater and that two-phase flow models such as STOMP are useful tools to assist in the interpretation of degassed groundwater age tracer data.

  19. The Gas Motion Due To Non-Uniform Heating By 3He(n,p)3H Reactions In The Nuclear-Pumped3He -Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Füsun

    2007-04-01

    In the nuclear pumped-lasers, the passage of these energetic charged particles through gas results in a non-uniform volumetric energy deposition. This spatial non-uniformity induces a gas motion, which results in density and hence refractive index gradients that affects the laser's optical behaviour. The motion of 3He gas in a closed cavity is studied when it experiences transient and spatially non-uniform volumetric heating caused by the passage of 3He(n,p)3H reaction products. Gas motion is described by the radial velocity field of gas flow. Spatial and temporal variations of radial gas velocity are calculated for various tube parameters by using a dynamic energy deposition model. In the calculations, it is assumed that the laser tube is irradiated with neutrons from the pulse at a peak power of 1200 MW corresponding to a maximum thermal neutron flux of 8×1016 n / cm2sn in the central channel of ITU TRIGA Mark II Reactor. Results are examined.

  20. SOLAR SOURCES OF {sup 3}He-RICH SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Wang, Linghua; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E. E-mail: glenn.mason@jhuapl.edu E-mail: cohen@srl.caltech.edu

    2015-06-20

    Using high-cadence EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the solar sources of 26 {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particle events at ≲1 MeV nucleon{sup −1} that were well-observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer during solar cycle 24. Identification of the solar sources is based on the association of {sup 3}He-rich events with type III radio bursts and electron events as observed by Wind. The source locations are further verified in EUV images from the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory, which provides information on solar activities in the regions not visible from the Earth. Based on AIA observations, {sup 3}He-rich events are not only associated with coronal jets as emphasized in solar cycle 23 studies, but also with more spatially extended eruptions. The properties of the {sup 3}He-rich events do not appear to be strongly correlated with those of the source regions. As in the previous studies, the magnetic connection between the source region and the observer is not always reproduced adequately by the simple potential field source surface model combined with the Parker spiral. Instead, we find a broad longitudinal distribution of the source regions extending well beyond the west limb, with the longitude deviating significantly from that expected from the observed solar wind speed.

  1. 3He(α,γ)7Be cross section measured using complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Rojas, A.; Borge, M. J. G.; Davids, B.; Fulton, B. R.; Hass, M.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Ruiz, C.; Tengblad, O.

    2014-03-01

    The astrophysical S-factor for the 3He(α,γ)7Be reaction plays an important role in the Solar Standard Model and in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis scenario. The advances from two recent experiments performed using complementary techniques at center of mass (C.M.) energies between 1 and 3 MeV are discussed.

  2. Beam suppression of the DRAGON recoil separator for 3He(α,γ)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Adsley, P.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Galinski, N.; Hager, U.; Hass, M.; Howell, D.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Triambak, S.

    2013-02-01

    Preliminary studies in preparation for an absolute cross-section measurement of the radiative capture reaction 3He(α,γ)7Be with the DRAGON recoil separator have demonstrated beam suppression >1014 at the 90% confidence level. A measurement of this cross section by observation of 7Be recoils at the focal plane of the separator should be virtually background free.

  3. Direct Observation of a Majorana Quasiparticle Heat Capacity in 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Y. M.

    2014-04-01

    The Majorana fermion, which acts as its own antiparticle, was suggested by Majorana in 1937 (Nuovo Cimento 14:171). While no stable particle with Majorana properties has yet been observed, Majorana quasiparticles (QP) may exist at the boundaries of topological insulators. Here we report the preliminary results of direct observation of Majorana QPs by a precise measurements of superfluid 3He heat capacity. The bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity falls exponentially with cooling at the temperatures significantly below the energy gap. Owing to the zero energy gap mode the Majorana heat capacity falls in a power law. The Majorana heat capacity can be larger than bulk one at some temperature, which depends on surface to volume ratio of the experimental cell. Some times ago we developed the Dark matter particles detector (DMD) on a basis of superfluid 3He which is working at the frontier of extremely low temperatures (Winkelmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 559:384-386, 2006). Here we report the observation of zero gap mode of Majorana, follows from the new analyses of DMD heat capacity, published early. We have found a 10 % deviation from the bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity at the temperature of 135 μK. This deviation corresponds well to the theoretical value for Majorana heat capacity at such low temperature. (Note, there were no fitting parameters).

  4. Surface Majorana fermions and bulk collective modes in superfluid 3He-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, YeJe; Chung, Suk Bum; Maciejko, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    The theoretical study of topological superfluids and superconductors has so far been carried out largely as a translation of the theory of noninteracting topological insulators into the superfluid language, whereby one replaces electrons by Bogoliubov quasiparticles and single-particle band Hamiltonians by Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonians. Band insulators and superfluids are, however, fundamentally different: While the former exist in the absence of interparticle interactions, the latter are broken symmetry states that owe their very existence to such interactions. In particular, unlike the static energy gap of a band insulator, the gap in a superfluid is due to a dynamical order parameter that is subject to both thermal and quantum fluctuations. In this work, we explore the consequences of bulk quantum fluctuations of the order parameter in the B phase of superfluid 3He on the topologically protected Majorana surface states. Neglecting the high-energy amplitude modes, we find that one of the three spin-orbit Goldstone modes in 3He-B couples to the surface Majorana fermions. This coupling in turn induces an effective short-range two-body interaction between the Majorana fermions, with coupling constant inversely proportional to the strength of the nuclear dipole-dipole interaction in bulk 3He. A mean-field theory suggests that the surface Majorana fermions in 3He-B may be in the vicinity of a metastable gapped time-reversal-symmetry-breaking phase.

  5. Association of 3He-rich solar energetic particles with large-scale coronal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucik, Radoslav; Innes, Davina; Guo, Lijia; Mason, Glenn M.; Wiedenbeck, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive or 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events have been typically associated with jets or small EUV brightenings. We identify 30 impulsive SEP events from ACE at L1 during the solar minimum period 2007-2010 and examine their solar sources with high resolution STEREO-A EUV images. At beginning of 2007, STEREO-A was near the Earth while at the end of the investigated period, when there were more events, STEREO-A was leading the Earth by 90°. Thus STEREO-A provided a better (more direct) view on 3He-rich flares generally located on the western Sun's hemisphere. Surprisingly, we find that about half of the events are associated with large-scale EUV coronal waves. This finding provides new insights on acceleration and transport of 3He-rich SEPs in solar corona. It is believed that elemental and isotopic fractionation in impulsive SEP events is caused by more localized processes operating in the flare sites. The EUV waves have been reported in gradual SEP events in association with fast coronal mass ejections. To examine their role on 3He-rich SEPs production the energy spectra and relative abundances are discussed. R. Bucik is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under grant BU 3115/2-1.

  6. New type liquid He free 3He Cryostat using Commercial GM refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, T.; Sumida, T.; Takesaka, T.; Kawamura, Y.; Kato, H.; Matsumura, M.

    2009-02-01

    We have succeeded to construct a novel 3He cryostat by improving a low cost commercial two stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerator whose cooling power is 0.3 W at 4.2 K. This main portion of this system consists of 4 K pot, 1 K pot, heat exchanger and 3He pot, which are connected to the second cold stage. The main portion is covered with the 1st radiation shield attached to the 1st cold stage and the 3He pot is covered with the 2nd radiation shield attached to the heat exchanger, where the 1st shield must be further covered with more than five layers of super-insulation films in order to realize 3He temperature. The achieved temperature is 0.4 K and persists over one day. The temperature oscillation is less than 1 mK below 4 K. The required time to attain the lowest temperature is typically about 8 hours. This system allows us to deal with almost all the low temperature experiments of condensed matter physics without requiring low temperature technique.

  7. Deep mixing of 3He: reconciling Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eggleton, Peter P; Dearborn, David S P; Lattanzio, John C

    2006-12-01

    Low-mass stars, approximately 1 to 2 solar masses, near the Main Sequence are efficient at producing the helium isotope 3He, which they mix into the convective envelope on the giant branch and should distribute into the Galaxy by way of envelope loss. This process is so efficient that it is difficult to reconcile the low observed cosmic abundance of 3He with the predictions of both stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Here we find, by modeling a red giant with a fully three-dimensional hydrodynamic code and a full nucleosynthetic network, that mixing arises in the supposedly stable and radiative zone between the hydrogen-burning shell and the base of the convective envelope. This mixing is due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability within a zone just above the hydrogen-burning shell, where a nuclear reaction lowers the mean molecular weight slightly. Thus, we are able to remove the threat that 3He production in low-mass stars poses to the Big Bang nucleosynthesis of 3He.

  8. Phase-space analysis of convection in a /sup 3/He - superfluid /sup 4/He solution

    SciTech Connect

    Haucke, H.; Maeno, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Observations have been made on thermal convection below 1K in a dilute solution of /sup 3/He in superfluid /sup 4/He contained in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio GAMMA = 1.20. Complicated oscillatory phenomena were observed with a high degree of reproducibility using two temperature sensors. Phase-space analysis suggests a description in terms of strange-attractor dynamics.

  9. Solar Sources of 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Mason, Glenn M.; Wang, Linghua; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    2015-06-01

    Using high-cadence EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the solar sources of 26 3He-rich solar energetic particle events at ≲1 MeV nucleon-1 that were well-observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer during solar cycle 24. Identification of the solar sources is based on the association of 3He-rich events with type III radio bursts and electron events as observed by Wind. The source locations are further verified in EUV images from the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory, which provides information on solar activities in the regions not visible from the Earth. Based on AIA observations, 3He-rich events are not only associated with coronal jets as emphasized in solar cycle 23 studies, but also with more spatially extended eruptions. The properties of the 3He-rich events do not appear to be strongly correlated with those of the source regions. As in the previous studies, the magnetic connection between the source region and the observer is not always reproduced adequately by the simple potential field source surface model combined with the Parker spiral. Instead, we find a broad longitudinal distribution of the source regions extending well beyond the west limb, with the longitude deviating significantly from that expected from the observed solar wind speed.

  10. Solar-source regions of /sup 3/He-rich particle events

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S.W.; Lin, R.P.; Reames, D.V.; Stone, R.G.; Liggett, M.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen alpha, x-ray, and metric and kilometric radio data were used to examine the solar sources of energetic (about 1 MeV/nucleon) Helium 3-rich particle events observed near earth in association with impulsive 2- to 100-keV electron events. Each /sup 3/He/electron event is associated with a kilometric type III burst belonging to a family of such bursts characterized by similar interplanetary propagation paths from the same solar-active region. The /sup 3/He/electron events correlate very well with the interplanetary low-frequency (about 188 kHz) radio brightnesses of these events, but progressively worse with signatures from regions closer to the Sun. When hydrogen alpha brightenings can be associated with /sup 3/He/electron events, they have onsets coinciding to within 1 min of that of the associated metric type III burst but are often too small to be reported. The data are consistent with the earlier idea that many type III bursts, and now, by implication, the /sup 3/He/electron events, are due to particle acceleration in the corona, well above the associated hydrogen alpha and x-ray flares.

  11. Stability of skyrmions in thin films of superfluid [sup 3]He-[ital A

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. )

    1993-09-01

    Topological considerations show that thin films of [sup 3]He-[ital A] might support skyrmions. These are topological excitations in the spin part of the order parameter. By deriving an approximation to the solitonic free energy that is exact for both small and large sizes we show that the skyrmions are unstable against collapse.

  12. First measurement of the vector analyzing power in muon capture by polarized muonic {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Behr, J.; Bogorad, P.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the first measurement of spin observables in nuclear muon capture by {sup 3}He. The sensitivity of spin observables to the pseudoscalar coupling is described. The triton asymmetry presented has to be corrected for small systematic effects in order to extract the vector analyzing power. The analysis of these effects is currently underway.

  13. Zeeman relaxation of cold atomic iron and nickel in collisions with {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Cort; Newman, Bonna; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Brahms, Nathan; Doyle, John M.

    2010-06-15

    We have measured the ratio {gamma} of the diffusion cross section to the angular momentum reorientation cross section in the colliding Fe-{sup 3}He and Ni-{sup 3}He systems. Nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) atoms are introduced via laser ablation into a cryogenically cooled experimental cell containing cold (<1 K) {sup 3}He buffer gas. Elastic collisions rapidly cool the translational temperature of the ablated atoms to the {sup 3}He temperature. {gamma} is extracted by measuring the decays of the atomic Zeeman sublevels. For our experimental conditions, thermal energy is comparable to the Zeeman splitting. As a result, thermal excitations between Zeeman sublevels significantly impact the observed decay. To determine {gamma} accurately, we introduce a model of Zeeman-state dynamics that includes thermal excitations. We find {gamma}{sub Ni-}{sup 3}{sub He}=5x10{sup 3} and {gamma}{sub Fe-}{sup 3}{sub He{<=}}3x10{sup 3} at 0.75 K in a 0.8-T magnetic field. These measurements are interpreted in the context of submerged shell suppression of spin relaxation, as studied previously in transition metals and rare-earth-metal atoms [C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, R. V. Krems, and J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 013201 (2005); C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, L. Luo, and J. M. Doyle, Nature (London) 431, 281 (2004); A. Buchachenko, G. Chaasiski, and M. Szczniak, Eur. Phys. J. D 45, 147 (2007)].

  14. Single-collision approximation for p{sup 3}-He elastic scattering at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Abusini, M.

    2009-06-15

    A theoretical approach to studying four-body reactions of p{sup 3}-He elastic scattering that takes consistently into account the single-collision mechanism is reported. The theoretical results obtained by this method were compared with experimental data, and the agreement is found to be quite satisfactory.

  15. Torsion Pendulum Experiments with Superfluid 3He in ``Nematically Ordered'' Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelev, Nikolay; Smith, Eric; Sebastian, Abhilash; Parpia, Jeevak

    2014-03-01

    A new type of highly anisotropic alumina aerogel is used to induce directional disorder in superfluid 3He. The aerogel sample consists of a network of long strands that have a preferred orientation (nematic order). It is placed in the head of a double torsion pendulum with the anisotropy axis oriented along the axis of the pendulum. We observe the frequency shift of the symmetric torsion mode of the pendulum in order to determine the superfluid fraction of the embedded 3He. The superfluid transition temperature of the fluid in the aerogel is measured to be very close to that of bulk 3He. However, in contrast to the bulk phase diagram, the region of stability of the Equal Spin Pairing (ESP) superfluid phase is enhanced on cooling. In addition, unlike the case of 3He in isotropic silica aerogel, the ESP phase reappears on warming. We compare our measurements to the NMR data reported in and discuss the possible structure of the observed superfluid phases.

  16. Surface Andreev bound states of superfluid 3He and Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y, Okuda; R, Nomura

    2012-08-01

    Superfluid 3He is an intensively investigated and well characterized p-wave superfluid. In the bulk Balian-Werthamer state, which is commonly called the 3He B phase, the superfluid gap is opened isotropically but near a flat boundary such as a wall of a container it can harbor interesting quasi-particle states inside the gap. These states are called surface Andreev bound states, and have not been experimentally explored in detail. Transverse acoustic impedance measurement has revealed their existence and provided spectroscopic details of the dispersion of the bound states. Recent theoretical arguments claim that the surface Andreev bound states of the superfluid 3He B phase can be recognized as the edge states of the topological superfluid and be regarded as a Majorana fermion, a fancy particle which has not been confirmed in elementary particle physics. In this review, we present up-to-date knowledge on the surface Andreev bound states of the 3He B phase revealed by acoustic spectroscopy and the possible realization of a Majorana fermion, along with related studies on this topic.

  17. Magnétomètre à ^3He pompé par diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, O.; Chéron, B.; Gilles, H.; Hamel, J.; Noël, E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the realization of a ^3He magnetometer based on the free precession of nuclear spins oriented by optical pumping with a laser. The use of a laser diode, directly tuned to 1.083 μm, and the increase of the ^3He nuclear orientation relaxation time with cesium coated cells, allow us to elaborate a new original magnetometer, which operates sequentially and opens several possibilities of use. Nous décrivons une réalisation d'un magnétomètre à ^3He mettant en oeuvre la précession libre des spins nucléaires orientés par pompage optique laser. L'utilisation d'une diode laser directement accordée à 1,083 μm ainsi que l'allongement du temps de relaxation de l'orientation nucléaire de ^3He à l'aide d'une cellule avec enduit de césium nous a permis de réaliser un nouveau magnétomètre à fonctionnement séquentiel original et aux possiblités d'utilisation multiples.

  18. Deep Mixing of 3He: Reconciling Big Bang and Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleton, P P; Dearborn, D P; Lattanzio, J

    2006-07-26

    Low-mass stars, {approx} 1-2 solar masses, near the Main Sequence are efficient at producing {sup 3}He, which they mix into the convective envelope on the giant branch and should distribute into the Galaxy by way of envelope loss. This process is so efficient that it is difficult to reconcile the low observed cosmic abundance of {sup 3}He with the predictions of both stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. In this paper we find, by modeling a red giant with a fully three-dimensional hydrodynamic code and a full nucleosynthetic network, that mixing arises in the supposedly stable and radiative zone between the hydrogen-burning shell and the base of the convective envelope. This mixing is due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability within a zone just above the hydrogen-burning shell, where a nuclear reaction lowers the mean molecular weight slightly. Thus we are able to remove the threat that {sup 3}He production in low-mass stars poses to the Big Bang nucleosynthesis of {sup 3}He.

  19. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  20. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  1. 3H/3He age data in assessing the susceptibility of wells to contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, A.H.; Solomon, D.K.; Thiros, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory agencies are becoming increasingly interested in using young-ground water dating techniques, such as the 3H/3He method, in assessing the susceptibility of public supply wells (PSWs) to contamination. However, recent studies emphasize that ground water samples of mixed age may be the norm, particularly from long-screened PSWs, and tracer-based "apparent" ages can differ substantially from actual mean ages for mixed-age samples. We present age and contaminant data from PSWs in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, that demonstrate the utility of 3H and 3He measurements in evaluating well susceptibility, despite potential age mixing. Initial 3H concentrations (measured 3H + measured tritiogenic 3He) are compared to those expected based on the apparent 3H/3He age and the local precipitation 3H record. This comparison is used to determine the amount of modern water (recharged after ???1950) vs. prebomb water (recharged before ???1950) samples might contain. Concentrations of common contaminants were also measured using detection limits generally lower than those used for regulatory purposes. A clear correlation exists between the potential magnitude of the modern water fraction and both the occurrence and concentration of contaminants. For samples containing dominantly modern water based on their initial 3H concentrations, potential discrepancies between apparent 3H/ 3He ages and mean ages are explored using synthetic samples that are random mixtures of different modern waters. Apparent ages can exceed mean ages by up to 13 years for these samples, with an exponential age distribution resulting in the greatest discrepancies.

  2. Solar Sources of 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Mason, Glenn M.; Wang, Linghua; Cohen, Christina; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    2015-04-01

    We still do not understand the origin of impulsive SEP events enriched in 3He and heavy ions. A major impediment may be the difficulty to observe them in the corona, apart from the common knowledge that 3He-rich SEP events are correlated with longer-than-metric type III radio bursts and <100 keV electron events. This is because their X-ray and EUV signatures tend to be tiny and short-lived. Using high-cadence and high-sensitivity EUV images obtained by SDO/AIA, we investigate the solar sources of 26 3He-rich SEP events during solar cycle 24 that were well-observed by ACE. The source locations are further confirmed in data from STEREO/EUVI, which capture solar activities in the regions inaccessible from the Earth. We confirm that 3He-rich events have a broad longitudinal distribution (including locations well behind the west limb) and that a frequent association with coronal jets and narrow CMEs. Some events were seen in association with eruptions of closed structures and large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs, aka EUV waves). While these LCPFs may account for the occasional mismatching polarities at the source region and L1 in such a way that the particles are transported to and released at a region that has the opposite polarity, their associated CMEs may not be fast enough to drive shock waves for particle acceleration. Moreover, open field lines from PFSS models may not be correct for the entire Sun although they often look reasonable in discrete locations. We also discuss the apparent lack of correlation between the solar sources and the basic properties of 3He-rich SEP events.

  3. Precision neutron interferometric measurement of the n- 3He coherent neutron scattering length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; Jacobson, D. L.; Schoen, K.; Arif, M.; Black, T. C.; Snow, W. M.; Werner, S. A.

    2004-07-01

    A measurement of the n- 3He coherent scattering length using neutron interferometry is reported. The result, bc =(5.8572±0.0072) fm , improves the measured precision of any single measurement of bc by a factor of eight; the previous world average, bc =(5.74±0.04) fm , now becomes bc =(5.853±0.007) fm . Measurements of the n-p , n-d , and n- 3He coherent scattering lengths have now been performed using the same technique, thus allowing one to extract the scattering length ratios: parameters that minimize systematic errors. We obtain values of bn 3He / bnp =(-1.5668±0.0021) and bnd / bnp =(-1.7828±0.0014) . Using the new world average value of bc and recent high-precision spin-dependent scattering length data also determined by neutron optical techniques, we extract new values for the bound singlet and triple scattering lengths of b0 =(9.949±0.027) fm and b1 =(4.488±0.017) fm for the n- 3He system. The free nuclear singlet and triplet scattering lengths are a0 =(7.456±0.020) fm and a1 =(3.363±0.013) fm . The coherent scattering cross section is σc =(4.305±0.007) b and the total scattering cross section is σs =(5.837±0.014) b . Comparisons of a0 and a1 to the only existing high-precision theoretical predictions for the n- 3He system, calculated using a resonating group technique with nucleon-nucleon potentials incorporating three-nucleon forces, have been performed. Neutron scattering length measurements in few-body systems are now sensitive enough to probe small effects not yet adequately treated in present theoretical models.

  4. 3HE RECOVERY FROM A TRITIUM-AGED LANA75 SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.

    2010-12-01

    {sup 3}He recovery is a topic of recent interest. One potential recovery source is from metal hydride materials once used to store tritium, as the decay product, {sup 3}He, is primarily trapped in the metal lattice, usually in bubbles, with such materials. In 2001, a Tritium Exposure Program (TEP) sample known as LANA75-SP1 was retired and the material was removed from the test cell and stored. Subsequently scoping temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were conducted on that material to see what it might take to drive out He and residual H isotopes (the heel). Two experiments consisted of heating the sample in the presence of an excess of tin (the so-called Sn fusion experiment), and one was a simple TPD with no additives. Prior data on the so-called '21-month bed' material in the 1980's had produced {approx}21 cc of gas per gram of a LANA30 material (LaNi4.7Al0.3), with approximately 67% of that being {sup 3}He and the rest being D{sub 2} (Fig.3). However, the material had to be heated in excess of 850 C to obtain that level. Heating to less produced approximately half that amount of gas. The data also showed that {sup 3}He was released at different temperatures than the residual hydrogen isotopes. Unfortunately this implies full {sup 3}He recovery will be a difficult process. Therefore, it seemed advisable to attempt to extract as much information from the 3 scoping experiments from 2001-2 as possible.

  5. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  6. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible (3)He/10 T cryostat.

    PubMed

    von Allwörden, H; Ruschmeier, K; Köhler, A; Eelbo, T; Schwarz, A; Wiesendanger, R

    2016-07-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped (3)He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001). PMID:27475560

  7. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible 3He/10 T cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Allwörden, H.; Ruschmeier, K.; Köhler, A.; Eelbo, T.; Schwarz, A.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-07-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped 3He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  8. Electric breakdown and ionization detection in normal liquid and superfluid 4He for the SNA nEDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Maciej

    A new experiment to search for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is under construction at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SNS nEDM experiment is a national collaboration spanning over 20 universities and laboratories with more than 100 physicists and engineers contributing to the research and development. The search for a nEDM is a precision test of time reversal symmetry in particle physics, in the absence of a discovery, the SNS nEDM experiment seeks to improve the present limit on the nEDM value by two orders of magnitude. A non-zero value of the nEDM would help to explain the asym- metry between matter and anti-matter in the universe by providing an additional source of charge conjugation and parity symmetry violation, a necessary ingredient in the theory of baryogenesis in the early universe. The nEDM experiment will measure the Larmor precession frequency of neutrons by detecting scintillation from neutron capture by a dilute concentration of 3He inside a bath of superfluid 4He. Neutron capture by 3He is spin-dependent and the magnetic moments of the neutron and the 3He nucleus are comparable. A direct measurement of the precession frequency of polarized 3He and scintillation from neutron capture allows for the relative precession frequencies of 3He and the neutron to be determined. The experiment will then look for changes in the relative precession of 3He and neutrons under the influence of strong electric fields. 3He has negligible EDM and therefore any deviation due to an applied electric field would be from a nEDM. The nEDM experiment will need to apply strong electric fields inside superfluid (SF) 4He and it was necessary to investigate the ability of SF 4He to sustain electric fields. An experiment to study electric breakdown in superfluid 4He was constructed at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). The experiment studied the electric breakdown behavior of liquid

  9. Performance of compact liquid helium free 3He-4He dilution refrigerator directly coupled with GM cooler in TES microcalorimeter operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeno, T.; Kamioka, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Maehata, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Takasaki, K.; Tanaka, K.

    2009-02-01

    A superconducting transition edge thermosensor (TES) microcalorimeter was cooled by a compact liquid-helium-free 3He-4He dilution refrigerator with loading a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cooler for detection of LX-ray photons emitted from an 241Am source. The first and second stages of the GM cooler are directly coupled with the first and the second precool heat exchangers of a stick shaped dilution unit through copper plates in the vacuum chamber, respectively. The circulating 3He-4He gas through the precooled heat exchangers is condensed into a liquid of condense mixture by the isoenthalpic expansion through the Joule-Thomson impedance. A cascade of two mixing chambers are employed for achieving sufficient cooling power. The helium-free dilution refrigerator performs the cooling power of 20 μW at 100 mK. The TES and SQUID chips suffered from mechanical vibrations induced by a reciprocating motion of the displacer of the GM cooler. Detection signals of LX-ray photons emitted from 241Am source were observed by operating the TES microcalorimeter in severe noise environment induced by mechanical vibrations.

  10. A validation of the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He method for determining groundwater recharge

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.K. ); Schiff, S.L. ); Poreda, R.J. ); Clarke, W.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Tritium and He isotopes have been measured at a site where groundwater flow is nearly vertical for a travel time of 100 years and where recharge rates are spatially variable. Because the mid-1960s [sup 3]H peak (arising from aboveground testing of thermonuclear devices) is well-defined, the vertical groundwater velocity is known with unusual accuracy at this site. Utilizing [sup 3]H and its stable daughter [sup 3]He to determine groundwater ages, we compute a recharge rate of 0.16 m/yr, which agrees to within about 5% of the value based on the depth of the [sup 3]H peak (measured both in 1986 and 1991) and two-dimensional modeling in an area of high recharge. Zero [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age occurs at a depth that is approximately equal to the average depth of the annual low water table, even though the capillary fringe extends to land surface during most of the year at the study site. In an area of low recharge (0.05 m/yr) where the [sup 3]H peak (and hence the vertical velocity) is also well-defined, the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He results could not be used to compute recharge because samples were not collected sufficiently far above the [sup 3]H peak; however, modeling indicates that the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age gradient near the water table is an accurate measure of vertical velocities in the low-recharge area. Because [sup 3]H and [sup 3]He have different diffusion coefficients, and because the amount of mechanical mixing is different in the area of high recharge than in the low-recharge area, we have separated the dispersive effects of mechanical mixing from molecular diffusion. We estimate a longitudinal dispersivity of 0.07 m and effective diffusion coefficients for [sup 3]H ([sup 3]HHO) and [sup 3]He of 2.4 x 10[sup [minus]5] and 1.3 x 10[sup [minus]4] m[sup 2]/day, respectively. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Calibration of the RSS-131 high efficiency ionization chamber for radiation dose monitoring during plasma experiments conducted on plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczak, Kamil; Jednoróg, Sławomir

    2014-10-01

    Plasma research poses a radiation hazard. Due to the program of deuterium plasma research using the PF-1000 device, it is an intensive source of neutrons (up to 1011 n · pulse -1) with energy of 2,45 MeV and ionizing electromagnetic radiation with a broad energy spectrum. Both types of radiation are mostly emitted in ultra-short pulses (˜100 ns). The aim of this work was to test and calibrate the RSS-131 radiometer for its application in measurements of ultra-short electromagnetic radiation pulses with broad energy spectrum emitted during PF-1000 discharge. In addition, the results of raw measurements performed in the control room are presented.

  12. Neutral-beam-injection fueling for a small, D-3He burning, field-reversed-configuration reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttolph, Michael; Stotler, Daren; Cohen, Samuel

    2013-10-01

    Rocket propulsion powered by the D-3He fusion reaction in a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) has been proposed for a variety of solar-system missions. Two key unique features of this concept are a relatively small, 25-cm-radius, plasma core and a relatively thick (10 cm), dense (1e14 cm3), and cool (100 eV electron temperature) scrape-off layer (SOL). The SOL contains the heated propellant - likely hydrogen, deuterium or helium - and also fusion reaction products at a lower density (ca. 1e12 cm-3). A critical design question is the refueling of the fusion reactants. A moderate energy neutral-beam method is considered. It must be able to penetrate the SOL without significant losses but must be stopped in the core. DEGAS 2, a Monte-Carlo code designed to model neutral transport, was implemented to simulate beam-plasma interactions including ionization and charge exchange of the neutral beam's helium-3 and deuterium atoms by impact in the SOL and core plasma with thermal plasma constituents and fusion reaction products. Operational methods to alleviate the effects deleterious reactions such as deuterium charge-exchange in the SOL are described.

  13. Surface Scattering Effect and the Stripe Order in Films of the Superfluid 3He B Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi

    2016-09-01

    Surface scattering effects in thin films of the superfluid 3He B phase have been theoretically investigated, with an emphasis on the stability of the stripe order with spontaneous broken translational symmetry in the film plane and quasiparticle excitations in this spatially inhomogeneous phase. Based on the Ginzburg-Landau theory in the weak coupling limit, we have shown that the stripe order, which was originally discussed for a film with two specular surfaces, can be stable in a film with one specular and one diffusive surfaces which should correspond to superfluid 3He on a substrate. It is also found by numerically solving the Eilenberger equation that due to the stripe structure, a midgap state distinct from the surface Andreev bound state emerges and its signature is reflected in the local density of states.

  14. Thermal Transport by Ballistic Quasiparticles in Superfluid 3He-B in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Martin, H.; Pickett, G. R.; Roberts, J. E.; Tsepelin, V.

    2006-09-07

    In the temperature range below 0.2Tc, the gas of thermal excitations from the superfluid 3He-B ground state is in the ultra-dilute ballistic regime. Here we discuss preliminary measurements of the transport properties of this quasiparticle gas in a cell of cylindrical geometry with dimensions much smaller than any mean free path. The vertical cylinder, constructed from epoxy-coated paper, has vibrating wire resonator (VWR) heaters and thermometers at the top and bottom, and a small aperture at the top which provides the only exit for quasiparticles. Using the thermometer VWRs, we measure the difference in quasiparticle density between the top and bottom of the tube when we excite the top or bottom VWR heater. This gives information about the transport of energy along the cylindrical 3He sample and hence about the scattering behaviour involved when a quasiparticle impinges on the cylinder wall.

  15. Probing Bogoliubov Quasiparticles in Superfluid ^3He with a `Vibrating-Wire Like' MEMS Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defoort, M.; Dufresnes, S.; Ahlstrom, S. L.; Bradley, D. I.; Haley, R. P.; Guénault, A. M.; Guise, E. A.; Pickett, G. R.; Poole, M.; Woods, A. J.; Tsepelin, V.; Fisher, S. N.; Godfrin, H.; Collin, E.

    2016-05-01

    We have measured the interaction between superfluid ^3He-B and a micro-machined goalpost-shaped device at temperatures below 0.2 T_c. The measured damping follows well the theory developed for vibrating wires, in which the Andreev reflection of quasiparticles in the flow field around the moving structure leads to a nonlinear frictional force. At low velocities, the damping force is proportional to velocity, while it tends to saturate for larger excitations. Above a velocity of 2.6 mm s^{-1}, the damping abruptly increases, which is interpreted in terms of Cooper-pair breaking. Interestingly, this critical velocity is significantly lower than that reported with other mechanical probes immersed in superfluid ^3He. Furthermore, we report on a nonlinear resonance shape for large motion amplitudes that we interpret as an inertial effect due to quasiparticle friction, but other mechanisms could possibly be invoked as well.

  16. Theory of (3He,(alpha)) surrogate reactions for deformed uranium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I; Escher, J E

    2006-11-08

    We present the one-step theory of neutron-pickup transfer reactions with {sup 3}He projectiles on {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. We find all the neutron eigenstates in a deformed potential, and use those in a given energy range for ({sup 3}He, {alpha}) DWBA pickup calculations to find the spin and parity distributions of the residual target nuclei. A simple smoothing convolution is used to take into account the spreading width of the single-neutron hole states into the more complicated compound nuclear states. We assume that the initial target is an even-even rotor, but can take into account spectator neutrons outside such a rotor by recombining their spin and parity at the end of the calculations.

  17. The First Measurement of Neutron Transversity on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Qiang

    2009-12-01

    We recently measured the neutron target single spin asymmetry in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic 3He (e,e',pi+/-)X reactions with a transversely polarized 3He target. The experiment was performed in Hall A at Jefferson Lab from October 2008 to February 2009. Pions were detected in the high-resolution spectrometer in coincidence with scattered electrons detected by the BigBite spectrometer. The kinematic coverage focuses on the valence quark region, x = 0.1 - 0.4, at Q2 = 1-3 (GeV/c)2. With good particle identifications using a RICH detector and an aerogel Cherenkov counter, data on kaons were obtained at the same time. The data from this experiment, when combined with the world data, will provide constraints on the Transversity and Sivers distributions on both u-quark and d-quark in the valence quark region.

  18. Pulsed NMR Measurements in Superfluid 3He in Aerogel of 97.5 % Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Kado, Ryusuke; Obara, Ken; Yano, Hideo; Hata, Tohru; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Yokogawa, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2006-09-07

    Aerogel is made of thin SiO2 strands of a few nanometer diameter. Since the coherence length of superfluid 3He is much longer than the silica strand diameter and is nearly the same as the mean distance between silica strands, aerogel gives us a chance to study the effects of an impurity in superfluid 3He. To investigate what superfluid states are formed in aerogel, we performed a pulsed NMR experiment. Both the A-like and B-like phases show a tipping angle dependent frequency shift in the FID signal after an rf pulse. The dependence in the A-like phase is well explained by an expectation based on the ''robust phase'' introduced by Fomin, while the FID frequencies in the B-like phase behave similarly to those observed in the bulk B phase in a slab geometry with the initial condition of a non-Leggett configuration.

  19. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange 3He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-01

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the 3He-N2 mixture. The cells could be refilled. The 3He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  20. High-3He plume origin and temporal-spatial evolution of the Siberian flood basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Poreda, R.J.; Renne, P.R.; Teichmann, F.; Vasiliev, Y.R.; Sobolev, N.V.; Turrin, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    An olivine nephelinite from the lower part of a thick alkalic ultrabasic and mafic sequence of volcanic rocks of the northeastern part of the Siberian flood basalt province (SFBP) yielded a 40ArX39Ar plateau age of 253.3 ?? 2.6 million years, distinctly older than the main tholeiitic pulse of the SFBP at 250.0 million years. Olivine phenocrysts of this rock showed 3He/4He ratios up to 12.7 times the atmospheric ratio; these values suggest a lower mantle plume origin. The neodymium and strontium isotopes, rare earth element concentration patterns, and cerium/lead ratios of the associated rocks were also consistent with their derivation from a near-cnondritic, primitive plume. Geochemical data from the 250-million-year-old volcanic rocks higher up in the sequence indicate interaction of this high-3He SFBP plume with a suboceanic-type upper mantle beneath Siberia.