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Sample records for 3he-particle induced nuclear

  1. Formation of the isomeric pairs {sup 139}Nd{sup m,g} and {sup 141}Nd{sup m,g} in proton and {sup 3}He-particle-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hilgers, K.; Qaim, S. M.; Sudar, S.

    2007-12-15

    Cross sections were measured by the activation technique for the nuclear reactions {sup 141}Pr(p,n){sup 141}Nd{sup m},{sup 141}Pr(p,3n){sup 139}Nd{sup m},{sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He,xn){sup 141}Nd{sup m}, and {sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He,xn){sup 139}Nd{sup m} up to proton energies of 44 MeV and {sup 3}He-particle energies of 35 MeV. Using the present data and some of our earlier experimental results the isomeric cross-section ratios for the nuclide pairs {sup 139}Nd{sup m,g} and {sup 141}Nd{sup m,g} were calculated. The experimental data were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations using the code STAPRE, which combines the statistical and precompound formalisms. In general the experimentally determined excitation functions as well as the isomeric cross-section ratios could be described by the theory within the limits of experimental uncertainties, but using relatively low values of {eta} [i.e., the ratio of the effective moment of inertia to the rigid-body moment of inertia ({theta}{sub eff}/{theta}{sub rig})]. The mass dependence of {eta} could be confirmed.

  2. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  3. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  4. Managing nuclear power plant induced disasters.

    PubMed

    Kyne, Dean

    2015-01-01

    To understand the management process of nuclear power plant (NPP) induced disasters. The study shields light on phases and issues associated with the NPP induced disaster management. This study uses Palo Verde Nuclear Generation Station as study subject and Arizona State as study area. This study uses the Radiological Assessment System for Consequence Analysis (RASCAL) Source Term to Dose (STDose) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a computer software to project and assess the source term dose and release pathway. This study also uses ArcGIS, a geographic information system to analyze geospatial data. A detailed case study of Palo Verde Nuclear Power Generation (PVNPG) Plant was conducted. The findings reveal that the NPP induced disaster management process is conducted by various stakeholders. To save lives and to minimize the impacts, it is vital to relate planning and process of the disaster management. Number of people who expose to the radioactive plume pathway and level of radioactivity could vary depending on the speed and direction of wind on the day the event takes place. This study findings show that there is a need to address the burning issue of different racial and ethnic groups' unequal exposure and unequal protection to potential risks associated with the NPPs.

  5. Nuclear Reactions Induced by a Pyroelectric Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geuther, Jeffrey; Danon, Yaron; Saglime, Frank

    2006-02-10

    This work demonstrates the use of pyroelectric crystals to induce nuclear reactions. A system based on a pair of pyroelectric crystals is used to ionize gas and accelerate the ions to energies of up to 200 keV. The system operates above room temperature by simply heating or cooling the pyroelectric crystals. A D-D fusion reaction was achieved with this technique, and 2.5 MeV neutrons were detected. The measured neutron yield is in good agreement with the calculated yield. This work also verifies the results published by Naranjo, Gimzewski, and Putterman [Nature (London) 434, 1115 (2005)].

  6. Depth profiling of light elements using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwagne, G.; Bodart, F.; Demortier, G.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper, we present some examples of depth profiling of light elements with a nuclear microprobe performed at LARN during the last decade. Some new possibilities of ion beam microanalysis of light elements with our 2 MV Tandetron accelerator are also discussed. The first example of application consists of depth profiling of nitrogen and aluminium on a SiAl alloy implanted with nitrogen. The nuclear microprobe was used to determine three-dimensional distribution of aluminium, silicon and nitrogen in a specific grain of the implanted alloy. The nitrogen depth profile was measured using the well known 15N(p,αγ) 12C nuclear resonant reaction at 429 keV. The aluminium depth profile was measured with the resonant nuclear reaction 27Al(p,γ) 28Si at 991.8 keV. Depth profiling of carbon and oxygen is also possible using nuclear reactions induced by 3He particles. Nuclear reactions like 12C( 3He,p i) 14N ( i=0,1,2) or 16O( 3He,α 0) 15O were used to measure local wear tracks on a diamond coating after a fretting test against a Cr steel ball. PIXE microprobe and nuclear reactions induced by deuterons were also used to characterise the gold-silicon alloy formed by the diffusion of silicon into gold foils. The nuclear reaction 28Si(d,p) 29Si in a transmission geometry was used in order to depth profile silicon especially in the grain boundaries of the gold-silicon alloy. Some new perspectives of depth profiling light elements are also presented using our new 2 MV Tandetron accelerator, such as high energy 4He microbeams for depth profiling of carbon or nitrogen.

  7. Nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha

    2013-05-28

    In nuclear magneto-optic spectroscopy, effects of nuclear magnetization are detected in light passing through a sample containing spin-polarized nuclei. An optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift has been predicted and observed in the nuclear spin optical rotation of linearly polarized light propagating parallel to the nuclear magnetization. A recently proposed magneto-optic analogue of the NMR spin-spin coupling, the nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton (NSCM) effect entails an ellipticity induced to linearly polarized light when passing through a medium with the nuclear spins polarized in a direction perpendicular to the light beam. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of NSCM in terms of response theory as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations for small molecules. The roles of basis set (we use completeness-optimized sets), electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. It is found that the explicitly temperature-dependent contribution to NSCM, arising from the partial orientation of the molecules due to the nuclear magnetization, typically dominates the effect. This part of NSCM is proportional to the tensor product of molecular polarizability and the NMR direct dipolar coupling tensor. Hence, NSCM provides a means of investigating the dipolar coupling and, thus, molecular structure in a formally isotropic medium. Overall ellipticities of the order of magnitude of 10(-8)...10(-7) rad/(M cm) are predicted for fully polarized nuclei. These should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt setup.

  8. Transient nuclear Prospero induces neural progenitor quiescence.

    PubMed

    Lai, Sen-Lin; Doe, Chris Q

    2014-10-29

    Stem cells can self-renew, differentiate, or enter quiescence. Understanding how stem cells switch between these states is highly relevant for stem cell-based therapeutics. Drosophila neural progenitors (neuroblasts) have been an excellent model for studying self-renewal and differentiation, but quiescence remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that when neuroblasts enter quiescence, the differentiation factor Prospero is transiently detected in the neuroblast nucleus, followed by the establishment of a unique molecular profile lacking most progenitor and differentiation markers. The pulse of low level nuclear Prospero precedes entry into neuroblast quiescence even when the timing of quiescence is advanced or delayed by changing temporal identity factors. Furthermore, loss of Prospero prevents entry into quiescence, whereas a pulse of low level nuclear Prospero can drive proliferating larval neuroblasts into quiescence. We propose that Prospero levels distinguish three progenitor fates: absent for self-renewal, low for quiescence, and high for differentiation.

  9. Induced Nuclear Activity in Galaxy Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ibarra, F. J.; Dultzin, D.; Krongold, Y.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.

    2011-10-01

    We analized the nuclear spectra of 893 galaxies in isolated pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7). These pairs can be divided into three groups: S+S, E+E, E+S according to the catalogue of isolated galaxy pairs (KPG) by Karachentsev. We also analyzed two samples of isolated galaxies: the catalogue of Isolated Galaxies by Karachentseva (CIG) and Varela's sample of northern isolated galaxies. We studied the incidence of Nuclear Activity in every group. Our results show that the incidence of AGN activity is significantly higher in most galaxies in pairs as compared to isolated. Most importantly, we show that this is stronger for earlier morphological types. The presence of a bulb appears to be crucial in explaining the feeding of super massive black holes in AGN. We also confirm that Seyfert type 1 nuclei are almost absent. This result cannot be explained with the unified model for Seyferts only.

  10. Transient nuclear Prospero induces neural progenitor quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Sen-Lin; Doe, Chris Q

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells can self-renew, differentiate, or enter quiescence. Understanding how stem cells switch between these states is highly relevant for stem cell-based therapeutics. Drosophila neural progenitors (neuroblasts) have been an excellent model for studying self-renewal and differentiation, but quiescence remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that when neuroblasts enter quiescence, the differentiation factor Prospero is transiently detected in the neuroblast nucleus, followed by the establishment of a unique molecular profile lacking most progenitor and differentiation markers. The pulse of low level nuclear Prospero precedes entry into neuroblast quiescence even when the timing of quiescence is advanced or delayed by changing temporal identity factors. Furthermore, loss of Prospero prevents entry into quiescence, whereas a pulse of low level nuclear Prospero can drive proliferating larval neuroblasts into quiescence. We propose that Prospero levels distinguish three progenitor fates: absent for self-renewal, low for quiescence, and high for differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03363.001 PMID:25354199

  11. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  12. Nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha

    2013-05-01

    In nuclear magneto-optic spectroscopy, effects of nuclear magnetization are detected in light passing through a sample containing spin-polarized nuclei. An optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift has been predicted and observed in the nuclear spin optical rotation of linearly polarized light propagating parallel to the nuclear magnetization. A recently proposed magneto-optic analogue of the NMR spin-spin coupling, the nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton (NSCM) effect entails an ellipticity induced to linearly polarized light when passing through a medium with the nuclear spins polarized in a direction perpendicular to the light beam. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of NSCM in terms of response theory as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations for small molecules. The roles of basis set (we use completeness-optimized sets), electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. It is found that the explicitly temperature-dependent contribution to NSCM, arising from the partial orientation of the molecules due to the nuclear magnetization, typically dominates the effect. This part of NSCM is proportional to the tensor product of molecular polarizability and the NMR direct dipolar coupling tensor. Hence, NSCM provides a means of investigating the dipolar coupling and, thus, molecular structure in a formally isotropic medium. Overall ellipticities of the order of magnitude of 10-8…10-7 rad/(M cm) are predicted for fully polarized nuclei. These should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt setup.

  13. Nuclear-induced XeBr/asterisk/ photolytic laser model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Parameters for a photolytically pumped alkyl iodide lasant gas by the nuclear-induced XeBr excimer fluorescence are calculated according to a detailed kinetic model. High gain on the atomic iodine 2P1/2 state is estimated and 100-mJ pulses with an average power output on the order of 1 kW appear possible.

  14. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  15. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  16. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  17. A Transport Model for Nuclear Reactions Induced by Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Das, Champak B.; Das Gupta, Subal; Gale, Charles; Ko, C.M.; Yong, G.-C.; Zuo Wei

    2005-10-14

    Major ingredients of an isospin and momentum dependent transport model for nuclear reactions induced by radioactive beams are outlined. Within the IBUU04 version of this model we study several experimental probes of the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, especially the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Comparing with the recent experimental data from NSCL/MSU on isospin diffusion, we found a nuclear symmetry energy of Esym({rho}) {approx_equal} 31.6({rho}/{rho}0)1.05 at subnormal densities. Predictions on several observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at supranormal densities accessible at GSI and the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) are also made.

  18. Nuclear Transitions Induced by Synchrotron X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, Donald S.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss two rare but interesting processes by which synchrotron x-rays with energies up to about 100 keV may be used to induce nuclear transitions. In the NEET (Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition) process, an intense x-ray beam is employed to make vacancies, e.g. K-holes, in the atoms of a specific nuclear isotope. When a vacancy is filled by an electronic transition from a higher atomic level, there is some probability that instead of the usual x-ray or Auger emission, the nucleus of the atom itself will be excited. This is then followed by a nuclear decay exhibiting characteristic gamma-rays or other types of radiation, with time delays typical of the nuclear states involved. The probability for NEET increases when the energies of the atomic and the nuclear transitions become close. We address some theoretical aspects of the process and describe experimental efforts to observe it in 189Os and 197Au. The second process to be discussed is the possibility of "triggering" the decay of a nuclear isomer by irradiation with an x-ray beam. We focus on the case of the 31-year, 2.4-MeV, 16+ isomer of 178Hf. There has been speculation that if one could isolate gram quantities, say, of this isomer and then have the capability to accelerate its decay in a controlled way, one would have a powerful triggerable source of enormous energy. This could be used to generate explosions, for rapid irradiations, or for more general energy-storage applications, depending on the rate of energy release. We describe attempts to observe this process.

  19. Nuclear Transitions Induced by Synchrotron X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, Donald S.

    2003-01-24

    We discuss two rare but interesting processes by which synchrotron x-rays with energies up to about 100 keV may be used to induce nuclear transitions. In the NEET (Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition) process, an intense x-ray beam is employed to make vacancies, e.g. K-holes, in the atoms of a specific nuclear isotope. When a vacancy is filled by an electronic transition from a higher atomic level, there is some probability that instead of the usual x-ray or Auger emission, the nucleus of the atom itself will be excited. This is then followed by a nuclear decay exhibiting characteristic gamma-rays or other types of radiation, with time delays typical of the nuclear states involved. The probability for NEET increases when the energies of the atomic and the nuclear transitions become close. We address some theoretical aspects of the process and describe experimental efforts to observe it in 189Os and 197Au. The second process to be discussed is the possibility of 'triggering' the decay of a nuclear isomer by irradiation with an x-ray beam. We focus on the case of the 31-year, 2.4-MeV, 16+ isomer of 178Hf. There has been speculation that if one could isolate gram quantities, say, of this isomer and then have the capability to accelerate its decay in a controlled way, one would have a powerful triggerable source of enormous energy. This could be used to generate explosions, for rapid irradiations, or for more general energy-storage applications, depending on the rate of energy release. We describe attempts to observe this process.

  20. Diacylglycerol induces fusion of nuclear envelope membrane precursor vesicles.

    PubMed

    Barona, Teresa; Byrne, Richard D; Pettitt, Trevor R; Wakelam, Michael J O; Larijani, Banafshe; Poccia, Dominic L

    2005-12-16

    Purified membrane vesicles isolated from sea urchin eggs form nuclear envelopes around sperm nuclei following GTP hydrolysis in the presence of cytosol. A low density subfraction of these vesicles (MV1), highly enriched in phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), is required for nuclear envelope formation. Membrane fusion of MV1 with a second fraction that contributes most of the nuclear envelope can be initiated without GTP by an exogenous bacterial PtdIns-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) which hydrolyzes PtdIns to form diacylglycerides and inositol 1-phosphate. This PI-PLC hydrolyzes a subset of sea urchin membrane vesicle PtdIns into diglycerides enriched in long chain, polyunsaturated species as revealed by a novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Large unilammelar vesicles (LUVs) enriched in PtdIns can substitute for MV1 in PI-PLC induced nuclear envelope formation. Moreover, MV1 prehydrolyzed with PI-PLC and washed to remove inositols leads to spontaneous nuclear envelope formation with MV2 without further PI-PLC treatment. LUVs enriched in diacylglycerol mimic prehydrolyzed MV1. These results indicate that production of membrane-destabilizing diglycerides in membranes enriched in PtdIns may facilitate membrane fusion in a natural membrane system and suggest that MV1, which binds only to two places on the sperm nucleus, may initiate fusion locally.

  1. Effects of Induced Surface Tension in Nuclear and Hadron Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagun, V. V.; Bugaev, K. A.; Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Oliinychenko, D. R.; Mishustin, I. N.

    2017-03-01

    Short range particle repulsion is rather important property of the hadronic and nuclear matter equations of state. We present a novel equation of state which is based on the virial expansion for the multicomponent mixtures with hard-core repulsion. In addition to the hard-core repulsion taken into account by the proper volumes of particles, this equation of state explicitly contains the surface tension which is induced by another part of the hard-core repulsion between particles. At high densities the induced surface tension vanishes and the excluded volume treatment of hard-core repulsion is switched to its proper volume treatment. Possible applications of this equation of state to a description of hadronic multiplicities measured in A+A collisions, to an investigation of the nuclear matter phase diagram properties and to the neutron star interior modeling are discussed.

  2. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Janice; Chen, Yiming; Teixeira, Priscila C; Schumacher, Robert I; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Van Houten, Bennett; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2004-12-15

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a heme precursor accumulated in plasma and in organs in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), a disease associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver biopsies of AIP patients showed odd-shaped mitochondria and autophagic vacuoles containing well-preserved mitochondria. ALA yields reactive oxygen species upon metal-catalyzed oxidation and causes in vivo and in vitro impairment of rat liver mitochondria and DNA damage. Using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that ALA induces a dose-dependent damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in human SVNF fibroblasts and rat PC12 cells. CHO cells treated with ALA also show nuclear DNA damage and human HepG2 cells entered in apoptosis and necrosis induced by ALA and its dimerization product, DHPY. The present data provide additional information on the genotoxicity of ALA, reinforcing the hypothesis that it may be involved in the development of HCC in AIP patients.

  3. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  4. Induced Stokes or anti-Stokes nuclear transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Eliezer, S. |; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Velarde, G.

    1995-11-01

    It is suggested that laser-generated soft x rays can be used to induce Stokes or anti-Stokes nuclear transitions. Isomeric transitions in {sup 99}Tc and {sup 179}Hf are considered as Stokes and anti-Stokes transitions, respectively. It is shown that success of the proposed scheme may open the way for a gamma-ray laser. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  6. Experiments on nuclear fission induced by radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, N.K.

    1994-07-01

    The cross sections of {sup 209}Bi nuclear fission induced by secondary beams of {sup 6}He and {sup 4}He are measured under identical conditions. The experimental data are in good agreement with earlier results on the fission cross section of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. The measured values of the cross section of {sup 209}Bi fission induced by {sup 6}He ions are much higher than the cross sections of fission induced by {alpha}-particles. It is found that the fission threshold for the {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction is shifted as compared to that of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. Various factors that can be responsible for the observed peculiarities in the {sup 209}Bi fission induced by the {sup 6}He ions are analyzed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Parvovirus Induced Alterations in Nuclear Architecture and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Jylhävä, Juulia; Paloheimo, Outi; Dross, Nicolas; Smolander, Hanna; Langowski, Jörg; Timonen, Jussi; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus of interphase eukaryotic cell is a highly compartmentalized structure containing the three-dimensional network of chromatin and numerous proteinaceous subcompartments. DNA viruses induce profound changes in the intranuclear structures of their host cells. We are applying a combination of confocal imaging including photobleaching microscopy and computational methods to analyze the modifications of nuclear architecture and dynamics in parvovirus infected cells. Upon canine parvovirus infection, expansion of the viral replication compartment is accompanied by chromatin marginalization to the vicinity of the nuclear membrane. Dextran microinjection and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies revealed the homogeneity of this compartment. Markedly, in spite of increase in viral DNA content of the nucleus, a significant increase in the protein mobility was observed in infected compared to non-infected cells. Moreover, analyzis of the dynamics of photoactivable capsid protein demonstrated rapid intranuclear dynamics of viral capsids. Finally, quantitative FRAP and cellular modelling were used to determine the duration of viral genome replication. Altogether, our findings indicate that parvoviruses modify the nuclear structure and dynamics extensively. Intranuclear crowding of viral components leads to enlargement of the interchromosomal domain and to chromatin marginalization via depletion attraction. In conclusion, parvoviruses provide a useful model system for understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced intranuclear modifications. PMID:19536327

  8. Parvovirus induced alterations in nuclear architecture and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Teemu O; Niskanen, Einari A; Jylhävä, Juulia; Paloheimo, Outi; Dross, Nicolas; Smolander, Hanna; Langowski, Jörg; Timonen, Jussi; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2009-06-17

    The nucleus of interphase eukaryotic cell is a highly compartmentalized structure containing the three-dimensional network of chromatin and numerous proteinaceous subcompartments. DNA viruses induce profound changes in the intranuclear structures of their host cells. We are applying a combination of confocal imaging including photobleaching microscopy and computational methods to analyze the modifications of nuclear architecture and dynamics in parvovirus infected cells. Upon canine parvovirus infection, expansion of the viral replication compartment is accompanied by chromatin marginalization to the vicinity of the nuclear membrane. Dextran microinjection and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies revealed the homogeneity of this compartment. Markedly, in spite of increase in viral DNA content of the nucleus, a significant increase in the protein mobility was observed in infected compared to non-infected cells. Moreover, analysis of the dynamics of photoactivable capsid protein demonstrated rapid intranuclear dynamics of viral capsids. Finally, quantitative FRAP and cellular modelling were used to determine the duration of viral genome replication. Altogether, our findings indicate that parvoviruses modify the nuclear structure and dynamics extensively. Intranuclear crowding of viral components leads to enlargement of the interchromosomal domain and to chromatin marginalization via depletion attraction. In conclusion, parvoviruses provide a useful model system for understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced intranuclear modifications.

  9. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations of 3He-induced nuclear reactions on zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abyad, M.; Mohamed, Gehan Y.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.

    2017-05-01

    Excitation functions of 3He -induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc were measured using the standard stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From their threshold energies up to 27MeV, the cross-sections for natZn (3He, xn) 69Ge, natZn(3He, xnp) 66,67,68Ga, and natZn(3He, x)62,65Zn reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.6, EMPIRE-3.2 and ALICE-IPPE were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared with the theoretical results and with the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined.

  10. Possible nuclear decay of bismuth induced by a mechanical impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakhtanov, M. K.

    2016-09-01

    It is experimentally shown that the metallic dust after the inertial explosion induced by the impact of a metallic bismuth striker on a fixed steel barrier contains platinum and boron, which were absent before the explosion. The existence of platinum and boron is qualitatively determined. The emission of single 8-MeV α particles is also detected from the metallic dust that forms at the site of the impact interaction of bismuth with steel. Both effects point to possible nuclear decay of bismuth due to the energy of a mechanical impact.

  11. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  12. Determination of the nuclear-induced electrical conductivity in a nuclear-driven MHD device

    SciTech Connect

    Bitteker, L.

    1994-06-01

    The continual need for more efficient energy conversion techniques for space, sea, and terrestrial systems has renewed interest in nuclear-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion. The concept of nuclear-driven MHD energy conversion utilizes a flow seeded with a neutron absorbing species. The energy released in neutron absorption or fission processes is used to ionize the flow and enhance electrical conductivity. Research into the use of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He mixtures in the 1960`s and 1970`s suggested the enhancement is insufficient for MHD purposes. However, new calculations suggest a region of conditions not previously considered may provide significant conductivity enhancement. Specifically, at densities less than standard atmospheric density and neutron flux greater than 1{times}10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}s, conductivity greater than 10 mho/m may be achievable. These calculations also suggest conductivity`s of several hundred mho/m may be possible for an achievable range of conditions. Additionally, the nuclear-induced conductivity is strongly density dependent and weakly temperature dependent. Therefore, higher flow velocities, and hence higher power densities than those used in traditional MHD channels utilizing thermal ionization are possible. In order to confirm these promising calculations, a series of experiments has been proposed.

  13. Trace elemental distributions in induced atherosclerotic lesions using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minqin, Ren; Watt, Frank; Tan Kwong Huat, Benny; Halliwell, B.

    2003-09-01

    Nuclear Microscopy, using the combination of scanning transmission ion microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and proton induced X-ray emission has the ability to map and accurately quantify localised trace element levels in newly formed atherosclerotic lesions. In this study, New Zealand white rabbits fed on a high cholesterol diet were divided into two groups. One test group was treated with an iron chelating agent desferal, and the second group served as a control model. Tissue sections were taken from the aortic arch, flash frozen and air-dried, and scanned using the nuclear microscope of the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, NUS. Results of this experiment, although not definitive ( p=0.07) indicated that during the treatment with desferal, there was a trend for lesion development to be slowed down. However, analysis of atherosclerotic lesions both from the test and control groups showed that iron concentrations within the lesions exhibit a high degree of correlation with the depth of the lesion in the artery wall, whereas zinc is observed to be anti-correlated to the size of the lesion area. This investigation implies that the observed high iron levels, which can lead to increased free radical damage, may cause premature or accelerated arterial damage.

  14. Stress-induced nuclear export of 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaka, Hiromi; Shimizu, Takao; Izumi, Takashi . E-mail: takizumi@med.gunma-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-09

    A key enzyme for leukotriene biosynthesis is 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which we found is exported from the nucleus when p38 MAPK is activated. CHO-K1 cells stably express green fluorescent protein-5-lipoxygenase fusion protein (GFP-5LO), which is located predominantly in the nucleus, and is exported by anisomycin, hydrogen peroxide, and sorbitol, with activation of p38 MAPK. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export, blocked the anisomycin-induced export of GFP-5LO. When HEK293 cells were transformed with plasmids for wild-type GFP-5LO, GFP-5LO-S271A or GFP-5LO-S271E mutants, most wild-type GFP-5LO and GFP-5LO-S271A localized in the nucleus, but GFP-5LO-S271E localized in the cytosol. Thus, phosphorylation at Ser-271 of 5-LO is important for its export. Endogenous 5-LO in RBL cells stimulated with anisomycin was also exported from the nucleus. These results suggest that the nuclear export of 5-LO depends on the stress-induced activation of the p38 MAPK pathway.

  15. An inducible nuclear body in the Drosophila germinal vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Alison B

    2011-01-01

    When living egg chambers of Drosophila are isolated in a saline solution and gently squashed between a microscope slide and coverslip, prominent nuclear bodies (1–20 µm diameter) can be seen inside the oocyte nucleus or germinal vesicle (GV). These bodies do not pre-exist within the GV and are not seen in material that is fixed in paraformaldehyde before squashing. Instead, they form spontaneously within minutes after an egg chamber is damaged and the cytoplasm is exposed to the isolation medium. Electron microscopy shows that the bodies lack an investing membrane and consist of closely packed, irregular particles 30–50 nm in diameter. We used GFP-tagged proteins from the Carnegie Protein Trap Library to identify 22 proteins that are either enriched in the bodies or excluded from them. We were unable to discern common features of proteins that are concentrated in the bodies, such as isoelectric point, molecular weight or biological process. Induced bodies are formed in GVs of flies that are null for coilin or WDR79, proteins that are required for formation of Cajal bodies (CBs). We performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments on five GFP-tagged proteins that are enriched in the bodies. Four of the proteins regained the full pre-bleach fluorescence intensity, indicating that the contents of the bodies are in dynamic equilibrium with the surrounding nucleoplasm. Induced nuclear bodies presumably form as a result of unusual physico-chemical changes in the Drosophila GV. We suggest that their behavior serves as a useful model for self-assembly of nuclear bodies in general, and we discuss the possibility that similar bodies may occur normally in cells of other organisms. PMID:21941118

  16. The nuclear receptor CAR modulates alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaosong; Meng, Zhipeng; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Zeng, Samuel; Huang, Wendong

    2011-08-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and a sensor and detoxifier of both xenobiotics and endobiotics. Recent studies also show that CAR participates in metabolism of glucose and lipid, and has an important role in fatty liver disease and diabetes. In this study, we investigate the roles of CAR in chronic and acute alcohol-induced liver injuries. The results showed that absence of CAR in rodents led to significantly increased susceptibility to chronic alcohol-induced liver injury, which was accompanied with elevated hepatocyte apoptosis and fat accumulation. However, pre-activation of CAR by a CAR agonist, TCPOBOP, strongly enhanced the hepatic toxicity by both chronic and acute alcohol infusion in wild-type, but not in CAR(-/-) mice. Gene expression analyses indicated that CAR pre-activation and alcohol infusion synergistically decreased the expression of enzymes that metabolize the alcohol in liver. These results support a role of CAR in modulating alcoholic liver injury and imply a risk of synergistic liver toxicity induced by alcohol and CAR activation.

  17. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Emerging Techniques for Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Woong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction of four transcription factors, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, can successfully reprogram somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)-like cells. These cells, which are referred to as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, closely resemble embryonic stem cells in genomic, cell biologic, and phenotypic characteristics, and the creation of these special cells was a major triumph in cell biology. In contrast to pluripotent stem cells generated by somatic cell nuclear-transfer (SCNT) or ES cells derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, direct reprogramming provides a convenient and reliable means of generating pluripotent stem cells. iPS cells have already shown incredible potential for research and for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine within just a few years of their discovery. In this review, current techniques of generating iPS cells and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming are reviewed, and the potential for therapeutic applications is discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1799–1820. PMID:21194386

  19. Detecting special nuclear material using muon-induced neutron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, Elena; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Matthew Durham, J.; Fabritius, Joseph, II; Hecht, Adam; Milner, Edward C.; Miyadera, Haruo; Morris, Christopher L.; Perry, John; Poulson, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The penetrating ability of cosmic ray muons makes them an attractive probe for imaging dense materials. Here, we describe experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by cosmic-ray muons to identify the presence of special nuclear material (SNM). Neutrons emitted from SNM are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of SNM-bearing objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects, and may have potential applications in warhead verification scenarios. During the experiment described here we did not attempt to distinguish the type or grade of the SNM.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of induced renal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    London, D.A.; Davis, P.L.; Williams, R.D.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.; Gooding, C.A.

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images obtained after unilateral ligation of the ureter, renal artery, or renal vein in the rat were analyzed and compared with NMR images of the normal rat kidney. Anatomic and functional correlation of the induced renal lesions was made by concurrent CT and by gross examination of the excised kidneys. Many normal anatomic structures at the level of the renal hilum can be identified by high resolution NMR imaging. Differentiation of urine from renal parenchyma permits detection of gross changes both in renal function and in the mass of the renal parenchyma. NMR imaging is capable of diagnosing hydronephrosis, acute renal ischemia, and acute venous congestion in this rat model. In addition, a trend toward prolongation of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for abnormal renal parenchyma is demonstrated.

  1. Homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells coincides with nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 activity.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Jessica A; Hahn, Nynke; van den Brand, Carlien S; Meischl, Christof; Cillessen, Saskia A G M; Smith, Desirée E C; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Musters, René J P; Roos, Dirk; Jakobs, Cornelis; Blom, Henk J; Smulders, Yvo M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Rauwerda, Jan A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M

    2013-11-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells related to homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported in several studies. In this study, we evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing signaling pathways contribute to Hcy-induced apoptosis induction, with specific emphasis on NADPH oxidases. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 0.01-2.5 mM Hcy. We determined the effect of Hcy on caspase-3 activity, annexin V positivity, intracellular NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and p47(phox) expression and localization, nuclear nitrotyrosine accumulation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m). Hcy induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis; this effect was concentration dependent and maximal after 6-h exposure to 2.5 mM Hcy. It was accompanied by a significant increase in ΔΨ m. Cysteine was inactive on these parameters excluding a reactive thiol group effect. Hcy induced an increase in cellular NOX2, p47(phox), and NOX4, but not that of NOX1. 3D digital imaging microscopy followed by image deconvolution analysis showed nuclear accumulation of NOX2 and p47(phox) in endothelial cells exposed to Hcy, but not in control cells, which coincided with accumulation of nuclear nitrotyrosine residues. Furthermore, Hcy enhanced peri-nuclear localization of NOX4 coinciding with accumulation of peri-nuclear nitrotyrosine residues, a reflection of local ROS production. p47(phox) was also increased in the peri-nuclear region. The Hcy-induced increase in caspase-3 activity was prevented by DPI and apocynin, suggesting involvement of NOX activity. The data presented in this article reveal accumulation of nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 accumulation as potential source of ROS production in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  2. Prm3p is a pheromone-induced peripheral nuclear envelope protein required for yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E; Rose, Mark D

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromone-responding cells, with significant colocalization with the spindle pole body in zygotes. A previous report, using a truncated protein, claimed that Prm3p is localized to the inner nuclear envelope. Based on biochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and live cell microscopy, we find that functional Prm3p is a peripheral membrane protein exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the outer nuclear envelope. In support of this, mutations in a putative nuclear localization sequence had no effect on full-length protein function or localization. In contrast, point mutations and deletions in the highly conserved hydrophobic carboxy-terminal domain disrupted both protein function and localization. Genetic analysis, colocalization, and biochemical experiments indicate that Prm3p interacts directly with Kar5p, suggesting that nuclear membrane fusion is mediated by a protein complex.

  3. Nonequilibrium nuclear polarization and induced hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţifrea, Ionel; Flatté, Michael E.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) caused by hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. We derive the time and position dependence of the resulting hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields. In GaAs quantum wells the induced nuclear spin polarization greatly exceeds the polarization of the electronic system that causes the DNP. The induced magnetic fields vary between tens of tesla for the electronic hyperfine field acting on nuclei, to hundreds of gauss for the nuclear hyperfine field acting on electrons, to a few gauss for the induced nuclear dipolar fields that act on both nuclei and electrons. The field strengths should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures.

  4. Nuclear factor-κB signaling contributes to mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm weakness*.

    PubMed

    Smuder, Ashley J; Hudson, Matthew B; Nelson, W Bradley; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2012-03-01

    Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving measure for patients in respiratory failure, prolonged mechanical ventilation results in diaphragmatic weakness attributable to fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Therefore, identifying the signaling pathways responsible for mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic weakness is important. In this context, it is established that oxidative stress is required for mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic weakness to occur. Numerous redox-sensitive signaling pathways exist in muscle including the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Although it has been suggested that nuclear factor-κB contributes to proteolytic signaling in inactivity-induced atrophy in locomotor muscles, the role that nuclear factor-κB plays in mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic weakness is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that nuclear factor-κB activation plays a key signaling role in mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic weakness and that oxidative stress is required for nuclear factor-κB activation. Cause and effect was determined by independently treating mechanically ventilated animals with either a specific nuclear factor-κB inhibitor (SN50) or a clinically relevant antioxidant (curcumin). Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activity partially attenuated both mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Further, treatment with the antioxidant curcumin prevented mechanical ventilation-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB in the diaphragm and rescued the diaphragm from both mechanical ventilation-induced atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that nuclear factor-κB activation plays a significant signaling role in mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic weakness and that oxidative stress is an upstream activator of nuclear factor-κB. Finally, our results suggest that prevention of mechanical ventilation-induced

  5. Nuclear EGFRvIII resists hypoxic microenvironment induced apoptosis via recruiting ERK1/2 nuclear translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hui; Yang, Jinfeng; Xing, Wenjing; Dong, Yucui; Ren, Huan

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive type of primary brain tumor. Its interaction with the tumor microenvironment promotes tumor progression. Furthermore, GBM bearing expression of EGFRvIII displays more adaptation to tumor microenvironment related stress. But the mechanisms were poorly understood. Here, we presented evidence that in the human U87MG glioblastoma tumor model, EGFRvIII overexpression led aberrant kinase activation and nuclear translocation of EGFRvIII/ERK1/2 under hypoxia, which induced growth advantage by resisting apoptosis. Additionally, EGFRvIII defective in nuclear entry impaired this capacity in hypoxia adaptation, and partially interrupted ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. Pharmacology or genetic interference ERK1/2 decreased hypoxia resistance triggered by EGFRvIII expression, but not EGFRvIII nuclear translocation. In summary, this study identified a novel role for EGFRvIII in hypoxia tolerance, supporting an important link between hypoxia and subcellular localization alterations of the receptor. - Highlights: • Nuclear translocation of EGFRvIII contributes to GBM cell apoptotic resistance by hypoxia. • Nuclear ERK1/2 facilitates EGFRvIII in hypoxia resistance. • EGFRvIII nuclear translocation is not dependent on ERK1/2.

  6. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  7. Meson-induced correlations of nucleons in nuclear Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Huett, M.; Milstein, A.I.

    1998-01-01

    The nonresonant (seagull) contribution to the nuclear Compton amplitude at low energies is strongly influenced by nucleon correlations arising from meson exchange. We study this problem in a modified Fermi gas model, where nuclear correlation functions are obtained with the help of perturbation theory. The dependence of the mesonic seagull amplitude on the nuclear radius is investigated and the influence of a realistic nuclear density on this amplitude is discussed. We found that different form factors appear for the static part (proportional to the enhancement constant {kappa}) of the mesonic seagull amplitude and for the parts, which contain the contribution from electromagnetic polarizabilities. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Meson-induced correlations of nucleons in nuclear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütt, M.-Th.; Milstein, A. I.

    1998-01-01

    The nonresonant (seagull) contribution to the nuclear Compton amplitude at low energies is strongly influenced by nucleon correlations arising from meson exchange. We study this problem in a modified Fermi gas model, where nuclear correlation functions are obtained with the help of perturbation theory. The dependence of the mesonic seagull amplitude on the nuclear radius is investigated and the influence of a realistic nuclear density on this amplitude is discussed. We found that different form factors appear for the static part (proportional to the enhancement constant κ) of the mesonic seagull amplitude and for the parts, which contain the contribution from electromagnetic polarizabilities.

  9. Influenza Virus-Induced Caspase-Dependent Enlargement of Nuclear Pores Promotes Nuclear Export of Viral Ribonucleoprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mühlbauer, Dirk; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Hardt, Martin; Hocke, Andreas; Schierhorn, Kristina L.; Mostafa, Ahmed; Müller, Christin; Wisskirchen, Christian; Herold, Susanne; Wolff, Thorsten; Ziebuhr, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses (IAV) replicate their segmented RNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells and utilize caspase-dependent nucleocytoplasmic export mechanisms to transport newly formed ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) to the site of infectious virion release at the plasma membrane. In this study, we obtained evidence that apoptotic caspase activation in IAV-infected cells is associated with the degradation of the nucleoporin Nup153, an integral subunit of the nuclear pore complex. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a distinct enlargement of nuclear pores in IAV-infected cells. Transient expression and subcellular accumulation studies of multimeric marker proteins in virus-infected cells provided additional evidence for increased nuclear pore diameters facilitating the translocation of large protein complexes across the nuclear membrane. Furthermore, caspase 3/7 inhibition data obtained in this study suggest that active, Crm1-dependent IAV RNP export mechanisms are increasingly complemented by passive, caspase-induced export mechanisms at later stages of infection. IMPORTANCE In contrast to the process seen with most other RNA viruses, influenza virus genome replication occurs in the nucleus (rather than the cytoplasm) of infected cells. Therefore, completion of the viral replication cycle critically depends on intracellular transport mechanisms that ensure the translocation of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes across the nuclear membrane. Here, we demonstrate that virus-induced cellular caspase activities cause a widening of nuclear pores, thereby facilitating nucleocytoplasmic translocation processes and, possibly, promoting nuclear export of newly synthesized RNPs. These passive transport mechanisms are suggested to complement Crm1-dependent RNP export mechanisms known to occur at early stages of the replication cycle and may contribute to highly efficient production of infectious virus progeny at late stages of the viral

  10. Nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase is required for graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Valdepeñas, Carmen; Casanova, Lucía; Colmenero, Isabel; Arriero, Mar; González, África; Lozano, Nieves; González-Vicent, Marta; Díaz, Miguel A.; Madero, Luís; Fresno, Manuel; Ramírez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Donor T lymphocytes are directly responsible for graft-versus-host disease. Molecules important in T-cell function may, therefore, be appropriate targets for graft-versus-host disease therapy and/or prophylaxis. Here we analyzed whether nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase might have a role in graft-versus-host disease. Design and Methods We studied the expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in human samples from patients with graft-versus-host disease. We also explored the effect of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in a murine model of graft-versus-host disease using donor cells from aly/aly mice (deficient in nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase) and C57BL/6 mice (control). Results We detected expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in T-lymphocytes in the pathological lesions of patients with acute graft-versus-host disease. Mice transplanted with aly/aly T lymphocytes did not develop graft-versus-host disease at all, while mice receiving C57BL/6 cells died of a lethal form of the disease. Deficiency of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase did not affect the engrafting ability of donor T cells, but severely impaired their expansion capacity early after transplantation, and aly/aly T cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis than did C57BL/6 T cells. Effector T lymphocytes were the T-cell subset most affected by nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase deficiency. We also detected lower amounts of inflammatory cytokines in the serum of mice receiving aly/aly T cells than in the serum of mice receiving C57BL/6 T cells. Conclusions Our results show that nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase has a role in graft-versus-host disease by maintaining the viability of activated alloreactive T lymphocytes. PMID:20823135

  11. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  12. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Hopkinson, M; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2015-02-23

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging.

  13. Scaling laws in {sup 3}He induced nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rubehn, T.; Jing, K.X.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Tso, K.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Fission excitation functions of compound nuclei in a mass region where shell effects are expected to be very strong are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once these shell effects are accounted for. Furthermore, the method applied in this paper allows for the model-independent determination of the nuclear shell effects. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Intensive Nuclear War Education: Inducing Attitude and Behavior Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Nuclear war education has become a topic of concern among educators who, on one side, see it as an essential component of undergraduate education or, on the other, see it as political indoctrination dominated by direct and indirect Soviet interests. This study assessed the affective impact of an intensive (eight hours per day for five straight…

  15. Intensive Nuclear War Education: Inducing Attitude and Behavior Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Nuclear war education has become a topic of concern among educators who, on one side, see it as an essential component of undergraduate education or, on the other, see it as political indoctrination dominated by direct and indirect Soviet interests. This study assessed the affective impact of an intensive (eight hours per day for five straight…

  16. DNA damage-induced nuclear translocation of Apaf-1 is mediated by nucleoporin Nup107

    PubMed Central

    Jagot-Lacoussiere, Léonard; Faye, Audrey; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Poyet, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Beside its central role in the mitochondria-dependent cell death pathway, the apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) is involved in the DNA damage response through cell-cycle arrest induced by genotoxic stress. This non-apoptotic function requires a nuclear translocation of Apaf-1 during the G1-to-S transition. However, the mechanisms that trigger the nuclear accumulation of Apaf-1 upon DNA damage remain to be investigated. Here we show that the main 4 isoforms of Apaf-1 can undergo nuclear translocation and restore Apaf-1 deficient MEFs cell cycle arrest in the S phase following genotoxic stress through activation of Chk-1. Interestingly, DNA damage-dependent nuclear accumulation of Apaf-1 occurs independently of p53 and the retinoblastoma (pRb) pathway. We demonstrated that Apaf-1 associates with the nucleoporin Nup107 and this association is necessary for Apaf-1 nuclear import. The CED-4 domain of Apaf-1 directly binds to the central domain of Nup107 in an ATR-regulated, phosphorylation-dependent manner. Interestingly, expression of the Apaf-1-interacting domain of Nup107 interfered with Apaf-1 nuclear translocation upon genotoxic stress, resulting in a marked reduction of Chk-1 activation and cell cycle arrest. Thus, our results confirm the crucial role of Apaf-1 nuclear relocalization in mediating cell-cycle arrest induced by genotoxic stress and implicate Nup107 as a critical regulator of the DNA damage-induced intra-S phase checkpoint response. PMID:25695197

  17. COP1 is required for UV-B-induced nuclear accumulation of the UVR8 photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ruohe; Skvortsova, Mariya Y; Loubéry, Sylvain; Ulm, Roman

    2016-07-26

    The UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) promotes UV-B acclimation and tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8 localizes to both cytosol and nucleus, but its main activity is assumed to be nuclear. UV-B photoreception stimulates nuclear accumulation of UVR8 in a presently unknown manner. Here, we show that CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) is required for UV-B-induced nuclear accumulation of UVR8, but bypassing the COP1 requirement for UVR8 nuclear accumulation did not rescue the cop1 mutant UV-B phenotype. Using a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-based fusion protein system to conditionally localize GR-UVR8 to the nucleus, we have demonstrated that both photoactivation and nuclear localization of UVR8 are required for UV-B-induced photomorphogenic responses. In contrast, there was no UV-B response when UV-B-activated UVR8 was artificially retained in the cytosol. In agreement with a predominantly nuclear activity, constitutively active UVR8(W285A) accumulated in the nucleus also in the absence of UV-B. Furthermore, GR-COP1 expression lines suggested that UV-B-activated UVR8 can be coimported into the nucleus by COP1. Our data strongly support localization of UVR8 signaling in the nucleus and a dual role for COP1 in the regulation of UV-B-induced UVR8 nuclear accumulation and in UVR8-mediated UV-B signaling.

  18. COP1 is required for UV-B–induced nuclear accumulation of the UVR8 photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Mariya Y.; Loubéry, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) promotes UV-B acclimation and tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. UVR8 localizes to both cytosol and nucleus, but its main activity is assumed to be nuclear. UV-B photoreception stimulates nuclear accumulation of UVR8 in a presently unknown manner. Here, we show that CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) is required for UV-B–induced nuclear accumulation of UVR8, but bypassing the COP1 requirement for UVR8 nuclear accumulation did not rescue the cop1 mutant UV-B phenotype. Using a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-based fusion protein system to conditionally localize GR-UVR8 to the nucleus, we have demonstrated that both photoactivation and nuclear localization of UVR8 are required for UV-B–induced photomorphogenic responses. In contrast, there was no UV-B response when UV-B–activated UVR8 was artificially retained in the cytosol. In agreement with a predominantly nuclear activity, constitutively active UVR8W285A accumulated in the nucleus also in the absence of UV-B. Furthermore, GR-COP1 expression lines suggested that UV-B–activated UVR8 can be coimported into the nucleus by COP1. Our data strongly support localization of UVR8 signaling in the nucleus and a dual role for COP1 in the regulation of UV-B–induced UVR8 nuclear accumulation and in UVR8-mediated UV-B signaling. PMID:27407149

  19. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  20. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Paert

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induces apoptosis in epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARD domain of AIRE is sufficient for apoptosis induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induced apoptosis involves GAPDH translocation to the nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deprenyl inhibits AIRE induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  1. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain

    PubMed Central

    Chekhovich, E.A.; Hopkinson, M.; Skolnick, M.S.; Tartakovskii, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear–nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2–4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging. PMID:25704639

  2. Status of the Nuclear-Induced Conductivity Experiment (NICE) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitteker, Leo; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Litchford, Ron J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion has been pursued in various forms since the 1950's. The majority of this work was motivated by the compatibility of MHD generators with the high temperature achievable with a nuclear reactor and the associated potential for very high cycle efficiency. As a result of this perspective, methods for enhancing the electrical conductivity of the MHD flow have primarily focused on traditional thermal ionization processes, especially those utilizing alkali metal seeds. However, electrical conductivity enhancement via thermal interactions imposes significant limitations on the flow expansion through the generator, and hence on the ultimate power density. Furthermore, the introduction of an alkali metal seed into the flow significantly complicates the engineering design and increases the potential for system failures due to plating of the evaporated metal on cold surfaces.

  3. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Induced Reactions: Quasi-Free Reactions and RIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Coc, A.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; De Sereville, N.

    2010-08-12

    The use of quasi-free reactions in studying nuclear reactions between charged particles of astrophysical interest has received much attention over the last two decades. The Trojan Horse Method is based on this approach and it has been used to study a number of reactions relevant for Nuclear Astrophysics. Recently we applied this method to the study of nuclear reactions that involve radioactive species, namely to the study of the {sup 18}F+p{yields}{sup 15}O+{alpha} process at temperatures corresponding to the energies available in the classical novae scenario. Quasi-free reactions can also be exploited to study processes induced by neutrons. This technique is particularly interesting when applied to reaction induced by neutrons on unstable short-lived nuclei. Such processes are very important in the nucleosynthesis of elements in the sand r-processes scenarios and this technique can give hints for solving key questions in nuclear astrophysics where direct measurements are practically impossible.

  4. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-06-02

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  6. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  7. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  8. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; ...

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  9. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  10. Electron flux in molecules induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Michihiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-07-01

    As a general tool for analysis of chemical reactions from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics, electron flux within a molecule is numerically realized in terms of physically time-dependent electronic wavefunctions given by the semiclassical Ehrenfest theory. These wavefunctions are synchronized with real time motion of molecular nuclei through the nuclear kinematic coupling (nonadiabatic elements). Since the standard quantum flux gives only a null field for a real-valued electronic eigenfunction, we extend the definition of flux such that the essential information of dynamical flow of electrons can be retrieved even from adiabatic electronic wavefunctions calculated in the scheme of the so-called ab initio molecular dynamics.

  11. Nuclear dynamical deformation induced hetero- and euchromatin positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    We studied the role of active deformation dynamics in cell nuclei in chromatin positioning. Model chains containing two types of regions, with high (euchromatic) or low (heterochromatic) mobility, were confined in a pulsating container simulating a nucleus showing dynamic deformations. Brownian dynamic simulations show that the positioning of low mobility regions changes from sites near the periphery to the center if the affinity between these regions and the container periphery disappears. The former and latter positionings are similar to the "conventional" and "inverted" chromatin positionings in nuclei of normal differentiated cells and cells lacking Lamin-related proteins. Additionally, nuclear dynamical deformation played essential roles in "inverted" chromatin positioning.

  12. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  13. Nuclear Collisions Induced by Single-Cycle Laser Pulses:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei

    2004-10-01

    Fusion occurs when light nuclei of hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), or tritium (T), join together to produce helium, neutrons, and energy. If harnessed on earth, fusion has the potential to provide a clean and virtually unlimited source of energy. The two present techniques for controlled fusion all rely on hot plasma. Thermal motion of the nuclei results in random nuclear collisions, which can be energetic enough to produce fusion when the temperature is high. We propose a ``new method'' which doesn't require preparation and confinement of hot and dense plasma, but works in a molecular gas. It uses the fact that nuclei in a molecule are pre-aligned in front of each other and can be driven into each other by the very strong and ultra-short laser pulse since the nuclei of different masses will acquire different velocities when driven by the same electric field. The nuclei may collide with high kinetic energy needed to overcome the Coulomb Barrier. These collisions may lead to fusion. Realization of this technique will require ultrashort (few-femtosecond, single-cycle) laser pulses with field intensities approaching 10^23W/cm^2. We have performed a classical simulation of nuclear motion under the action of the Coulomb repulsion and a strong laser field. We have also done a simple statistical ensemble calculation. From our results, we can see that collision will occur on a sub-attosecond time scale. On that timescale the nuclei will experience large acceleration and emit zeptosecond bursts of light.

  14. Saw palmetto extract induces nuclear heterogeneity in mice.

    PubMed

    Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Francis, Bettina M; Rayburn, A Lane

    2009-01-01

    Saw palmetto (SW), a phytotherapeutic compound used in the treatment of prostate disease, was examined for potential nuclear effects. SW extract was incorporated into a complete casein-based semisynthetic rodent chow at 0%, 0.1% and 1% SW. SW was fed to mice for 6 weeks, after which the mice received a single i/p injection of either the known genotoxic agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in saline or just saline. Forty-eight hours after injection, blood and bone marrow were collected for flow cytometric analysis. A significant effect of MMS was observed in both male and female mice with respect to: an increase in nuclear heterogeneity in bone marrow cells as measured by the coefficient of variation of the G1 peak in a flow histogram (6.32 versus 4.8 in male mice, 7.0 versus 4.9 in female mice) and an increase in the number of micronucleated blood cells (3.4% versus 0.56% male mice, 3.1% versus 0.6 in female mice) indicating a positive genotoxic response. SW also appears to increase the heterogeneity of bone marrow nuclei in a dose dependent manner (0-5.1%, 0.1-5.5% and 1-5.7% in male mice, 0-5.7%, 0.1-6.0% and 1-6.2% in female mice) without a concomitant increase in blood cell micronuclei. These results indicate that SW is not genotoxic with respect to physical DNA damage and that the changes observed in the bone marrow are due to chromatin conformation modifications in the nuclei of in vivo treated mouse cells.

  15. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH.

    PubMed

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Pärt

    2012-06-22

    AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [X-ray irradiation induces apoptosis of mouse GC1 sperm cells via nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Ding, Jingbin; Wang, Zhijun; Ding, Juan; Xia, Xinshe; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Objective To study the effect of X-ray irradiation on the localization of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in mouse GC1 sperm cells. Methods After GC1 cells were treated with 0, 3, 6 and 9 Gy X irradiation, BrdU incorporation assay was performed to detect the proliferation of GC1 cells. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, the nuclear condensation was observed by DAPI staining. The subcellular localization of AIF was showed using the immunofluorescence staining, both in the whole cell extracts and in nuclear extracts, and the expression levels of AIF were detected using Western blot analysis. Results With the increase of X-ray irradiation dose, the proliferation of GC1 cells significantly decreased, and the activity of cells was weakened. After 6 Gy irradiation, in nuclear extracts, but not in the whole cell extracts, the protein AIF was upregulated significantly. It meant the nuclear translocation of protein AIF. Conclusion X-ray irradiation induces the apoptosis of mouse GC1 sperm cells, meanwhile, the nuclear translocation of AIF occurs.

  17. Nitric oxide induces thioredoxin-1 nuclear translocation: Possible association with the p21Ras survival pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Roberto J.; Yodoi, J.; Debbas, V.; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Stern, A.; Monteiro, Hugo P. . E-mail: hpmonte@uol.com.br

    2006-10-06

    One of the major redox-regulating molecules with thiol reducing activity is thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1). TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that exists in the extracellular millieu, cytoplasm, and nucleus, and has a distinct role in each environment. It is well known that TRX-1 promptly migrates to the nuclear compartment in cells exposed to oxidants. However, the intracellular location of TRX-1 in cells exposed to nitrosothiols has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the exposure of HeLa cells to increasing concentrations of the nitrosothiol S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) promoted TRX-1 nuclear accumulation. The SNAP-induced TRX-1 translocation to the nucleus was inhibited by FPTIII, a selective inhibitor of p21Ras. Furthermore, TRX-1 migration was attenuated in cells stably transfected with NO insensitive p21Ras (p21{sup RasC118S}). Downstream to p21Ras, the MAP Kinases ERK1/2 were activated by SNAP under conditions that promote TRX-1 nuclear translocation. Inhibition of MEK prevented SNAP-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and TRX-1 nuclear migration. In addition, cells treated with p21Ras or MEK inhibitor showed increased susceptibility to cell death induced by SNAP. In conclusion, our observations suggest that the nuclear translocation of TRX-1 is induced by SNAP involving p21Ras survival pathway.

  18. From cloned frogs to patient matched stem cells: induced pluripotency or somatic cell nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Byrne, James; Egli, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer has seen a remarkable comeback in the past few years. Three groups have independently reported the derivation of stem cell lines by somatic cell nuclear transfer, from either adult, neonatal or fetal cells. Though the ability of human oocytes to reprogram somatic cells to stem cells had long been anticipated, success did not arrive on a straightforward path. Little was known about human oocyte biology, and nuclear transfer protocols developed in animals required key changes to become effective with human eggs. By overcoming these challenges, human nuclear transfer research has contributed to a greater understanding of oocyte biology, provided a point of reference for the comparison of induced pluripotent stem cells, and delivered a method for the generation of personalized stem cells with therapeutic potential.

  19. REG-γ associates with and modulates the abundance of nuclear activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Barton, Lance F.; Rada, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) acts on the immunoglobulin loci in activated B lymphocytes to initiate antibody gene diversification. The abundance of AID in the nucleus appears tightly regulated, with most nuclear AID being either degraded or exported back to the cytoplasm. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating nuclear AID, we screened for proteins interacting specifically with it. We found that REG-γ, a protein implicated in ubiquitin- and ATP-independent protein degradation, interacts in high stoichiometry with overexpressed nuclear AID as well as with endogenous AID in B cells. REG-γ deficiency results in increased AID accumulation and increased immunoglobulin class switching. A stable stoichiometric AID–REG-γ complex can be recapitulated in co-transformed bacteria, and REG-γ accelerates proteasomal degradation of AID in in vitro assays. Thus, REG-γ interacts, likely directly, with nuclear AID and modulates the abundance of this antibody-diversifying but potentially oncogenic enzyme. PMID:22042974

  20. YY1 Controls Immunoglobulin Class Switch Recombination and Nuclear Activation-Induced Deaminase Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zaprazna, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is an enzyme required for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), processes that ensure antibody maturation and expression of different immunoglobulin isotypes. AID function is tightly regulated by tissue- and stage-specific expression, nuclear localization, and protein stability. Transcription factor YY1 is crucial for early B cell development, but its function at late B cell stages is unknown. Here, we show that YY1 conditional knockout in activated splenic B cells interferes with CSR. Knockout of YY1 did not affect B cell proliferation, transcription of the AID and IgM genes, or levels of various switch region germ line transcripts. However, we show that YY1 physically interacts with AID and controls the accumulation of nuclear AID, at least in part, by increasing nuclear AID stability. We show for the first time that YY1 plays a novel role in CSR and controls nuclear AID protein levels. PMID:22290437

  1. Regulation of the Drosophila hypoxia-inducible factor alpha Sima by CRM1-dependent nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Romero, Nuria M; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Roth, Peggy; Cauerhff, Ana; Samakovlis, Christos; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-05-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-alpha) proteins are regulated by oxygen levels through several different mechanisms that include protein stability, transcriptional coactivator recruitment, and subcellular localization. It was previously reported that these transcription factors are mainly nuclear in hypoxia and cytoplasmic in normoxia, but so far the molecular basis of this regulation is unclear. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster HIF-alpha protein Sima shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the relevant nuclear localization signal and two functional nuclear export signals (NESs). These NESs are in the Sima basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and promote CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Site-directed mutagenesis of either NES provoked Sima nuclear retention and increased transcriptional activity, suggesting that nuclear export contributes to Sima regulation. The identified NESs are conserved and probably functional in the bHLH domains of several bHLH-PAS proteins. We propose that rapid nuclear export of Sima regulates the duration of cellular responses to hypoxia.

  2. DNA damage induces nuclear actin filament assembly by Formin -2 and Spire-½ that promotes efficient DNA repair. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Belin, Brittany J; Lee, Terri; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-08-19

    Actin filaments assemble inside the nucleus in response to multiple cellular perturbations, including heat shock, protein misfolding, integrin engagement, and serum stimulation. We find that DNA damage also generates nuclear actin filaments-detectable by phalloidin and live-cell actin probes-with three characteristic morphologies: (i) long, nucleoplasmic filaments; (ii) short, nucleolus-associated filaments; and (iii) dense, nucleoplasmic clusters. This DNA damage-induced nuclear actin assembly requires two biologically and physically linked nucleation factors: Formin-2 and Spire-1/Spire-2. Formin-2 accumulates in the nucleus after DNA damage, and depletion of either Formin-2 or actin's nuclear import factor, importin-9, increases the number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), linking nuclear actin filaments to efficient DSB clearance. Nuclear actin filaments are also required for nuclear oxidation induced by acute genotoxic stress. Our results reveal a previously unknown role for nuclear actin filaments in DNA repair and identify the molecular mechanisms creating these nuclear filaments.

  3. Studies of Nuclear Structure Related to an Induced Depletion of Isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, James J.

    2009-03-31

    Nuclear isomers have served as important touchstones in the development of nuclear models. In addition, those metastable excited states whose lifetimes reach decades or longer present intriguing possibilities as high-energy-density media. Together, these aspects have motivated considerable research on whether some isomeric nuclides might allow an induced release of the stored energy upon demand. Targeted studies of nuclear structure aimed at this question are a rather recent development, providing a parallel approach to direct tests of induced depletion on isomeric samples. This paper will discuss the relationship between these dual research tracks, as exemplified by experiments conducted on isomeric nuclei in {sup 108}Ag, {sup 178}Hf and {sup 180}Ta.

  4. Nuclear-Spin-Induced Circular Dichroism in the Infrared Region for Liquids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Yao, Guo-hua; Zhang, Zhen-lin; Liu, Fan-chen; Chen, Dong-ming

    2015-06-22

    Recently, the nuclear-spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) and circular dichroism (NSCD) for liquids were discovered and extensively studied and developed. However, so far, nuclear-spin-induced magnetic circular dichroism in the IR region (IR-NSCD) has not been explored, even though all polyatomic molecules exhibit extensive IR spectra. Herein, IR-NSCD is proposed and discussed theoretically. The results indicate that in favorable conditions the IR-NSCD angle may be much larger than the NSOR angle in the UV/Vis region due to a vibrational resonance effect and can be measurable by using the NSOR experiment scheme. IR-NSCD can automatically combine and give NMR spectra and IRCD spectra of the nuclear spin prepolarized samples in liquids, which, in principle, could be developed to become a unique, novel analytical tool.

  5. Rhodamine B induces long nucleoplasmic bridges and other nuclear anomalies in Allium cepa root tip cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dehong; Bai, Bing; Jiang, Donghua; Shi, Lin; Cheng, Shunchang; Tao, Dongbing; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-03-01

    The cytogenetic toxicity of rhodamine B on root tip cells of Allium cepa was investigated. A. cepa were cultured in water (negative control), 10 ppm methyl methanesulfonate (positive control), and three concentrations of rhodamine B (200, 100, and 50 ppm) for 7 days. Rhodamine B inhibited mitotic activity; increased nuclear anomalies, including micronuclei, nuclear buds, and bridged nuclei; and induced oxidative stress in A. cepa root tissues. Furthermore, a substantial amount of long nucleoplasmic bridges were entangled together, and some nuclei were simultaneously linked to several other nuclei and to nuclear buds with nucleoplasmic bridges in rhodamine B-treated cells. In conclusion, rhodamine B induced cytogenetic effects in A. cepa root tip cells, which suggests that the A. cepa root is an ideal model system for detecting cellular interactions.

  6. Enhancing the effectiveness of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer by inducing Filamin A nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Mooso, Benjamin A.; Vinall, Ruth L.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Savoy, Rosalinda M.; Cheung, Jean P.; Singh, Sheetal; Siddiqui, Salma; Wang, Yu; Bedolla, Roble G.; Martinez, Anthony; Mudryj, Maria; Kung, Hsing-Jien; deVere White, Ralph W.; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2013-01-01

    Since prostate cancer (CaP) is regulated by androgen receptor (AR) activity, metastatic CaP is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Despite initial response, patients on ADT eventually progress to castration-resistant CaP (CRPC), which is currently incurable. We previously showed that cleavage of the 280kDa structural protein Filamin A (FlnA) to a 90kDa fragment, and nuclear localization of the cleaved product, sensitized CRPC cells to ADT. Hence, treatment promoting FlnA nuclear localization would enhance androgen responsiveness. Here, we show that FlnA nuclear localization induced apoptosis in CRPC cells during ADT, identifying it as a treatment tool in advanced CaP. Significantly, the natural product genistein-combined-polysaccharide (GCP) had a similar effect. Investigation of the mechanism of GCP-induced apoptosis showed that GCP induced FlnA cleavage and nuclear localization, and that apoptosis resulting from GCP treatment was mediated by FlnA nuclear localization. Two main components of GCP are genistein and daidzein: the ability of GCP to induce G2 arrest was due to genistein whereas sensitivity to ADT stemmed from daidzein; hence both were needed to mediate GCP's effects. FlnA cleavage is regulated by its phosphorylation; we show that ADT enhanced FlnA phosphorylation, which prevented its cleavage, whereas GCP inhibited FlnA phosphorylation, thereby sensitizing CaP cells to ADT. In a mouse model of CaP recurrence, GCP, but not vehicle, impeded relapse following castration; indicating that GCP, when administered with ADT, interrupted the development of CRPC. These results demonstrate the efficacy of GCP in promoting FlnA nuclear localization and enhancing androgen responsiveness in CaP. PMID:22993077

  7. Enhancing the effectiveness of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer by inducing Filamin A nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Mooso, Benjamin A; Vinall, Ruth L; Tepper, Clifford G; Savoy, Rosalinda M; Cheung, Jean P; Singh, Sheetal; Siddiqui, Salma; Wang, Yu; Bedolla, Roble G; Martinez, Anthony; Mudryj, Maria; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Devere White, Ralph W; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2012-12-01

    As prostate cancer (CaP) is regulated by androgen receptor (AR) activity, metastatic CaP is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Despite initial response, patients on ADT eventually progress to castration-resistant CaP (CRPC), which is currently incurable. We previously showed that cleavage of the 280 kDa structural protein Filamin A (FlnA) to a 90 kDa fragment, and nuclear localization of the cleaved product, sensitized CRPC cells to ADT. Hence, treatment promoting FlnA nuclear localization would enhance androgen responsiveness. Here, we show that FlnA nuclear localization induced apoptosis in CRPC cells during ADT, identifying it as a treatment tool in advanced CaP. Significantly, the natural product genistein combined polysaccharide (GCP) had a similar effect. Investigation of the mechanism of GCP-induced apoptosis showed that GCP induced FlnA cleavage and nuclear localization and that apoptosis resulting from GCP treatment was mediated by FlnA nuclear localization. Two main components of GCP are genistein and daidzein: the ability of GCP to induce G2 arrest was due to genistein whereas sensitivity to ADT stemmed from daidzein; hence, both were needed to mediate GCP's effects. FlnA cleavage is regulated by its phosphorylation; we show that ADT enhanced FlnA phosphorylation, which prevented its cleavage, whereas GCP inhibited FlnA phosphorylation, thereby sensitizing CaP cells to ADT. In a mouse model of CaP recurrence, GCP, but not vehicle, impeded relapse following castration, indicating that GCP, when administered with ADT, interrupted the development of CRPC. These results demonstrate the efficacy of GCP in promoting FlnA nuclear localization and enhancing androgen responsiveness in CaP.

  8. Death Inducer-Obliterator 1 Triggers Apoptosis after Nuclear Translocation and Caspase Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    García-Domingo, David; Ramírez, Dorian; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Martínez-A, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Death inducer-obliterator 1 (DIO-1) is a gene that is upregulated early in apoptosis. Here we report that in healthy cells, the DIO-1 gene product was located in the cytoplasm, where it formed oligomers. After interleukin-3 starvation or c-Myc-induced apoptosis in serum-free conditions, DIO-1 translocated to the nucleus, where it upregulated caspase levels and activity. A nuclear localization signal deletion mutant (DIO-1ΔNLS) was unable to translocate to the nuclear compartment in the absence of interleukin-3 and failed to upregulate procaspase levels or trigger cell death. In addition, cells stably expressing DIO-1ΔNLS were protected from apoptosis induced by interleukin-3 withdrawal. These results indicate that DIO-1 has a relevant role in regulating the early stages of cell death. PMID:12697821

  9. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Programmed nuclear death (PND), which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation). In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:20146827

  10. Realistic calculations of nuclear disappearance lifetimes induced by n nmacr oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2008-07-01

    Realistic calculations of nuclear disappearance lifetimes induced by n nmacr oscillations are reported for oxygen and iron, using nmacr nuclear potentials derived from a recent comprehensive analysis of pmacr atomic X-ray and radiochemical data. A lower limit τn nmacr >3.3×108s on the n nmacr oscillation time is derived from the Super-Kamiokande I new lower limit Td(O)>1.77×1032yr on the neutron lifetime in oxygen. Antineutron scattering lengths in carbon and nickel, needed in trap experiments using ultracold neutrons, are calculated from updated Nmacr optical potentials at threshold, with results shown to be largely model independent.

  11. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  12. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  13. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Yu; Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1's role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates PARP-1. In addition, RGC-5 cells damaged

  14. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. Methods RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1’s role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. Results We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. Conclusions These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates

  15. Androgen Induces a Switch from Cytoplasmic Retention to Nuclear Import of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Li; Llewellyn, Ryan; Kesler, Cristina T.; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Snow, Chelsi J.; Shank, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has critical functions as a transcription factor in both normal and cancer cells, but the specific mechanisms that regulate its nuclear localization are not well defined. We found that an AR mutation commonly reported in prostate cancer generates an androgen-independent gain of function for nuclear import. The substitution, Thr877Ala, is within the ligand-binding domain, but the nuclear import gain of function is mediated by the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) spanning the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and hinge region. Bipartite NLS activity depends on the structure provided by the DBD, and protein interactions with the bipartite NLS are repressed by the hinge region. The bipartite NLS is recognized by importin 7, a nuclear import receptor for several proteins. Importin 7 binding to AR, however, inhibits import by shielding the bipartite NLS. Androgen binding relieves the inhibition by inducing a switch that promotes exchange of importin 7 for karyopherin alpha import receptors. Importin 7 contributes to the regulation of AR import by restraining import until androgen is detected in the cytoplasm. PMID:24100013

  16. Involement of an acrosinlike proteinase in the sulfhydryl-induced degradation of rabbit sperm nuclear protamine

    PubMed Central

    Zirkin, BR; Chang, TSK; Heaps, J

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that proteolytic activity is associated with isolated rabbit sperm nuclei and is responsible for the degradation of nuclear protamine that occurs during thiol-induced in vitro decondensation of the nuclei (Zirkin and Chang, 1977; Chang and Zirkin, 1978). In this study, we present the results of experiments designed to characterize this proteolytic activity. Basic protein isolated from rabbit sperm nuclei incubated with 5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) and 1 percent Triton X-100 for increasing periods of time exhibited progressively faster migrating bands on acid-urea polyacrylamide gels, reflection the progressive degradation of protamine. Ultimately, a specific and characteristic peptide banding pattern resulted. When sperm nuclei were treated with the esterase inhibitor nitrophenyl-p-guanidino benzoate (NPGB) to inhibit the nuclear-associated proteolytic activity and then incubated with one of several exogenous proteinases in addition to DTT and Triton X-100, characteristic peptide banding patterns were seen for each exogenous proteinase employed. For trypsin, chymotrypsin, pronase, and papain, the peptide banding patterns differed from one another and from the pattern characteristic of protamine degradation by the nuclear-associated proteinase. By contrast, when rabbit acrosin served as the exogenous proteinase, the peptide banding pattern seen was identical to the pattern characteristic of the nuclear-associated proteinase. These results demonstrate directly that the proteinase associated with rabbit sperm nuclei and involved in sperm nuclear decondensation in vitro is acrosinlike. PMID:6988441

  17. Declining NAD+ Induces a Pseudohypoxic State Disrupting Nuclear-Mitochondrial Communication during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana P.; Price, Nathan L.; Ling, Alvin J.Y.; Moslehi, Javid J.; Montgomery, Magdalene K.; Rajman, Luis; White, James P.; Teodoro, João S.; Wrann, Christiane D.; Hubbard, Basil P.; Mercken, Evi M.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; de Cabo, Rafael; Rolo, Anabela P.; Turner, Nigel; Bell, Eric L.; Sinclair, David A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Ever since eukaryotes subsumed the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria, the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have had to closely coordinate their activities, as each encode different subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, but its causes are debated. We show that, during aging, there is a specific loss of mitochondrial, but not nuclear, encoded OXPHOS subunits. We trace the cause to an alternate PGC-1α/β-independent pathway of nuclear-mitochondrial communication that is induced by a decline in nuclear NAD+ and the accumulation of HIF-1α under normoxic conditions, with parallels to Warburg reprogramming. Deleting SIRT1 accelerates this process, whereas raising NAD+ levels in old mice restores mitochondrial function to that of a young mouse in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Thus, a pseudohypoxic state that disrupts PGC-1α/β-independent nuclear-mitochondrial communication contributes to the decline in mitochondrial function with age, a process that is apparently reversible. PMID:24360282

  18. Nuclear apoJ: An X-ray-inducible cell death signal. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-29

    The complex interactions between apoptosis, genomic instability and carcinogenesis induced by low dose ionizing radiation (IR) are poorly understood. Tissues differentially withstand IR based on complex processes that include DNA repair, altered gene expression, and apoptosis. This proposal is based on the investigators' discovery of a protein, apoJ (initially designated xip8/XIP8), that is dramatically IR-induced. The protein is also known as a marker for apoptosis, but its function is unknown. The ''nuclear'' form of the apoJ protein, undergoes dramatic accumulation in the nucleus following IR, and then strongly associates with the C-terminus of Ku70, a key factor in DNA-PK-dependent nonhomologous DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. These studies suggest that the nuclear form of apoJ is a major determinant in the elimination of carcinogenic cells and that it contributes strongly to nonlinearity threshold responses for survival and carcinogenesis.

  19. Light-induced nuclear export reveals rapid dynamics of epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Lerner, Andrew Michael; Zimmerman, Seth Parker; Hahn, Klaus; Bear, James E; Strahl, Brian D.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We engineered a photoactivatable system for rapidly and reversibly exporting proteins from the nucleus by embedding a nuclear export signal in the LOV2 domain from phototropin 1. Fusing the chromatin modifier Bre1 to the photoswitch, we achieved light-dependent control of histone H2B monoubiquitylation in yeast, revealing fast turnover of the ubiquitin mark. Moreover, this inducible system allowed us to dynamically monitor the status of epigenetic modifications dependent on H2B ubiquitylation. PMID:27089030

  20. Molecular mapping of a new induced gene for nuclear male sterility in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new NMS line, NMS HA89-872, induced by mitomycin C and streptomycin carries a single recessive male-sterile gene ms6. An F2 population of 88 plants was obtained from a cross between nuclear male-sterile mutant NMS HA89-872 (msms) and male-fertile line RHA271 (MsMs). 225 SSR primers and 9 RFLP-deri...

  1. Stress-induced Nuclear Bodies Are Sites of Accumulation of Pre-mRNA Processing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) HAP (hnRNP A1 interacting protein) is a multifunctional protein with roles in RNA metabolism, transcription, and nuclear structure. After stress treatments, HAP is recruited to a small number of nuclear bodies, usually adjacent to the nucleoli, which consist of clusters of perichromatin granules and are depots of transcripts synthesized before stress. In this article we show that HAP bodies are sites of accumulation for a subset of RNA processing factors and are related to Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) detectable in unstressed cells. Indeed, HAP and Sam68 are both present in SNBs and in HAP bodies, that we rename “stress-induced SNBs.” The determinants required for the redistribution of HAP lie between residue 580 and 788. Different portions of this region direct the recruitment of the green fluorescent protein to stress-induced SNBs, suggesting an interaction of HAP with different components of the bodies. With the use of the 580–725 region as bait in a two-hybrid screening, we have selected SRp30c and 9G8, two members of the SR family of splicing factors. Splicing factors are differentially affected by heat shock: SRp30c and SF2/ASF are efficiently recruited to stress-induced SNBs, whereas the distribution of SC35 is not perturbed. We propose that the differential sequestration of splicing factors could affect processing of specific transcripts. Accordingly, the formation of stress-induced SNBs is accompanied by a change in the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A transcripts. PMID:11694584

  2. A System Design Requirements Tool for Satellite Communications through Nuclear-Induced Scintillation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-10

    DOCUMENT NUMBER BMO-TR-87-19 A SYSTEM DESIGN REQUIREM4ENTS TOOL FOR SATELLITE COMMNICATIONS THROUGH NUCLEAR-INDUCED SCINTILILATION *~MA Acoesslon For NT...parameters. Several contractors, most notably Mission Research Corporation , have contributed to the development of this model. The full DNA model was never...Performance," Briefing Mission Research Corporation , Santa Barbara, CA (no date). 26. Dana, "Antenna Impulse Response Functions, Theory and Applications

  3. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  4. Twist1 Enhances Hypoxia Induced Radioresistance in Cervical Cancer Cells by Promoting Nuclear EGFR Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hua; Nie, Xin; Zou, Yanmei; Gong, Chen; Li, Yang; Wu, Hua; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Lin; Zhuang, Liang; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yihua; Xiong, Huihua

    2017-01-01

    Twist1 is a crucial transcription factor that regulates epithelial mesenchymal transition and involves in metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that Twist1 plays important role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we investigated the change of Twist1 expression in human cervical squamous cancer cell line SiHa after hypoxia treatment. We also explored the role of Twist1 in radioresistance by manipulating the expression level of Twist1. We observed that hypoxia treatment elevated the expression of Twist1 in SiHa cells. Knockdown of Twist1 with siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of SiHa cells under hypoxia condition, accompanied by reduced levels of nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Conversely, overexpression of Twist1 led to increased radioresistance of SiHa cells, which in turn increased nuclear EGFR localization and expression levels of nuclear DNA-PK. Moreover, concomitant high expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and Twist1 in primary tumors of cervical cancer patients correlated with the worse prognosis after irradiation treatment. Taken together, these data provide new insights into molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced radioresistance in cervical cancer cells, and suggest that Twist1 is a promising molecular target to improve the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy. PMID:28261334

  5. Oxidized LDL enhances stretch-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation through alterations in nuclear protein import.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Mirna N; Dibrov, Elena; Blackwood, David P; Pierce, Grant N

    2012-12-01

    Mechanical stress contributes to hypertension and atherosclerosis partly through the stimulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is another important atherogenic factor that can increase VSMC proliferation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether oxLDL could further enhance the proliferative action of mechanical stretch on VSMC, and to determine the mechanism responsible for this interaction. Because nuclear protein import is critical in regulating gene expression, transcription, and cell proliferation, its involvement in the mitogenic effects of oxLDL and mechanical stress was studied. OxLDL enhanced the proliferative effects of mechanical stretch on its own in rabbit aortic VSMC, and induced increases in the expression of HSP60 in an additive manner. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of HSP60 induced increases in cell proliferation compared with uninfected VSMC. Mechanical stretch and oxLDL stimulated the rate of nuclear protein import in VSMC and increased the expression of nucleoporins. These effects were sensitive to inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We conclude that oxLDL and mechanical stretch have a synergistic effect on VSMC proliferation. This synergistic effect is induced through a stimulation of nuclear protein import via HSP60 and an activation of the MAPK pathway.

  6. Experimental study of photon induced gamma emission of hafnium-178(m2) by nuclear spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoita, Nicolae Catalin

    The induced release of the energy stored in nuclear isomers in the form of an incoherent gamma burst is of great scientific and technological importance. Powerful sources of induced gamma-ray radiation could be obtained, which would be an intermediary step to the development of a gamma-ray laser. High-energy nuclear isomers with very long lifetimes of the order of years and higher can serve as good active media. For instance, a macroscopic sample of 178Hfm2 isomer stores about 1 GJ/g as excitation energy of the isomeric state. Photonuclear reactions induced by real or virtual photons are the most promising mechanisms to release the energy stored by 178Hfm2 nuclei. The isomeric nucleus is excited to an intermediate level from which cascade to the ground state emitting gamma-photons. The nuclear level density approaches one per keV at those excitation energies. Experimental investigations by nuclear spectroscopy methods conducted in this work revealed that the decay of 178Hfm2 is accelerated when the energies of the incident photons were tuned at about 20,825 keV, 11.15 keV or near the L3 photoionization threshold of atomic hafnium at 9561 keV. In the first case, the presumed mechanism was the direct photoexcitation of the m2 isomeric nucleus to a trigger level at about 2466.9 keV. There was a strong decay branch from this trigger level to the 11- level of the 8 - band that caused the accelerated emission of gamma photons from many of the transitions detected in the unperturbed spontaneous decay. In the second case, a trigger level at about 2457.2 keV, that meant 11.15 keV above the 16+ isomeric level, was mediating the energy release. The direct transition from this level to ground state was observed. Other branches of its decay enhanced the gamma-emission of the ground state band (GSB) members. In the third case, complex electron bridging mechanisms were implied when incident X-ray photons were tuned at energies near the L3 photoionization threshold. Those

  7. Cold exposure rapidly induces virtual saturation of brown adipose tissue nuclear T sub 3 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, A.C.; Silva, J.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1988-10-01

    Cold exposure induces a rapid increase in uncoupling protein (UCP) concentration in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of euthyroid, but not hypothyroid, rats. To normalize this response with exogenous 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), it is necessary to cause systemic hyperthyroidism. In contrast, the same result can be obtained with just replacement doses of thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and, in euthyroid rats, the normal response of UCP to cold occurs without hyperthyroid plasma T{sub 3} levels. Consequently, the authors explored the possibility that the cold-induced activation of the type II 5{prime}-deiodinase resulted in high levels of nuclear T{sub 3} receptor occupancy in euthyroid rats. Studies were performed with pulse injections of tracer T{sub 3} or T{sub 4} in rats exposed to 4{degree}C for different lengths of time (1 h-3 wk). Within 4 h of cold exposure, they observed a significant increase in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from the tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 4} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 4})) and a significant reduction in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 3})). The number of BAT nuclear T{sub 3} receptors did not increase for up to 3 wk of observation at 4{degree}C. The mass of nuclear-bound T{sub 3} was calculated from the nuclear tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 3}) and ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 4}) at equilibrium and the specific activity of serum T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}, respectively. By 4 h after the initiation of the cold exposure, the receptors were >95% occupied and remained so for the 3 weeks of observation. They conclude that the simultaneous activation of the deiodinase with adrenergic BAT stimulation serves the purpose of nearly saturating the nuclear T{sub 3} receptors. This makes possible the realization of the full thermogenic potential of the tissue without causing systemic hyperthyroidism.

  8. Time-Reversal Symmetry Violation in Molecules Induced by Nuclear Magnetic Quadrupole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; DeMille, D.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2014-09-01

    Recent measurements in paramagnetic molecules improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Time-reversal (T) and parity (P) symmetry violation in molecules may also come from their nuclei. We point out that nuclear T, P-odd effects are amplified in paramagnetic molecules containing deformed nuclei, where the primary effects arise from the T, P-odd nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM). We perform calculations of T, P-odd effects in the molecules TaN, ThO, ThF+, HfF+, YbF, HgF, and BaF induced by MQMs. We compare our results with those for the diamagnetic TlF molecule, where the T, P-odd effects are produced by the nuclear Schiff moment. We argue that measurements in molecules with MQMs may provide improved limits on the strength of T, P-odd nuclear forces, on the proton, neutron, and quark EDMs, on quark chromo-EDMs, and on the QCD θ term and CP-violating quark interactions.

  9. Erosion/Corrosion-Induced Pipe Wall Thinning in U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P. C.

    1989-04-01

    Erosion/corrosion in single-phase piping systems was not clearly recognized as a potential safety issue before the pipe rupture incident at the Surry Power Station in December 1986. This incident reminded the nuclear industry and the regulators that neither the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) nor Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code require utilities to monitor erosion/corrosion in the secondary systems of nuclear power plants. This report provides a brief review of the erosion/corrosion phenomenon and its major occurrences in nuclear power plants. In addition, efforts by the NRC, the industry, and the ASME Section XI Committee to address this issue are described. Finally, results of the survey and plant audits conducted by the NRC to assess the extent of erosion/corrosion-induced piping degradation and the status of program implementation regarding erosion/corrosion monitoring are discussed. This report will support a staff recommendation for an additional regulatory requirement concerning erosion/corrosion monitoring.

  10. Nuclear quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li-juan E-mail: juha.vaara@iki.fi; Vaara, Juha E-mail: juha.vaara@iki.fi

    2014-01-14

    Nuclear magneto-optic effects could make important contributions to novel, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution spectroscopic and imaging methods that provide nuclear site-specific structural and dynamic information on molecular and materials systems. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of nuclear quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in terms of response theory, as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations of this phenomenon for a series of molecular liquids: H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, C{sub 6}H{sub 12} (cyclohexane), HI, XeF{sub 2}, WF{sub 5}Cl, and Pt(C{sub 2}dtp){sub 2}. The roles of basis-set convergence, electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. The estimated order of magnitude of the overall ellipticities induced to linearly polarized light is 10{sup −3}–10{sup −7} rad/(M cm) for fully spin polarized nuclei. The cases with the largest presently obtained ellipticities should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt magneto-optic setup, particularly for the heavy nuclei.

  11. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  12. Metazoan Nuclear Pores Provide a Scaffold for Poised Genes and Mediate Induced Enhancer-Promoter Contacts.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Debo, Brian; Aleman, Jennifer R; Talamas, Jessica A; Lan, Yemin; Nguyen, Nha H; Won, Kyoung J; Capelson, Maya

    2017-04-06

    Nuclear pore complex components (Nups) have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, yet what regulatory steps are controlled by metazoan Nups remains unclear. We identified the presence of multiple Nups at promoters, enhancers, and insulators in the Drosophila genome. In line with this binding, we uncovered a functional role for Nup98 in mediating enhancer-promoter looping at ecdysone-inducible genes. These genes were found to be stably associated with nuclear pores before and after activation. Although changing levels of Nup98 disrupted enhancer-promoter contacts, it did not affect ongoing transcription but instead compromised subsequent transcriptional activation or transcriptional memory. In support of the enhancer-looping role, we found Nup98 to gain and retain physical interactions with architectural proteins upon stimulation with ecdysone. Together, our data identify Nups as a class of architectural proteins for enhancers and supports a model in which animal genomes use the nuclear pore as an organizing scaffold for inducible poised genes.

  13. Outer nuclear membrane fusion of adjacent nuclei in varicella-zoster virus-induced syncytia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Lianwei; Huang, Xiumin; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-09-11

    Syncytia formation has been considered important for cell-to-cell spread and pathogenesis of many viruses. As a syncytium forms, individual nuclei often congregate together, allowing close contact of nuclear membranes and possibly fusion to occur. However, there is currently no reported evidence of nuclear membrane fusion between adjacent nuclei in wild-type virus-induced syncytia. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one typical syncytia-inducing virus that causes chickenpox and shingles in humans. Here, we report, for the first time, an interesting observation of apparent fusion of the outer nuclear membranes from juxtaposed nuclei that comprise VZV syncytia both in ARPE-19 human epithelial cells in vitro and in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse model in vivo. This work reveals a novel aspect of VZV-related cytopathic effect in the context of multinucleated syncytia. Additionally, the information provided by this study could be helpful for future studies on interactions of viruses with host cell nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular mechanism by which acyclic retinoid induces nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R; Tatsukawa, H; Shrestha, R; Ishibashi, N; Matsuura, T; Kagechika, H; Kose, S; Hitomi, K; Imamoto, N; Kojima, S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear accumulation of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an important step in TG2-dependent cell death. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for nuclear translocation of TG2 are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that acyclic retinoid (ACR) induced nuclear accumulation of TG2 in JHH-7 cells, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) leading to their apoptosis. We further demonstrated molecular mechanism in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TG2 and an effect of ACR on it. We identified a novel 14-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS) 466AEKEETGMAMRIRV479 in the ‘C' domain and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) 657LHMGLHKL664 in the ‘D' domain that allowed TG2 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic milieu. Increased nuclear import of GAPDH myc-HIS fused with the identified NLS was observed, confirming its nuclear import ability. Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of exportin-1 as well as point mutation of all leucine residues to glutamine residues in the NES of TG2 demolished its nuclear export. TG2 formed a trimeric complex with importin-α and importin-β independently from transamidase activity which strongly suggested the involvement of a NLS-based translocation of TG2 to the nucleus. ACR accelerated the formation of the trimeric complex and that may be at least in part responsible for enhanced nuclear localization of TG2 in HCC cells treated with ACR. PMID:26633708

  15. Parathyroid hormone induces the Nrna family of nuclear orphan receptors in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Pirih, Flavia Q. . E-mail: fqpirih@ucla.edu; Aghaloo, Tara L. . E-mail: taghaloo@ucla.edu; Bezouglaia, Olga . E-mail: obezougl@ucla.edu; Nervina, Jeanne M. . E-mail: jnervina@ucla.edu; Tetradis, Sotirios; E-mail: sotirist@dent.ucla.edu

    2005-07-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone metabolism, although the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are largely unknown. Among the transcription factors induced by Pth in osteoblasts are the nerve growth factor-inducible factor B (NR4A; NGFI-B) family of orphan nuclear receptors: Nurr1, Nur77, and NOR-1. PTH induces NR4A members through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in vitro. We report here that PTH rapidly and transiently induced expression of all three NR4A genes in PTH-target tissues in vivo. In calvaria, long bones, and kidneys, NR4A induction was maximal 0.5-1 h after a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 80 {mu}g/kg PTH. Nur77 demonstrated the highest expression, followed, in order, by Nurr1 and NOR-1. In calvaria and long bone, PTH-induced expression of each NR4A gene was detectable at 10 {mu}g/kg i.p. with maximum induction at 40-80 {mu}g/kg. PTH (3-34) did not induce NR4A mRNA levels in calvaria, long bone, and kidney in vivo, confirming our in vitro results that NR4A genes are induced primarily through the cAMP-PKA pathway. The magnitude of PTH-induced NR4A expression was comparable in vivo and in vitro. However, NR4A mRNA levels peaked and returned to baseline faster in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro, PTH induced NR4A pre-mRNA levels suggesting that induction of these genes is, at least in part, through activation of mRNA synthesis. The in vivo induction of the NR4A family members by PTH suggests their involvement in, at least some, PTH-induced changes in bone metabolism.

  16. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  17. Defect-induced magnetism in SiC probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Dmytriieva, D.; Molatta, S.; Wosnitza, J.; Wang, Yutian; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H.

    2017-02-01

    We give evidence for intrinsic defect-induced bulk paramagnetism in SiC by means of 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the internal dipole-field distribution, probed by the spin part of the NMR Knight shift and the spectral linewidth, follows the Curie law and scales very well with the macroscopic dc susceptibility. In order to quantitatively analyze the NMR spectra, a microscopic model based on dipole-dipole interactions was developed. The very good agreement between these simulations and the NMR data establishes a direct relation between the frequency distribution of the spectral intensity and the corresponding real-space volumes of nuclear spins. The presented approach by NMR can be applied to a variety of similar materials and, thus, opens a new avenue for the microscopic exploration and exploitation of diluted bulk magnetism in semiconductors.

  18. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  19. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel; Watanabe, Sugiko; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Andersen, Jens S

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. Apart from cataloging acetylation sites through SILAC proteomic analyses before IR and at 5 and 60 min after IR exposure of U2OS cells, we report that: (1) key components of the transcriptional machinery, such as EP300 and CREBBP, are dynamically acetylated; (2) that nuclear acetyltransferases themselves are regulated, not on the protein abundance level, but by (de)acetylation; and (3) that the recently reported p53 co-activator and methyltransferase MLL3 is acetylated on five lysines during the DDR. For selected examples, protein immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were used to assess lysine acetylation status and thereby validate the mass spectrometry data. We thus present evidence that nuclear proteins, including those known to regulate cellular functions via epigenetic modifications of histones, are regulated by (de)acetylation in a timely manner upon cell's exposure to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.

  20. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Nuclear Envelope Architecture Using Dual-Color Metal-Induced Energy Transfer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chizhik, Anna M; Ruhlandt, Daja; Pfaff, Janine; Karedla, Narain; Chizhik, Alexey I; Gregor, Ingo; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-09-20

    The nuclear envelope, comprising the inner and the outer nuclear membrane, separates the nucleus from the cytoplasm and plays a key role in cellular functions. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are embedded in the nuclear envelope, control transport of macromolecules between the two compartments. Here, using dual-color metal-induced energy transfer (MIET), we determine the axial distance between Lap2β and Nup358 as markers for the inner nuclear membrane and the cytoplasmic side of the NPC, respectively. Using MIET imaging, we reconstruct the 3D profile of the nuclear envelope over the whole basal area, with an axial resolution of a few nanometers. This result demonstrates that optical microscopy can achieve nanometer axial resolution in biological samples and without recourse to complex interferometric approaches.

  1. Dietary Restriction Induced Longevity Is Mediated by Nuclear Receptor NHR-62 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Heestand, Bree N.; Shen, Yidong; Liu, Wei; Magner, Daniel B.; Storm, Nadia; Meharg, Caroline; Habermann, Bianca; Antebi, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) extends lifespan in a wide variety of species, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans HNF4α-related nuclear hormone receptor NHR-62 is required for metabolic and physiologic responses associated with DR-induced longevity. nhr-62 mediates the longevity of eat-2 mutants, a genetic mimetic of dietary restriction, and blunts the longevity response of DR induced by bacterial food dilution at low nutrient levels. Metabolic changes associated with DR, including decreased Oil Red O staining, decreased triglyceride levels, and increased autophagy are partly reversed by mutation of nhr-62. Additionally, the DR fatty acid profile is altered in nhr-62 mutants. Expression profiles reveal that several hundred genes induced by DR depend on the activity of NHR-62, including a putative lipase required for the DR response. This study provides critical evidence of nuclear hormone receptor regulation of the DR longevity response, suggesting hormonal and metabolic control of life span. PMID:23935515

  2. Decomposition of nuclear response functions for neutrino-induced reactions on 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungjick; Kim, K. S.; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the nuclear response functions in neutrino-induced reaction via a neutral current (NC) on 12C, which functions are comprised of Coulomb, longitudinal, magnetic and electric transitions. Those response functions in the NC reaction are closely related to those extracted from other types of NC reactions by electrons, protons and other light nuclei, such as A( e, e')A *, A( p, p')A *, A( d, d')A *, and A(6Li,6Li')A *. For example, the magnetic response function for the J π = 1+ state (M1) which is associated with the spin transfer reaction can be measured in inelastic scattering and may give us valuable information for the NC neutrino-induced reaction. Therefore, if we exploit response functions deduced by using other nuclear reactions, neutrino reactions could be estimated indirectly without relying on neutrino-induced reaction experiments. For the purpose, in this work, we decompose every response function in the neutrino reaction 12C( ν e , ν' e )12C*( J π = 1+) and address the role of each response function in the reaction.

  3. Nuclear aggregates of polyamines in a radiation-induced DNA damage model.

    PubMed

    Iacomino, Giuseppe; Picariello, Gianluca; Stillitano, Ilaria; D'Agostino, Luciano

    2014-02-01

    Polyamines (PA) are believed to protect DNA minimizing the effect of radiation damage either by inducing DNA compaction and aggregation or acting as scavengers of free radicals. Using an in vitro pDNA double strand breakage assay based on gel electrophoretic mobility, we compared the protective capability of PA against γ-radiation with that of compounds generated by the supramolecular self-assembly of nuclear polyamines and phosphates, named Nuclear Aggregates of Polyamines (NAPs). Both unassembled PA and in vitro produced NAPs (ivNAPs) were ineffective in conferring pDNA protection at the sub-mM concentration. Single PA showed an appreciable protective effect only at high (mM) concentrations. However, concentrations of spermine (4+) within a critical range (0.481 mM) induced pDNA precipitation, an event that was not observed with NAPs-pDNA interaction. We conclude that the interaction of individual PA is ineffective to assure DNA protection, simultaneously preserving the flexibility and charge density of the double strand. Furthermore, data obtained by testing polyamine and ivNAPS with the current radiation-induced DNA damage model support the concept that PA-phosphate aggregates are the only forms through which PA interact with DNA.

  4. β-Amyloid induces nuclear protease-mediated lamin fragmentation independent of caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Vijay Sankar; Islam, Md Imamul; Haque, Md Aminul; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2016-06-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ), a hallmark peptide of Alzheimer's disease, induces both caspase-dependent apoptosis and non-apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined caspase-independent non-apoptotic cell death preceding caspase activation in Aβ42-treated cells. We first determined the optimal treatment conditions for inducing cell death without caspase activation and selected a double-treatment method involving the incubation of cells with Aβ42 for 4 and 6 h (4+6 h sample). We observed that levels of lamin A (LA) and lamin B (LB) were reduced in the 4+6 h samples. This reduction was decreased by treatment with suc-AAPF-CMK, an inhibitor of nuclear scaffold (NS) protease, but not by treatment with z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor. In addition, suc-AAPF-CMK decreased the changes in nuclear morphology observed in cells in the 4+6 h samples, which were different from nuclear fragmentation observed in STS-treated cells. Furthermore, suc-AAPF-CMK inhibited cell death in the 4+6 h samples. LA and LB fragmentation occurred in the isolated nuclei and was also inhibited by suc-AAPF-CMK. Together, these data indicated that the fragmentation of LA and LB in the Aβ42-treated cells was induced by an NS protease, whose identity is not clearly determined yet. A correlation between Aβ42 toxicity and the lamin fragmentation by NS protease suggests that inhibition of the protease could be an effective method for controlling the pathological process of AD.

  5. Pseudorabies Virus pUL46 Induces Activation of ERK1/2 and Regulates Herpesvirus-Induced Nuclear Envelope Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Katharina S.; Liu, XueQiao; Klupp, Barbara G.; Granzow, Harald; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesvirus capsid morphogenesis occurs in the nucleus, while final maturation takes place in the cytosol, requiring translocation of capsids through the nuclear envelope. The nuclear egress complex, consisting of homologs of herpes simplex virus pUL31 and pUL34, is required for efficient nuclear egress via primary envelopment and de-envelopment. Recently, we described an alternative mode of nuclear escape by fragmentation of the nuclear envelope induced by replication-competent pUL31 and pUL34 deletion mutants of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PrV), which had been selected by serial passaging in cell culture. Both passaged viruses carry congruent mutations in seven genes, including UL46, which encodes one of the major tegument proteins. Herpesvirus pUL46 homologs have recently been shown to activate the PI3K-Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, which are involved in regulation of mitosis and apoptosis. Since in uninfected cells fragmentation of the nuclear envelope occurs during mitosis and apoptosis, we analyzed whether pUL46 of PrV is involved in signaling events impairing the integrity of the nuclear envelope. We show here that PrV pUL46 is able to induce phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and, thus, expression of ERK1/2 target genes but fails to activate the PI3K-Akt pathway. Deletion of UL46 from PrV-ΔUL34Pass and PrV-ΔUL31Pass or replacement by wild-type UL46 resulted in enhanced nuclear envelope breakdown, indicating that the mutations in pUL46 may limit the extent of NEBD. Thus, although pUL46 induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation, controlling the integrity of the nuclear envelope is independent of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus nucleocapsids can leave the nucleus by regulated, vesicle-mediated transport through the nuclear envelope, designated nuclear egress, or by inducing nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). The viral proteins involved in NEBD are unknown. We show here that the pseudorabies virus tegument protein pUL46 induces the

  6. Light-Induced Nuclear Synthesis of Spinach Chloroplast Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Ana; Lázaro, Juan José; Gorgé, Julio López

    1984-01-01

    Etiolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var Winter Giant) seedlings show a residual photosynthetic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity, which sharply rises under illumination. This increase in activity is due to a light-induced de novo synthesis, as it has been demonstrated by enzyme labeling experiments with 2H2O and [35S]methionine. The rise of bisphosphatase activity under illumination is strongly inhibited by cycloheximide, but not by the 70S ribosome inhibitor lincocin, which shows the nuclear origin of this chloroplastic enzyme. Images Fig. 3 PMID:16663662

  7. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  8. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  9. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  10. Communication: Nuclear quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in noble gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio

    2013-11-14

    New, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic and imaging methods may be developed by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic effects. A first-principles electronic structure formulation of nuclear electric quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect (NQCME) is presented for closed-shell atoms. In NQCME, aligned quadrupole moments alter the index of refraction of the medium along with and perpendicular to the direction of nuclear alignment. The roles of basis-set convergence, electron correlation, and relativistic effects are investigated for three quadrupolar noble gas isotopes: {sup 21}Ne, {sup 83}Kr, and {sup 131}Xe. The magnitude of the resulting ellipticities is predicted to be 10{sup −4}–10{sup −6} rad/(M cm) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. These should be detectable in the Voigt setup. Particularly interesting is the case of {sup 131}Xe, in which a high degree of spin polarization can be achieved via spin-exchange optical hyperpolarization.

  11. Radiation induced dissolution of UO 2 based nuclear fuel - A critical review of predictive modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Trygve E.; Shoesmith, David W.; Jonsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Radiation induced dissolution of uranium dioxide (UO 2) nuclear fuel and the consequent release of radionuclides to intruding groundwater are key-processes in the safety analysis of future deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. For several decades, these processes have been studied experimentally using both spent fuel and various types of simulated spent fuels. The latter have been employed since it is difficult to draw mechanistic conclusions from real spent nuclear fuel experiments. Several predictive modelling approaches have been developed over the last two decades. These models are largely based on experimental observations. In this work we have performed a critical review of the modelling approaches developed based on the large body of chemical and electrochemical experimental data. The main conclusions are: (1) the use of measured interfacial rate constants give results in generally good agreement with experimental results compared to simulations where homogeneous rate constants are used; (2) the use of spatial dose rate distributions is particularly important when simulating the behaviour over short time periods; and (3) the steady-state approach (the rate of oxidant consumption is equal to the rate of oxidant production) provides a simple but fairly accurate alternative, but errors in the reaction mechanism and in the kinetic parameters used may not be revealed by simple benchmarking. It is essential to use experimentally determined rate constants and verified reaction mechanisms, irrespective of whether the approach is chemical or electrochemical.

  12. Nuclear Spiral Shocks and Induced Gas Inflows in Weak Oval Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear spirals are ubiquitous in galaxy centers. They exist not only in strong barred galaxies but also in galaxies without noticeable bars. We use high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of nuclear gas spirals driven by weak bar-like and oval potentials. The amplitude of the spirals increases toward the center by a geometric effect, readily developing into shocks at small radii even for very weak potentials. The shape of the spirals and shocks depends rather sensitively on the background shear. When shear is low, the nuclear spirals are loosely wound and the shocks are almost straight, resulting in large mass inflows toward the center. When shear is high, on the other hand, the spirals are tightly wound and the shocks are oblique, forming a circumnuclear disk through which gas flows inward at a relatively lower rate. The induced mass inflow rates are enough to power black hole accretion in various types of Seyfert galaxies as well as to drive supersonic turbulence at small radii.

  13. Relation between molecular electronic structure and nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Coriani, Sonia; Sundholm, Dage; Ovchinnikov, Vasily A.; Vaara, Juha

    2017-04-01

    The recently theoretically described nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism (NSCD) is a promising method for the optical detection of nuclear magnetization. NSCD involves both optical excitations of the molecule and hyperfine interactions and, thus, it offers a means to realize a spectroscopy with spatially localized, high-resolution information. To survey the factors relating the molecular and electronic structure to the NSCD signal, we theoretically investigate NSCD of twenty structures of the four most common nucleic acid bases (adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine). The NSCD signal correlates with the spatial distribution of the excited states and couplings between them, reflecting changes in molecular structure and conformation. This constitutes a marked difference to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift, which only reflects the local molecular structure in the ground electronic state. The calculated NSCD spectra are rationalized by means of changes in the electronic density and by a sum-over-states approach, which allows to identify the contributions of the individual excited states. Two separate contributions to NSCD are identified and their physical origins and relative magnitudes are discussed. The results underline NSCD spectroscopy as a plausible tool with a power for the identification of not only different molecules, but their specific structures as well.

  14. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Allman, Steve L; Brice, Deanne Jane; Martin, Rodger Carl; Andre, Nicolas O

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  15. Hyperin inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 signaling pathways in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Sheng; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chang, Yee-Phoung; Chen, Jian-Ming; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Yang, Shyh-Chyun

    2016-11-01

    Hyperin, a flavonoid compound found in Ericaceae, Guttiferae, and Celastraceae, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hyperin on cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in mice. The renal tissue damage induced by cisplatin was detected by H&E staining. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also detected. Further, the effects of hyperin on cisplatin-induced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were detected by ELISA. In addition, the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the expression of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and HO-1 were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that hyperin attenuated histological changes of kidney induced by cisplatin. The levels of BUN, creatinine, ROS, MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 induced by cisplatin were also inhibited by hyperin. Cisplatin-induced NF-κB activation was inhibited by hyperin. Additionally, hyperin was found to up regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. In conclusion, the results suggest that hyperin protects against cisplatin-induced AKI by inhibiting inflammatory and oxidant response.

  16. DNA damage induces nuclear actin filament assembly by Formin-2 and Spire-1/2 that promotes efficient DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Brittany J; Lee, Terri; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments assemble inside the nucleus in response to multiple cellular perturbations, including heat shock, protein misfolding, integrin engagement, and serum stimulation. We find that DNA damage also generates nuclear actin filaments—detectable by phalloidin and live-cell actin probes—with three characteristic morphologies: (i) long, nucleoplasmic filaments; (ii) short, nucleolus-associated filaments; and (iii) dense, nucleoplasmic clusters. This DNA damage-induced nuclear actin assembly requires two biologically and physically linked nucleation factors: Formin-2 and Spire-1/Spire-2. Formin-2 accumulates in the nucleus after DNA damage, and depletion of either Formin-2 or actin's nuclear import factor, importin-9, increases the number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), linking nuclear actin filaments to efficient DSB clearance. Nuclear actin filaments are also required for nuclear oxidation induced by acute genotoxic stress. Our results reveal a previously unknown role for nuclear actin filaments in DNA repair and identify the molecular mechanisms creating these nuclear filaments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07735.001 PMID:26287480

  17. Gastrin Induces Nuclear Export and Proteasome Degradation of Menin in Enteric Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Meininger, Cameron A; Kang, Anthony J; Photenhauer, Amanda L; Hayes, Michael M; Sahoo, Nirakar; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Ding, Lin; Giordano, Thomas J; Else, Tobias; Madrigal, David J; Low, Malcolm J; Campbell, Fiona; Baker, Ann-Marie; Xu, Haoxing; Wright, Nicholas A; Merchant, Juanita L

    2017-08-28

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (MEN1) locus encodes the nuclear protein and tumor suppressor menin. MEN1 mutations frequently cause neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) such as gastrinomas, characterized by their predominant duodenal location and local metastasis at time of diagnosis. Diffuse gastrin cell hyperplasia precedes the appearance of MEN1 gastrinomas, which develop within submucosal Brunner's glands. We investigated how menin regulates expression of the gastrin gene and induces generation of submucosal gastrin-expressing cell hyperplasia. Primary enteric glial cultures were generated from the VillinCre:Men(1FL/FL):Sst(-/-) mice or C57BL/6 mice (controls), with or without inhibition of gastric acid by omeprazole. Primary enteric glial cells from VillinCre:Men1FL/FL:Sst(+/+) mice were incubated with gastrin and separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Cells were incubated with forskolin and H89 to activate or inhibit protein kinase A (a family of enzymes whose activity depends on cellular levels of cyclic AMP). Gastrin was measured in blood, tissue, and cell cultures using an ELISA. Immunoprecipitation with menin or ubiquitin was used to demonstrate post-translational modification of menin. Primary glial cells were incubated with leptomycin b and MG132 to block nuclear export and proteasome activity, respectively. We obtained human duodenal, lymph node, and pancreatic gastrinoma samples, collected from patients who underwent surgery from 1996 through 2007 in the United States or the United Kingdom. Enteric glial cells that stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP+) expressed gastrin de novo through a mechanism that required PKA. Gastrin-induced nuclear export of menin via cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR)-mediated activation of PKA. Once exported from the nucleus, menin was ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. GFAP and other markers of enteric glial cells, e.g., p75 and S100B, colocalized with gastrin in human duodenal

  18. Chirality-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance effects induced by indirect spin-spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, P.; Buckingham, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    It is predicted that, for two spin-1/2 nuclei coupled by indirect spin-spin coupling in a chiral molecule, chirality-sensitive induced electric polarization can be observed at the frequencies equal to the sum and difference between the spin resonance frequencies. Also, an electric field oscillating at the difference frequency can induce spin coherences which allow the direct discrimination between enantiomers by nuclear magnetic resonance. The dominant contribution to the magnitude of these expected chiral effects is proportional to the permanent electric dipole moment and to the antisymmetric part of the indirect spin-spin coupling tensor of the chiral molecule. Promising compounds for experimental tests of the predictions are derivatives of 1,3-difluorocyclopropene.

  19. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2013-03-15

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  20. Dioxin induces a novel nuclear factor, DIF-3, that is implicated in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, T; Oikawa, K; Iwata, R; Kameta, A; Evine, K; Isobe, T; Matsuda, Y; Mimura, J; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Kuroda, M; Mukai, K

    2001-11-23

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; dioxin), a member of a class of environmental pollutants represented by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, is one of the most toxic artificial compounds ever developed. In this study, we identified a novel TCDD target gene, DIF-3 (dioxin inducible factor-3), by cDNA representational difference analysis. DIF-3 protein is a nuclear factor and possesses a zinc-finger motif at its N-terminus. High DIF-3 mRNA expression in the testes was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis and abundant DIF-3 protein was detected during spermatogenesis. Thus, these results suggest that DIF-3 may be a target gene mediating the reproductive toxicity induced by TCDD.

  1. Chirality-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance effects induced by indirect spin-spin coupling.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, P; Buckingham, A D

    2016-11-28

    It is predicted that, for two spin-1/2 nuclei coupled by indirect spin-spin coupling in a chiral molecule, chirality-sensitive induced electric polarization can be observed at the frequencies equal to the sum and difference between the spin resonance frequencies. Also, an electric field oscillating at the difference frequency can induce spin coherences which allow the direct discrimination between enantiomers by nuclear magnetic resonance. The dominant contribution to the magnitude of these expected chiral effects is proportional to the permanent electric dipole moment and to the antisymmetric part of the indirect spin-spin coupling tensor of the chiral molecule. Promising compounds for experimental tests of the predictions are derivatives of 1,3-difluorocyclopropene.

  2. Detection and estimation of magnetization induced resonances in unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N.; Bulu, I.; Song, Y. Q.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    In this work a systematic identification of factors contributing to signal ringing in unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors is conducted. Resonant peaks that originate due to multiple factors such as NMR, electrical, magneto-acoustic, core material response, eddy currents and other factors were observed. The peaks caused by the measurement system or electrical resonances and induced magnet vibrations are further analyzed. They appear in every measurement and are considered as interference to signals received from the magnetic core. Forming a distinction between different peaks is essential in identifying the primary contribution to the captured resonant signal. The measurements for the magnetic core indicate that the magnetization induced resonant peaks of the core have relatively higher amplitudes and shorter decay times at low frequencies.

  3. Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene 1 Protein (RIG1)-Like Receptor Pathway Is Required for Efficient Nuclear Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Nazish; Ospino, Frank; Himmati, Farhan; Lee, Jieun; Chanda, Palas; Mocarski, Edward S; Cooke, John P

    2017-05-01

    We have revealed a critical role for innate immune signaling in nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency, and in the nuclear reprogramming required for somatic cell transdifferentiation. Activation of innate immune signaling causes global changes in the expression and activity of epigenetic modifiers to promote epigenetic plasticity. In our previous articles, we focused on the role of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in this signaling pathway. Here, we define the role of another innate immunity pathway known to participate in response to viral RNA, the retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 receptor (RIG-1)-like receptor (RLR) pathway. This pathway is represented by the sensors of viral RNA, RIG-1, LGP2, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5). We first found that TLR3 deficiency only causes a partial inhibition of nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency in mouse tail-tip fibroblasts, which motivated us to determine the contribution of RLR. We found that knockdown of interferon beta promoter stimulator 1, the common adaptor protein for the RLR family, substantially reduced nuclear reprogramming induced by retroviral or by modified messenger RNA expression of Oct 4, Sox2, KLF4, and c-MYC (OSKM). Importantly, a double knockdown of both RLR and TLR3 pathway led to a further decrease in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colonies suggesting an additive effect of both these pathways on nuclear reprogramming. Furthermore, in murine embryonic fibroblasts expressing a doxycycline (dox)-inducible cassette of the genes encoding OSKM, an RLR agonist increased the yield of iPSCs. Similarly, the RLR agonist enhanced nuclear reprogramming by cell permeant peptides of the Yamanaka factors. Finally, in the dox-inducible system, RLR activation promotes activating histone marks in the promoter region of pluripotency genes. To conclude, innate immune signaling mediated by RLR plays a critical role in nuclear reprogramming. Manipulation of innate immune signaling may facilitate

  4. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-05

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard.

  5. Role of nuclear factor-kappaB in interleukin-1-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Fukuda, Ken; Li, Qin; Kumagai, Naoki; Nishida, Teruo

    2006-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 is implicated in corneal ulceration. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB in the IL-1-induced degradation of collagen by corneal fibroblasts that underlies corneal ulceration was investigated. Rabbit corneal fibroblasts were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen with or without IL-1 and sulfasalazine, an inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation. Collagen degradation was assessed from the amount of hydroxyproline generated by acid-heat hydrolysis of culture supernatants. The release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) into culture supernatants was examined by immunoblot analysis and gelatin zymography, and the cellular abundance of MMP and TIMP mRNAs was determined by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The phosphorylation and degradation of the NF-kappaB-inhibitory protein IkappaB-alpha were examined by immunoblot analysis. The subcellular localization and DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB were evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis and with a colorimetric assay, respectively. The transactivation activity of NF-kappaB was assessed with a reporter gene assay. Sulfasalazine inhibited IL-1-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts in a concentration-dependent manner. It also inhibited the stimulatory effects of IL-1 on the synthesis or activation of various MMPs in a concentration-dependent manner. IL-1 induced the phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha, the nuclear translocation and up-regulation of the DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB, and the activation of NF-kappaB in a manner sensitive to sulfasalazine. These results suggest that NF-kappaB contributes to the IL-1-induced degradation of collagen by corneal fibroblasts and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for treatment of corneal ulcers.

  6. Autophagy-mediated degradation of nuclear envelope proteins during oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Christelle; Gusyatiner, Olga; Douma, Sirith; van den Broek, Bram; Peeper, Daniel S

    2015-11-01

    Cellular senescence is a largely irreversible form of cell cycle arrest triggered by various types of damage and stress, including oncogene expression (termed oncogene-induced senescence or OIS). We and others have previously demonstrated that OIS occurs in human benign lesions, acting as a potent tumor suppressor mechanism. Numerous phenotypic changes occur during OIS, both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. These include the activation of autophagy, a catabolic process operating in the cytoplasm and downregulation of lamin B1, a component of the nuclear lamina. However, it is unknown whether these changes relate to each other. We discovered that cells entering BRAF(V600E)- or H-RAS(G12V)-induced senescence downregulate not only lamin B1 but also lamin A, as well as several other nuclear envelope (NE) proteins, resulting in an altered NE morphology. Depletion of LMNB1 or LMNA/C was sufficient to recapitulate some OIS features, including cell cycle exit and downregulation of NE proteins. We further found that the global loss of NE proteins is a consequence of their degradation by the autophagy machinery, which occurs concomitantly with autophagy induction and increased lysosomal content and activity. Our study therefore reveals a previously unknown connection between autophagy and the disruption of NE integrity during OIS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Nuclear Receptor-Induced Chromosomal Proximity and DNA Breaks Underlie Specific Translocations in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Tanasa, Bogdan; Hutt, Kasey; Ju, Bong-gun; Ohgi, Kenny; Zhang, Jie; Rose, Dave; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Glass, Christopher K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of leukemia/lymphoma and also appear in solid tumors, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. By establishing a cellular model that mimics the relative frequency of authentic translocation events without proliferation selection, we report mechanisms of nuclear receptor-dependent tumor translocations. Intronic binding of liganded-AR first juxtaposes translocation loci by triggering intra- and interchromosomal interactions. AR then promotes site-specific DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) at translocation loci by recruiting two types of enzymatic machinery induced by genotoxic stress and liganded-AR, including Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) and the LINE-1 repeat-encoded ORF2 endonuclease. These enzymatic machineries synergistically generate site-selective DSBs at juxtaposed translocation loci that are ligated by Non-Homologous Ending Joining (NHEJ) pathway for specific translocations. Our data suggest that the confluence of two parallel pathways initiated by liganded-nuclear receptor and genotoxic stress underlie non-random tumor translocations, which may function in many types of tumors and pathological processes. PMID:19962179

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  9. ATM induces MacroD2 nuclear export upon DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Golia, Barbara; Moeller, Giuliana Katharina; Jankevicius, Gytis; Schmidt, Andreas; Hegele, Anna; Preißer, Julia; Tran, Mai Ly; Imhof, Axel; Timinszky, Gyula

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a dynamic post-translation modification that regulates the early phase of various DNA repair pathways by recruiting repair factors to chromatin. ADP-ribosylation levels are defined by the activities of specific transferases and hydrolases. However, except for the transferase PARP1/ARDT1 little is known about regulation of these enzymes. We found that MacroD2, a mono-ADP-ribosylhydrolase, is exported from the nucleus upon DNA damage, and that this nuclear export is induced by ATM activity. We show that the export is dependent on the phosphorylation of two SQ/TQ motifs, suggesting a novel direct interaction between ATM and ADP-ribosylation. Lastly, we show that MacroD2 nuclear export temporally restricts its recruitment to DNA lesions, which may decrease the net ADP-ribosylhydrolase activity at the site of DNA damage. Together, our results identify a novel feedback regulation between two crucial DNA damage-induced signaling pathways: ADP-ribosylation and ATM activation. PMID:28069995

  10. MicroRNA-375 Is Induced in Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity to Repress Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-β.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jielu; Lou, Qiang; Wei, Qingqing; Mei, Shuqin; Li, Lin; Wu, Guangyu; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Mei, Changlin; Dong, Zheng

    2017-03-17

    Nephrotoxicity is a major adverse effect of cisplatin-mediated chemotherapy in cancer patients. The pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remains largely unclear, making it difficult to design effective renoprotective approaches. Here, we have examined the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. We show that cisplatin nephrotoxicity was not affected by overall depletion of both beneficial and detrimental miRNAs from kidney proximal tubular cells in mice in which the miRNA-generating enzyme Dicer had been conditionally knocked out. To identify miRNAs involved in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, we used microarray analysis to profile miRNA expression and identified 47 up-regulated microRNAs and 20 down-regulated microRNAs in kidney cortical tissues. One up-regulated miRNA was miR-375, whose expression was also induced in cisplatin-treated renal tubular cells. Interestingly, inhibition of miR-375 decreased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that miR-375 is a cell-damaging or pro-apoptotic agent. Blockade of P53 or NF-κB attenuated cisplatin-induced miR-375 expression, supporting a role of P53 and NF-κB in miR-375 induction. We also identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF-1β) as a key downstream target of miR-375. Of note, we further demonstrated that HNF-1β protected renal cells against cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that upon cisplatin exposure, P53 and NF-κB collaboratively induce miR-375 expression, which, in turn, represses HNF-1β activity, resulting in renal tubular cell apoptosis and nephrotoxicity.

  11. Oxidative Stress Induces Persistent Telomeric DNA Damage Responsible for Nuclear Morphology Change in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Elisa; Colamartino, Monica; Cozzi, Renata; Leone, Stefano; Meneghini, Carlo; O’Callaghan, Nathan; Sgura, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    One main function of telomeres is to maintain chromosome and genome stability. The rate of telomere shortening can be accelerated significantly by chemical and physical environmental agents. Reactive oxygen species are a source of oxidative stress and can produce modified bases (mainly 8-oxoG) and single strand breaks anywhere in the genome. The high incidence of guanine residues in telomeric DNA sequences makes the telomere a preferred target for oxidative damage. Our aim in this work is to evaluate whether chromosome instability induced by oxidative stress is related specifically to telomeric damage. We treated human primary fibroblasts (MRC-5) in vitro with hydrogen peroxide (100 and 200 µM) for 1 hr and collected data at several time points. To evaluate the persistence of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage up to 24 hrs after treatment, we analysed telomeric and genomic oxidative damage by qPCR and a modified comet assay, respectively. The results demonstrate that the genomic damage is completely repaired, while the telomeric oxidative damage persists. The analysis of telomere length reveals a significant telomere shortening 48 hrs after treatment, leading us to hypothesise that residual telomere damage could be responsible for the telomere shortening observed. Considering the influence of telomere length modulation on genomic stability, we quantified abnormal nuclear morphologies (Nucleoplasmic Bridges, Nuclear Buds and Micronuclei) and observed an increase of chromosome instability in the same time frame as telomere shortening. At subsequent times (72 and 96 hrs), we observed a restoration of telomere length and a reduction of chromosome instability, leaving us to conjecture a correlation between telomere shortening/dysfunction and chromosome instability. We can conclude that oxidative base damage leads to abnormal nuclear morphologies and that telomere dysfunction is an important contributor to this effect. PMID:25354277

  12. The kinesin-like protein TOP promotes Aurora localisation and induces mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear division.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yamato; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Imoto, Yuuta; Yoshida, Masaki; Ohnuma, Mio; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Misumi, Osami; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kato, Shoichi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2013-06-01

    The cell cycle usually refers to the mitotic cycle, but the cell-division cycle in the plant kingdom consists of not only nuclear but also mitochondrial and chloroplast division cycle. However, an integrated control system that initiates division of the three organelles has not been found. We report that a novel C-terminal kinesin-like protein, three-organelle division-inducing protein (TOP), controls nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast divisions in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. A proteomics study revealed that TOP is a member of a complex of mitochondrial-dividing (MD) and plastid-dividing (PD) machineries (MD/PD machinery complex) just prior to constriction. After TOP localizes at the MD/PD machinery complex, mitochondrial and chloroplast divisions occur and the components of the MD/PD machinery complexes are phosphorylated. Furthermore, we found that TOP downregulation impaired both mitochondrial and chloroplast divisions. MD/PD machinery complexes were formed normally at each division site but they were neither phosphorylated nor constricted in these cells. Immunofluorescence signals of Aurora kinase (AUR) were localized around the MD machinery before constriction, whereas AUR was dispersed in the cytosol by TOP downregulation, suggesting that AUR is required for the constriction. Taken together our results suggest that TOP induces phosphorylation of MD/PD machinery components to accomplish mitochondrial and chloroplast divisions prior to nuclear division, by relocalization of AUR. In addition, given the presence of TOP homologs throughout the eukaryotes, and the involvement of TOP in mitochondrial and chloroplast division may illuminate the original function of C-terminal kinesin-like proteins.

  13. Moraxella catarrhalis induces mast cell activation and nuclear factor kappa B-dependent cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, G; Martin, R; Walker, E; Li, C; Hossler, F; Hall, K; Chi, D S

    2003-01-01

    Human mast cells are often found perivascularly and at mucosal sites and may play crucial roles in the inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested a prominent role for mast cells in host defense. In this study, we analyzed the effects of a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, on activation of human mast cells. Human mast cell leukemia cells (HMC-1) were activated with either phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore or with varying concentrations of heat-killed suspensions of bacteria. Supernatants were assayed for the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-6, IL-8, IL-13 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Nuclear proteins were isolated and assayed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) nuclear binding activity. In some experiments, NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay-11 was added to determine functional significance. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induced mast cell activation and selective secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1. This was accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Neither spun bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced cytokine secretion, suggesting need for direct bacterial contact with mast cells. Scanning electron microscopy revealed active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces. The NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay-11, inhibited expression of MCP-1. These findings suggest the possibility of direct interactions between human mast cells and common bacteria and provide evidence for a novel role for human mast cells in innate immunity.

  14. Characterization of X-ray-induced immunostaining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Masahiko; Sasaki, Takehito; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    1996-01-01

    The repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage related to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts by an indirect immunofluorescence method. PCNA staining induced by X rays was lost after DNase I treatment but not after RNase treatment. The staining was not induced when ATP was depleted or the temperature was lowered to 0{degrees}C during the X irradiation. When cells were incubated at 37{degrees}C after X irradiation, PCNA staining diminished gradually and was almost entirely absent 12-15 h later. On the other hand, PCNA staining persisted during aphidicolin treatment even 20 h after X irradiation. Induction of PCNA staining was not affected by the aphidicolin treatment. Cycloheximide treatment did not affect induction of the staining either, but did inhibit the disappearance of the staining. There was no difference in the staining pattern and time course of PCNA staining after X irradiation between normal and xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) cells. These results imply that PCNA-dependent, aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases may be involved in repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage in vivo, but the repair initiation step could be different from that of nucleotide excision repair initiated by XP proteins. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Heterodimeric interaction between retinoid X receptor alpha and orphan nuclear receptor OR1 reveals dimerization-induced activation as a novel mechanism of nuclear receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebel, F F; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    OR1 is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily which has been described to mediate transcriptional responses to retinoids and oxysterols. On a DR4 response element, an OR1 heterodimer with the nuclear receptor retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) has been described to convey transcriptional activation in both the absence and presence of the RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid, the mechanisms of which have remained unclear. Here, we dissect the effects of RXR alpha and OR1 ligand-binding domain interaction on transcriptional regulation and the role of the respective carboxy-terminal activation domains (AF-2s) in the absence and presence of the RXR ligand, employing chimeras of the nuclear receptors containing the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain as well as natural receptors. The results show that the interaction of the RXR and OR1 ligand-binding domains unleashes a transcription activation potential that is mainly dependent on the AF-2 of OR1, indicating that interaction with RXR activates OR1. This defines dimerization-induced activation as a novel function of heterodimeric interaction and mechanism of receptor activation not previously described for nuclear receptors. Moreover, we present evidence that activation of OR1 occurs by a conformational change induced upon heterodimerization with RXR. PMID:9199332

  16. Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Methylation Patterns Induced by Valproic Acid in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Jarno E J; van Breda, Simone G J; Caiment, Florian; Claessen, Sandra M; de Kok, Theo M C M; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2017-09-13

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely prescribed antiepileptic drugs in the world. Despite its pharmacological importance, it may cause liver toxicity and steatosis through mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study is to further investigate VPA-induced mechanisms of steatosis by analyzing changes in patterns of methylation in nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Therefore, primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) were exposed to an incubation concentration of VPA that was shown to cause steatosis without inducing overt cytotoxicity. VPA was administered daily for 5 days, and this was followed by a 3 day washout (WO). Methylated DNA regions (DMRs) were identified by using the methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq) method. The nDNA DMRs after VPA treatment could indeed be classified into oxidative stress- and steatosis-related pathways. In particular, networks of the steatosis-related gene EP300 provided novel insight into the mechanisms of toxicity induced by VPA treatment. Furthermore, we suggest that VPA induces a crosstalk between nDNA hypermethylation and mtDNA hypomethylation that plays a role in oxidative stress and steatosis development. Although most VPA-induced methylation patterns appeared reversible upon terminating VPA treatment, 31 nDNA DMRs (including 5 zinc finger protein genes) remained persistent after the WO period. Overall, we have shown that MeDIP-seq analysis is highly informative in disclosing novel mechanisms of VPA-induced toxicity in PHHs. Our results thus provide a prototype for the novel generation of interesting methylation biomarkers for repeated dose liver toxicity in vitro.

  17. Overexpression of nuclear receptor SHP in adipose tissues affects diet-induced obesity and adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tabbi-Anneni, Imene; Cooksey, Robert; Gunda, Viswanath; Liu, Shiguo; Mueller, Aubrey; Song, Guisheng; McClain, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP) regulates metabolic pathways involved in hepatic bile acid production and both lipid and glucose homeostasis via the transcriptional repression of other nuclear receptors. In the present study, we generated fat-specific SHP-overexpressed transgenic (TG) mice and determined the potential role of SHP activation, specifically in adipocytes, in the regulation of adipose tissue function in response to stressors. We determined in 2 mo-old SHP TG mice body weight, fat mass index, adipose tissues morphology, thermogenic and metabolic gene expression, metabolic rates at baseline and in response to β adrenergic receptor agonists, and brown fat ultrastructural changes in response to cold exposure (6–48 h). Mice were fed a 10-wk high-fat diet (HFD; 42% fat). Weight gain, fat mass index, adipose tissues morphology, glucose tolerance, and metabolic rates were determined at the end of the feeding. Young TG mice had increased body weight and adiposity; however, their energy metabolism was increased and brown fat function was enhanced in response to cold exposure through the activation of thermogenic genes and mitochondrial biogenesis. SHP overexpression exacerbated the diet-induced obesity phenotype as evidence by marked weight gain over time, increased adiposity, and severe glucose intolerance compared with wild-type mice fed a HFD. In addition, SHP-TG mice fed HFD had decreased diet-induced adaptive thermogenesis, increased food intake, and decreased physical activity. In conclusion, SHP activation in adipocytes strongly affects weight gain and diet-induced obesity. Developing a synthetic compound to antagonize the effect of SHP may prove to be useful in treating obesity. PMID:20124506

  18. Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Lang, Maik; Tracy, Cameron L.; Palomares, Raul I.; ...

    2015-05-01

    Recent efforts to characterize the nanoscale structural and chemical modifications induced by energetic ion irradiation in nuclear materials have greatly benefited from the application of synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. Key to the study of actinide-bearing materials has been the use of small sample volumes, which are particularly advantageous, as the small quantities minimize the level of radiation exposure at the ion-beam and synchrotron user facility. This approach utilizes energetic heavy ions (energy range: 100 MeV–3 GeV) that pass completely through the sample thickness and deposit an almost constant energy per unit length along theirmore » trajectory. High energy x-rays (25–65 keV) from intense synchrotron light sources are then used in transmission geometry to analyze ion-induced structural and chemical modifications throughout the ion tracks. We describe in detail the experimental approach for utilizing synchrotron radiation (SR) to study the radiation response of a range of nuclear materials (e.g., ThO2 and Gd2TixZr2–xO7). Also addressed is the use of high-pressure techniques, such as the heatable diamond anvil cell, as a new means to expose irradiated materials to well-controlled high-temperature (up to 1000 °C) and/or high-pressure (up to 50 GPa) conditions. Furthermore, this is particularly useful for characterizing the annealing kinetics of irradiation-induced material modifications.« less

  19. Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Maik; Tracy, Cameron L.; Palomares, Raul I.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Severin, Daniel; Bender, Markus; Trautmann, Christina; Park, Changyong; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Skuratov, Vladimir A.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-05-01

    Recent efforts to characterize the nanoscale structural and chemical modifications induced by energetic ion irradiation in nuclear materials have greatly benefited from the application of synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. Key to the study of actinide-bearing materials has been the use of small sample volumes, which are particularly advantageous, as the small quantities minimize the level of radiation exposure at the ion-beam and synchrotron user facility. This approach utilizes energetic heavy ions (energy range: 100 MeV–3 GeV) that pass completely through the sample thickness and deposit an almost constant energy per unit length along their trajectory. High energy x-rays (25–65 keV) from intense synchrotron light sources are then used in transmission geometry to analyze ion-induced structural and chemical modifications throughout the ion tracks. We describe in detail the experimental approach for utilizing synchrotron radiation (SR) to study the radiation response of a range of nuclear materials (e.g., ThO2 and Gd2TixZr2–xO7). Also addressed is the use of high-pressure techniques, such as the heatable diamond anvil cell, as a new means to expose irradiated materials to well-controlled high-temperature (up to 1000 °C) and/or high-pressure (up to 50 GPa) conditions. Furthermore, this is particularly useful for characterizing the annealing kinetics of irradiation-induced material modifications.

  20. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  1. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA.

  2. Comparison of Cell and Nuclear Size Difference between Diploid and Induced Triploid in Marine Medaka, Oryzias dancena.

    PubMed

    Goo, In Bon; Im, Jae Hyun; Gil, Hyun Woo; Lim, Sang Gu; Park, In-Seok

    2015-09-01

    The influence of triploidization on cell and nucleus size characteristics of the same tissues of erythrocyte, retina, kidney, hepatocyte and midgut epithelium in marine medaka, Oryzias dancena has been determined histologically. Induced triploid fish are produced by cold shock treatments. Likewise, the size of horizontal cell nucleus in inner nuclear layer of retina, ganglion cell nucleus in ganglion cell layer of retina, proximal tubule cell of kidney, hepatocytes and nuclear height of midgut epithelium all appear to be significantly larger than diploid (p<0.05). On the other hand, retina thickness is larger in diploid than induced triploid (p<0.05). Induced triploid shows low density of cell number. Results of this study suggest that same characteristics in the induced triploid exhibiting larger cells and nucleus sizes with fewer number of cells than the diploid can be useful criteria for the distinction between diploid and induced triploid, and also the ploidy level in marine medaka.

  3. Comparison of Cell and Nuclear Size Difference between Diploid and Induced Triploid in Marine Medaka, Oryzias dancena

    PubMed Central

    Goo, In Bon; Im, Jae Hyun; Gil, Hyun Woo; Lim, Sang Gu; Park, In-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The influence of triploidization on cell and nucleus size characteristics of the same tissues of erythrocyte, retina, kidney, hepatocyte and midgut epithelium in marine medaka, Oryzias dancena has been determined histologically. Induced triploid fish are produced by cold shock treatments. Likewise, the size of horizontal cell nucleus in inner nuclear layer of retina, ganglion cell nucleus in ganglion cell layer of retina, proximal tubule cell of kidney, hepatocytes and nuclear height of midgut epithelium all appear to be significantly larger than diploid (p<0.05). On the other hand, retina thickness is larger in diploid than induced triploid (p<0.05). Induced triploid shows low density of cell number. Results of this study suggest that same characteristics in the induced triploid exhibiting larger cells and nucleus sizes with fewer number of cells than the diploid can be useful criteria for the distinction between diploid and induced triploid, and also the ploidy level in marine medaka. PMID:27004269

  4. Arsenic-induced PML targeting onto nuclear bodies: Implications for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Koken, Marcel H. M.; Quignon, Frédérique; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Degos, Laurent; Wang, Zhen Yi; Chen, Zhu; de Thé, Hugues

    1997-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is associated with the t(15;17) translocation, which generates a PML/RARα fusion protein between PML, a growth suppressor localized on nuclear matrix-associated bodies, and RARα, a nuclear receptor for retinoic acid (RA). PML/RARα was proposed to block myeloid differentiation through inhibition of nuclear receptor response, as does a dominant negative RARα mutant. In addition, in APL cells, PML/RARα displaces PML and other nuclear body (NB) antigens onto nuclear microspeckles, likely resulting in the loss of PML and/or NB functions. RA leads to clinical remissions through induction of terminal differentiation, for which the respective contributions of RARα (or PML/RARα) activation, PML/RARα degradation, and restoration of NB antigens localization are poorly determined. Arsenic trioxide also leads to remissions in APL patients, presumably through induction of apoptosis. We demonstrate that in non-APL cells, arsenic recruits the nucleoplasmic form of several NB antigens onto NB, but induces the degradation of PML only, identifying a powerful tool to approach NB function. In APL cells, arsenic targets PML and PML/RARα onto NB and induces their degradation. Thus, RA and arsenic target RARα and PML, respectively, but both induce the degradation of the PML/RARα fusion protein, which should contribute to their therapeutic effects. The difference in the cellular events triggered by these two agents likely stems from RA-induced transcriptional activation and arsenic effects on NB proteins. PMID:9108090

  5. The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Sugai, Manabu; Mori, Kentaro; Yokota, Yoshifumi

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Sodium arsenite induces cytoplasmic accumulation of Id3. •Arsenite binds to closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3. •N-terminal cysteines are essential for arsenite-induced nuclear export of Id3. •Nuclear export of Id3 counteracts its transcriptional repression activity. -- Abstract: Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite.

  6. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor induces phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shawver, L.K.; Pierce, G.F.; Kawahara, R.S.; Deuel, T.F.

    1989-01-15

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulated the phosphorylation of a nuclear protein of 64 kDa (pp64) in nuclei of nontransformed normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. Low levels of phosphorylation of pp64 were observed in nuclei of serum-starved NRK cells. Fetal calf serum (FCS), PDGF, and homodimeric v-sis and PDGF A-chain protein enhanced the incorporation of 32P into pp64 over 4-fold within 30 min and over 8-fold within 2 h of exposure of NRK cells to the growth factors. In contrast, constitutive phosphorylation of 32P-labeled pp64 in nuclei of NRK cells transformed by the simian sarcoma virus (SSV) was high and only minimally stimulated by PDGF and FCS. 32P-Labeled pp64 was isolated from nuclei of PDGF-stimulated nontransformed NRK cells; the 32P of pp64 was labile in 1 M KOH, and pp64 was not significantly recognized by anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that the PDGF-induced phosphorylation of pp64 occurred on serine or on threonine residues. However, pp64 from SSV-transformed NRK cell nuclei was significantly stable to base hydrolysis and was immunoprecipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that pp64 from SSV-transformed cell nuclei is phosphorylated also on tyrosine. FCS, PDGF, and PDGF A- and B-chain homodimers thus stimulate the rapid time-dependent phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein shortly after stimulation of responsive cells. The growth factor-stimulated phosphorylation of pp64 and the constitutive high levels of pp64 phosphorylation in cells transformed by SSV suggest important roles for pp64 and perhaps regulated nuclear protein kinases and phosphatases in cell division and proliferation.

  8. The nuclear receptor and clock gene REV-ERBα regulates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Rashid, Kahkashan; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-09-30

    REV-ERBα is a nuclear heme receptor, transcriptional repressor and critical component of the molecular clock that drives daily rhythms of metabolism. Evidence reveals that REV-ERBα also plays an important regulatory role in clock-dependent lung physiology and inflammatory responses. We hypothesize that cigarette smoke (CS) exposure influences REV-ERBα abundance in the lungs, facilitating a pro-inflammatory phenotype. To determine the impact of REV-ERBα activation in the CS-induced inflammatory response we treated primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) with CS extract (CSE) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the absence or presence of pre-treatment with the REV-ERBα agonist GSK 4112. We also exposed adult C57BL/6J (WT) and Rev-erbα global KO mice to CS (10 and 30 days) and measured pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Our data reveal that pre-treatment with GSK 4112 reduced CSE/LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines release from both SAECs and mouse lung fibroblasts (MLFs). Furthermore, REV-ERBα KO mice show a greater inflammatory response to 10 and 30 days of CS, including increased neutrophil lung influx, pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, MCP-1 and KC) release, and pro-senescence marker (p16) when compared to WT mice. These data demonstrate that REV-ERBα is a critical regulator of CS-induced lung inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-12-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A {approx_equal} 182 region, structure of {sup 182}Hg and {sup 182}Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm and the anomalous h{sub 11/2} proton crossing in the A{approximately}135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier {alpha} particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4{pi} channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  10. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. [Dept. of Chemistry, Washington Univ. , St. Louis, Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A [approx equal] 182 region, structure of [sup 182]Hg and [sup 182]Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in [sup 136]Pm and the anomalous h[sub 11/2] proton crossing in the A[approximately]135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier [alpha] particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative [sup 209]Bi + [sup 136]Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4[pi] channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  11. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M. N.; Hamm, R. W.; Adler, R. J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-12-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery — with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use and innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data is also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in "nested"-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  12. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, B.; Hamm, R. W.; Adler, R. J.; Glatstein, E.; Horn, K. M.; Segal, M. N.

    1995-12-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery - with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use and innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data is also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in 'nested'-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output He3e and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.>

  13. Network Analysis of Transcription Factors for Nuclear Reprogramming into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Using Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; S.Roy, Sanjiban; J.Hsu, Minna; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Research related to induce pluripotent stem (iPS) cell generation has increased rapidly in recent years. Six transcription factors, namely OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, KLF4, NANOG, and LIN28 have been widely used for iPS cell generation. As there is a lack of data on intra- and inter-networking among these six different transcription factors, the objective of this study is to analyze the intra- and inter-networks between them using bioinformatics. Materials and Methods: In this computational biology study, we used AminoNet, MATLAB to examine networking between the six different transcription factors. The directed network was constructed using MATLAB programming and the distance between nodes was estimated using a phylogram. The protein-protein interactions between the nuclear reprogramming factors was performed using the software STRING. Results: The relationship between C-MYC and NANOG was depicted using a phylogenetic tree and the sequence analysis showed OCT4, C-MYC, NANOG, and SOX2 together share a common evolutionary origin. Conclusion: This study has shown an innovative rapid method for the analysis of intra and inter-networking among nuclear reprogramming factors. Data presented may aid researchers to understand the complex regulatory networks involving iPS cell generation. PMID:24381858

  14. Microstructural evolution of nuclear grade graphite induced by ion irradiation at high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shuo-Cheng; Huang, E.-Wen; Kai, Ji-Jung; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2013-03-01

    This study simulates the Wigner Effect of nuclear-grade graphite in a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). The graphite was artificially irradiated with 3 MeV C2+ ions to mimic the fast neutron-radiation damage of the HTGR core environment. The irradiation temperatures were controlled between the range of 500-800 °C in a high vacuum environment of 10-7 torr. This high-dosage radiation creates enormous amounts of Frenkel pairs, which induce lattice swelling. These Frenkel vacancies and interstitials generate new strain fields and, hence, store energy in the distorted crystalline structure. The structural integrity of nuclear grade graphite was quantified using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The microstructure was estimated by the fast Fourier transform of HRTEM images. Within the samples irradiated with 10 dpa at 600 °C, the d-spacing of {0 0 0 2} expanded from 0.336 nm to 0.396 nm accompanying with the greatest distorted graphite microstructure. The c-axis of graphite swelled approximately 18% and the disorder coefficient was 1.10 ± 0.17 (1/nm). The synchrotron X-ray experimental results, gauged from 500 μm3 volume, suggesting that the ion-implanted graphite only deformed locally and epitaxially. This study also presents possible mechanisms.

  15. From nuclear power to coal power: Aerosol-induced health and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Laakso, Anton; Karhunen, Anni; Kokkola, Harri; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Korhonen, Hannele; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated what would be the climate and PM-induced air quality consequences if all nuclear reactors worldwide were closed down and replaced by coal combustion. In a way, this presents a "worst-case scenario" since less polluting energy sources are available. We studied simultaneously the radiative and health effects of coal power emissions using a global 3-D aerosol-climate model (ECHAM-HAMMOZ). This approach allowed us to estimate the effects of a major global energy production change from low carbon source to a high carbon one using detailed spatially resolved population density information. We included the radiative effects of both CO2 and PM2.5 but limited the study of health effects to PM2.5 only. Our results show that the replacement of nuclear power with coal power would have globally caused an average of 150,000 premature deaths per year during the period 2005-2009 with two thirds of them in Europe. For 37 years the aerosol emissions from the additional coal power plants would cool the climate but after that the accumulating CO2 emissions would accelerate the warming of the climate.

  16. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  17. Magnon-induced nuclear relaxation in the quantum critical region of a Heisenberg linear chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, M. J. R.

    2017-07-01

    The low-temperature properties of spin-1/2 one-dimensional (1D) Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (HAF) chains which have relatively small exchange couplings between the spins can be tuned using laboratory-scale magnetic fields. Magnetization measurements, made as a function of temperature, provide phase diagrams for these systems and establish the quantum critical point (QCP). The evolution of the spin dynamics behavior with temperature and applied field in the quantum critical (QC) region, near the QCP, is of particular interest and has been experimentally investigated in a number of 1D HAFs using neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance as the preferred techniques. In the QC phase both quantum and thermal spin fluctuations are present. As a result of extended spin correlations in the chains, magnon excitations are important at finite temperatures. An expression for the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 of probe nuclei in the QC phase of 1D HAFs is obtained by considering Raman scattering processes which induce nuclear spin flips. The relaxation rate expression, which involves the temperature and the chemical potential, predicts scaling behavior of 1 /T1 consistent with recent experimental findings for quasi-1D HAF systems. A simple relationship between 1 /T1 and the deviation of the magnetization from saturation (MS-M ) is predicted for the QC region.

  18. Quantitative nucleolar proteomics reveals nuclear re-organization during stress- induced senescence in mouse fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Kar, Bishnupriya; Liu, Baohua; Zhou, Zhongjun; Lam, Yun W

    2011-08-11

    Nucleolus is the most prominent mammalian organelle within the nucleus which is also the site for ribosomal biogenesis. There have been many reports indicating the involvement of nucleolus in the process of aging. Several proteins related to aging have been shown to localize in the nucleolus, which suggests the role of this organelle in senescence. In this study, we used quantitative mass spectrometry to map the flux of proteins into and out of the nucleolus during the induction of senescence in cultured mammalian cells. Changes in the abundance of 344 nucleolar proteins in sodium butyrate-induced senescence in NIH3T3 cells were studied by SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based mass spectrometry. Biochemically, we have validated the proteomic results and confirmed that B23 (nucleophosmin) protein was down-regulated, while poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and nuclear DNA helicase II (NDH II/DHX9/RHA) were up-regulated in the nucleolus upon treatment with sodium butyrate. Accumulation of chromatin in the nucleolus was also observed, by both proteomics and microscopy, in sodium butyrate-treated cells. Similar observations were found in other models of senescence, namely, in mitoxantrone- (MTX) treated cells and primary fibroblasts from the Lamin A knockout mice. Our data indicate an extensive nuclear organization during senescence and suggest that the redistribution of B23 protein and chromatin can be used as an important marker for senescence.

  19. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  20. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Subudhi, M.; Carroll, D.P.; Kasturi, S.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

  1. Degradation of nuclear Ubc9 induced by listeriolysin O is dependent on K(+) efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiexin; Lam, Wendy Wai-Ling; Lai, Tsz-Wah; Au, Shannon Wing-Ngor

    2017-09-12

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming toxin produced by L. monocytogenes, and is belonged to a protein family of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs). Previous studies have demonstrated that LLO triggers Ubc9 degradation and disrupts host SUMOylation to facilitate bacterial infection. However, the underlying mechanism of Ubc9 degradation is unclear. Here we show that LLO-induced down-regulation of Ubc9 is independent of Ubc9-SUMO interaction, however, it may involve phosphorylation signaling. Additionally, LLO exerts its effects primarily on nuclear Ubc9 and this process is mediated by K(+) efflux. Interestingly, for intracellular CDCs such as pneumolysin and suilysin, blockage of K(+) efflux enhances degradation of nuclear Ubc9, suggesting that extracellular and intracellular pathogens may exploit different mechanisms to modulate host SUMOylation system. Furthermore, up-regulation of SUMOylation by stable expression of SUMO-1 or SUMO-2 shows a delay in membrane perforation by LLO, indicating that SUMO modification of host proteins may act at the frontline for the defense response against LLO. Taken together, our study provides insights to the understanding of host-pathogen interactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  3. Tungsten fragmentation in nuclear reactions induced by high-energy cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chechenin, N. G. Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G.

    2015-01-15

    Tungsten fragmentation arising in nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons in space-vehicle electronics is considered. In modern technologies of integrated circuits featuring a three-dimensional layered architecture, tungsten is frequently used as a material for interlayer conducting connections. Within the preequilibrium model, tungsten-fragmentation features, including the cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons of energy between 30 and 240 MeV; the yields of isotopes and isobars; their energy, charge, and mass distributions; and recoil energy spectra, are calculated on the basis of the TALYS and EMPIRE-II-19 codes. It is shown that tungsten fragmentation affects substantially forecasts of failures of space-vehicle electronics.

  4. Characterization of 3 MeV H + irradiation induced defects in nuclear grade graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2010-09-01

    Atomistic structure change in a nuclear grade graphite irradiated at 353 K to 3.4×10 17 ion/cm 2 with 3 MeV H + was characterized by measuring positron lifetime and Raman spectrum at room temperature. It is evident from the positron lifetime results that the pre-existing structural defect is disoriented crystalline boundaries, and vacancy clusters ranging from di- to quadruple-vacancies were newly formed after ion irradiation. The relative intensity ratio of the Raman D and G peaks increased from 0.25 to 0.67 after ion irradiation. The concentration of radiation-induced vacancies was reasonably estimated by the Raman intensity ratio.

  5. Chirality-sensitive effects induced by nuclear relaxation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Two effects induced by the interaction between an electric field E and a permanent electric dipole moment 𝝁𝒆 of a chiral molecule placed in a magnetic field B are discussed as follows: (i) a spin-1/2 nucleus relaxes faster and the increase in the relaxation rate is the same for both enantiomers and (ii) in a two-spin system a cross correlation between the dipole-dipole relaxation mechanism and the interaction between nuclear magnetic shielding and the dipole moment 𝝁𝒆 enables the direct discrimination between the enantiomers. The former effect is too small in magnitude to be observed experimentally. For detection of the latter, an experimental procedure based on the application of an electric field oscillating at a frequency equal to the difference between the spin-precession frequencies of two heteronuclear spins is proposed.

  6. Analysis of the Nuclear Structure of 186 Re Using Neutron-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, David; McClory, John; Carroll, James; Chiara, Chris; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matt; Nelson, Ron O.

    2015-04-01

    Evaluated nuclear structure data for 186 Re identifies the majority of spin-parity assignments as tentative, with approximate values associated with the energies of several levels and transitions. In particular, the absence of known transitions that feed the Jπ =8+ isomer motivates their discovery, which would have astrophysical implications and a potential application in the development of an isomer power source. Using the GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE) spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, the (n,2n γ) and (n,n' γ) reactions in a 99.52% enriched 187 Re target were used to measure γ-ray excitation functions in 186 Re and 187 Re, respectively. A preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the experiment reveals several new transitions in 186 Re and 187 Re.

  7. Quercetin induces human colon cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-An; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as chemopreventers. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis as well as the antioxidant functions. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Inhibitors of NF-κB pathway have shown potential anti-tumor activities. However, it is not fully elucidated in colon cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer CACO-2 and SW-620 cells through inhibiting NF-κB pathway, as well as down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and up-regulation of Bax, thus providing basis for clinical application of quercetin in colon cancer cases.

  8. Long-lived nuclear spin states in methyl groups and quantum-rotor-induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Meier, Benno; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Stevanato, Gabriele; Hill-Cousins, Joseph T; Roy, Soumya Singha; Håkansson, Pär; Mamone, Salvatore; Brown, Richard C D; Pileio, Giuseppe; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2013-12-18

    Substances containing rapidly rotating methyl groups may exhibit long-lived states (LLSs) in solution, with relaxation times substantially longer than the conventional spin-lattice relaxation time T1. The states become long-lived through rapid internal rotation of the CH3 group, which imposes an approximate symmetry on the fluctuating nuclear spin interactions. In the case of very low CH3 rotational barriers, a hyperpolarized LLS is populated by thermal equilibration at liquid helium temperature. Following dissolution, cross-relaxation of the hyperpolarized LLS, induced by heteronuclear dipolar couplings, generates strongly enhanced antiphase NMR signals. This mechanism explains the NMR signal enhancements observed for (13)C-γ-picoline (Icker, M.; Berger, S. J. Magn. Reson. 2012, 219, 1-3).

  9. Somatic hypermutation is limited by CRM1-dependent nuclear export of activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kevin M; Barreto, Vasco; Ramiro, Almudena R; Stavropoulos, Pete; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2004-05-03

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) are initiated in activated B lymphocytes by activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID is thought to make lesions in DNA by deaminating cytidine residues in single-stranded DNA exposed by RNA polymerase during transcription. Although this must occur in the nucleus, AID is found primarily in the cytoplasm. Here we show that AID is actively excluded from the nucleus by an exportin CRM1-dependent pathway. The AID nuclear export signal (NES) is found at the carboxyl terminus of AID in a region that overlaps a sequence required for CSR but not SHM. We find that AID lacking a functional NES causes more hypermutation of a nonphysiologic target gene in transfected fibroblasts. However, the NES does not impact on the rate of mutation of immunoglobulin genes in B lymphocytes, suggesting that the AID NES does not limit AID activity in these cells.

  10. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  11. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the Δ -resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the Δ (1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics transport model. An isospin-, momentum-, and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the Δ (1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of the target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both π-- and π+-induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of the target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double-charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  12. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys(132) disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys(132) was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys(132) in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Epigenetically induced changes in nuclear textural patterns and gelatinase expression in human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poplineau, M; Doliwa, C; Schnekenburger, M; Antonicelli, F; Diederich, M; Trussardi-Régnier, A; Dufer, J

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin texture patterns of tumour cell nuclei can serve as cancer biomarkers, either to define diagnostic classifications or to obtain relevant prognostic information, in a large number of human tumours. Epigenetic mechanisms, mainly DNA methylation and histone post-translational modification, have been shown to influence chromatin packing states, and therefore nuclear texture. The aim of this study was to analyse effects of these two mechanisms on chromatin texture, and also on correlation with gelatinase expression, in human fibrosarcoma tumour cells. We investigated effects of DNA hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) on nuclear textural characteristics of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, evaluated by image cytometry, and expression of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, two metalloproteinases implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. 5-azadC induced significant variation in chromatin higher order organization, particularly chromatin decondensation, associated with reduction in global DNA methylation, concomitantly with increase in MMP-9, and to a lesser extent, MMP-2 expression. TSA alone did not have any effect on HT1080 cells, but exhibited differential activity when added to cells treated with 5-azadC. When treated with both drugs, nuclei had higher texture abnormalities. In this setting, reduction in MMP-9 expression was observed, whereas MMP-2 expression remained unaffected. These data show that hypomethylating drug 5-azadC and histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA were able to induce modulation of higher order chromatin organization and gelatinase expression in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. [Experimental detection of integration of mTDNA in the nuclear genome induced by ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of mtDNA in the nuclear genome is usually regarded as a continued and dynamic process of forming numt-pseudogenes or numt-insertions. They can be regarded not only as a neutral polymorphism, but may be involved in oncogenesis, aging and genetic diseases. Experimental identification of numt-insertions arising de novo is limited due to the presence of numerous homology mtDNA constitutively existing in the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes. It is known that the chick nuclear DNA (nDNA) constitutively contains 12 numt-pseudogenes. We attempted to experimentally detect the formation of numt-insertions de novo in the nDNA of chick embryos (Gallus gallus) from the eggs exposed to X-rays. Free mtDNAs were removed from preparations of nDNA of liver embryos through double gel electrophoresis. Numt-inserts in nDNA of control and survival embryos (from irradiated eggs) were revealed by PCR using 11 pairs of primers flanking the region of mtDNA of about 300-400 bp. PCR analysis with nDNA of control group showed no presence of homology mtDNA amplified with selected primers. PCR assays of nDNA of eight embryos from irradiated eggs showed that nDNA of two embryos contained new sites of mtDNA. PCR amplification of 3 loci of mtDNA is stably detected in nDNA from one embryo and 4 loci of mtDNA in nDNA from another embryo. Sequencing of PCR amplicons synthesized on templates of these nDNA showed that their sequences are identical to mtDNA and accurately cover the sites of several genes and the site of mtDNA D-loop. Thus, the experimental results indicate that ionizing radiation can induce integration of mtDNA fragments in the nuclear genome, apparently, through the mechanism of nonhomologous end-joining repair of double-strand breaks of nDNA.

  15. Prolonged interval between fusion and activation impairs embryonic development by inducing chromosome scattering and nuclear aneuploidy in pig somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Song, Kilyoung; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of various intervals between electrofusion and activation (FA interval) on the nuclear remodelling and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in pigs. Reconstructed oocytes were activated at 0 (simultaneous fusion and activation; SFA), 1, 2 and 3 h (delayed activation) after electrofusion; these groups were designated as DA1, DA2 and DA3, respectively. When oocyte nuclear status was examined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h after electrofusion, the incidence of chromosome scattering was increased (P < 0.01) as the FA interval was extended (0.0%, 12.0%, 77.3% and 78.0%, respectively). Extending the FA interval led to an increase (P < 0.01) in the percentage of oocytes containing multiple (>or=3) pseudopronuclei (PPN) (0.0% of SFA; 5.3% of DA1; 21.7% of DA2; and 33.5% of DA3). The development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was decreased (P < 0.05) in DA2 (5.7%) and DA3 (5.0%) compared with SFA (18.1%) and DA1 (19.5%). Our results demonstrate that extending the FA interval impairs the development of SCNT pig embryos by inducing chromosome scattering and the formation of multiple PPN, which may result in increased nuclear aneuploidy.

  16. Epac activation induces histone deacetylase nuclear export via a Ras-dependent signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Métrich, Mélanie; Laurent, Anne-Coline; Breckler, Magali; Duquesnes, Nicolas; Hmitou, Isabelle; Courillau, Delphine; Blondeau, Jean-Paul; Crozatier, Bertrand; Lezoualc'h, Frank; Morel, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Epac (Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) is a sensor for cAMP and represents a novel mechanism for governing cAMP signalling. Epac is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Ras family of small GTPases, Rap. Previous studies demonstrated that, in response to a prolonged beta-adrenergic stimulation Epac induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy. The aim of our study was to further characterize Epac downstream effectors involved in cardiac myocyte growth. Here, we found that Epac led to the activation of the small G protein H-Ras in primary neonatal cardiac myocytes. A Rap GTPase activating protein (RapGAP) partially inhibited Epac-induced H-Ras activation. Interestingly, we found that H-Ras activation involved the GEF domain of Epac. However, Epac did not directly induce exchange activity on this small GTPase protein. Instead, the effect of Epac on H-Ras activation was dependent on a signalling cascade involving phospholipase C (PLC)/inositol 1,3,5 triphosphate receptor (IP3R) and an increase intracellular calcium. In addition, we found that Epac activation induced histone deacetylase type 4 (HDAC4) translocation. Whereas HDAC5 alone was unresponsive to Epac, it became responsive to Epac in the presence of HDAC4 in COS cells. Consistent with its effect on HDAC cytoplasmic shuttle, Epac activation also increased the prohypertrophic transcription factor MEF2 in a CaMKII dependent manner in primary cardiac myocytes. Thus, our data show that Epac activates a prohypertrophic signalling pathway which involves PLC, H-Ras, CaMKII and HDAC nuclear export. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  18. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  19. Regulation of the Drosophila Hypoxia-Inducible Factor α Sima by CRM1-Dependent Nuclear Export ▿

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Nuria M.; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Roth, Peggy; Cauerhff, Ana; Samakovlis, Christos; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) proteins are regulated by oxygen levels through several different mechanisms that include protein stability, transcriptional coactivator recruitment, and subcellular localization. It was previously reported that these transcription factors are mainly nuclear in hypoxia and cytoplasmic in normoxia, but so far the molecular basis of this regulation is unclear. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster HIF-α protein Sima shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified the relevant nuclear localization signal and two functional nuclear export signals (NESs). These NESs are in the Sima basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and promote CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Site-directed mutagenesis of either NES provoked Sima nuclear retention and increased transcriptional activity, suggesting that nuclear export contributes to Sima regulation. The identified NESs are conserved and probably functional in the bHLH domains of several bHLH-PAS proteins. We propose that rapid nuclear export of Sima regulates the duration of cellular responses to hypoxia. PMID:18332128

  20. Nuclear expression of β-catenin promotes RB stability and resistance to TNF-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinbo; Soletti, Rossana C; Sadarangani, Anil; Sridevi, Priya; Ramirez, Michael E; Eckmann, Lars; Borges, Helena L; Wang, Jean Y J

    2013-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α promotes tumor development under chronic inflammation. Because TNF also activates caspase-8, selective inhibition of TNF-induced extrinsic apoptosis would be required for inflammation-associated tumor growth. In a mouse model of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis, we found nuclear expression of β-catenin in tumors of wild-type, but not mutant, mice that were made resistant to TNF-induced apoptosis by a germline mutation blocking caspase cleavage of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, despite similar frequencies of β-catenin exon-3 mutations in these two genetic backgrounds. TNF-induced apoptosis was also attenuated in human colon cancer cell lines with genetically activated β-catenin. However, we found that HCT116 cells, which contain an activated allele of β-catenin but do not express nuclear β-catenin, were sensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis. In HCT116 cells, TNF stimulated efficient RB cleavage that preceded chromatin condensation. In contrast, TNF did not induce RB cleavage in colon cancer cells expressing nuclear β-catenin and these cells could be sensitized to basal and/or TNF-induced apoptosis by the knockdown of β-catenin or RB. In the apoptosis-resistant colon cancer cells, knockdown of β-catenin led to a reduction in the RB protein without affecting RB mRNA. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the caspase-resistant, but not the wild-type, RB re-established resistance to TNF-induced caspase activation in colon cancer cells without β-catenin. Together, these results suggest that nuclear β-catenin-dependent RB stabilization suppresses TNF-induced apoptosis in caspase-8-positive colon cancer cells.

  1. Acute β-Adrenergic Activation Triggers Nuclear Import of Histone Deacetylase 5 and Delays Gq-induced Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Wei Jenny; Lee, Linda; Yu, David; Dao, Khanha; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    During hemodynamic stress, catecholamines and neurohumoral stimuli may induce co-activation of Gq-coupled receptors and β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR), leading to cardiac remodeling. Dynamic regulation of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5), a transcriptional repressor, is crucial during stress signaling due to its role in epigenetic control of fetal gene markers. Little is known about its regulation during acute and chronic β-AR stimulation and its cross-interaction with Gq signaling in adult cardiac myocytes. Here, we evaluate the potential cross-talk between Gq-driven and β-AR mediated signaling at the level of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5. We show the translocation of GFP-tagged wild type HDAC5 or mutants (S279A and S279D) in response to β-AR or Gq agonists. Isoproterenol (ISO) or PKA activation results in strong nuclear accumulation of HDAC5 in contrast to nuclear export driven by Ca2+-calmodulin protein kinase II and protein kinase D. Moreover, nuclear accumulation of HDAC5 under acute ISO/PKA signaling is dependent on phosphorylation of Ser-279 and can block subsequent Gq-mediated nuclear HDAC5 export. Intriguingly, the attenuation of Gq-induced export is abolished after chronic PKA activation, yet nuclear HDAC5 remains elevated. Last, the effect of chronic β-AR signaling on HDAC5 translocation was examined in adult myocytes from a rabbit model of heart failure, where ISO-induced nuclear import is ablated, but Gq-agonist mediated export is preserved. Acute β-AR/PKA activation protects against hypertrophic signaling by delaying Gq-mediated transcriptional activation. This serves as a key physiological control switch before allowing genetic reprogramming via HDAC5 nuclear export during more severe stress, such as heart failure. PMID:23161540

  2. First measurement of proton-induced low-momentum dielectron radiation off cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HADES Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of proton-induced dielectron radiation from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p + p data, we observe for e+e- momenta Pee<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectrum, which we attribute to an additional ρ-like contribution and a decrease of ω yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the ρ meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the ω meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  3. p52-independent nuclear translocation of RelB promotes LPS-induced attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.; Sasaki, C.Y.; Rezanka, L.J.; Ghosh, P.; Longo, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    The NF-{kappa}B signaling pathways have a critical role in the development and progression of various cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that the small cell lung cancer cell line (SCLC) H69 expressed a unique NF-{kappa}B profile as compared to other cancer cell lines. The p105/p50, p100/p52, c-Rel, and RelB protein and mRNA transcripts were absent in H69 cells but these cells expressed RelA/p65. The activation of H69 cells by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in the induction of RelB and p100 expression. The treatment also induced the nuclear translocation of RelB without the processing of p100 to p52. Furthermore, LPS-induced {beta}1 integrin expression and cellular attachment through an NF-{kappa}B-dependent mechanism. Blocking RelB expression prevented the increase in the expression of {beta}1 integrin and the attachment of H69. Taken together, the results suggest that RelB was responsible for the LPS-mediated attachment and may play an important role in the progression of some cancers.

  4. Neutron irradiation induced microstructural changes in NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Kane, Joshua; Butt, Darryl P.; Windes, William E.; Ubic, Rick

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the neutron-irradiation-induced effects on the microstructure of NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites. The high-temperature neutron irradiation at two different irradiation conditions was carried out at the Advanced Test Reactor National User Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NBG-18 samples were irradiated to 1.54 dpa and 6.78 dpa at 430 °C and 678 °C respectively. IG-110 samples were irradiated to 1.91 dpa and 6.70 dpa at 451 °C and 674 °C respectively. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to study the changes in different microstructural components such as filler particles, microcracks, binder and quinoline-insoluble (QI) particles. Significant changes have been observed in samples irradiated to about 6.7 dpa. The closing of pre-existing microcracks was observed in both the filler and the binder phases. The binder phase exhibited substantial densification with near complete elimination of the microcracks. The QI particles embedded in the binder phase exhibited a complete microstructural transformation from rosettes to highly crystalline solid spheres. The lattice images indicate the formation of edge dislocations as well as extended line defects bridging the adjacent basal planes. The positive climb of these dislocations has been identified as the main contributor to the irradiation-induced swelling of the graphite lattice.

  5. Prohibitin Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha–induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B Nuclear Translocation via the Novel Mechanism of Decreasing Importin α3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Aaron K.; Okoro, Ngozi I.; Klapproth, Jan-Michael A.; Merlin, Didier; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of prohibitin 1 (PHB), a multifunctional protein in the cell, is decreased during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Little is known regarding the regulation and role of PHB during intestinal inflammation. We examined the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), a cytokine that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of IBD, on PHB expression and the effect of sustained PHB expression on TNF-α activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and epithelial barrier dysfunction, two hallmarks of intestinal inflammation. We show that TNF-α decreased PHB protein and mRNA abundance in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in colon mucosa in vivo. Sustained expression of prohibitin in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo (prohibitin transgenic mice, PHB TG) resulted in a marked decrease in TNF-α–induced nuclear translocation of the NF-κB protein p65, NF-κB/DNA binding, and NF-κB–mediated transcriptional activation despite robust IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation and increased cytosolic p65. Cells overexpressing PHB were protected from TNF-α–induced increased epithelial permeability. Expression of importin α3, a protein involved in p50/p65 nuclear import, was decreased in cells overexpressing PHB and in colon mucosa of PHB TG mice. Restoration of importin α3 levels sustained NF-κB activation by TNF-α during PHB transfection. These results suggest that PHB inhibits NF-κB nuclear translocation via a novel mechanism involving alteration of importin α3 levels. TNF-α decreases PHB expression in intestinal epithelial cells and restoration of PHB expression in these cells can protect against the deleterious effects of TNF-α and NF-κB on barrier function. PMID:19710421

  6. Regulation of Stress-Inducible Phosphoprotein 1 Nuclear Retention by Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT PIAS1

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Iaci N.; Caetano, Fabiana A.; Pinder, Jordan; Rodrigues, Bruna Roz; Beraldo, Flavio H.; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Durette, Chantal; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Lopes, Marilene H.; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle; Cunha, Isabela W.; Sanematsu, Paulo I.; Suzuki, Sergio; Bleggi-Torres, Luiz F.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Thibault, Pierre; Dellaire, Graham; Martins, Vilma R.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1), a cochaperone for Hsp90, has been shown to regulate multiple pathways in astrocytes, but its contributions to cellular stress responses are not fully understood. We show that in response to irradiation-mediated DNA damage stress STI1 accumulates in the nucleus of astrocytes. Also, STI1 haploinsufficiency decreases astrocyte survival after irradiation. Using yeast two-hybrid screenings we identified several nuclear proteins as STI1 interactors. Overexpression of one of these interactors, PIAS1, seems to be specifically involved in STI1 nuclear retention and in directing STI1 and Hsp90 to specific sub-nuclear regions. PIAS1 and STI1 co-immunoprecipitate and PIAS1 can function as an E3 SUMO ligase for STI. Using mass spectrometry we identified five SUMOylation sites in STI1. A STI1 mutant lacking these five sites is not SUMOylated, but still accumulates in the nucleus in response to increased expression of PIAS1, suggesting the possibility that a direct interaction with PIAS1 could be responsible for STI1 nuclear retention. To test this possibility, we mapped the interaction sites between PIAS1 and STI1 using yeast-two hybrid assays and surface plasmon resonance and found that a large domain in the N-terminal region of STI1 interacts with high affinity with amino acids 450–480 of PIAS1. Knockdown of PIAS1 in astrocytes impairs the accumulation of nuclear STI1 in response to irradiation. Moreover, a PIAS1 mutant lacking the STI1 binding site is unable to increase STI1 nuclear retention. Interestingly, in human glioblastoma multiforme PIAS1 expression is increased and we found a significant correlation between increased PIAS1 expression and STI1 nuclear localization. These experiments provide evidence that direct interaction between STI1 and PIAS1 is involved in the accumulation of nuclear STI1. This retention mechanism could facilitate nuclear chaperone activity. PMID:23938469

  7. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Induces Redifferentiation of Dedifferentiated Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Mitsugu; Doke, Yukiko; Yamada, Chikaomi; Kawashima, Kayoko; Sho, Rumiko; Enomoto, Kei; Furuya, Mayumi; Inomata, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Tubular epithelial cells (TECs) can be dedifferentiated by repetitive insults, which activate scar-producing cells generated from interstitial cells such as fibroblasts, leading to the accumulation and deposition of extracellular matrix molecules. The dedifferentiated TECs play a crucial role in the development of renal fibrosis. Therefore, renal fibrosis may be attenuated if dedifferentiated TECs are converted back to their normal state (re-epithelialization). However, the mechanism underlying the re-epithelialization remains to be elucidated. In the present study, TGF-β1, a profibrotic cytokine, induced dedifferentiation of cultured TECs, and the dedifferentiated TECs were re-epithelialized by the removal of TGF-β1 stimulation. In the re-epithelialization process, transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, beta (HNF-1β) was identified as a candidate molecule involved in inducing re-epithelialization by means of DNA microarray and biological network analysis. In functional validation studies, the re-epithelialization by TGF-β1 removal was abolished by HNF-1β knockdown. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of HNF-1β in the dedifferentiated TECs induced the re-epithelialization without the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signaling, even in the presence of TGF-β1 stimulation. In mouse renal fibrosis model, unilateral ureteral obstruction model, HNF-1β expression in the TECs of the kidney was suppressed with fibrosis progression. Furthermore, the HNF-1β downregulated TECs resulted in dedifferentiation, which was characterized by expression of nestin. In conclusion, HNF-1β suppression in TECs is a crucial event for the dedifferentiation of TECs, and the upregulation of HNF-1β in TECs has a potential to restore the dedifferentiated TECs into their normal state, leading to the attenuation of renal fibrosis. PMID:27196561

  8. The Nuclear Receptor, Nor-1, Induces the Physiological Responses Associated With Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Joel M.; Tuong, Zewen K.; Wang, Shu-Ching M.; Oh, Tae Gyu; Shao, Emily X.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle remodels metabolic capacity, contractile and exercise phenotype in response to physiological demands. This adaptive remodeling response to physical activity can ameliorate/prevent diseases associated with poor diet and lifestyle. Our previous work demonstrated that skeletal muscle-specific transgenic expression of the neuron-derived orphan nuclear receptor, Nor-1 drives muscle reprogramming, improves exercise endurance, and oxidative metabolism. The current manuscript investigates the association between exercise, Nor-1 expression and the role of Nor-1 in adaptive remodeling. We demonstrate that Nor-1 expression is induced by exercise and is dependent on calcium/calcineurin signaling (in vitro and in vivo). Analysis of fatigue-resistant transgenic mice that express Nor-1 in skeletal muscle revealed increased hypertrophy and vascularization of muscle tissue. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic Nor-1 expression is associated with increased intracellular recycling, ie, autophagy, involving 1) increased expression of light chain 3A or LC3A-II, autophagy protein 5, and autophagy protein 12 in quadriceps femoris muscle extracts from Tg-Nor-1 (relative to Wild-type (WT) littermates); 2) decreased p62 expression indicative of increased autophagolysosome assembly; and 3) decreased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity. Transfection of LC3A-GFP-RFP chimeric plasmid demonstrated that autophagolysosome formation was significantly increased by Nor-1 expression. Furthermore, we demonstrated a single bout of exercise induced LC3A-II expression in skeletal muscle from C57BL/6 WT mice. This study, when combined with our previous studies, demonstrates that Nor-1 expression drives multiple physiological changes/pathways that are critical to the beneficial responses of muscle to exercise and provides insights into potential pharmacological manipulation of muscle reprogramming for the treatment of lifestyle induced chronic diseases. PMID:27144290

  9. Role of nuclear factor kappa-B in phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, T; Köse, O; Kizildağ, A; Albayrak, M; Ciçek, Y; Kara, A

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the expression of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and its relation to various cellular mediators that act in the pathogenesis of phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth. Eighteen epileptic patients had phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth (PHT-GO), 20 patients with plaque-induced gingivitis (Gingivitis), and 20 periodontally and systemically healthy individuals (Control) were included in this study. The expression of activated NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65), IL-1β, TNF-α and TGFβ-1 levels were examined in the gingival sections obtained from each participant. The results demonstrated a significantly higher expression of p65 in fibroblasts in PHT-GO group with respect to Gingivitis (P < 0.05) and control groups (P < 0.01). However, we found no statistically significant differences between PHT-GO and Gingivitis groups according to the immunohistochemical staining in macrophages (P > 0.05). Immune-reactive TGFβ-1 levels in the gingival connective tissue cells were statistically higher in PHT-GO group with respect to Gingivitis group(P < 0.05). Statistically significant correlations were found between the HI and activated TGFβ-1 and p65 levels in PHT-GO group. The results of this study showed that NF-κB is activated in PHT-related gingival overgrowth. This study may provide a basis for future research into specific NF-κB inhibition for preventing of the side effects of this drug. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A genetically encoded indicator for assaying bioactive chemicals that induce nuclear transport of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Ozawa, Takeaki; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    Glucocorticoids, the adrenal steroid hormones secreted during stress, are essential to homeostasis and metabolism in the human body. An impaired glucocorticoid signaling due to dysfunction of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by synthetic chemicals can cause diseases and disruptions of the homeostasis and metabolism. Here we demonstrate the development of a method for screening endocrine-disrupting chemicals and potent risk factors of human diseases based on the nuclear trafficking of the GR. We constructed a new assay using a pair of genetic indicators with the full length of the GR, split Renilla luciferase (RLuc), and split DnaE (a protein splicing element). The GR-containing fusion protein with C-terminal halves of DnaE and RLuc is localized in cytosol due to the cytosolic character of the GR, whereas the fusion protein with N-terminal halves of DnaE and RLuc stays in the nucleus due to the cofused nucleus localization signal. On being stimulated with a ligand, the GR is translocated into the cellular nucleus. Thus, a protein splicing occurs in the nucleus by an interaction between the splicing junctions of each DnaE fragment. The enzymatic activities from the reconstituted RLuc allow the ligand-dependent luminescence intensities. The feasibility of the method was evaluated by quantifying the hormonal activities of 20 different kinds of steroids and synthetic chemicals using the NIH 3T3 cells carrying the pair of indicators. The hormonal activities of tested ligands are discussed based on the chemical structure-activity relationship. We found that androgens, testosterone, and 19-nortestosterone weakly induce the nuclear transport of the GR. The current assay allows high-throughput screening of risk chemicals and drug candidates influential to a signal transduction pathway of the GR.

  11. Featured Article: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent nuclear entry of factor inhibiting HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke; Ding, Xue-qin; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity in the nucleus is related to factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 hydrolyzes asparagine at the C-terminal of HIF-1α, preventing the interaction between HIF-1α and its associated cofactors, and leading to suppressed activation of HIF-1. FIH-1 is a cytosolic protein and its entry to the nucleus has to be coordinated with HIF-1α. The present study was undertaken to examine the correlation between HIF-1α and FIH-1 in their nuclear entry. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine at a final concentration of 100 µM for 4 h, resulting in an accumulation of HIF-1α and an increase of FIH-1 in the nucleus as determined by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of the cells with copper (Cu) chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 50 µM in cultures for 24 h reduced both HIF-1α protein levels and the HIF-1α entry to the nucleus, along with decreased FIH-1 protein levels in the nucleus but no changes in the total FIH-1 protein levels in the cells. These effects were prevented by simultaneous addition of 50 µM CuSO4 with tetraethylenepentamine. Gene-silencing of HIF-1α significantly inhibited FIH-1 entry to the nucleus, but did not affect the total protein levels of FIH-1 in the cells. This work demonstrates that the nuclear entry of FIH-1 depends on HIF-1α. Cu deficiency caused a decrease of HIF-1α, leading to suppression of FIH-1 entry to the nucleus. PMID:25687434

  12. Featured Article: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent nuclear entry of factor inhibiting HIF-1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ke; Ding, Xue-Qin; Lin, Chen; Kang, Y James

    2015-11-01

    The regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity in the nucleus is related to factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 hydrolyzes asparagine at the C-terminal of HIF-1α, preventing the interaction between HIF-1α and its associated cofactors, and leading to suppressed activation of HIF-1. FIH-1 is a cytosolic protein and its entry to the nucleus has to be coordinated with HIF-1α. The present study was undertaken to examine the correlation between HIF-1α and FIH-1 in their nuclear entry. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine at a final concentration of 100 µM for 4 h, resulting in an accumulation of HIF-1α and an increase of FIH-1 in the nucleus as determined by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of the cells with copper (Cu) chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 50 µM in cultures for 24 h reduced both HIF-1α protein levels and the HIF-1α entry to the nucleus, along with decreased FIH-1 protein levels in the nucleus but no changes in the total FIH-1 protein levels in the cells. These effects were prevented by simultaneous addition of 50 µM CuSO4 with tetraethylenepentamine. Gene-silencing of HIF-1α significantly inhibited FIH-1 entry to the nucleus, but did not affect the total protein levels of FIH-1 in the cells. This work demonstrates that the nuclear entry of FIH-1 depends on HIF-1α. Cu deficiency caused a decrease of HIF-1α, leading to suppression of FIH-1 entry to the nucleus.

  13. Stress-Induced Nuclear RNA Degradation Pathways Regulate Yeast Bromodomain Factor 2 to Promote Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kevin; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2) is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD). Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD). We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress. PMID:25232960

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel: Main oxide phase

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Keri R.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Barefield, James E.; ...

    2017-04-22

    We show the analysis of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is explored using a simplified version of the main oxide phase. The main oxide phase consists of the actinides, lanthanides, and zirconium. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, quantitative technique for measuring zirconium in a uranium dioxide matrix without the need to dissolve the material. A second set of materials including cerium oxide is also analyzed to determine precision and limit of detection (LOD) using LIBS in a complex matrix. Two types of samples are used in this study:more » binary and ternary oxide pellets. The ternary oxide, (U,Zr,Ce)O2 pellets used in this study are a simplified version the main oxide phase of used nuclear fuel. The binary oxides, (U,Ce)O2 and (U,Zr)O2 are also examined to determine spectral emission lines for Ce and Zr, potential spectral interferences with uranium and baseline LOD values for Ce and Zr in a UO2 matrix. In the spectral range of 200 to 800 nm, 33 cerium lines and 25 zirconium lines were identified and shown to have linear correlation values (R2) > 0.97 for both the binary and ternary oxides. The cerium LOD in the (U,Ce)O2 matrix ranged from 0.34 to 1.08 wt% and 0.94 to 1.22 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 33 of Ce emission lines. The zirconium limit of detection in the (U,Zr)O2 matrix ranged from 0.84 to 1.15 wt% and 0.99 to 1.10 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 25 Zr lines. Finally, the effect of multiple elements in the plasma and the impact on the LOD is discussed.« less

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel: Main oxide phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Keri R.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Barefield, James E.; Colgan, James P.; Kilcrease, David P.; Czerwinski, Ken R.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of light water reactor simulated used nuclear fuel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is explored using a simplified version of the main oxide phase. The main oxide phase consists of the actinides, lanthanides, and zirconium. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, quantitative technique for measuring zirconium in a uranium dioxide matrix without the need to dissolve the material. A second set of materials including cerium oxide is also analyzed to determine precision and limit of detection (LOD) using LIBS in a complex matrix. Two types of samples are used in this study: binary and ternary oxide pellets. The ternary oxide, (U,Zr,Ce)O2 pellets used in this study are a simplified version the main oxide phase of used nuclear fuel. The binary oxides, (U,Ce)O2 and (U,Zr)O2 are also examined to determine spectral emission lines for Ce and Zr, potential spectral interferences with uranium and baseline LOD values for Ce and Zr in a UO2 matrix. In the spectral range of 200 to 800 nm, 33 cerium lines and 25 zirconium lines were identified and shown to have linear correlation values (R2) > 0.97 for both the binary and ternary oxides. The cerium LOD in the (U,Ce)O2 matrix ranged from 0.34 to 1.08 wt% and 0.94 to 1.22 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 33 of Ce emission lines. The zirconium limit of detection in the (U,Zr)O2 matrix ranged from 0.84 to 1.15 wt% and 0.99 to 1.10 wt% in (U,Ce,Zr)O2 for 25 Zr lines. The effect of multiple elements in the plasma and the impact on the LOD is discussed.

  16. Detection of Special Nuclear Material from Delayed Neutron Emission Induced by a Dual-Particle Monoenergetic Source

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Michael F.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I

    2016-06-30

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n gamma)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time- dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  17. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-06-27

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the {sup 11}B(d,n γ){sup 12}C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from {sup 238}U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  18. Abnormal mitosis in hypertetraploid cells causes aberrant nuclear morphology in association with H2O2-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu

    2008-09-01

    Aberrant nuclear morphology, such as nuclei with irregular shapes or fragmented nuclei, is often observed in senescent cells, but its biological significance is not fully understood. My previous study showed that aberrant nuclear morphology in senescent human fibroblasts is attributable to abnormal mitosis in later passages. In this study, the production of abnormal nuclei in association with premature senescence was investigated. Premature senescence was induced by brief exposure of human fibroblasts to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and mitosis was observed by time-lapse microscopy. In addition, cell cycle and nuclear morphology after exposure to H(2)O(2) were also analyzed using a laser scanning cytometer. Time-lapse analysis revealed that the induction of premature senescence caused abnormal mitoses, such as mitotic slippage or incomplete mitosis, especially in later days after H(2)O(2) exposure and often resulted in abnormal nuclear morphology. Analysis by laser scanning cytometer showed significantly higher frequency of abnormal cells with deformed nuclei and abnormal mitotic cells with misaligned chromosomes in a hypertetraploid subpopulation. These results suggest that unstable hypertetraploid cells, formed in association with H(2)O(2)-induced premature senescence, cause abnormal mitosis that leads to aberrant nuclear morphology.

  19. Alpha particles induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in primary human lymphocytes mediated through ATM.

    PubMed

    Horn, Simon; Brady, Darren; Prise, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The use of high linear energy transfer radiations in the form of carbon ions in heavy ion beam lines or alpha particles in new radionuclide treatments has increased substantially over the past decade and will continue to do so due to the favourable dose distributions they can offer versus conventional therapies. Previously it has been shown that exposure to heavy ions induces pan-nuclear phosphorylation of several DNA repair proteins such as H2AX and ATM in vitro. Here we describe similar effects of alpha particles on ex vivo irradiated primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Following alpha particle irradiation pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, but not DNA-PK and 53BP1, was observed throughout the nucleus. Inhibition of ATM, but not DNA-PK, resulted in the loss of pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in alpha particle irradiated lymphocytes. Pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX signal was rapidly lost over 24h at a much greater rate than foci loss. Surprisingly, pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX intensity was not dependent on the number of alpha particle induced double strand breaks, rather the number of alpha particles which had traversed the cell nucleus. This distinct fluence dependent damage signature of particle radiation is important in both the fields of radioprotection and clinical oncology in determining radionuclide biological dosimetry and may be indicative of patient response to new radionuclide cancer therapies.

  20. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-06-01

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n γ)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  1. Tau-Induced Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase-IV Activation Aggravates Nuclear Tau Hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ping; Ye, Jin-Wang; Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Li-Ping; Hu, Qing-Hua; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2017-06-23

    Hyperphosphorylated tau is the major protein component of neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying tau hyperphosphorylation is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously expressed wild-type human tau40 was detectable in the phosphorylated form at multiple AD-associated sites in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions from HEK293 cells. Among these sites, tau phosphorylated at Thr205 and Ser214 was almost exclusively found in the nuclear fraction at the conditions used in the present study. With the intracellular tau accumulation, the Ca(2+) concentration was significantly increased in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Further studies using site-specific mutagenesis and pharmacological treatment demonstrated that phosphorylation of tau at Thr205 increased nuclear Ca(2+) concentration with a simultaneous increase in the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) at Ser196. On the other hand, phosphorylation of tau at Ser214 did not significantly change the nuclear Ca(2+)/CaMKIV signaling. Finally, expressing calmodulin-binding protein-4 that disrupts formation of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin complex abolished the okadaic acid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the nuclear fraction. We conclude that the intracellular accumulation of phosphorylated tau, as detected in the brains of AD patients, can trigger nuclear Ca(2+)/CaMKIV signaling, which in turn aggravates tau hyperphosphorylation. Our findings provide new insights for tauopathies: hyperphosphorylation of intracellular tau and an increased Ca(2+) concentration may induce a self-perpetuating harmful loop to promote neurodegeneration.

  2. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE) domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Christine M; Ifrim, Marius F; Cowan, Ann E; Weller, Sandra K

    2009-10-01

    Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE) domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC) during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70), the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  3. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  4. The "genomic storm" induced by bacterial endotoxin is calmed by a nuclear transport modifier that attenuates localized and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Veach, Ruth Ann; Zienkiewicz, Jozef; Moore, Daniel J; Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hutchens, Martha A; Hawiger, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent microbial virulence factor that can trigger production of proinflammatory mediators involved in the pathogenesis of localized and systemic inflammation. Importantly, the role of nuclear transport of stress responsive transcription factors in this LPS-generated "genomic storm" remains largely undefined. We developed a new nuclear transport modifier (NTM) peptide, cell-penetrating cSN50.1, which targets nuclear transport shuttles importin α5 and importin β1, to analyze its effect in LPS-induced localized (acute lung injury) and systemic (lethal endotoxic shock) murine inflammation models. We analyzed a human genome database to match 46 genes that encode cytokines, chemokines and their receptors with transcription factors whose nuclear transport is known to be modulated by NTM. We then tested the effect of cSN50.1 peptide on proinflammatory gene expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with LPS. This NTM suppressed a proinflammatory transcriptome of 37 out of 84 genes analyzed, without altering expression of housekeeping genes or being cytotoxic. Consistent with gene expression analysis in primary macrophages, plasma levels of 23 out of 26 LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors were significantly attenuated in a murine model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation (lethal endotoxic shock) while the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 10, was enhanced. This anti-inflammatory reprogramming of the endotoxin-induced genomic response was accompanied by complete protection against lethal endotoxic shock with prophylactic NTM treatment, and 75% protection when NTM was first administered after LPS exposure. In a murine model of localized lung inflammation caused by direct airway exposure to LPS, expression of cytokines and chemokines in the bronchoalveolar space was suppressed with a concomitant reduction of neutrophil trafficking. Thus, calming the LPS-triggered "genomic storm" by

  5. Discovery of a new RNA-containing nuclear structure in UVC-induced apoptotic cells by integrated laser electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karreman, Matthia A; Agronskaia, Alexandra V; Verkleij, Arie J; Cremers, Fons F M; Gerritsen, Hans C; Humbel, Bruno M

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of cells with UVC radiation leads to the formation of DNA cross-links which, if not repaired, can lead to apoptosis. gamma-H2AX and cleaved caspase 3 are proteins formed during UVC-induced DNA damage and apoptosis respectively. The present study sets out to identify early morphological markers of apoptosis using a new method of correlative microscopy, ILEM (integrated laser electron microscopy). Cleaved caspase 3 and gamma-H2AX were immunofluorescently labelled to mark the cells of interest. These cells were subsequently searched in the fluorescence mode of the ILEM and further analysed at high resolution with TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Following the treatment of HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with UVC radiation, in the majority of the cells gamma-H2AX was formed, whereas only in a subset of cells caspase 3 was activated. In severely damaged cells with high levels of gamma-H2AX a round, electron-dense nuclear structure was found, which was hitherto not identified in UV-stressed cells. This structure exists only in nuclei of cells containing cleaved caspase 3 and is present during all stages of the apoptotic process. Energy-loss imaging showed that the nuclear structure accumulates phosphorus, indicating that it is rich in nucleic acids. Because the nuclear structure did not label for DNA and was not affected by regressive EDTA treatment, it is suggested that the UV-induced nuclear structure contains a high amount of RNA. Because the UV-induced nuclear structure was only found in cells labelled for cleaved caspase 3 it is proposed as an electron microscopic marker for all stages of apoptosis. Such a marker will especially facilitate the screening for early apoptotic cells, which lack the well-known hallmarks of apoptosis within a cell population. It also raises new questions on the mechanisms involved in the UV-induced apoptotic pathway.

  6. Nuclear c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation induces chromatin structural changes through histone modifications that include H4K16 hypoacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Kubota, Sho; Morinaga, Takao; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Takahashi, Akinori; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2011-12-10

    c-Abl tyrosine kinase, which is ubiquitously expressed, has three nuclear localization signals and one nuclear export signal and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. c-Abl plays important roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. Recently, we developed a pixel imaging method for quantitating the level of chromatin structural changes and showed that nuclear Src-family tyrosine kinases are involved in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation. Using this method, we show here that nuclear c-Abl induces chromatin structural changes in a manner dependent on the tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl drastically increases the levels of chromatin structural changes, compared with that of c-Abl. Intriguingly, nuclear-targeted c-Abl induces heterochromatic profiles of histone methylation and acetylation, including hypoacetylation of histone H4 acetylated on lysine 16 (H4K16Ac). The level of heterochromatic histone modifications correlates with that of chromatin structural changes. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage stimulates translocation of c-Abl into the nucleus and induces chromatin structural changes together with H4K16 hypoacetylation. Treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, blocks chromatin structural changes but not nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by c-Abl. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays an important role in chromatin dynamics through nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation-induced heterochromatic histone modifications.

  7. Obesity-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress suppresses nuclear factor-Y expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yulan; Zhang, Yuwei; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Jinlong; Liu, Yin; Feng, Peiqun; Su, Zhiguang

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor composed of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC. NF-Y plays crucial roles in pre-adipocyte maintenance and/or commitment to adipogenesis. NF-YA dysfunction in adipocyte resulted in an age-dependent progressive loss of adipose tissue associated with metabolic complications. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has emerged as an important mediator in the pathogenesis of obesity. However, it is not known if NF-YA is involved in the ER stress-mediated pathogenesis of obesity. We first examined the effects of ER stress on the NF-YA expression in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes; then in ob/ob genetic obesity mice, we tested the effect of chemical chaperones alleviating ER stress on the expression levels of NF-YA. Subsequently, we inhibited the new mRNA synthesis using actinomycin D in 3T3-L1 cells to explore the mechanism modulating NF-YA expression. Finally, we evaluated the involvement of PPARg in the regulation of NF-YA expression by ER stress. We demonstrated that both obesity- and chemical chaperone -induced ER stress suppressed NF-YA expression and alleviation of ER stress by chemical chaperone could recover NF-YA expression in ob/ob mice. Moreover, we showed that ER stress suppressed NF-YA mRNA transcription through the involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARg). Activation of PPARg ameliorates the ER stress-induced NF-YA suppression. Our findings may point to a possible role of NF-YA in stress conditions that occur in chronic obesity, ER stress might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity through NF-YA depletion.

  8. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 alpha in noise-induced cochlear neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Groth, Jane Bjerg; Kao, Shyan-Yuan; Briët, Martijn C; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2016-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a problem of profound clinical significance and growing magnitude. Alarmingly, even moderate noise levels, previously assumed to cause only temporary shifts in auditory thresholds ("temporary" NIHL), are now known to cause cochlear synaptopathy and subsequent neuropathy. To uncover molecular mechanisms of this neuropathy, a network analysis of genes reported to have significantly altered expression after temporary threshold shift-inducing noise exposure was performed. The transcription factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-4 alpha (HNF4α), which had not previously been studied in the context of cochlear response to noise, was identified as a hub of a top-ranking network. Hnf4α expression and localization using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, respectively, were described in adolescent and adult mice exposed to neuropathic noise levels in adolescence. Isoforms α3 and α12 in the cochlea were also identified. At every age examined, Hnf4α mRNA expression in the cochlear apex was similar to expression in the base. Hnf4α expression was evident in select cochlear cells, including spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and hair cells, and was significantly upregulated from 6 to 70 weeks of age, especially in SGNs. This age-related Hnf4α upregulation was inhibited by neuropathic noise exposure in adolescence. Hnf4α silencing with shRNA transfection into auditory neuroblast cells (VOT-33) reduced cell viability, as measured with the MTT assay, suggesting that Hnf4α may be involved in SGN survival. Our results motivate future studies of HNF4α in cochlear pathophysiology, especially because HNF4α mutations and polymorphisms are associated with human diseases that may include hearing loss. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1374-1386, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Chronic inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B attenuates aldosterone/salt-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Minmin; Gu, Yong

    2012-04-20

    Recent studies suggested that nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of renal injury. This study investigated whether NF-κB inhibition attenuates progressive renal damage in aldosterone/salt-induced renal injury and its mechanisms. Adult male rats were uninephrectomized and treated with one of the following for 4 weeks: vehicle (0.5% ethanol, subcutaneously); vehicle/1% NaCl (1% NaCl in drinking solution); aldosterone/1% NaCl (1% NaCl in drinking solution and aldosterone, 0.75 μg/h, subcutaneously); or aldosterone/1%NaCl+pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-κB (100 mg/kg/day, by gavage). The activity of NF-κB was measured by EMSA and immunohistochemistry, CTGF and ICAM-1 were measured by Western blot and real-time PCR, and TGF-β and CTGF were measured by immunohistochemistry. Rats that received aldosterone/1% NaCl exhibited hypertension and severe renal injury. Renal cortical mRNA levels of CTGF, TGF-β, ICAM-1 and collagen IV, protein expression of CTGF and ICAM-1, and NF-κB-DNA binding activity were significantly upregulated in rats that received aldosterone/1% NaCl. Treatment with PDTC significantly decreased the percentage of cells positive for CTGF and TGF-β; mRNA levels of CTGF, TGF-β, ICAM-1 and collagen IV, and protein levels of CTGF and ICAM-1 were also inhibited by PDTC. These data suggest that the NF-κB signal pathway plays a role in the progression of aldosterone/salt-induced renal injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of simulated high burnup nuclear fuel by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manjeet; Sarkar, Arnab; Banerjee, Joydipta; Bhagat, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) grade (Th-U)O2 fuel sample and Simulated High Burn-Up Nuclear Fuels (SIMFUEL) samples mimicking the 28 and 43 GWd/Te irradiated burn-up fuel were studied using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) setup in a simulated hot-cell environment from a distance of > 1.5 m. Resolution of < 38 pm has been used to record the complex spectra of the SIMFUEL samples. By using spectrum comparison and database matching > 60 emission lines of fission products was identified. Among them only a few emission lines were found to generate calibration curves. The study demonstrates the possibility to investigate impurities at concentrations around hundreds of ppm, rapidly at atmospheric pressure without any sample preparation. The results of Ba and Mo showed the advantage of LIBS analysis over traditional methods involving sample dissolution, which introduces possible elemental loss. Limits of detections (LOD) under Ar atmosphere shows significant improvement, which is shown to be due to the formation of stable plasma.

  11. Gamma-Ray Transitions Induced in Nuclear Spin Isomers by X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. B.; Rusu, A. C.; Zoita, N. C.; Iosif, M. C.; Camase, D. T.; Davanloo, F.; Ur, C. A.; Popescu, I. I.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Dussart, R.; Kirischuk, V. I.; Strilchuk, N. V.; Agee, F. J.

    2001-07-01

    Because of the high density of energy storage and the large cross section for its release, nuclear spin isomers have attracted considerable recent interest. The triggering of induced gamma emission from them has encouraged efforts to develop intense sources of short-wavelength radiation. One of the more interesting examples is the 16+ 4-qp isomer of 178Hf which stores 2.445 MeV for a half-life of 31 years meaning that as a material, such isomeric 178Hf would store 1.3 GJ/g. Recently, a sample containing 6.3×1014 nuclei of the isomer of 178Hf was irradiated with X-ray pulses derived from a device operated at 15 mA to produce bremsstrahlung radiation with end point energies set to values between 60 and 90 keV. Emission of gamma radiation from the sample was increased by 1 2% above the quiescent value of spontaneous emission. Such an accelerated decay of the 178Hf isomer is consistent with an integrated cross section of 2.2×10-22 cm2 keV if the resonant absorption of the X-rays takes place below 20 keV as indicated by the use of selective absorbing filters in the irradiating beam. The work reported here describes the current experimental focus and results recently obtained with the use of coincident detection of emitted gamma photons by several detectors.

  12. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  13. Oxidative stress–induced assembly of PML nuclear bodies controls sumoylation of partner proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Umut; Ferhi, Omar; Jeanne, Marion; Benhenda, Shirine; Berthier, Caroline; Jollivet, Florence; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Faklaris, Orestis; Setterblad, Niclas; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein organizes PML nuclear bodies (NBs), which are stress-responsive domains where many partner proteins accumulate. Here, we clarify the basis for NB formation and identify stress-induced partner sumoylation as the primary NB function. NB nucleation does not rely primarily on intermolecular interactions between the PML SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) and SUMO, but instead results from oxidation-mediated PML multimerization. Oxidized PML spherical meshes recruit UBC9, which enhances PML sumoylation, allow partner recruitment through SIM interactions, and ultimately enhance partner sumoylation. Intermolecular SUMO–SIM interactions then enforce partner sequestration within the NB inner core. Accordingly, oxidative stress enhances NB formation and global sumoylation in vivo. Some NB-associated sumoylated partners also become polyubiquitinated by RNF4, precipitating their proteasomal degradation. As several partners are protein-modifying enzymes, NBs could act as sensors that facilitate and confer oxidative stress sensitivity not only to sumoylation but also to other post-translational modifications, thereby explaining alterations of stress response upon PML or NB loss. PMID:24637324

  14. A photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization study of denatured states of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, R.W.; Dobson, C.M.; Hore, P.J.; Radford, S.E.; Rees, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) techniques have been used to examine denatured states of lysozyme produced under a variety of conditions. {sup 1}H CIDNP difference spectra of lysozyme denatured thermally, by the addition of 10 M urea, or by the complete reduction of its four disulfide bonds were found to differ substantially not only from the spectrum of the native protein but also from that expected for a completely unstructured polypeptide chain. Specifically, denatured lysozyme showed a much reduced enhancement of tryptophan relative to tyrosine than did a mixture of blocked amino acids with the same composition as the intact protein. By contrast, the CIDNP spectrum of lysozyme denatured in dimethyl sulfoxide solution was found to be similar to that expected for a random coil. It is proposed that nonrandom hydrophobic interactions are present within the denatured states of lysozyme in aqueous solution and that these reduce the reactivity of tryptophan residues relative to tyrosine residues. Characterization of such interactions is likely to be of considerable significance for an understanding of the process of protein folding.

  15. Cutting Edge: Helicobacter pylori Induces Nuclear Hypersegmentation and Subtype Differentiation of Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Laura C; Weems, Megan N; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human stomach and causes a spectrum of disease that includes gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma. A chronic, neutrophil-rich inflammatory response characterizes this infection. It is established that H. pylori stimulates neutrophil chemotaxis and a robust respiratory burst, but other aspects of this interaction are incompletely defined. We demonstrate here that H. pylori induces N1-like subtype differentiation of human neutrophils as indicated by profound nuclear hypersegmentation, a CD62L(dim), CD16(bright), CD11b(bright), CD66b(bright), CD63(bright) surface phenotype, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and cytotoxicity. Hypersegmentation requires direct neutrophil-H. pylori contact as well as transcription and both host and bacterial protein synthesis, but not urease, NapA, VacA, CagA, or CagT. The concept of neutrophil plasticity is new and, to our knowledge, these data are the first evidence that neutrophils can undergo subtype differentiation in vitro in response to bacterial pathogen infection. We hypothesize that these changes favor H. pylori persistence and disease.

  16. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasmaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Kravarik, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-01

    A 1016 W/cm2 Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD2 targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD2 targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  17. Deuterium-deuterium nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Kravarik, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2013-05-01

    A 1016 W/cm2 Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD2 targets placed into the high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deuterons and carbon ions emission with energy up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deuterium ions may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD2 targets can be availed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deuterons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  18. Peri-nuclear clustering of mitochondria is triggered during aluminum maltolate induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dewitt, David A; Hurd, Jennifer A; Fox, Nena; Townsend, Brigitte E; Griffioen, Kathleen J S; Ghribi, Othman; Savory, John

    2006-07-01

    Synapse loss and neuronal death are key features of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Disrupted axonal transport of mitochondria is a potential mechanism that could contribute to both. As the major producer of ATP in the cell, transport of mitochondria to the synapse is required for synapse maintenance. However, mitochondria also play an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. Investigation of aluminum (Al) maltolate induced apoptosis in human NT2 cells led us to explore the relationship between apoptosis related changes and the disruption of mitochondrial transport. Similar to that observed with tau over expression, NT2 cells exhibit peri-nuclear clustering of mitochondria following treatment with Al maltolate. Neuritic processes largely lacked mitochondria, except in axonal swellings. Similar, but more rapid results were observed following staurosporine administration, indicating that the clustering effect was not specific to Al maltolate. Organelle clustering and transport disruption preceded apoptosis. Incubation with the caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK effectively blocked apoptosis, however failed to prevent organelle clustering. Thus, transport disruption is associated with the initiation, but not necessarily the completion of apoptosis. These results, together with observed transport defects and apoptosis related changes in Alzheimer disease brain suggest that mitochondrial transport disruption may play a significant role in synapse loss and thus the pathogenesis or Alzheimer's disease.

  19. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients. PMID:26469385

  20. Rac1-induced cell migration requires membrane recruitment of the nuclear oncogene SET.

    PubMed

    ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Leeuwen, Ingrid v; Scheres, Nina; Anthony, Eloise C; Hordijk, Peter L

    2007-01-24

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls cell adhesion and motility. The effector loop of Rac1 mediates interactions with downstream effectors, whereas its C-terminus binds the exchange factor beta-Pix, which mediates Rac1 targeting and activation. Here, we report that Rac1, through its C-terminus, also binds the nuclear oncogene SET/I2PP2A, an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A. We found that SET translocates to the plasma membrane in cells that express active Rac1 as well as in migrating cells. Membrane targeting of SET stimulates cell migration in a Rac1-dependent manner. Conversely, reduction of SET expression inhibits Rac1-induced migration, indicating that efficient Rac1 signalling requires membrane recruitment of SET. The recruitment of the SET oncogene to the plasma membrane represents a new feature of Rac1 signalling. Our results suggest a model in which Rac1-stimulated cell motility requires both effector loop-based downstream signalling and recruitment of a signalling amplifier, that is, SET, through the hypervariable C-terminus.

  1. Rac1-induced cell migration requires membrane recruitment of the nuclear oncogene SET

    PubMed Central

    ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Leeuwen, Ingrid v; Scheres, Nina; Anthony, Eloise C; Hordijk, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls cell adhesion and motility. The effector loop of Rac1 mediates interactions with downstream effectors, whereas its C-terminus binds the exchange factor β-Pix, which mediates Rac1 targeting and activation. Here, we report that Rac1, through its C-terminus, also binds the nuclear oncogene SET/I2PP2A, an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A. We found that SET translocates to the plasma membrane in cells that express active Rac1 as well as in migrating cells. Membrane targeting of SET stimulates cell migration in a Rac1-dependent manner. Conversely, reduction of SET expression inhibits Rac1-induced migration, indicating that efficient Rac1 signalling requires membrane recruitment of SET. The recruitment of the SET oncogene to the plasma membrane represents a new feature of Rac1 signalling. Our results suggest a model in which Rac1-stimulated cell motility requires both effector loop-based downstream signalling and recruitment of a signalling amplifier, that is, SET, through the hypervariable C-terminus. PMID:17245428

  2. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-10-15

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients.

  3. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Giuffrida, L; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Kravarik, J; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Szydlowski, A; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    A 10(16) W∕cm(2) Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD(2) targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD(2) targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  4. Cutting Edge: Helicobacter pylori Induces Nuclear Hypersegmentation and Subtype Differentiation of Human Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Laura C.; Weems, Megan N.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human stomach and causes a spectrum of disease that includes gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma. A chronic, neutrophil-rich inflammatory response characterizes this infection. It is established that H. pylori stimulates neutrophil chemotaxis and a robust respiratory burst, but other aspects of this interaction are incompletely defined. We demonstrate here that H. pylori induces N1-like subtype differentiation of human neutrophils as indicated by profound nuclear hypersegmentation, a CD62Ldim, CD16bright, CD11bbright, CD66bbright, CD63bright surface phenotype, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and cytotoxicity. Hypersegmentation requires direct neutrophil–H. pylori contact as well as transcription and both host and bacterial protein synthesis, but not urease, NapA, VacA, CagA, or CagT. The concept of neutrophil plasticity is new and, to our knowledge, these data are the first evidence that neutrophils can undergo subtype differentiation in vitro in response to bacterial pathogen infection. We hypothesize that these changes favor H. pylori persistence and disease. PMID:28148734

  5. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-07-15

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10{sup 11}, 5 × 10{sup 11}, and 1 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V{sub N}), saturation output signal voltage (V{sub S}), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike.

  6. Activation of nuclear PTEN by inhibition of Notch signaling induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Lee, H-W; Baek, J-H; Cho, Y-H; Kang, H G; Jeong, J S; Song, J; Park, H-S; Chun, K-H

    2016-01-14

    Mutation in PTEN has not yet been detected, but its function as a tumor suppressor is inactivated in many cancers. In this study we determined that, activated Notch signaling disables PTEN by phosphorylation and thereby contributes to gastric tumorigenesis. Notch inhibition by small interfering RNA or γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Notch inhibition induced dephosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of PTEN, which led to PTEN nuclear localization. Overexpression of activated Notch1-induced phosphorylation of PTEN and reversed GSI-induced mitotic arrest. Dephosphorylated nuclear PTEN caused prometaphase arrest by interaction with the cyclin B1-CDK1 complex, resulting in their accumulation in the nucleus and subsequent apoptosis. We found a correlation between high expression levels of Notch1 and low survival rates and, similarly, between reduced nuclear PTEN expression and increasing the TNM classification of malignant tumours stages in malignant tissues from gastric cancer patients. The growth of Notch1-depleted gastric tumors was significantly retarded in xenografted mice, and in addition, PTEN deletion restored growth similar to control tumors. We also demonstrated that combination treatment with GSI and chemotherapeutic agents significantly reduced the orthotopically transplanted gastric tumors in mice without noticeable toxicity. Overall, our findings suggest that inhibition of Notch signaling can be employed as a PTEN activator, making it a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  7. Nuclear calcium controls the apoptotic-like cell death induced by d-erythro-sphinganine in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Cotelle, Valérie; Thuleau, Patrice; Xiong, Tou Cheu; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Graziana, Annick; Bellec, Yannick; Faure, Jean-Denis; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies performed in animals have highlighted the major role of sphingolipids in regulating the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Sphingolipids have also been shown to induce cell death in plants via calcium-based signalling pathways but the contribution of free cytosolic and/or nuclear calcium in the overall process has never been evaluated. Here, we show that increase in tobacco BY-2 cells of the endogenous content of Long Chain Bases (LCBs) caused by external application of d-erythro-sphinganine (DHS) is followed by immediate dose-dependent elevations of cellular free calcium concentration within the first minute in the cytosol and 10min later in the nucleus. Cells challenged with DHS enter a death process through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Lanthanum chloride, a general blocker of calcium entry, suppresses the cellular calcium variations and the PCD induced by DHS. Interestingly, dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5) and [(+)-dizocilpine] (MK801), two inhibitors of animal and plant ionotropic glutamate receptors, suppress DHS-induced cell death symptoms by selectively inhibiting the variations of nuclear calcium concentration. The selective action of these compounds demonstrates the crucial role of nuclear calcium signature in controlling DHS-induced cell death in tobacco cells. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PGE2/EP3/SRC signaling induces EGFR nuclear translocation and growth through EGFR ligands release in lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bazzani, Lorenzo; Donnini, Sandra; Finetti, Federica; Christofori, Gerhard; Ziche, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) interacts with tyrosine kinases receptor signaling in both tumor and stromal cells supporting tumor progression. Here we demonstrate that in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells, A549 and GLC82, PGE2 promotes nuclear translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (nEGFR), affects gene expression and induces cell growth. Indeed, cyclin D1, COX-2, iNOS and c-Myc mRNA levels are upregulated following PGE2 treatment. The nuclear localization sequence (NLS) of EGFR as well as its tyrosine kinase activity are required for the effect of PGE2 on nEGFR and downstream signaling activities. PGE2 binds its bona fide receptor EP3 which by activating SRC family kinases, induces ADAMs activation which, in turn, releases EGFR-ligands from the cell membrane and promotes nEGFR. Amphiregulin (AREG) and Epiregulin (EREG) appear to be involved in nEGFR promoted by the PGE2/EP3-SRC axis. Pharmacological inhibition or silencing of the PGE2/EP3/SRC-ADAMs signaling axis or EGFR ligands i.e. AREG and EREG expression abolishes nEGFR induced by PGE2. In conclusion, PGE2 induces NSCLC cell proliferation by EP3 receptor, SRC-ADAMs activation, EGFR ligands shedding and finally, phosphorylation and nEGFR. Since nuclear EGFR is a hallmark of cancer aggressiveness, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for the contribution of PGE2 to tumor progression. PMID:28415726

  9. Implementation of a new energy-angular distribution of particles emitted by deuteron induced nuclear reaction in transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, Patrick; Koning, Arjan; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    MCUNED code is an MCNPX extension able to handle evaluated nuclear data library for light ion transport simulations. In this work the MCUNED code is improved to describe more accurately the neutron emission during deuteron induced nuclear reaction. This code update consists in introducing a new methodology to take into account the angular distribution of neutron produced by deuteron breakup reaction. To carry out this work a new formulation for the angular distribution of neutrons produced by breakup reaction has been proposed. The implementation of this new methodology requires the use of extra parameters which are provided by the nuclear code TALYS and stored in the ENDF file. This new methodology shows significant improvement in comparison with the former treatment of neutron emission kinematics, these results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. Activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on neodymium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rare earths, the reactions on neodymium for production of therapeutic radionuclides were measured for the first time. The excitation functions of the natNd(d,x) 151,150,149,148m,148g,146,144,143Pm, 149,147,139mNd, 142Pr and 139gCe nuclear reactions were assessed by using the stacked foil activation technique and high resolution γ-spectrometry. The experimental excitation functions were compared to the theoretical predictions calculated with the modified model codes ALICE-IPPE-D and EMPIRE-II-D and with the data in the TENDL-2012 library based on latest version of the TALYS code. The application of the data in the field of medical isotope production and nuclear reaction theory is discussed.

  11. Nuclear vasohibin-2 promotes cell proliferation by inducing G0/G1 to S phase progression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qianqian; Zhou, Jia; Tu, Min; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhanjun; Lu, Zipeng; Wei, Jishu; Song, Guoxin; Chen, Jianmin; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi; Gao, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    As a member of the vasohibin (VASH2) family, VASH2 is localized intracellularly as a nuclear and cytoplasmic type. Cytoplasmic VASH2 is associated with carcinoma angiogenesis and malignant transformation and promotes cancer growth. However, the function of nuclear VASH2 has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to detect the nuclear VASH2 expression profile in human organs and tissues by protein microarray technique. To examine the function of nuclear VASH2, we analyzed the relationship between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, and stably constructed VASH2 overexpression and knockdown in LO2 and HepG2 cell lines, based on a previous study in hepatic cells. The study was conducted using bromodeoxyuridine, immunofluorescent staining, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Nuclear VASH2 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells in normal and cancer tissues. There was a significant positive correlation between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, indicating that nuclear VASH2 positively correlated with cell proliferation in normal and cancer tissues. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation test showed that nuclear VASH2 increased the S-phase population and promoted cell proliferation, while VASH2 knockdown reduced BrdU absorbance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that nuclear VASH2 overexpression increased the S-phase population in LO2 and HepG2 cells, while nuclear VASH2 knockdown reduced the S-phase population and increased the G0/G1 population. The findings of this study challenge the classic view of VASH2, which was previously reported as an angiogenesis factor. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, these results are the first clinical data indicating that nuclear VASH2, but not cytoplasmic VASH2, promotes cell proliferation by driving the cell cycle from the G0/G1 to S phase.

  12. a Study of Proton Induced Nuclear Fragmentation in the Threshold Region: 1 TO 20 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, Thomas Craig

    This thesis contains the details of the experimental set-up and final results of BNL E-778. The experimental objective was to study proton induced nuclear fragmentation using an internal gas jet target facility that was specifically designed for this experiment and installed in the AGS main ring. The fragment telescopes were designed to measure a broad range of fragment charge (2 to 14) and kinetic energy (5 to 100 MeV). Using a mixed gas target (1% or 3% Xe with H(,2)), normalized fragment production cross sections were obtained by separately measuring p-p elastic production from the H(,2) component. Fragment production cross sections are observed to rise dramatically ((TURN) x 10) for incident proton energies between 1 and 10 GeV, while above 10 GeV, fragment production appears to be independent of the incident proton energy. The measured differential cross sections (above 10 GeV) are found to agree (within 20%) with the differential cross sections measured during a previous internal target experiment (E-591) conducted at FNAL, where the lowest available proton energies were 50 GeV. The measured fragment kinetic energy spectra (above 10 GeV) are fit with a functional form motivated by the observation that fragment production in an excited nuclear system is consistent with a critical phenomenon (a liquid -gas phase transition). The failure of this functional form at the lowest available incident energies (below 10 GeV) is interpreted as the observation of an additional fragment production mechanism. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence for an asymmetric fission process (binary decay), is used to modify the original functional form for the two-component spectra. It is concluded that, in the threshold region, two fragment production mechanisms are observed. Although insufficient information is available to uniquely separate the two components, certain features of the asymmetric fission mechanism are identified. The observed p-nucleus systematics are also

  13. Nuclear-spin-induced localization of edge states in two-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chen-Hsuan; Stano, Peter; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the influence of nuclear spins on the resistance of helical edge states of two-dimensional topological insulators (2DTIs). Via the hyperfine interaction, nuclear spins allow electron backscattering, otherwise forbidden by time-reversal symmetry. We identify two backscattering mechanisms, depending on whether the nuclear spins are ordered or not. Their temperature dependence is distinct but both give resistance, which increases with the edge length, decreasing temperature, and increasing strength of the electron-electron interaction. Overall, we find that the nuclear spins will typically shut down the conductance of the 2DTI edges at zero temperature.

  14. Peptidoglycan induces loss of a nuclear peptidoglycan recognition protein during host tissue development in a beneficial animal-bacterial symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Troll, Joshua V; Adin, Dawn M; Wier, Andrew M; Paquette, Nicholas; Silverman, Neal; Goldman, William E; Stadermann, Frank J; Stabb, Eric V; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2009-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are mediators of innate immunity and recently have been implicated in developmental regulation. To explore the interplay between these two roles, we characterized a PGRP in the host squid Euprymna scolopes (EsPGRP1) during colonization by the mutualistic bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Previous research on the squid-vibrio symbiosis had shown that, upon colonization of deep epithelium-lined crypts of the host light organ, symbiont-derived peptidoglycan monomers induce apoptosis-mediated regression of remote epithelial fields involved in the inoculation process. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EsPGRP1 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells, and symbiont colonization induces the loss of EsPGRP1 from apoptotic nuclei. The loss of nuclear EsPGRP1 occurred prior to DNA cleavage and breakdown of the nuclear membrane, but followed chromatin condensation, suggesting that it occurs during late-stage apoptosis. Experiments with purified peptidoglycan monomers and with V. fischeri mutants defective in peptidoglycan-monomer release provided evidence that these molecules trigger nuclear loss of EsPGRP1 and apoptosis. The demonstration of a nuclear PGRP is unprecedented, and the dynamics of EsPGRP1 during apoptosis provide a striking example of a connection between microbial recognition and developmental responses in the establishment of symbiosis.

  15. Nuclear Shape Changes Are Induced by Knockdown of the SWI/SNF ATPase BRG1 and Are Independent of Cytoskeletal Connections

    PubMed Central

    Imbalzano, Karen M.; Cohet, Nathalie; Wu, Qiong; Underwood, Jean M.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in nuclear morphology occur during normal development and have been observed during the progression of several diseases. The shape of a nucleus is governed by the balance of forces exerted by nuclear-cytoskeletal contacts and internal forces created by the structure of the chromatin and nuclear envelope. However, factors that regulate the balance of these forces and determine nuclear shape are poorly understood. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme ATPase, BRG1, has been shown to contribute to the regulation of overall cell size and shape. Here we document that immortalized mammary epithelial cells show BRG1-dependent nuclear shape changes. Specifically, knockdown of BRG1 induced grooves in the nuclear periphery that could be documented by cytological and ultrastructural methods. To test the hypothesis that the observed changes in nuclear morphology resulted from altered tension exerted by the cytoskeleton, we disrupted the major cytoskeletal networks and quantified the frequency of BRG1-dependent changes in nuclear morphology. The results demonstrated that disruption of cytoskeletal networks did not change the frequency of BRG1-induced nuclear shape changes. These findings suggest that BRG1 mediates control of nuclear shape by internal nuclear mechanisms that likely control chromatin dynamics. PMID:23405182

  16. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of the electric dipole moment of radium induced by the nuclear Schiff moment

    SciTech Connect

    Bieron, Jacek; Gaigalas, Gediminas; Gaidamauskas, Erikas; Fritzsche, Stephan; Indelicato, Paul; Joensson, Per

    2009-07-15

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock theory has been employed to calculate the electric dipole moment of the 7s6d {sup 3}D{sub 2} state of radium induced by the nuclear Schiff moment. The results are dominated by valence and core-valence electron correlation effects. We show that the correlation effects can be evaluated in a converged series of multiconfiguration expansions.

  17. Importance of nuclear localization for the apoptosis-induced activity of a fungal galectin AAL (Agrocybe aegerita lectin)

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yi; Feng, Lei; Tong, Xin; Wang, Kun; Li, De Feng; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tang, Zi Jian; Liu, Hong Hong; Jiang, Shuai; Guo, Lin; Wang, Da Cheng; Sun, Hui

    2009-08-28

    Agrocybe aegerita lectin (AAL) was identified previously in our group as a novel galectin from medicinal fungi Agrocybe aegerita, and has been shown to effectively induce cancer cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. Here, AAL was observed to translocate into the HeLa cell nucleus and induce cell apoptosis when it was predominantly in the nucleus. The N-terminus and C-terminus of AAL were required for nuclear localization. Site mutated proteins were generated based on AAL structure. Dimer interface mutant I25G, carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) mutant R63H, and loop region mutant L33A could not enter the nucleus and lost the ability to induce apoptosis. CRD mutant H59Q and loop region mutant I144G maintained nuclear localization activity, and H59Q retained residual bioability but I144G had no activity, indicating that nuclear localization is important but not sufficient for AAL to become apoptotically active. Our findings provide a novel antitumor mechanism of fungal galectin.

  18. Characterization of organic contaminants in porous media using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupert, Y. K.

    2015-12-01

    The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. This laboratory research focuses on combining two innovative geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to assess their suitability to characterize and quantify organic contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), and ethoxy-nonafluorobutane, an engineered dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), have been selected as representative organic contaminants. Low-field NMR relaxation time (T2) measurements and diffusion-relaxation (D-T2) correlation measurements, as well as low frequency SIP measurements (<10 kHz) are performed to quantify the amount of these two organic compounds in the presence of water in three types of porous media (sands, clay, and various sand-clay mixtures). The T2, D-T2, and SIP measurements are made on water, toluene, and the synthetic DNAPL in each porous media to understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR and SIP responses in each fluid. We then plan to make measurements on water-organic mixtures with varied concentrations of organic compounds in each porous medium to resolve the NMR and SIP response of the organic contaminants from that of water and to quantify the amount of organic contaminants. Building a relationship between SIP and NMR signatures from organic contaminants not only provides a fundamental yet important petrophysical relationship, but also builds a framework for continued investigation into how these two methods synergize. This will also provide spatially dense information about organic contaminated natural sediments at scales that will improve the quantitative characterization and remediation of contaminated sites.The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts

  19. Comparison of reprogramming genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and nuclear transfer cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Zhendong; Shen, Jingling; Shan, Zhiyan; Shen, Xinghui; Wu, Yanshuang; Sun, Ruizhen; Li, Tong; Yuan, Rui; Zhao, Qiaoshi; Bai, Guangyu; Gu, Yanli; Jin, Lianhong; Lei, Lei

    2014-08-01

    The most effective reprogramming methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are widely used in biological research and regenerative medicine, yet the mechanism that reprograms somatic cells to totipotency remains unclear and thus reprogramming efficiency is still low. Microarray technology has been employed in analyzing the transcriptomes changes during iPS reprogramming. Unfortunately, it is difficult to obtain enough DNA from SCNT reconstructed embryos to take advantage of this technology. In this study, we aimed to identify critical genes from the transcriptional profile for iPS reprogramming and compared expression levels of these genes in SCNT reprogramming. By integrating gene expression information from microarray databases and published studies comparing somatic cells with either miPSCs or mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we obtained two lists of co-upregulated genes. The gene ontology (GO) enriched analysis of these two lists demonstrated that the reprogramming process is associated with numerous biological processes. Specifically, we selected 32 genes related to heterochromatin, embryonic development, and cell cycle from our co-upregulated gene datasets and examined the gene expression level in iPSCs and SCNT embryos by qPCR. The results revealed that some reprogramming related genes in iPSCs were also expressed in SCNT reprogramming. We established the network of gene interactions that occur with genes differentially expressed in iPS and SCNT reprogramming and then performed GO analysis on the genes in the network. The network genes function in chromatin organization, heterochromatin, transcriptional regulation, and cell cycle. Further researches to improve reprogramming efficiency, especially in SCNT, will focus on functional studies of these selected genes.

  20. Characterizing petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Chi; Rankey, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    Unlike sandstones, with well-characterized correlations between porosity and permeability, carbonate rocks are well known for their highly complex petrophysical behaviors due to their intrinsically heterogeneous pore shape, pore size, and pore distributions and connectivity. The characterization of petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks, including rock properties and rock-fluid interactions, remains big challenges. This laboratory study focuses on integrating two geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to determine porosity, pore size distribution, and permeability of carbonate rocks. NMR measures the relaxation of hydrogen nuclei at pore scale. Samples with different pore structures saturated by fluids have molecular relaxation responses to the external magnetic field which could generate various NMR signals. Permeability estimation from NMR in siliciclastic rocks is routine, however, is problematic in carbonates. SIP determines complex resistivity of a sample across a wide range of frequency and is sensitive to variations in the properties of solid-fluid and fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media. Previous studies investigated the relationships between permeability and parameters derived from SIP data, but are restricted to narrow lithology range. Our study used carbonate core samples from three depositional environments: tidal zone, shallow marine, and platform/reef margin of an atoll. Samples were fully saturated by water for T2 relaxation measurements and complex conductivity measurements at low frequencies. We compare the pore volume to surface area ratio measured from NMR and SIP and assess the applicability of established petrophysical models to estimate permeability from NMR and SIP data. We hope to build a relationship between NMR signals, SIP responses and petrophysical properties in carbonate rocks. The results could also provide new data and help further understand the unique and complex pore

  1. Massive reshaping of genome-nuclear lamina interactions during oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Christelle; de Graaf, Carolyn A; Pagie, Ludo; Visser, Nils L; de Haas, Marcel; de Vries, Sandra S; Peric-Hupkes, Daniel; van Steensel, Bas; Peeper, Daniel S

    2017-10-01

    Cellular senescence is a mechanism that virtually irreversibly suppresses the proliferative capacity of cells in response to various stress signals. This includes the expression of activated oncogenes, which causes Oncogene-Induced Senescence (OIS). A body of evidence points to the involvement in OIS of chromatin reorganization, including the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF). The nuclear lamina (NL) is an important contributor to genome organization and has been implicated in cellular senescence and organismal aging. It interacts with multiple regions of the genome called lamina-associated domains (LADs). Some LADs are cell-type specific, whereas others are conserved between cell types and are referred to as constitutive LADs (cLADs). Here, we used DamID to investigate the changes in genome-NL interactions in a model of OIS triggered by the expression of the common BRAF(V600E) oncogene. We found that OIS cells lose most of their cLADS, suggesting the loss of a specific mechanism that targets cLADs to the NL. In addition, multiple genes relocated to the NL. Unexpectedly, they were not repressed, implying the abrogation of the repressive activity of the NL during OIS. Finally, OIS cells displayed an increased association of telomeres with the NL. Our study reveals that senescent cells acquire a new type of LAD organization and suggests the existence of as yet unknown mechanisms that tether cLADs to the NL and repress gene expression at the NL. © 2017 Lenain et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy.

  3. Nuclear proteins and prolactin-induced annexin Icp35 gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y H; Horseman, N D

    1992-03-01

    Annexin Icp35 is the major PRL-stimulated gene in the pigeon cropsac. The regulation of its promoter has been studied by in vitro assays for nuclear protein binding and transcription. Proteins present in nuclear extracts of PRL-stimulated, but not control, pigeon cropsac contained factors which specifically bound to sequences within 73 base pairs upstream of the cp35 transcription start point. The binding of some of the factors was localized to a region between -32 and -73 by gel-shift assays. Cell-free transcription was used to determine whether the cp35 promoter could be influenced by factors present in cropsac nuclear extract. HeLa cell nuclear extract transcribed the cp35 gene at a basal rate. Transcription of the cp35 gene, but not adml, was synergistically enhanced by nuclear extract from PRL-stimulated cropsac. Nuclear extract from unstimulated pigeon cropsacs did not stimulate either cp35 or adml transcription. A template from which sequences upstream of the cp35 gene TATA box were deleted was transcribed by HeLa cell extract but unaffected by any cropsac factors. These results demonstrate that PRL can cause the expression of one or more nuclear factors that bind to 5'-flanking DNA of cp35 and activate the gene's transcription.

  4. Modeled Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Yttrium, Zirconium, Niobium, and Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M G

    2006-06-13

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron, proton, and deuteron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from strontium (Z = 38) to rhodium (Z = 45).

  5. Nuclear translocation of Acinetobacter baumannii transposase induces DNA methylation of CpG regions in the promoters of E-cadherin gene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Su Man; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Seung Il; Kim, Dong Sun; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins has emerged as a pathogenic mechanism whereby bacterial proteins induce host cell pathology. In this study, we examined nuclear targeting of Acinetobacter baumannii transposase (Tnp) and subsequent epigenetic changes in host cells. Tnp of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 possesses nuclear localization signals (NLSs), (225)RKRKRK(230). Transient expression of A. baumannii Tnp fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) resulted in the nuclear localization of these proteins in COS-7 cells, whereas the truncated Tnp without NLSs fused with GFP were exclusively localized in the cytoplasm. A. baumannii Tnp was found in outer membrane vesicles, which delivered this protein to the nucleus of host cells. Nuclear expression of A. baumannii Tnp fused with GFP in A549 cells induced DNA methylation of CpG regions in the promoters of E-cadherin (CDH1) gene, whereas the cytoplasmic localization of the truncated Tnp without NLSs fused with GFP did not induce DNA methylation. DNA methylation in the promoters of E-cadherin gene induced by nuclear targeting of A. baumannii Tnp resulted in down-regulation of gene expression. In conclusion, our data show that nuclear traffic of A. baumannii Tnp induces DNA methylation of CpG regions in the promoters of E-cadherin gene, which subsequently down-regulates gene expression. This study provides a new insight into the epigenetic control of host genes by bacterial proteins.

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer induces changes in the expression of nuclear β-catenin: prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the cornerstone of treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Although high local control is achieved, overall rates of distant control remain suboptimal. Colorectal carcinogenesis is associated with critical alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway involved in proliferation and survival. The aim of this study was to assess whether CRT induces changes in the expression of β-catenin/E-cadherin, and to determine whether these changes are associated with survival. Methods The Immunohistochemical expression of nuclear β-catenin and membranous E-cadherin was prospectively analysed in tumour blocks from 98 stage II/III rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative CRT. Tumour samples were collected before and after CRT treatment. All patients were treated with pelvic RT (46–50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) intravenous infusion (225 mg/m2) or capecitabine (825 mg/m2) during RT treatment, followed by total mesorectal excision (TME). Disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method and a multivariate Cox regression model was employed for the Multivariate analysis. Results CRT induced significant changes in the expression of nuclear β-catenin (49% of patients presented an increased expression after CRT, 17% a decreased expression and 34% no changes; p = 0.001). After a median follow-up of 25 months, patients that overexpressed nuclear β-catenin after CRT showed poor survival compared with patients that experienced a decrease in nuclear β-catenin expression (3-year DFS 92% vs. 43%, HR 0.17; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.8; p = 0.02). In the multivariate analysis for DFS, increased nuclear β-catenin expression after CRT almost reached the cut-off for significance (p = 0.06). Conclusions In our study, preoperative CRT for LARC induced significant changes in nuclear β-catenin expression, which had a major impact on survival. Finding a way to decrease CRT

  7. Redox signalling to nuclear regulatory proteins by reactive oxygen species contributes to oestrogen-induced growth of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Okoh, V O; Garba, N A; Penney, R B; Das, J; Deoraj, A; Singh, K P; Sarkar, S; Felty, Q; Yoo, C; Jackson, R M; Roy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: 17β-Oestradiol (E2)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in regulating the growth of breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this is not clear. Here we show how ROS through a novel redox signalling pathway involving nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and p27 contribute to E2-induced growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Methods: Chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, mass spectrometry, redox western blot, colony formation, cell proliferation, ROS assay, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used to study the role of NRF-1. Results: The major novel finding of this study is the demonstration of oxidative modification of phosphatases PTEN and CDC25A by E2-generated ROS along with the subsequent activation of AKT and ERK pathways that culminated in the activation of NRF-1 leading to the upregulation of cell cycle genes. 17β-Oestradiol-induced ROS by influencing nuclear proteins p27 and Jab1 also contributed to the growth of MCF-7 cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our results present evidence in the support of E2-induced ROS-mediated AKT signalling leading to the activation of NRF-1-regulated cell cycle genes as well as the impairment of p27 activity, which is presumably necessary for the growth of MCF-7 cells. These observations are important because they provide a new paradigm by which oestrogen may contribute to the growth of breast cancer. PMID:25965299

  8. Nuclear receptor ERR alpha and coactivator PGC-1 beta are effectors of IFN-gamma-induced host defense.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Junichiro; Laganière, Josée; Mehl, Isaac R; Barish, Grant D; Chong, Ling-Wa; Li, Xiangli; Scheffler, Immo E; Mock, Dennis C; Bataille, Alain R; Robert, Francois; Lee, Chih-Hao; Giguère, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M

    2007-08-01

    Macrophage activation by the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a critical component of the host innate response to bacterial pathogenesis. However, the precise nature of the IFN-gamma-induced activation pathway is not known. Here we show using genome-wide expression and chromatin-binding profiling that IFN-gamma induces the expression of many nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory chain machinery via activation of the nuclear receptor ERR alpha (estrogen-related receptor alpha, NR3B1). Studies with macrophages lacking ERR alpha demonstrate that it is required for induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and efficient clearance of Listeria monocytogenes (LM) in response to IFN-gamma. As a result, mice lacking ERR alpha are susceptible to LM infection, a phenotype that is localized to bone marrow-derived cells. Furthermore, we found that IFN-gamma-induced activation of ERR alpha depends on coactivator PGC-1 beta (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 beta), which appears to be a direct target for the IFN-gamma/STAT-1 signaling cascade. Thus, ERR alpha and PGC-1 beta act together as a key effector of IFN-gamma-induced mitochondrial ROS production and host defense.

  9. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,40-trichloro-20-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergenc...

  10. Novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction in wheat (Triticum aestivum) induces vigorous plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interspecific hybridization can be considered an accelerator of evolution, otherwise a slow process, solely dependent on mutation and recombination. Upon interspecific hybridization, several novel interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes emerge which provide additional sources of diversi...

  11. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,40-trichloro-20-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergenc...

  12. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  13. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Wei, Fang; Gao, Shujun; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Tong, Yin; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV.

  14. Nuclear clusterin/XIP8, an x-ray-induced Ku70-binding protein that signals cell death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chin-Rang; Leskov, Konstantin; Hosley-Eberlein, Kelly; Criswell, Tracy; Pink, John J.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Boothman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Clusterin [CLU, a.k.a. TRPM-2, SGP-2, or ionizing radiation (IR)-induced protein-8 (XIP8)] was implicated in apoptosis, tissue injury, and aging. Its function remains elusive. We reisolated CLU/XIP8 by yeast two-hybrid analyses using as bait the DNA double-strand break repair protein Ku70. We show that a delayed (2–3 days), low-dose (0.02–10 Gy) IR-inducible nuclear CLU/XIP8 protein coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized (by confocal microscopy) in vivo with Ku70/Ku80, a DNA damage sensor and key double-strand break repair protein, in human MCF-7:WS8 breast cancer cells. Overexpression of nuclear CLU/XIP8 or its minimal Ku70 binding domain (120 aa of CLU/XIP8 C terminus) in nonirradiated MCF-7:WS8 cells dramatically reduced cell growth and colony-forming ability concomitant with increased G1 cell cycle checkpoint arrest and increased cell death. Enhanced expression and accumulation of nuclear CLU/XIP8-Ku70/Ku80 complexes appears to be an important cell death signal after IR exposure. PMID:10823943

  15. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  16. Nuclear Translocation of Jacob in Hippocampal Neurons after Stimuli Inducing Long-Term Potentiation but Not Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Behnisch, Thomas; YuanXiang, PingAn; Bethge, Philipp; Parvez, Suhel; Chen, Ying; Yu, Jin; Karpova, Anna; Frey, Julietta U.; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years a number of potential synapto-nuclear protein messengers have been characterized that are thought to be involved in plasticity-related gene expression, and that have the capacity of importin- mediated and activity-dependent nuclear import. However, there is a surprising paucity of data showing the nuclear import of such proteins in cellular models of learning and memory. Only recently it was found that the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein 2 (CREB2) transits to the nucleus during long-term depression (LTD), but not during long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission in hippocampal primary neurons. Jacob is another messenger that couples NMDA-receptor-activity to nuclear gene expression. We therefore aimed to study whether Jacob accumulates in the nucleus in physiological relevant models of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the dynamics of Jacob's nuclear import following induction of NMDA-receptor dependent LTP or LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in rat hippocampal slices. Using time-lapse imaging of neurons expressing a Jacob-Green-Fluorescent-Protein we found that Jacob rapidly translocates from dendrites to the nucleus already during the tetanization period of LTP, but not after induction of LTD. Immunocytochemical stainings confirmed the nuclear accumulation of endogenous Jacob in comparison to apical dendrites after induction of LTP but not LTD. Complementary findings were obtained after induction of NMDA-receptor dependent chemical LTP and LTD in hippocampal primary neurons. However, in accordance with previous studies, high concentrations of NMDA and glycine as well as specific activation of extrasynaptic NMDA-receptors resembling pathological conditions induce an even more profound increase of nuclear Jacob levels. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these findings suggest that the two major forms of NMDA-receptor dependent

  17. Tetrachlorobenzoquinone induces Nrf2 activation via rapid Bach1 nuclear export/ubiquitination and JNK-P62 signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Chuanyang; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Liu, Zixuan; Wang, Yawen; Wang, Yuxin; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that tetrachlorobenzoquinone (TCBQ), an active metabolite of pentachlorophenol, has effects on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a cellular sensor of electrophilic or oxidative stress that regulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes and defensive proteins. We have illustrated that TCBQ activates Nrf2 signaling by promoting the formation of the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) cross-linking dimer and the formation of an ubiquitination switch from Nrf2 to Keap1. The activation of Nrf2 by TCBQ may serve as an adaptive response to a TCBQ-induced oxidative insult. BTB and CNC homolog 1 (Bach1) compete with Nrf2, leading to the negative regulation of the antioxidant response element (ARE). In this report, we propose that TCBQ induces the dynamic inactivation of Bach1. We observed a rapid nuclear efflux of Bach1 and an accumulation of Nrf2 in nuclei upon TCBQ treatment that precedes the binding of Nrf2 with ARE. We found that the nuclear export of Bach1 is dependent on its chromosomal region maintenance 1 (Crm1) interaction and tyrosine phosphorylation. Although TCBQ induces the ubiquitination of Bach1, TCBQ also increases the mRNA and protein levels of Bach1, returning Bach1 to normal levels. Moreover, we found that TCBQ-induced activation of Nrf2 involves c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-P62 signaling.

  18. FOXO3 promoted mitophagy via nuclear retention induced by manganese chloride in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongmei; Ma, Junxiang; Chen, Li; Guo, Caixia; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Tian; Zhang, Shixuan; Zhu, Zhonghui; Tian, Lin; Niu, Piye

    2017-09-20

    To evaluate the role of FOXO3 during the process of mitophagy induced by manganese chloride (MnCl2), mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy were detected before and after FOXO3 was knocked down in SH-SY5Y cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and a western blot were used to detect mitochondrial ultrastructure and autophagy, Ca(2+) levels, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), autophagosomes and mitophagy marker proteins (p62, LC3-II/LC3-I, Beclin-1, PINK1 and P-parkin), respectively. After SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to MnCl2, the levels of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and mitochondrial ROS increased but the mitochondrial MMP decreased significantly compared to the control in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.05), which indicated that MnCl2 can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction. Under TEM, mitophagy and autolysosomes were observed. The WB results also showed that mitophagy marker proteins including LC3-II/LC3-I, Beclin-1, PINK1 and P-parkin except for p62 increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by FOXO3 nuclear retention, which indicated that MnCl2 can lead to mitophagy and FOXO3 nuclear translocation may be involved in this process. After FOXO3 was knocked down, the inverse results of mitophagy and the levels of mitochondrial ROS decreasing were observed, which showed that FOXO3 silencing could inhibit mitophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by MnCl2. Our results indicated that Mn could induce mitophagy by enhancing FOXO3 nuclear retention, which might promote mitophagy induced by MnCl2.

  19. Ethanol induces rapid lipid peroxidation and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B in cerebral vascular smooth muscle: relation to alcohol-induced brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Gebrewold, Asefa; Zhang, Aimin; Altura, Bella T

    2002-06-07

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that acute administration of alcohol (ethanol) to primary cultured cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells will cause lipid peroxidation, inhibition of IkappaB phosphorylation, and inhibition of nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB). Ethanol (10, 25, 100 mM) resulted in concentration-dependent rises in malondialdehyde in as little as 30-45 min after exposure to the alcohol, rising to levels 2.5-10x normal after 18-24 h. Using EMSA assays and specific antibodies, ethanol caused three DNA-binding proteins (p50, p65, c-Rel) to rise in nuclear extracts in a concentration-dependent manner. Using a rabbit antibody, IkappaB phosphorylation (and degradation) was stimulated by ethanol (in a concentration-dependent manner) and inhibited by a low concentration of the NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. These new biochemical and molecular data indicate that ethanol, even in physiologic concentrations, can elicit rapid lipid peroxidation and activation of NF-kappaB in cerebral vascular muscle cells. The present results when viewed in light of other recently published data suggest that ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation and activation of nuclear transcription factors probably play important roles in alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage, neurobehavioral actions and stroke.

  20. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  1. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  2. IkappaB-zeta, a new anti-inflammatory nuclear protein induced by lipopolysaccharide, is a negative regulator for nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Muta, Tatsushi; Yamazaki, Soh; Eto, Akiko; Motoyama, Masaiwa; Takeshige, Koichiro

    2003-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), a prominent cellular response to bacterial endotoxin or other microbial products, must be strictly regulated because excessive activation leads to overproduction of cytotoxic cytokines that culminates in septic shock. During screening for genes up-regulated upon inflammation, we identified a new member of the IkappaB family proteins with the ankyrin-repeats. This protein, designated IkappaB-zeta, is hardly detectable in resting cells, but is strongly induced upon stimulation by lipopolysaccharide, which stimulates cells through the Toll-like receptor 4. Interleukin-1beta stimulation also results in the strong induction of IkappaB-zeta, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha does not. In contrast to IkappaB-alpha or IkappaB-beta, IkappaB-zeta localizes in the nucleus, where it inhibits NF-kappaB activity. NF-kappaB activity is essential for the induction of IkappaB-zeta, but is not sufficient. Thus, this protein is a new anti-inflammatory protein, which is specifically induced upon inflammation to regulate NF-kappaB activity.

  3. Nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability induced by senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) aqueous extract in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Silva, C R; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2014-11-27

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (senna) is commonly used in self-medication and is frequently used to treat intestine constipation. A previous study involving bacteria and plasmid DNA suggested the possible toxicity of the aqueous extract of senna (SAE). The aim of this study was to extend the knowledge concerning SAE genotoxicity mechanisms because of its widespread use and its risks to human health. We investigated the impact of SAE on nuclear DNA and on the stability of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wt, ogg1, msh6, and ogg1msh6) strains, monitoring the formation of petite mutants. Our results demonstrated that SAE specifically increased Can(R) mutagenesis only in the msh6 mutant, supporting the view that SAE can induce misincorporation errors in DNA. We observed a significant increase in the frequency of petite colonies in all studied strains. Our data indicate that SAE has genotoxic activity towards both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  4. Application of Dipole-dipole, Induced Polarization, and CSAMT Electrical Methods to Detect Evidence of an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. J.; Felske, D.

    2013-12-01

    There is little experience with application of electrical methods that can be applied during the continuation period of an on-site inspection (OSI), one of the verification methods of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In order add to such experience, we conducted controlled source audiomagnetotelluric (CSAMT), dipole-dipole resistivity, and induced polarization electrical measurements along three survey lines over and near to ground zero of an historic nuclear explosion. The presentation will provide details and results of the surveys, an assessment of application of the method toward the purposes of an OSI, and an assessment of the manpower and time requirements for data collection and processing that will impact OSI inspection team operations. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Histone H2B-IFI16 Recognition of Nuclear Herpesviral Genome Induces Cytoplasmic Interferon-β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Jawed; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Kumar, Binod; Dutta, Dipanjan; Roy, Arunava; Chikoti, Leela; Pisano, Gina; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2016-01-01

    IFI16 (gamma-interferon-inducible protein 16), a predominantly nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, also functions as an innate immune response DNA sensor and induces the IL-1β and antiviral type-1 interferon-β (IFN-β) cytokines. We have shown that IFI16, in association with BRCA1, functions as a sequence independent nuclear sensor of episomal dsDNA genomes of KSHV, EBV and HSV-1. Recognition of these herpesvirus genomes resulted in IFI16 acetylation, BRCA1-IFI16-ASC-procaspase-1 inflammasome formation, cytoplasmic translocation, and IL-1β generation. Acetylated IFI16 also interacted with cytoplasmic STING and induced IFN-β. However, the identity of IFI16 associated nuclear proteins involved in STING activation and the mechanism is not known. Mass spectrometry of proteins precipitated by anti-IFI16 antibodies from uninfected endothelial cell nuclear lysate revealed that histone H2B interacts with IFI16. Single and double proximity ligation microscopy, immunoprecipitation, EdU-genome labeled virus infection, and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that H2B is associated with IFI16 and BRCA1 in the nucleus in physiological conditions. De novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection as well as latent KSHV and EBV infection induces the cytoplasmic distribution of H2B-IFI16, H2B-BRCA1 and IFI16-ASC complexes. Vaccinia virus (dsDNA) cytoplasmic replication didn’t induce the redistribution of nuclear H2B-IFI16 or H2B into the cytoplasm. H2B is critical in KSHV and HSV-1 genome recognition by IFI16 during de novo infection. Viral genome sensing by IFI16-H2B-BRCA1 leads to BRCA1 dependent recruitment of p300, and acetylation of H2B and IFI16. BRCA1 knockdown or inhibition of p300 abrogated the acetylation of H2B-IFI16 or H2B. Ran-GTP protein mediated the translocation of acetylated H2B and IFI16 to the cytoplasm along with BRCA1 that is independent of IFI16-ASC inflammasome. ASC knockdown didn’t affect the acetylation of H2B, its cytoplasmic

  6. Cell and nuclear enlargement of SW480 cells induced by a plant lignan, arctigenin: evaluation of cellular DNA content using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Hee Ju; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Jho, Eun Hye; Kim, Chul Young; Kim, Minkyun; Nho, Chu Won

    2011-08-01

    Arctigenin is a natural plant lignan previously shown to induce G(2)/M arrest in SW480 human colon cancer cells as well as AGS human gastric cancer cells, suggesting its use as a possible cancer chemopreventive agent. Changes in cell and nuclear size often correlate with the functionality of cancer-treating agents. Here, we report that arctigenin induces cell and nuclear enlargement of SW480 cells. Arctigenin clearly induced the formation of giant nuclear shapes in SW480, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopic observation and quantitative determination of nuclear size. Cell and nuclear size were further assessed by flow cytometric analysis of light scattering and fluorescence pulse width after propidium iodide staining. FSC-H and FL2-W values (parameters referring to cell and nuclear size, respectively) significantly increased after arctigenin treatment; the mean values of FSC-H and FL2-W in arctigenin-treated SW480 cells were 572.6 and 275.1, respectively, whereas those of control cells were 482.0 and 220.7, respectively. Our approach may provide insights into the mechanism behind phytochemical-induced cell and nuclear enlargement as well as functional studies on cancer-treating agents.

  7. Application of Nuclear Volume Measurements to Comprehend the Cell Cycle in Root-Knot Nematode-Induced Giant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Antonino de Souza Junior, José Dijair; Pierre, Olivier; Coelho, Roberta R.; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F.; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2017-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes induce galls that contain giant-feeding cells harboring multiple enlarged nuclei within the roots of host plants. It is recognized that the cell cycle plays an essential role in the set-up of a peculiar nuclear organization that seemingly steers nematode feeding site induction and development. Functional studies of a large set of cell cycle genes in transgenic lines of the model host Arabidopsis thaliana have contributed to better understand the role of the cell cycle components and their implication in the establishment of functional galls. Mitotic activity mainly occurs during the initial stages of gall development and is followed by an intense endoreduplication phase imperative to produce giant-feeding cells, essential to form vigorous galls. Transgenic lines overexpressing particular cell cycle genes can provoke severe nuclei phenotype changes mainly at later stages of feeding site development. This can result in chaotic nuclear phenotypes affecting their volume. These aberrant nuclear organizations are hampering gall development and nematode maturation. Herein we report on two nuclear volume assessment methods which provide information on the complex changes occurring in nuclei during giant cell development. Although we observed that the data obtained with AMIRA tend to be more detailed than Volumest (Image J), both approaches proved to be highly versatile, allowing to access 3D morphological changes in nuclei of complex tissues and organs. The protocol presented here is based on standard confocal optical sectioning and 3-D image analysis and can be applied to study any volume and shape of cellular organelles in various complex biological specimens. Our results suggest that an increase in giant cell nuclear volume is not solely linked to increasing ploidy levels, but might result from the accumulation of mitotic defects. PMID:28659939

  8. Neutron-induced nuclear data for the MYRRHA fast spectrum facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romojaro, Pablo; Žerovnik, Gašper; Álvarez-Velarde, Francisco; Stankovskiy, Alexey; Kodeli, Ivan; Fiorito, Luca; Díez, Carlos Javier; Cabellos, Óscar; García-Herranz, Nuria; Heyse, Jan; Paradela, Carlos; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    The MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) concept is a flexible experimental lead-bismuth cooled and mixed-oxide (MOX) fueled fast spectrum facility designed to operate both in sub-critical (accelerator driven) and critical modes. One of the key issues for the safe operation of the reactor is the uncertainty assessment during the design works. The main objective of the European project CHANDA (solving CHAllenges in Nuclear DAta) Work Package 10 is to improve MYRRHA relevant nuclear data in order to reduce the reactor parameter uncertainties derived from them. In order to achieve this goal, several tasks have been undertaken. First, a sensitivity study of MYRRHA integral parameters, such as energy dependent cross sections, fission spectra and neutron multiplicities, to nuclear data has been conducted resulting in a list of MYRRHA relevant quantities (nuclides and reactions). On the second task, an analysis of the existing experimental data and evaluations for the quantities included in the list has been carried out. In this framework, the impact on the multiplication factor of quantities from different nuclear data libraries for different nuclides, reactions and energy regions has been investigated on the MYRRHA MOX critical core model. As the next step, new experiments and evaluations will be performed in order to improve existing nuclear data libraries.

  9. Novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction in wheat (Triticum aestivum) induces vigorous plants.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali; Kumar, Ajay; Mergoum, Mohamed; Pirseyedi, Seyed Mostafa; Hegstad, Justin B; Mazaheri, Mona; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2016-03-01

    Interspecific hybridization can be considered an accelerator of evolution, otherwise a slow process, solely dependent on mutation and recombination. Upon interspecific hybridization, several novel interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes emerge which provide additional sources of diversity. The magnitude and essence of intergenomic interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes remain unknown due to the direction of many crosses. This study was conducted to address the role of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions as a source of variation upon hybridization. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) alloplasmic lines carrying the cytoplasm of Aegilops mutica along with an integrated approach utilizing comparative quantitative trait locus (QTL) and epigenome analysis were used to dissect this interaction. The results indicate that cytoplasmic genomes can modify the magnitude of QTL controlling certain physiological traits such as dry matter weight. Furthermore, methylation profiling analysis detected eight polymorphic regions affected by the cytoplasm type. In general, these results indicate that novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions can potentially trigger an epigenetic modification cascade in nuclear genes which eventually change the genetic network controlling physiological traits. These modified genetic networks can serve as new sources of variation to accelerate the evolutionary process. Furthermore, this variation can synthetically be produced by breeders in their programs to develop epigenomic-segregating lines.

  10. Deuteron Induced ( d,p) and ( d,2p) Nuclear Reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, M.; Tel, E.; Kara, A.

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have shown that the nuclear reactions of charged particles with nuclei are very important in many fields of nuclear physics. The interactions of deuterons with nuclei have been especially the subject of common research in the history of nuclear physics. Moreover, the knowledge of cross section for deuteron-nucleus interactions are required for various application such as space applications, accelerator driven sub-critical systems, nuclear medicine, nuclear fission reactors and controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. Particularly, the future of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors is largely dependent on the nuclear reaction cross section data and the selection of structural fusion materials. Finally, the reaction cross section data of deuteron induced reactions on fusion structural materials are of great importance for development and design of both experimental and commercial fusion devices. In this work, reaction model calculations of the cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on structural fusion materials such as Al ( Aluminium), Ti ( Titanium), Cu ( Copper), Ni ( Nickel), Co ( Cobalt), Fe ( Iron), Zr ( Zirconium), Hf ( Hafnium) and Ta ( Tantalum) have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27 Al( d,2p) 27 Mg, 47 Ti( d,2p) 47 Sc, 65 Cu( d,2p) 65 Ni, 58 Ni( d,2p) 58 Co, 59 Co( d,2p) 59 Fe, 58 Fe( d,p) 59 Fe, 96 Zr( d,p) 97 Zr, 180 Hf ( d,p) 181 Hf and 181 Ta( d,p) 182 Ta have been carried out for incident deuteron energies up to 50 MeV. In these calculations, the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium effects for ( d,p) and ( d,2p) reactions have been investigated. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing ( WE) Model. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the Geometry Dependent Hybrid Model ( GDH) and Hybrid Model. In the calculations the program code ALICE/ASH was used. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the

  11. The Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Promotes the Herpesvirus-Induced Phosphorylation-Dependent Disassembly of the Nuclear Lamina Required for Nucleocytoplasmic Egress

    PubMed Central

    Milbradt, Jens; Hutterer, Corina; Bahsi, Hanife; Wagner, Sabrina; Sonntag, Eric; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Mori, Yasuko; Sticht, Heinrich; Fossen, Torgils; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina lines the inner nuclear membrane providing a structural framework for the nucleus. Cellular processes, such as nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis or nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes, are functionally linked to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina. In general, lamina disassembly is mediated by phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanism is still not completely understood. Recently, we suggested a novel mechanism for lamina disassembly during the nuclear egress of herpesviral capsids which involves the cellular isomerase Pin1. In this study, we focused on mechanistic details of herpesviral nuclear replication to demonstrate the general importance of Pin1 for lamina disassembly. In particular, Ser22-specific lamin phosphorylation consistently generates a Pin1-binding motif in cells infected with human and animal alpha-, beta-, and gammaherpesviruses. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we showed that binding of Pin1 to a synthetic lamin peptide induces its cis/trans isomerization in vitro. A detailed bioinformatic evaluation strongly suggests that this structural conversion induces large-scale secondary structural changes in the lamin N-terminus. Thus, we concluded that a Pin1-induced conformational change of lamins may represent the molecular trigger responsible for lamina disassembly. Consistent with this concept, pharmacological inhibition of Pin1 activity blocked lamina disassembly in herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts and consequently impaired virus replication. In addition, a phospho-mimetic Ser22Glu lamin mutant was still able to form a regular lamina structure and overexpression of a Ser22-phosphorylating kinase did not induce lamina disassembly in Pin1 knockout cells. Intriguingly, this was observed in absence of herpesvirus infection proposing a broader importance of Pin1 for lamina constitution. Thus, our results suggest a functional model of similar events leading to disassembly of the nuclear

  12. The estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization sequence is critical for fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Casa, Angelo J; Hochbaum, Daniel; Sreekumar, Sreeja; Oesterreich, Steffi; Lee, Adrian V

    2015-11-05

    Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD) is a pure competitive antagonist of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Fulvestrant binds ERα and reduces the receptor's half-life by increasing protein turnover, however, its mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this study, we show that removal of the ERα nuclear localization sequence (ERΔNLS) resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic ERα that was degraded in response to 17-β-estradiol (E2) but was resistant to degradation by fulvestrant. ERΔNLS bound the ligands and exhibited receptor interaction similar to ERα, indicating that the lack of degradation was not due to disruption of these processes. Forcing ERΔNLS into the nucleus with a heterologous SV40-NLS did not restore degradation, suggesting that the NLS domain itself, and not merely receptor localization, is critical for fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. Indeed, cloning of the endogenous ERα NLS onto the N-terminus of ERΔNLS significantly restored both its nuclear localization and turnover in response to fulvestrant. Moreover, mutation of the sumoylation targets K266 and K268 within the NLS impaired fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the unique role of the ERα NLS in fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

  13. A lignan induces lysosomal dependent degradation of FoxM1 protein to suppress β-catenin nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guang-zhi; Jeong, Ji Hye; Lee, Yu-ih; Han, Yeong Eun; Shin, Jung Sook; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Young Hwa; Park, Tae Jun; Kim, Keun Il; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common cancers. In this study, we isolated a lignan [(−)-(2R,3R)-1,4-O-diferuloylsecoisolariciresinol, DFS] from Alnus japonica (Betulaceae) and investigated its biological activity and mechanism of action on colon cancer. DFS reduced the viability of colon cancer cells and induced cell cycle arrest. DFS also suppressed β-catenin nuclear translocation and β-catenin target gene expression through a reduction in FoxM1 protein. To assess the mechanism of the action of DFS, we investigated the effect of DFS on endogenous and exogenous FoxM1 protein degradation in colon cancer cells. DFS-induced FoxM1 protein degradation was suppressed by lysosomal inhibitors, chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, but not by knock-down of proteasomal proteins. The mechanism of DFS for FoxM1 degradation is lysosomal dependent, which was not reported before. Furthermore, we found that FoxM1 degradation was partially lysosomal-dependent under normal conditions. These observations indicate that DFS from A. japonica suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation by reducing β-catenin nuclear translocation. DFS induces lysosomal-dependent FoxM1 protein degradation. This is the first report on the lysosomal degradation of FoxM1 by a small molecule. DFS may be useful in treating cancers that feature the elevated expression of FoxM1. PMID:28378765

  14. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P{sub 0} interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P{sub 1.2} interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  15. Propagation Distance of the α-Particle-Induced Bystander Effect: The Role of Nuclear Traversal and Gap Junction Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Sylvain; Pusset, David; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2009-01-01

    When cell populations are exposed to low-dose α-particle radiation, a significant fraction of the cells will not be traversed by a radiation track. However, stressful effects occur in both irradiated and bystander cells in the population. Characterizing these effects, and investigating their underlying mechanism(s), is critical to understanding human health risks associated with exposure to α particles. To this end, confluent normal human fibroblast cultures were grown on polyethylene terephthalate foil grafted to an ultrathin solid-state nuclear track detector and exposed under non-perturbing conditions to low-fluence α particles from a broadbeam irradiator. Irradiated and affected bystander cells were localized with micrometer precision. The stress-responsive protein p21Waf1 (also known as CDKN1A) was induced in bystander cells within a 100-µm radius from an irradiated cell. The mean propagation distance ranged from 20 to 40 µm around the intranuclear α-particle impact point, which corresponds to a set of ∼30 cells. Nuclear traversal, induced DNA damage, and gap junction communication were critical contributors to propagation of this stressful effect The strategy described here may be ideal to investigate the size of radiation-affected target and the relative contribution of different cellular organelles to bystander effects induced by energetic particles, which is relevant to radioprotection and cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19580486

  16. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P(0) interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P(1.2) interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  17. A lignan induces lysosomal dependent degradation of FoxM1 protein to suppress β-catenin nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guang-Zhi; Jeong, Ji Hye; Lee, Yu-Ih; Han, Yeong Eun; Shin, Jung Sook; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Young Hwa; Park, Tae Jun; Kim, Keun Il; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2017-04-05

    Colon cancer is one of the most common cancers. In this study, we isolated a lignan [(-)-(2R,3R)-1,4-O-diferuloylsecoisolariciresinol, DFS] from Alnus japonica (Betulaceae) and investigated its biological activity and mechanism of action on colon cancer. DFS reduced the viability of colon cancer cells and induced cell cycle arrest. DFS also suppressed β-catenin nuclear translocation and β-catenin target gene expression through a reduction in FoxM1 protein. To assess the mechanism of the action of DFS, we investigated the effect of DFS on endogenous and exogenous FoxM1 protein degradation in colon cancer cells. DFS-induced FoxM1 protein degradation was suppressed by lysosomal inhibitors, chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, but not by knock-down of proteasomal proteins. The mechanism of DFS for FoxM1 degradation is lysosomal dependent, which was not reported before. Furthermore, we found that FoxM1 degradation was partially lysosomal-dependent under normal conditions. These observations indicate that DFS from A. japonica suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation by reducing β-catenin nuclear translocation. DFS induces lysosomal-dependent FoxM1 protein degradation. This is the first report on the lysosomal degradation of FoxM1 by a small molecule. DFS may be useful in treating cancers that feature the elevated expression of FoxM1.

  18. Effect of Cornus Officinalis on Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-kappaB Ligand (RANKL)-induced Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Young; Kim, Yun-Kyung; Choi, Min Kyu; Oh, Jaemin; Kwak, Han Bok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Osteoporosis is a disease of bones that is thought to result from an imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation. Although osteoporosis itself has no symptoms, osteoporosis caused by osteoclasts leads to an increased risk of fracture. Here we examined the effects of cornus officinalis on receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Methods We evaluated the effects of cornus officinalis on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and performed a cytotoxicity assay, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Results Cornus officinalis significantly inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner, but without cytotoxicity against BMMs. The mRNA expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), c-Fos, and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) in BMMs treated with RANKL was considerably inhibited by cornus officinalis treatment. Also, cornus officinalis inhibits the protein expression of c-Fos and NFATc1. Cornus officinalis greatly inhibits RANKL-induced phosphorylation of p38 and c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK). Also, cornus officinalis significantly suppresses RANKL-induced degradation of I-κB. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that cornus officinalis may be a useful the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:24524042

  19. Inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation by pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ).

    PubMed

    Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Koide, Naoki; Haque, Abedul; Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2012-02-29

    The effect of pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ) on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation was examined using RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. RANKL led to the formation of osteoclasts identified as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in the culture of RAW 264.7 cells. However, PQQ inhibited the appearance of osteoclasts and prevented the decrease of F4/80 macrophage maturation marker on RANKL-stimulated cells, suggesting a preventive action of PQQ on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PQQ inhibited the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1), a key transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, in RANKL-stimulated cells. On the other hand, PQQ did not inhibit the signaling pathway from RANK/RANKL binding to NFATc1 activation, including NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). PQQ augmented the expression of type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) and enhanced the IFN-β-mediated janus kinase (JAK1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1) expression. Moreover, PQQ reduced the expression level of c-Fos leading to the activation of NFATc1. Taken together, PQQ was suggested to prevent RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via the inactivation of NFATc1 by reduced c-Fos expression. The reduced c-Fos expression might be mediated by the enhanced IFN-β signaling due to augmented IFNAR expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [RAC3 nuclear receptor co-activator has a protective role in the apoptosis induced by different stimuli].

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Rubio, María F; Alvarado, Cecilia V; Costas, Mónica A

    2007-01-01

    RAC3 belongs to the family of p160 nuclear receptors coactivators and it is over-expressed in several tumors. We have previously shown that RAC3 is a NF-kappaB coactivator. In this paper, we investigated the role of RAC3 in cell-sensitivity to apoptosis, using H2O2 in the human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293), and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line (K562) naturally resistant to TRAIL. We observed that the tumoral K562 cells have high levels of RAC3 if compared with the non-tumoral HEK293 cells. The normal or transfected coactivator over-expression inhibits apoptosis through a diminished caspase activity and AIF nuclear translocation, increased NF-kappaB, AKT and p38, and decreased ERK activities. In contrast, inhibition of RAC3 by siRNA induced sensitivity of K562 to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Such results suggest that over-expression of RAC3 contributes to tumor development through molecular mechanisms that do not depend strictly on acetylation and/or steroid hormones, which control cell death. This could be a possible target for future tumor therapies.

  1. Involvement of the UL24 protein in herpes simplex virus 1-induced dispersal of B23 and in nuclear egress

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberopoulos, Maria H.; Bourget, Amelie; Abdeljelil, Nawel Ben; Pearson, Angela

    2011-04-10

    UL24 of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is widely conserved within the Herpesviridae family. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that UL24, which we have previously shown to induce the redistribution of nucleolin, also affects the localization of the nucleolar protein B23. We found that HSV-1-induced dispersal of B23 was dependent on UL24. The conserved N-terminal portion of UL24 was sufficient to induce the redistribution of B23 in transient transfection assays. Mutational analysis revealed that the endonuclease motif of UL24 was important for B23 dispersal in both transfected and infected cells. Nucleolar protein relocalization during HSV-1 infection was also observed in non-immortalized cells. Analysis of infected cells by electron microscopy revealed a decrease in the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear viral particles in cells infected with a UL24-deficient strain compared to KOS-infected cells. Our results suggest that UL24 promotes nuclear egress of nucleocapsids during HSV-1 infection, possibly though effects on nucleoli.

  2. Signal Transduction Triggered by Iron to Induce the Nuclear Importation of a Myb3 Transcription Factor in the Parasitic Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Yu; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chou, Ya-Wen; Chen, Yet-Ran; Chen, Shu-Hui; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Iron was previously shown to induce rapid nuclear translocation of a Myb3 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis. In the present study, iron was found to induce a transient increase in cellular cAMP, followed by the nuclear influx of Myb3, whereas the latter was also induced by 8-bromo-cyclic AMP. Iron-inducible cAMP production and nuclear influx of Myb3 were inhibited by suramin and SQ22536, respective inhibitors of the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins and adenylyl cyclases. In contrast, the nuclear influx of Myb3 induced by iron or 8-bromo-cAMP was delayed or inhibited, respectively, by H89, the inhibitor of protein kinase A. Using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry, Thr156 and Lys143 in Myb3 were found to be phosphorylated and ubiquitinated, respectively. These modifications were induced by iron and inhibited by H89, as shown by immunoprecipitation-coupled Western blotting. Iron-inducible ubiquitination and nuclear influx were aborted in T156A and K143R, but T156D was constitutively ubiquitinated and persistently localized to the nucleus. Myb3 was phosphorylated in vitro by the catalytic subunit of a T. vaginalis protein kinase A, TvPKAc. A transient interaction between TvPKAc and Myb3 and the phosphorylation of both proteins were induced in the parasite shortly after iron or 8-bromo-cAMP treatment. Together, these observations suggest that iron may induce production of cAMP and activation of TvPKAc, which then induces the phosphorylation of Myb3 and subsequent ubiquitination for accelerated nuclear influx. It is conceivable that iron probably exerts a much broader impact on the physiology of the parasite than previously thought to encounter environmental changes. PMID:25183012

  3. Nuclear envelope rupture is induced by actin-based nucleus confinement.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Emily M; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-10-10

    Repeated rounds of nuclear envelope (NE) rupture and repair have been observed in laminopathy and cancer cells and result in intermittent loss of nucleus compartmentalization. Currently, the causes of NE rupture are unclear. Here, we show that NE rupture in cancer cells relies on the assembly of contractile actin bundles that interact with the nucleus via the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We found that the loss of actin bundles or the LINC complex did not rescue nuclear lamina defects, a previously identified determinant of nuclear membrane stability, but did decrease the number and size of chromatin hernias. Finally, NE rupture inhibition could be rescued in cells treated with actin-depolymerizing drugs by mechanically constraining nucleus height. These data suggest a model of NE rupture where weak membrane areas, caused by defects in lamina organization, rupture because of an increase in intranuclear pressure from actin-based nucleus confinement.

  4. NAD+ treatment can prevent rotenone-induced increases in DNA damage, Bax levels and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yunyi; Nie, Hui; Wei, Xunbin; Fu, Shen; Ying, Weihai

    2015-04-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) plays critical roles in energy metabolism, mitochondrial functions, calcium homeostasis and immunological functions. Our previous studies have found that NAD(+) administration can profoundly decrease ischemic brain injury and traumatic brain injury. Our recent study has also provided first direct evidence indicating that NAD(+) treatment can decrease cellular apoptosis, while the mechanisms underlying this protective effect remain unclear. In our current study, we determined the effects of NAD(+) treatment on several major factors in apoptosis and necrosis, including levels of Bax and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), as well as levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and intracellular ATP in rotenone-treated differentiated PC12 cells. We found that NAD(+) treatment can markedly attenuate the rotenone-induced increases in the levels of Bax and nuclear translocation of AIF in the cells. We further found that NAD(+) treatment can significantly attenuate the rotenone-induced increase in the levels of DSBs and decrease in the intracellular ATP levels. Collectively, our study has suggested mechanisms underlying the preventive effects of NAD(+) on apoptosis, which has highlighted the therapeutic potential of NAD(+) for decreasing apoptotic changes in multiple major diseases.

  5. HnRNPA2 is a novel histone acetyltransferase that mediates mitochondrial stress-induced nuclear gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Guja, Kip; Mejia, Edison; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Johnson, F Brad; Ruthel, Gordon; Kaufman, Brett A; Rappaport, Eric F; Glineburg, M Rebecca; Fang, Ji-Kang; Szanto, Andres Klein; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Basha, Jeelan; Kundu, Tapas; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA mutations or disruption of electron transfer chain complexes induce mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling, which induces global change in nuclear gene expression ultimately contributing to various human pathologies including cancer. Recent studies suggest that these mitochondrial changes cause transcriptional reprogramming of nuclear genes although the mechanism of this cross talk remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling regulates chromatin acetylation and alters nuclear gene expression through the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNAP2). These processes are reversed when mitochondrial DNA content is restored to near normal cell levels. We show that the mitochondrial stress-induced transcription coactivator hnRNAP2 acetylates Lys 8 of H4 through an intrinsic histone lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) activity with Arg 48 and Arg 50 of hnRNAP2 being essential for acetyl-CoA binding and acetyltransferase activity. H4K8 acetylation at the mitochondrial stress-responsive promoters by hnRNAP2 is essential for transcriptional activation. We found that the previously described mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling-mediated transformation of C2C12 cells caused an increased expression of genes involved in various oncogenic processes, which is retarded in hnRNAP2 silenced or hnRNAP2 KAT mutant cells. Taken together, these data show that altered gene expression by mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling involves a novel hnRNAP2-dependent epigenetic mechanism that may have a role in cancer and other pathologies. PMID:27990297

  6. Role of electron-nuclear coupled dynamics on charge migration induced by attosecond pulses in glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Astiaso, Manuel; Palacios, Alicia; Decleva, Piero; Tavernelli, Ivano; Martín, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of charge dynamics initiated by an attosecond XUV pulse in the glycine molecule, which consists in delocalized charge fluctuations all over the molecular skeleton. For this, we have explicitly used the actual electron wave packet created by such a broadband pulse. We show that, for the chosen pulse, charge dynamics in glycine is barely affected by nuclear motion or non adiabatic effects during the first 8 fs, and that the initial electronic coherences do not dissipate during the first 20 fs. In contrast, small variations in the initial nuclear positions, compatible with the geometries expected in the Franck-Condon region, lead to noticeable changes in this dynamics.

  7. Research on fission induced plasmas and nuclear pumped lasers at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    A program of research on gaseous uranium and uranium plasmas is being conducted at The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory under sponsorship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the proof of principle of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor, and (2) pursue fundamental research on nuclear pumped lasers. The relevancy of the two parallel programs is embodied in the possibility of a high-performance uranium plasma reactor being used as the power supply for a nuclear pumped laser system. The accomplishments in the two above fields are summarized

  8. Multiple-Quantum Transitions and Charge-Induced Decoherence of Donor Nuclear Spins in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2017-06-01

    We study single- and multiquantum transitions of the nuclear spins of an ensemble of ionized arsenic donors in silicon and find quadrupolar effects on the coherence times, which we link to fluctuating electrical field gradients present after the application of light and bias voltage pulses. To determine the coherence times of superpositions of all orders in the 4-dimensional Hilbert space, we use a phase-cycling technique and find that, when electrical effects were allowed to decay, these times scale as expected for a fieldlike decoherence mechanism such as the interaction with surrounding Si 29 nuclear spins.

  9. Rapid regulation of nuclear proteins by rapamycin-induced translocation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Laor, Dana; Weisman, Ronit; Forsburg, Susan L

    2014-07-01

    Genetic analysis of protein function requires a rapid means of inactivating the gene under study. Typically, this exploits temperature-sensitive mutations or promoter shut-off techniques. We report the adaptation to Schizosaccharomyces pombe of the anchor-away technique, originally designed in budding yeast by Laemmli lab. This method relies on a rapamycin-mediated interaction between the FRB- and FKBP12-binding domains to relocalize nuclear proteins of interest to the cytoplasm. We demonstrate a rapid nuclear depletion of abundant proteins as proof of principle.

  10. Research on fission induced plasmas and nuclear pumped lasers at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    A program of research on gaseous uranium and uranium plasmas is being conducted at The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory under sponsorship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the proof of principle of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor, and (2) pursue fundamental research on nuclear pumped lasers. The relevancy of the two parallel programs is embodied in the possibility of a high-performance uranium plasma reactor being used as the power supply for a nuclear pumped laser system. The accomplishments in the two above fields are summarized

  11. A computational model of lipopolysaccharide-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation: a key signalling pathway in infection-induced preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gemma C; Ma, Hongwu; Saunders, Philippa T K; Norman, Jane E

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth is the single biggest cause of significant neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the incidence is rising. Development of new therapies to treat and prevent preterm labour is seriously hampered by incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate labour at term and preterm. Computational modelling provides a new opportunity to improve this understanding. It is a useful tool in (i) identifying gaps in knowledge and informing future research, and (ii) providing the basis for an in silico model of parturition in which novel drugs to prevent or treat preterm labour can be "tested". Despite their merits, computational models are rarely used to study the molecular events initiating labour. Here, we present the first attempt to generate a dynamic kinetic model that has relevance to the molecular mechanisms of preterm labour. Using published data, we model an important candidate signalling pathway in infection-induced preterm labour: that of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced activation of Nuclear Factor kappa B. This is the first model of this pathway to explicitly include molecular interactions upstream of Nuclear Factor kappa B activation. We produced a formalised graphical depiction of the pathway and built a kinetic model based on ordinary differential equations. The kinetic model accurately reproduced published in vitro time course plots of Lipopolysaccharide-induced Nuclear Factor kappa B activation in mouse embryo fibroblasts. In this preliminary work we have provided proof of concept that it is possible to build computational models of signalling pathways that are relevant to the regulation of labour, and suggest that models that are validated with wet-lab experiments have the potential to greatly benefit the field.

  12. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Induced Coherent Pion Production at K2K and MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2006-06-23

    The coherent pion production induced by neutrinos in nuclei is studied using a delta hole model in the local density approximation taking into account the renormalization of {delta} properties in a nuclear medium. The pion absorption effects are included in an eikonal approximation. These effects give a large reduction in the total cross section. The numerical results for the total cross section are found to be consistent with recent experimental results from the K2K and MiniBooNE Collaborations and other older experiments in the intermediate energy region.

  13. Gamma irradiation-induced modifications of polymers found in nuclear waste embedding processes Part I: The epoxy/amine resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debré, O.; Nsouli, B.; Thomas, J.-P.; Stevenson, I.; Colombini, D.; Romero, M.-A.

    1997-08-01

    In order to simulate the effect of embedded nuclear waste of low and medium activity, an epoxy/amine DGEBA/DDM system has been irradiated by gamma-rays. Various techniques have been used for the characterization of the induced modifications, either macroscopic (DMA), or dealing with the chemical structure (FTIR, HSF-SIMS). For two different dose rates (50 and 900 Gy/h), in two different media (air and water) and up to 2 MGy, no significant changes can be detected except oxidation processes at the surface. This last result comes from HSF-SIMS measurements, from which other peculiarities of the thermosetting polymer are also presented and discussed.

  14. Nuclear stopping in oxygen-induced reactions at 200 A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Obenshain, F.E.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Dragon, L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of transverse energy and energy at zero degrees are compared with the results of a Glauber-type multiple collision model calculations. The best fit to the data shows that the degree of nuclear stopping is large. This theoretical model also predicts energy densities and shows how the energy density changes as the projectile and target masses change. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Marielle; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc; Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Bontems, Sébastien; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  16. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Ahn, Sang-Gun

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  17. Optical Pumping and Laser Induced Nuclear Orientation of a Microsecond Isomeric Level in BARIUM-134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis John

    Using optical pumping techniques, on and off-line experiments were performed on a microsecond nuclear isomer (('134m)Ba 10('+) ). Shifts in atomic resonances detected by changes in the angular distribution of characteristic nuclear radiations (expressed as changes in shape and size) yield information on changes in nuclear structure. The 10('+) isomeric state was produced using a 49 MeV pulsed beam of ('13)C on an isotopically enriched ('124)Sn target. The reaction products recoil out of the target and are slowed to thermal velocities in 10 torr of xenon in a region illuminated with circularly polarized light (553.5 nm) from a Coherent 699-21 dye laser. Nuclear parameters measured were the lifetime (3.8(2)(mu)s) and g-factor (g = -.20(1)) of the 10('+) state. Atomic parameters measured for barium were the depolarization cross sections of the ('1)P(,1) atomic level (6.0(6) nm('2)) in xenon, the quenching cross section for hydrogen (0.042(4) nm('2)), and the branching ratio of the metastable (('1,3)D(,1,2,3)) atomic states (0.011(1)). A possible anisotropy signal and the cumulative results (no measurable anisotropy) are presented. Difficulties encountered were insufficient neutralization, and unexpectedly large spatial distribution, and 'trapping' in metastable atomic states.

  18. Maturation-promoting factor induces nuclear envelope breakdown in cycloheximide-arrested embryos of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the effect of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) on embryonic nuclei during the early cleavage stage of Xenopus laevis development. When protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide during this stage, the embryonic cell cycle arrests in an artificially produced G2 phase-like state, after completion of one additional round of DNA synthesis. Approximately 100 nuclei can be arrested in a common cytoplasm if cytokinesis is first inhibited by cytochalasin B. Within 5 min after injection of MPF into such embryos, the nuclear envelope surrounding each nucleus disperses, as determined histologically or by immunofluorescent staining of the nuclear lamina with antilamin antiserum. The breakdown of the nuclear envelope occurs at levels of MPF comparable to or slightly lower than those required for oocyte maturation. Amplification of MPF activity, however, does not occur in the arrested egg as it does in the oocyte. These results suggest that MPF can act to advance interphase nuclei into the first events of mitosis and show that the nuclear lamina responds rapidly to MPF. PMID:6345556

  19. Nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 regulates VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Hideki; Tokumaru, Sho; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Shiraishi, Ken; Shirakata, Yuji; Dai, Xiuju; Yang, Lijun; Tohyama, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Sayama, Koji

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF-A enhanced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and increased tube formation. {yields} VEGF-A treated lymphatic endothelial cell showed activation of STAT3. {yields} Dominant-negative STAT3 inhibited VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific growth factor that regulates endothelial functions, and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are known to be important during VEGF receptor signaling. The aim of this study was to determine whether STAT3 regulates VEGF-induced lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) migration and tube formation. VEGF-A (33 ng/ml) enhanced LEC migration by 2-fold and increased tube length by 25% compared with the control, as analyzed using a Boyden chamber and Matrigel assay, respectively. Western blot analysis and immunostaining revealed that VEGF-A induced the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 in LECs, and this translocation was blocked by the transfection of LECs with an adenovirus vector expressing a dominant-negative mutant of STAT3 (Ax-STAT3F). Transfection with Ax-STAT3F also almost completely inhibited VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation. These results indicate that STAT3 is essential for VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation and that STAT3 regulates LEC functions.

  20. Nuclear factor κB-inducing kinase activation as a mechanism of pancreatic β cell failure in obesity.

    PubMed

    Malle, Elisabeth K; Zammit, Nathan W; Walters, Stacey N; Koay, Yen Chin; Wu, Jianmin; Tan, Bernice M; Villanueva, Jeanette E; Brink, Robert; Loudovaris, Tom; Cantley, James; McAlpine, Shelli R; Hesselson, Daniel; Grey, Shane T

    2015-07-27

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway is a master regulator of inflammatory processes and is implicated in insulin resistance and pancreatic β cell dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome. Whereas canonical NF-κB signaling is well studied, there is little information on the divergent noncanonical NF-κB pathway in the context of pancreatic islet dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that pharmacological activation of the noncanonical NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) disrupts glucose homeostasis in zebrafish in vivo. We identify NIK as a critical negative regulator of β cell function, as pharmacological NIK activation results in impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mouse and human islets. NIK levels are elevated in pancreatic islets isolated from diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, which exhibit increased processing of noncanonical NF-κB components p100 to p52, and accumulation of RelB. TNF and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), two ligands associated with diabetes, induce NIK in islets. Mice with constitutive β cell-intrinsic NIK activation present impaired insulin secretion with DIO. NIK activation triggers the noncanonical NF-κB transcriptional network to induce genes identified in human type 2 diabetes genome-wide association studies linked to β cell failure. These studies reveal that NIK contributes a central mechanism for β cell failure in diet-induced obesity. © 2015 Malle et al.

  1. Nuclear factor κB–inducing kinase activation as a mechanism of pancreatic β cell failure in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Malle, Elisabeth K.; Zammit, Nathan W.; Walters, Stacey N.; Koay, Yen Chin; Wu, Jianmin; Tan, Bernice M.; Villanueva, Jeanette E.; Brink, Robert; Loudovaris, Tom; Cantley, James; McAlpine, Shelli R.; Hesselson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway is a master regulator of inflammatory processes and is implicated in insulin resistance and pancreatic β cell dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome. Whereas canonical NF-κB signaling is well studied, there is little information on the divergent noncanonical NF-κB pathway in the context of pancreatic islet dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that pharmacological activation of the noncanonical NF-κB–inducing kinase (NIK) disrupts glucose homeostasis in zebrafish in vivo. We identify NIK as a critical negative regulator of β cell function, as pharmacological NIK activation results in impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mouse and human islets. NIK levels are elevated in pancreatic islets isolated from diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, which exhibit increased processing of noncanonical NF-κB components p100 to p52, and accumulation of RelB. TNF and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), two ligands associated with diabetes, induce NIK in islets. Mice with constitutive β cell–intrinsic NIK activation present impaired insulin secretion with DIO. NIK activation triggers the noncanonical NF-κB transcriptional network to induce genes identified in human type 2 diabetes genome-wide association studies linked to β cell failure. These studies reveal that NIK contributes a central mechanism for β cell failure in diet-induced obesity. PMID:26122662

  2. Radiation-Induced Survivin Nuclear Accumulation is Linked to DNA Damage Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Reichert, Sebastian; Roedel, Claus

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Increased expression of survivin has been identified as a negative prognostic marker in a variety of human cancers. We have previously shown that survivin is a radiation-resistance factor and that the therapeutic effect of survivin knock-down might result from an impaired DNA repair capacity. In this study, we aimed to elucidate an interrelationship between survivin's cellular localization and DNA double-strand break repair. Methods and Materials: Survivin's cellular distribution and nuclear complex formation were assayed by Western blotting of subcellular fractions, by immunofluorescence staining, and co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 colorectal cancer cells. DNA repair capacity was analyzed by kinetics of gamma-H2AX foci formation, and by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) assays in the presence of survivin-specific or nonspecific control siRNA. Results: Following irradiation, we observed a rapid nuclear accumulation of survivin and subsequent phosphorylation of the protein in the nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses from nuclear extracts revealed an interaction among survivin, Ku70, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, and DNA-PKcs that was confirmed by immunofluorescence co-localization in nuclear foci. Survivin knock down by siRNA resulted in an impaired DNA double strand break repair, as demonstrated by an increased detection of gamma-H2AX foci/nucleus at 60 min and a higher amount of residual gamma-H2AX foci at 24 hr postirradiation. Furthermore, we detected in survivin-depleted cells a hampered S2056 autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs and a significantly decreased DNA-PKcs kinase activity. Conclusion: These data indicate that nuclear survivin is linked to DNA double-strand break repair by interaction with members of the DNA double-strand breaks repair machinery, thus regulating DNA-PKcs activity.

  3. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals: Static potential energy surfaces and fission fragment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.; Knoll, A.

    2014-11-01

    Eighty years after its experimental discovery, a description of induced nuclear fission based solely on the interactions between neutrons and protons and quantum many-body methods still poses formidable challenges. The goal of this paper is to contribute to the development of a predictive microscopic framework for the accurate calculation of static properties of fission fragments for hot fission and thermal or slow neutrons. To this end, we focus on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction and employ nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities. Potential energy surfaces are computed at the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation with up to five collective variables. We find that the triaxial degree of freedom plays an important role, both near the fission barrier and at scission. The impact of the parametrization of the Skyrme energy density and the role of pairing correlations on deformation properties from the ground state up to scission are also quantified. We introduce a general template for the quantitative description of fission fragment properties. It is based on the careful analysis of scission configurations, using both advanced topological methods and recently proposed quantum many-body techniques. We conclude that an accurate prediction of fission fragment properties at low incident neutron energies, although technologically demanding, should be within the reach of current nuclear density functional theory.

  4. Modification of nuclear PML protein by SUMO-1 regulates Fas-induced apoptosis in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Meinecke, Ingmar; Cinski, Antje; Baier, Anja; Peters, Marvin A.; Dankbar, Berno; Wille, Aline; Drynda, Andreas; Mendoza, Heidi; Gay, Renate E.; Hay, Ronald T.; Ink, Barbara; Gay, Steffen; Pap, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-1 is an important posttranslational regulator of different signaling pathways and involved in the formation of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein nuclear bodies (NBs). Overexpression of SUMO-1 has been associated with alterations in apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms and their relevance for human diseases are not clear. Here, we show that the increased expression of SUMO-1 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts (SFs) contributes to the resistance of these cells against Fas-induced apoptosis through increased SUMOylation of nuclear PML protein and increased recruitment of the transcriptional repressor DAXX to PML NBs. We also show that the nuclear SUMO-protease SENP1, which is found at lower levels in RA SFs, can revert the apoptosis-inhibiting effects of SUMO-1 by releasing DAXX from PML NBs. Our findings indicate that in RA SFs overexpression of SENP1 can alter the SUMO-1-mediated recruitment of DAXX to PML NBs, thus influencing the proapoptotic effects of DAXX. Accumulation of DAXX in PML NBs by SUMO-1 may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders. PMID:17360386

  5. Downregulation and nuclear relocation of MLP during the progression of right ventricular hypertrophy induced by chronic pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Ecarnot-Laubriet, A; De Luca, K; Vandroux, D; Moisant, M; Bernard, C; Assem, M; Rochette, L; Teyssier, J R

    2000-12-01

    The cardiac LIM domain protein MLP plays a crucial role in the architecture and mechanical function of cardiac myocytes. Mice lacking the MLP gene develop cardiac hypertrophy, dilated cardiopathy and heart failure. We investigated whether downregulation of MLP is induced by pressure overload and contributes to the physiopathology of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We studied this mechanism in rat right ventricles submitted to pulmonary arterial hypertension, because it is known that this ventricle is very vulnerable to the deleterious effects of pressure overload. During the progression of cardiac hypertrophy to failure over a 31 days period there was a dramatic decrease by 50% of the MLP transcripts level. Consistently, immunohistochemistry detected very weak protein signals in the cytoplasms of cardiomyocytes at the failing stage, but myocytes nuclei were heavily labeled. The nuclear relocation was confirmed by the immunodetection of MLP on the nuclear and cytosolic fractions. This nuclear localization is the hallmark of a retro-differentiated phenotype, since it has been observed only in differentiating myoblasts. These changes were associated with ultrastructural disorganization of the myofibrils similar to that observed in MLP -/- mice. Therefore, MLP dowregulation occurring during gene reprogramming may critically contribute to mechanical failure of the myocardium. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Minimal detection of nuclear mutations in XP-V and normal cells treated with oxidative stress inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Herman, Kimberly N; Toffton, Shannon; McCulloch, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be induced by exposure to various chemicals and radiation. One type of damage in DNA produced by ROS is modification of guanine to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). This particular alteration to the chemistry of the base can inhibit the replication fork and has been linked to mutagenesis, cancer, and aging. In vitro studies have shown that the translesion synthesis polymerase, DNA polymerase η (pol η), is able to efficiently bypass 8-oxoG in DNA. In this study, we wanted to investigate the mutagenic effects of oxidative stress, and in particular 8-oxoG, in the presence and absence of pol η. We quantified levels of oxidative stress, 8-oxoG levels in DNA, and nuclear mutation rates. We found that most of the 8-oxoG detected were localized to the mitochondrial DNA, opposed to the nuclear DNA. We also saw a corresponding lack of mutations in a nuclear-encoded gene. This suggests that oxidative stress' primary mutagenic effects are not predominantly on genomic DNA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nucleolar disruption and cajal body disassembly are nuclear hallmarks of DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration in purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Baltanás, Fernando C; Casafont, Iñigo; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2011-07-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration (pcd) phenotype results from mutation in nna1 gene and is associated with the degeneration and death of PCs during the postnatal life. Although the pcd mutation is a model of the ataxic mouse, it shares clinical and pathological characteristics of inherited human spinocerebellar ataxias. PC degeneration in pcd mice provides a useful neuronal system to study nuclear mechanisms involved in DNA damage-dependent neurodegeneration, particularly the contribution of nucleoli and Cajal bodies (CBs). Both nuclear structures are engaged in housekeeping functions for neuronal survival, the biogenesis of ribosomes and the maturation of snRNPs and snoRNPs required for pre-mRNA and pre-rRNA processing, respectively. In this study, we use ultrastructural analysis, in situ transcription assay and molecular markers for DNA damage, nucleoli and CB components to demonstrate that PC degeneration involves the progressive accumulation of nuclear DNA damage associated with disruption of nucleoli and CBs, disassembly of polyribosomes into monoribosomes, ribophagy and shut down of nucleolar and extranucleolar transcription. Microarray analysis reveals that four genes encoding repressors of nucleolar rRNA synthesis (p53, Rb, PTEN and SNF2) are upregulated in the cerebellum of pcd mice. Collectively, these data support that nucleolar and CB alterations are hallmarks of DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration.

  8. Mycalamide A Shows Cytotoxic Properties and Prevents EGF-Induced Neoplastic Transformation through Inhibition of Nuclear Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.; Fedorov, Sergey N.; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I.; Shubina, Larisa K.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Stonik, Valentin A.; Honecker, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    Mycalamide A, a marine natural compound previously isolated from sponges, is known as a protein synthesis inhibitor with potent antitumor activity. However, the ability of this compound to prevent malignant transformation of cells has never been examined before. Here, for the first time, we report the isolation of mycalamide A from ascidian Polysincraton sp. as well as investigation of its cancer preventive properties. In murine JB6 Cl41 P+ cells, mycalamide A inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic transformation, and induced apoptosis at subnanomolar or nanomolar concentrations. The compound inhibited transcriptional activity of the oncogenic nuclear factors AP-1 and NF-κB, a potential mechanism of its cancer preventive properties. Induction of phosphorylation of the kinases MAPK p38, JNK, and ERK was also observed at high concentrations of mycalamide A. The drug shows promising potential for both cancer-prevention and cytotoxic therapy and should be further developed. PMID:22822368

  9. Inflammatory responses to alcohol in the CNS: nuclear receptors as potential therapeutics for alcohol-induced neuropathologies.

    PubMed

    Kane, Cynthia J M; Drew, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), which results from ethanol exposure during pregnancy, and alcohol use disorder (AUD), which includes both binge and chronic alcohol abuse, are strikingly common and costly at personal and societal levels. These disorders are associated with significant pathology, including that observed in the CNS. It is now appreciated in both humans and animal models that ethanol can induce inflammation in the CNS. Neuroinflammation is hypothesized to contribute to the neuropathologic and behavioral consequences in FASD and AUD. In this review, we: 1) summarize the evidence of alcohol-induced CNS inflammation, 2) outline cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie alcohol induction of CNS inflammation, and 3) discuss the potential of nuclear receptor agonists for prevention or treatment of neuropathologies associated with FASD and AUD. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. Extension of activation cross section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhodium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-11-01

    In the frame of the systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions on monoisotopic 103Rh were extended to 50 MeV incident energy. Excitation functions were measured in the 49.8-36.6 MeV energy range for the 103Rh(d,xn)100,101Pd, 103Rh(d,pxn)99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103Rh(d,x)97,103Ru reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and off-line high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental results are compared to our previous results and to the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 library (TALYS 1.6 code).

  11. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 inhibits low shear stress-induced carotid artery remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Cai, Zhaohua; Cui, Mingli; Nie, Peng; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Shiqun; Chu, Shichun; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Liuhua; Yi, Jing; Shen, Linghong; He, Ben

    2015-12-01

    Shear stress, particularly low and oscillatory shear stress, plays a critical pathophysiological role in vascular remodeling-related cardiovascular diseases. Growing evidence suggests that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 [also known as TR3 or nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1)] is expressed in diseased human vascular tissue and plays an important role in vascular physiology and pathology. In the present study, we used a mouse model of flow-dependent remodeling by partial ligation of the left common carotid artery (LCCA) to define the exact role of Nur77 in vascular remodeling induced by low shear stress. Following vascular remodeling, Nur77 was highly expressed in neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the ligated carotid arteries. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in the remodeled arteries in vivo and in primary rat VSMCs in vitro following stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Further in vitro experiments revealed that Nur77 expression was rapidly increased in the VSMCs following stimulation with PDGF and H2O2, whereas treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) reversed the increase in the protein level of Nur77 induced by H2O2. Moreover, Nur77 overexpression markedly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, induced by PDGF. Finally, to determine the in vivo role of Nur77 in low shear stress-induced vascular remodeling, wild-type (WT) and Nur77-deficient mice were subjected to partial ligation of the LCCA. Four weeks following surgery, in the LCCAs of the Nur77‑deficient mice, a significant increase in the intima-media area and carotid intima-media thickness was noted, as well as more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition compared to the WT mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed an increase in VSMC proliferation [determined by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) production in the Nur77

  12. Model for optically-induced nuclear spin polarization in gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Patrick Joseph

    New technologies and corresponding research fields have recently emerged that aim to develop solid-state devices based on large polarizations of electron and/or nuclear spins. These include spin-based strategies for parallel information processing through quantum entanglement ("quantum computing") and semi-classical electronic devices controlled via the spin degree of freedom ("spintronics"). A new rule of thumb - polarization has application - makes the optically pumped semiconductor an interesting system, as it exhibits both large electron and nuclear polarizations. However, several aspects of the process by which nuclear polarization is generated through optical pumping were not understood prior to this thesis, even for the most well studied semiconductor, GaAs. These include the dependence of the nuclear polarization on laser power, irradiation time, and especially on photon energy, which exhibits a dramatic peak near 1.5 eV. This thesis presents a quantitative model for optical nuclear polarization in GaAs. The model makes predictions for all quantities observable in a hulk optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) spectrum: the OPNMR signal magnitude, the hyperfine shift of the NMR frequency, and the nuclear spin temperature. The model may help researchers to optimize experimental conditions for maximizing nuclear polarization in spintronics or quantum computing architectures. A clear correlation is shown between the OPNMR signal and the photoconductivity. A photoconductivity model is developed herein that accounts for the varying penetration depth of the light with photon energy and for the presence of band-to-band and band-to-defect recombination of charge carriers. The model's predictions agree well with the photoconductivity data. The photoconductivity model is then combined with a nuclear polarization model. The resulting picture for near-band-gap (1.495 eV ≲ by ≲ 1.6 eV) optical nuclear polarization is as follows. Optical absorption generates free, non

  13. Cryopreservation of human spermatozoa decreases the number of motile normal spermatozoa, induces nuclear vacuolization and chromatin decondensation.

    PubMed

    Boitrelle, Florence; Albert, Martine; Theillac, Claire; Ferfouri, Fatma; Bergere, Marianne; Vialard, François; Wainer, Robert; Bailly, Marc; Selva, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Even though cryopreservation of human spermatozoa is known to alter sperm motility and viability, it may also induce nuclear damages. The present study set out to determine whether or not cryopreservation alters motile sperm morphology under high magnification and/or is associated with chromatin decondensation. For 25 infertile men, we used high-magnification microscopy to determine the proportions of various types of motile spermatozoa before and after freezing-thawing: morphometrically normal spermatozoa with no vacuole (grade I), ≤ 2 small vacuoles (grade II), at least 1 large vacuole or >2 small vacuoles (grade III), and morphometrically abnormal spermatozoa (grade IV). The spermatozoa's chromatin condensation and viability were also assessed before and after freezing-thawing. Cryopreservation induced sperm nuclear vacuolization. It decreased the proportion of grade I + II spermatozoa (P < .001). It induced a decrease in the sperm viability rate (P < .001) and increased the proportion of sperm with noncondensed chromatin (P < .001). The latter parameter was strongly correlated with sperm viability (r = 0.71; P < .001). However, even motile sperm presented a failure of chromatin condensation after freezing-thawing, because the proportion of sperm with noncondensed chromatin was correlated with high-magnification morphology (r = -0.49 and 0.49 for the proportions of grade I + II and grades III + IV, respectively; P < .001). Cryopreservation alters the organelle morphology of motile human spermatozoa and induces sperm chromatin decondensation. High-magnification microscopy may be useful for evaluating frozen-thawed spermatozoa before use in assisted reproductive technology procedures (such as intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection) and for performing research on cryopreservation methods. If frozen-thawed sperm is to be used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection, morphological selection under high magnification may

  14. Tyrosol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced ocular inflammation in rats via inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    SATO, Kazuaki; MIHARA, Yuko; KANAI, Kazutaka; YAMASHITA, Yohei; KIMURA, Yuya; ITOH, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of tyrosol (Tyr) on endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rats. EIU was induced in male Lewis rats by subcutaneous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tyr (10, 50 or 100 mg/kg) was intravenously injected 2 hr before, simultaneously and 2 hr after LPS injection. The aqueous humor (AqH) was collected 24 hr after LPS injection; the infiltrating cell number, protein concentration, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, prostaglandin (PG)-E2 and nitric oxide (NO) levels were determined. Histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical studies for nuclear factor (NF)-κB, inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the iris–ciliary body (ICB) were performed at 3 or 24 hr after LPS injection. To further clarify the anti-inflammatory effects, RAW264.7 macrophages were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of Tyr. Tyr reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the infiltrating cell number, protein concentration, and TNF-α, PGE2 and NO levels in AqH and improved histopathologic scores of EIU. Tyr also inhibited LPS-induced COX-2 and iNOS expression, IκB-α degradation and nuclear translocation of activated NF-κB in ICB. Tyr significantly suppressed inflammatory mediator production in the culture medium and COX-2 and iNOS expression and activated NF-κB translocation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that Tyr suppresses ocular inflammation of EIU by inhibiting NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory mediator production. PMID:27238160

  15. Radiation-induced changes in DNA methylation and their relationship to chromosome aberrations in nuclear power plant workers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghyun; Kim, Yang Jee; Choi, Young Joo; Lee, Joong Won; Lee, Sunyeong; Cho, Yoon Hee; Chung, Hai Won

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the association between occupational radiation exposure and DNA methylation changes in nuclear power plant workers. We also evaluated whether radiation- induced DNA methylation alterations are associated with chromosome aberrations. The study population included 170 radiation-exposed workers and 30 controls. We measured global, long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1), and satellite 2 methylation levels in blood leukocyte DNA. The analysis of chromosome aberrations was performed on peripheral lymphocytes. Global DNA methylation levels were lower in radiation-exposed workers than in controls. The methylation levels were negatively associated with the recent 1.5-year radiation dose in a multiple linear regression model (β = - 0.0088, p ≤ 0.001); the levels increased proportionally with the total cumulative dose in radiation-exposed workers. LINE-1 methylation levels were higher in radiation-exposed workers than in controls and were significantly associated with the total cumulative radiation dose in a multiple linear regression model (β = - 0.031, p = 0.035). Global DNA methylation levels were also correlated with chromosome aberrations among workers. Workers with low global methylation levels had a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations than did subjects with high global methylation levels. Occupational exposure to low-dose radiation could affect DNA methylation levels, and the radiation-induced DNA methylation alterations may be associated with chromosome aberrations.

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate, induces PML nuclear body formation and apoptosis in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Naoyuki; Asakawa, Mayako; Umezawa, Kazuo . E-mail: umezawa@applc.keio.ac.jp; Segawa, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are the nuclear structure consisting of various proteins such as PML, SUMO-1, and p53. PML-NBs are implicated in the regulation of tumor suppression, antiviral responses, and apoptosis. In this study, we searched for bioactive metabolites that would promote the formation of PML-NBs in tumor cells. As a result, methyl 2,5-dihydromethylcinnimate (2,5-MeC), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced expression and/or stability of PML proteins and induced PML-NB formation in p53 null H1299 cells established from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild-type p53-expressing U2OS cells derived from osteosarcoma. Furthermore, it enhanced apoptosis by exogenously expressed wild type p53 and the expression of p53-responsive genes, such as PUMA and p21, in H1299 cells. 2,5-MeC also activated endogenous p53 and induced apoptosis in U2OS cells. The results suggest that 2,5-MeC is likely to be a promising candidate drug for the clinical treatment of terminal cancer-expressing wild-type p53.

  17. Interleukin-8 Induces Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB through a TRAF6-dependent Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Sunil K.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the potential role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in inflammation, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and metastasis, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in IL-8-mediated signaling. In this report we provide evidence that like TNF, an inducer of NF-κB and also a NF-κB-dependent gene product, IL-8 induces NF-κB in a unique pathway. IL-8 induces NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner in different cell types as detected by a DNA-protein binding assay. IL-8 induces NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression as well as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cox-2 expression. IL-8 also induces IκBα phosphorylation followed by degradation and p65 translocation. IL-8 induces c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation is for the most part unaltered when cells are transfected with dominant-negative TRADD, FADD, or TRAF2, but is inhibited with dominant-negative TRAF6-, NIK-, IKK-, or IκBα-transfected cells. The data suggest that IL-8-induced NF-κB activation proceeds through a TRAF2-independent but TRAF6-dependent pathway, followed by recruitment of IRAK and activation of IKK. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation is not observed in a cell-permeable peptide that has TRAF6 binding motif-treated cells or IRAK-deficient cells. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation proceeds mostly through interaction with TRAF6 and partially through the Rho-GTPase pathways. This is the first report that IL-8 induces NF-κB in a distinct pathway, and activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes may be one of the pathways of IL-8-induced inflammation and angiogenesis. PMID:15591054

  18. Antrodia camphorata suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation in transgenic mice evaluated by bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Huang, Hui-Chi; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier study, we found that Antrodia camphorata inhibited the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 by blocking nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. This study was aimed at evaluating the inhibitory effects of the fermented culture broth of A. camphorata in terms of LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation in transgenic mice by using a non-invasive, real-time NF-kappaB bioluminescence imaging technique. Transgenic mice carrying the luciferase gene under the control of NF-kappaB were given A. camphorata (570 mg/kg, p.o.) for three consecutive days and then injected with LPS (4 mg/kg, i.p.). In vivo imaging showed that treatment with LPS increased the luminescent signal, whereas A. camphorata suppressed the LPS-induced inflammatory response significantly. Ex vivo imaging showed that A. camphorata suppressed LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity in the small intestine, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and kidney. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that A. camphorata suppressed production of the LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and NF-kappaB p65 subunit in these organs. Furthermore, A. camphorata attenuated the productions of LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in serum from transgenic mice. We report the first confirmation of the anti-inflammatory action in vivo of this potentially beneficial mushroom.

  19. Vitamin K3 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury through inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Nishiumi, S; Nishida, M; Mizushina, Y; Kobayashi, K; Masuda, A; Fujita, T; Morita, Y; Mizuno, S; Kutsumi, H; Azuma, T; Yoshida, M

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin K is a family of fat-soluble compounds including phylloquinone (vitamin K1), menaquinone (vitamin K2) and menadione (vitamin K3). Recently, it was reported that vitamin K, especially vitamins K1 and K2, exerts a variety of biological effects, and these compounds are expected to be candidates for therapeutic agents against various diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin K3 in in vitro cultured cell experiments and in vivo animal experiments. In human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, vitamin K3 inhibited the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-evoked translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB into the nucleus, although vitamins K1 and K2 did not. Vitamin K3 also suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and production of TNF-α in mouse macrophage RAW264·7 cells. Moreover, the addition of vitamin K3 before and after LPS administration attenuated the severity of lung injury in an animal model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which occurs in the setting of acute severe illness complicated by systemic inflammation. In the ARDS model, vitamin K3 also suppressed the LPS-induced increase in the serum TNF-α level and inhibited the LPS-evoked nuclear translocation of NF-κB in lung tissue. Despite marked efforts, little therapeutic progress has been made, and the mortality rate of ARDS remains high. Vitamin K3 may be an effective therapeutic strategy against acute lung injury including ARDS. PMID:20030669

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization in solid samples by electrical-discharge-induced radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Itai; Blank, Aharon

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method for enhancing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that has many potential applications in chemistry and medicine. Traditionally, DNP signal enhancement is achieved through the use of exogenous radicals mixed in a solution with the molecules of interest. Here we show that proton DNP signal enhancements can be obtained for solid samples without the use of solvent and exogenous radicals. Radicals are generated primarily on the surface of a solid sample using electrical discharges. These radicals are found suitable for DNP. They are stable under moderate vacuum conditions, yet readily annihilate upon compound dissolution or air exposure. This feature makes them attractive for use in medical applications, where the current variety of radicals used for DNP faces regulatory problems. In addition, this solvent-free method may be found useful for analytical NMR of solid samples which cannot tolerate solvents, such as certain pharmaceutical products.

  1. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in cells with progerin-induced defective nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Storti, Barbara; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2017-10-01

    Recent data indicate that nuclear lamina (NL) plays a relevant role in many fundamental cellular functions. The peculiar role of NL in cells is dramatically demonstrated by the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an inherited laminopathy that causes premature, rapid aging shortly after birth. In HGPS, a mutant form of Lamin A (progeria) leads to a dysmorphic NL structure, but how this perturbation is transduced into cellular changes is still largely unknown. Owing to the close structural relationship between NL and the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC), in this work we test whether HGPS affects passive and active nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of cargoes by means of an established model based of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Our findings clearly demonstrate that dysmorphic NL is decoupled from the dynamic characteristics of passive and active transport towards and from the nucleus, as well as from the binding affinity of transport protein mediators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization in solid samples by electrical-discharge-induced radicals.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itai; Blank, Aharon

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method for enhancing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that has many potential applications in chemistry and medicine. Traditionally, DNP signal enhancement is achieved through the use of exogenous radicals mixed in a solution with the molecules of interest. Here we show that proton DNP signal enhancements can be obtained for solid samples without the use of solvent and exogenous radicals. Radicals are generated primarily on the surface of a solid sample using electrical discharges. These radicals are found suitable for DNP. They are stable under moderate vacuum conditions, yet readily annihilate upon compound dissolution or air exposure. This feature makes them attractive for use in medical applications, where the current variety of radicals used for DNP faces regulatory problems. In addition, this solvent-free method may be found useful for analytical NMR of solid samples which cannot tolerate solvents, such as certain pharmaceutical products.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of changes induced by the energy of ultrasonic field in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Gaită, A; Andru-Vangheli, D; Nagy, I; Coman, M; Covlescu, H

    156 laboratory mice were exposed to ultrasonic (US) waves under 12 different conditions. After exposure to ultrasounds, the left lung of each animal was studied morphopathologically and then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The study emphasized the possibility of hemorrhagical lesions in the lung through US and the fact that both measurement techniques (for T1 and T2) are alike in sensitivity. The effect on the lung is depending on the intensity and time of exposure to US.

  4. Folate rescues vitamin B12 depletion-induced inhibition of nuclear thymidylate biosynthesis and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ashley M; Kamynina, Elena; Field, Martha S; Stover, Patrick J

    2017-05-16

    Clinical vitamin B12 deficiency can result in megaloblastic anemia, which results from the inhibition of DNA synthesis by trapping folate cofactors in the form of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF) and subsequent inhibition of de novo thymidylate (dTMP) biosynthesis. In the cytosol, vitamin B12 functions in the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine, which regenerates THF from 5-methylTHF. In the nucleus, THF is required for de novo dTMP biosynthesis, but it is not understood how 5-methylTHF accumulation in the cytosol impairs nuclear dTMP biosynthesis. The impact of vitamin B12 depletion on nuclear de novo dTMP biosynthesis was investigated in methionine synthase-null human fibroblast and nitrous oxide-treated HeLa cell models. The nucleus was the most sensitive cellular compartment to 5-methylTHF accumulation, with levels increasing greater than fourfold. Vitamin B12 depletion decreased de novo dTMP biosynthesis capacity by 5-35%, whereas de novo purine synthesis, which occurs in the cytosol, was not affected. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, was increased in vitamin B12 depletion, and this effect was exacerbated by folate depletion. These studies also revealed that 5-formylTHF, a slow, tight-binding inhibitor of serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), was enriched in nuclei, accounting for 35% of folate cofactors, explaining previous observations that nuclear SHMT is not a robust source of one-carbons for de novo dTMP biosynthesis. These findings indicate that a nuclear 5-methylTHF trap occurs in vitamin B12 depletion, which suppresses de novo dTMP biosynthesis and causes DNA damage, accounting for the pathophysiology of megaloblastic anemia observed in vitamin B12 and folate deficiency.

  5. VRK3-mediated nuclear localization of HSP70 prevents glutamate excitotoxicity-induced apoptosis and Aβ accumulation via enhancement of ERK phosphatase VHR activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haengjin; Kim, Wanil; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Most of neurodegenerative disorders are associated with protein aggregation. Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and persistent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation are also implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we found that vaccinia-related kinase 3 (VRK3) facilitates nuclear localization of glutamate-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Nuclear HSP70 leads to enhancement of vaccinia H1-related phosphatase (VHR) activity via protein-protein interaction rather than its molecular chaperone activity, thereby suppressing excessive ERK activation. Moreover, glutamate-induced ERK activation stimulates the expression of HSP70 and VRK3 at the transcriptional level. Downregulation of either VRK3 or HSP70 rendered cells vulnerable to glutamate-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of HSP70 fused to a nuclear localization signal attenuated apoptosis more than HSP70 alone. The importance of nuclear localization of HSP70 in the negative regulation of glutamate-induced ERK activation was further confirmed in VRK3-deficient neurons. Importantly, we showed a positive correlation between levels of VRK3 and HSP70 in the progression of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases in humans, and neurons with HSP70 nuclear localization exhibited less Aβ accumulation in brains from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, HSP70 and VRK3 could potentially serve as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27941812

  6. Pulsed, Photonuclear-induced, Neutron Measurements of Nuclear Materials with Composite Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    James Jones; Kevin Haskell; Rich Waston; William Geist; Jonathan Thron; Corey Freeman; Martyn Swinhoe; Seth McConchie; Eric Sword; Lee Montierth; John Zabriskie

    2011-07-01

    Active measurements were performed using a 10-MeV electron accelerator with inspection objects containing various nuclear and nonnuclear materials available at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility. The inspection objects were assembled from ZPPR reactor plate materials to evaluate the measurement technologies for the characterization of plutonium, depleted uranium or highly enriched uranium shielded by both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. A series of pulsed photonuclear, time-correlated measurements were performed with unshielded calibration materials and then compared with the more complex composite shield configurations. The measurements used multiple 3He detectors that are designed to detect fission neutrons between pulses of an electron linear accelerator. The accelerator produced 10-MeV bremsstrahlung X-rays at a repetition rate of 125 Hz (8 ms between pulses) with a 4-us pulse width. All inspected objects were positioned on beam centerline and 100 cm from the X-ray source. The time-correlated data was collected in parallel using both a Los Alamos National Laboratory-designed list-mode acquisition system and a commercial multichannel scaler analyzer. A combination of different measurement configurations and data analysis methods enabled the identification of each object. This paper describes the experimental configuration, the ZPPR inspection objects used, and the various measurement and analysis results for each inspected object.

  7. Loss of the integral nuclear envelope protein SUN1 induces alteration of nucleoli.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Matsumori, Haruka; Katahira, Jun; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Hieda, Miki

    2016-01-01

    A supervised machine learning algorithm, which is qualified for image classification and analyzing similarities, is based on multiple discriminative morphological features that are automatically assembled during the learning processes. The algorithm is suitable for population-based analysis of images of biological materials that are generally complex and heterogeneous. Here we used the algorithm wndchrm to quantify the effects on nucleolar morphology of the loss of the components of nuclear envelope in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, an assembly of nuclear envelope proteins comprising mainly members of the SUN and nesprin families, connects the nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments. The components of the LINC complex are markedly deficient in breast cancer tissues. We found that a reduction in the levels of SUN1, SUN2, and lamin A/C led to significant changes in morphologies that were computationally classified using wndchrm with approximately 100% accuracy. In particular, depletion of SUN1 caused nucleolar hypertrophy and reduced rRNA synthesis. Further, wndchrm revealed a consistent negative correlation between SUN1 expression and the size of nucleoli in human breast cancer tissues. Our unbiased morphological quantitation strategies using wndchrm revealed an unexpected link between the components of the LINC complex and the morphologies of nucleoli that serves as an indicator of the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells.

  8. Loss of the integral nuclear envelope protein SUN1 induces alteration of nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Matsumori, Haruka; Katahira, Jun; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Hieda, Miki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A supervised machine learning algorithm, which is qualified for image classification and analyzing similarities, is based on multiple discriminative morphological features that are automatically assembled during the learning processes. The algorithm is suitable for population-based analysis of images of biological materials that are generally complex and heterogeneous. Here we used the algorithm wndchrm to quantify the effects on nucleolar morphology of the loss of the components of nuclear envelope in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, an assembly of nuclear envelope proteins comprising mainly members of the SUN and nesprin families, connects the nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments. The components of the LINC complex are markedly deficient in breast cancer tissues. We found that a reduction in the levels of SUN1, SUN2, and lamin A/C led to significant changes in morphologies that were computationally classified using wndchrm with approximately 100% accuracy. In particular, depletion of SUN1 caused nucleolar hypertrophy and reduced rRNA synthesis. Further, wndchrm revealed a consistent negative correlation between SUN1 expression and the size of nucleoli in human breast cancer tissues. Our unbiased morphological quantitation strategies using wndchrm revealed an unexpected link between the components of the LINC complex and the morphologies of nucleoli that serves as an indicator of the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells. PMID:26962703

  9. The role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha in perfluorooctanoic acid- and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid-induced hepatocellular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Kevin M; McGreal, Steven R; McCarthy, Alex; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Lampe, Jed N; Lau, Christoper; Apte, Udayan

    2016-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), chemicals present in a multitude of consumer products, are persistent organic pollutants. Both compounds induce hepatotoxic effects in rodents, including steatosis, hepatomegaly and liver cancer. The mechanisms of PFOA- and PFOS-induced hepatic dysfunction are not completely understood. We present evidence that PFOA and PFOS induce their hepatic effects via targeting hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α). Human hepatocytes treated with PFOA and PFOS at a concentration relevant to occupational exposure caused a decrease in HNF4α protein without affecting HNF4α mRNA or causing cell death. RNA sequencing analysis combined with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of global gene expression changes in human hepatocytes treated with PFOA or PFOS indicated alterations in the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis, several of which are regulated by HNF4α. Further investigation of specific HNF4α target gene expression revealed that PFOA and PFOS could promote cellular dedifferentiation and increase cell proliferation by down regulating positive targets (differentiation genes such as CYP7A1) and inducing negative targets of HNF4α (pro-mitogenic genes such as CCND1). Furthermore, in silico docking simulations indicated that PFOA and PFOS could directly interact with HNF4α in a similar manner to endogenous fatty acids. Collectively, these results highlight HNF4α degradation as novel mechanism of PFOA and PFOS-mediated steatosis and tumorigenesis in human livers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4-Alpha in Perfluorooctanoic Acid- and Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid-Induced Hepatocellular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Kevin M.; McGreal, Steven R.; McCarthy, Alex; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Lampe, Jed N.; Lau, Christoper; Apte, Udayan

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), chemicals present in a multitude of consumer products, are persistent organic pollutants. Both compounds induce hepatotoxic effects in rodents, including steatosis, hepatomegaly and liver cancer. The mechanisms of PFOA- and PFOS-induced hepatic dysfunction are not completely understood. We present evidence that PFOA and PFOS induce their hepatic effects via targeting hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α). Human hepatocytes treated with PFOA and PFOS at a concentration relevant to occupational exposure caused a decrease in HNF4α protein without affecting HNF4α mRNA or causing cell death. RNA sequencing analysis combined with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of global gene expression changes in human hepatocytes treated with PFOA or PFOS indicated alterations in the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis, several of which are regulated by HNF4α. Further investigation of specific HNF4α target gene expression revealed that PFOA and PFOS could promote cellular dedifferentiation and increase cell proliferation by down regulating positive targets (differentiation genes such as CYP7A1) and inducing negative targets of HNF4α (pro-mitogenic genes such as CCND1). Furthermore, in silico docking simulations indicated that PFOA and PFOS could directly interact with HNF4α in a similar manner to endogenous fatty acids. Collectively, these results highlight HNF4α degradation as novel mechanism of PFOA and PFOS-mediated steatosis and tumorigenesis in human livers. PMID:27153767

  11. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  12. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  13. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  14. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemsitry in the region of Thulium, Lutetium, and Tantalum I. Results of Built in Spherical Symmetry in a Deformed Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2013-09-06

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from Terbium (Z = 65) to Rhenium (Z = 75). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Tm, Lu, and Ta including reactions on isomeric targets.

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) Method and Probe for Generating RF Magnetic Fields in Different Directions to Distinguish NQR from Acoustic Ringing Induced in a Sample

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    77,719 TITLE OF THE INVENTION NUCLEAR QUADRUPOLE RESONANCE ( NQR ) METHOD AND PROBE FOR GENERATING RF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS TO...DISTINGUISH NQR FROM ACOUSTIC RINGING INDUCED IN A SAMPLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a...nuclear quadrupole 15 resonance ( NQR ) method and probe for generating RF magnetic fields in different directions towards a sample. More specifically

  16. v-Src-induced nuclear localization of YAP is involved in multipolar spindle formation in tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kakae, Keiko; Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine kinase, c-Src, is involved in a variety of signaling events, including cell division. We have reported that v-Src, which is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene, c-Src, causes delocalization of Aurora B kinase, resulting in a furrow regression in cytokinesis and the generation of multinucleated cells. However, the effect of v-Src on mitotic spindle formation is unknown. Here we show that v-Src-expressing HCT116 and NIH3T3 cells undergo abnormal cell division, in which cells separate into more than two cells. Upon v-Src expression, the proportion of multinucleated cells is increased in a time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that v-Src increases the number of cells having a ≥4N DNA content. Microscopic analysis showed that v-Src induces the formation of multipolar spindles with excess centrosomes. These results suggest that v-Src induces multipolar spindle formation by generating multinucleated cells. Tetraploidy activates the tetraploidy checkpoint, leading to a cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells at the G1 phase, in which the nuclear exclusion of the transcription co-activator YAP plays a critical role. In multinucleated cells that are induced by cytochalasin B and the Plk1 inhibitor, YAP is excluded from the nucleus. However, v-Src prevents this nuclear exclusion of YAP through a decrease in the phosphorylation of YAP at Ser127 in multinucleated cells. Furthermore, v-Src decreases the expression level of p53, which also plays a critical role in the cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells. These results suggest that v-Src promotes abnormal spindle formation in at least two ways: generation of multinucleated cells and a weakening of the tetraploidy checkpoint.

  17. Directly converted patient-specific induced neurons mirror the neuropathology of FUS with disrupted nuclear localization in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su Min; Choi, Won Jun; Oh, Ki-Wook; Xue, Yuanchao; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Sung Hoon; Nahm, Minyeop; Kim, Young-Eun; Lee, Jinhyuk; Noh, Min-Young; Lee, Seungbok; Hwang, Sejin; Ki, Chang-Seok; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-22

    Mutations in the fused in sarcoma (FUS) gene have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS patients with FUS mutations exhibit neuronal cytoplasmic mislocalization of the mutant FUS protein. ALS patients' fibroblasts or induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons have been developed as models for understanding ALS-associated FUS (ALS-FUS) pathology; however, pathological neuronal signatures are not sufficiently present in the fibroblasts of patients, whereas the generation of iPSC-derived neurons from ALS patients requires relatively intricate procedures. Here, we report the generation of disease-specific induced neurons (iNeurons) from the fibroblasts of patients who carry three different FUS mutations that were recently identified by direct sequencing and multi-gene panel analysis. The mutations are located at the C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) region of the protein (p.G504Wfs*12, p.R495*, p.Q519E): two de novo mutations in sporadic ALS and one in familial ALS case. Aberrant cytoplasmic mislocalization with nuclear clearance was detected in all patient-derived iNeurons, and oxidative stress further induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic FUS in cytoplasmic granules, thereby recapitulating neuronal pathological features identified in mutant FUS (p.G504Wfs*12)-autopsied ALS patient. Importantly, such FUS pathological hallmarks of the patient with the p.Q519E mutation were only detected in patient-derived iNeurons, which contrasts to predominant FUS (p.Q519E) in the nucleus of both the transfected cells and patient-derived fibroblasts. Thus, iNeurons may provide a more reliable model for investigating FUS mutations with disrupted NLS for understanding FUS-associated proteinopathies in ALS.

  18. DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induce the Nuclear Actin Filaments Formation in Cumulus-Enclosed Oocytes but Not in Denuded Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Hong; Yang, Mo; Xie, Feng-Yun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lili; Shen, Wei; Yin, Shen; Ma, Jun-Yu

    2017-01-01

    As a gamete, oocyte needs to maintain its genomic integrity and passes this haploid genome to the next generation. However, fully-grown mouse oocyte cannot respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) effectively and it is also unable to repair them before the meiosis resumption. To compensate for this disadvantage and control the DNA repair events, oocyte needs the cooperation with its surrounding cumulus cells. Recently, evidences have shown that nuclear actin filament formation plays roles in cellular DNA DSB repair. To explore whether these nuclear actin filaments are formed in the DNA-damaged oocytes, here, we labeled the filament actins in denuded oocytes (DOs) and cumulus-enclosed oocytes (CEOs). We observed that the nuclear actin filaments were formed only in the DNA-damaged CEOs, but not in DOs. Formation of actin filaments in the nucleus was an event downstream to the DNA damage response. Our data also showed that the removal of cumulus cells led to a reduction in the nuclear actin filaments in oocytes. Knocking down of the Adcy1 gene in cumulus cells did not affect the formation of nuclear actin filaments in oocytes. Notably, we also observed that the nuclear actin filaments in CEOs could be induced by inhibition of gap junctions. From our results, it was confirmed that DNA DSBs induce the nuclear actin filament formation in oocyte and which is controlled by the cumulus cells.

  19. DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induce the Nuclear Actin Filaments Formation in Cumulus-Enclosed Oocytes but Not in Denuded Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-Hong; Yang, Mo; Xie, Feng-Yun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lili; Shen, Wei; Yin, Shen

    2017-01-01

    As a gamete, oocyte needs to maintain its genomic integrity and passes this haploid genome to the next generation. However, fully-grown mouse oocyte cannot respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) effectively and it is also unable to repair them before the meiosis resumption. To compensate for this disadvantage and control the DNA repair events, oocyte needs the cooperation with its surrounding cumulus cells. Recently, evidences have shown that nuclear actin filament formation plays roles in cellular DNA DSB repair. To explore whether these nuclear actin filaments are formed in the DNA-damaged oocytes, here, we labeled the filament actins in denuded oocytes (DOs) and cumulus-enclosed oocytes (CEOs). We observed that the nuclear actin filaments were formed only in the DNA-damaged CEOs, but not in DOs. Formation of actin filaments in the nucleus was an event downstream to the DNA damage response. Our data also showed that the removal of cumulus cells led to a reduction in the nuclear actin filaments in oocytes. Knocking down of the Adcy1 gene in cumulus cells did not affect the formation of nuclear actin filaments in oocytes. Notably, we also observed that the nuclear actin filaments in CEOs could be induced by inhibition of gap junctions. From our results, it was confirmed that DNA DSBs induce the nuclear actin filament formation in oocyte and which is controlled by the cumulus cells. PMID:28099474

  20. Nuclear β-arrestin1 is a critical cofactor of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling in endothelin-1-induced ovarian tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Rosanò, Laura; Caprara, Valentina; Sestito, Rosanna; Di Castro, Valeriana; Bagnato, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediates the response to hypoxia or other stimuli, such as growth factors, including endothelin-1 (ET-1), to promote malignant progression in numerous tumors. The importance of cofactors that regulate HIF-1α signalling within tumor is not well understood. Here we elucidate that ET-1/ETA receptor (ETAR)-induced pathway physically and functionally couples the scaffold protein β-arrestin1 (β-arr1) to HIF-1α signalling. In epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells, ET-1/ETAR axis induced vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression through HIF-1α nuclear accumulation. In these cells, activation of ETAR by ET-1, by mimicking hypoxia, promoted the nuclear interaction between β-arr1 and HIF-1α and the recruitment of p300 acetyltransferase to hypoxia response elements on the target gene promoters, resulting in enhanced histone acetylation, and HIF-1α target gene transcription. Indeed, β-arr1-HIF-1α interaction regulated the enhanced expression and release of downstream targets, such as ET-1 and VEGF, required for tumor cell invasion and pro-angiogenic effects in endothelial cells. These effects were abrogated by β-arr1 or HIF-1α silencing or by pharmacological treatment with the dual ET-1 receptor antagonist macitentan. Interestingly, ETAR/β-arr1 promoted the self-amplifying HIF-1α-mediated transcription of ET-1 that sustained a regulatory circuit involved in invasive and angiogenic behaviors. In a murine orthotopic model of metastatic human EOC, treatment with macitentan, or silencing of β-arr1, inhibits intravasation and metastasis formation. Collectively, these findings reveal the interplay of β-arr1 with HIF-1α in the complexity of ET-1/ETAR signalling, mediating epigenetic modifications directly involved in the metastatic process, and suggest that targeting ET-1-dependent β-arr1/HIF-1α pathway by using macitentan may impair EOC progression. PMID:26909598

  1. Celecoxib Induced Tumor Cell Radiosensitization by Inhibiting Radiation Induced Nuclear EGFR Transport and DNA-Repair: A COX-2 Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, Klaus H. Mayer, Claus; Ohneseit, Petra A.; Raju, Uma; Andratschke, Nickolaus H.; Milas, Luka; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms mediating radiosensitization of human tumor cells by the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed using bronchial carcinoma cells A549, transformed fibroblasts HH4dd, the FaDu head-and-neck tumor cells, the colon carcinoma cells HCT116, and normal fibroblasts HSF7. Effects of celecoxib treatment were assessed by clonogenic cell survival, Western analysis, and quantification of residual DNA damage by {gamma}H{sub 2}AX foci assay. Results: Celecoxib treatment resulted in a pronounced radiosensitization of A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells, whereas FaDu and HH4dd cells were not radiosensitized. The observed radiosensitization could neither be correlated with basal COX-2 expression pattern nor with basal production of prostaglandin E2, but was depended on the ability of celecoxib to inhibit basal and radiation-induced nuclear transport of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The nuclear EGFR transport was strongly inhibited in A549-, HSF7-, and COX-2-deficient HCT116 cells, which were radiosensitized, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells, which resisted celecoxib-induced radiosensitization. Celecoxib inhibited radiation-induced DNA-PK activation in A549, HSF7, and HCT116 cells, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells. Consequentially, celecoxib increased residual {gamma}H2AX foci after irradiation, demonstrating that inhibition of DNA repair has occurred in responsive A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells only. Conclusions: Celecoxib enhanced radiosensitivity by inhibition of EGFR-mediated mechanisms of radioresistance, a signaling that was independent of COX-2 activity. This novel observation may have therapeutic implications such that COX-2 inhibitors may improve therapeutic efficacy of radiation even in patients whose tumor radioresistance is not dependent on COX-2.

  2. Experimental cross-sections for proton-induced nuclear reactions on natMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenák, Jaroslav; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the Co-ordinated Research Project of the IAEA, we measured in detail cross-sections of the nuclear reactions natMo(p,x)93gTc, 93mTc, 93m+gTc, 94gTc, 94mTc, 95gTc, 95mTc, 96m+gTc, 97mTc, 99mTc, 90Mo, 93mMo, 99Mo, 88gNb, 88mNb, 89gNb, 89mNb, 90m+gNb, 90m+gNbcum, 91mNb, 92mNb, 95gNb, 95mNb, 95m+gNb, 96Nb, 97m+gNb, 88m+gZrcum and 89m+gZrcum in the energy range of 6.9-35.8 MeV. The data for formation of 97mTc, 88gNb, 88mNb and 89mNb are reported for the first time. The obtained results were compared to the prediction of the nuclear reaction model code TALYS adopted from the TENDL-2015 library and to the previously published cross-sections. The thick target yields for all the radionuclides were calculated from the measured data. We suggest recommended cross-sections and thick target yields for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 100Mo(p,x)99Mo and natMo(p,x)96m+gTc nuclear reactions deduced from the selected experimental data.

  3. In situ transmission electron microscopy of electron-beam induced damage process in nuclear grade graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, C.; Kane, J.; Butt, D. P.; Windes, W. E.; Ubic, R.

    2011-05-01

    Atomic level processes involved in the swelling and crack-closing in nuclear grade graphite under electron irradiation have been observed in real-time using transmission electron microscopy. Noise-filtered lattice images show the formation of vacancy loops, interstitial loops and resulting dislocations with unprecedented clarity. The dislocation dipoles formed via vacancy loops were found to undergo climb resulting in extra basal planes. Concurrent EELS studies showed a reduction in the atomic density because of the breakage of hexagonal carbon rings. The formation of new basal planes via dislocation climb in addition to the bending/breaking of basal planes leads to swelling and closing of micro-cracks.

  4. Future prospects of nuclear reactions induced by gamma-ray beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Camera, F.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Kaur, J.; Ur, C. A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Varlamov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The future prospects of photonuclear reactions studies at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure—Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the pursuit of investigating the electromagnetic response of nuclei using γ-ray beams of unprecedented energy resolution and intensity characteristics. We present here the features of the γ-ray beam source, the emerging ELI-NP experimental program involving photonuclear reactions cross section measurements and spectroscopy and angular measurements of γ-rays and neutrons along with the detection arrays currently under implementation.

  5. FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES ON DEEPLY EMBEDDED NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.

    2006-06-26

    PAPER DISCUSSES COMPUTATIONS OF SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED AND OR BURIED STIFF STRUCTURES SUCH AS THOSE APPEARING IN THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS OF STRUCTURES FOR ADVANCED REACTORS.

  6. Angiogenin-induced protein kinase B/Akt activation is necessary for angiogenesis but is independent of nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hye-Mi; Kang, Dong-Ku; Kim, Hak Yong; Kang, Sang Sun; Chang, Soo-Ik . E-mail: sichang@cbnu.ac.kr

    2007-01-12

    Angiogenin, a potent angiogenic factor, binds to endothelial cells and is endocytosed and rapidly translocated to and concentrated in the nucleolus where it binds to DNA. In this study, we report that angiogenin induces transient phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells. LY294002 inhibits the angiogenin-induced protein kinase B/Akt activation and also angiogenin-induced cell migration in vitro as well as angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane in vivo without affecting nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells. These results suggest that cross-talk between angiogenin and protein kinase B/Akt signaling pathways is essential for angiogenin-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and that angiogenin-induced PKB/Akt activation is independent of nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells.

  7. Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cytosol-to-Nuclear Translocation of Rat Liver Nrf2 Is Dependent on Kupffer Cell Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Videla, Luis A.; Cornejo, Pamela; Romanque, Pamela; Santibáñez, Catherine; Castillo, Iván; Vargas, Romina

    2012-01-01

    L-3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) administration upregulates nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in rat liver, which is redox-sensitive transcription factor mediating cytoprotection. In this work, we studied the role of Kupffer cell respiratory burst activity, a process related to reactive oxygen species generation and liver homeostasis, in Nrf2 activation using the macrophage inactivator gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg i.v. 72 h before T3 [0.1 mg/kg i.p.]) or NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (1.5 mmol/L added to the drinking water for 7 days before T3), and determinations were performed 2 h after T3. T3 increased nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 content ratio and levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase, and thioredoxin (Western blot) over control values, proteins whose gene transcription is induced by Nrf2. These changes were suppressed by GdCl3 treatment prior to T3, an agent-eliciting Kupffer-cell depletion, inhibition of colloidal carbon phagocytosis, and the associated respiratory burst activity, with enhancement in nuclear inhibitor of Nrf2 kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/Nrf2 content ratios suggesting Nrf2 degradation. Under these conditions, T3-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) response was eliminated by previous GdCl3 administration. Similar to GdCl3, apocynin given before T3 significantly reduced liver Nrf2 activation and HO-1 expression, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor eliciting abolishment of colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity without altering carbon phagocytosis. It is concluded that Kupffer cell functioning is essential for upregulation of liver Nrf2-signaling pathway by T3. This contention is supported by suppression of the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells and the associated reactive oxygen species production by GdCl3 or apocynin given prior to T3, thus hindering Nrf2 activation. PMID:22649286

  8. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  9. Designed inhibitor for nuclear localization signal of polo-like kinase 1 induces mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangjin; Zhuo, Xiaolong; Qin, Tan; Guo, Xiao; Zhang, Chuanmao; Lai, Luhua

    2016-11-24

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), a member of polo-like kinase family, regulates multiple essential steps of the cell cycle progression. Plk1 is overexpressed in multiple cancer cell lines and considered to be a prime anticancer target. Plk1 accumulates in the nucleus during S and G2 phases by its bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, which is crucial for Plk1 regulation during normal cell cycle progression. Here, through combined computational and experimental studies, we identified compound D110, which inhibits Plk1 kinase activity with an IC50 of 85 nm and blocks the nuclear localization of Plk1 during S and G2 phases. D110-treated cancer cells were arrested at mitosis with monopolar spindle, indicating the inhibition of the Plk1 kinase activity in cell. As D110 interacts with both the ATP site and the NLS in Plk1, it demonstrates good selectivity toward Plk2 and Plk3. The strategy of simultaneously inhibiting kinase activity and its subcellular translocations offers a novel approach for selective kinase inhibitor design.

  10. Abnormal XPD-induced nuclear receptor transactivation in DNA repair disorders: trichothiodystrophy and xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Khan, Sikandar G; Tamura, Deborah; Ueda, Takahiro; Boyle, Jennifer; Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-08-01

    XPD (ERCC2) is a DNA helicase involved in nucleotide excision repair and in transcription as a structural bridge tying the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) core with the cdk-activating kinase complex, which phosphorylates nuclear receptors. Mutations in XPD are associated with several different phenotypes, including trichothiodystrophy (TTD), with sulfur-deficient brittle hair, bone defects, and developmental abnormalities without skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), with pigmentary abnormalities and increased skin cancer, or XP/TTD with combined features, including skin cancer. We describe the varied clinical features and mutations in nine patients examined at the National Institutes of Health who were compound heterozygotes for XPD mutations but had different clinical phenotypes: four TTD, three XP, and two combined XP/TTD. We studied TFIIH-dependent transactivation by nuclear receptor for vitamin D (VDR) and thyroid in cells from these patients. The vitamin D stimulation ratio of CYP24 and osteopontin was associated with specific pairs of mutations (reduced in 5, elevated in 1) but not correlated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Thyroid receptor stimulation ratio for KLF9 was not significantly different from normal. XPD mutations frequently were associated with abnormal VDR stimulation in compound heterozygote patients with TTD, XP, or XP/TTD.

  11. Review: Placental perturbations induce the developmental abnormalities often observed in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Chavatte-Palmer, P; Camous, S; Jammes, H; Le Cleac'h, N; Guillomot, M; Lee, R S F

    2012-02-01

    Since the first success in cloning sheep, the production of viable animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has developed significantly. Cattle are by far the most successfully cloned species but, despite this, the technique is still associated with a high incidence of pregnancy failure and accompanying placental and fetal pathologies. Pre- and early post-implantation losses can affect up to 70% of the pregnancies. In the surviving pregnancies, placentomegaly and fetal overgrowth are commonly observed, but the incidence varies widely, depending on the genotype of the nuclear donor cell and differences in SCNT procedures. In all cases, the placenta is central to the onset of the pathologies. Although cellular organisation of the SCNT placenta appears normal, placental vascularisation is modified and fetal-to-maternal tissue ratios are slightly increased in the SCNT placentomes. In terms of functionality, steroidogenesis is perturbed and abnormal estrogen production and metabolism probably play an important part in the increased gestation length and lack of preparation for parturition observed in SCNT recipients. Maternal plasma concentrations of pregnancy-associated glycoproteins are increased, mostly due to a reduction in turnover rate rather than increased placental production. Placental glucose transport and fructose synthesis appear to be modified and hyperfructosemia has been observed in neonatal SCNT calves. Gene expression analyses of the bovine SCNT placenta show that multiple pathways and functions are affected. Abnormal epigenetic re-programming appears to be a key component of the observed pathologies, as shown by studies on the expression of imprinted genes in SCNT placenta.

  12. Field-induced spin reorientation in [Fe/Cr ] n multilayers studied by nuclear resonance reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, M.; Gupta, A.; Sharma, G.; Kamali, S.; Okada, K.; Yoda, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We present depth-resolved nuclear resonance reflectivity studies of the magnetization evolution in [57Fe(3nm ) /Cr (1.2 nm ) ] 10 multilayer under applied external field. The measurements have been performed at the station BL09XU of SPring-8 at different values of the external field (0-1500 Oe). We apply the joint fit of the delayed reflectivity curves and the time spectra of the nuclear resonance reflectivity measured at different grazing angles for enhancement of the depth resolution and reliability of results. We show that the azimuth angle, which is used in all papers devoted to the magnetization profile determination, has a more complicated physical sense due to the partially coherent averaging of the scattering amplitudes from magnetic lateral domains. We describe how to select the true azimuth angle from the determined "effective azimuth angle." Finally we obtain the noncollinear twisted magnetization depth profiles where the spin-flop state appears sequentially in different 57Fe layers at increasing applied field.

  13. The proteasome regulates collagen-induced platelet aggregation via nuclear-factor-kappa-B (NFĸB) activation.

    PubMed

    Grundler, Katharina; Rotter, Raffaela; Tilley, Sloane; Pircher, Joachim; Czermak, Thomas; Yakac, Mustaf; Gaitzsch, Erik; Massberg, Steffen; Krötz, Florian; Sohn, Hae-Young; Pohl, Ulrich; Mannell, Hanna; Kraemer, Bjoern F

    2016-12-01

    Platelets possess critical hemostatic functions in the system of thrombosis and hemostasis, which can be affected by a multitude of external factors. Previous research has shown that platelets have the capacity to synthesize proteins de novo and more recently a multicatalytic protein complex, the proteasome, has been discovered in platelets. Due to its vital function for cellular integrity, the proteasome has become a therapeutic target for anti-proliferative drug therapies in cancer. Clinically thrombocytopenia is a frequent side-effect, but the aggregatory function of platelets also appears to be affected. Little is known however about underlying regulatory mechanisms and functional aspects of proteasome inhibition on platelets. Our study aims to investigate the role of the proteasome in regulating collagen-induced platelet aggregation and its interaction with NFkB in this context. Using fluorescence activity assays, platelet aggregometry and immunoblotting, we investigate regulatory interactions of the proteasome and Nuclear-factor-kappa-B (NFkB) in collagen-induced platelet aggregation. We show that collagen induces proteasome activation in platelets and collagen-induced platelet aggregation can be reduced with proteasome inhibition by the specific inhibitor epoxomicin. This effect does not depend on Rho-kinase/ROCK activation or thromboxane release, but rather depends on NFkB activation. Inhibition of the proteasome prevented cleavage of NFκB-inhibitor protein IκBα and decreased NFκB activity after collagen stimulation. Inhibition of the NFκB-pathway in return reduced collagen-induced platelet proteasome activity and cleavage of proteasome substrates. This work offers novel explanations how the proteasome influences collagen-dependent platelet aggregation by involving non-genomic functions of NFkB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Colitis and Colitis-Associated Cancer Are Exacerbated in Mice Deficient for Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Gommeaux, Julien; Cano, Carla; Garcia, Stéphane; Gironella, Meritxell; Pietri, Sylvia; Culcasi, Marcel; Pébusque, Marie-Josèphe; Malissen, Bernard; Dusetti, Nelson; Iovanna, Juan; Carrier, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) is an antiproliferative and proapoptotic protein involved in cell stress response. To address its physiological roles in colorectal cancer and colitis, we generated and tested the susceptibility of Trp53inp1-deficient mice to the development of colorectal tumors induced by injection of the carcinogen azoxymethane followed by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced chronic colitis. Trp53inp1-deficient mice showed an increased incidence and multiplicity of tumors compared to those of wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, acute colitis induced by DSS treatment was more severe in Trp53inp1-deficient mice than in WT mice. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis more efficiently in WT mice than in Trp53inp1-deficient mice, suggesting a higher oxidative load in the latter. Consistently, we demonstrated by electron spin resonance and spin trapping that colons derived from deficient mice produced more free radicals than those of the WT during colitis and that the basal blood level of the antioxidant ascorbate was decreased in Trp53inp1-deficient mice. Collectively, these results indicate that the oxidative load is higher in Trp53inp1-deficient mice than in WT mice, generating a more-severe DSS-induced colitis, which favors development of colorectal tumors in Trp53inp1-deficient mice. Therefore, TP53INP1 is a potential target for the prevention of colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17242209

  15. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77 Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Remodeling via Downregulation of β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingli; Cai, Zhaohua; Chu, Shichun; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Liuhua; Yi, Jing; Shen, Linghong; He, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the predominant effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system. Ang II contributes to vascular remodeling in many cardiovascular diseases (eg, hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, and aneurysm). Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 has a crucial role in the functional regulation of vascular cells. The objective of this study was to define the specific role of Nur77 in Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. Nur77 expression was initially found to be elevated in medial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of thoracic aortas from mice continuously infused with Ang II for 2 weeks using a subcutaneous osmotic minipump. Cellular studies revealed that Nur77 expression was upregulated by Ang II via the MAPK/PKA-CREB signaling pathway. Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, and phenotypic switching were significantly enhanced in VSMCs isolated from Nur77(-/-) mice compared with wild-type VSMCs. Consistent with the role in VSMCs, we found that compared with wild-type mice, Nur77(-/-) mice had elevated aortic medial areas and luminal diameters, more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition, increased VSMC proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase production, and decreased VSMC-specific genes SM-22α and α-actin expression, after 2 weeks of exogenous Ang II administration. The results of additional experiments suggested that Nur77 suppressed Ang II-induced β-catenin signaling pathway activation by promoting β-catenin degradation and inhibiting its transcriptional activity. Our findings indicated that Nur77 is a critical negative regulator of Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation, migration, and phenotypic switching via the downregulation of β-catenin activity. Nur77 may reduce Ang II-induced vascular remodeling involved in many cardiovascular diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Ibuprofen inhibits activation of nuclear β-catenin in human colon adenomas and induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3β

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, Emily J.; Madigan, James P.; Boardman, Lisa A.; Rosenberg, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors target many of the same cancer-associated molecular pathways as COX-2 specific inhibitors. Although these non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often associated with gastrointestinal toxicity, there is renewed interest in their use as colorectal cancer (CRC) chemopreventive agents due to the adverse side effects associated with long-term use of selective COX-2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term use (up to 25 years) of NSAIDs (ibuprofen or aspirin) on adenoma pathology and β-catenin-mediated signaling in sporadic human colon adenomas. Although NSAID use did not impact overall adenoma size or degree of dysplasia, it did cause a significant inhibition of nuclear β-catenin localization, which correlated with suppression of cyclin D1 expression. In order to further elucidate the effect of these agents in regulating β-catenin, we treated SW480 colon cancer cells with a panel of NSAIDs and determined their effects on β-catenin levels and cellular localization. In agreement with our in vivo results, both S-ibuprofen and aspirin were found to decrease total levels of β-catenin, while increasing its phosphorylation. In addition, S-ibuprofen induced both degradation of IκBα and nuclear localization of NF-κB. Despite its nuclear localization, however, the activation of the NF-κB target genes, Bcl-2, survivin and cyclin D1, was suppressed. This reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity may be due to increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β following S-ibuprofen treatment. These data suggest that ibuprofen can effectively target both the Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB pathways, and potentially uncovers a novel mechanism through which NSAIDS may exert their chemopreventive efficacy. PMID:21205744

  17. TANGRA-Setup for the Investigation of Nuclear Fission Induced by 14.1 MeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, I. N.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Bystritsky, V. M.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Noy, R. Capote; Sedyshev, P. V.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Ivanov, I. Zh.; Aleksakhin, V. Yu.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Khabarov, S. V.; Krasnoperov, A. V.; Krylov, A. R.; Obhođaš, J.; Pikelner, L. B.; Rapatskiy, V. L.; Rogachev, A. V.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Salmin, R. A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Slepnev, V. M.; Sudac, D.; Tarasov, O. G.; Valković, V.; Yurkov, D. I.; Zamyatin, N. I.; Zeynalov, Sh. S.; Zontikov, A. O.; Zubarev, E. V.

    The new experimental setup TANGRA (Tagged Neutrons & Gamma Rays), for the investigation of neutron induced nuclear reactions, e.g. (n,xn'), (n,xn'γ), (n,γ), (n,f), on a number of important isotopes for nuclear science and engineering (235,238U, 237Np, 239Pu, 244,245,248Cm) is under construction and being tested at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. The TANGRA setup consists of: a portable neutron generator ING-27, with a 64-pixel Si charge-particle detector incorporated into its vacuum chamber for registering of α-particles formed in the T(d, n)4He reaction, as a source of 14.1 MeV steady-state neutrons radiation with an intensity of ∼5x107n/s; a combined iron (Fe), borated polyethylene (BPE) and lead (Pb) compact shielding-collimator; a reconfigurable multi-detector (neutron plus gamma ray detecting system); a fast computer with 2 (x16 channels) PCI-E 100 MHz ADC cards for data acquisition and hard disk storage; Linux ROOT data acquisition, visualization and analysis software. The signals from the α-particle detector are used to 'tag' the neutrons with the coincident α-particles. Counting the coincidences between the α-particle and the reaction-product detectors in a 20ns time-interval improves the effect/background-ratio by a factor of ∼200 as well as the accuracy in the neutron flux determination, which decreases noticeably the overall experimental data uncertainty.

  18. Cross sections of proton-induced nuclear reactions on bismuth and lead up to 100 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, L.; Jung, N. S.; Bakhtiari, M.; Lee, A.; Lee, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    Production cross sections of 209Bi(p , x n )207,206,205,204,203Po, 209Bi(p , pxn) 207,206,205,204,203,202Bi, and natPb(p , x n ) 206,205,204,203,202,201Bi reactions were measured to fill the gap in the excitation functions up to 100 MeV as well as to figure out the effects of different nuclear properties on proton-induced reactions including heavy nuclei. The targets were arranged in two different stacks consisting of Bi, Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by the activation analysis method using 27Al(p ,3 p n )24Na, 197Au(p ,p n )196Au, and 197Au(p , p 3 n )194Au monitor reactions in parallel as well as the Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The activities of produced radionuclei in the foils were measured by the HPGe spectroscopy system. Over 40 new cross sections were measured in the investigated energy range. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the previously published data. Excitation functions of mentioned reactions were calculated by using the theoretical model based on the latest version of the TALYS code and compared to the new data as well as with other data in the literature. Additionally, the effects of various combinations of the nuclear input parameters of different level density models, optical model potentials, and γ-ray strength functions were considered. It was concluded that if certain level density models are used, the calculated cross sections could be comparable to the measured data. Furthermore, the effects of optical model potential and γ-ray strength functions were considerably lower than that of nuclear level densities.

  19. Ibuprofen inhibits activation of nuclear {beta}-catenin in human colon adenomas and induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta}.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Emily J; Madigan, James P; Boardman, Lisa A; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    Nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors target many of the same cancer-associated molecular pathways as COX-2-specific inhibitors. Although these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often associated with gastrointestinal toxicity, there is renewed interest in their use as colorectal cancer (CRC) chemopreventive agents due to the adverse side effects associated with long-term use of selective COX-2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term use (up to 25 years) of NSAIDs (ibuprofen or aspirin) on adenoma pathology and β-catenin-mediated signaling in sporadic human colon adenomas. Although NSAID use did not impact overall adenoma size or degree of dysplasia, it did cause a significant inhibition of nuclear β-catenin localization, which correlated with suppression of cyclin D1 expression. To further elucidate the effect of these agents in regulating β-catenin, we treated SW480 colon cancer cells with a panel of NSAIDs and determined their effects on β-catenin levels and cellular localization. In agreement with our in vivo results, both S-ibuprofen and aspirin were found to decrease total levels of β-catenin while increasing its phosphorylation. In addition, S-ibuprofen induced both degradation of IκBα and nuclear localization of NF-κB. Despite its nuclear localization, however, the activation of the NF-κB target genes, Bcl-2, survivin, and cyclin D1, was suppressed. This reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity may be due to increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β following S-ibuprofen treatment. These data suggest that ibuprofen can effectively target both the Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB pathways, and potentially uncovers a novel mechanism through which NSAIDS may exert their chemopreventive efficacy.

  20. A direct-repeat sequence of the human BiP gene is required for A23187-mediated inducibility and an inducible nuclear factor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Lin-Chao, S

    1992-01-01

    We have recently isolated a functional promoter encoding the human polypeptide-binding protein (BiP) gene from Burkitt's lymphoma cells by polymerase chain reaction (The EMBL Data Library accession number X59969, 1991). This promoter DNA segment (termed BiP670) was fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene and expressed in NIH3T3 cells. BiP670 retains basal and Ca2+ ionophore A23187-inducible activities. Using 5' deletion assay, we found three basal expression elements (BEE) in the BiP670. Removal of the distal BBE (BBE3), which is contained in a segment spanning -368/-170, caused a 50% loss of the basal activity; removal together with the middle BBE (BBE2), which is contained in a segment spanning -170/-107, resulted in a further 30% loss of the activity. Further removal of the proximal BBE (BBE1), which spans -107/-39, abolished greater than 95% of the basal expression. In addition, an A23187-inducible element (AIE) appeared to be associated with the BBE1. At least a six-fold inducibility remained as long as the BiP promoter retained the sequences -107/-39. Using an in vitro gel mobility shift assay, an A23187-inducible nuclear factor (AINF) was detected from NIH3T3 cells. DNA binding competition experiments indicate that the -107/-39 segment contains a sequence motif which interacts with this cellular factor. Further analysis showed that the two direct repeats, ranging -108/-73 and -72/-40, are the target for AINF binding. A 3-4 fold increase of the AINF binding to both repeated sequences was detected from induced cells. Similar results were also demonstrated in HeLa cells, suggesting that transcriptional control of BiP gene expression in mammalian cells is conserved. These findings also imply that the identified nuclear factor may be important in mediating transcriptional activation of the BiP gene. Images PMID:1480470

  1. Scopoletin induces apoptosis in human promyeloleukemic cells, accompanied by activations of nuclear factor kappaB and caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Seo, Eun-A; Lee, Young-Rae; Kim, Jong-Suk; Park, Jin-Woo; Park, Byung-Hyun; Ryu, Do-Gon

    2005-07-01

    Scopoletin (6-methoxy-7-hydroxycoumarin) is a phenolic coumarin and a member of the phytoalexins. In this study we investigated whether scopoletin caused apoptosis in HL-60 promyelocytic cells and, if so, by what mechanisms. We found that scopoletin induced apoptosis as confirmed by a characteristic ladder pattern of discontinuous DNA fragments in a dose-dependent manner. The signal cascade activated by scopoletin included the heterodimeric redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kappaB, which exhibited an upregulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) translocation to the nucleus by increase of IkappaBalpha degradation. In addition, scopoletin activated caspase-3 as was evidenced by both the proteolytic cleavage of the proenzyme and increased protease activity. Activation of caspase-3 resulted in the cleavage of 116 kDa poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) to 85 kDa cleavage product in time-and dose-dependent fashions. Prior treatment of the cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a potent inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation, or Ac-DEVD-CHO, a specific caspase-3 inhibitor, prevented scopoletin-induced caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and finally DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest that scopoletin induces NF-kappaB activation, which, in turn, causes activation of caspase-3, degradation of PARP, and eventually leads to apoptotic cell death in HL-60 cells.

  2. iNOS-derived nitric oxide promotes glycolysis by inducing pyruvate kinase M2 nuclear translocation in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Bingtao; Gao, Wenwen; Wang, Qianli; Li, Keyi; Wang, Meng; Huang, Mengqiu; Liu, Zhengjun; Yang, Qiaohong; Li, Xiqing; Zhong, Zhuo; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Guanghui; Xu, Yang; Yao, Kaitai; Liu, Qiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is essential for tumor growth and survival. Activation of multiple carcinogenic signals contributes to metabolism reprogramming during malignant transformation of cancer. Recently nitric oxide has been noted to promote glycolysis but the mechanism remains elusive. We report here the dual role of nitric oxide in glycolysis: low/physiological nitric oxide (≤ 100 nM) promotes glycolysis for ATP production, oxidative defense and cell proliferation of ovary cancer cells, whereas excess nitric oxide (≥ 500 nM) inhibits it. Nitric oxide has a positive effect on glycolysis by inducing PKM2 nuclear translocation in an EGFR/ERK2 signaling-dependent manner. Moreover, iNOS induced by mild inflammatory stimulation increased glycolysis and cell proliferation by producing low doses of nitric oxide, while hyper inflammation induced iNOS inhibited it by producing excess nitric oxide. Finally, iNOS expression is abnormally increased in ovarian cancer tissues and is correlated with PKM2 expression. Overexpression of iNOS is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor survival outcome in ovarian cancer patients. Our study indicated that iNOS/NO play a dual role of in tumor glycolysis and progression, and established a bridge between iNOS/NO signaling pathway and EGFR/ERK2/PKM2 signaling pathway, suggesting that interfering glycolysis by targeting the iNOS/NO/PKM2 axis may be a valuable new therapeutic approach of treating ovarian cancer. PMID:28380434

  3. Melatonin enhances the developmental competence of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos by preventing DNA damage induced by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Jin, Yong-Xun; Yuan, Bao; Zhang, Jia-Bao; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2017-09-11

    Melatonin has antioxidant and scavenger effects in the cellular antioxidant system. This research investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of melatonin action in porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. The results suggested that the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos was considerably enhanced after melatonin treatment. In addition, melatonin attenuated the increase in reactive oxygen species levels induced by oxidative stress, the decrease in glutathione levels, and the mitochondrial dysfunction. Importantly, melatonin inhibited phospho-histone H2A.X (γH2A.X) expression and comet tail formation, suggesting that γH2A.X prevents oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. The expression of genes involved in homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining pathways for the repair of double-stranded breaks (DSB) was reduced upon melatonin treatment in porcine SCNT embryos at day 5 of development under oxidative stress condition. These results indicated that melatonin promoted porcine SCNT embryo development by preventing oxidative stress-induced DNA damage via quenching of free radical formation. Our results revealed a previously unrecognized regulatory effect of melatonin in response to oxidative stress and DNA damage. This evidence provides a novel mechanism for the improvement in SCNT embryo development associated with exposure to melatonin.

  4. Transmutation prospect of long-lived nuclear waste induced by high-charge electron beam from laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Y.; Luo, W.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yan, X. Q.

    2017-09-01

    Photo-transmutation of long-lived nuclear waste induced by a high-charge relativistic electron beam (e-beam) from a laser plasma accelerator is demonstrated. A collimated relativistic e-beam with a high charge of approximately 100 nC is produced from high-intensity laser interaction with near-critical-density (NCD) plasma. Such e-beam impinges on a high-Z convertor and then radiates energetic bremsstrahlung photons with flux approaching 1011 per laser shot. Taking a long-lived radionuclide 126Sn as an example, the resulting transmutation reaction yield is the order of 109 per laser shot, which is two orders of magnitude higher than obtained from previous studies. It is found that at lower densities, a tightly focused laser irradiating relatively longer NCD plasmas can effectively enhance the transmutation efficiency. Furthermore, the photo-transmutation is generalized by considering mixed-nuclide waste samples, which suggests that the laser-accelerated high-charge e-beam could be an efficient tool to transmute long-lived nuclear waste.

  5. Nuclear Dependence of Proton-Induced Drell-Yan Dimuon Production at 120 GeV at Seaquest

    SciTech Connect

    Dannowitz, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the atomic mass (A) dependence of p + A → µ+µ- + X Drell-Yan dimuons produced by 120 GeV protons is presented here. The data was taken by the SeaQuest experiment at Fermilab using a proton beam extracted from its Main Injector. Over 61,000 dimuon pairs were recorded with invariant mass 4.2 < Mγ* < 10 GeV and target parton momentum fraction 0.1 ≤ x2 ≤ 0.5 for nuclear targets 1H, 2H, C, Fe, and W . The ratio of dimuon yields per nucleon (Y ) for heavy nuclei versus 2H, RDY = 2 2 Y (A)/Y ( H) ≈ u¯(A)(x)/u¯( H)(x), is sensitive to modifications in the anti-quark sea distributions in nuclei for the case of proton-induced Drell-Yan. The data analyzed here and in the future of SeaQuest will provide tighter constraints on various models that attempt to define the anomalous behavior of nuclear modification as seen in deep inelastic lepton scattering, a phenomenon generally known as the EMC effect.

  6. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.

  7. Neutralizing Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Induces β-Cell Survival by Maintaining PDX1 Protein Nuclear Localization*

    PubMed Central

    Ardestani, Amin; Sauter, Nadine S.; Paroni, Federico; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Oberholzer, José; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor PDX1 plays a critical role during β-cell development and in glucose-induced insulin gene transcription in adult β-cells. Acute glucose exposure leads to translocalization of PDX1 to the nucleoplasm, whereas under conditions of oxidative stress, PDX1 shuttles from the nucleus to the cytosol. Here we show that cytosolic PDX1 expression correlated with β-cell failure in diabetes. In isolated islets from patients with type 2 diabetes and from diabetic mice, we found opposite regulation of insulin and PDX1 mRNA; insulin was decreased in diabetes, but PDX1 was increased. This suggests that elevated PDX1 mRNA levels may be insufficient to regulate insulin. In diabetic islets, PDX1 protein was localized in the cytosol, whereas in non-diabetic controls, PDX1 was in the nucleus. In contrast, overexpression of either IL-1 receptor antagonist or shuttling-deficient PDX1 restored β-cell survival and function and PDX1 nuclear localization. Our results show that nuclear localization of PDX1 is essential for a functional β-cell and provides a novel mechanism of the protective effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist on β-cell survival and function. PMID:21393239

  8. Binding of steroids in nuclear extracts and cytosol of rat pituitary and estrogen-induced pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Weisenberg, L S; Piroli, G; Heller, C L; De Nicola, A F

    1987-12-01

    We have determined binding sites for estrogen, progestin, androgen and glucocorticoid in anterior pituitaries from Sprague-Dawley rats, a strain with low estrogen sensitivity, and in diethylstilbestrol-induced pituitary tumors in Fischer 344 rats, a strain with high estrogen sensitivity. Binding sites differ in their quantity and subcellular distribution. Cytosolic sites for [3H]estradiol in normal pituitaries from untreated rats were high prevailing over sites for other hormones, but they were depleted in the tumors due to their retention in nuclei under the influence of estrogen. Unoccupied nuclear sites for estrogen in normal glands also prevailed over sites for other steroids, and were similar to those in tumors. Second, the progestin site labeled with [3H]R 5020 was concentrated 5.7-fold in cytosol and 8.5-fold in nuclei of the tumors over the values found in glands from normal males estrogenized for 3 days. Third, glucocorticoid receptors labeled with [3H]dexamethasone were predominantly cytosolic in normal glands, but very low in cytosol and more evident in nuclear extracts from the tumors, the reverse of the profile found in normal pituitaries. Last, limited and comparable amounts of androgen receptors were measured in the subcellular fractions of both tissues. It is suggested that the subcellular distribution of some steroid receptors may be controlled in part by the cell population of the tissue and its degree of genetic activity.

  9. DNA-SCARS: distinct nuclear structures that sustain damage-induced senescence growth arrest and inflammatory cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis; Muñoz, Denise P.; Teachenor, Robert; Chu, Victoria; Le, Oanh; Bhaumik, Dipa; Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Campeau, Eric; Beauséjour, Christian M.; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Campisi, Judith

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage can induce a tumor suppressive response termed cellular senescence. Damaged senescent cells permanently arrest growth, secrete inflammatory cytokines and other proteins and harbor persistent nuclear foci that contain DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To understand how persistent damage foci differ from transient foci that mark repairable DNA lesions, we identify sequential events that differentiate transient foci from persistent foci, which we term ‘DNA segments with chromatin alterations reinforcing senescence’ (DNA-SCARS). Unlike transient foci, DNA-SCARS associate with PML nuclear bodies, lack the DNA repair proteins RPA and RAD51, lack single-stranded DNA and DNA synthesis and accumulate activated forms of the DDR mediators CHK2 and p53. DNA-SCARS form independently of p53, pRB and several other checkpoint and repair proteins but require p53 and pRb to trigger the senescence growth arrest. Importantly, depletion of the DNA-SCARS-stabilizing component histone H2AX did not deplete 53BP1 from DNA-SCARS but diminished the presence of MDC1 and activated CHK2. Furthermore, depletion of H2AX reduced both the p53-dependent senescence growth arrest and p53-independent cytokine secretion. DNA-SCARS were also observed following severe damage to multiple human cell types and mouse tissues, suggesting that they can be used in combination with other markers to identify senescent cells. Thus, DNA-SCARS are dynamically formed distinct structures that functionally regulate multiple aspects of the senescent phenotype. PMID:21118958

  10. Gamma irradiation-induced modifications of polymers found in nuclear waste embedding processes Part II: The ion-exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debré, O.; Nsouli, B.; Thomas, J.-P.; Stevenson, I.; Colombini, D.; Romero, M.-A.

    1997-08-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) saturated in cesium and borate ions are well representative of low and medium activity nuclear waste to be embedded in an epoxy resin/amine hardener, such a conditioning procedure being under qualification. In order to test these materials in realistic conditions they are externally irradiated (air and water), in mixed beds saturated in fixed ions (cesium and borate) and water. Irradiation effects are evidenced with the HSF-SIMS technique by the variation of the emission characteristic of both the fixed ions, the chemical structure of the IERs and their interrelationship, both from the analysis of the solid material and of the residual or rinsing water. It appears that the fixed ions can be released in surrounding water as a consequence of radiation-induced resin fragments solubility.

  11. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TITANIUM ALLOYS IN US HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. De; K. Mon; G. Gordon; D. Shoesmith; F. Hua

    2006-02-21

    This paper evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository with particular emphasis on the. effect of the oxide passive film on the hydrogen absorption process of titanium alloys being evaluated. The titanium alloys considered in this review include Ti 2, 5 , 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24 and 29. In general, the concentration of hydrogen in a titanium alloy can increase due to absorption of atomic hydrogen produced from passive general corrosion of that alloy or galvanic coupling of it to a less noble metal. It is concluded that under the exposure conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain repository, the HIC of titanium drip shield will not occur because there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the metal even after 10,000 years of emplacement. Due to the conservatisms adopted in the current evaluation, this assessment is considered very conservative.

  12. On a Unified Approach to Average Phase Space Density in Some Sulphur-Induced High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, Bhaskar

    The Average Phase Space Density (APSD) of very high energy nuclear collisions at the total ``freeze-out'' temperature offers an indirect but convenient tool to assess the merit and worth of the pionisation models. We have attempted to apply here a specific multiple production model with a view to estimating the APSD of pions for a set of sulphur-induced ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions in a unified manner, to compare them finally with the experiment-based results of NA35 and NA44-groups at CERN and also with the calculational results based on the thermal model. The specific implications of the present approach have also been pointed out in the end.

  13. Study of excitation functions of alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on holmium for 167Tm production.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Király, B; Takács, S; Ignatyuk, A V

    2010-03-01

    (167)Tm is a candidate radioisotope for both nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy due to its emitted Auger-electrons, low energy X- and gamma-rays. In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions for production of medically relevant radioisotopes by charged particle induced reactions on rare earths, the (165)Ho(alpha,2n)(167)Tm reaction and the (165)Ho(alpha,n)(168)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,3n)(166)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,4n)(165)Tm side reactions were measured up to 40 MeV by the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured results were compared to the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II theoretical curves. Thick target yields, impurity levels and specific activities were deduced and compared with the same parameters for other charged particle production routes of (167)Tm. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heavy component of spent nuclear fuel: Efficiency of model-substance ionization by electron-induced discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, N. N. Gavrikov, A. V.; Samokhin, A. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-12-15

    The method of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel can be tested with a model substance which has to be transformed from the condensed to plasma state. For this purpose, electron-induced discharge in lead vapor injected into the interelectrode gap is simulated using the kinetic approach. The ionization efficiency, the electrostatic-potential distribution, and those of the ion and electron densities in the discharge gap are derived as functions of the discharge-current density and concentration of the vapor of the model substance. Given a discharge-current density of 3.5 A/cm{sup 2} and a lead-vapor concentration of 2 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}, the simulated ionization efficiency proves to be nearly 60%. The discharge in lead vapor is also investigated experimentally.

  15. Novel Nuclear Factor-KappaB Targeting Peptide Suppresses β-Amyloid Induced Inflammatory and Apoptotic Responses in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Bayon, Baindu; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κβ) is associated with both neuronal survival and increased vulnerability to apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying these dichotomous effects are attributed to the composition of NF-κΒ dimers. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), β-amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregates upregulate activation of p65:p50 dimers in CNS cells and enhance transactivation of pathological mediators that cause neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Hence selective targeting of activated p65 is an attractive therapeutic strategy for AD. Here we report the design, structural and functional characterization of peptide analogs of a p65 interacting protein, the glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (GILZ). By virtue of binding the transactivation domain of p65 exposed after release from the inhibitory IκΒ proteins in activated cells, the GILZ analogs can act as highly selective inhibitors of activated p65 with minimal potential for off-target effects.

  16. Irradiation-induced changes of the atomic distributions around the interfaces of carbides in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Tsuchiya, N.; Nagai, Y.; Almazouzi, A.; Hatakeyama, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohkubo, T.; van Walle, E.; Gerard, R.

    2010-10-01

    Irradiation-induced changes of the atomic distributions of solute and impurity elements around carbides in a reactor pressure vessel steel of a Belgium nuclear power reactor were investigated by laser-assisted local electrode-type three-dimensional atom probe, before and after in-service irradiation of 12 years. Before irradiation, nano-scale Fe-Mn-Cr-Mo carbides were found to be intragranular. The atomic distributions of Mn, Cr and Mo inside the carbide indicate that their concentrations around the inner carbide-matrix interface were enhanced, while a clear segregation of P at the interface was observed. After irradiation, the Mn concentration in the carbide increased substantially. In addition, the enhancement of Mn, Cr and Mo concentrations around the interface and the segregation of P were markedly intensified.

  17. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a frictionmore » term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.« less

  18. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S; Carrillo, C; Horn, J

    2003-11-03

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges.

  19. Blast induced subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests over coral

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Glenn, H.D.; Bryan, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere. Attempts to account for the differences quantitatively have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Effects of Barrier-Induced Nuclear Spin Magnetization Inhomogeneities on Diffusion-Attenuated MR Signal

    PubMed Central

    Sukstanskii, A.L.; Ackerman, J.J.H.; Yablonskiy, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the transverse nuclear spin magnetization, appearing in a single compartment with impermeable boundaries in a Stejskal-Tanner gradient pulse MR experiment, is analyzed in detail. At short diffusion times the presence of diffusion-restrictive barriers (membranes) reduces effective diffusivity near the membranes and leads to an inhomogeneous spin magnetization distribution (the edge-enhancement effect). In this case, the signal reveals a quasi-two-compartment behavior and can be empirically modeled remarkably well by a biexponential function. The current results provide a framework for interpreting experimental MR data on various phenoma, including water diffusion in giant axons, metabolite diffusion in the brain, and hyperpolarized gas diffusion in lung airways. PMID:14523959

  1. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  2. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy losses in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-28

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. We found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  3. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate attenuates surgery-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction possibly via inhibition of nuclear factor κB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Jiang, W; Zuo, Z

    2014-03-07

    Surgery induces learning and memory impairment. Neuroinflammation may contribute to this impairment. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is an important transcription factor to regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesize that inhibition of NF-κB by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) reduces neuroinflammation and the impairment of learning and memory. To test this hypothesis, four-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were subjected to right carotid exploration under propofol and buprenorphine anesthesia. Some rats received two doses of 50mg/kg PDTC given intraperitoneally 30min before and 6h after the surgery. Rats were tested in the Barnes maze and fear conditioning paradigm begun 6days after the surgery. Expression of various proteins related to inflammation was examined in the hippocampus at 24h or 21days after the surgery. Here, surgery, but not anesthesia alone, had a significant effect on prolonging the time needed to identify the target hole during the training sessions of the Barnes maze. Surgery also increased the time for identifying the target hole in the long-term memory test and decreased context-related learning and memory in fear conditioning test. Also, surgery increased nuclear expression of p65, a NF-κB component, decreased cytoplasmic amount of inhibitor of NF-κB, and increased the expression of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 and active matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Finally, surgery enhanced IgG extravasation in the hippocampus. These surgical effects were attenuated by PDTC. These results suggest that surgery, but not propofol-based anesthesia, induces neuroinflammation and impairment of learning and memory. PDTC attenuates these effects possibly by inhibiting NF-κB activation and the downstream MMP-9 activity.

  4. Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-10-15

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

  5. Hypericum sampsonii induces apoptosis and nuclear export of retinoid X receptor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Sun, De-Fu; Wang, Li; Cao, Xihua; Qi, Jian-Bin; Yang, Ting; Hu, Chang-Qi; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Kun

    2006-10-01

    Natural products derived from plants provide a rich source for development of new anticancer drugs. Recent studies suggest that modulation of subcellular localization of retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRalpha) represents a potential approach for inducing cancer cell apoptosis. In this study, we screened a herbal library for inducing translocation of RXRalpha from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Our results revealed that the extract of Hypericum sampsonii, a member of the genus Hypericum, had remarkable effect on RXRalpha subcellular localization in various cancer cells. Treatment of NIH-H460 human lung cancer cells with H. sampsonii extract resulted in relocalization of RXRalpha from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic RXRalpha induced by H. sampsonii was associated with mitochondria, accompanied with cytochrome c release and apoptosis. H. sampsonii extract effectively inhibited the growth of various cancer cell lines, including NIH-H460 lung cancer, MGC-803 stomach cancer and SMMC7721 liver cancer cells. The growth inhibitory effect of H. sampsonii extract depended on levels of RXRalpha, as it failed to inhibit the growth of CV-1 cells lacking detectable RXRalpha, whereas transfection of RXRalpha into CV-1 cells restored its apoptotic response to H. sampsonii. Furthermore, the apoptotic effect of H. sampsonii was significantly enhanced when RXRalpha was overexpressed in NIH-H460 cells. Together, our results demonstrate that H. sampsonii contains ingredient(s) that induce apoptosis of cancer cells by modulating subcellular localization of RXRalpha.

  6. Imaging of nuclear factor κB activation induced by ionizing radiation in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells.

    PubMed

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine E; Reitz, Günther

    2014-08-01

    Ionizing radiation modulates several signaling pathways resulting in transcription factor activation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the most important transcription factors that respond to changes in the environment of a mammalian cell. NF-κB plays a key role not only in inflammation and immune regulation but also in cellular radiation response. In response to DNA damage, NF-κB might inhibit apoptosis and promote carcinogenesis. Our previous studies showed that ionizing radiation is very effective in inducing biological damages. Therefore, it is important to understand the radiation-induced NF-κB signaling cascade. The current study aims to improve existing mammalian cell-based reporter assays for NF-κB activation by the use of DD-tdTomato which is a destabilized variant of red fluorescent protein tdTomato. It is demonstrated that exposure of recombinant human embryonic kidney cells (HEK/293 transfected with a reporter constructs containing NF-κB binding sites in its promoter) to ionizing radiation induces NF-κB-dependent DD-tdTomato expression. Using this reporter assays, NF-κB signaling in mammalian cells was monitored by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of NF-κB by the canonical pathway was found to be quicker than by the genotoxin- and stress-induced pathway. X-rays activate NF-κB in HEK cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the extent of NF-κB activation is higher as compared to camptothecin.

  7. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB in the lungs prevents monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wei, Chuanyu; Kim, Il-Kwon; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with various lung and heart diseases. PAH is characterized by vascular obstruction which leads to a sustained increased pulmonary vascular resistance, vascular remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Limited PAH therapies indicate that novel approaches are urgently needed for the treatment of PAH. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been shown to play an important role in different cardiac pathologies; however, the role of NF-κB remains limited in the setting of PAH. Here, we investigated whether NF-κB inhibition in the lungs using Club (Clara) cell-10 promoter driving IκBα mutant had any effect in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH mouse model. Our data revealed that MCT-induced PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy were associated with NF-κB activation, inflammatory response, and altered expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, inhibitor of differentiation, and Notch-3 signaling molecules in wild-type mice; and all these alterations were prevented in IκBα mutant mice treated with MCT. Moreover, endothelial cell apoptosis and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurred in the lungs of MCT-treated wild-type mice and were restored in IκBα mutant+MCT mice, indicating an association with NF-κB signaling. In lung microvascular endothelial cells, IκBα (AA) mutant plasmid restored the decreased bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 protein level and reversed the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition process induced by transforming growth factor-β1. We conclude that NF-κB regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2-inhibitor of differentiation-Notch-3 axis genes and the subsequent endothelial cell apoptosis and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition events in the lungs, providing new mechanistic information about MCT-induced PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy.

  8. Ferulic acid (FA) abrogates γ-radiation induced oxidative stress and DNA damage by up-regulating nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and activation of NHEJ pathway.

    PubMed

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Khan, Amitava; Sinha, Mahuya; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Chakraborty, Anindita; Dey, Sanjit

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of ferulic acid (FA), a naturally occurring plant flavonoid in terms of DNA damage and damage related alterations of repair pathways by gamma radiation. FA was administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for five consecutive days prior to exposing the swiss albino mice to a single dose of 10 Gy gamma radiation. Ionising radiation induces oxidative damage manifested by decreased expression of Cu, Zn-SOD (SOD stands for super oxide dismutase), Mn-SOD and catalase. Gamma radiation promulgated reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated DNA damage and modified repair pathways. ROS enhanced nuclear translocation of p53, activated ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein), increased expression of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein) gene and inactivated Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. The comet formation in irradiated mice peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reiterated the DNA damage in IR exposed groups. FA pretreatment significantly prevented the comet formation and regulated the nuclear translocation of p53, inhibited ATM activation and expression of GADD45a gene. FA promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and activated NHEJ repair pathway to overcome ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage. Therefore, the current study stated that FA can challenge the oxidative stress by (i) inducing nuclear translocation of Nrf2, (ii) scavenging ROS, and (iii) activating NHEJ DNA repair process.

  9. Mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 induces glioma cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Sai, Ke; Gong, Fanghe; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Furong; Lin, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Recently, mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 gene, which specifically occur in the majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas, have drawn particular attention of neuro-oncologists. Mutations of the IDH1 gene have been proposed to have significant roles in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of gliomas. However, the molecular mechanism of the role of IDH1 mutants in gliomagenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study, showed that forced expression of an IDH1 mutant, of which the 132th amino acid residue arginine is substituted by histidine (IDH1R132H), promoted cell proliferation in cultured cells, while wild-type IDH1 overexpression had no effect on cell proliferation. Consistent with previous studies, it was also observed that expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) was upregulated in IDH1R132H expressing cells with the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. However, knockdown of VEGF via small RNA interference had no significant influence on the cell proliferation induced by overexpression of IDH1R132H, implying that another signaling pathway may be involved. Next, forced expression of IDH1R132H was found to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), since the inhibitory IκB protein (IκBα) was highly phosphorylated and the NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated into the nucleus. Notably, knockdown of HIF1-α significantly blocked NF-κB activation, which was induced by the overexpression of IDH1 mutants. In addition, expression of IDH1 mutants markedly induced the NF-κB target gene expression, including cyclin D1 and E and c-myc, which were involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the IDH1 mutant activated NF-κB in a HIF1-α‑dependent manner and was involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  10. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.P.; Kasturi, S.; Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W.

    1992-12-31

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  11. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.P. ); Kasturi, S. ); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. )

    1992-01-01

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  12. Measurement of Radiation Induced Damages in Semiconductor Materials Useful as Photovoltaic and Nuclear Detection Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Rubi; Keeter, Kara; Rodriguez, Rene

    2007-05-01

    Radiation interactions with materials cause a change in electronic and physical properties of the material, which affect the performance of the devices. It is a key issue in the employment of these materials in medical, space, security and other scientific applications. In our research we have determined the defects and their generation rate induced by gamma rays of energy 0.11-22 MeV, in CuInS2. We have used a simple model consisting of classical physics principles and Monte Carlo simulation software. The simulation results are in agreement with other published results done for other semiconductor materials. Our collaborators at INL will investigate different techniques for fabrication of thin films of CdZnTe and CuInS2 by using Radiofrequency Pulsed Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Pressurized Solvent techniques. Next, defects will be induced in the thin-film samples by exposure to a bremsstrahlung gamma-ray beam. The radiation dose will range from 5 to 25 kGy. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the defects in the crystals will be done by gamma-ray spectroscopy and PICTS (Photo induced current transient spectroscopy). To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NWS07.C1.5

  13. Stress-induced nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of cyclin C promotes mitochondrial fission in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katrina F; Khakhina, Svetlana; Kim, Stephen K; Strich, Randy

    2014-01-27

    Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by the opposing activities of dynamin-based fission and fusion machines. In response to stress, this balance is dramatically shifted toward fission. This study reveals that the yeast transcriptional repressor cyclin C is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced hyperfission. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is destroyed. Prior to its destruction, cyclin C both genetically and physically interacts with Mdv1p, an adaptor that links the GTPase Dnm1p to the mitochondrial receptor Fis1p. Cyclin C is required for stress-induced Mdv1p mitochondrial recruitment and the efficient formation of functional Dnm1p filaments. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation studies and fluorescence microscopy revealed an elevated association between Mdv1p and Dnm1p in stressed cells that is dependent on cyclin C. This study provides a mechanism by which stress-induced gene induction and mitochondrial fission are coordinated through translocation of cyclin C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stress-Induced Nuclear to Cytoplasmic Translocation of Cyclin C Promotes Mitochondrial Fission in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Katrina F.; Khakhina, Svetlana; Kim, Stephen K.; Strich, Randy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by the opposing activities of dynamin-based fission and fusion machines. In response to stress, this balance is dramatically shifted toward fission. This study reveals that the yeast transcriptional repressor cyclin C is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced hyper-fission. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it is destroyed. Prior to its destruction, cyclin C both genetically and physically interacts with Mdv1p, an adaptor that links the GTPase Dnm1p to the mitochondrial receptor Fis1p. Cyclin C is required for stress-induced Mdv1p mitochondrial recruitment and the efficient formation of functional Dnm1p filaments. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies and fluorescence microscopy revealed an elevated association between Mdv1p and Dnm1p in stressed cells that is dependent on cyclin C. This study provides a mechanism by which stress-induced gene induction and mitochondrial fission are coordinated through translocation of cyclin C. PMID:24439911

  15. Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Andrew S; Rudy, Cliff R; Tobin, Steve J; Charlton, William S; Stafford, A; Strohmeyer, D; Saavadra, S

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

  16. Corrosion- and irradiation-induced porosity changes of a nuclear graphitic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoinkis, E.; Eatherly, W. P.; Krautwasser, P.; Robens, E.

    1986-11-01

    In pristine specimens of a nuclear grade graphitic material the volume of accessible pores with diameters <0.1 μm is much smaller (0.9 mm 3 g -1) than the total accessible pore volume (82 mm 3 g -1) but the former increased with corrosion much more than the latter (36 and 160 mm 3 g -1, respectively, at a burn-off = 5 wt%). The specimens were oxidized by CO 2 at 900°C. Independent of burn-off the most frequent pore diameter is ˜2 nm, as was determined from N 2 adsorption isotherms at 77 K. Corrosion leads also to a pronounced increase in pores in the range 2-5 nm and in the apparent BET surface area from 0.6 m 2 g -1 (pristine) to 39 m 2 g -1 (burn-off = 5 wt%). The analysis of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) curves revealed that at the beginning of corrosion the existing 1 nm pores are enlarged. Additional micropores are developed with further burn-off. A neutron fluence of 5 × 10m 21 cm -2 EDN (equivalent to about 7 dpa) at 950°C caused a marked increase in the volume of pores with 2.5 nm diameter. From a comparison of the SAXS results with the data obtained by xylene impregnation and N 2 adsorption it was concluded that most of the pores generated by irradiation are accessible to gases.

  17. Prompt air fluorescence induced by a high-altitude nuclear explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, H.G.; Collins, D.G.; Holland, R.F.; Sutherland, C.D.

    1990-12-01

    A high-altitude (>100) nuclear explosion emits a large fraction of its energy yield in the form of x rays, approximately half of which are deposited in the atmospheric layers {approximately}50--90 km, exciting prompt fluorescence. This paper examines four of the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands that fluorescence strongly: {lambda}{lambda} 3914(0,0), 4278(0,1), 4709(0,2), and 5228(0,3) {Angstrom}. We developed both forward'' and backward'' Monte Carlo procedures and performed calculations using Los Alamos CRAY computers to simulate the physical problem for the variety of situations that are possible. We include the time-dependent treatment of x-ray energy deposition, both local and nonlocal excitation of fluorescence, multiple scattering and transmission of fluorescent photons with the resulting enhancement of the longer wavelength N{sub 2}{sup +} bands, and chemical reactions. A realistic atmospheric model is defined up to 800 km, including the troposphere and a Lambert reflecting ground surface with given albedo. To expedite such computations we use separate spatial meshes in which to carry out the x-ray deposition and fluorescence light scattering. Examples of our calculated results illustrate the effects of explosion yield, geometry, tropospheric scattering, ground albedo, and temperature of the fluorescing layer. 41 refs., 38 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Evidence for triclosan-induced activation of human and rodent xenobiotic nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Paul, Katie B; Thompson, Jerry T; Simmons, Steven O; Vanden Heuvel, John P; Crofton, Kevin M

    2013-10-01

    The bacteriostat triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenylether) (TCS) decreases rat serum thyroxine via putative nuclear receptor (NR) interaction(s) and subsequent transcriptional up-regulation of hepatic catabolism and clearance. However, due to the evolutionary divergence of the constitutive androstane and pregnane-X receptors (CAR, PXR), TCS-mediated downstream effects may be species-dependent. To test the hypothesis that TCS activates xenobiotic NRs across species, cell-based NR reporter assays were employed to assess potential activation of rat, mouse, and human PXR, and rat, mouse, and three splice variants of human CAR. TCS activated hPXR, acted as an inverse agonist of hCAR1, and as a weak agonist of hCAR3. TCS failed to activate rPXR in full-length receptor reporter assays, and instead acted as a modest inverse agonist of rCAR. Consistent with the rat data, TCS also failed to activate mPXR and was a modest inverse agonist of mCAR. These data suggest that TCS may interact with multiple NRs, including hPXR, hCAR1, hCAR3, and rCAR in order to potentially affect hepatic catabolism. Overall these data support the conclusion that TCS may interact with NRs to regulate hepatic catabolism and downstream thyroid hormone homeostasis in both rat and human models, though perhaps by divergent mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Heat shock-induced HIKESHI protects cell viability via nuclear translocation of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Yanoma, Toru; Ogata, Kyoichi; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ide, Munenori; Mochiki, Erito; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Kogure, Norimichi; Kimura, Akiharu; Suzuki, Masaki; Nakazawa, Nobuhiro; Bai, Tuya; Oyama, Tetsunari; Asao, Takayuki; Shirabe, Ken; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), particularly HSP70, help restore normal cellular function following damage caused by stressors. HSP expression in tumor tissues indicates cancer progression, and while the development of HSP inhibitors is progressing, these substances are not widely used to treat cancer. HIKESHI (C11orf73) does not control the intracellular movement of HSP70 at normal temperatures; however, it does regulate the function and movements of HSP70 during heat shock. In this study, we examined the intracellular movement of HSP70 during heat shock to investigate the significance of HIKESHI expression in gastric cancer (GC) and determine if HIKESHI inhibition has cytotoxic effects. We examined HIKESHI using GC cell lines and immunostaining in 207 GC tissue samples. HIKESHI expression in GC tissues was associated with the progression of lymphatic invasion. Suppressing HIKESHI using siRNA did not affect cell viability at normal temperatures. However, suppressing HIKESHI during heat shock inhibited HSP70 nuclear transport and suppressed cell viability. Our results suggest that HIKESHI is a marker of cancer progression and that the combination of HIKESHI inhibition and hyperthermia is a therapeutic tool for refractory GC.

  20. Ellagic acid induces apoptosis through inhibition of nuclear factor κB in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Odinokova, Irina; Ohno, Izumi; Gukovsky, Ilya; Go, Vay Liang W; Pandol, Stephen J; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of ellagic acid on apop-tosis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells and to determine the mechanism of the pro-survival effects of ellagic acid. METHODS: The effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis was assessed by measuring Phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation; and proliferation by measuring DNA thymidine incorporation. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured in permeabilized cells, and in isolated mitochondria. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was measured by electromobility shift assay (EMSA). RESULTS: We show that ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound in fruits and berries, at concentrations 10 to 50 mmol/L stimulates apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Further, ellagic acid decreases proliferation by up to 20-fold at 50 mmol/L. Ellagic acid stimulates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and the downstream caspase activation. Ellagic acid does not directly affect mitochondria. Ellagic acid dose-dependently decreased NF-κB binding activity. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activity using IkB wild type plasmid prevented the effect of ellagic acid on apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that ellagic acid stimulates apoptosis through inhibition of the prosu-rvival transcription factor NF-κB. PMID:18595134

  1. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-06-01

    Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ˜ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored "on line" and "off line". The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using "advanced targets".

  2. A circular RNA promotes tumorigenesis by inducing c-myc nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Du, William W; Wu, Nan; Yang, Weining; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Fang, Ling; Ma, Jian; Li, Xiangmin; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Zhenguo; Dong, Jun; Khorshidi, Azam; Yang, Burton B

    2017-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a subclass of noncoding RNAs widely expressed in mammalian cells. We report here the tumorigenic capacity of a circRNA derived from angiomotin-like1 (circ-Amotl1). Circ-Amotl1 is highly expressed in patient tumor samples and cancer cell lines. Single-cell inoculations using circ-Amotl1-transfected tumor cells showed a 30-fold increase in proliferative capacity relative to control. Agarose colony-formation assays similarly revealed a 142-fold increase. Tumor-take rate in nude mouse xenografts using 6-day (219 cells) and 3-day (9 cells) colonies were 100%, suggesting tumor-forming potential of every cell. Subcutaneous single-cell injections led to the formation of palpable tumors in 41% of mice, with tumor sizes >1 cm(3) in 1 month. We further found that this potent tumorigenicity was triggered through interactions between circ-Amotl1 and c-myc. A putative binding site was identified in silico and tested experimentally. Ectopic expression of circ-Amotl1 increased retention of nuclear c-myc, appearing to promote c-myc stability and upregulate c-myc targets. Expression of circ-Amotl1 also increased the affinity of c-myc binding to a number of promoters. Our study therefore reveals a novel function of circRNAs in tumorigenesis, and this subclass of noncoding RNAs may represent a potential target in cancer therapy.

  3. Influence of nuclear structure on the formation of radiation-induced lethal lesions.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Daniel A; Tait, Lauren; Vaughan, Andrew T M

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The rejoining of fragmented nuclear DNA caused by ionizing radiation may lead to lethal chromosome rearrangements, such as rings or dicentrics. The clinically useful linear quadratic relationship between dose and cell survival has been interpreted as the generation of lethal lesions secondary to damage occurring in two separate chromosomes simultaneously (α component), or as potentially repairable separate events (β component). Here, the generation of such lesions is discussed, synthesizing existing knowledge with new insights gleaned from spatial proximity data made possible by high-throughput sequencing of chromosome conformation capture experiments. Over a range of several Mbp, the linear DNA strand is organized as a fractal globule generating multiple sites of contact that may facilitate deletions or inversions if the points of contact are damaged. On a larger scale, transcriptionally active euchromatin occupies a physically identifiable space separate from inactive areas and is preferentially susceptible to free radical attack after irradiation. Specific transcriptional programs link genomic locations within that space, potentially enhancing their interaction if subject to simultaneous fragmentation by a single radiation event. Conclusions High throughput spatial analysis of the factors that control chromosome proximity has the potential to better describe the formation of the lethal chromosome aberrations that kill irradiated cells.

  4. Inhibition of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1b induces hepatic steatosis through DPP4/NOX1-mediated regulation of superoxide.

    PubMed

    Long, Zi; Cao, Meng; Su, Shuhao; Wu, Guangyuan; Meng, Fansen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Jiangzheng; Yu, Weihua; Atabai, Kamran; Wang, Xin

    2017-09-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder that is closely associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have suggested that hepatocyte nuclear factor 1b (HNF1b) ameliorates insulin resistance. However, the role of HNF1b in the regulation of lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis remains poorly understood. We found that HNF1b expression was decreased in steatotic livers. We injected mice with lentivirus (LV) expressing HNF1b shRNA to generate mice with hepatic knockdown of HNF1b. We also injected high fat (HF) diet-induced obese and db/db diabetic mice with LV expressing HNF1b to overexpress HNF1b. Knockdown of HNF1b increased hepatic lipid contents and induced insulin resistance in mice and in hepatocytes. Knockdown of HNF1b worsened HF diet-induced increases in hepatic lipid contents, liver injury and insulin resistance in mice and PA-induced lipid accumulation and impaired insulin signaling in hepatocytes. Moreover, overexpression of HNF1b alleviated HF diet-induced increases in hepatic lipid content and insulin resistance in mice. Knockdown of HNF1b increased expression of genes associated with lipogenensis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. DPP4 and NOX1 expression was increased by knockdown of HNF1b and HNF1b directly bound with the promoters of DPP4 and NOX1. Overexpression of DPP4 or NOX1 was associated with an increase in lipid droplets in hepatocytes and decreased expression of DPP4 or NOX1 suppressed the effects of knockdown of HNF1b knockdown on triglyceride (TG) formation and insulin signaling. Knockdown of HNF1b increased superoxide level and decreased glutathione content, which was inhibited by downregulation of DPP4 and NOX1. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed HNF1b knockdown-induced ER stress, TG formation and insulin resistance. Palmitic acid (PA) decreased HNF1b expression which was inhibited by NAC. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that HNF1b plays an essential role

  5. Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Bylkin, Boris K.; Davydova, Galina B.; Zverkov, Yuri A.; Krayushkin, Alexander V.; Neretin, Yuri A.; Nosovsky, Anatoly V.; Seyda, Valery A.; Short, Steven M.

    2001-10-15

    The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

  6. Prolonged induced hypothermia in hemorrhagic shock is associated with decreased muscle metabolism: a nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study.

    PubMed

    Lusczek, Elizabeth R; Lexcen, Daniel R; Witowski, Nancy E; Determan, Charles; Mulier, Kristine E; Beilman, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related death in war and is associated with significant alterations in metabolism. Using archived serum samples from a previous study, the purpose of this work was to identify metabolic changes associated with induced hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Twelve Yorkshire pigs underwent a standardized hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation protocol to simulate battlefield injury with prolonged evacuation to definitive care in cold environments. Animals were randomized to receive either hypothermic (33°C) or normothermic (39°C) limited resuscitation for 8 h, followed by standard resuscitation. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate serum metabolites from these animals at intervals throughout the hypothermic resuscitation period. Animals in the hypothermic group had a significantly higher survival rate (P = 0.02) than normothermic animals. Using random forest analysis, a difference in metabolic response between hypothermic and normothermic animals was identified. Hypothermic resuscitation was characterized by decreased concentrations of several muscle-related metabolites including taurine, creatine, creatinine, and amino acids. This study suggests that a decrease in muscle metabolism as a result of induced hypothermia is associated with improved survival.

  7. Nuclear phospholipid scramblase 1 prolongs the mitotic expansion of granulocyte precursors during G-CSF-induced granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Sowden, Mark; Zhao, Qian; Wiedmer, Therese; Sims, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    PLSCR1−/− mice exhibit normal, steady-state hematologic parameters but impaired emergency granulopoiesis upon in vivo administration of G-CSF. The mechanism by which PLSCR1 contributes to G-CSF-induced neutrophil production is largely unknown. We now report that the expansion of bone marrow myelocytes upon in vivo G-CSF treatment is reduced in PLSCR1−/− mice relative to WT. Using SCF-ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitors to examine the progression of G-CSF-driven granulocytic differentiation in vitro, we found that PLSCR1 prolongs the period of mitotic expansion of proliferative granulocyte precursors, thereby giving rise to increased neutrophil production from their progenitors. This effect of PLSCR1 is blocked by a ΔNLS-PLSCR1, which prevents its nuclear import. By contrast, mutation that prevents the membrane association of PLSCR1 has minimal impact on the role of PLSCR1 in G-CSF-induced granulopoiesis. These data imply that the capacity of PLSCR1 to augment G-CSF-dependent production of mature neutrophils from myeloid progenitors is unrelated to its reported activities at the endofacial surface of the plasma membrane but does require entry of the protein into the nucleus, suggesting that this response is mediated through the observed effects of PLSCR1 on gene transcription. PMID:21447647

  8. Proteasome inhibition induces DNA damage and reorganizes nuclear architecture and protein synthesis machinery in sensory ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor used as an anticancer drug. However, its clinical use is limited since it causes peripheral neurotoxicity. We have used Sprague-Dawley rats as an animal model to investigate the cellular mechanisms affected by both short-term and chronic bortezomib treatments in sensory ganglia neurons. Proteasome inhibition induces dose-dependent alterations in the architecture, positioning, shape and polarity of the neuronal nucleus. It also produces DNA damage without affecting neuronal survival, and severe disruption of the protein synthesis machinery at the central cytoplasm accompanied by decreased expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. As a compensatory or adaptive survival response against proteotoxic stress caused by bortezomib treatment, sensory neurons preserve basal levels of transcriptional activity, up-regulate the expression of proteasome subunit genes, and generate a new cytoplasmic perinuclear domain for protein synthesis. We propose that proteasome activity is crucial for controlling nuclear architecture, DNA repair and the organization of the protein synthesis machinery in sensory neurons. These neurons are primary targets of bortezomib neurotoxicity, for which reason their dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of the bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in treated patients.

  9. Acute blood glucose fluctuation induces myocardial apoptosis through oxidative stress and nuclear factor-ĸB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Sheng; Li, Yan; Peng, Guanjing; Han, Ping

    2013-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate whether acute blood glucose fluctuation induces myocardial apoptosis and to examine the potential mechanisms. Wistar rats were infused intermittently or continually with 50% glucose solution for 48 h. Serum and myocardium were taken to measure the levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase. The expression of nuclear factor (NF)-ĸB and apoptosis in myocardial cells was determined with immunohistochemisty and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, respectively. Expressions of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2-associated X protein and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 in myocardium were tested with Western blot analysis. The levels of malondialdehyde and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2-associated X protein in the acute blood glucose fluctuation group (AFG) were enhanced, but glutathione peroxidase and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 were reduced compared with levels in the continually high blood glucose group (p < 0.05). The expression of NF-ĸB in the nuclei of myocardial cells in the AFG was significantly higher than that in the continually high blood glucose group (p < 0.05). Apoptotic myocytes were observed in myocardium of the AFG. Acute blood glucose fluctuation induces myocardial apoptosis, apparently associated with enhanced oxidative stress and activation of NF-ĸB. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Physiological role of receptor activator nuclear factor-kB (RANK) in denervation-induced muscle atrophy and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Sébastien S.; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bossé, Sabrina; Frenette, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The bone remodeling and homeostasis are mainly controlled by the receptor-activator of nuclear factor kB (RANK), its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) pathway. While there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that synchronously regulates bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology remains elusive. Our recent article published in the American Journal of Physiology (Cell Physiology) showed that RANK is also expressed in fully differentiated C2C12 myotubes and skeletal muscles. We used the Cre-Lox approach to inactivate muscle RANK (RANKmko) and showed that RANK deletion preserves the force of denervated fast-twitch EDL muscles. However, RANK deletion had no positive impact on slow-twitch Sol muscles. In addition, denervating RANKmko EDL muscles induced an increase in the total calcium concentration ([CaT]), which was associated with a surprising decrease in SERCA activity. Interestingly, the levels of STIM-1, which mediates Ca2+ influx following the depletion of SR Ca2+ stores, were markedly higher in denervated RANKmko EDL muscles. We speculated that extracellular Ca2+ influx mediated by STIM-1 may be important for the increase in [CaT] and the gain of force in denervated RANKmko EDL muscles. Overall, these findings showed for the first time that the RANKL/RANK interaction plays a role in denervation-induced muscle atrophy and dysfunction. PMID:27547781

  11. Inactivation of AP1 proteins by a nuclear serine protease precedes the onset of radiation-induced fibrosing alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Haase, Michael G; Klawitter, Anke; Bierhaus, Angelika; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Kasper, Michael; Geyer, Peter; Baumann, Michael; Baretton, Gustavo B

    2008-05-01

    Radiation-induced lung damage comprises inflammation (alveolitis) as well as disturbed regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation (fibrosis). The transcriptional regulation of this process is poorly understood. One key transcription factor involved in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation is AP1 (activator protein 1). The present study examined changes in the DNA-binding activity of AP1 after irradiation and defined the underlying molecular mechanisms in an animal model. The right lungs of Fischer rats received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy. Lung tissue was tested for AP1 DNA-binding activity, AP1 mRNA, and levels of AP1 proteins as well as for c-Jun specific proteolytic activity. After an initial increase, the AP1 DNA-binding activity was completely lost starting at 5.5 weeks after irradiation, which is 2.5 weeks before the onset of fibrosing alveolitis. This was not caused by reduction of mRNA levels or size. Instead, a selective nuclear cleavage of c-Jun by a serine protease caused the loss of AP1 activity. Considering the central role of AP1 in cell proliferation and differentiation and the strict timely correlation to the onset of the disease, the complete loss of AP1 function is likely to play a critical role in radiation-induced fibrosing alveolitis.

  12. Curcumin induces Nrf2 nuclear translocation and prevents glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, oxidant stress, and the decrease in antioxidant enzymes in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Ortiz-Vega, Karla Mariana; Zarco-Márquez, Guillermo; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; Santamaría, José; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Correa, Francisco; Zazueta, Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2012-01-01

    Renal injury resulting from renal ablation induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6NX) is associated with oxidant stress, glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, and impaired Nrf2-Keap1 pathway. The purpose of this work was to know if the bifunctional antioxidant curcumin may induce nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and prevents 5/6NX-induced oxidant stress, renal injury, decrease in antioxidant enzymes, and glomerular hypertension and hyperfiltration. Four groups of rats were studied: (1) control, (2) 5/6NX, (3) 5/6NX +CUR, and (4) CUR (n = 8-10). Curcumin was given by gavage to NX5/6 +CUR and CUR groups (60 mg/kg/day) starting seven days before surgery. Rats were studied 30 days after NX5/6 or sham surgery. Curcumin attenuated 5/6NX-induced proteinuria, systemic and glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and increase in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. This protective effect was associated with enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and with prevention of 5/6NX-induced oxidant stress and decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that the protective effect of curcumin against 5/6NX-induced glomerular and systemic hypertension, hyperfiltration, renal dysfunction, and renal injury was associated with the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the prevention of both oxidant stress and the decrease of antioxidant enzymes.

  13. Sulfasalazine prevents the increase in TGF-β, COX-2, nuclear NFκB translocation and fibrosis in CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chávez, E; Castro-Sánchez, L; Shibayama, M; Tsutsumi, V; Moreno, M G; Muriel, P

    2012-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that this sulfasalazine (SF) inhibits the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) pathway, which regulates important genes during inflammation and immune answer. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of SF on carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced liver fibrosis. We formed the following experimental groups of rats: controls, damage induced by chronic CCl(4) (0.4 g/kg, intraperitoneally, three times a week for 8 weeks) administration and CCl(4) + SF (100 mg/kg/day, postoperatively for 8 weeks) administration. We determined the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP), cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2, lipid peroxidation, glutathione levels, collagen content, expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear translocation of NFκB. SF was capable to inhibit the ALT and γ-GTP elevated levels induced with the CCl(4) administration. SF had antioxidant properties, prevented the lipid peroxidation and the imbalance of reduced and oxidized glutathione produced by CCl(4). Importantly, SF blocked the accumulation of collagen in the liver, the expression of TGF-β, the nuclear translocation of NFκB and the activity of COX-2, all induced with the administration of CCl(4) in the rat. These results show that SF has strong antifibrotic properties because of its antioxidant properties and its ability to prevent nuclear translocation of NFκB and consequently the expression of TGF-β and the activity of COX-2.

  14. Nuclear IKKbeta is an adaptor protein for IkappaBalpha ubiquitination and degradation in UV-induced NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Asano, Tomoichiro; Nakayama, Keiko; Kato, Tomohisa; Karin, Michael; Kamata, Hideaki

    2010-08-27

    Proinflammatory cytokines activate NF-kappaB using the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex that phosphorylates inhibitory proteins (IkappaBs) at N-terminal sites resulting in their ubiquitination and degradation in the cytoplasm. Although ultraviolet (UV) irradiation does not lead to IKK activity, it activates NF-kappaB by an unknown mechanism through IkappaBalpha degradation without N-terminal phosphorylation. Here, we describe an adaptor function of nuclear IKKbeta in UV-induced IkappaBalpha degradation. UV irradiation induces the nuclear translocation of IkappaBalpha and association with IKKbeta, which constitutively interacts with beta-TrCP through heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein-U (hnRNP-U) leading to IkappaBalpha ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, casein kinase 2 (CK2) and p38 associate with IKKbeta and promote IkappaBalpha degradation by phosphorylation at C-terminal sites. Thus, nuclear IKKbeta acts as an adaptor protein for IkappaBalpha degradation in UV-induced NF-kappaB activation. NF-kappaB activated by the nuclear IKKbeta adaptor protein suppresses anti-apoptotic gene expression and promotes UV-induced cell death.

  15. Mutations that reduce its specific DNA binding inhibit high NaCl-induced nuclear localization of the osmoprotective transcription factor NFAT5

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yuichiro; Li, Jinxi; Villers, Courtney; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Burg, Maurice B.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) is activated by the stress of hypertonicity (e.g., high NaCl). Increased expression of NFAT5 target genes causes accumulation of protective organic osmolytes and heat shock proteins. Under normotonic conditions (∼300 mosmol/kgH2O), NFAT5 is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm, hypertonicity causes it to translocate into the nucleus, and hypotonicity causes it to translocate into the cytoplasm. The mechanism of translocation is complex and not completely understood. NFAT5-T298 is a known contact site of NFAT5 with its specific DNA element [osmotic response element (ORE)]. In the present study, we find that mutation of NFAT5-T298 to alanine or aspartic acid not only reduces binding of NFAT5 to OREs (EMSA) but also proportionately reduces high NaCl-induced nuclear translocation of NFAT5. Combined mutation of other NFAT5 DNA contact sites (R293A/E299A/R302A) also greatly reduces both specific DNA binding and nuclear localization of NFAT5. NFAT5-T298 is a potential phosphorylation site, but, using protein mass spectrometry, we do not find phosphorylation at NFAT5-T298. Further, decreased high NaCl-induced nuclear localization of NFAT5 mutated at T298 does not involve previously known regulatory mechanisms, including hypotonicity-induced export of NFAT5, regulated by phosphorylation of NFAT5-S155, XPO1 (CRM1/exportin1)-mediated export of NFAT5 from the nucleus, or hypertonicity-induced elevation of NUP88, which enhances nuclear localization of NFAT5. We conclude that specific DNA binding of NFAT5 contributes to its nuclear localization, by mechanisms, as yet undetermined, but independent of ones previously described to regulate NFAT5 distribution. PMID:22992674

  16. Resveratrol induces nuclear factor-κB activity in human cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Palomer, Xavier; Capdevila-Busquets, Eva; Alvarez-Guardia, David; Barroso, Emma; Pallàs, Mercè; Camins, Antoni; Davidson, Mercy M; Planavila, Ana; Villarroya, Francesc; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2013-09-10

    Resveratrol is a grape polyphenol that prevents cardiac hypertrophy and protects the heart from ischemic injury, metabolic dysregulation, and inflammatory processes in several murine models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol on the inflammatory processes in human cardiac AC16 cells in order to gain a better understanding of its cardioprotective mechanisms in the human heart. Resveratrol induced the DNA-binding activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB in AC16 cells, and exacerbated the increase caused by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In accordance with this, resveratrol increased the expression of the pro-inflammatory genes ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and TNF-α. In contrast, resveratrol decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory genes IL-6 (interleukin-6) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). Likewise, resveratrol also induced inflammation in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, and in the heart of mice fed a standard chow diet supplemented with resveratrol (1g/kg diet) for four months. Western-blot analyses revealed that NF-κB p65 subunit levels were upregulated in an IκB-dependent manner in the nuclei of resveratrol-treated human cardiac cells. Finally, resveratrol activated the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling and induced the expression of its anti-apoptotic downstream effector Bcl-xL, both involved in the cardioprotective survival activating factor enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Resveratrol enhanced NF-κB activity in human and murine cardiac cells, in a process that coincided with the activation of STAT3 and anti-apoptotic downstream effectors. Therefore, activation of the SAFE pathway by resveratrol might be involved in the cardioprotective effects of this compound. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Excimer laser-induced diamond graphitization for high-energy nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemanno, E.; Caricato, A. P.; Chiodini, G.; Martino, M.; Ossi, P. M.; Spagnolo, S.; Perrino, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the structure and the morphology of a graphite layer induced on the surface of a polycrystalline thermal grade CVD diamond by focusing a pulsed excimer laser operating at KrF (wavelength 248 nm) and ArF (wavelength 193 nm) mixtures. By micro-Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies, as well as scanning electron microscopy, we reported the synthesis of a turbostratic t-graphite layer after irradiation with ArF laser. By contrast, irradiating with a KrF laser beam, we obtained a disordered graphite layer with 10 laser shots, while 200 consecutive laser pulses resulted in target ablation.

  18. Ammonium sulfate induced nuclear changes in the oocyte of the fish, Channa punctatus (Bl. )

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R.N.; Sathyanesan, A.G.

    1986-06-01

    One among the common pollutants present in our riverine and lacustrine system is the commonly used fertilizer ammonium sulfate ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The unionized ammonia (UIA) base in the water is responsible for the toxicity due to its distinctive penetrative properties. Prolonged exposure of the fish Clarias batrachus to (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ causes endocrine changes. However, the deleterious effect of this fertilizer on the reproduction of fishes is not well recorded. In this study, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-induced degenerative changes in the nucleus of early vitellogenic oocytes of C. punctatus are described.

  19. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  20. Transfection of influenza A virus nuclear export protein induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lara-Sampablo, Alejandra; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; De Jesús-Ortega, Nereyda; Santos-López, Gerardo; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-06-24

    Influenza A virus genomic segments eight codes for non-structural 1 (NS1) protein that is involved in evasion of innate antiviral response, and nuclear export protein (NEP) that participates in the export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, transcription and replication. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is highly expressed during influenza virus infections and is considered an anti-infective cytokine. NS1 and NEP proteins were overexpressed and their role on TNF-α expression was evaluated. Both TNF-α mRNA and protein increased in cells transfected with NEP but not with NS1. We further investigate if NS1 or NEP regulates the activity of TNF-α promoter. In the presence of NEP the activity of TNF-α promoter increased significantly compared with the control (83.5±2.9 vs. 30.9±2.8, respectively; p=0.001). This effect decreased 15-fold when the TNF-α promoter distal region was deleted, suggesting the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-kB response elements. This was corroborated by testing the effect produced on TNF-α promoter by the treatment with Raf/MEK/ERK (U0126), NF-kB (Bay-11-7082) and PI3K (Ly294-002) cell signaling inhibitors. Treatment with U0126 and Bay-117082 reduced the activity of TNF-α promoter mediated by NEP (41.5±3.2, 70% inhibition; and 80.6±7.4, 35% inhibition, respectively) compared to mock-treated control. The results suggest a new role for NEP protein that participates in the transcriptional regulation of human TNF-α expression.

  1. Heart Failure Induces Significant Changes in Nuclear Pore Complex of Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazón, Estefanía; Rivera, Miguel; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio José; España, Francisco; Montero, José Anastasio; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Portolés, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aims The objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of heart failure (HF) on several proteins of nuclear pore complex (NPC) and their relationship with the human ventricular function. Methods and Results A total of 88 human heart samples from ischemic (ICM, n = 52) and dilated (DCM, n = 36) patients undergoing heart transplant and control donors (CNT, n = 9) were analyzed by Western blot. Subcellular distribution of nucleoporins was analysed by fluorescence and immunocytochemistry. When we compared protein levels according to etiology, ICM showed significant higher levels of NDC1 (65%, p<0.0001), Nup160 (88%, p<0.0001) and Nup153 (137%, p = 0.004) than those of the CNT levels. Furthermore, DCM group showed significant differences for NDC1 (41%, p<0.0001), Nup160 (65%, p<0.0001), Nup153 (155%, p = 0.006) and Nup93 (88%, p<0.0001) compared with CNT. However, Nup155 and translocated promoter region (TPR) did not show significant differences in their levels in any etiology. Regarding the distribution of these proteins in cell nucleus, only NDC1 showed differences in HF. In addition, in the pathological group we obtained good relationship between the ventricular function parameters (LVEDD and LVESD) and Nup160 (r = −0382, p = 0.004; r = −0.290, p = 0.033; respectively). Conclusions This study shows alterations in specific proteins (NDC1, Nup160, Nup153 and Nup93) that compose NPC in ischaemic and dilated human heart. These changes, related to ventricular function, could be accompanied by alterations in the nucleocytoplasmic transport. Therefore, our findings may be the basis for a new approach to HF management. PMID:23152829

  2. Nuclear factor-κB mediates placental growth factor induced pro-labour mediators in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandins, pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) are involved in the mechanisms of term and preterm parturition. Recent studies have reported an increase in angiogenesis-related genes during term and preterm labour, including placental growth factor (PLGF). In non-gestational tissues, PLGF induces inflammation via NF-κB. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PLGF on the gene expression and release of pro-labour mediators in human placenta. Samples were obtained from normal pregnancies at the time of Caesarean section. Human placenta was incubated in the absence (basal control) or presence of a 10 ng/ml PLGF for 24 h. Inflammatory gene expression was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR, concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins was quantified by ELISA, and secretory matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity by zymography. NF-κB DNA-binding activity and IκB-α (inhibitor of NF-κB) protein degradation were analysed by ELISA and Western blotting, respectively. PLGF significantly increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 gene expression and secretion, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and resultant prostaglandin (PG) E(2) and PGF(2α) release, and MMP-9 gene expression and enzyme production. PLGF induced the degradation of IκB-α whilst increasing NF-κB p65 DNA-binding activity. The PLGF-induced pro-labour responses were abrogated by co-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082. In summary, the pro-inflammatory and pro-labour effects of PLGF in human placenta are mediated by NF-κB.

  3. Signal transduction and nuclear responses in Staphylococcus aureus-induced expression of human beta-defensin 3 in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Barbara E; Kenoyer, Aimee

    2006-12-01

    The human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3) is an inducible epithelial peptide antibiotic that has potent antistaphylococcal activity. Infection of skin epithelial cells with viable Staphylococcus aureus, a common skin pathogen, induces increased gene expression of hBD-3 and other antimicrobial peptides. The aim of this study was to identify signaling pathways and nuclear responses that contribute to the gene expression of hBD-3 in primary human keratinocytes upon contact with S. aureus. Increased hBD-3 peptide was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in keratinocytes exposed to S. aureus and to lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Both are ligands for the cell surface Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and thus the contribution of TLR2 signaling in hBD-3 expression was examined. Functional inhibition of TLR2 prior to S. aureus stimulation significantly decreased hBD-3 mRNA levels by 37%, attesting to the involvement of this surface receptor in the initial recognition and downstream signaling for hBD-3 expression. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor prior to either S. aureus or LTA stimulation was associated with reduced hBD-3 mRNA transcripts and peptide. We also propose a role for the MAPK-regulated transcriptional activating protein 1 in S. aureus-induced hBD-3 gene expression. Combined, these studies indicate a role for TLR2 signaling and MAPK activation in the upregulation of hBD-3 and demonstrate the innate immune capacity of skin keratinocytes under conditions of S. aureus challenge to enhance the local expression of this antistaphylococcal peptide antibiotic.

  4. The role of constitutive nitric-oxide synthase in ultraviolet B light-induced nuclear factor κB activity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Wu, Shiyong

    2014-09-19

    NF-κB is a transcription factor involved in many signaling pathways that also plays an important role in UV-induced skin tumorigenesis. UV radiation can activate NF-κB, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we provided evidence that the activation of constitutive nitric-oxide synthase plays a role in regulation of IκB reduction and NF-κB activation in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells in early phase (within 6 h) post-UVB. Treating the cells with l-NAME, a selective inhibitor of constitutive nitric-oxide synthase (cNOS), can partially reverse the IκB reduction and inhibit the DNA binding activity as well as nuclear translocation of NF-κB after UVB radiation. A luciferase reporter assay indicates that UVB-induced NF-κB activation is totally diminished in cNOS null cells. The cNOS-mediated reduction of IκB is likely due to the imbalance of nitric oxide/peroxynitrite because treating the cells with lower (50 μm), but not higher (100-500 μm), concentration of S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) can reverse the effect of l-NAME in partial restore IκB level post-UVB. Our data also showed that NF-κB activity was required for maintaining a stable IκB kinase α subunit (IKKα) level because treating the cells with NF-κB or cNOS inhibitors could reduce IKKα level upon UVB radiation. In addition, our data demonstrated that although NF-κB protects cells from UVB-induced death, its pro-survival activity was likely neutralized by the pro-death activity of peroxynitrite after UVB radiation.

  5. Signal Transduction and Nuclear Responses in Staphylococcus aureus- Induced Expression of Human β-Defensin 3 in Skin Keratinocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, Barbara E.; Kenoyer, Aimee

    2006-01-01

    The human β-defensin 3 (hBD-3) is an inducible epithelial peptide antibiotic that has potent antistaphylococcal activity. Infection of skin epithelial cells with viable Staphylococcus aureus, a common skin pathogen, induces increased gene expression of hBD-3 and other antimicrobial peptides. The aim of this study was to identify signaling pathways and nuclear responses that contribute to the gene expression of hBD-3 in primary human keratinocytes upon contact with S. aureus. Increased hBD-3 peptide was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in keratinocytes exposed to S. aureus and to lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Both are ligands for the cell surface Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and thus the contribution of TLR2 signaling in hBD-3 expression was examined. Functional inhibition of TLR2 prior to S. aureus stimulation significantly decreased hBD-3 mRNA levels by 37%, attesting to the involvement of this surface receptor in the initial recognition and downstream signaling for hBD-3 expression. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor prior to either S. aureus or LTA stimulation was associated with reduced hBD-3 mRNA transcripts and peptide. We also propose a role for the MAPK-regulated transcriptional activating protein 1 in S. aureus-induced hBD-3 gene expression. Combined, these studies indicate a role for TLR2 signaling and MAPK activation in the upregulation of hBD-3 and demonstrate the innate immune capacity of skin keratinocytes under conditions of S. aureus challenge to enhance the local expression of this antistaphylococcal peptide antibiotic. PMID:16954397

  6. Effect of berberine on expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha in rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Leng, Sanhua; Lu, Fuer; Xie, Meijuan; Xu, Lijun; Wang, Kaifu

    2008-06-01

    The effects of berberine on the expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF-4alpha) in liver of rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance and the molecular mechanism of berberine preventing insulin resistance were investigated. The experimental animals were divided into two groups of 16 animals each. The control group received a control routine diet containing 60% carbohydrate, and the study group a high-fructose diet containing 60% fructose as the sole source of carbohydrate. At the end of 6 weeks these were each subdivided into two groups. One was administered with berberine [187.5 mg/(kg x d) in 5 g/L carboxymethyl cellulose] by intragastric intubation and the other group was treated with a vehicle (5 g/L carboxymethyl cellulose). The rats were fed on the same dietary regimen for the next 4 weeks. After the experimental period of 10 weeks, plasma glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels were measured. HOMA insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was assayed. Immunohistochemistry, semiquantitative RT-PCR and western blot were used to detect the expression of HNF-4alpha in liver. Compared with control diet, fructose feeding induced hyperinsulinemia, HOMA-IR and increased triglyceride (all P<0.01). Berberine prevented the rise in plasma insulin (P<0.01), HOMA-IR (P<0.01) and triglyceride (P<0.05) in the fructose-fed rats. No change in plasma glucose was seen among these groups. The mRNA and protein expression of HNF-4alpha was decreased in the fructose-fed rats, but berberine could promote its expression. It was concluded that berberine could prevent fructose-induced insulin resistance in rats possibly by promoting the expression HNF-4alpha in liver.

  7. Effective bilayer expansion and erythrocyte shape change induced by monopalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine. Quantitative light microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, L M; Wu, W G

    1990-01-01

    When human erythrocytes are treated with exogenous monopalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (MPPC), the normal biconcave disk shape red blood cells (RBC) become spiculate echinocytes. The present study examines the quantitative aspect of the relationship between effective bilayer expansion and erythrocyte shape change by a newly developed method. This method is based on the combination of direct surface area measurement of micropipette and relative bilayer expansion measurement of 13C crosspolarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assuming that 13C NMR chemical shift of fatty acyl chain can be used as an indicator of lateral packing of membrane bilayers, it is possible for us to estimate the surface area expansion of red cell membrane induced by MPPC from that induced by ethanol. Partitions of lipid molecules into cell membrane were determined by studies of shape change potency as a function of MPPC and red cell concentration. It is found that 8(+/- 0.5) x 10(6) molecules of MPPC per cell will effectively induce stage three echinocytes and yield 3.2(+/- 0.2)% expansion of outer monolayer surface area. Surface area of normal cells determined by direct measurements from fixed geometry of red cells aspirated by micropipette was 118.7 +/- 8.5 microns2. The effective cross-sectional area of MPPC molecules in the cell membrane therefore was determined to be 48(+/- 4) A2, which is in agreement with those determined by x-ray from model membranes and crystals of lysophospholipids. We concluded that surface area expansion of RBC can be explained by a simple consideration of cross-sectional area of added molecules and that erythrocyte shape changes correspond quantitatively to the incorporated lipid molecules. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:2393706

  8. HIV-1 gp120 induces NFAT nuclear translocation in resting CD4+ T-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cicala, Claudia . E-mail: ccicala@nih.gov; Arthos, James; Censoplano, Nina; Cruz, Catherine; Chung, Eva; Martinelli, Elena; Lempicki, Richard A.; Natarajan, Ven; VanRyk, Donald; Daucher, Marybeth; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2006-02-05

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in CD4+ T-cells is strongly dependent upon the state of activation of infected cells. Infection of sub-optimally activated cells is believed to play a critical role in both the transmission of virus and the persistence of CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. There is accumulating evidence that HIV can modulate signal-transduction pathways in a manner that may facilitate replication in such cells. We previously demonstrated that HIV gp120 induces virus replication in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Here, we show that in resting CD4+ T-cells, gp120 activates NFATs and induces their translocation into the nucleus. The HIV LTR encodes NFAT recognition sites, and NFATs may play a critical role in promoting viral replication in sub-optimally activated cells. These observations provide insight into a potential mechanism by which HIV is able to establish infection in resting cells, which may have implications for both transmission of HIV and the persistence of viral reservoirs.

  9. Nuclear effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol ingestion causes alteration in several cellular mechanisms, and leads to inflammation, apoptosis, immunological response defects, and fibrosis. These phenomena are associated with significant changes in the epigenetic mechanisms, and subsequently, to liver cell memory. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is one of the vital pathways in the cell that becomes dysfunctionial as a result of chronic ethanol consumption. Inhibition of the proteasome activity in the nucleus causes changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone modifying enzymes, and therefore, affects epigenetic mechanisms. Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increase in histone acetylation and a decrease in histone methylation, which leads to gene expression changes. DNA and histone modifications that result from ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition are key players in regulating gene expression, especially genes involved in the cell cycle, immunological responses, and metabolism of ethanol. The present review highlights the consequences of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in the nucleus of liver cells that are chronically exposed to ethanol. PMID:19291815

  10. Oxidative stress induces nuclear translocation of C-terminus of {alpha}-synuclein in dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Shengli; Zhou Ming; Yu Shun; Cai Yanning; Zhang Alex; Ueda, Kenji; Chan Piu . E-mail: pbchan@bjsap.org

    2006-03-31

    Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the neuronal degeneration and can promote the aggregation of {alpha}-synuclein. However, the role of {alpha}-synuclein under physiological and pathological conditions remains poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the possible interaction between the {alpha}-synuclein and oxidative stress. In a dopaminergic cell line MES23.5, we have found that the 200 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment induced the translocation of {alpha}-synuclein from cytoplasm to nuclei at 30 min post-treatment. The immunoactivity of {alpha}-synuclein became highly intensive in the nuclei after 2 h treatment. The protein translocated to nucleus was a 10 kDa fragment of C-terminus region of {alpha}-synuclein, while full-length {alpha}-synuclein remained in cytoplasm. Thioflavine-S staining suggested that the C-terminal fragment in the nuclei has no {beta}-sheet structures. Our present results indicated that 200 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment induces the intranuclear accumulation of the C-terminal fragment of {alpha}-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons, whose role remains to be investigated.

  11. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  12. Gene positional changes relative to the nuclear substructure during carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Gariglio, Patricio; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2004-12-15

    In the interphase nucleus the DNA of higher eukaryotes is organized in loops anchored to a substructure known as the nuclear matrix (NM). The topological relationship between gene sequences located in the DNA loops and the NM appears to be very important for nuclear physiology because processes such as replication, transcription, and processing of primary transcripts occur at macromolecular complexes located at discrete sites upon the NM. Mammalian hepatocytes rarely divide but preserve a proliferating capacity that is displayed in vivo after specific stimulus. We have previously shown that transient changes in the relative position of specific genes to the NM occur during the process of liver regeneration after partial ablation of the liver, but also that such changes correlate with the replicating status of the cells. Moreover, since chronic exposure to carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) leads to bouts of hepatocyte damage and regeneration, and eventually to non-reversible liver fibrosis in the rat, we used this animal model in order to explore if genes that show differential activity in the liver change or modify their relative position to the NM during the process of liver fibrosis induction. We found that changes in the relative position of specific genes to the NM occur during the chronic administration of CCl4, but also that such changes correlate with the proliferating status of the hepatocytes that goes from quiescence to regeneration to replicative senescence along the course of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, indicating that specific configurations in the higher-order DNA structure underlie the stages of progression towards liver fibrosis. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    PubMed

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons.

  14. Cell-free extract from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells can affect porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of somatic cells with undifferentiated cell extracts, such as embryonic stem cells and mammalian oocytes, is an attractive alternative method for reprogramming control. The properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are similar to those of embryonic stem cells; however, no studies have reported somatic cell nuclear reprogramming using iPSC extracts. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of porcine iPSC extracts treatment on porcine ear fibroblasts and early development of porcine cloned embryos produced from porcine ear skin fibroblasts pretreated with the porcine iPSC extracts. The Chariot(TM) reagent system was used to deliver the iPSC extracts into cultured porcine ear skin fibroblasts. The iPSC extracts-treated cells (iPSC-treated cells) were cultured for 3 days and used for analyzing histone modification and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Compared to the results for nontreated cells, the trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine residue 9 (H3K9) in the iPSC-treated cells significantly decreased. The expression of Jmjd2b, the H3K9 trimethylation-specific demethylase gene, significantly increased in the iPSC-treated cells; conversely, the expression of the proapoptotic genes, Bax and p53, significantly decreased. When the iPSC-treated cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes, no differences were observed in blastocyst development and total cell number in blastocysts compared with the results for control cells. However, H3K9 trimethylation of pronuclear-stage-cloned embryos significantly decreased in the iPSC-treated cells. Additionally, Bax and p53 gene expression in the blastocysts was significantly lower in iPSC-treated cells than in control cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that an extracts of porcine iPSCs can affect histone modification and gene expression in porcine ear skin fibroblasts and cloned embryos.

  15. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibits receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2017-01-01

    The adipokine nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), also known as pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor or the insulin-mimetic hormone visfatin, has a crucial role in the conversion of nicotinamide to nicotinamide mononucleotide during biosynthesis of the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Previous reports have demonstrated the inhibitory effects of Nampt on osteoclast formation from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD14+ monocytes. However, the effects of Nampt on bone marrow macrophage (BMM)-derived osteoclastogenesis and its precise role in the process remain unclear. The present in vitro study used recombinant Nampt and BMMs as osteoclast precursors demonstrated that Nampt suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis by decreasing the phosphorylation of various early signal transducers, including c-Jun N-terminal kinase, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3 β, Bruton's tyrosine kinase and phospholipase C γ-2. In addition, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that Nampt downregulates the mRNA and protein expression levels of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, leading to a decrease in the expression of osteoclast-specific genes including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, osteoclast-associated receptor and cathepsin K. However, the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts treated with Nampt was similar to untreated control osteoclasts. This finding indicates that Nampt exerts its anti-osteoclastogenic activity by targeting osteoclast precursor cells rather than mature osteoclasts. Consequently, the present study demonstrated that Nampt acts as a negative regulator of RANKL-mediated differentiation of BMMs into osteoclasts, suggesting the potential therapeutic targets to treat bone-related disorders such as osteoporosis. PMID:28035412

  16. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal.

  17. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A.; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-fei; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER–mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  18. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB during doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells and myocytes is pro-apoptotic: the role of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suwei; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Konorev, Eugene; Kalivendi, Shasi; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2002-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anti-tumour drug. Cardiotoxicity is a major toxic side effect of DOX therapy. Although recent studies implicated an apoptotic pathway in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, the mechanism of DOX-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of reactive oxygen species and the nuclear transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) during apoptosis induced by DOX in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) and adult rat cardiomyocytes. DOX-induced NF-kappaB activation is both dose- and time-dependent, as demonstrated using electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and luciferase and p65 (Rel A) nuclear-translocation assays. Addition of a cell-permeant iron metalloporphyrin significantly suppressed NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis induced by DOX. Overexpression of glutathione peroxidase, which detoxifies cellular H(2)O(2), significantly decreased DOX-induced NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis. Inhibition of DOX-induced NF-kappaB activation by a cell-permeant peptide SN50 that blocks translocation of the NF-kappaB complex into the nucleus greatly diminished DOX-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis was inhibited when IkappaB mutant vector, another NF-kappaB inhibitor, was added to DOX-treated BAECs. These results suggest that NF-kappaB activation in DOX-treated endothelial cells and myocytes is pro-apoptotic, in contrast with DOX-treated cancer cells, where NF-kappaB activation is anti-apoptotic. Removal of intracellular H(2)O(2) protects endothelial cells and myocytes from DOX-induced apoptosis, possibly by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of DOX. PMID:12139490

  19. RAD18 and associated proteins are immobilized in nuclear foci in human cells entering S-phase with ultraviolet light-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nicholas B.; Nelson, Eric; Digman, Michelle; Thornburg, Joshua A.; Alphenaar, Bruce W.; McGregor, W. Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Proteins required for translesion DNA synthesis localize in nuclear foci of cells with replication-blocking lesions. The dynamics of this process were examined in human cells with fluorescence-based biophysical techniques. Photobleaching recovery and raster image correlation spectroscopy experiments indicated that involvement in the nuclear foci reduced the movement of RAD18 from diffusion-controlled to virtual immobility. Examination of the mobility of REV1 indicated that it is similarly immobilized when it is observed in nuclear foci. Reducing the level of RAD18 greatly reduced the focal accumulation of REV1 and reduced UV mutagenesis to background frequencies. Fluorescence lifetime measurements indicated that RAD18 and RAD6A or polη only transferred resonance energy when these proteins colocalized in damage-induced nuclear foci, indicating a close physical association only within such foci. Our data support a model in which RAD18 within damage-induced nuclear foci is immobilized and is required for recruitment of Y-family DNA polymerases and subsequent mutagenesis. In the absence of damage these proteins are not physically associated within the nucleoplasm. PMID:18926833

  20. Production of medically useful bromine isotopes via alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Katharina; Scholten, Bernhard; Spahn, Ingo; Hermanne, Alex; Spellerberg, Stefan; Coenen, Heinz H.; Neumaier, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    The cross sections of α-particle induced reactions on arsenic leading to the formation of 76,77,78Br were measured from their respective thresholds up to 37 MeV. Thin sediments of elemental arsenic powder were irradiated together with Al degrader and Cu monitor foils using the established stacked-foil technique. For determination of the effective α-particle energies and of the effective beam current through the stacks the cross-section ratios of the monitor nuclides 67Ga/66Ga were used. This should help resolve discrepancies in existing literature data. Comparison of the data with the available excitation functions shows some slight energy shifts as well as some differences in curve shapes. The calculated thick target yields indicate, that 77Br can be produced in the energy range Eα = 25 → 17 MeV free of isotopic impurities in quantities sufficient for medical application.

  1. Flow-induced HDAC1 phosphorylation and nuclear export in angiogenic sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Bazou, Despina; Ng, Mei Rosa; Song, Jonathan W.; Chin, Shan Min; Maimon, Nir; Munn, Lance L.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis requires the coordinated growth and migration of endothelial cells (ECs), with each EC residing in the vessel wall integrating local signals to determine whether to remain quiescent or undergo morphogenesis. These signals include vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and flow-induced mechanical stimuli such as interstitial flow, which are both elevated in the tumor microenvironment. However, it is not clear how VEGF signaling and mechanobiological activation due to interstitial flow cooperate during angiogenesis. Here, we show that endothelial morphogenesis is histone deacetylase-1- (HDAC1) dependent and that interstitial flow increases the phosphorylation of HDAC1, its activity, and its export from the nucleus. Furthermore, we show that HDAC1 inhibition decreases endothelial morphogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) expression. Our results suggest that HDAC1 modulates angiogenesis in response to flow, providing a new target for modulating vascularization in the clinic. PMID:27669993

  2. Nuclear Raf-1 kinase regulates the CXCR5 promoter by associating with NFATc3 to drive retinoic acid-induced leukemic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Geil, Wendy M; Yen, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Novel functions of signaling molecules have been revealed in studies of cancer stem cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is an embryonic morphogen and stem cell regulator that controls the differentiation of a patient-derived leukemic cell line, HL-60, which is composed of progenitor cells with bipotent myelo-monocytic differentiation capability. RA treatment of HL-60 cells causes unusually long-lasting mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, with the cells exhibiting the beginning of G0 cell cycle arrest and functional differentiation by 48 h after treatment with RA. This event coincides with the nuclear translocation of Raf-1, phosphorylated at serine 621. The present study shows how the novel localization of Raf-1 to the nucleus results in transcriptional changes that contribute to the differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by RA. We find that nuclear pS621 Raf-1 associates with NFATc3 near its cognate binding site in the promoter of CXCR5, a gene that must be up-regulated to drive RA-induced differentiation. NFATc3 becomes immunoprecipitable with anti-phosphoserine serum, and CXCR5 is transcriptionally up-regulated upon RA-induced differentiation. Inhibiting the pS621 Raf-1/NFATc3 association with PD98059 inhibits these processes and cripples RA-induced differentiation. In this novel paradigm for Raf-1 and RA function, Raf-1 has a role in driving the nuclear signaling of RA-induced differentiation of leukemic progenitor cells.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Induces the Cytoplasmic Retention of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 by Disrupting Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Anne; Ajamian, Lara; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-opts host proteins and cellular machineries to its advantage at every step of the replication cycle. Here we show that HIV-1 enhances heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm. The latter was dependent on the nuclear export of the unspliced viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and to alterations in the abundance and localization of the FG-repeat nuclear pore glycoprotein p62. hnRNP A1 and vRNA remain colocalized in the cytoplasm supporting a post-nuclear function during the late stages of HIV-1 replication. Consistently, we show that hnRNP A1 acts as an internal ribosomal entry site trans-acting factor up-regulating internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation initiation of the HIV-1 vRNA. The up-regulation and cytoplasmic retention of hnRNP A1 by HIV-1 would ensure abundant expression of viral structural proteins in cells infected with HIV-1. PMID:19737937

  4. Application of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for the determination of trace neodymium in spent nuclear fuel using complexation with an emissive macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylate probe.

    PubMed

    Haraga, Tomoko; Saito, Shingo; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Asai, Shiho; Hanzawa, Yukiko; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Shibukawa, Masami; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    A simple and rapid method with low radiation exposure risk was developed for the determination of neodymium in spent nuclear fuel by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection using a fluorescent probe having a macrocyclic hexadentate polyaminocarboxylate structure. The concentration of Nd(III) in a spent nuclear fuel sample was determined with no interference from various matrix elements, including lanthanides and uranium (at a 200-fold excess), with 92 ± 3% recovery. This is due to high resolution based on establishing a ternary complex equilibrium during migration in which the hydroxyl ion plays an auxiliary role (log K(Ln-L-OH) = 3.9-5.3).

  5. An active nuclear retention signal in the glucocorticoid receptor functions as a strong inducer of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Amanda; Walther, Rhian F; Salem, Houssein Abdou; Wu, Dongmei; Atlas, Ella; Lefebvre, Yvonne A; Haché, Robert J G

    2007-04-13

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cycles between a naive chaperone-complexed form in the cytoplasm and a transcriptionally active steroid-bound nuclear form. Nuclear import of GR occurs rapidly and is mediated through the importin alpha/beta karyopherin import pathway. By contrast, nuclear export of GR occurs only slowly under most conditions, despite a dependence on active signaling. In this study we have defined a nuclear retention signal (NRS) in the hinge region of GR that actively opposes the nuclear export of GR as well as the nuclear export mediated through an ectopic CRM1-dependent