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Sample records for 3m empore carbon

  1. 3M Empore(R)-Membrane Filter Technology: Cesium Removal from Fuel Storage Water Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    2003-07-15

    This paper describes results from a seven-day demonstration of the use of 3M Empore(R) membrane filter loaded with ion exchange material (potassium cobalt hexacynoferrate) for cesium uptake from the R-Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site. The goal of the demonstration was to evaluate the ability of the Process Absorber Development unit, a water pre-filtration /CoHex configuration on a skid, to remove cesium from R-Disassembly Basin at a linear processing flow rate of 22.9 liters per minute (1,204 liters/minute/m2). Over 210,000 liters of R-Disassembly Basin water was processed through the PADU without a cesium breakthrough, that is, the effluent after treatment with CoHex, contained less than detectable amounts of radioactive cesium. Some of the observed advantages of the Empore(R) membrane filter technology over conventional packed column ion exchange systems include rapid flow rates without channeling effects, low volume secondary waste and fast extraction or rapid kinetics per unit of flow.

  2. Radiochemical analysis using Empore{trademark} Rad Disks.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L. L.

    1999-06-07

    A solid-phase extraction technique that isolates specific radionuclides (i.e., {sup 89/90}Sr, {sup 226/228}Ra, {sup 99}Tc) from surface, ground, and drinking waters is described. The analyte is isolated by pulling a sample through an appropriate Empore{trademark} Rad Disk with a vacuum, and the disk is subsequently assayed by a suitable counting technique. The method has both laboratory and field applications. Interferences are discussed.

  3. Application of Empore C-8 extraction disks for screening urine in systematic toxicological analysis.

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; Franke, J P; Temmink, A; Chen, X H; de Zeeuw, R A

    1992-03-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) by means of disposable columns has become a widely accepted technique for sample pretreatment in toxicology, both for directed analyses and for screening analyses. However, the sample capacity in SPE is usually limited to a few millilitres. Therefore, we have investigated to what extent these problems can be overcome by using Empore extraction disks, consisting of chemically modified C-8 reversed-phase silica, embedded in an inert polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) matrix. Human urine was selected as the matrix and dexetimide and mepyramine were initially used as test drugs because these drugs were available in tritiated form. Additional drugs investigated included codeine, hexobarbital, imipramine, methamphetamine, and nitrazepam. In these investigations, the sample capacity for untreated urine was at least 25 mL, and analyte quantities up to 250 micrograms could be retained by these filters. Washing with water/methanol mixtures was successful in removing substantial amounts of endogenous interferences, and methanol proved to be an acceptable eluent. Thus, these disks seem to have interesting potential for toxicological analysis in that sample concentration and cleanup can be achieved at the same time. PMID:1354247

  4. σ-Aromatic cyclic M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) clusters and their complexation with dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole, furan, noble gases and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-04-28

    The σ-aromaticity of M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) is analyzed and compared with that of Li3(+) and a prototype σ-aromatic system, H3(+). Ligands (L) like dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole and furan are employed to stabilize these monocationic M3(+) clusters. They all bind M3(+) with favorable interaction energy. Dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene forms the strongest bond with M3(+) followed by pyridine, isoxazole and furan. Electrostatic contribution is considerably more than that of orbital contribution in these M-L bonds. The orbital interaction arises from both L → M σ donation and L ← M back donation. M3(+) clusters also bind noble gas atoms and carbon monoxide effectively. In general, among the studied systems Au3(+) binds a given L most strongly followed by Cu3(+) and Ag3(+). Computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and its different extensions like the NICS-rate and NICS in-plane component vs. NICS out-of-plane component shows that the σ-aromaticity in L bound M3(+) increases compared to that of bare clusters. The aromaticity in pyridine, isoxazole and furan bound Au3(+) complexes is quite comparable with that in the recently synthesized Zn3(C5(CH3)5)3(+). The energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital also increases upon binding with L. The blue-shift and red-shift in the C-O stretching frequency of M3(CO)3(+) and M3(OC)3(+), respectively, are analyzed through reverse polarization of the σ- and π-orbitals of CO as well as the relative amount of OC → M σ donation and M → CO π back donation. The electron density analysis is also performed to gain further insight into the nature of interaction. PMID:26624276

  5. Spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures for Co 2+ ions in calcite-type trigonal carbonates MCO 3 (M=Co, Cd and Ca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chen, Zheng; Shao-Yi, Wu; Hui-Ning, Dong; Sheng, Tang

    2004-01-01

    From the perturbation formulas based on the cluster approach for 3d 7 ion in trigonal octahedral sites of crystals, the spin Hamiltonian parameters ( g factors g , g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A , A⊥) for Co 2+ in calcite-type MCO 3 (M=Co, Cd, Ca) crystals are calculated. In the calculations, for CoCO 3 crystal, the structural data of pure crystal are used, whereas for the Co 2+-doped CdCO 3 and CaCO 3 crystals, the local structural data caused by the impurity-induced local lattice relaxation are considered. The calculated results show good agreement with the observed values obtained from electron paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic resonance experiments. The difficulty shown in the previous paper related to the g⊥ value of CoCO 3 obtained from the change of the g factor as a function of the crystallographic data (i.e., the unit cell parameters) a0 and α0 of pure MCO 3 crystals is removed.

  6. A new data set for estimating organic carbon storage to 3 m depth in soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hugelius, G.; Bockheim, J.G.; Camill, P.; Elberling, B.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J.W.; Johnson, K.; Jorgenson, T.; Koven, C.D.; Kuhry, P.; Michaelson, G.; Mishra, U.; Palmtag, J.; Ping, C.-L.; O'Donnell, J.; Schirrmeister, L.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Sheng, Y.; Smith, L.C.; Strauss, J.; Yu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude terrestrial ecosystems are key components in the global carbon cycle. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) was developed to quantify stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the northern circumpolar permafrost region (a total area of 18.7 × 106 km2). The NCSCD is a geographical information system (GIS) data set that has been constructed using harmonized regional soil classification maps together with pedon data from the northern permafrost region. Previously, the NCSCD has been used to calculate SOC storage to the reference depths 0–30 cm and 0–100 cm (based on 1778 pedons). It has been shown that soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region also contain significant quantities of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, but there has been no circumpolar compilation of pedon data to quantify this deeper SOC pool and there are no spatially distributed estimates of SOC storage below 100 cm depth in this region. Here we describe the synthesis of an updated pedon data set for SOC storage (kg C m-2) in deep soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost regions, with separate data sets for the 100–200 cm (524 pedons) and 200–300 cm (356 pedons) depth ranges. These pedons have been grouped into the North American and Eurasian sectors and the mean SOC storage for different soil taxa (subdivided into Gelisols including the sub-orders Histels, Turbels, Orthels, permafrost-free Histosols, and permafrost-free mineral soil orders) has been added to the updated NCSCDv2. The updated version of the data set is freely available online in different file formats and spatial resolutions that enable spatially explicit applications in GIS mapping and terrestrial ecosystem models. While this newly compiled data set adds to our knowledge of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, it also reveals that large uncertainties remain. Identified data gaps include spatial coverage of deep (> 100 cm) pedons in many regions as well as the spatial extent of areas

  7. Treatment of severe secondary hyperparathyroidism with administration of calcium carbonate, intermittent high oral doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and dialysate with 3 mEq/1 calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Perez-Mijares, R; Gomez-Fernandez, P; Almaraz-Jimenez, M; Ramos-Diaz, M; Rivero-Bohorquez, J

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of long-term administration of daily calcium carbonate (2-4 g/day) and intermittent high oral doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3, 3-4 micrograms, given twice a week] in conjunction with a 3-mEq/1 calcium concentration in the dialysate for the treatment of severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in 6 hemodialysis patients. All patients had reduced serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, which increased significantly (p < 0.005) reaching the maximum level in the 4th month. Serum total and ionized calcium levels significantly increased also, in relation to those before treatment. No patients developed hypercalcemia. Serum phosphorus did not significantly change during the study. Initial serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1,241 +/- 233 pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) markedly decreased after starting treatment with 1,25-(OH)2D3, being 542 +/- 174 pg/ml in the 5th month and 477 +/- 174 pg/ml in the 8th month. These changes are statistically significant (p < 0.05 and < 0.007, respectively). Alkaline phosphatase behavior was similar to that of intact PTH. A constant direct correlation between intact PTH and alkaline phosphatase and an inverse significant correlation between intact PTH and 1,25-(OH)2D3 was evidenced by us. We conclude that oral 1,25-(OH)2D3 pulse therapy is very effective in suppressing PTH secretion. The administration of calcium carbonate and the use of dialysate with a reduced calcium concentration would allow to prevent hyperphosphatemia and the administration of high oral doses of 1,25-(OH)2D3 without concomitant hypercalcemia.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-M syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions 3-M syndrome 3-M syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description 3-M syndrome is a disorder that causes short ...

  9. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  10. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  11. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left to right: Richard Rawls, Chip Holloway, and Art Hayhurst standing next to the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  12. "Scrubbing" Data for D3M

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurius, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Data-driven decision-making (D3M) appears to be the new buzz phrase for this century, the information age. On the education front, teachers and administrators are engaging in data-centered dialog in grade-level meetings, lounges, hallways, and classrooms as they brainstorm toward closing the gap in student achievement. Clearly, such discussion…

  13. In situ formation of oxygen vacancy in perovskite Sr(0.95)Ti(0.8)Nb(0.1)M(0.1)O3 (M = Mn, Cr) toward efficient carbon dioxide electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Xie, Kui; Wei, Haoshan; Qin, Qingqing; Qi, Wentao; Yang, Liming; Ruan, Cong; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-11-18

    In this work, redox-active Mn or Cr is introduced to the B site of redox stable perovskite Sr(0.95)Ti(0.9)Nb(0.1)O3.00 to create oxygen vacancies in situ after reduction for high-temperature CO2 electrolysis. Combined analysis using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis confirms the change of the chemical formula from oxidized Sr(0.95)Ti(0.9)Nb(0.1)O3.00 to reduced Sr(0.95)Ti(0.9)Nb(0.1)O2.90 for the bare sample. By contrast, a significant concentration of oxygen vacancy is additionally formed in situ for Mn- or Cr-doped samples by reducing the oxidized Sr(0.95)Ti(0.8)Nb(0.1)M(0.1)O3.00 (M = Mn, Cr) to Sr(0.95)Ti(0.8)Nb(0.1)M0.1O2.85. The ionic conductivities of the Mn- and Cr-doped titanate improve by approximately 2 times higher than bare titanate in an oxidizing atmosphere and 3-6 times higher in a reducing atmosphere at intermediate temperatures. A remarkable chemical accommodation of CO2 molecules is achieved on the surface of the reduced and doped titanate, and the chemical desorption temperature reaches a common carbonate decomposition temperature. The electrical properties of the cathode materials are investigated and correlated with the electrochemical performance of the composite electrodes. Direct CO2 electrolysis at composite cathodes is investigated in solid-oxide electrolyzers. The electrode polarizations and current efficiencies are observed to be significantly improved with the Mn- or Cr-doped titanate cathodes.

  14. Stability and recovery of triazine and chloroacetamide herbicides from pH adjusted water samples by using empore solid-phase extraction disks and gas chromatography with ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mueller, T C; Senseman, S A; Carson, K H; Sciumbato, A S

    2001-01-01

    Empore disks were used to successfully extract herbicide residues from a difficult-to-analyze surface water source and deionized water. Herbicide recoveries were lower in surface water at 7,14, or 21 days after fortification and storage at 4 degrees C, presumably due to chemical sorption onto precipitated organic particulates. The addition of acid to the samples, as recommended in EPA Method 525.2, did not affect recoveries of alachlor and metolachlor, but reduced recoveries of atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine. Treatment of water samples with sodium hypochlorite did not affect alachlor or metolachlor recoveries, but greatly reduced the recovery of all triazine herbicides. This indicates that addition of acid or sodium hypochlorite to water samples may be detrimental to triazine analysis.

  15. 3M's PPR software criticized, but is research misleading?

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    New research suggests that a popular 3M software program doesn't clearly distinguish differences in care quality. The issue is important because the program is increasingly used to make payments to U.S. hospitals based on readmission rates. 3M says the study is flawed and the conclusion incorrect. The researchers concluded that either PPR flagged cases are not more preventable, or additional data collection is needed. The findings are based on a review of 100 randomly selected cases.

  16. Deployment of a Pair of 3 M telescopes in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.; Adams, B.; Butler, K.; Cardoza, J.; Colin, P.; Hui, C. M.; Kieda, D.; Kirkwood, D.; Kress, D.; Kress, M.; LeBohec, S.; McGuire, C.; Newbold, M.; Nunez, P.; Pham, K.

    2008-12-24

    Two 3 m telescopes are being installed in Grantsville Utah. They are intended for the testing of various approaches to the implementation of intensity interferometry using Cherenkov Telescopes in large arrays as receivers as well as for the testing of novel technology cameras and electronics for ground based gamma-ray astronomy.

  17. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  18. Strategic stories: how 3M is rewriting business planning.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G; Brown, R; Bromiley, P

    1998-01-01

    Virtually all business plans are written as a list of bullet points. Despite the skill or knowledge of their authors, these plans usually aren't anything more than lists of "good things to do." For example: Increase sales by 10%. Reduce distribution costs by 5%. Develop a synergistic vision for traditional products. Rarely do these lists reflect deep thought or inspire commitment. Worse, they don't specify critical relationships between the points, and they can't demonstrate how the goals will be achieved. 3M executive Gordon Shaw began looking for a more coherent and compelling way to present business plans. He found it in the form of strategic stories. Telling stories was already a habit of mind at 3M. Stories about the advent of Post-it Notes and the invention of masking tape help define 3M's identity. They're part of the way people at 3M explain themselves to their customers and to one another. Shaw and his coauthors examine how business plans can be transformed into strategic narratives. By painting a picture of the market, the competition, and the strategy needed to beat the competition, these narratives can fill in the spaces around the bullet points for those who will approve and those who will implement the strategy. When people can locate themselves in the story, their sense of commitment and involvement is enhanced. By conveying a powerful impression of the process of winning, narrative plans can mobilize an entire organization.

  19. Concerning neutral flux shielding in the U-3M torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dreval, N. B.

    2015-03-15

    The volume of the torsatron U-3M vacuum chamber is about 70 m{sup 3}, whereas the plasma volume is about 0.3 m{sup 3}. The large buffer volume of the chamber serves as a source of a substantial neutral flux into the U-3M plasma. A fraction of this flux falls onto the torsatron helical coils located in front of the plasma, due to which the dynamics of neutral influx into the plasma modifies. The shielding of the molecular flux from the buffer volume into the plasma is estimated using numerical calculations. Only about 10% of the incident flux reaches the plasma volume. Estimates show that about 20% of atoms escape beyond the helical coils without colliding with them. Under these conditions, the helical coils substantially affect the neutral flux. A discharge regime with a hot low-density plasma produced by a frame antenna is considered. The spatial distribution of the molecular density produced in this regime by the molecular flux from the chamber buffer volume after it has passed between the helical coils is calculated. The contributions of the fluxes emerging from the side and inner surfaces of the helical coils are considered. The calculations show that the shape of the spatial distribution of the molecular density differs substantially from the shape of the magnetic surfaces.

  20. Testing of the 3M Company Composite Conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, John P; Rizy, D Tom; Kisner, Roger A

    2010-10-01

    The 3M Company has developed a high-temperature low-sag conductor referred to as Aluminum-Conductor Composite-Reinforced or ACCR. The conductor uses an aluminum metal matrix material to replace the steel in conventional conductors. The objective of this work is to accelerate the commercial acceptance by electric utilities of this new conductor design by testing four representative conductor classes in controlled conditions. A unique facility called the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) Facility was built at ORNL for testing overhead conductors. The PCAT has been uniquely designed for testing overhead bare transmission line conductors at high currents and temperatures after they have been installed and tensioned to the manufacturer's specifications. The ability to operate a transmission line conductor in this manner does not exist elsewhere in the United States. Four classes of ACCR cable designed by the 3M Company have been successfully test at ORNL small, medium, large and small/compact. Based on these and other manufacturer tests, the 3M Company has successfully introduced the ACCR into the commercial market and has completed over twenty installations for utility companies.

  1. Wind tunnel tests on a 3 m diameter Musgrove windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmer, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    A 3 m diameter model of a two bladed Musgrove vertical axis windmill has been tested in the British Aerospace wind tunnel at Filton. Tunnel constraints were kept to a minimum by using a low flow blockage and appropriate corrections were applied to the measurements. The results of these tests demonstrate the good performance of this type of windmill. Comparison of the measured performance with predictions from a simple mathematical model show excellent agreement. Maximum loads measured on the windmill are not well predicted by the mathematical model. In order to reconcile measurement and prediction large induced crossflows must be postulated at some blade rotational positions.

  2. Attitudes toward ride-sharing: 3M Center case study

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, R.A.; Edwards, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    The 3M vanpooling program is examined to find out why it has been successful while carpooling has declined. Employee surveys are used to determine which incentives and disincentives are in effect and which psychological factors are important. Analysis of six factors (personal freedom restriction, longevity, auto ownership and competition, travel cost, interpersonnal relationships, and distance from home to work) is used to break down the survey information and establish the attitudes which determine behavior. The findings can be used to reduce or eliminate most of the objections to carpooling and to emphasize the positive aspects. A personalized matching program is also recommended. 1 figure, 5 tables. (DCK)

  3. GAM observation in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanin, V. V.; Askinazi, L. G.; Belokurov, A. A.; Kornev, V. A.; Lebedev, V.; Petrov, A. V.; Tukachinsky, A. S.; Vildjunas, M. I.; Wagner, F.; Yashin, A. Yu

    2016-04-01

    Results of an experimental study of geodesic acoustic modes (GAM) in the TUMAN-3M tokamak are reported. With Doppler backscattering (DBS) the basic properties of the GAM such as frequency, conditions for the GAM existence and the GAM radial location have been identified. The two-frequency Doppler reflectometer system was employed to reveal an interplay between low frequency sheared poloidal rotation, ambient turbulence level and the GAM intensity. Bicoherence analysis of the DBS data evidences the presence of a nonlinear interaction between the GAM and plasma turbulence.

  4. 30 years of ergonomics at 3M: a case study.

    PubMed

    Larson, N; Wick, H

    2012-01-01

    The added value of the Ergonomics Program at 3M was found to be improved employee safety, compliance with regulations and reduction of work-related illness, increases in productivity, and quality and operating efficiency. This paper describes the thirty years of existence of this program. For the first twenty years, the program objectives were to: respond to requests for assistance related to work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) concerns, raise employee awareness of MSDs and ergonomics; educate engineers in ergonomics design; and develop ergonomics teams at manufacturing locations. Since the year 2000, 3M's Ergonomics Program has been in transition from a US-centric and corporate-based technical-expertled program to a global program applying participatory ergonomics strategies within a macroergonomics framework. During that transition, the existing program requirements were revised, new methods and program tools were created, and expectations for implementation at the manufacturing locations clarified. This paper focuses on the company's manufacturing ergonomics program activities during the past ten years and includes specifics of the program's objectives, risk assessment reduction process, and ergonomics technical expertise development. The main benefit achieved throughout the company is reducing employee injury while also increasing productivity and operating efficiency.

  5. Hamline/3M Corp. Project: Liason for Curricular Change*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Jerry L.

    2002-04-01

    This project was designed to catalyze curricular changes to better prepare students for the workplace. Industrial managers provided a list of 16 characteristics valued in the workplace; most were NOT related to science course content. The project formed 5 teams each including 3M professionals and students. Each team developed curricular changes in one of the 16 areas. Team goals were to improve skills in communication, data analysis, business/economics, team problem solving, and cultural competency. Curricular changes realized include communication skill activities embodied in science courses and faculty communication teaching skill seminars; self learning tools in data analysis, statistics and model building; a new course developed with assistance from 3M personnel focusing on topics directly related to technological industries; high performance team problem solving training/coaching for faculty; workshops for students and faculty relative to importance of cultural competencies in the workplace; and a new course focusing on culture, team problem solving and conflict resolution in the technical workplace. Process for developing and content of curricular changes will be reported. *Thanks to: NSF GOALI CHE-99010782

  6. Hamline/3M Project: Liaison for Curricular Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundquist, Andy

    2002-03-01

    This project was designed to catalyze curricular changes to better prepare students for the workplace. Industrial managers provided a list of 16 characteristics valued in the workplace: most were NOT related to science course content. The project formed 5 teams each including 3M professionals and students. Each team developed curricular changes in one of the 16 areas. Team goals were to improve skills in communication, data analysis, business/economics, team problem solving, and culture competency. Curricular changes realized include communication skill activities embodied in science courses and faculty communication teaching skill seminars, self learning tools in data analysis, statistics and model building, a new course developed with assistance from 3M personnel focussing on topics directly related to technological industries, high performance team problem solving training/coaching for faculty and workshops for students and faculty relative to importance of cultural competencies in the workplace, and a new course focusing on culture, team problem solving and conflict resolution in the technical workplace. Process for developing and content of curricular changes will be reported.

  7. Identification of mutations in CUL7 in 3-M syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huber, Céline; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Glaser, Anna; O'Sullivan, James; Brauner, Raja; Wu, Kenneth; Xu, Xinsong; Pearce, Kerra; Wang, Rong; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Dagoneau, Nathalie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Dos Santos, Heloisa; Mégarbané, André; Morin, Gilles; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hennekam, Raoul; Van der Burgt, Ineke; Black, Graeme C M; Clayton, Peter E; Read, Andrew; Le Merrer, Martine; Scambler, Peter J; Munnich, Arnold; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Winter, Robin; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2005-10-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation is caused by maternal, fetal or placental factors that result in impaired endovascular trophoblast invasion and reduced placental perfusion. Although various causes of intrauterine growth retardation have been identified, most cases remain unexplained. Studying 29 families with 3-M syndrome (OMIM 273750), an autosomal recessive condition characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation, we first mapped the underlying gene to chromosome 6p21.1 and then identified 25 distinct mutations in the gene cullin 7 (CUL7). CUL7 assembles an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing Skp1, Fbx29 (also called Fbw8) and ROC1 and promotes ubiquitination. Using deletion analysis, we found that CUL7 uses its central region to interact with the Skp1-Fbx29 heterodimer. Functional studies indicated that the 3-M-associated CUL7 nonsense and missense mutations R1445X and H1464P, respectively, render CUL7 deficient in recruiting ROC1. These results suggest that impaired ubiquitination may have a role in the pathogenesis of intrauterine growth retardation in humans.

  8. 3M corporate incinerator environmental monitoring study and risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.B.; Elnabarawy, M.T.; Pilney, J.

    1998-12-31

    A one-year multi-media environmental monitoring study was performed around the 3M Cottage Grove Facility. Particulate metals from the 3M Corporate hazardous waste incinerator were the focus of the study. Two environmental media were of primary interest: area soil sampling was conducted to investigate the impact of past incinerator emissions on the environment, and ambient air monitoring was conducted to address current impacts. Over 180 soil samples were taken from both agricultural and forested land in the vicinity of the Facility. More than 25 chemical parameters were then quantified in the samples. The potential impacts of past emissions from the incinerator were assessed by comparing chemical concentrations from locations where incinerator impacts were expected to be greatest (based on air dispersion modeling) to chemical concentrations in matched samples from sites expected to be least impacted. The ambient air monitoring network consisted of six stations. Source-receptor modeling was used to determine the most likely contribution of the incinerator and six additional major area sources for the air monitoring (i.e. filter) data at each station. The model provided a best-fit analysis regarding the likely contributions of each source to the sample results. The results of these evaluations lead to the conclusion that the current emissions from this Facility do not present an unacceptable risk to human health.

  9. Testing of the 3M Company ACCR Conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, J.P.; RIzy, D.T.; Kisner, R.A.; Deve, H.E.

    2010-09-15

    The 3M Company has developed a high-temperature low-sag conductor referred to as Aluminum- Conductor Composite-Reinforced or ACCR. The conductor uses an aluminum metal matrix material to replace the steel in conventional conductors so the core has a lower density and higher conductivity. The objective of this work is to accelerate the commercial acceptance by electric utilities of these new conductor designs by testing four representative conductor classes in controlled conditions. Overhead transmission lines use bare aluminum conductor strands wrapped around a steel core strands to transmit electricity. The typical cable is referred to as aluminum-conductor steel-reinforced (ACSR). The outer strands are aluminum, chosen for its conductivity, low weight, and low cost. The center strand is of steel for the strength required to support the weight without stretching the aluminum due to its ductility. The power density of a transmission corridor has been directly increased by increasing the voltage level. Transmission voltages have increased from 115-kV to 765- kV over the past 80 years. In the United States, further increasing the voltage level is not feasible at this point in time, so in order to further increase the power density of a transmission corridor, conductor designs that increase the current carrying capability have been examined. One of the key limiting factors in the design of a transmission line is the conductor sag which determines the clearance of the conductor above ground or underlying structures needed for electrical safety. Increasing the current carrying capability of a conductor increases the joule heating in the conductor which increases the conductor sag. A conductor designed for high-temperature and lowsag operation requires an engineered modification of the conductor materials. To make an advanced cable, the 3M Company solution has been the development of a composite conductor consisting of Nextel ceramic fibers to replace the steel core and

  10. Decreased relative expression level of trefoil factor 3 mRNA to galectin-3 mRNA distinguishes thyroid follicular carcinoma from adenoma.

    PubMed

    Takano, Toru; Miyauchi, Akira; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kuma, Kanji; Amino, Nobuyuki

    2005-02-28

    The expression level of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) mRNA is a marker for distinguishing thyroid follicular adenomas from carcinomas. However, when measuring the expression level of TFF3 mRNA in fine needle aspiration biopsies, an appropriate internal control mRNA, of which expression is restricted in thyroid epithelial--derived cells, is necessary, since they are often contaminated with a considerable number of blood cells, which do not express TFF3 mRNA. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of molecular-based diagnosis of thyroid follicular carcinoma by measuring the relative expression of TFF3 mRNA by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using galectin-3 mRNA as an internal control. The TFF3/galectin-3 mRNA ratio (T/G ratio) was measured in 54 follicular adenomas and 29 follicular carcinomas. It was markedly decreased in 7 follicular carcinomas of widely invasive type and with evident distant metastases. When the cutoff point was set at 16.0 by a receiver operator characteristic curve, the TG ratio showed good agreement with the pathological diagnosis [kappa=0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.77]. This agreement was better when the pathologically questionable cases were excluded (kappa=0.72; 95% CI, 0.49-0.95). Quantification of the T/G ratio may be a useful tool for the distinction between follicular adenomas and carcinomas, which is the most difficult in thyroid pathology.

  11. 3M's Model Rewards and Recognition Program Engages Employees and Drives Energy Savings Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    3M has implemented more than 1,900 employee-inspired projects that have realized a 22% improvement in energy efficiency and yielded $100 million in energy savings. This case study provides information about 3M's approach to energy efficiency.

  12. Qualification Of Kapton Pretreatment Process Using 3M Scotch Weld 2216 For Solar Panel Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, B. R.; Krishna, Priya G.; Venkatesh, K.; Nagendra, H. R.; Nanjundaswamy, T. S.

    2011-10-01

    Substrates for solar arrays intended to be used on satellite systems are generally made of aluminum honeycomb structure sandwiched with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) face skin. Two mil thick KaptonTM sheets are co cured on one side of the aluminum /CFRP composite structure while realizing the substrate panels. This Kapton sheet would serve as an insulator over which solar cell blankets are bonded with suitable adhesive for the satellite solar panels. The satellite solar panels demands highest degree of quality and reliability and one of the prime factors in this regards is the bond strength of adhesive which is used to bond the solar cell blankets. Various methods of pretreatments of Kapton surface are in use for increasing the surface energy, which in turn results in improved bond strengths. These methods generally provide roughened surface of the Kapton which is achieved either by abrasive means like scrubbing the surface using fine silica chip, or plasma etching or alternatively by an additive process wherein suitable polyester, phenolic or other resins are coated on to the Kapton surface to achieve the desired results. For spacecraft solar panel applications at ISRO, polyester resin coating on to the Kapton surface was used as pretreatment prior to adhesive application. This process had provided adequate bond strengths between the solar cells and Kapton. Due to issues related to the supply of the polyester resin material from the vendor alternative methods of pretreatments were explored. In this paper, a novel process developed for Kapton pretreatment is described along with results of relevant qualifications for the satellite solar panel application. This newly developed pretreatment process for Kapton successfully adopts an epoxy based material 3M Scotch weld 2216 which is widely used in spacecraft electronic hardware.

  13. Pre- and post-natal growth in two sisters with 3-M syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Licia; Bertucci, Emma; Mazza, Vincenzo; Elmakky, Amira; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Neuhaus, Christine; Percesepe, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    3-M syndrome (OMIM #273750) is a rare autosomal recessive growth disorder characterized by severe pre- and post-natal growth restriction, associated with minor skeletal abnormalities and dysmorphisms. Although the 3-M syndrome is well known as a primordial dwarfism, descriptions of the prenatal growth are missing. We report a family with variable phenotypic features of 3-M syndrome and we describe the prenatal and postnatal growth pattern of two affected sisters with a novel homozygous CUL7 mutation (c.3173-1G>C), showing a pre- and post-natal growth deficiency and a normal cranial circumference. PMID:26850509

  14. The LIULIN-3M Radiometer for Measuring Particle Doses in Space and on Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dachev, T. P.; Tomov, B. T.; Dimitrov, P. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Obenschain, Art (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a compact radiation monitor/dosimeter, the LIULIN-3M, and on extended measurements conducted on the ground and on commercial aircraft on domestic and international flights.

  15. Measurements of Radiation Exposure on Commercial Aircraft with the LIULIN-3M Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dachev, T. P.; Brucker, G. J.; Tomov, B. T.; Dimitrov, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a compact radiation monitor/dosimeter, the LIULIN-3M, and on extended measurements conducted on the ground and on commercial aircraft on domestic and international flights.

  16. The LIULIN-3M Radiometer for Measuring Particle Doses in Space and on Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dachev, T. P.; Brucker, G. J.; Tomov, B. T.; Dimitrov, P. G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a compact radiation monitor/dosimeter, the LIULIN-3M, and on extended measurements conducted on the ground and on commercial aircraft on domestic and international flights.

  17. 101. JOB NO. 1347F, SHEET 3M, 1927, ASSEMBLY BUILDING; FORD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. JOB NO. 1347-F, SHEET 3M, 1927, ASSEMBLY BUILDING; FORD MOTOR COMPANY; ONE-EIGHTH SCALE OF OFFICES - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 115. JOB NO. 1347K, SHEET 3M, 1929/1930, FORD MOTOR COMPANY; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. JOB NO. 1347-K, SHEET 3M, 1929/1930, FORD MOTOR COMPANY; BOILER HOUSE ASSEMBLY PLANT; BOILER SETTING - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. SAGE III Meteor-3M L2 Solar Event Species Profiles (Native) V003

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-14

    SAGE III Meteor-3M L2 Solar Event Species Profiles (Native) V003 Project Title:  ... Aerosol Extinction Ozone Atmospheric Pressure Water Vapor Nitrogen Dioxide Air Temperature Trace Gases Dust/ash ...

  20. DNA sequence variability of IGHG3 alleles associated to the main G3m haplotypes in human populations.

    PubMed

    Dard, P; Lefranc, M P; Osipova, L; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2001-10-01

    The present study investigates the molecular basis of the G3m polymorphism expressed by the heavy constant domains of human immunoglobulins gamma 3 chains. By using a new protocol allowing the specific cloning of IGHG3 genes, a total of 51 full-length IGHG3 genomic sequences (about 2 kb) isolated from African, Siberian, West Asian and European population samples were sequenced. IGHG3 sequences were assigned precise G3m haplotypes on the basis of specific associations between G3m allotypes and IGHG3 RFLPs. Specific DNA substitutions involved in the expression of G3m(5), G3m(6), G3m(15), G3m(16), G3m(21), G3m(24) and G3m(28) allotypes were then deduced, elucidating almost completely the determination of the G3m polymorphism at the DNA level. The molecular evolution of G3m haplotypes was investigated by a maximum likelihood phylogeny of IGHG3 sequences. Sequence clusters are shown to be G3m haplotype-specific, corroborating the Gm molecular model deduced from serology, and showing that populations differentiation is much more recent than G3m haplotypes differentiation. The widely distributed G3m(5,10,11,13,14) haplotype is likely to be ancestral to the other G3m haplotypes presently found at high frequencies in different continental areas.

  1. Analysis of the Cyclotron Facility calibration and aircraft dosimetry results from the LIULIN-3M instrument.

    PubMed

    Dachev, Ts P; Stassinopoulous, E G; Tomov, B T; Dimitrov, Pl G; Matviichuk, Yu N; Shurshakov, V A; Petrov, V M

    2003-01-01

    The LIULIN-3M instrument is a further development of the LIULIN dosimeter-radiometer, used on the MIR spacestation during the 1988-1994 time period. The LIULIN-3M is designed for continuous monitoring of the radiation environment during the BION-12 satellite flight in 1999. A semiconductor detector with 1 mm thickness and cm2 area is contained in the instrument. Pulse high analysis technique is used to determine the energy losses in the detector. The final data from the instrument are the flux and the dose rate for the exposure time and 256 channels of absorbed dose spectra based on the assumption that the particle flux is normal to the detector. The LIULIN-3M instrument was calibrated by proton fluxes with different energies at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility in June 1997 and had been used for radiation measurements during commercial aircraft flights. The calibration procedure and some flight results are presented in this paper.

  2. CDKN3 mRNA as a Biomarker for Survival and Therapeutic Target in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrón, Eira Valeria; Roman-Bassaure, Edgar; Sánchez-Sandoval, Ana Laura; Espinosa, Ana María; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Alfaro, Ana; Bermúdez, Miriam; Zamora, Rubén; García-Ruiz, Carlos; Gomora, Juan Carlos; Kofman, Susana; Pérez-Armendariz, E. Martha; Berumen, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) gene, involved in mitosis, is upregulated in cervical cancer (CC). We investigated CDKN3 mRNA as a survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CC. CDKN3 mRNA was measured in 134 CC and 25 controls by quantitative PCR. A 5-year survival study was conducted in 121 of these CC patients. Furthermore, CDKN3-specific siRNAs were used to investigate whether CDKN3 is involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion in CC-derived cell lines (SiHa, CaSki, HeLa). CDKN3 mRNA was on average 6.4-fold higher in tumors than in controls (p = 8 x 10−6, Mann-Whitney). A total of 68.2% of CC patients over expressing CDKN3 gene (fold change ≥ 17) died within two years of diagnosis, independent of the clinical stage and HPV type (Hazard Ratio = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.5–10, p = 3.3 x 10−6, Cox proportional-hazards regression). In contrast, only 19.2% of the patients with lower CDKN3 expression died in the same period. In vitro inactivation of CDKN3 decreased cell proliferation on average 67%, although it had no effect on cell migration and invasion. CDKN3 mRNA may be a good survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CC. PMID:26372210

  3. A DS106 Thing Happened on the Way to the 3M Tech Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockridge, Rochelle; Levine, Alan; Funes, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This case study illustrates how DS106, a computer science course in Digital Storytelling from the University of Mary Washington (UMW) and accessible as an open course on the web, is being explored in a corporate environment at 3M, an American multinational corporation based in St. Paul, Minnesota, to build community, collaboration, and more…

  4. Improving Job Tenure Outcomes for People with Disabilities: The 3M Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on a three-part job retention model (3M model) containing "match,""maturity," and "mastery" constructs. Proposes that individuals with disabilities are more likely to retain employment when rehabilitation counselors provide retention services compatible with the 3Ms. Counselors can help people with disabilities (a) establish…

  5. CDKN3 mRNA as a Biomarker for Survival and Therapeutic Target in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Barrón, Eira Valeria; Roman-Bassaure, Edgar; Sánchez-Sandoval, Ana Laura; Espinosa, Ana María; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Alfaro, Ana; Bermúdez, Miriam; Zamora, Rubén; García-Ruiz, Carlos; Gomora, Juan Carlos; Kofman, Susana; Pérez-Armendariz, E Martha; Berumen, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) gene, involved in mitosis, is upregulated in cervical cancer (CC). We investigated CDKN3 mRNA as a survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CC. CDKN3 mRNA was measured in 134 CC and 25 controls by quantitative PCR. A 5-year survival study was conducted in 121 of these CC patients. Furthermore, CDKN3-specific siRNAs were used to investigate whether CDKN3 is involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion in CC-derived cell lines (SiHa, CaSki, HeLa). CDKN3 mRNA was on average 6.4-fold higher in tumors than in controls (p = 8 x 10-6, Mann-Whitney). A total of 68.2% of CC patients over expressing CDKN3 gene (fold change ≥ 17) died within two years of diagnosis, independent of the clinical stage and HPV type (Hazard Ratio = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.5-10, p = 3.3 x 10-6, Cox proportional-hazards regression). In contrast, only 19.2% of the patients with lower CDKN3 expression died in the same period. In vitro inactivation of CDKN3 decreased cell proliferation on average 67%, although it had no effect on cell migration and invasion. CDKN3 mRNA may be a good survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CC.

  6. Assessment of zenith tropospheric delay derived from UNB3m model over Asia area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liangke; Xie, Shaofeng; Liu, Lilong; Feng, Haiyang; Jiang, Maofang

    2015-12-01

    The tropospheric delay is one of the main errors for earth observation and a variety of radio navigation technologies, and the UNB3m model can be used to calculate the zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) without any real measured meteorological data, which taking the major changes in water vapor profiles with latitude into account, and it widely applied in Wide Area Augmentation System in America. However, there are few researches carried out on the assessment of ZTD from UNB3m model over Asia area. In this study, three years of the ZTD data observed from 56 IGS (International GNSS service) sites distributed in Asia area is used to assess the effectiveness and accuracy of ZTD calculated from UNB3m model. The results are: (1) relative to IGS observed ZTD, the bias and root mean square (RMS) for ZTD calculated from UNB3m model are -0.1 cm and 6.0 cm, respectively. Besides, the bias shows significant periodic characteristics in Asia area. (2) The bias and RMS present seasonal variations, which generally show larger values in summer months. (3) The precision of ZTD calculated from UNB3m model increases with increasing altitude or latitude, and also the bias and RMS show inconsistently in different Asia areas. At last, the best results can be achieved in inland area where presents the mean yearly RMS of 2.4 cm. These results provide a reference for the study of the tropospheric delay correction model and the applications of real-time GNSS navigation and positioning.

  7. Ultra Barrier Topsheet Film for Flexible Photovoltaics with 3M Company

    SciTech Connect

    Funkenbusch, Arnie; Ruth, Charles

    2014-12-30

    In this DOE sponsored program, 3M achieved the critical UBT features to enable durable flexible high efficiency modules to be produced by a range of customers who have now certified the 3M UBT and are actively developing said flexible modules. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the work under this program were; Scale-up the current Generation-1 UBT from 12” width, as made on 3M’s pilot line, to 1+meter width full-scale manufacturing, while maintaining baseline performance metrics (see table below); This objective was fully met; Validate service life of Generation-1 UBT for the 25+ year lifetime demanded by the photovoltaic market; Aggressive testing revealed potential failure modes in the Gen 1 UBT. Deficiencies were identified and corrective action taken in the Gen 2 UBT; Develop a Generation-2 UBT on the pilot line, targeting improved performance relative to baseline, including higher %T (percent transmission), lower water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) with targets based on what the technology needs for 25 year lifetime, proven lifetime of 25 years in solar module construction in the field, and lower cost; Testing of UBT Gen 2 under a wide range of conditions presented in this report failed to reveal any failure mode. Therefore UBT Gen 2 is known to be highly durable. 3M will continue to test towards statistically validating a 25 year lifetime under 3M funding; Transfer Generation-2 UBT from the pilot line to the full-scale manufacturing line within three years; and This objective was fully met.

  8. A 3 m. y. record of Pliocene-Pleistocene loess in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Westgate, J.A.; Stemper, B.A. ); Pewe, T.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Many distal tephra beds exist in the thick, fossiliferous loess deposits near Fairbanks interior Alaska. Isothermal plateau fission-track ages, determined on glass shards from tephra beds, in conjunction with tephrostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic techniques, indicate that loess deposition began in the late Pliocene-an antiquity previously unsuspected. Hence, there is the opportunity now to reconstruct a detailed, well-dated record of environmental changes in interior Alaska during the past 3 m.y.

  9. Florida hospital saves 5.3 M dollars by adopting principles of lean manufacturing.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Florida hospital saves 5.3M dollars by adopting principles of lean manufacturing. Surgery cancellations have been slashed from 13% of cases to less than 3%, while emergency department admissions have increased by 20%. Those are just two of the results of a quality improvement project at Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL, that focused on using the principles of lean manufacturing to improve patient flow in the five-hospital system

  10. Decreased TIM-3 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from nephropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, X Z; Liu, N; Qiao, Y; Du, S Y; Chen, Y; Chen, D; Yu, S; Jiang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that TIM-1 and TIM-3 in-fluence chronic autoimmune diseases, and their expression levels in immune cells from nephritic patients are still unknown. Real-time transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to deter-mine expression levels of TIM-1 and TIM-3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 36 patients with minimal change glo-merulopathy (MCG), 65 patients with lupus nephritis (LN), 78 patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), 55 patients with membranous nephropa-thy (MN), 22 patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN), 26 patients with anaphylactoid purpura nephritis (APN), and 63 healthy controls. TIM-3 mRNA expression significantly decreased in PBMCs from nephritic patients (LN, P < 0.0001; MCG, P < 0.0001; MN, P = 0.0031; CGN, P = 0.0464; IgAN, P = 0.0002; APN, P = 0.0392) com-pared with healthy controls. In contrast, there was no significant differ-ence in TIM-1 mRNA expression between the patients and the healthy controls. Our results suggest that insufficient expression of TIM-3 mRNA may be involved in the pathogenesis of nephropathy.

  11. A new series of chiral metal formate frameworks of [HONH3][M(II)(HCOO)3] (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, and Mg): synthesis, structures, and properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Shang, Ran; Hu, Ke-Li; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Song

    2012-12-17

    We report the synthesis, crystal structures, IR, and thermal, dielectric, and magnetic properties of a new series of ammonium metal formate frameworks of [HONH(3)][M(II)(HCOO)(3)] for M = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, and Mg. They are isostructural and crystallize in the nonpolar chiral orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), a = 7.8121(2)-7.6225(2) Å, b = 7.9612(3)-7.7385(2) Å, c = 13.1728(7)-12.7280(4) Å, and V = 819.27(6)-754.95(4) Å(3). The structures possess anionic metal formate frameworks of 4(9)·6(6) topology, in which the octahedral metal centers are connected by the anti-anti formate ligands and the hydroxylammonium is located orderly in the channels, forming strong O/N-H···O(formate) hydrogen bonds with the framework. HONH(3)(+) with only two non-H atoms favors the formation of the dense chiral 4(9)·6(6) frameworks, instead of the less dense 4(12)·6(3) perovskite frameworks for other monoammoniums of two to four non-H atoms because of its small size and its ability to form strong hydrogen bonding. However, the larger size of HONH(3)(+) compared to NH(4)(+) resulted in simple dielectric properties and no phase transitions. The three magnetic members (Mn, Co, and Ni) display antiferromagnetic long-range ordering of spin canting, at Néel temperatures of 8.8 K (Mn), 10.9 K (Co), and 30.5 K (Ni), respectively, and small spontaneous magnetizations for the Mn and Ni members but large magnetization for the Co member. Thermal and IR spectroscopic properties are also reported. PMID:23214977

  12. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGluR3, mGlu3, GRM3): expression, function and involvement in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, P J; Lyon, L; Sartorius, L J; Burnet, P W J; Lane, T A

    2008-05-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) comprise mGluR2 (mGlu2; encoded by GRM2) and mGluR3 (mGlu3; encoded by GRM3) and modulate glutamate neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Here we review the expression and function of mGluR3 and its involvement in schizophrenia. mGluR3 is expressed by glia and neurons in many brain regions and has a predominantly presynaptic distribution, consistent with its role as an inhibitory autoreceptor and heteroceptor. mGluR3 splice variants exist in human brain but are of unknown function. Differentiation of mGluR3 from mGluR2 has been problematic because of the lack of selective ligands and antibodies; the available data suggest particular roles for mGluR3 in long-term depression, in glial function and in neuroprotection. Some but not all studies find genetic association of GRM3 polymorphisms with psychosis, with the risk alleles also being associated with schizophrenia-related endophenotypes such as impaired cognition, cortical activation and glutamate markers. The dimeric form of mGluR3 may be reduced in the brain in schizophrenia. Finally, preclinical findings have made mGluR3 a putative therapeutic target, and now direct evidence for antipsychotic efficacy of a group II mGluR agonist has emerged from a randomised clinical trial in schizophrenia. Together these data implicate mGluR3 in aetiological, pathophysiological and pharmacotherapeutic aspects of the disorder. PMID:18541626

  13. Validation of the 3M molecular detection system for the detection of listeria in meat, seafood, dairy, and retail environments.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Esther D; David, John; Koeritzer, Bob; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-05-01

    There is a continued need to develop improved rapid methods for detection of foodborne pathogens. The aim of this project was to evaluate the 3M Molecular Detection System (3M MDS), which uses isothermal DNA amplification, and the 3M Molecular Detection Assay Listeria using environmental samples obtained from retail delicatessens and meat, seafood, and dairy processing plants. Environmental sponge samples were tested for Listeria with the 3M MDS after 22 and 48 h of enrichment in 3M Modified Listeria Recovery Broth (3M mLRB); enrichments were also used for cultural detection of Listeria spp. Among 391 samples tested for Listeria, 74 were positive by both the 3M MDS and the cultural method, 310 were negative by both methods, 2 were positive by the 3M MDS and negative by the cultural method, and one sample was negative by the 3M MDS and positive by the cultural method. Four samples were removed from the sample set, prior to statistical analyses, due to potential cross-contamination during testing. Listeria isolates from positive samples represented L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri. Overall, the 3M MDS and culture-based detection after enrichment in 3M mLRB did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) with regard to the number of positive samples, when chi-square analyses were performed for (i) number of positive samples after 22 h, (ii) number of positive samples after 48 h, and (iii) number of positive samples after 22 and/or 48 h of enrichment in 3M mLRB. Among 288 sampling sites that were tested with duplicate sponges, 67 each tested positive with the 3M MDS and the traditional U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual method, further supporting that the 3M MDS performs equivalently to traditional methods when used with environmental sponge samples.

  14. A new parallel P3M code for very large-scale cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarland, Tom; Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Pichlmeier, Jakob

    1998-12-01

    We have developed a parallel Particle-Particle, Particle-Mesh (P3M) simulation code for the Cray T3E parallel supercomputer that is well suited to studying the time evolution of systems of particles interacting via gravity and gas forces in cosmological contexts. The parallel code is based upon the public-domain serial Adaptive P3M-SPH (http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html) code of Couchman et al. (1995)[ApJ, 452, 797]. The algorithm resolves gravitational forces into a long-range component computed by discretizing the mass distribution and solving Poisson's equation on a grid using an FFT convolution method, and a short-range component computed by direct force summation for sufficiently close particle pairs. The code consists primarily of a particle-particle computation parallelized by domain decomposition over blocks of neighbour-cells, a more regular mesh calculation distributed in planes along one dimension, and several transformations between the two distributions. The load balancing of the P3M code is static, since this greatly aids the ongoing implementation of parallel adaptive refinements of the particle and mesh systems. Great care was taken throughout to make optimal use of the available memory, so that a version of the current implementation has been used to simulate systems of up to 109 particles with a 10243 mesh for the long-range force computation. These are the largest Cosmological N-body simulations of which we are aware. We discuss these memory optimizations as well as those motivated by computational performance. Performance results are very encouraging, and, even without refinements, the code has been used effectively for simulations in which the particle distribution becomes highly clustered as well as for other non-uniform systems of astrophysical interest.

  15. The holistic 3M modality of drug delivery nanosystems for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jin; Luo, Cong; Wang, Yongjun; He, Zhonggui

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has become the leading cause of human death worldwide. There are many challenges in the treatment of cancer and the rapidly developing area of nanotechnology has shown great potential to open a new era in cancer therapy. This article, rather than being exhaustive, focuses on the striking progress in the drug delivery nanosystems (DDNS) for cancer therapy and selects typical examples to point out the emerging mode of action of DDNS from our perspective. Among the outstanding advances in DDNS for cancer therapy is the development of ``multicomponent delivery systems'', ``multifunctional nanocarriers'' and ``multistage delivery systems''. However, these represent only one aspect of DDNS research. In addition, nature is the best teacher and natural evolution pressure has meant that virions conform to the ``multitarget, multistage and multicomponent'' (3M) mode of action. Amazingly, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), used for over 4000 years in China, also displays the same mode of action. Integrating the previous notable progress in nanoparticle technology, learned from the building mode of natural virions and the action concept of TCM, we propose an integrity-based 3M mode DDNS for cancer therapy: multitarget, multistage and multicomponent, which are not fragmented parts but an interconnected integrity. Based on the physiological multitarget and the pharmacokinetic multistage, multicomponent DDNS are rationally designed, where different components with individual specific functions act in a synergistic manner against each target at each disposition stage to maximize the targeted delivery effectiveness. In this article, we introduce each component of 3M DDNS in detail and describe some typical cases to realize the tumor-homing purposes.

  16. L2,3M1 satellites in soft x-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Steven; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-12-01

    A systematic study of the L2,3M1 (3s-2p) transition in elements from Cl to Cr reveals a satellite of unusually large intensity (~30% of parent line). Previous work on some of these elements led to the suggestion that the satellite is due to a two-electron shakeup (configuration-interaction) process. We compare our measurements of position, width, and intensity of the satellite as a function of atomic number with the predictions of this model and extend the theory to explain the apparent disappearance of the satellite outside this range.

  17. Theoretical study of 'Mixed' ligands superhalogens: Cl-M-NO3 (M = Li, Na, K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinghua; Liu, Weihui; Wang, Jiesheng; Li, Chun; Yuan, Guang

    2016-08-01

    MCl2-, M(NO3)2-, and (Cl-M-NO3)- (M = Li, Na, K) species are systematically investigated using the density functional theory. In all the cases studied, the vertical detachment energies (VDEs) exceed the electron affinity of chlorine atom, leading to the conclusion that MCl2-, M(NO3)2- and (Cl-M-NO3)- are superhalogens. The VDEs of (Cl-M-NO3)- are between that of MCl2- and M(NO3)2-, showing that replacing one ligand with a larger electronegative ligand leads to the higher VDE. Superhalogens with suitable VDEs can be built by using different ligands.

  18. Application of the S3M and Mcnpx Codes in Particle Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovič, Márius; Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Strašík, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Semiconductor detectors can be used to detect neutrons if they are covered by a conversion layer. Some neutrons transfer their kinetic energy to hydrogen via elastic nuclear scattering in the conversion layer, and protons are produced as recoils. These protons enter the sensitive volume of the detector and are detected. In the process of detector development, Monte Carlo computer codes are necessary to simulate the detection process. This paper presents the main features of the S3M code (SRIM Supporting Software Modules) and shows its application potential. Examples are given for the neutron detectors with a conversion layer and for CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond detectors for beam-condition monitors at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). Special attention is paid to the S3M statistical modules that can be of interest also for other application areas like beam transport, accelerators, ion therapy, etc. The results are generated by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) simulations used to optimize the thickness of the HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer.

  19. Unique Roll-Off Roof for Housing 1.3 m Telescope at Devasthal, Nainital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangia, Tarun

    2016-05-01

    Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES) had set up a 1.3 m telescope at Devasthal, Nainital, India in the year 2010. Country's largest roll-off roof was indigenously designed, fabricated and installed on top of a building (17 × 8 m) for housing 1.3 m telescope. Telescope was supplied by M/s DFM Engineering Inc., USA to ARIES and was installed in the building with unique roll-off roof to protect it from external environment. Roll-off roof was designed and fabricated considering various parameters and available manpower and resources at ARIES. This paper presents mechanical development work, simple but distinct design approach and innovative selection of materials to economically manufacture roll-off roof of large size (8 × 8 × 4 m) at hilly remote site of Devasthal situated in Central Himalayan region. All operations in the roof viz. opening of shutters and rolling of roof were motorized to facilitate observers during night observations.

  20. Far-Infrared Laser Interferometry Measurements on the STP-3(M) Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio

    1994-04-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 µm was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of ˜10% for both chords during the current rising phase and ˜5% and ˜15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a ˜30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m=0 magnetic fluctuations, and a ˜90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M).

  1. Far-infrared laser interferometry measurements on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio

    1993-09-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 micro m was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of approx. 10% for both chords during the current rising phase and approx. 5% and approx. 15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a approx. 30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m = 0 magnetic fluctuations, and a approx. 90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M).

  2. Differential targeting of VDAC3 mRNA isoforms influences mitochondria morphology

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Morgane; Ubrig, Elodie; Filleur, Sophie; Erhardt, Mathieu; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular targeting of mRNAs has recently emerged as a prevalent mechanism to control protein localization. For mitochondria, a cotranslational model of protein import is now proposed in parallel to the conventional posttranslational model, and mitochondrial targeting of mRNAs has been demonstrated in various organisms. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) are the most abundant proteins in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the major transport pathway for numerous metabolites. Four nucleus-encoded VDACs have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation generate two VDAC3 mRNA isoforms differing by their 3′ UTR. By using quantitative RT-PCR and in vivo mRNA visualization approaches, the two mRNA variants were shown differentially associated with mitochondria. The longest mRNA presents a 3′ extension named alternative UTR (aUTR) that is necessary and sufficient to target VDAC3 mRNA to the mitochondrial surface. Moreover, aUTR is sufficient for the mitochondrial targeting of a reporter transcript, and can be used as a tool to target an unrelated mRNA to the mitochondrial surface. Finally, VDAC3–aUTR mRNA variant impacts mitochondria morphology and size, demonstrating the role of mRNA targeting in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:24889622

  3. Test of P3M-1 nacelle in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Test of P3M-1 nacelle in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The NACA conducted drag tests on P3M-1 nacelle in 1931 which were presented in a special report to the Navy. Smith DeFrance described this work in the report's introduction: 'Tests were conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel on a five to four geared Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine mounted in a P3M-1 nacelle. In order to simulate the flight conditions the nacelle was assembled on a 15-foot span of wing from the same airplane. The purpose of the tests was to improve the cooling of the engine and to reduce the drag of the nacelle combination. Thermocouples were installed at various points on the cylinders and temperature readings were obtained from these by the power plants division. These results will be reported in a memorandum by that division. The drag results, which are covered by this memorandum, were obtained with the original nacelle condition as received from the Navy with the tail of the nacelle modified, with the nose section of the nacelle modified, with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached to the engine, with a Type G ring developed by the N.A.C.A., and with a Type D cowling which was also developed by the N.A.C.A.' (p. 1) This picture shows the engine with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached. The NACA tested several different modifications and cowlings as noted above. The Navy did not want to make any major structural alterations to the original wing and nacelle installation. Thus, the NACA did not conduct a full investigation of the aerodynamics of this particular configuration. DeFrance concludes his report with this note: 'in view of the limitations of the test, the drag data for the combinations tested may be summarized, and considering the necessity of temperature control and accessibility to the engine it is apparent that the best combination tested was with the large nose piece, the Curtiss anti-drag ring, and the modified tail section.'

  4. Dynamics of electrostatic fluctuations in the edge plasma in the U-3M torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Olshansky, V. V.; Stepanov, K. N.; Tarasov, M. I.; Sitnikov, D. A.

    2010-10-15

    Results are presented from experimental and theoretical investigations of oscillatory and wave phenomena observed in the edge region in the U-3M torsatron during plasma creation and heating by an RF discharge in the ICR frequency range, accompanied by a transition to improved confinement. The main results are reported of diagnostic measurements of the spectral composition of oscillations, as well as of how the phase and amplitude relationships depend on time and on the RF power during its injection into the plasma. The measurements were carried out with electrostatic probes positioned at the edge of the plasma confinement region. The experimental results are interpreted using the kinetic theory of the electron-ion parametric instability of a plasma in the ion cyclotron frequency range and are compared with the results of numerical simulations.

  5. Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint at 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Recently both Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint experiments were conducted at cryogenic conditions in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. This represented a re-introduction of the techniques to the facility after more than a decade, and provided a means to upgrade the measurements using newer technology as well as demonstrate that the techniques were still viable in the facility. Temperature-Sensitive Paint was employed on a laminar airfoil for transition detection and Pressure-Sensitive Paint was employed on a supercritical airfoil. This report will detail the techniques and their unique challenges that need to be overcome in cryogenic environments. In addition, several optimization strategies will also be discussed.

  6. Theoretical study of substitution effect in superalkali OM3 (M = Li, Na, K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jing; Li, Ying; Wu, Di; Wu, Zhi-Jian

    2013-06-01

    A class of superalkalies OM3 (M = Li, Na, K) and their corresponding cations OM3+ were theoretically investigated. The OM3 molecules possess very low adiabatic ionization potentials (AIPs) of 2.842-3.558 eV at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df) level. It was found that the ionization potentials of OM3 depend on the nature of the peripheral ligand atom and can be efficiently decreased upon replacing the M atom with the more electropositive one. Such superalkalies characterized by lower ionization potentials add candidates to the research on superatoms and can be used in the synthesis of new nontraditional salts where strong reducers are involved.

  7. Lattice relaxation and ferromagnetic character of (LaVO3)m/SrVO3superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Cosima; Lüders, Ulrike; Frésard, Raymond; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2013-08-01

    The experimental observation that vanadate superlattices (LaVO3)m/SrVO3 show ferromagnetism up to room temperature (Lüders U. et al., Phys. Rev. B, 80 (2009) 241102(R)) is investigated by means of density functional theory, and the band structure for m = 5 and 6 is calculated. A buckling of the interface VO2 layers is found in both cases, but subtle differences in bond length lead to very different properties for even and odd values of m: in the even case, the two interface VO2 layers effectively decouple from the adjacent LaO layers due to a strong bond length enhancement. This results into a local inversion of the orbital occupancy and to the confinement of the charge carriers. In the odd case, the amplitude of the bond length variation is smaller, so that the charge carriers spill into the deeper-lying VO2 layers, and spin-polarised interfaces are obtained.

  8. Save our secondary: recovering a broken 1.3-m mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Timothy M. C.; Probst, Ronald G.; Poczulp, Gary; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Montané, Andrés.; DeVries, Joseph; Harris, Ronald C.; Elias, Jonathan; Martinez, Manuel; Saa, Oscar

    2014-07-01

    In an inauspicious start to the ultimately very successful installation of the Dark Energy Camera on the V. M. Blanco 4- m telescope at CTIO, the light-weighted Cer-Vit 1.3-m-diameter secondary mirror suffered an accident in which it fell onto its apex. This punched out a central plug of glass and destroyed the focus and tip/tilt mechanism. However, the mirror proved fully recoverable, without degraded performance. This paper describes the efforts through which the mirror was repaired and the tip/tilt mechanism rebuilt and upgraded. The telescope re-entered full service as a Ritchey- Chrétien platform in October of 2013.

  9. Determination of the first hydrolysis constant of Europium (3) in 3 M of ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirezbernal, Maria Elena

    The first hydrolysis constant of Eu(sup 3+) has been determined at 303 K and 3 M (NaCl) ionic strength. A solvent extraction method was used, the extractant was dibenzoylmethane in benzene and di glycolate anion in the aqueous phase provided competitive complexation. The tracer solution was (sup 152m1) Eu (III) in water. The radioactive solution of europium was obtained by neutron irradiation of europium nitrate solutions at pH 3.0, in a TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor at a neutron flux of 1 x 10(exp 13) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1). The half life of the produced isotope, (sup 152m1) Eu (9.3 h), was verified by means of a Ge H detector and no interfering radiations were observed in the spectra.

  10. Modeling the hydrothermal circulation and the hydrogen production at the Rainbow site with Cast3M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Mügler, C.; Charlou, J.; Jean-baptiste, P.

    2012-12-01

    On the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Rainbow venting site is described as an ultramafic-hosted active hydrothermal site and releases high fluxes of methane and hydrogen [1, 2]. This behavior has first been interpreted as the result of serpentinization processes. But geochemical reactions involving olivine and plagioclase assemblages, and leading to chlorite, tremolite, talc and magnetite assemblages, could contribute to the observed characteristics of the exiting fluid [2]. The predominance of one of these geochemical reactions or their coexistence strongly depend on the hydrothermal fluid circulation. We developed and validated a 2D/3D numerical model using a Finite Volume method to simulate heat driven fluid flows in the framework of the Cast3M code [3, 4]. We also developed a numerical model for hydrogen production and transport that is based on experimental studies of the serpentinization processes [5-6]. This geochemical model takes into account the exothermic and water-consuming behavior of the serpentinization reaction and it can be coupled to our thermo-hydrogeological model. Our simulations provide temperatures, mass fluxes and venting surface areas very close to those estimated in-situ [7]. We showed that a single-path model [8] was necessary to simulate high values such as the in-situ measured temperatures and estimated water mass fluxes of the Rainbow site [7]. This single-path model will be used to model the production and transport of hydrogen at the Rainbow hydrothermal site. References [1]Charlou et al. (2010) AGU Monograph series. [2]Seyfried et al. (2011) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 1574-1593. [3]http://www-cast3m.cea.fr. [4]Martin & Fyfe (1970) Chem. Geol. 6, 185-202. [5] Marcaillou et al. (2011) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett. 303, 281-290. [6]Malvoisin et al. (2012) JGR, 117, B01104. [7]Perez et al. (2012) submited to Computational Geosciences. [8]Lowell & Germanovich (2004) AGU, Washington DC, USA.

  11. Analysis of temperature-time data from 3 m drillholes at Crystal Hot Springs, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.; Chapman, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    A method for determining the background geothermal gradient values through the analysis of temperature measurements at multiple depths to 3 m and recorded over a time span of several days is presented. The analysis is based on the amplitude decay and phase shift of temperature waves with depth. Diurnal and other high frequency temperature variations are used to compute thermal diffusivities which in turn are used to model and remove the effect of the annual temperature wave. The analysis considers both a homogeneous half space and a two layer medium consisting of an overburden of finite thickness overlying a semi-infinite substratum. The method was tested in three holes in the Crystal Hot Springs geothermal field. Temperatures in each hole were recorded once a minute over a period of three days with a probe containing thermistors at eight different depths. Five of the thermistors were positioned at shallow depths (less than or equal to 0.5 m) to monitor diurnal and other high frequency waves and three at greater depths (greater than or equal to 1 m) to measure lower frequency variations. Since measurements were recorded at only three sites, the accuracy and reliability of the method is not fully evaluated. Potential problems to the method resulting from inaccurate model parameters and convective heat transport are investigated.

  12. WATER AND WASTEWATER POLISHING USING 3M SELECTIVE SEPARATION REMEDIATION CARTRIDGE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K. M.; Scanlan, T. J.; Seely, D. C.

    2002-02-25

    3M has developed technology for selectively removing trace levels of dissolved contaminant materials from liquids using systems operating at flow rates up to 50 gallons per minute. This technology combines active particle chemistries with a particle-loaded membrane to achieve a new medium for liquid waste processing--a spiral wound filter cartridge. This technology has shown success by generating high decontamination factors and reducing contaminants to part per trillion levels. The spiral wound cartridge offers simplified installation, convenient replacement, and clean, easy disposal of a concentrated waste. By incorporating small, high surface area particles (5 to 80 microns) into a sturdy, yet porous, membrane greater removal efficiencies of even trace contaminants can be achieved at higher flow rates than with conventional column systems. In addition, the captive-particle medium prevents channeling of liquids and insures uniform flow across the sorbing particle surface. The cartridges fit into standard, commercially-available housings and whole system capital costs are substantially lower than those of column or reverse osmosis systems. Developmental work at high degrees of water polishing have included removal of mercury from contaminated wastewater, various radionuclides from process water, and organometallic species from surface water discharges. Laboratory testing and on-site demonstration data of these applications show the levels of success that have been achieved thus far.

  13. 3M Petrifilm enterobacteriaceae count plate method for enumeration of enterobacteriaceae in selected foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karen M; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2003-01-01

    The practice of detecting and enumerating all oxidase-negative, glucose-fermenting-Gram-negative rods (i.e., the family Enterobacteriaceae) is used to indicate unsanitary or inadequate food processing conditions. The objective of this interlaboratory collaborative study was to evaluate and compare the methods described in Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products (SMEDP) and the Compendium of Methods for the Microbiological Examination of Foods (Compendium) with a commercial product, the 3M Petrifilm Enterobacteriaceae Count Plate, for the recovery of Enterobacteriaceae in foods. Six foods--cheddar cheese, milk, flour, frozen prepared meals, frozen broccoli, and nut pieces--were analyzed for Enterobacteriaceae by 12 collaborating laboratories. For each food tested, the collaborators received 8 blind test portions consisting of a control test portion and 3 levels of inoculated test portion, each in duplicate. Each test portion was tested by the Petrifilm Enterobacteriaceae Count Plate method as well as the SMEDP or Compendium methods. The precision estimates (repeatability or within-laboratory variation, and reproducibility or between-laboratory variation) were calculated with standard statistical techniques.

  14. GRACOS: Scalable and Load Balanced P3M Cosmological N-body Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, Alexander; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The GRACOS (GRAvitational COSmology) code, a parallel implementation of the particle-particle/particle-mesh (P3M) algorithm for distributed memory clusters, uses a hybrid method for both computation and domain decomposition. Long-range forces are computed using a Fourier transform gravity solver on a regular mesh; the mesh is distributed across parallel processes using a static one-dimensional slab domain decomposition. Short-range forces are computed by direct summation of close pairs; particles are distributed using a dynamic domain decomposition based on a space-filling Hilbert curve. A nearly-optimal method was devised to dynamically repartition the particle distribution so as to maintain load balance even for extremely inhomogeneous mass distributions. Tests using 800(3) simulations on a 40-processor beowulf cluster showed good load balance and scalability up to 80 processes. There are limits on scalability imposed by communication and extreme clustering which may be removed by extending the algorithm to include adaptive mesh refinement.

  15. Oxidation, Reduction, and Condensation of Alcohols over (MO3)3 (M=Mo, W) Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zongtang; Li, Zhenjun; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Li, Shenggang; Hennigan, Jamie M.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-10-02

    The reactions of deuterated methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, 2-butanol and t-butanol over cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) clusters were studied experimentally with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and theoretically with coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory and density functional theory. The reactions of two alcohols per M3O9 cluster are required to provide agreement with experiment for D2O release, dehydrogenation and dehydration. The reaction begins with the elimination of water by proton transfers and forms an intermediate dialkoxy species which can undergo further reaction. Dehydration proceeds by a β hydrogen transfer to a terminal M=O. Dehydrogenation takes place via an α hydrogen transfer to an adjacent MoVI = O atom or a WVI metal center with redox involved for M = Mo and no redox for M = W. The two channels have comparable activation energies. H/D exchange to produce alcohols can take place after olefin is released or via the dialkoxy species depending on the alcohol and the cluster. The Lewis acidity of the metal center with WVI being larger than MoVI results in the increased reactivity of W3O9 over Mo3O9 for dehydrogenation and dehydration.

  16. Performance of 3M/house cochlear implant users on tests of speech perception.

    PubMed

    Danhauer, J L; Ghadialy, F B; Eskwitt, D L; Mendel, L L

    1990-10-01

    This report documents both closed- and open-set speech recognition performance for 18 adult experienced users of the 3M/House single-channel cochlear implant. The stimuli included tape-recorded, standard word and sentence recognition tests, an environmental-sound test, nonsense syllables, and sentences presented in auditory (implant-only), visual, and auditory-visual modes. All subjects were tested individually in a single session using their own cochlear implants, set to typical comfort use settings for running speech. Subjects' oral responses to the stimuli were transcribed by the experimenters and scored for percent correct. The results revealed considerable individual differences among the subjects and their performance on different tests. All subjects scored better than chance on the closed-set tests. Although they performed considerably poorer on the open-set tests, approximately half of these subjects demonstrated at least some open-set word recognition, a finding not previously reported in the literature for this device. All subjects performed better on the auditory-visual sentences than on either the auditory or visual conditions alone. These results contribute to the database on speech perception by cochlear implant users and show that open-set word recognition performance was somewhat better for these subjects using this implant than would have been predicted from the literature.

  17. Understanding the spin-driven polarizations in Bi MO3 (M = 3 d transition metals) multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kc, Santosh; Lee, Jun Hee; Cooper, Valentino R.

    Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) , a promising multiferroic, stabilizes in a perovskite type rhombohedral crystal structure (space group R3c) at room temperature. Recently, it has been reported that in its ground state it possess a huge spin-driven polarization. To probe the underlying mechanism of this large spin-phonon response, we examine these couplings within other Bi based 3 d transition metal oxides Bi MO3 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) using density functional theory. Our results demonstrate that this large spin-driven polarization is a consequence of symmetry breaking due to competition between ferroelectric distortions and anti-ferrodistortive octahedral rotations. Furthermore, we find a strong dependence of these enhanced spin-driven polarizations on the crystal structure; with the rhombohedral phase having the largest spin-induced atomic distortions along [111]. These results give us significant insights into the magneto-electric coupling in these materials which is essential to the magnetic and electric field control of electric polarization and magnetization in multiferroic based devices. Research is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division and the Office of Science Early Career Research Program (V.R.C) and used computational resources at NERSC.

  18. Nonlinear pulsations of stars with initial mass 3 {M_⊙} on the asymptotic giant branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2016-10-01

    Pulsation period changes in Mira type variables are investigated using the stellar evolution and nonlinear stellar pulsation calculations. We considered the evolutionary sequence of stellar models with initial mass {M_{ZAMS}} = 3{M_⊙} and population I composition. Pulsations of stars in the early stage of the asymptotic giant branch are shown to be due to instability of the fundamental mode. In the later stage of evolution when the helium shell source becomes thermally unstable the stellar oscillations occur in either the fundamental mode (for the stellar luminosuty L < 5.4 × {10^3}{L_⊙}) or the first overtone (L > 7 × {10^3}{L_⊙}). Excitation of pulsations is due to the κ-mechanism in the hydrogen ionization zone. Stars with intermediate luminosities 5.4 × {10^3}{L_⊙} < L < 7 × {10^3}{L_⊙} were found to be stable against radial oscillations. The pulsation period was determined as a function of evolutionary time and period change rates dot Π were evaluated for the first ten helium flashes. The period change rate becomes the largest in absolute value (dot Π/Π ≈ - {10^{ - 2}}y{r^{ - 1}}) between the helium flash and the maximum of the stellar luminosity. Period changes with rate | {dot Π/Π } | ≥slant - {10^{ - 3}}y{r^{ - 1}} take place during ≈500 yr, that is nearly one hundredth of the interval between helium flashes.

  19. The RCT 1.3 m robotic telescope: broadband color transformation and extinction calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Strolger, L.-G.; Gott, A. M.; Carini, M.; Gelderman, R.; Laney, C. D.; McGruder, C.; Engle, S.; Guinan, E.; Treffers, R. R.; Walter, D. K.

    2014-03-01

    The Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) 1.3 m telescope, formerly known as the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 50 inch telescope, has been refurbished as a fully robotic telescope, with an autonomous scheduler to take full advantage of the observing site without the requirement of a human presence. Here we detail the current configuration of the RCT and present, as a demonstration of its high-priority science goals, the broadband UBVRI photometric calibration of the optical facility. In summary, we find the linear color transformation and extinction corrections to be consistent with similar optical KPNO facilities, to within a photometric precision of 10% (at 1σ). While there were identified instrumental errors that likely added to the overall uncertainty, associated with since-resolved issues in engineering and maintenance of the robotic facility, a preliminary verification of this calibration gave a good indication that the solution is robust, perhaps to a higher precision than this initial calibration implies. The RCT has been executing regular science operations since 2009 and is largely meeting the science requirements set during its acquisition and redesign.

  20. Astrometric and Photometric Accuracy of the 1.3 m Robotically Controlled Telescope on Kitt Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGruder, Charles H.; Carini, M. T.; Engle, S. G.; Gelderman, R.; Guinan, E. F.; Laney, D.; Strolger, L.; Treffers, R. R.; Walter, D. K.

    2014-01-01

    The 1.3 m (50 inch) telescope on Kitt Peak has been refurbished and provided with an autonomous scheduler. It is operated by The Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) consortium whose members are: South Carolina State, Villanova and Western Kentucky Universities. The facility possesses 5 board (UBVRI) and 11 narrow-band filters. Attached to the RCT camera is a 2048 x 2048 SITe SI-424A back-illuminated CCD with 24 micrometer pixels. We used over 7,000 star measurements from 37, 198s R-images to compute the astrometric and photometric accuracy. The difference of the J2000 coordinates computed from the RCT images and the J2000 Nomad catalog coordinate values in right ascension peaks at 0.058”, while the declination peaks at -0.125”. We obtained these astrometric results using the simplest assumptions: linear relationship between standard coordinates and measured coordinates, no color or magnitude dependency and no differential refraction (all images taken in the zenith). We express the photometric accuracy in the following manner: The Signal-to-Noise-Ratio as a function of apparent magnitude shows that the RCT is not noise dominated at m < 20 magnitude.

  1. Initial operation and checkout of stratospheric aerosol gas experiment and Meteor-3M satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Shahid; Makridenko, Leonid; Chu, William P.; Salikhov, Rashid; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Trepte, Charles R.; Cisewski, Michael S.

    2003-04-01

    Under a joint agreement between the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (RASA), the Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument was launched in low earth orbit on December 10, 2001 aboard the Russian Meteor-3M(1) satellite from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. SAGE III is a spectrometer that measures attenuated radiation in the 282 nm to 1550 nm wavelength range to obtain the vertical profiles of ozone, aerosols, and other chemical species that are critical in studying the trends for the global climate change phenomena. This instrument version is more advanced than any of the previous versions and has more spectral bands, elaborate data gathering and storage, and intelligent terrestrial software. There are a number of Russian scientific instruments aboard the Meteor satellite in addition to the SAGE III instrument. These instruments deal with land imaging and biomass changes, hydro-meteorological monitoring, and helio-geophysical research. This mission was under development for over a period of six years and offered a number of unique technical and program management challenges for both Agencies. SAGE III has a long space heritage, and four earlier versions of this instrument have flown in space for nearly two decades now. In fact, SAGE II, the fourth instrument, is still flying in space on NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and has been providing important atmospheric data over the last 18 years. It has provided vital ozone and aerosol data in the mid latitudes and has contributed vastly in ozone depletion research. Ball Aerospace built the instrument under Langley Research Center's (LaRC) management. This paper presents the process and approach deployed by the SAGE III and the Meteor teams in performing the initial on-orbit checkout. It further documents a number of early science results obtained by deploying low risk, carefully coordinated procedures in resolving the serious operational

  2. PLANET ENGULFMENT BY {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitomo, M.; Ikoma, M.; Sato, B.; Ida, S.; Katsuta, Y.

    2011-08-20

    Recent radial-velocity surveys for GK clump giants have revealed that planets also exist around {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} stars. However, no planets have been found inside 0.6 AU around clump giants, in contrast to solar-type main-sequence stars, many of which harbor short-period planets such as hot Jupiters. In this study, we examine the possibility that planets were engulfed by host stars evolving on the red-giant branch (RGB). We integrate the orbital evolution of planets in the RGB and helium-burning phases of host stars, including the effects of stellar tide and stellar mass loss. Then we derive the critical semimajor axis (or the survival limit) inside which planets are eventually engulfed by their host stars after tidal decay of their orbits. Specifically, we investigate the impact of stellar mass and other stellar parameters on the survival limit in more detail than previous studies. In addition, we make detailed comparisons with measured semimajor axes of planets detected so far, which no previous study has done. We find that the critical semimajor axis is quite sensitive to stellar mass in the range between 1.7 and 2.1 M{sub sun}, which suggests a need for careful comparison between theoretical and observational limits of the existence of planets. Our comparison demonstrates that all planets orbiting GK clump giants that have been detected are beyond the survival limit, which is consistent with the planet-engulfment hypothesis. However, on the high-mass side (>2.1M{sub sun}), the detected planets are orbiting significantly far from the survival limit, which suggests that engulfment by host stars may not be the main reason for the observed lack of short-period giant planets. To confirm our conclusion, the detection of more planets around clump giants, especially with masses {approx}> 2.5M{sub sun}, is required.

  3. Dome flat-field system for 1.3-m Araki Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuji; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Ichizawa, Shunsuke; Arai, Akira; Isogai, Mizuki; Yonehara, Atsunori; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2012-09-01

    We report the system/optics design and performance of the dome flat-field system for the Araki Telescope, a 1.3- m optical/near-infrared telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory in Japan. A variety of instruments are attached to the telescope. The optical imager, which is intended to search for exoplanets, requires an illumination flatness within 1% on the focal plane over the 17-arcmin FOV. Illumination flatness at both the pupil plane and the focal plane of the telescope is essential for calibration of the transmittance of the optical system. We devised an optical design for the flat-field system that satisfies illumination flatness at both the focal and pupil planes using the non-sequential ray tracing software LightTools. We considered far-field illumination pattern of the lamps, scattering surface reflectance distribution of the screen, telescope structure, primary/secondary mirrors, and mirror baffles. We achieved a flat illumination distribution of 0.9% at the focal plane. The systems performance was tested by comparison with a cloud-flat frame, which was derived by imaging cloud cover illuminated by city lights. The calibration data for the dome flat-field system agree well with the cloud-flat frame within 1% for the g' and i' bands of the imager, but the r0 band data does not meet the requirement (less than or equal to 2). Moreover, various instruments require a focal plane illuminance ranging over three orders of magnitude. We used six high-power (60W) halogen lamps; the output power is remotely controlled by a thyristor-driven dimmer and a bypass circuit to an autotransformer.

  4. Modifications to Langley 0.3-m TCT adaptive wall software for heavy gas test medium, phase 1 studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    The scheme for two-dimensional wall adaptation with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) as test gas in the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT) is presented. A unified version of the wall adaptation software has been developed to function in a dual gas operation mode (nitrogen or SF6). The feature of ideal gas calculations for nitrogen operation is retained. For SF6 operation, real gas properties have been computed using the departure function technique. Installation of the software on the 0.3-m TCT ModComp-A computer and preliminary validation with nitrogen operation were found to be satisfactory. Further validation and improvements to the software will be undertaken when the 0.3-m TCT is ready for operation with SF6 gas.

  5. Carbon Residence Times in Pedogenic Carbonate Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monger, H.; Feng, Y.; Karnjanapiboonwang, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbonate is a huge pool of terrestrial carbon that contains at least 930 to 940 Pg C and has influx rates on the order of 1 to 12 g CaCO3/m2/yr. Such large mass to flux ratios yield long mean residence times for carbon (e.g., 85,000 years)--assuming steady state. Like other global carbon pools, the soil carbonate pool has smaller sub-pools with higher influx rates and shorter mean residence times. For example, pedogenic carbonate in coppice dunes known to have formed since 1858 and carbonate formed on lithic artifacts in soils at archaeology sites suggests mean residence times can be as short as 120 years--again assuming steady state. Harder to assess are efflux rates as CO2 emissions or bicarbonate leaching. Some Bowen-ratio studies have nevertheless found evidence for CO2 emissions resulting from carbonate dissolution, and other studies have found evidence for bicarbonate leaching based on dissolution pipes through calcic horizons using soil morphology studies. Since an understanding of mean residence times are prerequisite for a better understanding of soil carbonate in the global carbon cycle, especially in a scenario of an expanding Aridosphere, more influx and efflux measurements are needed to evaluate the possibility of carbon sequestration by soil carbonate in hyperarid, arid, semiarid, or subhumid soils.

  6. 2D and 3D Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Fetal Midface Hypoplasia in Two Cases with 3-M Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vimercati, A.; Chincoli, A.; de Gennaro, A. C.; DʼAddario, V.; Cicinelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the utility of 2D and 3D ultrasonography in the prenatal diagnosis of facial dysmorphisms suggestive of very rare syndromes such as 3-M syndrome. Two pregnant women at risk for fetal skeletal dysplasias were referred to our clinic for 2D/3D ultrasound scan in the second trimester of pregnancy. Only one of the patients had a familial history of 3-M syndrome. Karyotyping and genetic testing of abortion material were performed in both cases. 2D ultrasonography revealed growth retardation of the long bones in both cases. In the case without a familial history of the syndrome, 2D and 3D ultrasonography showed an absence of nasal bones and a flat malar region suggestive of 3-M syndrome, although the difficult differential diagnosis included other dysmorphic growth disorders with prenatal onset. The karyotype was normal but the pregnancy was terminated in both cases. Postmortem examination confirmed 3-M syndrome as indicated by prenatal findings. In high-risk cases with a familial history of 3-M syndrome, prenatal diagnosis of 3-M syndrome is possible by analyzing fetal DNA. In the absence of risk, a definitive prenatal diagnosis is often not possible but may be suspected in the presence of shortened long bones, normal head size and typical flattened malar region (midface hypoplasia) shown on complementary 2D and 3D sonograms. 2D and 3D ultrasonography has been shown to offer reliable information for the prenatal study of skeletal and facial anomalies and can be useful if there is a suspicion of 3-M syndrome in a pregnancy not known to be at risk. PMID:27453585

  7. Anisotropic surface melting in lyotropic cubic crystals. Part 1: Pn3m/L1 interface, poor faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, J.; Plötzing, T.; Rohe, D.; Pieranski, P.

    2006-02-01

    From experiments with ice or metal crystals, in the vicinity of their crystal/liquid/vapor triple points, it is known that melting of crystals starts on their surfaces and is anisotropic. It is shown here by direct observations under an optical microscope that this anisotropic surface melting phenomenon occurs also in lyotropic systems. In the case of C12EO2/water mixture, it takes place in the vicinity of the peritectic Pn3m/L3/L1 triple point. Above the peritectic triple point, where the Pn3m and L1 phases coexist in the bulk, the surface of a Pn3m-in-L1 crystal is composed of (111)-type facets surrounded by rough surfaces. The angular junction suggests that rough surfaces are wet by a L3-like layer while facets stay “dry”. This is analogous to the pre-melting at rough surfaces in solid crystals. Upon cooling below the peritectic triple point, where L3 and L1 phases coexist in the bulk, a thick layer of the L3 phase grows from the pre-melted, rough Pn3m/L1 interface. Simultaneously, facets stay dry and their radius decreases. In this tri-phasic configuration, stable in a narrow temperature range, the L3/L1 and L3/Pn3m interfaces have shapes of constant mean curvature surfaces having common borders: edges of facets.

  8. CED-4 is an mRNA-binding protein that delivers ced-3 mRNA to ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao-xing; Itoh, Masanori; Li, Shimo; Hida, Yoko; Ohta, Kazunori; Hayakawa, Miki; Nishida, Emika; Ueda, Masashi; Islam, Saiful; Tana; Nakagawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-29

    Cell death abnormal (ced)-3 and ced-4 genes regulate apoptosis to maintain tissue homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apoptosome formation and CED-4 translocation drive CED-3 activation. However, the precise role of CED-4 translocation is not yet fully understood. In this study, using a combination of immunoprecipitation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods in cells and a glutathione-S-transferase pull down assay in a cell-free system, we show that CED-4 binds ced-3 mRNA. In the presence of ced-3 mRNA, CED-4 protein is enriched in the microsomal fraction and interacts with ribosomal protein L10a in mammalian cells, increasing the levels of CED-3. These results suggest that CED-4 forms a complex with ced-3 mRNA and delivers it to ribosomes for translation.

  9. In vivo left ventricular assist induced coagulation derangements. Comparison of Sarns-3M and St. Jude Medical circuits.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J J; Wagner-Mann, C C; Mann, F A; Demmy, T L; Walls, J T; Schmaltz, R A

    1997-01-01

    An in vitro comparison of centrifugal pumping systems manufactured by Sarns-3M and St. Jude Medical revealed a difference in blood cell derangement. The purpose of this study was to compare in vivo the effects of 96 hr of left ventricular assist (LVA) on indexes of coagulopathy, hemolysis, and complement activation. Two groups of calves (each: n = 5) were instrumented with identical left atrial to thoracic aorta centrifugal pumping circuits using either Sarns-3M or St. Jude centrifugal pumps. Laboratory evaluations were performed pre-assist and at 1, 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr during LVA. Platelet counts dropped significantly by 24 hr (Sarns-3M: 28%; St. Jude: 30%); no significant change in function was noted. Activated clotting time increased slightly (p > 0.05). Prothrombin time increased at 4 and 24 hr of LVA, returning to baseline by 96 hr (p < 0.05). Activated partial thromboplastin time increased with the St. Jude device from 24 to 96 hr on LVA (p < 0.05); the increase with the Sarns-3M device never reached significance. No significant changes in lactate dehydrogenase or plasma free hemoglobin were detected. Complement fraction C5a rose by 1 hr of LVA (p < 0.05), peaking at 4 hr and returning to baseline by 96 hr with both pumps. No significant difference was detected between pump groups for any of the parameters. It was concluded that 1) 96 hr Sarns-3M and St. Jude LVA caused coagulation derangement in calves, 2) neither pump demonstrated an advantage regarding coagulation and complement parameters, 3) hemolysis observed with the Sarns-3M pump in vitro was not evidenced in vivo, and 4) in vitro evidenced centrifugal pump differences may not be realized in vivo.

  10. T-carbon: a novel carbon allotrope.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xian-Lei; Yan, Qing-Bo; Ye, Fei; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang

    2011-04-15

    A structurally stable crystalline carbon allotrope is predicted by means of the first-principles calculations. This allotrope can be derived by substituting each atom in diamond with a carbon tetrahedron, and possesses the same space group Fd3m as diamond, which is thus coined as T-carbon. The calculations on geometrical, vibrational, and electronic properties reveal that T-carbon, with a considerable structural stability and a much lower density 1.50  g/cm3, is a semiconductor with a direct band gap about 3.0 eV, and has a Vickers hardness 61.1 GPa lower than diamond but comparable with cubic boron nitride. Such a form of carbon, once obtained, would have wide applications in photocatalysis, adsorption, hydrogen storage, and aerospace materials. PMID:21568576

  11. Density functional theory studies on theelectronic, structural, phonon dynamicaland thermo-stability properties of bicarbonates MHCO3, M D Li, Na, K

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Yuhua; Zhang, Bo; Sorescu, Dan C.; Johnson, Karl; Majzoub, Eric H; Luebke, David R.

    2012-07-01

    The structural, electronic, phonon dispersion and thermodynamic properties of MHCO3 (M D Li, Na, K) solids were investigated using density functional theory. The calculated bulk properties for both their ambient and the high-pressure phases are in good agreement with available experimental measurements. Solid phase LiHCO3 has not yet been observed experimentally. We have predicted several possible crystal structures for LiHCO3 using crystallographic database searching and prototype electrostatic ground state modeling. Our total energy and phonon free energy .FPH/ calculations predict that LiHCO3 will be stable under suitable conditions of temperature and partial pressures of CO2 and H2O. Our calculations indicate that the HCO􀀀 3 groups in LiHCO3 and NaHCO3 form an infinite chain structure through O#1; #1; #1;H#1; #1; #1;O hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the HCO􀀀 3 anions form dimers, .HCO􀀀 3 /2, connected through double hydrogen bonds in all phases of KHCO3. Based on density functional perturbation theory, the Born effective charge tensor of each atom type was obtained for all phases of the bicarbonates. Their phonon dispersions with the longitudinal optical–transverse optical splitting were also investigated. Based on lattice phonon dynamics study, the infrared spectra and the thermodynamic properties of these bicarbonates were obtained. Over the temperature range 0–900 K, the FPH and the entropies (S) of MHCO3 (M D Li, Na, K) systems vary as FPH.LiHCO3/ > FPH.NaHCO3/ > FPH.KHCO3/ and S.KHCO3/ > S.NaHCO3/ > S.LiHCO3/, respectively, in agreement with the available experimental data. Analysis of the predicted thermodynamics of the CO2 capture reactions indicates that the carbonate/bicarbonate transition reactions for Na and K could be used for CO2 capture technology, in agreement with experiments.

  12. On the multi-index (3 m-parametric) Mittag-Leffler functions, fractional calculus relations and series convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneva-Konovska, Jordanka

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we consider a family of 3 m-indices generalizations of the classical Mittag-Leffler function, called multi-index (3 m-parametric) Mittag-Leffler functions. We survey the basic properties of these entire functions, find their order and type, and new representations by means of Mellin-Barnes type contour integrals, Wright p Ψ q -functions and Fox H-functions, asymptotic estimates. Formulas for integer and fractional order integration and differentiations are found, and these are extended also for the operators of the generalized fractional calculus (multiple Erdélyi-Kober operators). Some interesting particular cases of the multi-index Mittag-Leffler functions are discussed. The convergence of series of such type functions in the complex plane is considered, and analogues of the Cauchy-Hadamard, Abel, Tauber and Littlewood theorems are provided.

  13. On the multi-index (3m-parametric) Mittag-Leffler functions, fractional calculus relations and series convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneva-Konovska, Jordanka

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we consider a family of 3m-indices generalizations of the classical Mittag-Leffler function, called multi-index (3m-parametric) Mittag-Leffler functions. We survey the basic properties of these entire functions, find their order and type, and new representations by means of Mellin-Barnes type contour integrals, Wright pΨq-functions and Fox H-functions, asymptotic estimates. Formulas for integer and fractional order integration and differentiations are found, and these are extended also for the operators of the generalized fractional calculus (multiple Erdélyi-Kober operators). Some interesting particular cases of the multi-index Mittag-Leffler functions are discussed. The convergence of series of such type functions in the complex plane is considered, and analogues of the Cauchy-Hadamard, Abel, Tauber and Littlewood theorems are provided.

  14. Conditioning method development for 3M Trizact diamond tile fixed abrasives used in the finishing of brittle substrates; Technical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Tim; Gobena, Feben T.; Romero, Vince; Sventek, Bruce; Schoenhofen, Walter

    2005-05-01

    Results of a series of single sided lapping experiments designed to develop appropriate conditioning methods for 3M Trizact Diamond Tile fixed abrasives are reported. Trizact™ Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive lapping technology developed by 3M. The Trizact™ Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder)-inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. The effect of platen and conditioner speed on pad wear will be explored for a roller yoke single-side lapping machine. Pad break-in conditioning was studied in detail for a 6 micron Trizact™ Diamond Tile abrasive used to lap soda-lime glass.

  15. Third molar maturity index (I3M) for assessing age of majority in a black African population in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Cavrić, Jelena; Galić, Ivan; Vodanović, Marin; Brkić, Hrvoje; Gregov, Jelena; Viva, Serena; Rey, Laura; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of legal age, also known as age of majority, is a controversial issue as there are few body biomarkers or evidence during late adolescence differentiating a subject from being a minor or adult. The third molar was recognized as a suitable site for age examination in late adolescence. We analyzed the development of the left mandibular third molar by the third molar maturity index (I3M) and a specific cut-off value of I3M = 0.08, established by Cameriere et al. in 2008 and used it for discriminating between minors and adult black Africans from Gaborone, Botswana. A final sample of panoramic radiographs (OPTs) of 1294 people (582 males and 712 females) aged between 13 and 23 years was evaluated. The real age decreased as I3M gradually increased. There was no statistically significant difference in the third molar development evaluated using I3M between males and females (p > 0.05) across different I3M classes. Results of 2 × 2 contingency tables for different cut-off values indicated that I3M = 0.08 was useful in discriminating between adults and minors. Precisely, for I3M = 0.08, the values of accuracy or overall fraction of correctly classified were 0.91 in males with a 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) of 0.88 to 0.93 and 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.90 to 0.93) in females. Values of sensitivity of the test or the proportion of participants being 18 years and older were 0.88 (95 % CI, 0.87 to 0.90) in males and 0.88 (95 % CI, 0.90 to 0.93) in females, while values of specificity or proportion of individuals younger than 18 who have I3M <0.08 were 0.94 (95 % CI, 0.91 to 0.96) in males and 0.96 (95 % CI, 0.94 to 0.98) in females. Positive predictive values of the test, where the participants whose I3M <0.08 were adults, were 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91 to 0.96) in males and 0.97 (95 % CI, 0.94 to 0.98) in females, while negative predictive values of the test, where the participants whose I3M was ≥0.08 were minors, were 0.88 (95 % CI 0.85 to

  16. N- and O-linked glycosylation site profiling of the human basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Sanna, Monica; Piras, Valentina; Liori, Barbara; Pisano, Elisabetta; Iavarone, Federica; Vincenzoni, Federica; Cordaro, Massimo; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we show that the heterogeneous mixture of glycoforms of the basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M, encoded by PRB3-M locus, is a major component of the acidic soluble fraction of human whole saliva in the first years of life. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of the intact proteoforms before and after N-deglycosylation with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of peptides obtained after Endoproteinase GluC digestion allowed the structural characterization of the peptide backbone and identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites. The heterogeneous mixture of the proteoforms derives from the combination of 8 different neutral and sialylated glycans O-linked to Threonine 50, and 33 different glycans N-linked to Asparagine residues at positions 66, 87, 108, 129, 150, 171, 192, and 213. PMID:26991339

  17. Design of multichord Hα detector arrays for the U-3M torsatron and identification of rotating plasma perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M. B.; Shapoval, A. M.; Ozherelyev, F. I.; Makhov, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    An Hα camera has been designed and installed in the U-3M torsatron for spatially and temporally resolved measurements. This device provides fast measurements of the emission brightness profile in the noisy environment of the radio frequency (RF) heated plasma. Unusual topology of diagnostics and the data acquisition system are applied. All the system components, including digitizers, are assembled in a single unit. It allows the suppression of a low-frequency electromagnetic interference by eliminating the ground loops. And the suppression of RF noises is achieved by eliminating the signal interface cables and digital interface cables in the design. The Wi-Fi interface is used to prevent a ground loop in the data transfer stage. The achieved sensitivity of our diagnostics is high enough for measuring the Hα emission from the low-density (ne ≈ (1-2)ṡ1010 cm-3) plasma with a temporal resolution of about 20 μs in the noisy environment. Different types of Hα emission fluctuations within the frequency range of 1-5 kHz and poloidal mode numbers m = 0 and m = 5 have been observed in U-3M. A simple technique of the line-of-sight data analysis, based on the U-3M magnetic surface asymmetry, is proposed and used for the spatial localization of the rotating mode and for the determination of mode numbers and its poloidal rotation direction using a single Hα array.

  18. SF3M 2.0: improvement of 3D photo-reconstruction interface based on freely available software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael R.; Pérez, Rafael; Gómez, Jose A.

    2016-04-01

    During recent years, a number of tools based on Structure-from-Motion algorithms have been released for full image-based 3D reconstruction either freely (e.g. Bundler, PMVS2, VisualSFM, MicMac) or commercially (e.g. Agisoft PhotoScan). The SF3M interface was developed in Matlab® to use link software developments (VisualSFM, CloudCompare) and new applications to create a semi-automated workflow including reconstruction, georeferencing and point-cloud filtering, and has been tested for gully erosion assessment with terrestrial images (Castillo et al., 2015). The main aim of this work to provide an improved freely-available and easy-to-use alternative for 3D reconstruction intended for public agencies, non-profit organisations, researchers and other stakeholders interested in 3D modelling. In this communication we present SF3M 2.0, a new version of the graphical user interface. In this case, the SfM module is based on MicMac, an open-software tool (Pierrot-Deseilligny and Cléry, 2011) which provides advanced features such as camera calibration and constrained bundle adjustment using ground control points. SF3M 2.0 will be tested in two scenarios: a) using the same ground-based image set tested in Castillo et al. (2015) to compare the performance of both versions and b) using aerial images taken from a helium balloon to assess a gully network in a 40-hectares catchment. In this study we explore the advantages of SF3M 2.0, explain its operation and evaluate its accuracy and performance. This tool will be also available for free download. References Castillo, C., James, M.R., Redel-Macías, M. D., Pérez, R., and Gómez, J.A.: SF3M software: 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users and its application to a gully network, SOIL, 1, 583-594. Pierrot-Deseilligny, M and Cléry, I. APERO, an Open Source Bundle Adjusment Software for Automatic Calibration and Orientation of a Set of Images. Proceedings of the ISPRS Commission V Symposium, Image Engineering and Vision

  19. Higher alcohol and oxygenate synthesis over Cs/Cu/ZnO/M sub 2 O sub 3 (M = Al, Cr) catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nunan, J.G.; Herman, R.G.; Klier, K. )

    1989-03-01

    Surface doping of Cu/ZnO/M{sub 2}O{sub 3} (M = Al, Cr) catalysts prepared from hydrotalcite precursors with cesium (Cs/Cu/ZnO/M{sub 2}O{sub 3}) significantly enhanced to the alcohol synthesis rate under higher alcohol synthesis conditions. With respect to the unsupported Cs/Cu/ZnO catalyst, the product selectivity of the Cs/Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was shifted toward methanol, while the Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst maintained a high selectivity toward C{sub 2}{sup +} alcohols. The presence of cesium in the Cu/ZnO/M{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts inhibited the synthesis of dimethyl ether. Comparison of the product distributions obtained over the Cs/Cu/ZnO/M{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with those observed over the Cs/Cu/ZnO catalysts indicates that the function of the Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst is similar to that of the Cs/Cu/ZnO in that higher alcohols are synthesized by a stepwise carbon chain growth via a unique aldol coupling with oxygen retention reversal mechanism. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based catalysts undergo complex structural changes that probably cause occlusion of the Cs dopant, thus resulting in low selectivity to higher alcohols while retaining high activity toward methanol. 23 refs.

  20. Ab initio investigation of the oxygen reduction reaction activity on noble metal (Pt, Au, Pd), Pt3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) and Pd3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) alloy surfaces, for Lisbnd O2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarasubramanian, Shrihari; Singh, Nikhilendra; Mizuno, Fuminori; Prakash, Jai

    2016-07-01

    First principles, density functional theory (DFT) modelling of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on noble metal (Pt, Au, Pd), Pt3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) and Pd3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) alloy surfaces, was carried out. Periodic models of close-packed (111) surfaces were constructed, their geometry was optimized and the most stable geometric surface configuration was identified. The correlation between the intermediate species binding energy and the favored reaction pathway from amongst 1e-, 2e-, and 4e- mechanisms were studied by calculating the binding energies of a 1/4 monolayer of O, O2, LiO, LiO2, Li2O2, and Li2O on various sites and orientations. The reaction free energies (ΔGrxn) were calculated and used to compute the catalytic activity of the surfaces using molecular kinetics theory. Plots of the catalytic activity vs. Oxygen binding energy (EBinding (O)) showed a typical "volcano" profile. The insights gained from this study can be used to guide the choice of cathode catalysts in Lisbnd O2 cells.

  1. Genetic structure of the Caribbean giant barrel sponge Xestospongia muta using the I3-M11 partition of COI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Legentil, S.; Pawlik, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, reports of sponge bleaching, disease, and subsequent mortality have increased alarmingly. Population recovery may depend strongly on colonization capabilities of the affected species. The giant barrel sponge Xestospongia muta is a dominant reef constituent in the Caribbean. However, little is known about its population structure and gene flow. The 5'-end fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit I is often used to address these kinds of questions, but it presents very low intraspecific nucleotide variability in sponges. In this study, the usefulness of the I3-M11 partition of COI to determine the genetic structure of X. muta was tested for seven populations from Florida, the Bahamas and Belize. A total of 116 sequences of 544 bp were obtained for the I3-M11 partition corresponding to four haplotypes. In order to make a comparison with the 5'-end partition, 10 sequences per haplotype were analyzed for this fragment. The 40 resulting sequences were of 569 bp and corresponded to two haplotypes. The nucleotide diversity of the I3-M11 partition (π = 0.00386) was higher than that of the 5'-end partition (π = 0.00058), indicating better resolution at the intraspecific level. Sponges with the most divergent external morphologies (smooth vs. digitate surface) had different haplotypes, while those with the most common external morphology (rough surface) presented a mixture of haplotypes. Pairwise tests for genetic differentiation among geographic locations based on F ST values showed significant genetic divergence between most populations, but this genetic differentiation was not due to isolation by distance. While limited larval dispersal may have led to differentiation among some of the populations, the patterns of genetic structure appear to be most strongly related to patterns of ocean currents. Therefore, hydrological features may play a major role in sponge colonization and need to be considered in future plans for management and

  2. IF-combined smRNA FISH reveals interaction of MCPIP1 protein with IER3 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MCPIP1 and IER3 are recently described proteins essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. IER3 is involved in the regulation of apoptosis and differentiation and has been shown lately to protect activated T cells and macrophages from apoptosis. MCPIP1 is an RNase critical for controlling inflammation-related mRNAs. MCPIP1 interacts with and degrades a set of stem-loop-containing mRNAs (including IL-6). Our results demonstrate the involvement of MCPIP1 in the regulation of IER3 mRNA levels. A dual luciferase assay revealed that over-expression of MCPIP1 resulted in a decrease of luciferase activity in the samples co-transfected with constructs containing luciferase CDS attached to IER3 3′UTR. We identified a stem-loop structure similar to that described to be important for destabilization of the IL-6 mRNA by MCPIP1. Examination of IER3 3′UTR sequence, structure and evolutionary conservation revealed that the identified stem-loop is buried within a bigger element. Deletion of this fragment abolished the regulation of IER3 3′UTR-containing transcript by MCPIP1. Finally, using immunofluorescence-combined single-molecule RNA FISH we have shown that the MCPIP1 protein co-localizes with IER3 mRNA. By this method we also proved that the presence of the wild-type NYN/PIN-like domain of MCPIP1 correlated with the decreased level of IER3 mRNA. RNA immunoprecipitation further confirmed the interaction of MCPIP1 with IER3 transcripts in vivo. PMID:27256408

  3. The impact of Ghana’s R3M programme on the provision of safe abortions and postabortion care

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Aparna; Juarez, Fatima; Ahiadeke, Clement; Bankole, Akinrinola; Blades, Nakeisha

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, in response to the high maternal mortality, driven largely by unsafe abortions, the government of Ghana, in partnership with other organizations, launched the reducing maternal mortality and morbidity (R3M) programme in seven districts in Greater Accra, Ashanti and Eastern, to improve comprehensive abortion care services. This article examines whether this intervention made a difference to the provision of safe abortion services and postabortion care (PAC). We also examine the role played by provider attitudes and knowledge of the abortion law, on providers with clinical training in service provision. Primary data on health care providers in Ghana, collected using a quasi-experimental design, were analysed using propensity score weighting. Apart from the treatment group, the sample included two controls: (1) Districts in Accra, Ashanti and Eastern, not exposed to the treatment; and (2) Districts from distant Brong Ahafo, also not exposed to the treatment. The findings show that providers in the treatment group are nearly 16 times as likely to provide safe abortions compared with their peers in Brong Ahafo, and ∼2.5 times as likely compared with providers in the other control group. R3M providers were also different from their peers in providing PAC. Associations between provider attitudes and knowledge of the law on both outcomes were either non-significant or inconsistent including for providers with clinical knowledge of abortion provision. Provider confidence however is strongly associated with service provision. We conclude that the R3M programme is helping safe abortion provision, with the differences being greater with control groups that are geographically distant, perhaps owing to lower contamination from movement of providers between facilities. Increasing provider confidence is key to improving both safe abortion provision and PAC. PMID:25261230

  4. The Effect of Spray Strips on a Model of the P3M-1 Flying Boat Hull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R

    1933-01-01

    This note presents the results of a series of tests made in the N.A.C.A. tank on a one-sixth full-size model of the hull and side floats of the Navy P3M-1 flying boat for the purpose of finding a method of reducing the amount of spray thrown into the propellers of this craft when taking off and landing. The model was tested without spray strips and with five different spray-strip arrangements. The best arrangement was an improvement over the bare hull with no spray strips, but the improvement was not sufficient to be satisfactory with the propellers in the designed position.

  5. Mutual transformation of light waves by reflection holograms in photorefractive crystals of the 4-bar 3m symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Naunyka, V. N.; Shepelevich, V. V.

    2011-05-15

    The mutual transformation of light waves in the case of their simultaneous diffraction from a bulk reflection phase hologram, which was formed in a cubic photorefractive crystal of the 4-bar 3m symmetry class, has been studied. The indicator surfaces of the polarization-optimized values of the relative intensity of the object wave, which make it possible to determine the amplification of this wave for any crystal cut, are constructed. The linear polarization azimuths at which the energy exchange between the light waves reaches a maximum are found numerically for crystals of different cuts.

  6. Design and construction of 2 transonic airfoil models for tests in the NASA Langley C.3-M TCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechterle, G.; Ludewig, K. H.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a NASA/DFVLR cooperation program two transonic airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT. Model design and construction was carried out by DFVLR. The models designed and constructed performed extremely well under cryogenic conditions. Essentially no permanent changes in surface quality and geometric dimensions occurred during the tests. The aerodynamic results from the TCT tests which demonstrate the large sensitivity of the airfoil CAST 10-Z/DOAZ to Reynolds number changes compared well with results from other facilities at ambient temperatures.

  7. 3M: Hutchinson Plant Focuses on Heat Recovery and Cogeneration during Plan-Wide Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-01

    3M performed a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment at its Hutchinson, Minnesota, plant to identify energy- and cost-saving opportunities. Assessment staff developed four separate implementation packages that represented various combinations of energy-efficiency projects involving chiller consolidation, air compressor cooling improvements, a steam turbine used for cogeneration, and a heat recovery boiler for two of the plant's thermal oxidizers. Staff estimated that the plant could save 6 million kWh/yr in electricity and more than 200,000 MMBtu/yr in natural gas and fuel oil, and avoid energy costs of more than $1 million during the first year.

  8. Reconstruction of BL7B for UV, VIS and IR spectroscopy with a 3 m normal-incidence monochromator.

    PubMed

    Fukui, K; Nakagawa, H; Shimoyama, I; Nakagawa, K; Okamura, H; Nanba, T; Hasumoto, M; Kinoshita, T

    1998-05-01

    The beamline BL7B at the UVSOR facility for solid-state spectroscopy is currently under reconstruction. This reconstruction mainly involves the replacement of the 1 m Seya-Namioka-type monochromator (50-600 nm) with a 3 m NIM (modified version of McPherson model 2253), which covers the 50-1000 nm range with three gratings. The deviation angle of the gratings is 15 degrees. For linear and circular polarization experiments, the beamline optics consist of a two-grazing-incidence (87.5 degrees ) pre-mirror system and a normal-incidence (15 degrees ) post-mirror.

  9. Design and performance estimate of a focal reducer for the 2.3 m Thai National Telescope.

    PubMed

    Buisset, Christophe; Deboos, Alexis; Lépine, Thierry; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar

    2016-01-25

    We have designed a new kind of focal reducer for the 2.3 m Thai National Telescope (TNT) to image the TNT specified FOV Δθ = 14.6' with an angular resolution α ≈1.2 arcsec. This, at a minimum cost by using common glasses, spherical surfaces and by requiring comfortable mechanical tolerance. This focal reducer comprises 1 lens placed at the level of the fork entrance and 1 lens placed in front of the detector. In this paper, we present the focal reducer paraxial model, we describe the optical design and we present the performance.

  10. Anatomical characterization of bombesin receptor subtype-3 mRNA expression in the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Parks, Gregory S; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Lien; Lew, Michelle; Civelli, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Mice deficient in BRS-3 develop late-onset mild obesity with metabolic defects, while synthetic agonists activating BRS-3 show antiobesity profiles by inhibiting food intake and increasing metabolic rate in rodent models. The molecular mechanisms and the neural circuits responsible for these effects, however, remain elusive and demand better characterization. We report here a comprehensive mapping of BRS-3 mRNA in the rat and mouse brain through in situ hybridization. Furthermore, to investigate the neurochemical characteristics of the BRS-3-expressing neurons, double in situ hybridization was performed to determine whether BRS-3 colocalizes with other neurotransmitters or neuropeptides. Many, but not all, of the BRS-3-expressing neurons were found to be glutamatergic, while few were found to be cholinergic or GABAergic. BRS-3-containing neurons do not express some of the well-characterized neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), orexin/hypocretin, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and kisspeptin. Interestingly, BRS-3 mRNA was found to partially colocalize with corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), suggesting novel interactions of BRS-3 with stress- and growth-related endocrine systems. Our study provides important information for evaluating BRS-3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. PMID:22911445

  11. Photoelectron velocity-map imaging and theoretical studies of heteronuclear metal carbonyls MNi(CO)3- (M = Mg, Ca, Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua; Zou, Jinghan; Yuan, Qinqin; Fan, Hongjun; Tang, Zichao; Jiang, Ling

    2016-03-01

    The heteronuclear metal carbonyl anions MNi(CO)3- (M = Mg, Ca, Al) have been investigated using photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy. Electron affinities of neutral MNi(CO)3 (M = Mg, Ca, Al) are measured from the photoelectron spectra to be 1.064 ± 0.063, 1.050 ± 0.064, and 1.541 ± 0.040 eV, respectively. The C-O stretching mode in these three clusters is observed and the vibrational frequency is determined to be 2049, 2000, and 2041 cm-1 for MgNi(CO)3, CaNi(CO)3, and AlNi(CO)3, respectively. Density functional theory calculations are carried out to elucidate the geometric and electronic structures and to aid the experimental assignments. It has been found that three terminal carbonyls are preferentially bonded to the nickel atom in these heterobinuclear nickel carbonyls MNi(CO)3-1/0, resulting in the formation of the Ni(CO)3 motif. Ni remains the 18-electron configuration for MgNi(CO)3 and CaNi(CO)3 neutrals, but not for AlNi(CO)3. This is different from the homobinuclear nickel carbonyl Ni-Ni(CO)3 with the involvement of three bridging ligands. Present findings would be helpful for understanding CO adsorption on alloy surfaces.

  12. Two chicken erythrocyte band 3 mRNAs are generated by alternative transcriptional initiation and differential RNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H R; Kennedy, B S; Engel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte anion transport protein (band 3) mediates two distinct cellular functions: it provides plasma membrane attachment sites for the erythroid cytoskeletal network, and it also functions as the anion transporter between the erythrocyte cytoplasm and extracellular milieu. We previously showed that two chicken band 3 polypeptides are encoded by two different mRNAs with different translation initiation sites. Here we show that these two band 3 mRNAs are transcribed from two separate promoters within a single gene. In addition, the two pre-mRNAs are differentially spliced, leading to fusion with coding exons used in common in the two mRNAs. The chicken erythrocyte band 3 gene is therefore the first example of a gene that has two promoters within a single locus which function equally efficiently in one cell type at the same developmental stage. Images PMID:2601717

  13. 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected dairy foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karen M; Jechorek, Robert P; Carver, Charles N; Horter, Barbara L; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2003-01-01

    The 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method was compared with AOAC Official Method 975.55 for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected foods. Five foods--ice cream, raw milk, yogurt, whey powder, and cheese--were analyzed for S. aureus by 12 collaborating laboratories. For each food tested, the collaborators received 8 blind test samples consisting of a control sample, a low inoculation level, a medium inoculation level, and a medium inoculation level with background flora, each in duplicate. The mean log10 counts for the methods were comparable for all 5 foods. The repeatability and reproducibility variances of the 24 h Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method were similar to those of the 72 h standard method.

  14. Dry rehydratable film method for rapid enumeration of coliforms in foods (3M Petrifilm Rapid Coliform Count plate): collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Kinneberg, Karen M; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2002-01-01

    A rehydratable dry-film plating method for coliforms in foods, the 3M Petrifilm Rapid Coliform Count plate method, was compared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual method for nondairy foods and the American Public Health Association's Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products (SMEDP) method for dairy foods. Six food types, vanilla ice cream, cheddar cheese, fresh refrigerated uncooked pasta, wheat flour, prepared frozen macaroni and cheese, and frozen hash browns, were analyzed for coliforms by 11 collaborating laboratories. For each food product tested, the collaborators received 8 blind samples consisting of a control sample and 3 levels of inoculated sample, each in duplicate. The mean log counts for the methods were comparable. The repeatability and reproducibility variances of the Petrifilm Rapid Coliform Count method at 14 and 24 h were not significantly different from those of the standard methods.

  15. Evaluation of the 3M Petrifilm Enterobacteriaceae Count plate method for the enumeration of Enterobacteriaceae in foods.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karen M; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2002-09-01

    Results of the 3M Petrifilm Enterobacteriaceae Count (EB) plate method were compared with those of the standard violet red bile glucose agar (VRBG) method for the detection and enumeration of Enterobacteriaceae. Studies involving 107 bacterial strains demonstrated that the Petrifilm EB plate method is as sensitive as and more selective than the VRBG method. Sixty of the 62 pure Enterobacteriaceae cultures were recovered by both methods. In addition, 38 of the 45 non-Enterobacteriaceae organisms did not grow on the Petrifilm EB plate, while 28 of the 45 non-Enterobacteriaceae organisms did not grow on the VRBG plate. Colony counts from 174 naturally contaminated and 120 artificially inoculated dairy and nondairy food samples showed that the Petrifilm EB plate method performed as well as or better than the standard VRBG method for the enumeration of Enterobacteriaceae.

  16. Piezoelectric Enhancement of (PbTiO3)m/(BaTiO3)n Ferroelectric Superlattices through Domain Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Liang; Wu, Pingping; Li, Yulan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Eom, C.B.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Chen, Long-Qing

    2014-11-20

    The phase diagram of (PbTiO3)m/(BaTiO3)n ferroelectric superlattices was computed using the phase-field approach as a function of layer volume fraction and biaxial strain to tune ferroelectric properties through domain engineering. Two interesting domain structures are found: one with mixed Bloch-Néel-Ising domain wall structures and the other with stabilized monoclinic phases. The polarization of the monoclinic phase is able to rotate from out-of-plane to in-plane or vice versa under an electric field, and thus facilitates the domain reversal of rhombohedral domains. This contributes significantly to both reduced coercive fields and enhanced piezoelectric responses.

  17. The structural and electronic properties of cubic AgMO3 (M=Nb, Ta) by first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. Ganga; Niranjan, Manish K.; Asthana, Saket

    2016-05-01

    We report the electronic structure of the AgMO3(M=Nb, Ta) within the frame work of density functional theory and calculations are performed within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by using ultrasoft pseudopotentials. The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and volumes are extracted from fitting of Birch third order equation of state and which are reasonable agreement with the available experimental results. The density of states,band structure of Ag(Nb,Ta)O3 reveals that the valance bands mostly occupied with O-2p and O-2s states and whereas conduction band occupied with Nb (Ta) 4d(5d) states including less contribution from Ag 5s states.

  18. Magnetic properties of Co 1- xM xPt 3 (M  Mn, Fe) compounds with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. H.; Dinia, A.; Cadeville, M. C.

    1995-02-01

    Magnetic properties of the pseudo-binary Co 1- xM xPt 3 (M  Mn, Fe) compounds have been investigated. Under adequate preparation conditions, these compounds display the L1 2 structure. For M  Mn the magnetic phase diagram presents a continuous ferromagnetic region from CoPt 3 to MnPt 3 with a re-entrant spin glass (RSG) phase emerging at low T and H between x = 0.2 and 0.6. For M  Fe, a spin glass (SG) phase separates the ferromagnetic region on the Co-rich side, from the antiferromagnetic region on the Fe-rich side. The results are qualitatively discussed in terms of the three dominant competing magnetic interactions JCoCo, JCoM, JMM.

  19. Measurement of recovery temperature on an airfoil in the Langley 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Adcock, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental measurements of recovery temperature were made on an airfoil in the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.84 over a Reynolds number per meter range from about 15,000,000 to about 335,000,000. The measured recovery temperatures were considerably below those associated with ideal-gas ambient temperature wind tunnels. This difference was accentuated as the stagnation pressure increased and the total temperature decreased. A boundary-layer code modified for use with cryogenic nitrogen adequately predicted the measured adiabatic wall temperature at all conditions. A quantitative, on-line assessment of the nonadiabatic condition of a model can be made during the operation of a cryogenic wind tunnel by using a correlation for the adiabatic wall temperature which is only a function of total temperature, total pressure, and local Mach number on the model.

  20. Characteristics of the three-half-turn-antenna-driven RF discharge in the Uragan-3M torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Grigor’eva, L. I.; Chechkin, V. V. Moiseenko, V. E.; Grekov, D. L.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Lozin, A. V.; Tarasov, I. K.; Kulaga, A. Ye.; Zamanov, N. V.; Tretiak, K. K.; Kozulya, M. M.; Beletskii, A. A.; Kasilov, A. A.; Mironov, Yu. K.; Romanov, V. S.; Voitsenya, V. S.

    2015-12-15

    In the ℓ = 3 Uragan-3M torsatron hydrogen plasma is produced by RF fields in the Alfvén range of frequencies (ω ≤ ω{sub ci}). The initial (target) plasma with the line-averaged density of units 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} is produced by a frame antenna with a broad spectrum of generated parallel wavenumbers. After this, to heat the plasma and bring its density to ∼10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}, another, shorter wavelength three-half-turn antenna with large transverse currents is used. The behavior of the density, electron temperature, and loss of the plasma supported by the three-half-turn antenna is studied depending on the RF power fed to the antenna and initial values of the density and electron temperature supplied by the frame antenna.

  1. Trends in (LaMnO3)n/(SrTiO3)m superlattices with varying layer thicknesses

    PubMed Central

    Jilili, J.; Cossu, F.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the thickness dependence of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of (LaMnO3)n/(SrTiO3)m (n, m = 2, 4, 6, 8) superlattices using density functional theory. The electronic structure turns out to be highly sensitive to the onsite Coulomb interaction. In contrast to bulk SrTiO3, strongly distorted O octahedra are observed in the SrTiO3 layers with a systematic off centering of the Ti atoms. The systems favour ferromagnetic spin ordering rather than the antiferromagnetic spin ordering of bulk LaMnO3 and all show half-metallicity, while a systematic reduction of the minority spin band gaps as a function of the LaMnO3 and SrTiO3 layer thicknesses originates from modifications of the Ti dxy states. PMID:26323361

  2. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Määttä, A.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2015-07-01

    The three GOME-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modeling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, H2CO, H2O, SO2), tropospheric columns of NO2, total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices from the main science channels as well as from the polarization channels (AAI, AAI-PMD), Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Ozone Monitoring and Atmospheric Composition Satellite Application Facility (O3M SAF) processing and data dissemination is operational and running 24/7. Data quality is quarantined by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This is an overview paper providing the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans to utilization of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with the product sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects the references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  3. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kauppi, A.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lang, R.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2016-02-01

    The three Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modelling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as ozone and minor trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, HCHO, H2O, SO2), vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices, surface Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) processes and disseminates data 24/7. Data quality is guaranteed by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This paper provides an overview of the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans for the utilisation of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  4. KIF14 and E2F3 mRNA expression in human retinoblastoma and its phenotype association

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Moutushy; Mallikarjuna, Kandalam; Pranav, Oberoi; Srinivasan, Ramalingam; Nagpal, Amit; Venkatesan, Perumal; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We quantified mRNA expression of candidate genes for proliferation (KIF14 and E2F3) in a large retinoblastoma tumor cohort and associated with disease phenotype. Methods KIF14 and E2F3 mRNA expression was quantified by real time PCR in 57 retinoblastoma (RB) tumors, 3 RB cell lines, and control samples that included 4 each fetal, age-matched, adult retinas. Immunohistochemistry was done to confirm KIF14 and E2F3 protein expression in tumor cells. The mRNA expression levels were correlated with disease phenotypes including the significance of chemotherapy on tumors. Results There was statistically significant overexpression of KIF14 and E2F3 mRNA in tumors compared with control retinas (p<0.0001). Further, E2F3 also showed a significant overexpression compared to RB cell lines (p=0.01). Immunohistochemistry confirmed KIF14 and E2F3 protein overexpression in tumor cells. KIF14 had significant mRNA overexpression with older age (p=0.01) in presenting patients and in unilateral RB patients (p=0.04). Chemotherapy-treated tumors showed a significant decrease in KIF14 and E2F3 expression compared to untreated tumors (p<0.01 and 0.001, respectively). Conclusions This report confirms significant mRNA overexpression of KIF14 and E2F3 together in a large cohort of RB tumors. The decreased expression in chemotherapy treated cases needs further validation in a large chemotherapy-treated cohort. PMID:19190782

  5. Ferroelectric property of (Ba,Bi)(Ti,M)O3 (M; Cu, Mn, Al, Fe, In, Y, Yb) ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiroki, K.; Kumada, N.; Ogiso, H.; Yonesaki, Y.; Takei, T.; Kinomura, N.; Wada, S.

    2011-10-01

    Two types of solid solutions, (Ba1-2xBi2x)(CuxTi1-x)O3 (x <= 0.04) and (Ba1-xBix)(MxTi1-x)O3 (M; Al, Mn, Fe, In, Y, Yb; x <= 0.03) were prepared by conventional high temperature reaction. For the solid solution of (Ba1-2xBi2x)(CuxTi1-x)O3 single phases with the tetragonal cell was obtained in the region of x <= 0.04 and for the solid solutions of (Ba1-xBix)(MxTi1-x)O3 (M; Al, Mn, Fe, In, Y, Yb) single phases with the tetragonal cell was observed in the region of x <= 0.03 except the sample of M = Al in which a small amount of the second phase was contained. In these solid solutions the Tc increased with the value of x except for M = Al, and was 144.7°C for x = 0.020 of M = Cu, and the highest Tc was observed for x = 0.020 of every M atom and the order of the highest Tc was Cu (144.7°C), Y (141.4°C), Yb (140.8°C), In (138.5°C), Mn (135.5°C) and Fe (131.3°C). The highest apparent piezoelectric constant, (d33 = 258 pm/V) in these solid solutions was observed for x = 0.010 of Al.

  6. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 mRNA in the brain and retina of the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Karim, Mohammad Rabiul

    2014-11-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (vGluTs), which accumulate glutamate into synaptic vesicles, are classified into three subtypes in mammalian brains: vGluT1, vGluT2, and vGluT3. VGluT3 is localized in non-glutamatergic neurons of the brain and retinal amacrine cells. In birds, the vGluT3 genome is found, but its distribution in the brain or retina is unknown. The present study was conducted to analyze vGluT3 cDNA sequence and elucidate its distribution in the pigeon brain and retina. The vGluT3 cDNA comprises 1761bp and showed 95% and 88% identity to the chicken and zebra finch vGluT3 cDNAs, respectively, and 74% identity to human vGluT3 cDNA. In situ hybridization revealed that the vGluT3 mRNA was expressed in neurons of the caudal linear nucleus (LC) of the brain and in amacrine cells of the inner nuclear layer of the retina. A combination of in situ hybridization and serotonin immunohistochemistry revealed three types of stained cells in LC and retina: vGluT3(+)/serotonin(+), vGluT3(+)/serotonin(-), and vGluT3(-)/serotonin(+). The vGluT3(+)/serotonin(+) cells were approximately 22% in LC and 16% in the retina. The present results suggest that the pigeon vGluT3 mRNA is comparable with the mammalian type.

  7. Expanding on #YouDoYou: Reflections from the 2015 Cohort of 3M National Student Fellows on Exploring Authenticity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Justine; Shah, Wali; Spencer, Vrindy; Thompson, Piper Riley; Young, Karen; Zowmi, Aniqah

    2016-01-01

    The fourth cohort of 3M National Student Fellows explores the current state of our post-secondary education system across Canada and opportunities to further tune into practice in order to pursue an authentic and meaningful academic life. Six of the 2015 3M National Student Fellows propose recommendations for decision-makers at post-secondary…

  8. Rise of [Ca²⁺]i and apoptosis induced by M-3M3FBS in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chuan; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liou, Wen-Chin; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Lin, Ko-Long; Lu, Ti; Lu, Yi-Chau; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Tsai, Jeng-Yu; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2014-02-28

    M-3M3FBS (2,4,6-trimethyl-N-(meta-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-benzenesulfonamide is a presumed phospholipase C activator which induced Ca²⁺ movement and apoptosis in different cell models. How- ever, the effect of m-3M3FBS on cytosolic free Ca²⁺ concentrations ([Ca²⁺]i) and apoptosis in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells is unclear. This study explored whether m-3M3FBS elevated basal [Ca²⁺]i levels in suspended cells by using fura-2 as a Ca²⁺-sensitive fluorescent dye. M-3M3FBS at concentrations between 5-50 μM increased [Ca²⁺]i in a concentration-dependent manner. The Ca²⁺ signal was reduced by half by removing extracellular Ca²⁺. M-3M3FBS-induced Ca²⁺ influx was inhibited by nifedipine, econazole, SK&F96365, aristolochic acid, and GF109203X. In Ca²⁺-free medium, 50 μM m-3M3FBS pretreatment inhibited the [Ca²⁺]i rise induced by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ pump inhibitor thapsigargin. Conversely, pretreatment with thapsigargin partly reduced m-3M3FBS-induced [Ca²⁺]i rise. Suppression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production with U73122 did not change m-3M3FBS- induced [Ca²⁺]i rise. At concentrations between 25 and 50 μM m-3M3FBS killed cells in a concentration- dependent manner. The cytotoxic effect of m-3M3FBS was not reversed by prechelating cytosolic Ca²⁺ with acetoxy-methyl ester of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA/AM). Annexin V/propidium iodide staining data suggest that m-3M3FBS induced apoptosis at 25 and 50 μM. M-3M3FBS also increased levels of superoxide. Together, in human gastric cancer cells, m-3M3FBS induced a [Ca²⁺]i rise by inducing phospholipase C-independent Ca²⁺ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca²⁺ entry via protein kinase C-sensitive store-operated Ca²⁺ channels. M-3M3FBS induced cell death that might involve apoptosis via reactive oxygen species production.

  9. Synthesis of porous, hollow metal MCO(3) (M=Mn, Co, Ca) microstructures and adsorption properties thereof.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ren; Du, Yaping; Peng, Shengjie; Bi, Hengchang; Zhang, Wenyu; Yang, Dan; Chen, Jing; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Zhang, Hua; Cao, Y Charles; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    Porous, hollow metal carbonate microstructures show many unique properties, and are attractive for various applications. Herein, we report the first demonstration of a general strategy to synthesize hollow metal carbonate structures, including porous MnCO3 hollow cubics, porous CoCO3 hollow rhombuses and porous CaCO3 hollow capsules. For example, the porous, hollow MnCO3 microcubes show larger Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 359.5 m(2)  g(-1) , which is much larger than that of solid MnCO3 microcubics (i.e., 12.03 m(2)  g(-1) ). As a proof of concept, these porous MnCO3 hollow microcubes were applied to water treatment and exhibited an excellent ability to remove organic pollutants in waste water owing to their hollow structure and large specific surface area.

  10. Study of d -electron correlations in skutterudite-related Ce3M4 Sn13 (M =Co , Ru, and Rh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślebarski, A.; Goraus, J.; Witas, P.; Kalinowski, L.; Fijałkowski, M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of the skutterudite-related Ce3M4Sn13 compounds, where metal M is Co, Ru, or Rh, using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and band structure calculations, both within local density approximation scheme and within scheme including additional Coulomb correlations (LDA+U ). The d -electron states located near the Fermi level slightly change the intensity with applying the correlation energy U . We note the large impact of d -electron correlation, which is clearly observed in the change of Ce 5 p states located about 18 eV in the valence band. Namely, for Ce3Rh4Sn13 and Ce3Ru4Sn13 the d -electron correlations significantly shift the 5 p states towards higher binding energies, while for Ce3Co4Sn13 the energy of the Ce 5 p states almost does not depend on U . The influence of the d -electron correlations is also manifested by the positive magnetoresistivity (MR) of Ce3Rh4Sn13 and the Ce3 -xLaxRh4Sn13 alloys that reaches 40% at the highest magnetic field (B =9 T) for the sample x =0.6 , whereas only a small positive MR˜0.5 % is observed in Ce3Ru4Sn13 . The magnetoresistivity of Ce3Co4Sn13 exhibits quite different behavior and is negative.

  11. De novo somatic mutations in components of the PI3K-AKT3-mTOR pathway cause hemimegalencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Huynh, My; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Kim, Sangwoo; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Heiberg, Andrew; Scott, Eric; Bafna, Vineet; Hill, Kiley J; Collazo, Adrienne; Funari, Vincent; Russ, Carsten; Gabriel, Stacey B; Mathern, Gary W; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    De novo somatic mutations in focal areas are well documented in diseases such as neoplasia but are rarely reported in malformation of the developing brain. Hemimegalencephaly (HME) is characterized by overgrowth of either one of the two cerebral hemispheres. The molecular etiology of HME remains a mystery. The intractable epilepsy that is associated with HME can be relieved by the surgical treatment hemispherectomy, allowing sampling of diseased tissue. Exome sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis in paired brain-blood samples from individuals with HME (n = 20 cases) identified de novo somatic mutations in 30% of affected individuals in the PIK3CA, AKT3 and MTOR genes. A recurrent PIK3CA c.1633G>A mutation was found in four separate cases. Identified mutations were present in 8–40% of sequenced alleles in various brain regions and were associated with increased neuronal S6 protein phosphorylation in the brains of affected individuals, indicating aberrant activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Thus HME is probably a genetically mosaic disease caused by gain of function in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT3-mTOR signaling. PMID:22729223

  12. Control system design for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Robert S.; Hosp, Theodore J.; Schanzenbach, George P.

    1995-05-01

    This paper provides descriptions of the requirements analysis, hardware development and software development phases of the Control System design for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW Wind Turbine Generator. The system, designed by General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Programs Department, under contract DEN 3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and DOE, provides real time regulation of rotor speed by control of both generator torque and rotor torque. A variable speed generator system is used to provide both airgap torque control and reactive power control. The wind rotor is designed with segmented ailerons which are positioned to control blade torque. The central component of the control system, selected early in the design process, is a programmable controller used for sequencing, alarm monitoring, communication, and real time control. Development of requirements for use of aileron controlled blades and a variable speed generator required an analytical simulation that combined drivetrain, tower and blade elastic modes with wind disturbances and control behavior. An orderly two phase plan was used for controller software development. A microcomputer based turbine simulator was used to facilitate hardware and software integration and test.

  13. Pressure and temperature dependence of the reaction NO2 + NO3 + M yields N2O5 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kircher, C. C.; Margitan, J. J.; Sander, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    The pressure and temperature dependences of the reaction NO2 + NO3 + M which yields N2O5 + M are investigated by using the flash photolysis/visible absorption technique in which the pseudo-first-order decay of NO3 is monitored as a function of total pressure (20-700 torr), diluent gas (M = He and N2), and temperature (236-358 K). The reaction is found to be in the falloff region in the 20-700 torr pressure range with collision efficiencies increasing in the order He less than N2. Falloff parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental data to the falloff equation of Troe and co-workers. The expression for k1(N2 concentration, T) is obtained and compared with the evaluations presented in the NASA (DeMore, 1983) and CODATA (Baulch et al., 1982) reviews of kinetic data for atmospheric chemistry. Both evaluations are based on N2O5 thermal decomposition data coupled with estimates of the equilibrium constant. The significance of the reactions for atmospheric chemistry rests not only on their rates but on the extent to which they result in a permanent sink for NOX.

  14. MPO4:Nd3+ (M=Ca, Gd), Luminomagnetic Nanophosphors with Optical and Magnetic Features for Multimodal Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rightsell, Chris; Mimun, Lawrence C.; Kumar, Ajith G.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterials with multiple functionalities play a very important role in several high technology applications. A major area of such applications is the biomedical industry, where contrast agents with multiple imaging modalities can provide better results than conventional materials. Many of the contrast agents available now have drawbacks such as toxicity, photobleaching, low contrast, size restrictions, and overall cost of the imaging system. Rare-earth doped inorganic nanophosphors are alternatives to circumvent several of these issues, together with the added advantage of super high resolution imaging due to the excellent near infrared sensitivity of the phosphors. In addition to optical imaging features, by adding a magnetic ion such as Gd3+ at suitable lattice positions, the phosphor can be made magnetic, yielding dual imaging functionalities. In this research, we are presenting the optical and magnetic imaging features of sub-nanometer size MPO4:Nd3+ (M=Ca, Gd) phosphors for the potential application of these nanophosphors as multimodal contrast agents. Cytotoxicity, in vitro and in vivo imaging, penetration depth etc. are studied for various phosphor compositions, and optimized compositions are explored. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-PREM) Grant N0-DMR-0934218.

  15. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  16. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-05-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  17. SALMO and S3M: A Saliva Model and a Single Saliva Salt Model for Equilibrium Studies

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Concetta

    2015-01-01

    A model of synthetic saliva (SALMO, SALiva MOdel) is proposed for its use as standard medium in in vitro equilibrium and speciation studies of real saliva. The concentrations come out from the literature analysis of the composition of both real saliva and synthetic saliva. The chief interactions of main inorganic components of saliva, as well as urea and amino acids, are taken into account on the basis of a complex formation model, which also considers the dependence of the stability constants of these species on ionic strength and temperature. These last features allow the modelling of the speciation of saliva in different physiological conditions deriving from processes like dilution, pH, and temperature changes. To simplify equilibrium calculations, a plain approach is also proposed, in order to take into account all the interactions among the major components of saliva, by considering the inorganic components of saliva as a single 1 : 1 salt (MX), whose concentration is cMX = (1/2)∑ci (ci = analytical concentration of all the ions) and z ion charge calculated as z=±(I/cMX)1/2 = ±1.163. The use of the Single Saliva Salt Model (S3M) considerably reduces the complexity of the systems to be investigated. In fact, only four species deriving from internal ionic medium interactions must be considered. PMID:25733975

  18. An intracellular redox sensor for reactive oxygen species at the M3-M4 linker of GABAAρ1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán González, Andrea N; Gasulla, Javier; Calvo, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are normally involved in cell oxidative stress but also play a role as cellular messengers in redox signalling; for example, modulating the activity of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels. However, the direct actions of ROS on GABAA receptors were not previously demonstrated. In the present work, we studied the effects of ROS on GABAAρ1 receptor function. Experimental Approach GABAAρ1 receptors were expressed in oocytes and GABA-evoked responses electrophysiologically recorded in the presence or absence of ROS. Chemical protection of cysteines by selective sulfhydryl reagents and site-directed mutagenesis studies were used to identify protein residues involved in ROS actions. Key Results GABAAρ1 receptor-mediated responses were significantly enhanced in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner by H2O2. Potentiating effects were attenuated by a free radical scavenger, lipoic acid or an inhibitor of the Fenton reaction, deferoxamine. Each ρ1 subunit contains only three cysteine residues, two extracellular at the Cys-loop (C177 and C191) and one intracellular (C364) at the M3-M4 linker. Mutant GABAAρ1 receptors in which C364 was exchanged by alanine were completely insensitive to modulation, implying that this site, rather than a cysteine in the Cys-loop, is essential for ROS modulation. Conclusion and Implications Our results show that the function of GABAAρ1 receptors is enhanced by ROS and that the intracellular C364 is the sensor for ROS actions. PMID:24428763

  19. Tektronix color fiber optic tube for exposure of Mead Imaging's Cycolor and 3M's full-color dry silver media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlothlan, J. Kirk

    1990-08-01

    The Tektronix CFOT was used to expose Mead Cycolor and 3M dry silver photosensitive media. The results are presented and compared. The color gamut time to complete exposure and discernible resolution for the media are compared. Reciprocity failure and methods of minimizing the problems associated with it are discussed. The interactions between reciprocity failure and exposure time are discussed. The color coordinates attainable on the exposed media were determined by adjusting the paper feed speed and the intensity of the CFOT to obtain a range of exposures up to and beyond complete exposure. The CIELa*b* color coordinates of the media were measured with a Minolta color meter (Chroma Meter II). The discernible resolution was measured by exposing a 32 x 32 dot matrix on the media and then shrinking the dot to dot spacing between subsequent exposures to obtain a range of dot to dot spacings corresponding to resolutions ranging from 150 to 300 DPI. The exposed media was then examined under magnification to determine where uniform color fill was achieved. 1. CATHODE RAY TUBE DESCRIPTION The CFOT is a line scan tube with a fiber optic faceplate designed for producing full color hard copy on optically sensitive media. The tube has 3 stripes of phosphor each approximately . 060 inches wide by 8 inches long. The three phosphors are red green and blue enabling full color hard copy by sequentially

  20. Control system design for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Robert S.; Hosp, Theodore J.; Schanzenbach, George P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides descriptions of the requirements analysis, hardware development and software development phases of the Control System design for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW Wind Turbine Generator. The system, designed by General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Programs Department, under contract DEN 3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and DOE, provides real time regulation of rotor speed by control of both generator torque and rotor torque. A variable speed generator system is used to provide both airgap torque control and reactive power control. The wind rotor is designed with segmented ailerons which are positioned to control blade torque. The central component of the control system, selected early in the design process, is a programmable controller used for sequencing, alarm monitoring, communication, and real time control. Development of requirements for use of aileron controlled blades and a variable speed generator required an analytical simulation that combined drivetrain, tower and blade elastic modes with wind disturbances and control behavior. An orderly two phase plan was used for controller software development. A microcomputer based turbine simulator was used to facilitate hardware and software integration and test.

  1. The "Meteor - 3M" Satellite No.1 Observations of Electron Precipitation Events to Outer Terrestrial Atmosphere for 2002-2005.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkina, Marina

    National meteorological "Meteor - 3M" satellite No. 1 operated on the polar quasi-circular orbit at the altitude of about 1000 km during 2002-2005 years. The Geiger counter was included in the payload to register >100 keV electron flux. The counter has registered more than 1000 electron precipitation events from the outer radiation belt into the atmosphere. Constructed were histograms of the precipitation event number in dependence on the Mac-Ilwain parameter (L). According to the histograms, precipitations occurred most often on L-shells from 3.1 to 3.9 and from 5.1 to 5.9 during 2002-2005. For both intervals constructed were histograms for the electron precipitation event appearance frequency in dependence on the device count rate: the frequency of weak events is always much greater than the frequency of strong events, i.e. the dependence can be approximated by an exponential function. This allows estimating the probability of predetermined rate electron precipitation. Exponential distribution law means that the current precipitation event intensity does not depend on the intensity of previous events so that the sequence of events is the Markov random process in the view sample (2002-2005).

  2. Characterization and thermal behavior of PrMO{sub 3} (M = Co or Ni) ceramic materials obtained from gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, F.M.; Melo, D.M.A.; Pimentel, P.M.; Braga, R.M.; Melo, M.A.F.; Martinelli, A.E.; Costa, A.F.

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The micrograph in figure shows sample calcined at temperature 900 °C. The sample exhibits morphology with considerable porosity and the formation of agglomerated nanometric particles. Gelatin provides the system with a large amount of organic matter, which is then removed during calcinations, favoring the appearance of pores in the material. Highlights: ► Oxides with PrNiO{sub 3} and PrCoO{sub 3} were prepared by new method synthesis. ► The gelatin, through its carboxylate groups and amine, is an efficient director. ► The obtained materials have magnetic properties and application in catalysis. ► The decomposition kinetic study of bonding groups of gelatin with metallic ions that takes part in the synthesis of PrMO{sub 3}. -- Abstract: Metal oxides with perovskite-type structure have attracted considerable interest in recent years due to their magnetic and electrical properties, as well as their catalytic activity. In this study, oxides with PrNiO{sub 3} and PrCoO{sub 3} composition were prepared by using gelatin powder as a precursor agent for its use as a catalyst. The powders obtained were calcined at 700 °C and 900 °C and characterized using the X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis (thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis), infrared spectroscopy, temperature programed reduction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Thermogravimetric data using the non-isothermal kinetic models of Flynn and Wall and “Model-free Kinetics” were used to determine the activation energy to study the decomposition kinetics of the ligand groups with system's metallic ions that takes part in the synthesis of PrMO{sub 3} (M = Ni or Co).

  3. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

  4. Spacewatch Astrometry of Asteroids and Comets with the Bok 2.3-m and Mayall 4-m Telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, James V.; McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.

    2014-11-01

    We use the Bok 2.3-m and Mayall 4-m telescopes on Kitt Peak to improve knowledge of the orbits and magnitudes of high priority classes of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other small bodies in need of recovery that cannot be reached with the Spacewatch 0.9-m and 1.8-m telescopes. Targets include NEOs with potential close encounters with Earth (Virtual Impactors; VIs), future targets of radar, NEOs previously detected by NEOWISE with orbits or albedos suggesting potential for cometary activity, potential destinations for spacecraft, returning NEOs with hard-won albedos and diameters determined by NEOWISE, and faint Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs). Notable targets successfully recovered include the Earth Trojan 2010 TK7 and the faint almost-lost VI 2011 BY24 discovered by NEOWISE. Between 2010 June 6 and 2014 July 23 the MPC accepted 1316 lines of astrometry by us with these telescopes on 207 different NEOs including 84 PHAs. We made 343 observations of PHAs with V>=22. Our average arc extension on large PHAs (with H<=17.75) is 184 days, which is 2x longer than the next most effective observing station. Recently with all four telescopes Spacewatch has made 39% of all the observations of PHAs that were fainter than V=22 at the time of measurement. This count is twice that of the next most productive station in that measure. The faintest V magnitude we have observed so far is 24.4 and the smallest solar elongation angle at which we have observed is 46 degrees. Our work with the Mayall and Bok telescopes has been determined by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) to provide "dramatic improvement" to NEO orbits (T. Spahr, 2014 private communication). Support of Spacewatch was/is from JPL subcontract 100319 (2010-2011), NASA/NEOO grants NNG06GJ42G, NNX11AB52G, NNX12AG11G, NNX13AP99G, NNX14AL13G, and NNX14AL14G, the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, the Brinson Foundation of Chicago, IL, the estates of R. S. Vail and R. L. Waland, and other private donors. We are also indebted

  5. The first rubidium rare-earth(III) thiophosphates: Rb 3M3[PS 4] 4 ( M=Pr, Er)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Theresa; Schleid, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    The two non-isotypical rubidium rare-earth(III) thiophosphates Rb 3M3[PS 4] 4 of praseodymium and erbium can easily be obtained by the stoichiometric reaction of the respective rare-earth metal, red phosphorus and sulfur with an excess of rubidium bromide (RbBr) as flux and rubidium source at 950°C for 14 days in evacuated silica tubes. The pale green platelet-shaped single crystals of Rb 3Pr 3[PS 4] 4 as well as the pink rods of Rb 3Er 3[PS 4] 4 are moisture sensitive. Rb 3Pr 3[PS 4] 4 crystallizes triclinically in the space group P1¯ ( a=926.79(5) pm, b=1050.83(5) pm, c=1453.28(7) pm, α=84.329(4)°, β=88.008(4)°, γ=80.704(4)°; Z=2), Rb 3Er 3[PS 4] 4 monoclinically in the space group P21/n ( a=915.97(5) pm, b=1575.86(7) pm, c=1843.32(9) pm, β=95.601(6)°; Z=4). In both structures, there are three crystallographically different rare-earth cations present. ( M1) 3+ is eightfold coordinated in the shape of a square antiprism, ( M2) 3+ and ( M3) 3+ are both surrounded by eight sulfur atoms as bicapped trigonal prisms each with a coordination number of eight as well as for the praseodymium, but better described as CN=7+1 in the case of the erbium compound. These [ MS 8] 13- polyhedra form a layer according to ∞2{[M3[PS]4]} by sharing edges with the isolated [PS 4] 3- tetrahedra ( d(P-S)=200-209 pm, ∢(S-P-S)=102-116°). These layers are stacked with a repetition period of three in the case of the praseodymium compound, but of only two for the erbium analog. The rubidium cation (Rb1) + is located in cavities of these layers and tenfold coordinated in the shape of a tetracapped trigonal antiprism. The also tenfold but more irregularly coordinated rubidium cations (Rb2) + and (Rb3) + reside between the layers.

  6. Overview of the O3M-SAF validation facility for operational GOME-2 NO2 column data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinardi, Gaia; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Granville, Jos; van Roozendael, Michel; Delcloo, Andy; Debacker, Hugo; Valks, Pieter; Hao, Nan

    In the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF,) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) total column and tropospheric column data are generated operationally from GOME-2 measurements in near-real-time (within 2:30 hours after sensing). NO2 column data are retrieved from the Earth radiance and solar irradiance spectra by a chain of several modules (currently, the level-0-to-1 processor v4.0 and the level-1-to-2 DOAS retrieval processor GDP v4.3). These intermediate modules calculates the parameters needed to derive the final column data: the slant column density along the optical path, the fractional cover and top pressure of clouds affecting the measurement scene, the geometrical enhancement factor (AMF, needed to convert slant into vertical columns), and the NO2 stratospheric reference to be subtracted from the total column to obtain the tropospheric column. In order to validate the final product (the total and tropospheric NO2 columns) in the best way, and due to the complexity of the GOME-2 retrieval chain and the existing issues related to the set-up of a validation strategy in an operational environment, an end-to-end validation ap-proach has been developed, as recommended by Reference Protocols and Guidelines. To ensure meaningful and continuous quality assessment of GOME-2 NO2 data products, the end-to-end validation approach performs the verification and validation of critical individual components of the level-1-to-2 retrieval chain. Particular interest is given to recurring validation issues, such as the particular way remote sensing samples and smoothes the significant variability of atmospheric NO2, the diurnal cycle of NO2, the poor availability of correlative measure-ments (especially for tropospheric column), as well as the current lack of homogenisation of the validation methods. The end-to-end validation process of GOME-2 NO2 data is based on a set of correlative obser-vations performed by

  7. Determination of the four natural Ra isotopes in thermal waters by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Condomines, M; Rihs, S; Lloret, E; Seidel, J L

    2010-02-01

    Our method for the simultaneous determination of the four natural Ra isotopes ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (224)Ra and (223)Ra) in thermal waters involves a separation of Ra on a selective filter (3M EMPORE Radium Rad disk), and a single counting using a broad-energy HPGe detector (BE Ge manufactured by CANBERRA). The calculation of (223)Ra and (228)Ra activities requires interference and cascade summing corrections. The (226)Ra activities in CO(2)-rich thermal waters of the Lodève Basin (South of France) range from 530 to 2240mBq/l. The low ((228)Ra/(226)Ra) activity ratios (0.19-0.29) suggest that Ra is mostly derived from the aquifer carbonates. The short-lived (224)Ra and (223)Ra are probably added to the water through recoil or desorption processes from Th-enriched coatings on the fracture walls.

  8. Influence of Functionalized Pyridine Ligands on the Radio/Chemical Behavior of [MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re and 99mTc) 2 + 1 Complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While a number of chelate strategies have been developed for the organometallic precursor fac-[M (OH2)3(CO)3]+ (M = Re, 99mTc), a unique challenge has been to improve the overall function and performance of these complexes for in vivo and in vitro applications. Since its synthesis, the fac-[M (CO)3]...

  9. Isothiocyanate-functionalized bifunctional chelates and fac-[MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re, 99mTc) complexes for targeting uPAR in prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing strategies to rapidly incorporate the fac-[MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re, 99mTc) core into biological targeting vectors is a growing realm in radiopharmaceutical development. This work presents the preparation of a novel isothiocyanate-functionalized bifunctional chelate based on 2,2´-dipicolylamine ...

  10. Possible safety hazards associated with the operation of the 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at the NASA Langley Research Center was built in 1973 as a facility intended to be used for no more than 60 hours in order to verify the validity of the cryogenic wind tunnel concept at transonic speeds. The role of the 0.3 m TCT has gradually changed until now, after over 3000 hours of operation, it is classified as a major NASA research facility and, under the administration of the Experimental Techniques Branch, it is used extensively for the testing of airfoils at high Reynolds numbers and for the development of various technologies related to the efficient operation and use of cryogenic wind tunnels. The purpose of this report is to document the results of a recent safety analysis of the 0.3 m TCT facility. This analysis was made as part of an on going program with the Experimental Techniques Branch designed to ensure that the existing equipment and current operating procedures of the 0.3 m TCT facility are acceptable in terms of today's standards of safety for cryogenic systems.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIOLOGICAL & PARTICULATE CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER: US FILTER 3M10C MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE SYSTEM AT CHULA VISTA, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the US Filter 3M10C membrane system was conducted over a 44-day test period at the Aqua 2000 Research Center in Chula Vista, California. The test period extended from July 24, 2002 to September 5, 2002. The source water was a blend of Colorado River and ...

  12. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperation with the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M). This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between METC and 3M was to evaluate exposure of 3M SICONEX{trademark} fiber-reinforced ceramic and NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabric materials to a gasifying environment at high temperatures (1000--1100{degree}F) and high pressure (300 psia). Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) provided two 60 mm I.D. {times} 0.5 m SICONEX{trademark} spools and one each of the NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabrics for exposure to coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the materials in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the CRADA are found in CRADA 94-024. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 94-024. Four gasifier runs were conducted over a five month period to accumulate 483 hours of operation. During this time, 2 LayCer{trademark} 70/3 filters were used for filtering the coal gas while the SICONEX{trademark} and NEXTEL{trademark} were exposed along side of the filters. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer{trademark} 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

  13. Citrate enhances in vitro metastatic behaviours of PC-3M human prostate cancer cells: status of endogenous citrate and dependence on aconitase and fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Mycielska, Maria E; Broke-Smith, Timothy P; Palmer, Christopher P; Beckerman, Rachel; Nastos, Theodoros; Erguler, Kamil; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2006-01-01

    Prostate is a unique organ that produces and releases large amounts of citrate. This is reduced significantly in cancer and it is possible that citrate is (re)taken up and used as a metabolite to enhance cellular activity. The main purpose of this study was to determine how cytosolic citrate might affect in vitro metastatic cell behaviours (lateral motility, endocytosis and adhesion). Normal (PNT2-C2) and metastatic (PC-3M) human prostate cancer cells were used in a comparative approach. As regards intermediary metabolic enzymes, aconitase and fatty acid synthase, already implicated in prostate cancer, were evaluated. The level of intracellular citrate was significantly higher in PNT2-C2 cells under both control conditions and following preincubation in extracellular citrate. Supply of exogenous citrate enhanced endocytosis, lateral motility, decreased cell adhesion of PC-3M cells but failed to produce any effect on normal cells. Real-time PCR measurements showed that the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and fatty acid synthase were significantly higher in PC-3M cells. Correspondingly, aconitase activity was also higher in PC-3M cells. Using cerulenin (an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase), oxalomalate and fluorocitrate (inhibiting aconitases), we investigated the dependence of citrate-induced down-regulation of cellular adhesion on aconitase and fatty acid synthase activities. It was concluded: (1) that strongly metastatic PC-3M cells stored less/utilised more cytosolic citrate than the normal PNT2-C2 cells and (2) that cancer cells could metabolise cytoplasmic citrate via aconitase and fatty acid synthase to enhance their metastatic behaviour. PMID:16798056

  14. Lingual BDNF and NT-3 mRNA expression patterns and their relation to innervation in the human tongue: similarities and differences compared with rodents.

    PubMed

    Nosrat, I V; Lindskog, S; Seiger, A; Nosrat, C A

    2000-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) mRNAs are expressed in developing and adult rodent tongue and are important for the proper development of lingual gustatory and somatosensory innervation in rodents. Here, we wished to determine whether the findings in rodents apply to humans. By using in situ hybridization histochemistry, distinct, specific, and in some instances overlapping patterns of BDNF and NT-3 mRNA expression were found in the developing and adult human tongue, gustatory papillae, and taste buds. BDNF mRNA was expressed in the superior surface epithelium of the developing fungiform papillae (i.e., developing taste buds), in the epithelium covering the circumvallate papillae, and in the subepithelial mesenchyme. Interestingly, BDNF mRNA was expressed in the lingual epithelium before nerve fibers reached the epithelium, indicating a prespecialization of the gustatory epithelium before the arrival of nerves. In the adult fungiform papillae, BDNF mRNA labeling was found in taste buds and in restricted areas in the non-gustatory lingual epithelium. NT-3 mRNA was found in the developing lingual epithelium and gustatory papillae. NT-3 mRNA labeling was observed in the adult fungiform taste buds, overlapping with BDNF mRNA labeling, in contrast to what was seen in rodents. NT-3 mRNA was additionally found in restricted areas in filiform papillae. Protein gene product 9.5 (PGP) antibodies were used to investigate a possible correlation between lingual innervation and sites of neurotrophin gene activity. Adult human tongue innervation differed from that of rodents, possibly in part due to a different neurotrophin expression pattern in the human tongue. Based on these findings, we suggest that BDNF and NT-3 are important for the initiation and maintenance of the gustatory and somatosensory innervation also in humans. The broader and somewhat overlapping expression patterns of BDNF and NT-3 mRNAs, compared with rodents, suggest

  15. Expression of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA in CD4(+)CD25 (+) T regulatory cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Nan; Li, Xiang-Pei; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Tao, Jin-Hui; Pan, Hai-Feng; Fang, Xuan; Ma, Qian; Yu, Ning

    2014-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with complex genetic predisposing factors involved. Ets-1 transcription factor plays an important role in the suppressive activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and stable expression of FOXP3. To find its potential role in the pathogenesis of SLE, we investigate the mRNA expression of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from patients with SLE. Real-time transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to determine the expression of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from 36 patients with SLE and 18 sex-and-age-matched healthy controls. The Ets-1 mRNA expression level was decreased in patients with SLE [0.225 (0.135, 0.337)] than healthy controls [0.528 (0.303, 0.681)] (P < 0.001). The expression levels of FOXP3 mRNA were lower in SLE patients [0.608 (0.272, 1.164)] than healthy controls [0.919 (0.690, 1.223)], but the difference was not significant (P = 0.106). Significant reduction in Ets-1 and FOXP3 expression was also found in new-onset SLE subgroup when compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001). The level of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA was not significantly different in hyperactive and lower active SLE group when compared with inactive SLE group, respectively (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between SLE with lupus nephritis (LN) and SLE without LN either (P > 0.05). Associations of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA expression levels with major clinical and laboratory parameters of SLE patients were also analyzed. However, no significant association was found. Significant positive correlation was found between Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA expression in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from SLE patients (r = 0.698, P < 0.001). Our results found that the expression levels of Ets-1 mRNA were decreased in SLE patients and Ets-1 expression was positively correlated with the expression of FOXP3. It indicated that Ets-1 may play an important role in the stable expression of FOXP3 in

  16. Influence of M2O3 (M = Al, Ga) glass modifiers on structure, thermal and spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in lead phosphate based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sołtys, Marta; Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Goryczka, Tomasz; Pisarski, Wojciech A.

    2014-05-01

    Influence of M2O3 (M = Al, Ga) modifiers oxide on local structure and spectroscopic properties of lead phosphate glasses containing rare earth ions was studied. Among the rare earths, the trivalent europium and erbium ions were selected as an optically active dopants. The thermal properties were examined using DSC, whereas the X-ray diffraction analysis was used in order to verify the structure glass matrix. Luminescence of rare earth ions in lead phosphate glasses was registered in visible and NIR spectral region. The excitation and emission spectra of lead-based systems are presented and discussed in relation to the effect of modifiers oxide M2O3 (M = Al, Ga). Luminescence lifetimes (τm) for the 5D0 state of Eu3+ ions and 4I13/2 state of Er3+ ions were also evaluated.

  17. Anticancer Effect of a Novel Proteasome Inhibitor, YSY01A, via G2/M Arrest in PC-3M Cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Xia; Xu, Bo; Guo, Wei; Ran, Fu-Xiang; Li, Run-Tao; Cui, Jing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    YSY01A is a new tripeptideboronic acid and an analog of PS341. However, YSY01A's antitumor effects and mechanism have not yet been elucidated. This study demonstrates that YSY01A inhibited proteasome activity by combining with the chymotrypsin-like (CT-L) site (β5i/β5), the post-glutamyl peptide hydrolase (PGPH) site (β1i/β1) and the trypsin-like (T-L) site (β2i/β2) in special fluorgonic substrates and proteasome probe tests. We explored the anticancer effect using methyl thiazolyltetrazolium (MTT) or sulforhodamine B (SRB), and PC-3M cells were sensitive to YSY01A among the four cancer cell types tested. The YSY01A antiproliferative effect was stronger than that of PS341. In vivo, YSY01A (1.25, 2.25, and 3.25 mg/kg) inhibited PC-3M cell xenograft tumor growth, and the tumor volume inhibition rate was approximately 40% to 60%. YSY01A arrested PC-3M cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle by flow cytometry (FCM). Many proteins related to the cell cycle were analyzed using western blot, and YSY01A was shown to increase p21, p27, cyclinB1, P-cdc2 (tyr15) and wee1 protein expression in both cells and tumor tissue in a concentration-dependent manner. YSY01A, a proteasome inhibitor, exerts anticancer effects on PC-3M cells in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of the YSY01A-mediated antitumor effect is that the cell cycle is arrested at the G2/M stage. This study suggests that YSY01A may be a novel therapeutic agent for prostate cancer. PMID:26185531

  18. Identification of a QTL in Mus musculus for alcohol preference, withdrawal, and Ap3m2 expression using integrative functional genomics and precision genetics.

    PubMed

    Bubier, Jason A; Jay, Jeremy J; Baker, Christopher L; Bergeson, Susan E; Ohno, Hiroshi; Metten, Pamela; Crabbe, John C; Chesler, Elissa J

    2014-08-01

    Extensive genetic and genomic studies of the relationship between alcohol drinking preference and withdrawal severity have been performed using animal models. Data from multiple such publications and public data resources have been incorporated in the GeneWeaver database with >60,000 gene sets including 285 alcohol withdrawal and preference-related gene sets. Among these are evidence for positional candidates regulating these behaviors in overlapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapped in distinct mouse populations. Combinatorial integration of functional genomics experimental results revealed a single QTL positional candidate gene in one of the loci common to both preference and withdrawal. Functional validation studies in Ap3m2 knockout mice confirmed these relationships. Genetic validation involves confirming the existence of segregating polymorphisms that could account for the phenotypic effect. By exploiting recent advances in mouse genotyping, sequence, epigenetics, and phylogeny resources, we confirmed that Ap3m2 resides in an appropriately segregating genomic region. We have demonstrated genetic and alcohol-induced regulation of Ap3m2 expression. Although sequence analysis revealed no polymorphisms in the Ap3m2-coding region that could account for all phenotypic differences, there are several upstream SNPs that could. We have identified one of these to be an H3K4me3 site that exhibits strain differences in methylation. Thus, by making cross-species functional genomics readily computable we identified a common QTL candidate for two related bio-behavioral processes via functional evidence and demonstrate sufficiency of the genetic locus as a source of variation underlying two traits.

  19. Ubiquitous accumulation of 3' mRNA decay fragments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNAs with chromosomally integrated MS2 arrays.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jennifer F; Parker, Roy

    2016-05-01

    The binding of MS2-GFP protein to arrays of MS2 sites in yeast mRNAs has been used extensively to visualize mRNA localization. We previously reported that arrays of MS2 sites bound by MS2 protein could inhibit Xrn1p and lead to the accumulation of 3' mRNA decay fragments. We suggest that these decay fragments have the potential to complicate mRNA localization studies, as stated in an earlier study. PMID:27090788

  20. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  1. Comparison of Sarns 3M heparin bonded to Duraflo II and control circuits in a porcine model: macro- and microanalysis of thrombi accumulation in circuit arterial filters.

    PubMed

    Larson, D F; Arzouman, D; Kleinert, L; Patula, V; Williams, S

    2000-01-01

    Heparin-bonded perfusion circuits have been reported to reduce the thrombus formation during various levels of systemic heparinization. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of thrombo-resistance of the Sarns 3M heparin-bonded circuit to Baxter Duraflo II and untreated control in a porcine model. Fifteen Yorkshire pigs (60-65 kg) were anesthetized, heparinized with 3000 IU, intravenously (i.v.) and surgically cannulated with an internal jugular outflow and a femoral vein inflow. All circuits consisted of a 22-Fr venous cannula, centrifugal pump, arterial filter, an 18-Fr cannula for return and connected with equal lengths of 3/8" polyvinyl chloride tubing. The flows were maintained at 2.0 l/min for 4 h. Thrombus formation in filter samples were morphometrically analyzed through macro-densitometry, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our findings revealed that the 3M circuit had significantly less gross thrombus (p < 0.001), 66% and 84% less microscopic thrombi and fivefold less SEM-measured aggregates (p = 0.03) compared to the Duraflo II and uncoated groups. This study demonstrated that the 3M heparin-bonded circuit had significantly reduced the formation of micro- and macro-thrombi in the minimally heparinized pig model compared to the Duraflo II and untreated control circuits.

  2. Ferroelectric and magnetic properties of Aurivillius Bi{sub m+1}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub m−3}O{sub 3m+3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Tingting Kimura, Hideo; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang

    2015-11-15

    Aurivillius Bi{sub m+1}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub m−3}O{sub 3m+3} (m = 4, 5, 6) thin films have been deposited by a pulsed laser deposition system. The x-ray diffraction patterns indicate the formation of orthorhombic phase. The remanent polarization (2P{sub r}) of Bi{sub m+1}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub m−3}O{sub 3m+3} thin films is decreased with the m-number. Positive-up-negative-down measurements indicate the presence of ferroelectric (FE) polarization in as-obtained thin films. Piezoresponse force microscopy investigations confirm the existence of FE domains and the switchable polarization. Weak magnetic moment is detected in the Aurivillius films at room temperature. The present work suggests the possibility of Aurivillius Bi{sub m+1}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub m−3}O{sub 3m+3} (m = 4, 5, 6) materials as potential room-temperature multiferroics.

  3. Measurement of the radiative L3-M vacancy transfer probabilities of some 4f elements and compounds using Indus-2 synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnananda; Mirji, Santosh; Badiger, N. M.; Tiwari, M. K.

    2016-08-01

    The L X-ray intensity ratios (ILα/ILl, ILα/ILβ, ILα/ILγ) and the radiative L3-M vacancy transfer probabilities (ηL3-M) of some 4f elements such as Gd, Tb, Ho and compounds; Pr2O3, Pr2(CO3)3·8H2O, Nd2O3, Sm2O3, Sm2(CO3)3·2.85H2O, Sm2(SO4)3·8H2O, Gd2(CO3)3, Tb2O3, Dy2(SO4)3, Ho2O3 and HoF3 have been measured using Indus-2 synchrotron radiation. The elements and compounds are excited by synchrotron radiation and the emitted characteristic L X-ray photons are measured with high resolution silicon drift detector. The measured intensity ratios of compounds are not influenced by the chemical environment. However, the ηL3-M values of compound targets indicate the effect of crystal structure.

  4. SRG3/mBAF155 stabilizes the SWI/SNF-like BAF complex by blocking CHFR mediated ubiquitination and degradation of its major components

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Inkyung; Sohn, Dong H.; Choi, Jinwook; Kim, Joo Mi; Jeon, Shin; Seol, Jae Hong; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHFR mediates the ubiquitination of the major components of the SWI/SNF complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHFR mediated-ubiquitination induces the degradation of the major components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRG3 stabilizes the SWI/SNF-like BAF complex by blocking the CHFR activity. -- Abstract: The murine SWI/SNF-like BAF complex is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex that functions as a transcriptional regulator in cell proliferation, differentiation and development. The SWI/SNF-like BAF complex consists of several components including core subunits such as BRG1, BAF155/SRG3, BAF47/SNF5/INI1, and BAF170. We have previously shown that the interaction between SRG3/mBAF155 and other components of the complex stabilizes them by attenuating their proteasomal degradation. However, it has not been known how the major components of the SWI/SNF-like BAF complex such as BRG1, SNF5, and BAF60a are targeted for the ubiquitination and degradation, and how SRG3/mBAF155 protects them from the degradation process. Here we report that CHFR interacts with BRG1, SNF5, and BAF60a of the SWI/SNF-like BAF complex and ubiquitinates them to target for degradation through a proteasome-mediated pathway, and that SRG3/mBAF155 stabilizes these components by blocking their interaction with CHFR.

  5. Assessment of Three Tropospheric Delay Models (IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m) Based on Precise Point Positioning in the Chinese Region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing; Yuan, Yunbin; Li, Wei; Li, Ying; Chai, Yanju

    2016-01-20

    Tropospheric delays are one of the main sources of errors in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). They are usually corrected by using tropospheric delay models, which makes the accuracy of the models rather critical for accurate positioning. To provide references for suitable models to be chosen for GNSS users in China, we conduct herein a comprehensive study of the performances of the IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m models in China. Firstly, we assess the models using 5 years' Global Positioning System (GPS) derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) series from 25 stations of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC). Then we study the effects of the models on satellite positioning by using various Precise Point Positioning (PPP) cases with different tropospheric delay resolutions, the observation data processed in PPP is from 21 base stations of CMONOC for a whole year of 2012. The results show that: (1) the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the IGGtrop model is about 4.4 cm, which improves the accuracy of ZTD estimations by about 24% for EGNOS and 19% for UNB3m; (2) The positioning error in the vertical component of the PPP solution obtained by using the IGGtrop model is about 15.0 cm, which is about 30% and 21% smaller than those of the EGNOS and UNB3m models, respectively. In summary, the IGGtrop model achieves the best performance among the three models in the Chinese region.

  6. Assessment of Three Tropospheric Delay Models (IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m) Based on Precise Point Positioning in the Chinese Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxing; Yuan, Yunbin; Li, Wei; Li, Ying; Chai, Yanju

    2016-01-01

    Tropospheric delays are one of the main sources of errors in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). They are usually corrected by using tropospheric delay models, which makes the accuracy of the models rather critical for accurate positioning. To provide references for suitable models to be chosen for GNSS users in China, we conduct herein a comprehensive study of the performances of the IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m models in China. Firstly, we assess the models using 5 years’ Global Positioning System (GPS) derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) series from 25 stations of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC). Then we study the effects of the models on satellite positioning by using various Precise Point Positioning (PPP) cases with different tropospheric delay resolutions, the observation data processed in PPP is from 21 base stations of CMONOC for a whole year of 2012. The results show that: (1) the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the IGGtrop model is about 4.4 cm, which improves the accuracy of ZTD estimations by about 24% for EGNOS and 19% for UNB3m; (2) The positioning error in the vertical component of the PPP solution obtained by using the IGGtrop model is about 15.0 cm, which is about 30% and 21% smaller than those of the EGNOS and UNB3m models, respectively. In summary, the IGGtrop model achieves the best performance among the three models in the Chinese region. PMID:26805834

  7. High-throughput differential screening of mRNAs by serial analysis of gene expression: decreased expression of trefoil factor 3 mRNA in thyroid follicular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Takano, T; Miyauchi, A; Yoshida, H; Kuma, K; Amino, N

    2004-04-19

    To find mRNAs whose expression differs between thyroid follicular adenomas and carcinomas, a high-throughput analysis of mRNAs in these two tumours was performed. This method, named high-throughput differential screening by serial analysis of gene expression (HDSS), combines a modified method of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A total of 40 candidate tag sequences that showed extremely different expression levels between a follicular carcinoma and a follicular adenoma in the SAGE analysis were analysed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, using RNAs from an additional four typical follicular carcinomas and adenomas. One sequence tag that represents trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) mRNA showed a clear difference in its expression level between adenomas and carcinomas. The expression levels of TFF3 mRNA in 48 follicular adenomas and 29 follicular carcinomas were measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR using a specific probe for TFF3. They were significantly decreased in follicular carcinomas, especially in widely invasive types and those with evident metastases. These results indicate that the decreased expression of TFF3 mRNA is a marker of follicular carcinomas, especially those with a high risk of invasion or metastasis.

  8. Profile storage of organic/inorganic carbon in soil: from forest to desert.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yugang; Li, Yan; Ye, Xuehua; Chu, Yu; Wang, Xinping

    2010-03-15

    Understanding the distribution of organic/inorganic carbon storage in soil profile is crucial for assessing regional, continental and global soil C stores and predicting the consequences of global change. However, little is known about the organic/inorganic carbon storages in deep soil layers at various landscapes. This study was conducted to determine the soil organic/inorganic carbon storage in soil profile of 0-3m at 5 sites of natural landscape from forest to desert. Landscapes are temperate forest, temperate grassland, temperate shrub-grassland, temperate shrub desert, and temperate desert. Root mass density and carbon contents at the profile were determined for each site. The results showed that considerable decrease in root biomass and soil organic carbon content at the soil profile of 0-3m when landscape varied from forest to desert along a precipitation gradient, while soil inorganic carbon content increased significantly along the precipitation gradient. Namely, for density of soil organic carbon: forest>grassland>shrub-grassland>shrub desert>desert; for density of soil inorganic carbon: forest, grasslandcarbon storage was found in 1-3m depth. For grassland and shrub-grassland, the contribution from 1-3m was mainly in the form of organic carbon, while for shrub desert and desert the contribution from this depth was mainly in the form of inorganic carbon. The comparison of soil C storage between top 0-1m and 1-3m showed that the using top 1m of soil profile to estimate soil carbon storages would considerably underestimate soil carbon storage. This is especially true for organic soil carbon at grassland region, and for soil inorganic carbon at desert region.

  9. Length and Amino Acid Sequence of Peptides Substituted for the 5-HT3A Receptor M3M4 Loop May Affect Channel Expression and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Nicole K.; Bali, Moez; Akabas, Myles H.

    2012-01-01

    5-HT3A receptors are pentameric neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor family. Each subunit contains an extracellular domain, four transmembrane segments (M1, M2, M3, M4) and a 115 residue intracellular loop between M3 and M4. In contrast, the M3M4 loop in prokaryotic homologues is <15 residues. To investigate the limits of M3M4 loop length and composition on channel function we replaced the 5-HT3A M3M4 loop with two to seven alanine residues (5-HT3A-An = 2–7). Mutants were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized using two electrode voltage clamp recording. All mutants were functional. The 5-HT EC50's were at most 5-fold greater than wild-type (WT). The desensitization rate differed significantly among the mutants. Desensitization rates for 5-HT3A-A2, 5-HT3A-A4, 5-HT3A-A6, and 5-HT3A-A7 were similar to WT. In contrast, 5-HT3A-A3 and 5-HT3A-A5 had desensitization rates at least an order of magnitude faster than WT. The one Ala loop construct, 5-HT3A-A1, entered a non-functional state from which it did not recover after the first 5-HT application. These results suggest that the large M3M4 loop of eukaryotic Cys-loop channels is not required for receptor assembly or function. However, loop length and amino acid composition can effect channel expression and desensitization. We infer that the cytoplasmic ends of the M3 and M4 segments may undergo conformational changes during channel gating and desensitization and/or the loop may influence the position and mobility of these segments as they undergo gating-induced conformational changes. Altering structure or conformational mobility of the cytoplasmic ends of M3 and M4 may be the basis by which phosphorylation or protein binding to the cytoplasmic loop alters channel function. PMID:22539982

  10. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema

    Jeffrey Long

    2016-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  11. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  12. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  13. [Effect of Zhuangyao Jianshen Wan (ZYJCW) on P2X1 and P2X3 mRNA expressions in rats with diuresis caused by kidney deficiency].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-yi; Jiang, Wei-wen; He, Feng-lei; Mo, Guo-qiang; Guo, Zhong-hui; Wang, Xiao-dan; Wu, Qing-he; Cao, Hong-yin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the urination-reducing effect and mechanism of Zhuangyao Jianshen Wan (ZYJCW). In this study, SI rats were subcutaneously injected with 150 mg · kg(-1) dose of D-galactose to prepare the sub-acute aging model and randomly divided into the model group, the Suoquan Wan group (1.17 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)), and ZYJCW high, medium and low dose groups (2.39, 1.20, 0.60 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)) , with normal rats in the blank group. They were continuously administered with drugs for eight weeks. The metabolic cage method was adopted to measure the 24 h urine volume and 5 h water load urine volume in rats. The automatic biochemistry analyzer was adopted to detect urine concentrations of Na+, Cl-, K+. The ELISA method was used to determine serum aldosterone (ALD) and antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The changes in P2X1 and P2X3 mRNA expressions in bladder tissues of rats were detected by RT-PCR. According to the results, both ZYJCW high and medium dose groups showed significant down-regulations in 24 h urine volume and 5 h water load urine volume in (P <0.05, P <0.01), declines in Na+ and Cl- concentrations in urine (P <0.01), notable rises in plasma ALD and ADH contents (P <0.05, P <0.01) and remarkable down-regulations in the P2X1 and P2X3 mRNA expressions in bladder tissues (P <0.01). The ZYJCW low dose group revealed obvious reductions in Na+ and Cl- concentrations in urine (P <0.01). The results indicated that ZYJCW may show the urination-reducing effect by down-regulating the P2X1 and P2X3 mRNA expressions in bladder tissues of rats with diuresis caused by kidney deficiency.

  14. The trigonal bipyramidal MN3M species: a new kind of aromatic complex containing a multiple-fold aromatic N3 subunit.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Zhi-Ru; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2005-12-01

    A new kind of aromatic trigonal bipyramidal MN3M (M=Be, B, Mg, Al, and Ca) species, with all real frequencies, is obtained at the MP2/6-311+G(3d) level. The nucleus-independent chemical shift values are -102.16 ppm for the N3 (3-) ring, and -74.09, -79.39, -65.06, -74.44, and -62.33 ppm (at the geometrical center of the trigonal bipyramid) for BeN3Be, BN3B, MgN3Mg, AlN3Al, and CaN3Ca, respectively. Molecular orbital analysis indicates that the regular triangular N3 (3-) ring and each MN3M species have three aromatic six-electron systems (pi, sigma(p), and sigma(s)) and exhibit threefold aromaticity. The CaN3Ca species has a very low vertical ionization energy of 3.64 eV at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3d) level, which is even lower than the ionization energy (3.9 eV) of the Cs atom. Therefore, CaN3Ca can be considered as a new superalkali species. A further study on the CaN3CaCl molecule confirms the superalkali characteristics of CaN3Ca. Two interesting phenomena are explored in the MN3M species: the delocalized electron cloud of the N3 subunit is elongated by two M cations, and the electron clouds of two M cations are distended by the N3 (3-) ring.

  15. Exploring artificial layered heterostructures of LaM'O3/LaM''O3 (M'M''= NiCr, FeCr and NiV).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Kareev, M.; Freeland, J. W.; Kareev, A.; Lee, H. N.; Chakhalian, J.

    2008-03-01

    Digital synthesis of atomically sharp interfaces between strongly correlated electron systems can provide a template to build completely new materials. Here we present our results on magnetism and electronic structure in LaM'O3/LaM''O3 (M'M''= NiCr, FeCr and NiV) superlattices by using polarized X-ray spectroscopies. Using laser MBE, the (111) and (100) oriented ultra-thin superlattices were grown with alternating layer thicknesses of 1 unit cell. In the bulk, LaMO3 (M=Cr,Fe,V) are antiferromagnetic insulators while LaNiO3 is a paramagnetic metal. The evolution of element specific magnetism and charge at the interface of LFO/LCO, LNO/LVO and LNO/LCO superlattices with temperature and an applied magnetic field will be discussed in detail. The superlattice results will be contrasted to the bulk magnetic properties of the constituent layers. The work has been supported by U.S. DOD-ARO under Contract No. 0402-17291.

  16. Y chromosome haplotype diversity in Mongolic-speaking populations and gene conversion at the duplicated STR DYS385a,b in haplogroup C3-M407.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina; Woźniak, Marcin; Rogalla, Urszula; Dambueva, Irina; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosome microsatellite (Y-STR) diversity has been studied in different Mongolic-speaking populations from South Siberia, Mongolia, North-East China and East Europe. The results obtained indicate that the Mongolic-speaking populations clustered into two groups, with one group including populations from eastern part of South Siberia and Central Asia (the Buryats, Barghuts and Khamnigans) and the other group including populations from western part of Central Asia and East Europe (the Mongols and Kalmyks). High frequency of haplogroup C3-M407 (>50%) is present in the Buryats, Barghuts and Khamnigans, whereas in the Mongols and Kalmyks its frequency is much lower. In addition, two allelic combinations in DYS385a,b loci of C3-M407 haplotypes have been observed: the combination 11,18 (as well as 11,17 and 11,19) is frequent in different Mongolic-speaking populations, but the 11,11 branch is present mainly in the Kalmyks and Mongols. Results of locus-specific sequencing suggest that the action of gene conversion is a more likely explanation for origin of homoallelic 11,11 combination. Moreover, analysis of median networks of Y-STR haplotypes demonstrates that at least two gene conversion events can be revealed-one of them has probably occurred among the Mongols, and the other event occurred in the Barghuts. These two events give an average gene conversion rate range of 0.24-7.1 × 10(-3) per generation. PMID:26911356

  17. The SF3M approach to 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users: application to a gully network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; James, M. R.; Redel-Macías, M. D.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    3-D photo-reconstruction (PR) techniques have been successfully used to produce high resolution elevation models for different applications and over different spatial scales. However, innovative approaches are required to overcome some limitations that this technique may present in challenging scenarios. Here, we evaluate SF3M, a new graphical user interface for implementing a complete PR workflow based on freely available software (including external calls to VisualSFM and CloudCompare), in combination with a low-cost survey design for the reconstruction of a several-hundred-meters-long gully network. SF3M provided a semi-automated workflow for 3-D reconstruction requiring ~ 49 h (of which only 17% required operator assistance) for obtaining a final gully network model of > 17 million points over a gully plan area of 4230 m2. We show that a walking itinerary along the gully perimeter using two light-weight automatic cameras (1 s time-lapse mode) and a 6 m-long pole is an efficient method for 3-D monitoring of gullies, at a low cost (about EUR 1000 budget for the field equipment) and time requirements (~ 90 min for image collection). A mean error of 6.9 cm at the ground control points was found, mainly due to model deformations derived from the linear geometry of the gully and residual errors in camera calibration. The straightforward image collection and processing approach can be of great benefit for non-expert users working on gully erosion assessment.

  18. New rock salt-related oxides Li{sub 3}M{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} (M=Co, Ni): Synthesis, structure, magnetism and electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, S.; Morán, E.; Sáez-Puche, R.; Alario-Franco, M.Á.; Dos santos-Garcia, A.J.; Gonzalo, E.; Kuhn, A.; García-Alvarado, F.; Sivakumar, T.; Tamilarasan, S.; Natarajan, S.; Gopalakrishnan, J.

    2013-07-15

    We describe the synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic and electrochemical characterization of new rock salt-related oxides of formula, Li{sub 3}M{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} (M=Co, Ni). The M=Co oxide adopts the LiCoO{sub 2} (R-3m) structure, where sheets of LiO{sub 6} and (Co{sub 2}/Ru)O{sub 6} octahedra are alternately stacked along the c-direction. The M=Ni oxide also adopts a similar layered structure related to Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, where partial mixing of Li and Ni/Ru atoms lowers the symmetry to monoclinic (C2/c). Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that in Li{sub 3}Co{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}, the oxidation states of transition metal ions are Co{sup 3+} (S=0), Co{sup 2+} (S=1/2) and Ru{sup 4+} (S=1), all of them in low-spin configuration and at 10 K, the material orders antiferromagnetically. Analogous Li{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} presents a ferrimagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature of 100 K. The differences in the magnetic behavior have been explained in terms of differences in the crystal structure. Electrochemical studies correlate well with both magnetic properties and crystal structure. Li-transition metal intermixing may be at the origin of the more impeded oxidation of Li{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} when compared to Li{sub 3}Co{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}. Interestingly high first charge capacities (between ca. 160 and 180 mAh g{sup −1}) corresponding to ca. 2/3 of theoretical capacity are reached albeit, in both cases, capacity retention and cyclability are not satisfactory enough to consider these materials as alternatives to LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Two new rock salt related oxides of formula, Li{sub 3}M{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}, (M=Co, Ni) have been prepared. The M=Co oxide adopts the LiCoO{sub 2} (R-3m) structure and the M=Ni oxide adopts a similar layered structure related to Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3,} monoclinic (C2/c), with partial mixing of Li and Ni/Ru atoms. For Li{sub 3}Co{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}, oxidation state for Ru is 4+ and antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is

  19. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  20. Carbon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed.

  1. 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected types of meat, seafood, and poultry: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Wendy A; Aleo, Victoria A; Schultz, Ann M; Horter, Barbara L; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2003-01-01

    The 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method was compared with AOAC Official Method 975.55 for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected foods. Four foods--cooked, diced chicken; cured ham; smoked salmon; and pepperoni--were analyzed for S. aureus by 12 collaborating laboratories. For each food tested, the collaborators received 8 blind test samples consisting of a control sample, a low inoculation level, a medium inoculation level, and a medium inoculation level with background flora, each in duplicate. The mean log10 counts for the methods were comparable for all 4 foods. The repeatability and reproducibility variances of the 24 h Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method were similar to those of the 72 h standard method.

  2. 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected types of processed and prepared foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karen M; Jechorek, Robert P; Carver, Charles N; Horter, Barbara L; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2003-01-01

    The 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method was compared with AOAC Official Method 975.55 for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected foods. Five foods--frozen lasagna, custard, frozen mixed vegetables, frozen hashbrowns, and frozen batter-coated mushrooms--were analyzed for S. aureus by 13 collaborating laboratories. For each food tested, the collaborators received 8 blind test samples consisting of a control sample, a low inoculation level, a medium inoculation level, and a medium inoculation level with background flora, each in duplicate. The mean log10 counts for the methods were comparable for all 5 foods. The repeatability and reproducibility variances of the 24 h Petrifilm Staph Express Count plate method were similar to those of the 72 h standard method.

  3. Accuracy assessment of NOGGIN Plus and MALÅ RAMAC X3M single channel ground penetrating RADAR (GPR) for underground utility mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazali Hashim, Mas; Nizam Saip, Saiful; Hani, Nurfauziah; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Abdullahi, Saleh

    2016-06-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) becomes a popular device in investigation of the underground utilities in recent years. GPR analyses the type and position of utility objects. However, the performance accuracy of GPR models is an important issue that should be considered. This study conducts the accuracy analysis between two models of single channel GPR; NOGGIN PLUS and MALÅ RAMAC X3M, by focusing on the basic principles of single channel GPR, accuracy analysis and calibration methods implemented on GPR. The survey work has been performed to identify the most accurate instrument to detect underground utility objects. In addition, data analysis was carried out to compare between two models of single channel GPR. This study provides proper guidelines and assists surveyors to select the suitable instruments regarding on applications especially on utility mapping in terms of accuracy.

  4. Large magnetocaloric effect in La0.845Sr0.155Mn1-xMxO3 (M = Mn, Cu, Co) perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Phan, The-Long; Yu, Seong-Cho; Tho, Nguyen Duc; Chau, Nguyen

    2004-06-01

    We present the results of an investigation on the magnetocaloric effect in the perovskites of La0.845Sr0.155Mn1-xMxO3 (M = Mn, Cu, Co). It is found that there was a large magnetic entropy change, i.e. a large magneto-caloric effect, in all these samples. Among them, the magnetic entropy change reaches a maximum value of 2.67 J/kg K at the applied field of 13.5 kOe for the Cu-doped sample, suggesting that this material would be a suitable candidate for the advanced magnetic refrigeration technology. The large magnetic entropy change produced by the abrupt reduction of magnetization is attributed to the strong coupling between spin and lattice that occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition temperature (TC) - which is experimentally verified by electron paramagnetic resonance study.

  5. Identification of hyperhalogens in Ag(n)(BO2)(m) (n = 1-3, m = 1-2) clusters: anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Hong-Guang; Koirala, Pratik; Zheng, Wei-Jun; Kandalam, Anil K; Jena, Puru

    2014-12-21

    The electronic and structural properties of neutral and anionic Agn(BO2)m (n = 1-3, m = 1-2) clusters are investigated by using mass-selected anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Agreement between the measured and calculated vertical detachment energies (VDEs) allows us to validate the equilibrium geometries of [Agn(BO2)m](-) clusters obtained from theory. The ground state structures of anionic Ag2(BO2) and Agn(BO2)2 (n = 1-3) clusters are found to be very different from those of their neutral counterparts. The structures of anionic clusters are chain-like while those of the neutral clusters are closed-rings. The presence of multiple isomers for [Ag2(BO2)2](-) and [Ag3(BO2)2](-) in the cluster beam has also been confirmed. Several of these clusters are found to be hyperhalogens.

  6. Surface modification of MAl2O4:Eu2+,Dy3+ (M = Sr, Ca, Ba) phosphors to enhance water resistance by combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Suqing; Xue, Zhiping; Yang, Qu; Liu, Yingliang; Lei, Bingfu; Xiao, Yong; Zheng, Mingtao

    2013-10-01

    A facile combustion method was introduced into surface modification of MAl2O4:Eu2+,Dy3+ (M = Sr, Ca, Ba) phosphors to improve their water resistance. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), pH measurements and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry were used to characterize the phosphors before and after modification, respectively. Experimental results showed that compact layer of MAl2B2O7 (M = Sr, Ca, Ba) substance was formed on the surface of aluminate phosphors by direct chemical reaction between aluminate and boracic acid. MAl2B2O7 (M = Sr, Ca, Ba) substance is chemically stable in water and could improve water resistance of aluminate phosphors effectively with little influence of luminescence property. It was considered that the versatility of combustion method for surface modification of aluminate phosphors has been confirmed.

  7. MeV proton beams generated by 3 mJ ultrafast laser pulses at 0.5 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Bixue; Nees, John; Easter, James; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl; Davis, Jack; Petrov, George

    2009-09-07

    Well-collimated proton beams are generated from bulk glass along the target normal direction by tightly focused 55 fs, 3 mJ pulses from a laser operating at 0.5 kHz repetition rate. Proton beams with energies of >265 keV have an emission angle of about 16 deg. full width at half maximum. Spectral measurements indicate proton energies exceeding 0.5 MeV with a flux of 3.2x10{sup 9} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} and the flux of measured protons with energies of greater than 90 keV is 8.5x10{sup 11} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} on center.

  8. Effects of electron correlations application to Ti atoms on physical properties of (LaMnO3)m/(SrTiO3)n superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aezami, A.; Abolhassani, M.; Elahi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic structures and Curie temperatures of the (LaMnO3)m/(SrTiO3)n superlattices (SLm-n) with m=1, 2, 3 and n=1, 2, 3, 8 were investigated, using density functional theory implemented in Quantum-Espresso open source code. By applying on-site coulomb interaction (Hubbard term U) to Ti atoms for all of these superlattices, using Stoner-Wolfarth model, it was found that the magnetic order of interfacial atoms of these superlattices changed to ferromagnetic by implying U=5 eV on Ti atoms. The inclusion of electron-electron correlation with U=5 eV on the Ti atoms for all of the superlattices made the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the interfaces, half-metallic. The obtained values of Curie temperature, calculated within mean field approximation with U=5 eV on the Ti atoms, are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of a new and ordered quaternary alloy MnNiCuSb (SG: F 4 bar 3m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Zeba; Thakur, Gohil S.; Ghara, Somnath; Gupta, L. C.; Sundaresan, A.; Ganguli, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized a new crystallographically ordered quaternary Heusler alloy, MnNiCuSb. The crystal structure of the alloy has been determined by Rietveld refinement of the powder X-ray diffraction data. This alloy crystallizes in the LiMgPdSb type structure with F 4 bar 3m space group. MnNiCuSb is a ferromagnet with a high TC~690 K and magnetic moment of 3.85 μB/f.u. Besides this we have also studied two other off-stoichiometric compositions; one Cu rich and the other Ni rich (MnNi0.9Cu1.1Sb and MnNi1.1Cu0.9Sb) which are also ferromagnets. It must be stressed that MnNiCuSb is one of the very few known, non-Fe containing quaternary Heusler alloys with 1:1:1:1 composition.

  10. Luminescence properties of M2Si5N8:Ce3+ (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) mixed nitrides prepared by metal hydrides as starting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, Daiki; Kim, Hyo Sung; Horikawa, Takashi; Itoh, Masahiro; Machida, Ken-ichi

    2012-08-01

    Mixed metal nitrides, M2Si5N8:Ce3+ (M = Ca, Sr, Ba), were synthesized from M2-yCeySi5 or an appropriate mixture of MSiHx, Si3N4 and CeF3, by a direct nitriding process in N2 gas: 2 MSiHx + Si3N4 + CeF3 → M2Si5N8:Ce3+. Also, charge-compensated materials, M2AlzSi5-zN8:Ce3+ were prepared (from an appropriate mixture of MSiHx, MAlSiHx, Si3N4 and CeF3) and the luminescence properties were characterized. The resultant phosphors showed green emission suitable for LED illumination by optimizing the mixing ratio of metal elements.

  11. Charge transfer and orbital reconstruction in the (La2/3Sr1/3MnO3)m/(SrRuO3)n superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Kai; Zhu, H. P.; Zou, W. Q.; Zhang, F. M.; Wu, X. S.

    2015-05-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of (La2/3Sr1/3MnO3)m/(SrRuO3)n superlattices have been investigated based on the first principles calculations. An obvious Jahn-Teller distortion, which depends on m, n, appears in MnO6 octahedron in the superlattices. The stretch along c-axis of MnO6 octahedron at the interface lifts the Mn eg orbital degeneracy, with electrons preferring the lower energy 3 z2-r2 to the higher energy x2-y2 . Benefitting from the charge transfer at the interface, the still occupied x2-y2 orbital can mediate a robust in-plane double exchange interaction. La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 block is ferromagnetic and metallic, even for the superlattice with m = n = 1.

  12. Generation of stable 3'-mRNA cleavage fragments induced by siRNA in cells with high-levels of duck hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lin; Mao, Qing; Blum, Hubert E

    2014-01-17

    Therapeutic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have attracted a lot of interest both in basic biomedical sciences as well as in translational medicine. Apart from their therapeutic efficacy adverse effects of siRNAs must be addressed. The generation of stable mRNA cleavage fragments and the translation of N-truncated proteins induced by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASOs) have been reported. Similar to ASOs, siRNAs are considered to function via an antisense mechanism that promotes the cleavage of the target mRNA. To further investigate whether the stable mRNA cleavage fragments also occur in siRNA we constructed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmid, pshRNA794, containing the same sequence reported in experiments using ASOs which directly targeted the overlapping region of the pre-genomic mRNA (pgmRNA) and sub-genomic mRNA (sgmRNA) of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The shRNA resulted in a 70.9% and 69.9% reduction of the DHBV mRNAs in LMH and HuH-7 cells, respectively. In addition a 70% inhibition of the DHBV DNA level was observed. Interestingly, 3'-mRNA cleavage fragments were detected in LMH but not in HuH-7 cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the ASO sequence was also effective in siRNA. Importantly, our results provide direct evidence that stable 3'-mRNA fragments were generated by siRNA in cells with high levels of DHBV replication. Whether these can cause adverse RNAi effects needs to be explored further.

  13. Coordinated study of subkilometer and 3-m irregularities in the F region generated by high-power HF heating at Arecibo

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Ganguly, S.; Gordon, W.E.

    1983-11-01

    High-power high-frequency transmitters near Arecibo were used to generate artificial ionospheric irregularities in the F region. Radio star scintillation observations at 430 MHz were performed at Arecibo Ionospheric Observatory with the 305-m antenna, and radar backscatter measurements at 50 MHz were simultaneously made from Guadeloupe Island to probe the subkilometer and 3-m irregularities in the heated volume. Scintillation studies indicate a low-frequency modulation of the faster intensity fluctuation structure. By the use of plasma drift data this low-frequency modulation of the faster intensity fluctuation structure. By the use of plasma drift data this low-frequency temporal structure translates to spatial dimensions of 1--2 km. The frequency of the modulation envelope is found to be controlled by the heater power and is related to the dominant irregularity wavelength generated by the self-focusing instability. Scintillation spectra imply a steep power law index of approx.5 in the scale length range of about 300 m to 150 m and a shallow index of approx.2 at less than 150 m. The steep power law index may arise from a aperture averaging effect of the large 305-m antenna at Arecibo. Simultaneous measurements of 430-MHz scintillations and 50-MHz radar backscatter from field-aligned striations were performed to show that subkilometer irregularities can be generated by both O and X mode heating whereas the 3-m irregularities are excited only by the O mode heating, as is predicted by the theories of self-focusing and parametric instability.

  14. The association between splenocyte apoptosis and alterations of Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 mRNA expression, and oxidative stress induced by dietary nickel chloride in broilers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wu, Bangyuan

    2013-12-01

    Two hundred and forty avian broilers were equally divided into four groups, and raised with a corn-soybean basal diet or the same diet supplemented with 300, 600, 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Numbers or percentages of apoptotic splenocytes by flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL were higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than those in the control group. Results measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that mRNA expression and contents were significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bax and Caspase-3, and were significantly lower (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bcl-2 of the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups. Also, the SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, and the ability to inhibit hydroxyl radical, and GSH contents were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), and MDA contents were increased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in all groups. In conclusion, dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused apoptosis, altered Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression levels and contents, and induced oxidative stress in the spleen. Also, splenocyte apoptosis was closely related to the alternations of Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression, and oxidative damage. The splenic immunity and blood filtration functions were impaired in broilers. PMID:24351749

  15. Tudor-SN, a component of stress granules, regulates growth under salt stress by modulating GA20ox3 mRNA levels in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunxia; Yan, Zongyun; Wang, Yizheng; Yan, Xiaoyuan; Han, Yuzhen

    2014-01-01

    The Tudor-SN protein (TSN) is universally expressed and highly conserved in eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, TSN is reportedly involved in stress adaptation, but the mechanism involved in this adaptation is not understood. Here, we provide evidence that TSN regulates the mRNA levels of GA20ox3, a key enzyme for gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. The levels of GA20ox3 transcripts decreased in TSN1/TSN2 RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic lines and increased in TSN1 over-expression (OE) transgenic lines. The TSN1 OE lines displayed phenotypes that may be attributed to the overproduction of GA. No obvious defects were observed in the RNAi transgenic lines under normal conditions, but under salt stress conditions these lines displayed slower growth than wild-type (WT) plants. Two mutants of GA20ox3, ga20ox3-1 and -2, also showed slower growth under stress than WT plants. Moreover, a higher accumulation of GA20ox3 transcripts was observed under salt stress. The results of a western blot analysis indicated that higher levels of TSN1 accumulated after salt treatment than under normal conditions. Subcellular localization studies showed that TSN1 was uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm under normal conditions but accumulated in small granules and co-localized with RBP47, a marker protein for stress granules (SGs), in response to salt stress. The results of RNA immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that TSN1 bound GA20ox3 mRNA in vivo. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that TSN is a novel component of plant SGs that regulates growth under salt stress by modulating levels of GA20ox3 mRNA. PMID:25205572

  16. Measurement of TFF3 mRNA in aspirates from thyroid nodules using mesh filtration: the first clinical trial in 130 cases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroya; Takano, Toru; Kihara, Minoru; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mikio; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Hidaka, Yoh; Miyauchi, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of gene expression levels in thyroid tumor cells in aspirates was difficult because it is interfered with peripheral blood cells or infiltrating lymphocytes. In this study, we established a novel method to separate thyroid tumor cells from blood cells efficiently with mesh filtration. The expression level of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) mRNA was estimated using LGALS3 mRNA as an internal control (T/G ratio) in 148 preoperative thyroid aspirates. Intra-assay coefficients of variation (CV) of T/G ratio for high, moderate, and low samples were 6.5%, 2.5%, and 9.7%, respectively, and inter-assay CV for high, moderate, and low samples were 27.7%, 21.9%, and 38.2%, respectively. Nondiagnostic samples in terms of T/G ratio and cytology were 12.2% and 16.9%, respectively. We observed no interference with the data by contaminating blood cells. Among these patients, 12 patients received more than two repeated aspirations. We did not observe a marked day-to-day variation except in two cases. All 13 preoperative aspirates diagnosed as malignant by cytology showed an extremely low T/G ratio, whereas 93 aspirates diagnosed as benign by cytology showed extremely varied T/G ratios and 21.5% of them showed a T/G ratio below the cut-off value. Eleven cases underwent surgery. All nodules showing a low T/G ratio were diagnosed as papillary carcinoma by pathological diagnosis. However, one nodule diagnosed as follicular adenoma after surgery showed a high T/G ratio. Our present method may be a promising preoperative test for measuring mRNAs in thyroid aspirates.

  17. SF3M software: 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users and its application to a gully network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; James, M. R.; Redel-Macías, M. D.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional photo-reconstruction (PR) techniques have been successfully used to produce high-resolution surface models for different applications and over different spatial scales. However, innovative approaches are required to overcome some limitations that this technique may present for field image acquisition in challenging scene geometries. Here, we evaluate SF3M, a new graphical user interface for implementing a complete PR workflow based on freely available software (including external calls to VisualSFM and CloudCompare), in combination with a low-cost survey design for the reconstruction of a several-hundred-metres-long gully network. SF3M provided a semi-automated workflow for 3-D reconstruction requiring ~ 49 h (of which only 17 % required operator assistance) for obtaining a final gully network model of > 17 million points over a gully plan area of 4230 m2. We show that a walking itinerary along the gully perimeter using two lightweight automatic cameras (1 s time-lapse mode) and a 6 m long pole is an efficient method for 3-D monitoring of gullies, at a low cost (~ EUR 1000 budget for the field equipment) and the time requirements (~ 90 min for image collection). A mean error of 6.9 cm at the ground control points was found, mainly due to model deformations derived from the linear geometry of the gully and residual errors in camera calibration. The straightforward image collection and processing approach can be of great benefit for non-expert users working on gully erosion assessment.

  18. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat. No. 4.909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially. the carbon fabric or tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel. to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar. or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U" channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also be accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum-alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  19. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  20. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  1. Temperature sensitivity (Q10), and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in permafrost soils with different carbon quality and under experimental warming. R. Bracho1, E.A.G Schuur1, E. Pegoraro1, K.G. Crummer1, S. Natali2, J. Zhou, Y Luo3, J. L. Wu3, M. Tiedje4, K. Konstantinidis5 1Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 2Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA. 3Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 4Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; 5Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics and School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho, R. G.; Schuur, E. A.; Pegoraro, E.; Crummer, K. G.; Natali, S.; Zhou, J.; Wu, L.; Luo, Y.; Tiedje, J. M.; Konstantinidis, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils contain approximately1700 Pg of carbon (C), twice the amount of C in the atmosphere. Temperatures in higher latitudes are increasing, inducing permafrost thaw and subsequent microbial decomposition of previously frozen C. This process is one of the most likely positive feedbacks to climate change. Understanding the temperature sensitivity (Q10) and dynamics of SOM decomposition under warming is essential to predict the future state of the earth - climate system. Alaskan tundra soils were exposed to two winter warming (WW) seasons in the field, which warmed the soils by 4°C to 40 cm depth. Soils were obtained from three depths (0 - 15, 15 - 25 and 45 - 55 cm) and differed in initial amounts of labile and recalcitrant C. Soils were incubated in the lab under aerobic conditions, at 15 and 25°C over 365 days. Q10 was estimated at 14, 100 & 280 days of incubation (DOI); C fluxes were measured periodically and dynamics of SOM decomposition (C pool sizes and decay rates) were estimated by fitting a two pool C model to cumulative respired C (Ccum, mgC/ginitialC). After two WW seasons, initial C content tended to decrease through the soil profile and C:N ratio was significantly decreased in the top 15 cm. After one year of incubation, Ccum was twice as high at 25°C as at 15°C and significantly decreased with depth. No significant WW field treatment was detected, although Ccum tended to be lower in warmed soils. Labile C accounted for up to 5% of initial soil C content in the top 15 cm and decreased with depth. Soils exposed to WW had smaller labile C pools, and higher labile C decay rates in the top 25 cm. Q10 significantly decreased with time and depth as labile pool decreased, especially for WW. This decrease with time indicates a lower temperature sensitivity of the most recalcitrant C pool. The deepest WW soil layer, where warming was more pronounced, had significantly lower Q10 compared to control soils at the same depth. After two seasons, the

  2. Topochemical fluorination of Sr3(M(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7 (M = Ti, Mn, Fe), n = 2, Ruddlesden-Popper phases.

    PubMed

    Romero, Fabio Denis; Bingham, Paul A; Forder, Susan D; Hayward, Michael A

    2013-03-18

    Reaction of the appropriate Sr3(M(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7 (M = Ti, Mn, Fe), n = 2, Ruddlesden-Popper oxide with CuF2 under flowing oxygen results in formation of the oxide-fluoride phases Sr3(Ti(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7F2, Sr3(Mn(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7F2, and Sr3(Fe(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O(5.5)F(3.5) via a topochemical anion insertion/substitution process. Analysis indicates the titanium and manganese phases have Ti(4+), Ru(6+) and Mn(4+), Ru(6+) oxidation state combinations, respectively, while Mössbauer spectra indicate an Fe(3+), Ru(5.5+) combination for the iron phase. Thus, it can be seen that the soft fluorination conditions employed lead to formation of highly oxidized Ru(6+) centers in all three oxide-fluoride phases, while oxidation states of the other transition metal M cations remain unchanged. Fluorination of Sr3(Ti(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7 to Sr3(Ti(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7F2 leads to suppression of magnetic order as the fluorinated material approaches metallic behavior. In contrast, fluorination of Sr3(Mn(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7 and Sr3(Fe(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7 lifts the magnetic frustration present in the oxide phases, resulting in observation of long-range antiferromagnetic order at low temperature in Sr3(Mn(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O7F2 and Sr3(Fe(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O(5.5)F(3.5). The influence of the topochemical fluorination on the magnetic behavior of the Sr3(M(0.5)Ru(0.5))2O(x)F(y) phases is discussed on the basis of changes to the ruthenium oxidation state and structural distortions.

  3. Early depression of Ankrd2 and Csrp3 mRNAs in the polyribosomal and whole tissue fractions in skeletal muscle with decreased voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael D; Childs, Thomas E; Brown, Jacob D; Davis, J Wade; Booth, Frank W

    2012-04-01

    The wheel-lock (WL) model for depressed ambulatory activity in rats has shown metabolic maladies ensuing within 53-173 h after WL begins. We sought to determine if WL beginning after 21-23 days of voluntary running in growing female Wistar rats affected the mRNA profile in the polyribosomal fraction from plantaris muscle shortly following WL. In experiment 1, WL occurred at 0200 and muscles were harvested at 0700 daily at 5 h (WL5h, n = 4), 29 h (WL29h, n = 4), or 53 h (WL53h, n = 4) after WL. Affymetrix Rat Gene 1.0 ST Arrays were used to test the initial question as to whether WL affects mRNA occupancy on skeletal muscle polyribosomes. Using a false discovery rate of 15%, no changes in mRNAs in the polyribosomal fraction were observed at WL29h and eight mRNAs (of over 8,200 identified targets) were altered at WL53h compared with WL5h. Interestingly, two of the six downregulated genes included ankyrin repeat domain 2 (Ankrd2) and cysteine-rich protein 3/muscle LIM protein (Csrp3), both of which encode mechanical stretch sensors and RT-PCR verified their WL-induced decline. In experiment 2, whole muscle mRNA and protein levels were analyzed for Ankrd2 and Csrp3 from the muscles of WL5h (4 original samples + 2 new), WL29h (4 original), WL53h (4 original + 2 new), as well as WL173 h (n = 6 new) and animals that never ran (SED, 4-5 new). Relative to WL5h controls, whole tissue Ankrd2 and Csrp3 mRNAs were lower (P < 0.05) at WL53h, WL173h, and SED; Ankrd2 protein tended to decrease at WL53h (P = 0.054) and Csrp3 protein was less in WL173h and SED rats (P < 0.05). In summary, unique early declines in Ankrd2 and Csrp3 mRNAs were identified with removal of voluntary running, which was subsequently followed by declines in Csrp3 protein levels during longer periods of wheel lock.

  4. Protection against rectal transmission of an emtricitabine-resistant simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIV162p3M184V mutant by intermittent prophylaxis with Truvada.

    PubMed

    Cong, Mian-Er; Youngpairoj, Ae S; Zheng, Qi; Aung, Wutyi; Mitchell, James; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Hanson, Debra L; Hendry, R Michael; Dobard, Charles; Heneine, Walid; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2011-08-01

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada (emtricitabine [FTC] and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate [TDF]) is a novel HIV prevention strategy recently found to reduce HIV incidence among men who have sex with men. We used a macaque model of HIV transmission to investigate if Truvada maintains prophylactic efficacy against an FTC-resistant isolate containing the M184V mutation. Five macaques received a dose of Truvada 3 days before exposing them rectally to the simian/human immunodeficiency virus mutant SHIV162p3(M184V), followed by a second dose 2 h after exposure. Five untreated animals were used as controls. Virus exposures were done weekly for up to 14 weeks. Despite the high (>100-fold) level of FTC resistance conferred by M184V, all five treated animals were protected from infection, while the five untreated macaques were infected (P = 0.0008). Our results show that Truvada maintains high prophylactic efficacy against an FTC-resistant isolate. Increased susceptibility to tenofovir due to M184V and other factors, including residual antiviral activity by FTC and/or reduced virus fitness due to M184V, may all have contributed to the observed protection.

  5. Evaluation of a flexible wall testing technique to minimize wall interferences in the NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Free air simulations in conventional transonic wind tunnels require improvement which adaptive wall testing techniques can provide primarily by minimizing wall interferences. In addition, these techniques offer other substantial advantages such as increased Reynolds number capability and a reduction in tunnel drive power. The combination of an adaptive wall test section with a continuous flow cryogenic wind tunnel is unique. The test section has four solid walls with two flexible walls mounted between rigid sidewalls. This modification of an existing major facility stresses the practicalities of the testing technique. These practicalities were evaluated in terms of flexible wall test section design and operation. Increased hardware and operating complexity of the new test section is offset by a significant improvement in real-time data accuracy in two-dimensional testing. Validation testing has expanded the experience with flexible walled test sections into the realms of flight Reynolds numbers and high lift. Data accuracy has been assessed with regard to test section geometry and operating tolerances. The successful evaluation of the testing technique in two-dimensional testing has proved that a production type operation is possible, with suitable control system and test section design. The 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel with an adaptive wall test section currently represents the most advanced two-dimensional facility anywhere.

  6. Reactivity of Hydride Bridges in High-Spin [3M-3(μ-H)] Clusters (M = FeII, CoII).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yousoon; Anderton, Kevin J; Sloane, Forrest T; Ermert, David M; Abboud, Khalil A; García-Serres, Ricardo; Murray, Leslie J

    2015-08-26

    The designed [3M-3(μ-H)] clusters (M = Fe(II), Co(II)) Fe3H3L (1-H) and Co3H3L (2-H) [where L(3-) is a tris(β-diketiminate) cyclophane] were synthesized by treating the corresponding M3Br3L complexes with KBEt3H. From single-crystal X-ray analysis, the hydride ligands are sterically protected by the cyclophane ligand, and these complexes selectively react with CO2 over other unsaturated substrates (e.g., CS2, Me3SiCCH, C2H2, and CH3CN). The reaction of 1-H or 2-H with CO2 at room temperature yielded Fe3(OCHO)(H)2L (1-CO2) or Co3(OCHO)(H)2L (2-CO2), respectively, which evidence the differential reactivity of the hydride ligands within these complexes. The analogous reactions at elevated temperatures revealed a distinct difference in the reactivity pattern for 2-H as compared to 1-H; Fe3(OCHO)3L (1-3CO2) was generated from 1-H, while 2-H afforded only 2-CO2.

  7. METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/3M CRADA 94024. Online particulate monitoring began in June 1994 and ended in October, 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in four MGCR runs (No. 7 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.0 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, Modular Gas Cleanup Rig, from the FBG, pressurized Fluidized-Bed Gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit. The alkali monitor unit was not used during runs No. 7 through No. 10.

  8. A liquid film-forming acrylate for peri-wound protection: a systematic review and meta-analysis (3M Cavilon no-sting barrier film).

    PubMed

    Schuren, Jan; Becker, Anja; Sibbald, R Gary

    2005-09-01

    To undertake a systematic review of all reliable evaluations of the clinical performance and cost-effectiveness of a film-forming liquid acrylate in the protection of the chronic ulcer peri-wound skin. Results from searches were scrutinised by two reviewers to identify possible randomised controlled trials and full reports of these were obtained. Details of eligible studies were extracted and summarised independently by two reviewers using a data extraction sheet. Meta-analysis was used to combine the results of trials where the interventions and outcome measures were sufficiently similar. A total of nine eligible studies were identified. The review reveals that a liquid-film forming acrylate (Cavilon no-sting barrier film, 3M, Minneapolis, MN, USA) is a safe and effective skin barrier to protect the peri-wound area of chronic ulcers. There is no difference between the protective properties of different barrier methods that are used to protect the peri-wound skin around chronic ulcers. Compared with no treatment or a placebo, this liquid film-forming acrylate has a significant impact on the integrity of the peri-wound skin. In addition, it has significant benefits in terms of pain control and patient comfort, and its use may reduce nursing time.

  9. Theoretical and experimental studies of formation and migration of oxygen vacancies in BaM x Ti1- x O3 (M = Zr, Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Yuji; Aman, Sanshiro; Kuwabara, Akihide; Moriwake, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    The formation and migration energies of oxygen vacancies in pure BaTiO3, and BaM x Ti1- x O3 (M = Zr, Ge) are calculated by first-principles calculations to understand the effect of doping on the reliability of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs). The formation and migration energies of oxygen vacancies are found to be larger in BaZr x Ti1- x O3 than in BaTiO3. This finding could be one of the possible reasons behind the improved reliability of Zr-doped MLCCs materials. On the other hand, by substituting Ge, the migration energy of BaGe x Ti1- x O3 becomes larger than that of BaTiO3. This is despite the smaller oxygen vacancy formation energy in BaGe x Ti1- x O3 than in BaTiO3. Even though Zr and Ge are tetravalent in BaM x Ti1- x O3, their valence states are different after the formation of oxygen vacancies, providing an explanation for the differences in vacancy formation and migration energies between BaZr x Ti1- x O3 and BaGe x Ti1- x O3. Our theoretical results are further confirmed by experiments on these model systems.

  10. Elastic and optoelectronic properties of RbMF3 (M=Zn, Cd, Hg): A mBJ density functional calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, G.; Hayatullah; Khenata, R.; Khalid, M. N.; Naeem, S.

    2013-02-01

    Bonding nature as well as the structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of cubic fluoroperovskites RbMF3 (M=Zn, Cd and Hg) compounds have been calculated using a full-potential augmented plane (FPLAPW) method within the density functional theory. The exchange-correlation potential was treated with the generalized gradient approximation of Wu and Cohen (WC-GGA) to calculate the total energy. Moreover, the modified Becke-Johnson potential (TB-mBJ) was also applied for the electronic and optical properties. It is found that lattice constant increases while bulk modulus decreases with the change of cation (M) in going from Zn to Hg in RbMF3 in accordance with the experimental results. The calculations of the electronic band structure, density of states and charge density show that these compounds have an indirect energy band gap (M-Г) with a mixed ionic and covalent bonding. The optical properties (namely: the absorption coefficient and the reflectivity) were calculated for radiation up to 45.0 eV.

  11. Understanding the Interplay of Polar, Magnetic, and Electronic Order in Ferroic (LuFeO3)m /LuFe2O4 Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebola, Alejandro; Das, Hena; Fennie, Craig

    Multiferroics are not only important from a technological point of view but also because of the rich and complex physics that results from the interplay between spin, charge and structural distortions. Hexagonal LuFeO3 has recently been understood theoretical and experimentally, and shown to be an improper structural ferroelectric directly analogous to the hexagonal manganites. LuFe2O4 is structurally homologous to LuFeO3 -both are characterized by a FeO5 bipyramidal crystal field- but unlike the latter it exhibits a much larger magnetic moment and it is still a matter of debate whether it is ferroelectric. The double Fe-layer in LuFe2O4 is thought to be charge ordered and highly frustrated, resulting in possible polar, non-polar or anti-polar charge arrangements. Here we first investigate the relation between different charge and magnetic orders and structural distortions in bulk LuFe2O4 by DFT and Monte Carlo calculations. Then we concentrate on a system that combines both mechanisms -a structural improper ferroelectric and a charge frustrated polar structure- such as the (LuFeO3)m /LuFe2O4superlattices.

  12. Measurements in the flow field of a cylinder with a laser transit anemometer and a drag rake in the Langley 0.3 m transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honaker, W. C.; Lawing, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel using a Laser Transit Anemometer (LTA) to probe the flow field around a 3.05 centimeter-diameter circular cylinder. Measurements were made along the stagnation line and determination of particle size was evaluated by their ability to follow the flow field. The LTA system was also used to scan into the boundary layer near the 45 degree point on the model. Results of these scans are presented in graphic and tabular form. Flow field particle seeding was accomplished by inbleeding dry service air. The residual moisture (5-10 ppm) condensed and formed ice particles which served as Mie scattering centers for the LTA detection system. Comparison of data taken along the stagnation streamline with theory indicated that these particles tracked the velocity gradient of the flow. Tunnel operating conditions for the tests were a Mach number of 0.3, a pressure of 1.93 x 100000 n/m squared, and a temperature of 225 degrees K. Free stream Mach number and pressure were varied for the particle size determination.

  13. The horizontal branch in the UV colour-magnitude diagrams - II. The case of M3, M13 and M79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessandro, E.; Salaris, M.; Ferraro, F. R.; Mucciarelli, A.; Cassisi, S.

    2013-03-01

    We present a detailed comparison between far-ultraviolet (UV)/optical colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope data and suitable theoretical models for three Galactic globular clusters: M3, M13 and M79. These systems represents a `classical' example of clusters in the intermediate-metallicity regime that, even sharing similar metal content and age, show remarkably different horizontal branch morphologies. As a consequence, the observed differences in the colour distributions of horizontal branch stars cannot be interpreted in terms of either first (metallicity) or a second parameter such as age. We investigate here the possible role of variations of initial helium abundance (Y). Thanks to the use of a proper setup of far-UV filters, we are able to put strong constraints on the maximum Y (Ymax) values compatible with the data. We find differences Δ Y_max˜ 0.02-0.04 between the clusters with M13 showing the largest value (Ymax ˜ 0.30) and M3 the smallest (Ymax ˜ 0.27). In general, we observe that these values are correlated with the colour extensions of their horizontal branches and with the range of the observed NaO anticorrelations.

  14. Rapid identification of a novel complex I MT-ND3 m.10134C>A mutation in a Leigh syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Miller, David K; Menezes, Minal J; Simons, Cas; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Grimmond, Sean M; Thorburn, David R; Christodoulou, John; Taft, Ryan J

    2014-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive multi-system neurodegenerative disorder, the genetics of which is frequently difficult to resolve. Rapid determination of the genetic etiology of LS in a 5-year-old girl facilitated inclusion in Edison Pharmaceutical's phase 2B clinical trial of EPI-743. SNP-arrays and high-coverage whole exome sequencing were performed on the proband, both parents and three unaffected siblings. Subsequent multi-tissue targeted high-depth mitochondrial sequencing was performed using custom long-range PCR amplicons. Tissue-specific mutant load was also assessed by qPCR. Complex I was interrogated by spectrophotometric enzyme assays and Western Blot. No putatively causal mutations were identified in nuclear-encoded genes. Analysis of low-coverage off-target mitochondrial reads revealed a previously unreported mitochondrial mutation in the proband in MT-ND3 (m.10134C>A, p.Q26K), a Complex I mitochondrial gene previously associated with LS. Targeted investigations demonstrated that this mutation was 1% heteroplasmic in the mother's blood and homoplasmic in the proband's blood, fibroblasts, liver and muscle. Enzyme assays revealed decreased Complex I activity. The identification of this novel LS MT-ND3 variant, the genomics of which was accomplished in less than 3.5 weeks, indicates that rapid genomic approaches may prove useful in time-sensitive cases with an unresolved genetic diagnosis. PMID:25118196

  15. Charge-compensation effect of Al on luminescence properties of M2(Si, Al)5N8:Ce3+ (M = Ca, Sr, Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, Daiki; Horikawa, Takashi; Hanzawa, Hiromasa; Machida, Ken-ichi

    2013-09-01

    The charge-compensated materials, M2AlxSi5-xN8:Ce3+ (M = Ca, Sr, Ba), were synthesized from appropriate mixtures of MSi, MAlSi, (MSiHy, MAlSiHy), Si3N4 and CeF3 by a direct nitriding process in a N2 gas and the luminescence properties were characterized. The resultant phosphors showed green emission suitable for LED illumination by optimizing the mixing ratio of metal elements. These phosphors were effectively excited by violet or blue light (400-430 nm) and the emission bands were observed at various wavelength regions for Ca: 489-528 nm, Sr: 511-520 nm, and Ba: 508-514 nm. Although the emission intensity of Ca2(Si, Al)5N8:Ce3+ was decreased with increasing amount of Al, those of Sr- and Ba-analogues were maximized at x = 0.5 of Al content in M2Si5-xAlxN8:Ce3+.

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis: A fast and efficient route to produce LaMO{sub 3} (M = Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) perovskite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Prado-Gonjal, J.; Arevalo-Lopez, A.M.; Moran, E.

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Lanthanum perovskites can be prepared by microwave irradiation in a domestic set-up. {yields} Microwave-assisted synthesis yields well crystallized and pure materials, sometimes nanosized. {yields} Rietveld analysis has been performed to refine the structures. {yields} Magnetic and electric measurements are similar to those previously reported. {yields} Microwave-assisted synthesis is a fast and efficient method for the synthesis of lanthanum perovskites. -- Abstract: A series of lanthanum perovskites, LaMO{sub 3} (M = Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co), having important technological applications, have been successfully prepared by a very fast, inexpensive, reproducible, environment-friendly method: the microwave irradiation of the corresponding mixtures of nitrates. Worth to note, the microwave source is a domestic microwave oven. In some cases the reaction takes place in a single step, while sometimes further annealings are necessary. For doped materials the method has to be combined with others such as sol-gel. Usually, nanopowders are produced which yield high density pellets after sintering. Rietveld analysis, oxygen stoichiometry, microstructure and magnetic measurements are presented.

  17. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  18. Formation of the bisulfite anion (HSO(3) (-) , m/z 81) upon collision-induced dissociation of anions derived from organic sulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Freneil B; Wood, Ryan E; Nishshanka, Upul; Attygalle, Athula B

    2012-04-01

    In the negative-ion collision-induced dissociation mass spectra of most organic sulfonates, the base peak is observed at m/z 80 for the sulfur trioxide radical anion (SO(3) (-·) ). In contrast, the product-ion spectra of a few sulfonates, such as cysteic acid, aminomethanesulfonate, and 2-phenylethanesulfonate, show the base peak at m/z 81 for the bisulfite anion (HSO(3) (-) ). An investigation with an extensive variety of sulfonates revealed that the presence of a hydrogen atom at the β-position relative to the sulfur atom is a prerequisite for the formation of the bisulfite anion. The formation of HSO(3) (-) is highly favored when the atom at the β-position is nitrogen, or the leaving neutral species is a highly conjugated molecule such as styrene or acrylic acid. Deuterium-exchange experiments with aminomethanesulfonate demonstrated that the hydrogen for HSO(3) (-) formation is transferred from the β-position. The presence of a peak at m/z 80 in the spectrum of 2-sulfoacetic acid, in contrast to a peak at m/z 81 in that of 3-sulfopropanoic acid, corroborated the proposed hydrogen transfer mechanism. For diacidic compounds, such as 4-sulfobutanoic acid and cysteic acid, the m/z 81 ion can be formed by an alternative mechanism, in which the negative charge of the carboxylate moiety attacks the α-carbon relative to the sulfur atom. Experiments conducted with deuterium-exchanged and deuterium-labeled analogs of sulfocarboxylic acids demonstrated that the formation of the bisulfite anion resulted either from a hydrogen transfer from the β-carbon, or from a direct attack by the carboxylate moiety on the α-carbon.

  19. Final report for the ORNL/3M CRADA No. ORNL91-0061 for the period January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.L.; Besmann, T.M.; Lowden, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Composites using Nextel{trademark} fibers of varying composition were prepared to investigate the effectiveness of each Nextel{trademark} fiber as a reinforcement for the given matrix. A carbon interface coating was used for the baseline materials, however, alternate interlayers with improved oxidation resistance were also explored. Room-temperature flexure strengths of as-fabricated composites and specimens heated in air at 1273 K were measured and compared to results for other SiC-matrix composites.

  20. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  1. Isothiocyanate-Functionalized Bifunctional Chelates and fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) Complexes for Targeting uPAR in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasten, Benjamin B; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Kai; Bu, Lihong; Slocumb, Winston S; Hayes, Thomas R; Trabue, Steven; Cheng, Zhen; Benny, Paul D

    2016-01-20

    Developing new strategies to rapidly incorporate the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) core into biological targeting vectors in radiopharmaceuticals continues to expand as molecules become more complex and as efforts to minimize nonspecific binding increase. This work examines a novel isothiocyanate-functionalized bifunctional chelate based on 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA) specifically designed for complexing the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) core. Two strategies (postlabeling and prelabeling) were explored using the isothiocyanate-functionalized DPA to determine the effectiveness of assembly on the overall yield and purity of the complex with amine containing biomolecules. A model amino acid (lysine) examined (1) amine conjugation of isothiocyanate-functionalized DPA followed by complexation with fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) (postlabeling) and (2) complexation of fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) with isothiocyanate-functionalized DPA followed by amine conjugation (prelabeling). Conducted with stable Re and radioactive (99m)Tc analogs, both strategies formed the product in good to excellent yields under macroscopic and radiotracer concentrations. A synthetic peptide (AE105) which targets an emerging biomarker in CaP prognosis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), was also explored using the isothiocyanate-functionalized DPA strategy. In vitro PC-3 (uPAR+) cell uptake assays with the (99m)Tc-labeled peptide (8a) showed 4.2 ± 0.5% uptake at 4 h. In a murine model bearing PC-3 tumor xenografts, in vivo biodistribution of 8a led to favorable tumor uptake (3.7 ± 0.7% ID/g) at 4 h p.i. with relatively low accumulation (<2% ID/g) in normal organs not associated with normal peptide excretion. These results illustrate the promise of the isothiocyanate-functionalized approach for labeling amine containing biological targeting vectors with fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+).

  2. Rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl, {M(CO)3} (+) (M = Tc, Re), binding to mammalian metallothioneins: new insights into chemical and radiopharmaceutical implications.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Palacios, Òscar; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè; Suades, Joan

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the binding of the four mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) to the organometallic metal fragment {fac-M(CO)3}(+) (M = (99)Tc, Re), which is highly promising for the preparation of second-generation radiopharmaceuticals. The study of the transmetallation reaction between zinc and rhenium in Zn7-MT1 by means of UV-vis and CD spectroscopy demonstrated the incorporation of the {fac-Re(CO)3}(+) fragment to the MTs. This reaction should be performed at 70 °C to accelerate the reaction rate, a result that is consistent with the reported reactivity of the rhenium fragment. ESI-TOF MS demonstrated the formation of mixed-metal species as Zn6,{Re(CO)3}-MT, Zn6,{Re(CO)3}2-MT, and Zn5,{Re(CO)3}3-MT, as well as the different reactivity of the four MT isoforms. Hence, Zn-MT3 showed the highest reactivity, in agreement with its high Cu-thionein character, whereas Zn-MT2 exhibited the lowest reactivity, in line with its high Zn-thionein character. The reactivity of the Zn-loaded forms of MT1 and MT4 is intermediate between those of MT3 and MT2. The study of the binding of the {fac-(99)Tc(CO)3}(+) fragment to MTs showed a significant and very interesting different reactivity in relation to rhenium. The transmetallation reaction is much more effective with technetium than with rhenium and significant amounts of mixed Zn x ,{(99)Tc(CO)3} y -MT species were formed with the four MT isoforms whereas only MT3 rendered similar amounts of rhenium derivatives. The results obtained in this study support the possible use of technetium for labelling mammalian metallothioneins and also for possible radiopharmaceutical applications.

  3. Identifying fecal pollution sources using 3M(™) Petrifilm (™) count plates and antibiotic resistance analysis in the Horse Creek Watershed in Aiken County, SC (USA).

    PubMed

    Harmon, S Michele; West, Ryan T; Yates, James R

    2014-12-01

    Sources of fecal coliform pollution in a small South Carolina (USA) watershed were identified using inexpensive methods and commonly available equipment. Samples from the upper reaches of the watershed were analyzed with 3M(™) Petrifilm(™) count plates. We were able to narrow down the study's focus to one particular tributary, Sand River, that was the major contributor of the coliform pollution (both fecal and total) to a downstream reservoir that is heavily used for recreation purposes. Concentrations of total coliforms ranged from 2,400 to 120,333 cfu/100 mL, with sharp increases in coliform counts observed in samples taken after rain events. Positive correlations between turbidity and fecal coliform counts suggested a relationship between fecal pollution and stormwater runoff. Antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA) compared antibiotic resistance profiles of fecal coliform isolates from the stream to those of a watershed-specific fecal source library (equine, waterfowl, canines, and untreated sewage). Known fecal source isolates and unknown isolates from the stream were exposed to six antibiotics at three concentrations each. Discriminant analysis grouped known isolates with an overall average rate of correct classification (ARCC) of 84.3 %. A total of 401 isolates from the first stream location were classified as equine (45.9 %), sewage (39.4 %), waterfowl (6.2 %), and feline (8.5 %). A similar pattern was observed at the second sampling location, with 42.6 % equine, 45.2 % sewage, 2.8 % waterfowl, 0.6 % canine, and 8.8 % feline. While there were slight weather-dependent differences, the vast majority of the coliform pollution in this stream appeared to be from two sources, equine and sewage. This information will contribute to better land use decisions and further justify implementation of low-impact development practices within this urban watershed.

  4. Photolabeling of membrane-bound Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the hydrophobic probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.J.; Cohen, J.B.

    1988-11-29

    The hydrophobic, photoactivatable probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine ((/sup 125/I)TID) was used to label acetylcholine receptor rich membranes purified from Torpedo californica electric organ. All four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) were found to incorporate label, with the ..gamma..-subunit incorporating approximately 4 times as much as each of the other subunits. Carbamylcholine, an agonist, and histrionicotoxin, a noncompetitive antagonist, both strongly inhibited labeling of all AChR subunits in a specific and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the competitive antagonist ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin and the noncompetitive antagonist phencyclidine had only modest effect on (/sup 125/I)TID labeling of the AChR. The regions of the AChR ..cap alpha..-subunit that incorporate (/sup 125/)TID were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protest digestion. The carbamylcholine-sensitive site of labeling was localized to a 20-kDa V8 cleavage fragment that begins at Ser-173 and is of sufficient length to contain the three hydrophobic regions M1, M2, and M3. A 10-kDa fragment beginning at Asn-339 and containing the hydrophobic region M4 also incorporated (/sup 125/I)TID but in a carbamylcholine-insensitive manner. Two further cleavage fragments, which together span about one-third of the ..cap alpha..-subunit amino terminus, incorporated no detectable (/sup 125/I)TID. The mapping results place constraints on suggested models of AChR subunit topology.

  5. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2(η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6-O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2)-OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3OCH2 CH2OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+)-doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology. PMID:26891039

  6. Synthesis and structure of In(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} and vibrational spectroscopy of M(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} (M=Al, Ga, In)

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Nhan; Kalachnikova, Katrina; Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, Richard G.; Sykora, Richard E. . E-mail: rsykora@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

    2006-12-15

    The reaction of Al, Ga, or In metals and H{sub 5}IO{sub 6} in aqueous media at 180{sup o}C leads to the formation of Al(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, Ga(IO{sub 3}){sub 3,} or In(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, respectively. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments have shown In(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} contains the Te{sub 4}O{sub 9}-type structure, while both Al(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Ga(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} are known to exhibit the polar Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}-type structure. Crystallographic data for In(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, trigonal, space group R3-bar , a=9.7482(4)A, c=14.1374(6)A, V=1163.45(8) Z=6, R(F)=1.38% for 41 parameters with 644 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I). All three iodate structures contain group 13 metal cations in a distorted octahedral coordination environment. M(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} (M=Al, Ga) contain a three-dimensional network formed by the bridging of Al{sup 3+} or Ga{sup 3+} cations by iodate anions. With In(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, iodate anions bridge In{sup 3+} cations in two-dimensional layers. Both materials contain distorted octahedral holes in their structures formed by terminal oxygen atoms from the iodate anions. The Raman spectra have been collected for these metal iodates; In(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} was found to display a distinctively different vibrational profile than Al(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} or Ga(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Hence, the Raman profile can be used as a rapid diagnostic tool to discern between the different structural motifs.

  7. 1,2-Ethanediol and 1,3-Propanediol Conversions over (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) Nanoclusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zongtang; Zetterholm, Patrick; Dixon, David A

    2016-03-24

    The dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions of one and two 1,2-ethanediol and 1,3-propanediol molecules on (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) nanoclusters have been studied computationally using density functional and coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) theory. The reactions are initiated by the formation of a Lewis acid-base complex with an additional hydrogen bond. Dehydration is the dominant reaction proceeding via a metal bisdiolate. Acetaldehyde, the major product for 1,2-ethanediol, is produced by α-hydrogen transfer from one CH2 group to the other. For 1,3-propanediol, the C-C bond breaking pathways to produce C2H4 and HCH═O simultaneously and proton transfer to generate propylene oxide have comparable barrier energies. The barrier to produce propanal from the propylene oxide complex is less than that for epoxide release from the cluster. On the Mo3O9 cluster, a redox reaction channel for 1,2-ethanediol to break the C-C bond to form two formaldehyde molecules and then to produce C2H4 is slightly more favorable than the formation of acetaldehyde. For W(VI), the energy barrier for the reduction pathway is larger due to the lower reducibility of W3O9. Similar reduction on Mo(VI) for 1,3-propanediol to form propene is not a favorable pathway compared with the other pathways as additional C-H bond breaking is required in addition to breaking a C-C bond. The dehydrogenation and dehydration activation energies for the selected glycols are larger than the reactions of ethanol and 1-propanol on the same clusters. The CCSD(T) method is required because density functional theory with the M06 and B3LYP functionals does not predict quantitative energies on the potential energy surface. The M06 functional performs better than does the B3LYP functional. PMID:26901665

  8. Carbon cyclist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    A satellite launched in early August as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth could dramatically increase understanding of how carbon cycles through the Earth's biosphere and living organisms and how this process influences global climate. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) will measure the color of the oceans with a radiometer to determine the concentration of chlorophyll found in oceanic phytoplankton. The single-celled plants, at the base of food chains around the world, remove carbon dioxide from seawater through photosynthesis, which allows oceans to absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

  9. Deep Soil Carbon: The Insight into Global Carbon Estimation and Deforestation Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangmanee, Podjanee; Dell, Bernard; Harper, Richard; Henry, David

    2015-04-01

    World carbon stocks have been dramatically changed by deforestation. The current estimation of carbon loss is based on allometric techniques assisted with satellite imagery and the assumption that, 20% of the total biomass carbon stock is below ground. However, the monitoring of soil carbon is limited to 0.3 m despite many soils being much deeper than this. For example, direct measurement of soil carbon demonstrated the occurrence of two to five times more carbon stored in deep soils of south Western Australia (SWA) compared to what would normally be reported, although the land had been deforested for 80 years. This raises important questions about the dynamics of this deeper carbon and whether it will contribute to global climate change. This paper reports the form and variation of carbon in soil at three adjacent areas at three different depths (0-1, 11-12 and 18-19 m). Techniques were developed to quantitatively and qualitatively determine small concentrations of carbon in deep soils. There were marked differences in carbon compounds with depth. Near the surface these were macromolecular organic compounds derived from lignin, polysaccharides, proteins, terpenes, whereas at depth they were low molecular weight compounds, 13-docosenamide, 13-docosenoate, xanthone, benzophenone. The deeper compounds are likely derived from the roots of the previous forest whereas the surface soils are affected by current land use. The in situ decomposition of deep roots was revealed by the pyridine compound. The variation of compounds and location of carbon in clay could imply the state of decomposition. The result demonstrated that carbon is contained in deep soils and should be considered in global carbon accounting, particularly given ongoing deforestation on deep soils.

  10. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  11. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  12. BTG/Tob family members Tob1 and Tob2 inhibit proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells via Id3 mRNA degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuanfan; Wang, Chenchen; Wu, Jenny; Li, Lingsong

    2015-07-03

    The mammalian BTG/Tob family is a group of proteins with anti-proliferative ability, and there are six members including BTG1, BTG2/PC3/Tis21, BTG3/ANA, BTG4/PC3B, Tob1/Tob and Tob2. Among them, Tob subfamily members, specifically Tob1/Tob and Tob2, have the most extensive C-terminal regions. As previously reported, overexpression of BTG/Tob proteins is associated with the inhibition of G1 to S-phase cell cycle progression and decreased cell proliferation in a variety of cell types. Tob subfamily proteins have similar anti-proliferative effects on cell cycle progression in cultured tumor cells. An important unresolved question is whether or not they have function in rapidly proliferating cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Tob1 and Tob2 were expressed ubiquitously in mouse ESCs (mESCs), suggesting a possible role in early embryonic development and mESCs. To address the above question and explore the possible functions of the Tob subfamily in ESCs, we established ESCs from different genotypic knockout inner cell mass (ICM). We found that Tob1{sup −/−}, Tob2{sup −/−}, and Tob1/2 double knockout (DKO, Tob1{sup −/−} & Tob2{sup −/−}) ESCs grew faster than wild type (WT) ESCs without losing pluripotency, and we provide a possible mechanistic explanation for these observations: Tob1 and Tob2 inhibit the cell cycle via degradation of Id3 mRNA, which is a set of directly targeted genes of BMP4 signaling in mESCs that play critical roles in the maintenance of ESC properties. Together, our data suggest that BTG/Tob family protein Tob1 and Tob2 regulation cell proliferation does not compromise the basic properties of mESCs. - Highlights: • We established mouse Tob1/2 double knockout embryonic stem cells. • Tob1 and Tob2 inhibit the proliferation of ESCs without effect on pluripotency. • Tob1 and Tob2 involved in the degradation of Id3 in mESCs.

  13. The central dynamics of M3, M13, and M92: stringent limits on the masses of intermediate-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamann, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.; Gerssen, J.; Husser, T.-O.; Sandin, C.; Weilbacher, P.

    2014-06-01

    We used the PMAS integral field spectrograph to obtain large sets of radial velocities in the central regions of three northern Galactic globular clusters: M3, M13, and M92. By applying the novel technique of crowded field 3D spectroscopy, we measured radial velocities for about 80 stars within the central ~10″ of each cluster. These are by far the largest spectroscopic datasets obtained in the innermost parts of these clusters up to now. To obtain kinematical data across the whole extent of the clusters, we complement our data with measurements available in the literature. We combine our velocity measurements with surface brightness profiles to analyse the internal dynamics of each cluster using spherical Jeans models, and investigate whether our data provide evidence for an intermediate-mass black hole in any of the clusters. The surface brightness profiles reveal that all three clusters are consistent with a core profile, although shallow cusps cannot be excluded. We find that spherical Jeans models with a constant mass-to-light ratio provide a good overall representation of the kinematical data. A massive black hole is required in none of the three clusters to explain the observed kinematics. Our 1σ (3σ) upper limits are 5300 M⊙ (12 000 M⊙) for M3, 8600 M⊙ (13 000 M⊙) for M13, and 980 M⊙ (2700 M⊙) for M92. A puzzling circumstance is the existence of several potential high velocity stars in M3 and M13, as their presence can account for the majority of the discrepancies that we find in our mass limits compared to M92. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano-Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables D.1 to D.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. The 1.3-m Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak - A Fifty year old dream Realized: Telescope Characteristics, Current Research and Education Progr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward; Gelderman, Richard; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Carini, Michael T.; McGruder, Charles, III; Campbell, Rachel; Walter, Donald K.; Davis, Donald R.; Tedesco, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.

    2011-03-01

    The 1.3 m Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) on Kitt Peak has a rich history, including its role as a prototype for remotely controlled telescopes during the 1960s. As such, the RCT could be considered one of the first - Telescopes from Afar. The telescope, originally called the Remotely Controlled Telescope, has been renamed the Robotically Controlled Telescope to reflect the change in operational control and mode of use. The RCT was a conceptual precursor of today's robotic telescopes, but the actual operation of a remotely controlled telescope was technologically premature for its time, and was subsequently manually operated primarily to conduct optical and infrared observations as well being used as a test bed for new spectroscopic and photometric instruments. In 1995 budget constraints forced the closing of the telescope as part of the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), following nearly 30 years of distinguished service to KPNO. A request for proposals to operate this telescope was issued to the science community. The RCT consortium, lead by Western Kentucky University, was the successful proposer for operation of the telescope. After several difficult years of retrofitting, refurbishing, and automating the telecope and observatory dome, the telescope has returned to routine science operations in November 2009. The RCT has operated smoothly since that time, with no major interruptions. Observations of objects of interest to the consortium partners (including: comets & asteroids, variable & binary stars, exoplanets, supernovae, quasars & blazars) are being routinely obtained and evaluated. One of the distinguishing features of the RCT is that it is an autonomous observatory designed to handle diverse optical imaging and photometry programs. These include being able to automatically deal with a wide range of observing parameters such as -integration time, sky conditions, repetitions, return visits, filters, air mass, non-sidereal objects, transients etc

  15. Elastic relaxations associated with the Pm3m-R3c transition in LaA103 III: superattenuation of acoustic resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Timothy W; Carpenter, M A; Buckley, A; Taylor, P A; Mcknight, R E A

    2009-01-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy has been used to characterize elastic softening and a variety of new acoustic dissipation processes associated with the Pm{bar 3}m {leftrightarrow} R{bar 3}c transition in single crystal and ceramic samples of LaAlO{sub 3}. Softening of the cubic structure ahead of the transition point is not accompanied by an increase in dissipation but follows different temperature dependences for the bulk modulus, 1/3(C{sub 11} + 2C{sub 12}), and the shear components 1/2(C{sub 11}-C{sub 12}) and C{sub 44} as if the tilting instability contains two slightly different critical temperatures. The transition itself is marked by the complete disappearance of resonance peaks (superattenuation), which then reappear below {approx}700 K in spectra from single crystals. Comparison with low frequency, high stress data from the literature indicate that the dissipation is not due to macroscopic displacement of needle twins. An alternative mechanism, local bowing of twin walls under low dynamic stress, is proposed. Pinning of the walls with respect to this displacement process occurs below {approx}350 K. Anelasticity maps, analogous to plastic deformation mechanism maps, are proposed to display dispersion relations and temperature/frequency/stress fields for different twin wall related dissipation mechanisms. An additional dissipation process, with an activation energy of 43 {+-} 6 kJ.mole{sup -1}, occurs in the vicinity of 250 K. The mechanism for this is not known, but it is associated with C{sub 44} and therefore appears to be related in some way to the cubic {leftrightarrow} rhombohedral transition at {approx}817 K. Slight softening in the temperature interval {approx}220 {yields} 70 K of resonance peaks determined by shear elastic constants hints at an incipient E{sub g} ferroelastic instability in LaAlO{sub 3}. The softening interval ends with a further dissipation peak at {approx} 60 K, the origin of which is discussed in terms of freezing of atomic

  16. Developments in carbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  17. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  18. The effect of additives on the reactivity of palladium surfaces for the chemisorption and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide: A surface science and catalytic study. [LaMO/sub 3/(M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Rh)

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, T.G.

    1987-06-01

    This research studied the role of surface additives on the catalytic activity and chemisorptive properties of Pd single crystals and foils. Effects of Na, K, Si, P, S, and Cl on the bonding of CO and H and on the cyclotrimerization of acetylene on the (111), (100) and (110) faces of Pd were investigated in addition to role of TiO/sub 2/ and SiO/sub 2/ overlayers deposited on Pd foils in the CO hydrogenation reaction. On Pd, only in the presence of oxide overlayers, are methane or methanol formed from CO and H/sub 2/. The maximum rate of methane formation is attained on Pd foil where 30% of the surface is covered with titania. Methanol formation can be achieved only if the TiO/sub x//Pd surface is pretreated in 50 psi of oxygen at 550/sup 0/C prior to the reaction. The additives (Na, K, Si, P, S, Cl) affect the bonding of CO and hydrogen and the cyclotrimerization of acetylene to benzene by structural and electronic interactions. In general, the electron donating additives increase the desorption temperature of CO and increase the rate of acetylene cyclotrimerization and the electron withdrawing additives decrease the desorption temperature of CO and decrease the rate of benzene formation from acetylene.

  19. A novel, cysteine-modified chelation strategy for the incorporation of [MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re, 99mTc) in an α-MSH peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Han; Kasten, Benjamin B.; Liu, Hongguang; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Yang; Tian, Mei; Barnes, Charles L.; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Zhen; Benny, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering peptide-based targeting agents with residues for site specific and stable complexation of radionuclides is a highly desirable strategy for producing diagnostic and therapeutic agents for cancer and other diseases. In this report, a model N-S-NPy ligand (3) and a cysteine-derived alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide (6) were used as novel demonstrations of a widely applicable chelation strategy for incorporation of the [MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re, 99mTc) core into peptide-based molecules for radiopharmaceutical applications. The structural details of the core ligand-metal complexes as model systems were demonstrated by full chemical characterization of fac-[ReI(CO)3(N,S,NPy-3)]+ (4) and comparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis between 4 and [99mTcI(CO)3(N,S,NPy-3)]+ (4a). The α-MSH analogue bearing the N-S-NPy chelate on a modified cysteine residue (6) was generated and complexed with [MI(CO)3]+ to confirm the chelation strategy’s utility when applied in a peptide-based targeting agent. Characterization of the ReI(CO)3-6 peptide conjugate (7) confirmed the efficient incorporation of the metal center, and the 99mTcI(CO)3-6 analogue (7a) was explored as a potential single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) compound for imaging the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) in melanoma. Peptide 7a showed excellent radiolabeling yields and in vitro stability during amino acid challenge and serum stability assays. In vitro B16F10 melanoma cell uptake of 7a reached a modest value of 2.3 ± 0.08% of applied activity at 2 h at 37 °C while this uptake was significantly reduced by coincubation with a nonlabeled α-MSH analogue, NAPamide (3.2 µM) (P < 0.05). In vivo SPECT/X-ray computer tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and biodistribution of 7a were evaluated in a B16F10 melanoma xenografted mouse model. SPECT/CT imaging clearly visualized the tumor at 1 h post injection (p.i.) with high tumor-to-background contrast. Blocking

  20. Clickable, Hydrophilic Ligand for fac-[MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re/99mTc) Applied in an S-Functionalized α-MSH Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click reaction was used to incorporate alkyne-functionalized dipicolylamine (DPA) ligands (1 and 3) for fac-[MI(CO)3]+ (M = Re/99mTc) complexation into an α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analogue. A novel DPA ligand with carboxylate substitutions on the pyridyl rings (3) was designed to increase the hydrophilicity and to decrease in vivo hepatobiliary retention of fac-[99mTcI(CO)3]+ complexes used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging studies with targeting biomolecules. The fac-[ReI(CO)3(3)] complex (4) was used for chemical characterization and X-ray crystal analysis prior to radiolabeling studies between 3 and fac-[99mTcI(OH2)3(CO)3]+. The corresponding 99mTc complex (4a) was obtained in high radiochemical yields, was stable in vitro for 24 h during amino acid challenge and serum stability assays, and showed increased hydrophilicity by log P analysis compared to an analogous complex with nonfunctionalized pyridine rings (2a). An α-MSH peptide functionalized with an azide was labeled with fac-[MI(CO)3]+ using both click, then chelate (CuAAC reaction with 1 or 3 followed by metal complexation) and chelate, then click (metal complexation of 1 and 3 followed by CuAAC with the peptide) strategies to assess the effects of CuAAC conditions on fac-[MI(CO)3]+ complexation within a peptide framework. The peptides from the click, then chelate strategy had different HPLC tR’s and in vitro stabilities compared to those from the chelate, then click strategy, suggesting nonspecific coordination of fac-[MI(CO)3]+ using this synthetic route. The fac-[MI(CO)3]+-complexed peptides from the chelate, then click strategy showed >90% stability during in vitro challenge conditions for 6 h, demonstrated high affinity and specificity for the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) in IC50 analyses, and led to moderately high uptake in B16F10 melanoma cells. Log P analysis of the 99m

  1. Carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Lal, Rattan

    2008-02-27

    Developing technologies to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from annual emissions of 8.6PgCyr-1 from energy, process industry, land-use conversion and soil cultivation is an important issue of the twenty-first century. Of the three options of reducing the global energy use, developing low or no-carbon fuel and sequestering emissions, this manuscript describes processes for carbon (CO2) sequestration and discusses abiotic and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric CO2 into other long-lived global pools including oceanic, pedologic, biotic and geological strata to reduce the net rate of increase in atmospheric CO2. Engineering techniques of CO2 injection in deep ocean, geological strata, old coal mines and oil wells, and saline aquifers along with mineral carbonation of CO2 constitute abiotic techniques. These techniques have a large potential of thousands of Pg, are expensive, have leakage risks and may be available for routine use by 2025 and beyond. In comparison, biotic techniques are natural and cost-effective processes, have numerous ancillary benefits, are immediately applicable but have finite sink capacity. Biotic and abiotic C sequestration options have specific nitches, are complementary, and have potential to mitigate the climate change risks. PMID:17761468

  2. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  3. Manual of carbonate sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Reijers, T.J.; Hsu, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    This manual, organised along encycolopaedic/lexicographic lines, summarizes information on the properties and characteristics of carbonates and their environments. Part 1 deals with the elements of carbonates; Part 2 with environments, settings, and carbonate bodies; Part 3 with carbonate diagenesis, and Part 4 with carbonate reservoirs. Contents include: Elements of carbonates; Carbonate Environments, Settings and Bodies; Carbonate diagenesis; Carbonate reservoirs; Alphabetical Indices; English, Dutch, German, Spanish, French Computer Compatible Codes; Commonly Used (Informal) abbreviations.

  4. Carbon disulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon disulfide ; CASRN 75 - 15 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  5. Carbon tetrachloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon tetrachloride ; CASRN 56 - 23 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  6. Textural and mechanical characteristics of carbon aerogels synthesized by polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde using alkali carbonates as basification agents.

    PubMed

    Morales-Torres, Sergio; Maldonado-Hódar, Francisco José; Pérez-Cadenas, Agustín Francisco; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco

    2010-09-21

    Five organic aerogels were prepared simultaneously by polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde using different alkali carbonates (M(2)CO(3), M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) as basification agents. The gelation time depended on the carbonate used, increasing from Li(2)CO(3) to Cs(2)CO(3). The porosity of the samples is defined during this process, when the three-dimensional packing of primary particles is formed. The slower the gelation, the greater the overlapping of primary particles and the formation of clusters, leading to a mechanical reinforcement of the samples and the progressive displacement of their pore size distribution (PSD) towards larger pores. Carbonization produces certain shrinkage of the structure and increases the microporosity and the Young modulus of the samples. Carbon aerogels change from mesoporous to macroporous materials as the counter-ion size of the carbonate increases.

  7. CARBONATE METHOD OF SEPARATION OF TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM FISSION PRODUCT VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-02-01

    It has been found that plutonium forms an insoluble precipitate with carbonate ion when the carbonate ion is present in stoichiometric proportions, while an excess of the carbonate ion complexes plutonium and renders it soluble. A method for separating tetravalent plutonium from lanthanum-group rare earths has been based on this discovery, since these rare earths form insoluble carbonates in approximately neutral solutions. According to the process the pH is adjusted to between 5 and 7, and approximately stoichiometric amounts of carbonate ion are added to the solution causing the formation of a precipitate of plutonium carbonate and the lanthanum-group rare earth carbonates. The precipitate is then separated from the solution and contacted with a carbonate solution of a concentration between 1 M and 3 M to complex and redissolve the plutonium precipitate, and thus separate it from the insoluble rare earth precipitate.

  8. Oxidation protected carbon-carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlosky, J. E.; St. Leger, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Pyrolized carbon-carbon has one unique advantage over other materials that makes its application to the space shuttle thermal protection system very attractive. This unique characteristic is the increase in material strength and modulus with increase in temperature up to about 2500 K (4040 F). Offsetting this unique advantage are disadvantages which include brittleness, high cost, and the tendency of the material to react with oxygen, particularly at high temperatures. The development of an oxidation inhibitor for the material and the definition of fabrication processes for selected full-scale components are considered.

  9. What Have We Learned About Arctic Carbon Since The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    Large pools of organic carbon were reported in The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report, but measurements from high latitude ecosystems, in particular for deeper soils >1m depth, remained scarce. A newly enlarged soil carbon database with an order of magnitude more numerous deep sampling sites has verified the widespread pattern of large quantities of carbon accumulated deep in permafrost (perennially frozen) soils. The known pool of permafrost carbon across the northern circumpolar permafrost zone is now estimated to be 1330-1580 Pg C, with the potential for an additional ~400 Pg C in deep permafrost sediments. In addition, an uncertainty estimate of plus/minus 15% has now been calculated for the soil carbon pool in the surface 0-3m. Laboratory incubations of these permafrost soils reveal that a significant fraction can be mineralized by microbes upon thaw and converted to carbon dioxide and methane on time scales of years to decades, with decade-long average losses from aerobic incubations ranging from 6-34% of initial carbon. Carbon emissions from the same soils incubated in an anaerobic environment are, on average, 78-85% lower than aerobic soils. But, the more potent greenhouse gas methane released under anaerobic conditions in part increases the climate impact of these emissions. While mean quantities of methane are only 3% to 7% that of carbon dioxide emitted from anaerobic incubations (by weight of C), these mean methane values represent 25% to 45% of the overall potential impact on climate when accounting for the higher global warming potential of methane. Taken together though, in spite of the more potent greenhouse gas methane, a unit of newly thawed permafrost carbon could have a greater impact on climate over a century if it thaws and decomposes within a drier, aerobic soil as compared to an equivalent amount of carbon within a waterlogged soil or sediment. Model projections tend to estimate losses of carbon in line with empirical measurements, but

  10. Carbon Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A. A.; Ramsden, F.

    1961-01-01

    The occurrence of carbon pneumoconiosis in rubber-factory workers is unusual: the case reported here was discovered in a routine post-mortem examination. The report includes the clinical, radiological, morbid anatomical, and histological findings on a man who had worked in the carbon black store of a rubber works for a continuous period of 21 years, followed by 11 years in the calender department of the same factory. At the age of 65 years the man was retired on the grounds of age and indifferent health: he collapsed and died soon afterwards. The medical history of severe cough with expectoration suggested that he may have had pulmonary tuberculosis in earlier life and some supporting evidence of this infection was found in that his wife contracted this disease after marriage and subsequently died from tuberculosis. The appearances of massive fibrosis in the upper lobes of the lungs suggested that the combined action of carbon black and tuberculosis had produced an “infective” type of pneumoconiosis: in the lower lobes there was far less fibrosis and the appearances were those of simple pneumoconiosis. In addition to the fibrosis the lungs showed nodules of black dust with severe perifocal emphysema. Electron microscopy of the lung dust showed two distinct components and they were similar to samples of channel and thermal blacks which were the main types of carbon used in the factory. This case is an example of pneumoconiosis due to virtually non-siliceous carbon and illustrates that prolonged exposure to heavy dust concentration produces such lesions as described in this paper. Images PMID:13770721

  11. Carbon/Carbon Grids For Ion Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    Ion-extraction grids made of carbon/carbon composites used in spacecraft ion engines and industrial ion sources in place of molybdenum grids. In principle, carbon/carbon grids offer greater extraction efficiency and longer life. Grid fabricated by mechanical drilling, laser drilling, or electrical-discharge machining of array of holes in sheet of carbon/carbon. Advantages; better alignment and slower erosion.

  12. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt3M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius; Ham, Hyung Chul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt3M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt3M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt3M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt3M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  13. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr; Ham, Hyung Chul E-mail: hchahm@kist.re.kr

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt{sub 3}M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt{sub 3}M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt{sub 3}M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt{sub 3}M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  14. Engine makers tap carbon-carbon pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the use of a carbon-carbon composite, developed for nose cones and rocket nozzles, for pistons in modern internal combustion engines. The topics of the article include the carbon-carbon composite mechanical and physical characteristics, initial research, manufacturing methods, fabrication techniques, initial testing in 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines, and current research.

  15. Carbon investment funds

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-15

    The report is a study of the development of funds to invest in the purchase of carbon credits. It takes a look at the growing market for carbon credits, the rise of carbon investment funds, and the current state of carbon investing. Topics covered in the report include: Overview of climate change, greenhouse gases, and the Kyoto Protocols. Analysis of the alternatives for reducing carbon emissions including nitrous oxide reduction, coal mine methane capture and carbon capture and storage; Discussion of the different types of carbon credits; Discussion of the basics of carbon trading; Evaluation of the current status of carbon investing; and Profiles of 37 major carbon investment funds worldwide.

  16. Pyruvate inhibition of the carbon dioxide fixation of the strict chemolithotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Butler, R G

    1975-12-01

    A flow-through dialysis system used to decrease the concentrations of toxic organic materials excreted by Thiobacillus thiooxidans permitted an improved efficiency of carbon dioxide fixation when compared with cells taken from the usual shaken culture. The additions of various concentrations of pyruvic acid and succinic acid inhibited growth significantly. Pyruvate at a concentration of 5 X 10(-3) M completely inhibited the respiration of resting cells oxidizing sulfur. The toxicity of pyruvic acid was found to be permanent as evidenced by the inability to obtain satisfactory oxidation rates after washing the exposed cells twice in buffer. Both pyruvate (10(-3) M) and succinate (10(-3) M) inhibited carbon dioxide fixation by 84%.

  17. Sequestering ADM ethanol plant carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finley, R.J.; Riddle, D.

    2008-01-01

    Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) and the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) are collaborating on a project in confirming that a rock formation can store carbon dioxide from the plant in its pores. The project aimed to sequester the gas underground permanently to minimize release of the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. It is also designed to store one million tons of carbon dioxide over a three-year period. The project is worth $84.3M, funded by $66.7M from the US Department Energy, supplemented by co-funding from ADM and other corporate and state resources. The project will start drilling of wells to an expected depth over 6500 feet into the Mount Simon Sandstone formation.

  18. Carbon Nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) are synthetic 2D carbon sheets with tailored physical or chemical properties. These depend on the structure, molecular composition, and surroundings on either side. Due to their molecular thickness, they can be regarded as "interfaces without bulk" separating regions of different gaseous, liquid, or solid components and controlling the materials exchange between them. Here, a universal scheme for the fabrication of 1 nm-thick, mechanically stable, functional CNMs is presented. CNMs can be further modified, for example perforated by ion bombardment or chemically functionalized by the binding of other molecules onto the surfaces. The underlying physical and chemical mechanisms are described, and examples are presented for the engineering of complex surface architectures, e.g., nanopatterns of proteins, fluorescent dyes, or polymer brushes. A simple transfer procedure allows CNMs to be placed on various support structures, which makes them available for diverse applications: supports for electron and X-ray microscopy, nanolithography, nanosieves, Janus nanomembranes, polymer carpets, complex layered structures, functionalization of graphene, novel nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. To close, the potential of CNMs in filtration and sensorics is discussed. Based on tests for the separation of gas molecules, it is argued that ballistic membranes may play a prominent role in future efforts of materials separation. PMID:27281234

  19. Comparison of 3M Petrifilm Aerobic Count Plates to standard plating methodology for use with AOAC antimicrobial efficacy methods 955.14, 955.15, 964.02, and 966.04 as an alternative enumeration procedure: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Maria T; LaBudde, Robert A; Tomasino, Stephen F; Pines, Rebecca M

    2013-01-01

    A multilaboratory study was conducted to determine the equivalence of the 3M Petrifilm Aerobic Count Plate and standard plating methodology for measuring viable bacteria and spores recovered from hard-surface carriers (stainless steel and porcelain), also known as "control carrier counts," used in AOAC antimicrobial efficacy test methods. Six laboratories participated in the study in which carriers inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and spores of Bacillus subtilis were evaluated using 3M Petrifilm Aerobic Count (AC) plates and standard plating side-by-side. The data were analyzed using a matched-pair t-test to determine the between-method effect with confidence intervals. For all test organisms pooled across all laboratories, the mean difference in log10 concentration between the standard plate count method and 3M Petrifilm AC Plates was -0.012, with a 95% confidence interval of (-0.090, +0.066), which was well within the -0.5, +0.5 interval established as the acceptance criterion. The between-carrier SD averaged 0.139; the between-replicate SD was 0.050. The carrier reproducibility, given that a single replicate per carrier is done, was estimated to be 0.148. Although differences were seen in the final concentrations of the test organisms among laboratories, there were no statistical differences between the enumeration methods. Based on the results from this study, 3M Petrifilm AC Plates are equivalent to standard plating methodology and can be used as an alternative procedure for the enumeration of test organisms used in AOAC Methods 955.14, 955.15, 964.02, and 966.04.

  20. Rare earth element complexation by carbonate and oxalate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Byrne, Robert H.

    1987-03-01

    Rare earth carbonate and oxalate complexation constants have been determined through ex-amination of distribution equilibria between tributyl phosphate and an aqueous perchlorate phase. Carbonate complexation constants appropriate to the REE in seawater (25°C, 35%., 1 atm) can be described in terms of atomic number, Z. nlog swβ1 = 4.853 + 0.1135( Z - 57) - 0.003643( Z - 57) 2log swβ2 = 80.197 + 0.1730( Z - 57) - 0.002714( Z -57) 2 where swβ 1 = [MCO +3] /[M 3+][CO 2-3] T, swβ 2 = [M(CO 3) -3] /[M 3+][CO 2-3] 2' T [ M3+] is an uncomplexed rare earth concentration in seawater, [ MCO+3] and [ M( CO-3) 2] are carbonate complex concentrations, and [CO 2-3] T is the total (free plus ion paired) carbonate ion concentration in seawater (molal scale). Our analyses indicate that in seawater with a total carbonate ion concentration of 1.39 × 10 -4 moles/Kg H 2O, carbonate complexes for the lightest rare earth, La, constitute 86% of the total metal, 7% is free La 3+ and the remaining 7% exists as hydroxide, sulfate, chloride and fluoride complexes. For Lu, the heaviest rare earth, carbonate complexes are 98% of the total metal, 0.3% is uncomplexed and 1.5% is complexed with hydroxide, sulfate, chloride and fluoride. Oxalate and carbonate constants are linearly correlated. This correlation appears to be quite useful for estimating trivalent metal-arbonate stability constants from their respective oxalate stability constants.

  1. Trading forest carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  2. Estimating Regional Changes in Soil Carbon with High Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Brandt, Craig C; Marland, Gregg; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Larson, James; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Wilson, Bradly; Tyler, Donald G; Nelson, Richard G

    2008-01-01

    To manage lands locally for carbon sequestration and for emissions reductions it is useful to have a system that can monitor and predict changes in soil carbon and greenhouse gas emissions with high spatial resolution. We are developing a carbon accounting framework that can estimate carbon dynamics and net emissions associated with changes in land management. One component of this framework integrates field measurements, inventory data, and remote sensing products to estimate changes in soil carbon and to estimate where these changes are likely to occur at a sub-county (30m x 30m) resolution. We applied this framework component to a mid-western region of the US that consists of 679 counties approximately centered around Iowa. We estimate the 1990 baseline soil carbon to a maximum depth of 3m for this region to be 4,117 Tg C. Cumulative soil carbon accumulation of 70.3 Tg C is estimated for this region between 1991-2000, of which 33.8 Tg C is due to changes in tillage intensity. Without accounting for soil carbon loss following changes to more intensive tillage practices, our estimate increases to 45.0 Tg C. This difference indicates that on-site permanence of soil carbon associated with a change to less intensive tillage practices is approximately 75% if no additional economic incentives are provided for soil carbon sequestration practices. This carbon accounting framework offers a method to integrate inventory and remote sensing data on an annual basis and to transparently account for alternating annual trends in land management and associated carbon stocks and fluxes.

  3. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  4. Carbon dioxide concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. F.; Huebscher, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Passed exhaled air through electrochemical cell containing alkali metal carbonate aqueous solution, and utilizes platinized electrodes causing reaction of oxygen at cathode with water in electrolyte, producing hydroxyl ions which react with carbon dioxide to form carbonate ions.

  5. A 3M high temperature dielectric film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampl, Edward, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a dielectric film are summarized. Additionally, the film's environmental and chemical properties are listed: low shrinkage to 300 C; moisture insensitive; low outgassing under vacuum; excellent surface qualities--easy metallization of film; flame retardant; and low smoke generation. A series of graphs that display the performance characteristics of the film are also presented.

  6. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1993-01-01

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  7. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Smit, Berend

    2016-07-12

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  9. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  10. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  11. Variable Carbon Isotopes in ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains a small amount of carbonate that was deposited from aqueous fluids on the Martian surface approximately 3.9 Ga.. McKay et al. (1996) proposed evidence for the existence of life preserved within the carbonate grains. In order to determine the nature of the ancient Martian aqueous system we have combined previously collected oxygen isotopic data with new carbon isotopic measurements performed on the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at Arizona State University. Isotopic measurements were made at high mass resolution with a spot size of 10 microns. The measured carbon isotopic values range from 29.2‰ to 64.5‰ (PDB) with an average uncertainty of +/-1.6‰ (1σ ). These data agree very well with previous acid dissolution and stepped combustion experiments which range from a δ13C of +32‰ to +41‰ . As observed with the oxygen isotopic data, the carbon isotopic composition is correlated with the chemical composition of the carbonates. This allows us to establish that the earliest (Ca-rich) carbonates had the lightest carbon isotopic composition while the latest forming (Mg-rich) carbonates had the heaviest carbon isotopic composition. The large range of carbon isotopic compositions measured in this study cannot be explained by previously proposed models. Temperature change or a Rayleigh distillation process caused by progressive carbonate precipitation are insufficient to create the observed carbon isotopic compositions. Furthermore, processes such as evaporation or photosynthesis will not produce large carbon isotopic variations due to rapid isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. We propose two possible models for the formation of the ALH84001 carbonates consistent with the isotopic data collected thus far. Carbonates could have formed from an evolving system where the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates reflects a mixing between magmatic hydrothermal fluids and fluids in equilibrium with an isotopically

  12. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  13. Development of a novel, CNS-penetrant, metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3) NAM probe (ML289) derived from a closely related mGlu5 PAM.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, Douglas J; Wenthur, Cody J; Bruner, Joshua A; Carrington, Sheridan J S; Vinson, Paige N; Gogi, Kiran K; Blobaum, Anna L; Morrison, Ryan D; Vamos, Mitchell; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Stauffer, Shaun R; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2012-06-15

    Herein we report the discovery and SAR of a novel metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu(3)) NAM probe (ML289) with 15-fold selectivity versus mGlu(2). The mGlu(3) NAM was discovered via a 'molecular switch' from a closely related, potent mGlu(5) positive allosteric modulator (PAM), VU0092273. This NAM (VU0463597, ML289) displays an IC(50) value of 0.66 μM and is inactive against mGlu(5). PMID:22607673

  14. Carbon in, Carbon out: Reevaluating Carbon Fluxes in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones exert a fundamental control on the deep carbon cycle. We reevaluated carbon inputs and outputs in convergent margins considering new estimates of C concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, carbonate solubility in aqueous fluids along subduction geotherms, melting and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments, and diffuse degassing from arcs. Our updated estimate of carbon inputs to the global subduction system, which includes estimates for C in altered peridotite, is 40-66 megatons carbon/year (MtC/y). We find that estimates of C lost from slabs (14-66 MtC/y) must take into account the high CaCO3 solubility in aqueous fluids, which contributes significant C that must be added to that derived from mineral decarbonation reactions. When taken together with hydrous silicate and carbonatite melts and metasediment diapirs, nearly all C can be scavenged from subducting lithosphere. The return of C to the atmosphere via arc-volcano degassing is only 18-43 MtC/y, but consideration deep volatile saturation of arc magmas, magma ponding in the middle and deep arc crust, and CO2 venting in forearcs can account for the remaining C lost from the slab. Thus, whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust and the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing, at least over the last 5-10 My. This is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Recycled carbon in diamonds is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory.

  15. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  16. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  17. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  18. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  19. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  20. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  1. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  2. Carbon-coated LiFePO4-porous carbon composites as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haifang; Liu, Jinkun; Fan, Li-Zhen

    2013-03-01

    This work introduces a facile strategy for the synthesis of carbon-coated LiFePO(4)-porous carbon (C-LiFePO(4)-PC) composites as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. The LiFePO(4) particles obtained are about 200 nm in size and homogeneously dispersed in porous carbon matrix. These particles are further coated with the carbon layers pyrolyzed from sucrose. The C-LiFePO(4)-PC composites display a high initial discharge capacity of 152.3 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 C, good cycling stability, as well as excellent rate capability (112 mA h g(-1) at 5 C). The likely contributing factors to the excellent electrochemical performance of the C-LiFePO(4)-PC composites could be related to the combined effects of enhancement of conductivity by the porous carbon matrix and the carbon coating layers. It is believed that further carbon coating is a facile and effective way to improve the electrochemical performance of LiFePO(4)-PC.

  3. The impact of either 4-R-hydroxyproline or 4-R-fluoroproline on the conformation and SH3m-cort binding of HPK1 proline-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, Andrea; Ruzza, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    SH3 domains are probably the most abundant molecular-recognition modules of the proteome. A common feature of these domains is their interaction with ligand proteins containing Pro-rich sequences. Crystal and NMR structures of SH3 domains complexes with Pro-rich peptides show that the peptide ligands are bound over a range of up to seven residues in a PPII helix conformation. Short proline-rich peptides usually adopt little or no ordered secondary structure before binding interactions, and consequently their association with the SH3 domain is characterized by unfavorable binding entropy due to a loss of rotational freedom on forming the PPII helix. With the aim to stabilize the PPII helix conformation into the proline-rich decapeptide PPPLPPKPKF (P2), we replaced some proline residues either with the 4(R)-4-fluoro-L-proline (FPro) or the 4(R)-4-hydroxy-L-proline (Hyp). The interactions of P2 analogues with the SH3 domain of cortactin (SH3(m-cort)) were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy, while CD thermal transition experiments have been used to determine their propensity to adopt a PPII helix conformation. Results show that the introduction of three residues of Hyp efficiently stabilizes the PPII helix conformation, while it does not improve the affinity towards the SH3 domain, suggesting that additional forces, e.g., electrostatic interactions, are involved in the SH3(m-cort) substrate recognition.

  4. Ternary rare-earth ruthenium and iridium germanides RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu; M=Ru, Ir)

    SciTech Connect

    Oliynyk, Anton O.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Mar, Arthur

    2013-06-15

    Through arc-melting reactions of the elements and annealing at 800 °C, the ternary rare-earth germanides RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} and RE{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} have been prepared for most of the smaller RE components (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu). In the iridium-containing reactions, the new phases RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2} were also generally formed as by-products. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structures (space group Cmcm, Z=4) for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) and monoclinic Sc{sub 2}CoSi{sub 2}-type structures (space group C2/m, Z=4) for RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2}. Full crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for all members of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2477(6) Å, b=10.7672(16) Å, c=13.894(2) Å for RE=Y; a=4.2610(3)–4.2045(8) Å, b=10.9103(8)–10.561(2) Å, c=14.0263(10)–13.639(3) Å in the progression of RE from Gd to Lu) and for Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2937(3) Å, b=10.4868(7) Å, c=14.2373(10) Å). Both structures can be described in terms of CrB- and ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs built from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. However, band structure calculations on Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} support an alternative description for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} based on [M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}] layers built from linked MGe{sub 4} tetrahedra, which emphasizes the strong M–Ge covalent bonds present. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} generally indicates metallic behaviour but with low-temperature transitions visible for some members (RE=Gd, Tb, Dy) that are probably associated with magnetic ordering of the RE atoms. Anomalously, Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibits semiconductor-like behaviour of uncertain origin. Magnetic measurements on Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} reveal antiferromagnetic ordering at 3 K and several unusual field-dependent transitions suggestive of complex spin reorientation processes. - Graphical abstract

  5. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC. PMID:22467369

  6. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-04-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC.

  7. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  8. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible.

  9. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  10. Metallic carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Crespi, Vincent Henry; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    1999-01-01

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  11. Dopant dependent band gap tailoring of hydrothermally prepared cubic SrTi{sub x}M{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (M=Ru,Rh,Ir,Pt,Pd) nanoparticles as visible light photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Sang Won; Borse, Pramod H.; Lee, Jae Sung

    2008-03-10

    Nanostructured cubic SrTiO{sub 3} particles were hydrothermally synthesized and studied experimentally/theoretically for photoreduction of water. The particles were doped with metal atoms (M=Ru,Rh,Ir,Pt,Pd), which acquired high cyrstallinity after thermal treatment. SrTiO{sub 3}:Rh showed the highest rate of H{sub 2} evolution under {lambda}>420 nm photons. The density functional theory calculations of SrTi{sub x}M{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (M=Ru,Rh,Ir,Pt) implied that the photocatalytic activity of SrTi{sub x}Rh{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} was due to its suitable band energetics, and the induced hybridized Ti/Rh orbitals in the bandgap of SrTiO{sub 3}.

  12. A 3-mW/Gbps 1.8-V Operated Current-Reuse Low-Voltage Differential Signaling Driver Using Vertical Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoi, Satoru; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2013-04-01

    A low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) driver with a new current reuse topology is proposed for low power-supply voltage (VDD) operation. The proposed driver has a new current mirror with shared MOSFET and is designed using vertical MOSFETs. The new current mirror reduces the output degradation to less than half of the conventional. And the design with vertical MOSFETs reduces the voltage drop of the eight-stage cascode circuit to 77.6% of that with planar ones. Our current reuse driver achieves 3-mW/Gbps with 2.5-Gbps and 1.8-V VDD operation in the simulation using 0.18-µm gate length MOSFET parameters. The achieved reduction of the power normalized by the output power at 1.8-V VDD is larger than 30% of that for the conventional drivers.

  13. Nanostructured Gd 0.8Sr 0.2Fe 0.8M 0.2O 3 (M=Cr, Ga) materials for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz de Larramendi, I.; Pinedo, R.; Ortiz-Vitoriano, N.; Ruiz de Larramendi, J. I.; Arriortua, M. I.; Rojo, T.

    Polycrystalline samples of Gd0.8Sr0.2Fe0.8M0.2O3 (M=Cr, Ga) are prepared by combustion route and pore wetting technique in order to compare the influence of the morphology in the performance of two cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. When polycarbonate membranes are used as templates nanowire arrays with a diameter of 50-70 nm are obtained. Comparing the results obtained by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, it is clearly observed that the cathodic resistance considerably decreases when optimized synthesis parameters are used, obtaining a better performance for the Gd0.8Sr0.2Fe0.8Ga0.2O3 nanowires with an area specific resistance (ASR) value at 850 ∘C of 0.195 Ω cm2.

  14. Heterotetranuclear oxalato-bridged Re(IV)3M(II) (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) complexes: a new example of a single-molecule magnet (M = Ni).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Clemente-Juan, Juan Modesto; Krzystek, J; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Faus, Juan

    2009-04-01

    The use of the mononuclear species (NBu(4))(2)[Re(IV)Cl(4)(ox)] (NBu(4)(+) = tetra-n-butylammonium cation; ox = oxalate dianion) as a ligand toward fully solvated divalent first-row transition-metal ions affords the tetranuclear complexes (NBu(4))(4)[{Re(IV)Cl(4)(mu-ox)}(3)M(II)] with M = Mn (1), Fe (2), Co (3), Ni (4), and Cu (5). Their structure is made up of discrete [{ReCl(4)(mu-ox)}(3)M](4-) anions and bulky NBu(4)(+) cations. The complexes 2-5 crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P1; 2 and 5 as well as 3 and 4 are isostructural. The Re and M atoms exhibit somewhat distorted ReCl(4)O(2) and MO(6) octahedral surroundings, with the oxalate groups adopting the bis-bidentate bridging mode. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on polycrystalline samples of 1-5 in the temperature range 1.9-300 K show the occurrence of intramolecular antiferromagnetic [J = -1.30 cm(-1) (1)] and ferromagnetic couplings [J = +1.62 (2), +3.0 (3), +16.3 (4), and +4.64 cm(-1) (5)], with the Hamiltonian being defined as H = -J[S(M)(S(Re1) + S(Re2) + S(Re3))]. Compound 4 is the first example of an oxalato-bridged heterometallic species that behaves as a single-molecule magnet with a ground-state spin S = (11)/(2) and D = -0.8(1) cm(-1), as shown by the study of its static and dynamic magnetic properties and a high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance study on polycrystalline samples together with detailed micro-SQUID measurements on single crystals.

  15. Tungsten bronze-based nuclear waste form ceramics. Part 3: The system Cs 0.3M xW 1- xO 3 for the immobilization of radio cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Vittorio; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Chronis, Harriet; McLeod, Terry

    2006-11-01

    Previous studies in this series have indicated that Cs- and Sr-loaded Mo-doped hexagonal tungsten bronze (MoW-HTB) oxides, either in the form of fine grained powders, or as composite granules, can be converted to leach resistant ceramics at modest temperatures in the range 600-1200 °C. In the present study it has been shown that such waste form ceramics can also be readily prepared through very simple conventional routes involving the blending of cesium nitrate with tungstic acid and other oxide components followed by heating in air. The phase chemistry resulting from the blending of these oxides has been explored. In the Cs 0.3M xW 1- xO 3 compositional system where x = Ti, Zr, Nb and Ta the solid solution limit has been found to be where x = 0.2. For all values of x between 0 and 0.2 mixed phase materials of HTB and WO 3 were obtained and Cs was found associated with HTB phases that are both rich and depleted in M element. At temperatures above about 1000 °C, phase pure HTB compounds in the space group P63/ mcm were obtained. Even when x greatly exceeds 0.2, the additional oxide content did not interfere with the formation of the HTB phase. Durability of the Cs 0.3M xW 1- xO 3 compositions as gauged by the fractional Cs loss in de-mineralized water was lowest when M = Ti and Nb, and greatest when M = Zr. From these results the durability appears intimately linked with the unit cell a-dimension which in turn varies with M cation radius.

  16. Expression of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 (RFRP-3) mRNA in Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus and KiSS-1 mRNA in Arcuate Nucleus of Rat during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Tamadon, Amin; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Mohammadi Nezhad, Saeed; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) and kisspeptin (KiSS-1) are known to respectively inhibit and stimulate gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and lute- inizing hormone (LH) secretion in rat. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relative mRNA expression of RFRP-3 and KiSS-1 in the hypothalamus of pregnant rats. Materials and Methods In a randomized controlled experimental study, the exact preg- nancy day of 18 Sprague-Dawley rats were confirmed using the vaginal smear method and were equally assigned to three groups of days 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy. Four non- pregnant female rats were ovariectomized and assigned as the control group. All rats were decapitated, and the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the arcuate nucleus (ARC) for detection of KiSS-1 mRNA were separated from their hypothalamus to detect RFRP-3 and KiSS-1 mRNA respectively. Then, their relative expressions were compared between control and pregnant groups using real-time polymerase chain reac- tion (PCR). Results The relative expression of RFRP-3 mRNA in DMH did not change significantly during pregnancy (p>0.01). However, the relative expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in ARC was at its highest in day 7 of pregnancy and decreased until day 21 of pregnancy (p<0.01). Conclusion Decrease in GnRH and LH secretion during the pregnancy of rat may be controlled by constant expression of RFRP-3 mRNA and reduced expression of KiSS-1 mRNA in hypothalamus. PMID:25379163

  17. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  18. A Symbiosis: Carbon Monitoring and Carbon Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macauley, M.

    2015-12-01

    "We measure what we value and value what we measure." This old dictum characterizes the usefulness of carbon monitoring in serving society, both in advancing research on carbon cycles and in applying new scientific knowledge to help carbon management. Many attempts to design policy for carbon management have been limited, ineffective, or otherwise unsuccessful in part due to inadequate capacity to observe carbon sources and sinks with sufficient measurement certainty and at appropriate spatial scale. Too often, policy designers fail to understand the complexities of carbon science and carbon researchers fail to align at least a portion of their science goals with policy requirements. The carbon monitoring systems research and applications activities under the auspices of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration have significantly advanced both science and applications. To further this necessary symbiosis, this paper will synthesize current and prospective spatial and temporal requirements for emerging policy needs, discuss likely requirements for measurement certainty, and draw lessons from experiences in policies designed to monitor and manage other natural resources for which scientific research necessarily influenced policy design and effectiveness.

  19. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, G.B.

    1991-10-29

    A process is described for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500 to 3000 C to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000 to 1300 C at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  20. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  1. Interstellar carbon in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swart, P. K.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Murchison and Allende chondrites contain up to 5 parts per million carbon that is enriched in carbon-13 by up to +1100 per mil (the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 42, compared to 88 to 93 for terrestrial carbon). This 'heavy' carbon is associated with neon-22 and with anomalous krypton and xenon showing the signature of the s-process (neutron capture on a slow time scale). It apparently represents interstellar grains ejected from late-type stars. A second anomalous xenon component ('CCFXe') is associated with a distinctive, light carbon (depleted in carbon-13 by 38 per mil), which, however, falls within the terrestrial range and hence may be of either local or exotic origin.

  2. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    EPA Science Inventory

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  3. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  4. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  5. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  6. Not just carbon widgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-08-01

    Forests are important for the global carbon cycle, and for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. However, the role forests play in carbon sequestration should not eclipse everything else we value them for.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoxide Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  8. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  9. Protolytic carbon film technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  10. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  11. Carbon Goes To…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  12. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-06

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  13. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  14. Carbon stocks of intact mangroves and carbon emissions arising from their conversion in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, J Boone; Heider, Chris; Norfolk, Jennifer; Payton, Frederick

    2014-04-01

    Mangroves are recognized to possess a variety of ecosystem services including high rates of carbon sequestration and storage. Deforestation and conversion of these ecosystems continue to be high and have been predicted to result in significant carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Yet few studies have quantified the carbon stocks or losses associated with conversion of these ecosystems. In this study we quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of three common mangrove types of the Caribbean as well as those of abandoned shrimp ponds in areas formerly occupied by mangrove-a common land-use conversion of mangroves throughout the world. In the mangroves of the Montecristi Province in Northwest Dominican Republic we found C stocks ranged from 706 to 1131 Mg/ha. The medium-statured mangroves (3-10 m in height) had the highest C stocks while the tall (> 10 m) mangroves had the lowest ecosystem carbon storage. Carbon stocks of the low mangrove (shrub) type (< 3 m) were relatively high due to the presence of carbon-rich soils as deep as 2 m. Carbon stocks of abandoned shrimp ponds were 95 Mg/ha or approximately 11% that of the mangroves. Using a stock-change approach, the potential emissions from the conversion of mangroves to shrimp ponds ranged from 2244 to 3799 Mg CO2e/ha (CO2 equivalents). This is among the largest measured C emissions from land use in the tropics. The 6260 ha of mangroves and converted mangroves in the Montecristi Province are estimated to contain 3,841,490 Mg of C. Mangroves represented 76% of this area but currently store 97% of the carbon in this coastal wetland (3,696,722 Mg C). Converted lands store only 4% of the total ecosystem C (144,778 Mg C) while they comprised 24% of the area. By these metrics the replacement of mangroves with shrimp and salt ponds has resulted in estimated emissions from this region totaling 3.8 million Mg CO2e or approximately 21% of the total C prior to conversion. Given the high C stocks of mangroves, the high emissions

  15. The Temporal Evolution of Changes in Carbon Storage in the Northern Permafrost Region Simulated by Carbon Cycle Models between 2010 and 2300: Implications for Atmospheric Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, A. D.; Lawrence, D. M.; Burke, E.; Chen, G.; Jafarov, E. E.; Koven, C.; MacDougall, A. H.; Nicolsky, D.; Peng, S.; Rinke, A.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted an assessment of changes in permafrost area and carbon storage simulated by 8 process-based models between 2010 and 2300. The models participating in this comparison were those that had joined the model integration team of the Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon Network (see http://www.permafrostcarbon.org/). Each of the models in this comparison conducted simulations over the permafrost land region in the Northern Hemisphere driven by CCSM4-simulated climate for RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. Among the models, the area of permafrost (defined as the area for which active layer thickness was less than 3 m) in 2010 ranged between 8 and 19 million km2. Between 2100 and 2300, models indicated the loss of permafrost area between 3 and 5 million km2 for RCP 4.5 and between 6 and 16 million km2 for RCP 8.5. Among the models, the density of soil carbon storage in 2010 ranged between 10 and 45 thousand g C m-2; models that explicitly represented carbon with depth had estimates greater than 32 thousand g C m-2. For the RCP 4.5 scenario, mean cumulative change in soil carbon between 2010 and 2300 was a gain of 10 Pg C (range: loss of 67 to gain of 70 Pg C). For the RCP 8.5 scenario, the mean cumulative change in soil carbon was between 1960 and 2300 was a loss of 256 Pg C (range: losses of 7 to 652 Pg C). Gains in vegetation carbon negated losses in the RCP 4.5 simulations for all but one of the models (mean change in total ecosystem carbon: 60 Pg C, range: loss of 14 Pg C gain of 244 Pg C), but only for two of the RCP 8.5 simulations (mean: 148 Pg C, range: loss of 641 to gain of 167 Pg C). For the RCP simulations that lost carbon between 2010 and 2300, substantial losses of carbon did not occur until after 2100. These results suggest that the permafrost carbon feedback would not have substantial consequences until after 2100, and that effective mitigation efforts during this century have the potential to prevent the negative consequences of the permafrost carbon

  16. Carbon monoxide in rainwater.

    PubMed

    Swinnerton, J W; Lamontagne, R A; Linnenbom, V J

    1971-05-28

    Concentrations of carbon monoxide in rainwater collected at widely diverse locations show up to a 200-fold supersaturation relative to the partial pressure of the gas in the atmosphere. These results indicate the existence of an additional natural source of carbon monoxide not heretofore considered. Production of carbon monoxide in clouds is tentatively attributed to the photochemical oxidation of organic matter or the slight dissociation of carbon dioxide induced by electrical discharges, or both. Methane concentrations measured in the same rainwater show that the partitioning of this gas, unlike that of carbon monoxide, is very close to a state of equilibrium.

  17. Nonmagnetic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipert, Kamil; Kretzschmar, Florian; Ritschel, Manfred; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Büchner, Bernd

    2009-03-01

    We have synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single-, double-, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes without magnetic impurities. In particular, we have applied a rhenium-based CVD technique yielding nonmagnetic carbon nanotubes with diamagnetic Re particles. In addition, carbon nanotubes prepared with iron as catalyst particles are annealed at very high temperatures in which the catalyst material is completely vaporized, while the carbon nanotubes are structurally preserved. Detailed magnetic studies show for both approaches a clear diamagnetic behavior typical for pure carbon nanotubes but no indication of ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material.

  18. A first-principles density functional theory study of the electronic structural and thermodynamic properties of M2ZrO3 and M2CO3 (M=Na, K) and their capabilities for CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhua Duan

    2012-01-01

    Alkali metal zirconates could be used as solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The structural, electronic, and phonon properties of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are investigated by combining the density functional theory with lattice phonon dynamics. The thermodynamics of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption reactions of these two zirconates are analyzed. The calculated results show that their optimized structures are in a good agreement with experimental measurements. The calculated band gaps are 4.339 eV (indirect), 3.641 eV (direct), 3.935 eV (indirect), and 3.697 eV (direct) for Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, respectively.The calculated phonon dispersions and phonon density of states for M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) revealed that from K to Na to Li, their frequency peaks are shifted to high frequencies due to the molecular weight decreased from K to Li. From the calculated reaction heats and relationships of free energy change versus temperatures and CO{sub 2} pressures of the M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) reacting with CO{sub 2}, we found that the performance of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} capturing CO{sub 2} is similar to that of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and is better than that of K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Therefore, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} are good candidates of high temperature CO{sub 2} sorbents and could be used for post combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies.

  19. Phase Transitions in the Na 3M2(PO 4) 2F 3 Family ( M=Al 3+, V 3+, Cr 3+, Fe 3+, Ga 3+): Synthesis, Thermal, Structural, and Magnetic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Meins, J.-M.; Crosnier-Lopez, M.-P.; Hemon-Ribaud, A.; Courbion, G.

    1999-12-01

    The investigated compounds Na3M2(PO4)2F3 (M=Al3+, V3+, Cr3+, Fe3+, Ga3+) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis or by solid state synthesis and characterized by thermal analyses (TGA, DTA, DSC), powder and single crystal X-ray works, or neutron diffraction. Several other ways of characterization have also been used such as diffraction by TEM, IR, magnetism, and Mössbauer spectrometry. These compounds present two crystallographic transitions which involve three modifications: α, β, and α. The room temperature (β) phases can be split into two groups: the first (β1), with M=Al3+, Cr3+, Ga3+, crystallizes in the space group P42/mbc (a=12.406(2) Å, c=10.411(2) Å, Z=8 for M=Al3+) whereas the second group (β3) with M=V3+, Fe3+ crystallizes in the space group P42/mnm (a=9.047(2) Å, c=10.705(2) Å, Z=4 for M=V3+). On the other hand all the high temperature (α) phases adopt the same space group I4/mmm (a=6.206(1) Å, c=10.418(4) Å, Z=2 for M=Al3+). Mössbauer spectrometry and powder neutron diffraction (paramagnetic state) allowed us to evidence a low temperature (γ) phase on the Fe compound which is characterized by an orthorhombic symmetry (a=12.756(1) Å, b=12.803(1) Å, c=10.602(2) Å, Z=8, space group Pbam). All these compounds adopt an identical three-dimensional [M2(PO4)2F3]3-∞ network built up by sharing four corners between PO4 tetrahedra and M2O8F3 bioctahedra (one fluorine apex bridges two octahedra). Na+ ions are statistically distributed inside the resulting channels. Susceptibility measurements reveal an antiferromagnetic behavior for each of the paramagnetic compounds (M=V3+, Cr3+, Fe3+).

  20. Trends in Syntheses, Structures, and Properties for Three Series of Ammine Rare-Earth Metal Borohydrides, M(BH4)3·nNH3 (M = Y, Gd, and Dy).

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Lars H; Ley, Morten B; Černý, Radovan; Lee, Young-Su; Cho, Young Whan; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe; Besenbacher, Flemming; Skibsted, Jørgen; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-08-01

    Fourteen solvent- and halide-free ammine rare-earth metal borohydrides M(BH4)3·nNH3, M = Y, Gd, Dy, n = 7, 6, 5, 4, 2, and 1, have been synthesized by a new approach, and their structures as well as chemical and physical properties are characterized. Extensive series of coordination complexes with systematic variation in the number of ligands are presented, as prepared by combined mechanochemistry, solvent-based methods, solid-gas reactions, and thermal treatment. This new synthesis approach may have a significant impact within inorganic coordination chemistry. Halide-free metal borohydrides have been synthesized by solvent-based metathesis reactions of LiBH4 and MCl3 (3:1), followed by reactions of M(BH4)3 with an excess of NH3 gas, yielding M(BH4)3·7NH3 (M = Y, Gd, and Dy). Crystal structure models for M(BH4)3·nNH3 are derived from a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXD), (11)B magic-angle spinning NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The structures vary from two-dimensional layers (n = 1), one-dimensional chains (n = 2), molecular compounds (n = 4 and 5), to contain complex ions (n = 6 and 7). NH3 coordinates to the metal in all compounds, while BH4(-) has a flexible coordination, i.e., either as a terminal or bridging ligand or as a counterion. M(BH4)3·7NH3 releases ammonia stepwise by thermal treatment producing M(BH4)3·nNH3 (6, 5, and 4), whereas hydrogen is released for n ≤ 4. Detailed analysis of the dihydrogen bonds reveals new insight about the hydrogen elimination mechanism, which contradicts current hypotheses. Overall, the present work provides new general knowledge toward rational materials design and preparation along with limitations of PXD and DFT for analysis of structures with a significant degree of dynamics in the structures.

  1. Effect of interfacial ion structuring on range and magnitude of electric double layer, hydration, and adhesive interactions between mica surfaces in 0.05-3 M Li⁺ and Cs⁺ electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Baimpos, Theodoros; Shrestha, Buddha R; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-04-22

    Ions and water structuring at charged-solid/electrolyte interfaces and forces arising from interfacial structuring in solutions above 100 mM concentrations dominate structure and functionality in many physiological, geological, and technological systems. In these concentrations, electrolyte structuring occurs within the range of molecular dimensions. Here, we quantitatively measure and describe electric double layer (EDL) and adhesive interactions at mica-interfaces in aqueous CsCl and LiCl solutions with concentrations ranging from 50 mM to 3 M. Complementarily, using atomic force microscopy and surface forces apparatus experiments we characterize concentration-dependent stark differences in the inner and outer EDL force profiles, and discuss differences between the used methods. From 50 mM to 1 M concentrations, interactions forces measured in CsCl-solutions exhibit strong hydration repulsions, but no diffuse EDL-repulsions beyond the Stern layer. In confinement the weakly hydrated Cs(+) ions condensate into the mica-lattice screening the entire surface charge within the Stern layer. In contrast, strongly hydrated Li(+) ions only partially compensate the surface charge within the Stern layer, leading to the formation of a diffuse outer double layer with DLVO behavior. Both LiCl and CsCl solutions exhibit oscillatory ion-hydration forces at surface separations from 2.2 nm to 4-8 Å. Below 4-8 Å the force profiles are dominated in both cases by forces originating from water and/or ion confinement at the solid/electrolyte/solid interface. Adhesive minima and their location vary strongly with the electrolyte and its concentration due to specific ion correlations across the interface, while dispersion forces between the surfaces are overpowered. Highly concentrated 3 M solutions exhibit solidification of the inner EDL structure and an unexpected formation of additional diffuse EDL forces with an increasing range, as recently measured in ionic liquids. Our results may

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine

  3. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction

  4. Process of making carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Kowbel, Witold (Inventor); Bruce, Calvin (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon composite structure, for example, an automotive engine piston, is made by preparing a matrix including of a mixture of non crystalline carbon particulate soluble in an organic solvent and a binder that has a liquid phase. The non crystalline particulate also contains residual carbon hydrogen bonding. An uncured structure is formed by combining the matrix mixture, for example, carbon fibers such as graphite dispersed in the mixture and/or graphite cloth imbedded in the mixture. The uncured structure is cured by pyrolyzing it in an inert atmosphere such as argon. Advantageously, the graphite reinforcement material is whiskered prior to combining it with the matrix mixture by a novel method involving passing a gaseous metal suboxide over the graphite surface.

  5. Neutron and magnetic studies of L a0.7S r0.3M n1 -xC rxO3 (x ≤0.7 ) : A homogeneous charge-ordered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, Thomas F.; Yang, Jinbo; Malik, Satish K.; Quezado, S.; Pringle, O. A.; Yelon, William B.; James, William J.

    2016-02-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of L a0.7S r0.3M n1 -xC rxO3(0

  6. Effects of Alloyed Metal on the Catalysis Activity of Pt for Ethanol Partial Oxidation: Adsorption and Dehydrogenation on Pt3M (M=Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Yixuan

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption and dehydrogenation reactions of ethanol over bimetallic clusters, Pt3M (M = Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd), have been extensively investigated with density functional theory. Both the α-hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorptions on Pt as well as on the alloyed transition metal M sites of PtM were considered as initial reaction steps. The adsorptions of ethanol on Pt and M sites of some PtM via the α-hydrogen were well established. Although the α-hydrogen adsorption on Pt site is weaker than the hydroxyl, the potential energy profiles show that the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path has much lower energy barrier than that via the hydroxyl path. Generally for the α-hydrogen path the adsorption is a rate-determining-step because of rather low dehydrogenation barrier for the α-hydrogen adsorption complex (thermodynamic control), while the hydroxyl path is determined by its dehydrogenation step (kinetic control). The effects of alloyed metal on the catalysis activity of Pt for ethanol partial oxidation, including adsorption energy, energy barrier, electronic structure, and eventually rate constant were discussed. Among all of the alloyed metals only Sn enhances the rate constant of the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path on the Pt site of Pt3Sn as compared with Pt alone, which interprets why the PtSn is the most active to the oxidation of ethanol. PMID:22102920

  7. Effects of Alloyed Metal on the Catalysis Activity of Pt for Ethanol Partial Oxidation: Adsorption and Dehydrogenation on Pt(3)M (M=Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd).

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Yixuan

    2011-10-27

    The adsorption and dehydrogenation reactions of ethanol over bimetallic clusters, Pt(3)M (M = Pt, Ru, Sn, Re, Rh, and Pd), have been extensively investigated with density functional theory. Both the α-hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorptions on Pt as well as on the alloyed transition metal M sites of PtM were considered as initial reaction steps. The adsorptions of ethanol on Pt and M sites of some PtM via the α-hydrogen were well established. Although the α-hydrogen adsorption on Pt site is weaker than the hydroxyl, the potential energy profiles show that the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path has much lower energy barrier than that via the hydroxyl path. Generally for the α-hydrogen path the adsorption is a rate-determining-step because of rather low dehydrogenation barrier for the α-hydrogen adsorption complex (thermodynamic control), while the hydroxyl path is determined by its dehydrogenation step (kinetic control). The effects of alloyed metal on the catalysis activity of Pt for ethanol partial oxidation, including adsorption energy, energy barrier, electronic structure, and eventually rate constant were discussed. Among all of the alloyed metals only Sn enhances the rate constant of the dehydrogenation via the α-hydrogen path on the Pt site of Pt(3)Sn as compared with Pt alone, which interprets why the PtSn is the most active to the oxidation of ethanol. PMID:22102920

  8. Catalytic properties of La0.8Sr0.2Co0.5M0.5O3 (M Co, Ni, Cu) in methane combustion1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-Hui, Wu; Lai-Tao, Luo; Wei, Liu

    2010-03-01

    A set of perovskite-type catalysts of general formula La0.8Sr0.2Co0.5M0.5O3 (M = Co, Ni, Cu) were prepared by alanine solution combustion method and used successfully for the methane combustion. The property of these materials were characterized by XRD, and TPR measurements. The effects of transition-metal ions on site B on structure and performance of the catalysts were studied. The result indicated that the structure and catalytic activities of the catalysts can remarkably affect by transition-metal ions on site B, the decrease of the electrons filled in d orbitals in the atom on site B is propitious to increase the catalytic activity for methane combustion, and the sequences of catalysts activities are La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 τ; Ce0.8Sr0.2CoO3 τ; Nd0.8Sr0.2CoO3.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Structural phase transition behaviour of Zn4Sb3 and its substitutional compounds (Zn0.98M0.02)4Sb3 (M = Al, Ga and In) at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Qin, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Mian

    2009-10-01

    Structural phase transitions of Zn4Sb3 and its substitutional compounds (Zn0.98M0.02)4Sb3 (M = Al, Ga and In) are investigated by electrical transport measurement and differential scanning calorimetry below room temperature. The results indicate that both β → α and α → α' phase transitions of Zn4Sb3 are reversible and exothermic processes, which may be explained as that both the transitions originate from the ordering of the disordered interstitial Zn and vacancies in regular sizes. The derived activation energies of β → α and α → α' phase transition processes for Zn4Sb3 are E1 = 3.9 eV and E2 = 4.1 eV, respectively. Although no remarkable influence on activation energy E2 is observed after Al doping, Al substitution for Zn causes E1 to increase to 4.6 eV, implying its suppression of β → α transition to a great extent. Moreover, it is found that both β → α and α → α' transitions are completely prohibited by substitution of either In or Ga for Zn in Zn4Sb3. The underlying mechanisms for these phenomena are discussed.

  10. Hydrogenolysis of cellulose to C4-C7 alcohols over bi-functional CuO-MO/Al2O3 (M=Ce, Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn) catalysts coupled with methanol reforming reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Gu, Fangna; Xu, Guangwen; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2013-06-01

    This work demonstrates the efficient hydrogenolysis of cellulose to C4-C7 alcohols and gas products (reaction 1) by coupling it with the reforming reaction of methanol (reaction 2) over bi-functional CuO-based catalysts. In this process, the CuO-based catalysts catalyze both the reactions 1 and 2, and the in situ regenerated H2 in the reaction 2 is used for the reaction 1. A series of CuO-MO/Al2O3 (M=Ce, Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn) catalysts were prepared by the co-precipitation method. Among these catalysts, CuO-ZnO/Al2O3 exhibited the highest activity to generate a high cellulose conversion of 88% and a high C4-C7 alcohols content above 95% in the liquid products. The CuO-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was stable under the reaction conditions and reusable after 4 runs. This work provides a cost-effective route to convert abundant renewable cellulose to liquid fuels.

  11. siRNA screen of the human signaling proteome identifies the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-mTOR signaling pathway as a primary regulator of transferrin uptake

    PubMed Central

    Galvez, Thierry; Teruel, Mary N; Heo, Won Do; Jones, Joshua T; Kim, Man Lyang; Liou, Jen; Myers, Jason W; Meyer, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Background Iron uptake via endocytosis of iron-transferrin-transferrin receptor complexes is a rate-limiting step for cell growth, viability and proliferation in tumor cells as well as non-transformed cells such as activated lymphocytes. Signaling pathways that regulate transferrin uptake have not yet been identified. Results We surveyed the human signaling proteome for regulators that increase or decrease transferrin uptake by screening 1,804 dicer-generated signaling small interfering RNAs using automated quantitative imaging. In addition to known transport proteins, we identified 11 signaling proteins that included a striking signature set for the phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3)-target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We show that the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway is a positive regulator of transferrin uptake that increases the number of transferrin receptors per endocytic vesicle without affecting endocytosis or recycling rates. Conclusion Our study identifies the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-mTOR signaling pathway as a new regulator of iron-transferrin uptake and serves as a proof-of-concept that targeted RNA interference screens of the signaling proteome provide a powerful and unbiased approach to discover or rank signaling pathways that regulate a particular cell function. PMID:17640392

  12. Finite-size effects in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum magnets Sr2CuO3,Sr2Cu 0.99M0.01 O3(M =Ni ,Zn ), and SrCuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Koushik; Singh, Surjeet

    2015-06-01

    We studied the finite-size effects on the magnetic behavior of the quasi-one-dimensional spin S =1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnets Sr2CuO3 , Sr2Cu0.99M0.01 O3 (M =Zn and Ni), and SrCuO2. Magnetic susceptibility data were analyzed to estimate the concentration of chain breaks due to extrinsically doped defects and/or due to slight oxygen off-stoichiometry. We show that the susceptibility of Sr2Cu0.99Ni0.01O3 can be described by considering Ni2+ as a scalar defect (Seff=0 ) indicating that the Ni spin is screened. In Sr2Cu0.99Zn0.01O3 susceptibility analysis yields a defect concentration smaller than the nominal value which is in good qualitative agreement with crystal growth experiments. Influence of doping on the low-temperature long-range spin ordered state is studied. In the compound SrCuO2, consisting of zigzag S =1/2 chains, the influence of spin frustration on the magnetic ordering and the defect concentration determined from the susceptibility data is discussed.

  13. Mechanical behavior of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A general background, test plan, and some results of preliminary examinations of a carbon-carbon composite material are presented with emphasis on mechanical testing and inspection techniques. Experience with testing and evaluation was gained through tests of a low modulus carbon-carbon material, K-Karb C. The properties examined are the density - 1.55 g/cc; four point flexure strength in the warp - 137 MPa (19,800 psi) and the fill - 95.1 MPa (13,800 psi,) directions; and the warp interlaminar shear strength - 14.5 MPa (2100 psi). Radiographic evaluation revealed thickness variations and the thinner areas of the composite were scrapped. The ultrasonic C-scan showed attenuation variations, but these did not correspond to any of the physical and mechanical properties measured. Based on these initial tests and a survey of the literature, a plan has been devised to examine the effect of stress on the oxidation behavior, and the strength degradation of coated carbon-carbon composites. This plan will focus on static fatigue tests in the four point flexure mode in an elevated temperature, oxidizing environment.

  14. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  15. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dutta, Prabir K.; Lee, Inhee; Akbar, Sheikh A.

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  16. The Cycle Performance of a Hybrid Carbon Battery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sang-Yong; Kim, Sang-Chai; Jung, Ho-Young

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of a hybrid carbon battery is studied by using the Hg/Hg2SO4 reference electrode. The performance is confirmed in the discharge mode and a short-term cycle test. The capacities of the cell were 76.1, 60.3, 40.5, and 31.7 mAh at discharge currents of 150, 300, 600, and 900 mA, respectively. In the short-term cycle test, the capacity of the cell, 52.3 mAh at the first cycle, continuously increased to 66.7 mAh upon the fifth cycle (cut-off voltage 0.5 V in the deep cycle mode), indicating high feasibility of the hybrid carbon battery as a large-capacity energy storage system.

  17. Electrochemical performance of Si anode modified with carbonized gelatin binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying; Mu, Daobin; Chen, Shi; Wu, Borong; Cheng, Kailin; Li, Luyu; Wu, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Gelatin is alternatively adopted as the binder to modify Si anode coupling with its carbonization treatment. The binder can provide good bonding and uniform dispersion of the particles besides its environmental benignancy. Importantly, the carbonized binder containing nitrogen will be advantageous to the electrical conductivity of the electrode. In addition, some spaces are formed in the electrode due to the decomposition and shrinkage of the gelatin binder during heat-treatment, which may facilitate electrolyte penetration and accommodate volume change during cycling. All these merits make contribution to the good electrochemical performance of the modified Si electrode. It exhibits a reversible capacity of 990.3 mA h g-1 after 70 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1 and 904 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at 400 mA g-1.

  18. Creating With Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  19. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  20. The carbon dioxide cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mesoporous carbon -Cr2O3 composite as an anode material for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Bingkun; Chi, Miaofang; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon-Cr2O3 (M-C-Cr2O3) composite was prepared by co-assembly of in-situ formed phenolic resin, chromium precursor, and Pluronic block copolymer under acidic conditions, followed by carbonization at 750oC under Argon. The TEM results confirmed that the Cr2O3 nanoparticles, ranging from 10 to 20 nm, were well dispersed in the matrix of mesoporous carbon. The composite exhibited an initial reversible capacity of 710 mAh g-1 and good cycling stability, which is mainly due to the synergic effects of carbons within the composites, i.e. confining the crystal growth of Cr2O3 during the high temperature treatment step and buffering the volume change of Cr2O3 during the cycling step. This composite material is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  2. Activated carbon derived from waste coffee grounds for stable methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, K. Christian; Baek, Seung Bin; Lee, Wang-Geun; Meyyappan, M.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-09-01

    An activated carbon material derived from waste coffee grounds is shown to be an effective and stable medium for methane storage. The sample activated at 900 °C displays a surface area of 1040.3 m2 g-1 and a micropore volume of 0.574 cm3 g-1 and exhibits a stable CH4 adsorption capacity of ˜4.2 mmol g-1 at 3.0 MPa and a temperature range of 298 ± 10 K. The same material exhibits an impressive hydrogen storage capacity of 1.75 wt% as well at 77 K and 100 kPa. Here, we also propose a mechanism for the formation of activated carbon from spent coffee grounds. At low temperatures, the material has two distinct types with low and high surface areas; however, activation at elevated temperatures drives off the low surface area carbon, leaving behind the porous high surface area activated carbon.

  3. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  8. Smooth-Surfaced Carbon/Carbon Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Jacoy, Paul J.; Porter, Christopher C.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    Surface-densification technique integral to fabrication of reflective, lightweight, low-outgassing radio-antenna-reflector panels including carbon/carbon surface laminates supported by carbon/carbon core structures. Densification prevents "print-through" of carbon fibers on surface. When properly densified, surface polished to smooth finish.

  9. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  10. Constraints on the Distance Moduli, Helium and Metal Abundances, and Ages of Globular Clusters from their RR Lyrae and Non-variable Horizontal-branch Stars. I. M3, M15, and M92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Denissenkov, P. A.; Catelan, Márcio

    2016-08-01

    Up-to-date isochrones, zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) loci, and evolutionary tracks for core He-burning stars are applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of M3, M15, and M92, focusing in particular on their RR Lyrae populations. Periods for the ab- and c-type variables are calculated using the latest theoretical calibrations of {log} {P}{ab} and {log} {P}c as a function of luminosity, mass, effective temperature ({T}{{eff}}), and metallicity. Our models are generally able to reproduce the measured periods to well within the uncertainties implied by the stellar properties on which pulsation periods depend, as well as the mean periods and cluster-to-cluster differences in < {P}{ab}> and < {P}c> , on the assumption of well-supported values of E(B-V), {(m-M)}V, and [Fe/H]. While many of RR Lyrae in M3 lie close to the same ZAHB that fits the faintest horizontal-branch (HB) stars at bluer or redder colors, the M92 variables are all significantly evolved stars from ZAHB locations on the blue side of the instability strip. M15 appears to contain a similar population of HB stars as M92, along with additional helium-enhanced populations not present in the latter which comprise most of its RR Lyrae stars. The large number of variables in M15 and the similarity of the observed values of < {P}{ab}> and < {P}c> in M15 and M92 can be explained by HB models that allow for variations in Y. Similar ages (˜12.5 Gyr) are found for all three clusters, making them significantly younger than the field halo subgiant HD 140283. Our analysis suggests a preference for stellar models that take diffusive processes into account.

  11. Constraints on the Distance Moduli, Helium and Metal Abundances, and Ages of Globular Clusters from their RR Lyrae and Non-variable Horizontal-branch Stars. I. M3, M15, and M92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Denissenkov, P. A.; Catelan, Márcio

    2016-08-01

    Up-to-date isochrones, zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) loci, and evolutionary tracks for core He-burning stars are applied to the color–magnitude diagrams of M3, M15, and M92, focusing in particular on their RR Lyrae populations. Periods for the ab- and c-type variables are calculated using the latest theoretical calibrations of {log} {P}{ab} and {log} {P}c as a function of luminosity, mass, effective temperature ({T}{{eff}}), and metallicity. Our models are generally able to reproduce the measured periods to well within the uncertainties implied by the stellar properties on which pulsation periods depend, as well as the mean periods and cluster-to-cluster differences in < {P}{ab}> and < {P}c> , on the assumption of well-supported values of E(B-V), {(m-M)}V, and [Fe/H]. While many of RR Lyrae in M3 lie close to the same ZAHB that fits the faintest horizontal-branch (HB) stars at bluer or redder colors, the M92 variables are all significantly evolved stars from ZAHB locations on the blue side of the instability strip. M15 appears to contain a similar population of HB stars as M92, along with additional helium-enhanced populations not present in the latter which comprise most of its RR Lyrae stars. The large number of variables in M15 and the similarity of the observed values of < {P}{ab}> and < {P}c> in M15 and M92 can be explained by HB models that allow for variations in Y. Similar ages (˜12.5 Gyr) are found for all three clusters, making them significantly younger than the field halo subgiant HD 140283. Our analysis suggests a preference for stellar models that take diffusive processes into account.

  12. Ab Initio Structure Determination of New Mixed Zirconium Hydroxide Nitrates Zr M(OH) 2(NO 3) 3 ( M=K, Rb) from X-Ray Powder Diffraction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénard-Rocherullé, P.; Louër, D.

    2000-01-01

    Two new mixed zirconium hydroxide nitrates ZrM(OH)2(NO3)3 (M=K, Rb) have been synthesized through a wet chemical process. The two crystal structures have been solved ab initio from powder diffraction data collected with conventional monochromatic X-rays. ZrK(OH)2(NO3)3 crystallizes with a monoclinic symmetry [a=16.569(3) Å, b=5.791(1) Å, c=9.813(2) Å, β=90.17(2)°, P21/n, Z=4) and ZrRb(OH)2(NO3)3 with an orthorhombic symmetry [a=10.126(3) Å, b=16.492(3) Å, c=5.855(2) Å, Pbcn, Z=4]. The heavy atoms have been located from an interpretation of Patterson functions. The coordinates of the remaining light atoms have been determined from successive three-dimensional Fourier maps. The final Rietveld refinement indicators were RF=0.042, Rp=0.077 (M=K) and RF=0.064, Rp=0.115 (M=Rb). Like the structures of α-Zr(OH)2(NO3)2·1.65H2O and β-Zr(OH)2(NO3)2·H2O, the structures of the mixed basic zirconium nitrates are built from edge-sharing ZrO8 polyhedra to form infinite neutral zigzag chains of chemical composition [Zr(OH)4/2(NO3)2]n. The main difference with respect to the hydrated phases is the nature of the cohesion in the structures based on ionic contacts involving intercalated K+ or Rb+ and NO-3 species in the mixed compounds and on a complex hydrogen-bonding network in the hydrated phases. The crystal chemistry of the zirconium hydroxide nitrates is discussed and three structure types are identified.

  13. Naturally produced carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Santos, C.; Martínez-Hernández, A. L.; Consultchi, A.; Rodríguez, R.; Castaño, V. M.

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes represent an impressive kind of materials with diverse unexpected properties, and different methods to artificially produce them have been developed. Recently, they have also been synthesized at low temperatures, demonstrating that these materials might exist in fluids or carbon rocks of the Earth's crust. A new type of natural encapsulated carbon nanotubes found in a coal-petroleum mix is presented. These findings show that all allotropic carbon forms known up to date can be produced in Nature, where pressure, catalysts particles, shear stress and parameters other than exclusively very high temperature, seem to play an important role for producing nanotubes.

  14. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  15. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  16. Carbon Monoxide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Aniol, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Of all fatal poisonings in the United States, an estimated half are due to carbon monoxide. The number of non-lethal poisonings due to carbon monoxide is difficult to estimate because signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning cover a wide spectrum and mimic other disorders. Misdiagnosis is serious, as the patient often returns to the contaminated environment. Those not receiving proper treatment are at significant risk, as high as 10% to 12%, of developing late neurological sequelae. The diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning depends upon precise history taking, careful physical examination, and a high index of suspicion. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:21221282

  17. Nanoindentation of Carbon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Karamjit; Verma, Veena; Bhatti, H S

    2016-06-01

    In the present research paper carbon nanostructures viz. single walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nanohorns and graphene nanoplatelets have been synthesized by CVD technique, hydrothermal method, DC arc discharge method in liquid nitrogen and microwave technique respectively. After synthesis 5 mm thick pallets of given nanomaterial are prepared by making a paste in isopropyl alcohol and using polyvinylidene difluoride as a binder and then these pallets were used for nanoindentation measurements. Hardness, reduced modulus, stiffness, contact height and contact area have been measured using nanoindenter. PMID:27427726

  18. Environmental carbon dioxide control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B.; Gidaspow, D.

    1974-01-01

    A study of environmental carbon dioxide control for NASA EVA missions found solid potassium carbonate to be an effective regenerable absorbent in maintaining low carbon dioxide levels. The supported sorbent was capable of repeated regeneration below 150 C without appreciable degradation. Optimum structures in the form of thin pliable sheets of carbonate, inert support and binder were developed. Interpretation of a new solid-gas pore closing model helped predict the optimum sorbent and analysis of individual sorbent sheet performance in a thin rectangular channel sorber can predict packed bed performance.

  19. Downsizing the pelagic carbonate factory: Impacts of calcareous nannoplankton evolution on carbonate burial over the past 17 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchéras-Marx, Baptiste; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2014-12-01

    Cenozoic deep-sea carbonates ("calcareous oozes") are predominantly biogenic in origin and offer detailed records of the evolution of calcifying plankton groups, such as coccolithophores and foraminifera. The size and abundance of calcifying plankton determine the strength of the calcium carbonate "pump" in the open ocean, which acts as a short-term source of CO2, while the burial of pelagic carbonates serves as a long-term sink of carbon. Here, we show how the macroevolutionary size decrease in calcareous nannoplankton (coccoliths and calcareous nannoliths) has affected burial rates of calcareous ooze over the past 17 million years. We quantified nannofossil carbonate burial rates (g CaCO3/m2/yr) at five DSDP/ODP sites in the Atlantic, Indian, and Western Pacific oceans. The proportion of nannofossil-dominated fine fraction carbonate (< 38 μm) and its mass accumulation rates were regionally and temporally variable, but our combined data reveal globally consistent long-term trends. Mean nannofossil carbonate mass decreased about four-fold between 9 and 4 Ma, but this had little or only minor impact on the burial of pelagic carbonate until ~ 4 Ma. After ~ 4 Ma, when small-sized coccolith-bearing species prevailed, nannofossil carbonate burial rates decreased by one order of magnitude to the lowest values during the Pleistocene. In contrast, mass accumulation rates of the foraminifera-dominated > 38 μm fraction remained stable over the past 17 Myr. This suggests that changes in the deposition of calcareous ooze were primarily driven by calcareous nannoplankton, and that foraminifera did not compensate for the lower nannofossil-carbonate accumulation rates since the Pliocene. Despite a deepening of the lysocline over the past 4 Myr, global pelagic carbonate mass accumulation likely decreased. Whether, or how, this may relate to changes in weathering or other components within the long-term carbonate cycle remains unclear. Explanations for the macroevolutionary size

  20. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin David C.; O'Connor William K.; Penner Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    Concerns about global warming caused by the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere have resulted in the need for research to reduce or eliminate emissions of these gases. Carbonation of magnesium and calcium silicate minerals is one possible method to achieve this reduction. It is possible to carry out these reactions either in situ (storage underground and subsequent reaction with the host rock to trap CO2 as carbonate minerals) or ex situ (above ground in a more traditional chemical processing plant). Research at the Department of Energy’s Albany Research Center has explored both of these routes. This paper will explore parameters that affect the direct carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4) and olivine (Mg2SiO4) to produce magnesite (MgCO3), as well as the calcium silicate mineral, wollastonite (CaSiO3), to form calcite (CaCO3). The Columbia River Basalt Group is a multi-layered basaltic lava plateau that has favorable mineralogy and structure for storage of CO2. Up to 25% combined concentration of Ca, Fe2+, and Mg cations could react to form carbonates and thus sequester large quantities of CO2. Core samples from the Columbia River Basalt Group were reacted in an autoclave for up to 2000 hours at temperatures and pressures to simulate in situ conditions. Changes in core porosity, secondary minerals, and solution chemistry were measured.

  1. Lithium and calcium carbides with polymeric carbon structures.

    PubMed

    Benson, Daryn; Li, Yanling; Luo, Wei; Ahuja, Rajeev; Svensson, Gunnar; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    We studied the binary carbide systems Li2C2 and CaC2 at high pressure using an evolutionary and ab initio random structure search methodology for crystal structure prediction. At ambient pressure Li2C2 and CaC2 represent salt-like acetylides consisting of C2(2-) dumbbell anions. The systems develop into semimetals (P3m1-Li2C2) and metals (Cmcm-Li2C2, Cmcm-CaC2, and Immm-CaC2) with polymeric anions (chains, layers, strands) at moderate pressures (below 20 GPa). Cmcm-CaC2 is energetically closely competing with the ground state structure. Polyanionic forms of carbon stabilized by electrostatic interactions with surrounding cations add a new feature to carbon chemistry. Semimetallic P3m1-Li2C2 displays an electronic structure close to that of graphene. The π* band, however, is hybridized with Li-sp states and changed into a bonding valence band. Metallic forms are predicted to be superconductors. Calculated critical temperatures may exceed 10 K for equilibrium volume structures.

  2. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  3. Redwoods, restoration, and implications for carbon budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) of California have several unique characteristics that influence interactions between vegetation and geomorphic processes. Case studies, using a combination of in-channel wood surveys and an air photo inventory of landslides, illustrate current conditions in a redwood-dominated watershed undergoing restoration work, and the influence of wood loading and landslides on the carbon budget. Redwood trees have extremely large biomass (trunk wood volumes of 700 to 1000 m3) and are very decay-resistant; consequently, they have a large and persistent influence on in-channel wood loading. Large wood surveys indicate high wood loading in streams in uncut forests (0.3-0.5 m3/m2 of channel), but also show that high wood loading can persist in logged basin with unlogged riparian buffers because of the slow decay of fallen redwoods. Through a watershed restoration program, Redwood National Park increases in-channel wood loading in low-order streams, but the effectiveness of this technique has not yet been tested by a large flood. Another unique characteristic of redwood is its ability to resprout from basal burls after cutting, so that root strength may not decline as sharply following logging as in other types of forests. An air photo inventory of landslides following a large storm in 1997 indicated: 1) that in the Redwood Creek watershed the volume of material displaced by landslides in harvested areas was not related to the time elapsed since logging, suggesting that the loss of root strength was not a decisive factor in landslide initiation, 2) landslide production on decommissioned logging roads was half that of untreated roads, and 3) landslides removed an estimated 28 Mg of organic carbon/km2 from hillslopes. The carbon budget of a redwood-dominated catchment is dominated by the vegetative component, but is also influenced by the extent of mass movement, erosion control work, and in-channel storage of wood.

  4. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide increases soil carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Jastrow, Julie D; Miller, Michael R; Matamala, Roser; Boutton, Thomas W; Rice, Charles W; Owensby, Clenton E

    2005-01-01

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, researchers from Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories and Kansas State and Texas A&M Universities evaluated the collective results of earlier studies by using a statistical procedure called meta-analysis. They found that on average elevated CO2 increased soil carbon by 5.6 percent over a two to nine year period. They also measured comparable increases in soil carbon for Tennessee deciduous forest and Kansas grassland after five to eight years of experimental exposure to elevated CO2.

  5. The carbonate profile and water regime of migrational-mycelial chernozems in different ecosystems of Kursk oblast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovechkin, S. V.; Bazykina, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    The carbonate profiles of migrational-mycelial (typical) chernozems under regularly mown and absolutely reserved steppes in the V.V. Alekhin Central Chernozemic State Biospheric Reserve and under cropland with cereals (Kursk oblast) were studied in 2007-2009. A comparison of the results of these studies with previous results obtained in the mid-1970s attests to certain changes in the carbonate profiles of the soils. They are conditioned by the activation of the migration of carbonates and the more pronounced manifestation of differently directed processes of the leaching and accumulation of carbonates. The reasons for the observed transformation of the carbonate profiles are related to the increased moistening of the upper 3-m-deep chernozemic layer in different ecosystems because of a general rise in the humidity of the local climate in the recent decades (1973-2006).

  6. Carbon Dioxide and Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Peter G.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

  7. 1992 Carbon emissions data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This article reports on the global total of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement manufacture in 1992. The total estimate of 6097 million metric tons of carbon is essentially the same for 1990 and down slightly from 1991, but 7 of 9 geographical regions had increases.

  8. Modeling Carbon Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Model results will be reviewed to assess different methods for bounding the terrestrial role in the global carbon cycle. It is proposed that a series of climate model runs could be scoped that would tighten the limits on the "missing sink" of terrestrial carbon and could also direct future satellite image analyses to search for its geographical location and understand its seasonal dynamics.

  9. The carbon cycle revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolin, Bert; Fung, Inez

    1992-01-01

    Discussions during the Global Change Institute indicated a need to present, in some detail and as accurately as possible, our present knowledge about the carbon cycle, the uncertainties in this knowledge, and the reasons for these uncertainties. We discuss basic issues of internal consistency within the carbon cycle, and end by summarizing the key unknowns.

  10. Carbon dioxide recycling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  11. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  13. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  14. Seeing the Carbon Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Pamela; Welty, David J.; Repeta, Daniel; Engle-Belknap, Cheryl A.; Cramer, Catherine; Frashure, Kim; Chen, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a classroom experiment that was developed to introduce middle school learners to the carbon cycle. The experiment deals with transfer of CO[subscript 2] between liquid reservoirs and the effect CO[subscript 2] has on algae growth. It allows students to observe the influence of the carbon cycle on algae growth,…

  15. Mangroves among the most carbon-rich forests in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Daniel C.; Kauffman, J. Boone; Murdiyarso, Daniel; Kurnianto, Sofyan; Stidham, Melanie; Kanninen, Markku

    2011-05-01

    Mangrove forests occur along ocean coastlines throughout the tropics, and support numerous ecosystem services, including fisheries production and nutrient cycling. However, the areal extent of mangrove forests has declined by 30-50% over the past half century as a result of coastal development, aquaculture expansion and over-harvesting. Carbon emissions resulting from mangrove loss are uncertain, owing in part to a lack of broad-scale data on the amount of carbon stored in these ecosystems, particularly below ground. Here, we quantified whole-ecosystem carbon storage by measuring tree and dead wood biomass, soil carbon content, and soil depth in 25 mangrove forests across a broad area of the Indo-Pacific region--spanning 30° of latitude and 73° of longitude--where mangrove area and diversity are greatest. These data indicate that mangroves are among the most carbon-rich forests in the tropics, containing on average 1,023Mg carbon per hectare. Organic-rich soils ranged from 0.5m to more than 3m in depth and accounted for 49-98% of carbon storage in these systems. Combining our data with other published information, we estimate that mangrove deforestation generates emissions of 0.02-0.12Pg carbon per year--as much as around 10% of emissions from deforestation globally, despite accounting for just 0.7% of tropical forest area.

  16. Apatite formation on (2-x)CaO.x/3 M2O3 x 2SiO2 glasses (M = La, Y; 0 < or = x < or = 0.6) in a simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Fresa, R; Costantini, A; Buri, A; Branda, F

    1995-11-01

    Glasses were prepared by substituting La2O3 or Y2O3 for CaO in glassy wollastonite composition (CaO.SiO2). Their behaviour when they are soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF) was studied by means of an electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive system for elemental analysis, and by means of IR spectroscopy. Electron microscopy and energy dispersive microanalysis were performed on samples soaked as polished bulk samples, and IR analysis was on samples soaked as fine powders. A carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite layer is formed when glasses of low La2O3 content are soaked in SBF. When Y2O3-containing glasses are considered, even in the case of small substitution for CaO, the same layer forms only on fracture surfaces. The experimental results agree with the mechanism reported in the literature. PMID:8589195

  17. Oscillating carbon nanotori along carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and C60 fullerenes, has given rise to a number of potential nanoscale devices. One such device is the gigahertz oscillator, comprising an inner shell sliding inside an outer shell of a multiwalled carbon nanotube, and which, at least theoretically, generates oscillatory frequencies in the gigahertz range. Following the concept of these gigahertz oscillators and the recent discovery of “fullerene crop circles,” here we propose the notion of a nanotorus-nanotube oscillator comprising a carbon nanotorus which is sucked by the van der Waals force onto the carbon nanotube, and subsequently oscillates along the nanotube axis due to the equal and opposite pulselike forces acting at either end of the nanotube. Assuming a continuum approach, where the interatomic interactions are replaced by uniform atomic surface densities, and assuming that the geometry of the nanotube and nanotorus is such that the nanotorus always remains symmetrically situated around the nanotube, we present the basic mechanics of such a system, including the determination of the suction and acceptance energies, and the frequency of the resulting oscillatory motion. In contrast to the previously studied gigahertz nanoscale oscillators, here the oscillatory frequencies are shown to be in the megahertz range. Our study, although purely theoretical must necessarily precede any experimental implementation of such oscillatory systems.

  18. The Contemporary Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    The global carbon cycle refers to the exchanges of carbon within and between four major reservoirs: the atmosphere, the oceans, land, and fossil fuels. Carbon may be transferred from one reservoir to another in seconds (e.g., the fixation of atmospheric CO2 into sugar through photosynthesis) or over millennia (e.g., the accumulation of fossil carbon (coal, oil, gas) through deposition and diagenesis of organic matter). This chapter emphasizes the exchanges that are important over years to decades and includes those occurring over the scale of months to a few centuries. The focus will be on the years 1980-2000 but our considerations will broadly include the years ˜1850-2100. Chapter 8.09, deals with longer-term processes that involve rates of carbon exchange that are small on an annual timescale (weathering, vulcanism, sedimentation, and diagenesis).The carbon cycle is important for at least three reasons. First, carbon forms the structure of all life on the planet, making up ˜50% of the dry weight of living things. Second, the cycling of carbon approximates the flows of energy around the Earth, the metabolism of natural, human, and industrial systems. Plants transform radiant energy into chemical energy in the form of sugars, starches, and other forms of organic matter; this energy, whether in living organisms or dead organic matter, supports food chains in natural ecosystems as well as human ecosystems, not the least of which are industrial societies habituated (addicted?) to fossil forms of energy for heating, transportation, and generation of electricity. The increased use of fossil fuels has led to a third reason for interest in the carbon cycle. Carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), forms two of the most important greenhouse gases. These gases contribute to a natural greenhouse effect that has kept the planet warm enough to evolve and support life (without the greenhouse effect the Earth's average temperature would be -33

  19. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihan; Zhang, Zhaohui; Lu, Yongqi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Jones, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90 days at 50 °C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4 M), nitrate (0.05 M) and chloride (0.3 M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts.

  20. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Impacts of Land Cover Change on the Carbon Dynamics in Indonesian Tropical Forested Wetlands- Mangroves and Peat Swamp Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, J. B.; Arifanti, V. B.; Basuki, I.; Kurnianto, S.; Novita, N.; Murdiyarso, D.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical wetland forests including mangroves and lowland peat swamp forests contain among the highest carbon stocks of any ecosystem on the planet. This is largely due to the accumulation of deep organic rich soils which have been sequestering carbon for millennia. Depth of organic layers (peats) can exceed 3 m in mangrove and 10 m in the peat swamp forests. The ecosystem carbon stocks may exceed 2000 Mg/ha in mangroves and 5000 Mg/ha in peat swamp forests. Ironically, rates of deforestation of these tropical forests are among the highest in the tropics. With land cover change comes dramatic shifts in carbon stocks, net ecosystem productivity, and greenhouse gas emissions. Land cover change results in carbon losses of practically all aboveground pools as well as losses arising from soil pools. Based upon studies where we have compared stock changes due to land use the carbon emissions arising from land cover change to shrimp ponds and oil palm have ranged from 800-3000 Mg CO2e/ha. The lowered carbon sequestration rates coupled with increased or similar emissions from decomposition results in an ecosystem shift from a carbon sink to a carbon source. Clearly the large carbon stocks, high rates of deforestation, and large emissions resulting from their degradation suggest that these ecosystems should receive great consideration in climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  2. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  3. Nano-Crystals of c-Diamond, n-Diamond and i-Carbon Grown in Carbon-Ion Implanted Fused Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J. L.; Orwa, J. O.; Jiang, B.; Prawer, S.; Bursill, L. A.

    Combined high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy are used to characterise carbon nano-phases found embedded in fused quartz. These appear after implantation of 1 MeV carbon ions, followed by annealing in argon, oxygen and forming gas for 1 hour at 1100°C. For Ar, virtually all of the carbon diffuses out of the substrate with no observable carbon clusters for all doses studied. After annealing in oxygen, a crystalline COx phase is identified at the end of range, following a dose of 5×1017 C/cm2. Three nano-crystalline carbon phases, including diamond, appear after annealing in forming gas: these form a layer 170 nm beneath the fused quartz surface for all ion doses. The average size of these clusters and the corresponding phases depend on the ion dose; the smallest size of 5-7 nm diameter crystallise as fcc Fd¯ {3}m diamond following a dose of 0.5× 1017 C/cm2, whereas clusters of 8-13 nm diameter, for a higher dose of 2× 1017 C/cm2, have a Fm¯ {3}m modified phase of diamond known as n-diamond. The largest clusters, diameter 15-40 nm, for a dose of 5× 1017 C/cm2, have the cubic P213 (or P4232) structure known as i-carbon. These buried layered diamond and diamond-related materials may have applications for field emission and optical waveguide type devices.

  4. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  5. Carbon isotope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, D.C. ); Fry, B. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The {sup 11}C, {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations.

  6. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  7. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  8. Resistivity of Carbon-Carbon Composites Halved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have become the material of choice for applications requiring strength and stiffness at very high temperatures (above 2000 C). These composites comprise carbon or graphite fibers embedded in a carbonized or graphitized matrix. In some applications, such as shielding sensitive electronics in very high temperature environments, the performance of these materials would be improved by lowering their electrical resistivity. One method to lower the resistivity of the composites is to lower the resistivity of the graphite fibers, and a proven method to accomplish that is intercalation. Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules into a host lattice. In this study the host fibers were highly graphitic pitch-based graphite fibers, or vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCF), and the intercalate was bromine. Intercalation compounds of graphite are generally thought of as being only metastable, but it has been shown that the residual bromine graphite fiber intercalation compound is remarkably stable, resisting decomposition even at temperatures at least as high as 1000 C. The focus of this work was to fabricate composite preforms, determine whether the fibers they were made from were still intercalated with bromine after processing, and determine the effect on composite resistivity. It was not expected that the resistivity would be lowered as dramatically as with graphite polymer composites because the matrix itself would be much more conductive, but it was hoped that the gains would be substantial enough to warrant its use in high-performance applications. In a collaborative effort supporting a Space Act Agreement between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Applied Sciences, Inc. (Cedarville, OH), laminar preforms were fabricated with pristine and bromine-intercalated pitch-based fibers (P100 and P100-Br) and VGCF (Pyro I and Pyro I-Br). The green preforms were carbonized at 1000 C and then heat treated to 3000 C. To determine whether the

  9. Flow injection catalase activity measurement based on gold nanoparticles/carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    El Nashar, Rasha Mohamed

    2012-07-15

    Amperometric flow injection method of hydrogen peroxide analysis was developed based on catalase enzyme (CAT) immobilization on a glassy carbon electrode (GC) modified with electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticles on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan film. The resulting biosensor was applied to detect hydrogen peroxide with a linear response range 1.0×10(-7)-2.5×10(-3)M with a correlation coefficient 0.998 and response time less than 10s. The optimum conditions of film deposition such as potential applied, deposition time and pH were tested and the flow injection conditions were optimized to be: flow rate of 3ml/min, sample volume 75μl and saline phosphate buffer of pH 6.89. Catalase enzyme activity was successfully determined in liver homogenate samples of rats, raised under controlled dietary plan, using a flow injection analysis system involving the developed biosensor simultaneously with spectrophotometric detection, which is the common method of enzymatic assay.

  10. Flow injection catalase activity measurement based on gold nanoparticles/carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    El Nashar, Rasha Mohamed

    2012-07-15

    Amperometric flow injection method of hydrogen peroxide analysis was developed based on catalase enzyme (CAT) immobilization on a glassy carbon electrode (GC) modified with electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticles on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan film. The resulting biosensor was applied to detect hydrogen peroxide with a linear response range 1.0×10(-7)-2.5×10(-3)M with a correlation coefficient 0.998 and response time less than 10s. The optimum conditions of film deposition such as potential applied, deposition time and pH were tested and the flow injection conditions were optimized to be: flow rate of 3ml/min, sample volume 75μl and saline phosphate buffer of pH 6.89. Catalase enzyme activity was successfully determined in liver homogenate samples of rats, raised under controlled dietary plan, using a flow injection analysis system involving the developed biosensor simultaneously with spectrophotometric detection, which is the common method of enzymatic assay. PMID:22817944

  11. Design and syntheses of hybrid metal-organic materials based on K3[M(C2O4)3]·3H2O [M(III)=Fe, Al, Cr] metallotectons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yayong; Zong, Yingxia; Ma, Haoran; Zhang, Ao; Liu, Kang; Wang, Debao; Wang, Wenqiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    By using K3[M(C2O4)3]·3H2O [M(III)=Fe, Al, Cr] (C2O42-=oxalate) metallotectons as the starting material, we have synthesized eight novel complexes with formulas [{Fe(C2O4)2(H2O)2}2]·(H-L1)2·H2O 1, [Fe(C2O4)Cl2]·(H2-L2)0.5·(L2)0.5·H2O 2, [{Fe(C2O4)1.5Cl2}2]·(H-L3)43, [Fe2(C2O4)Cl8]·(H2-L4)2·2H2O 4, K[Al(C2O4)3]·(H2-L5)·2H2O 5, K[Al(C2O4)3]·(H-L6)2·2H2O 6, K[Cr(C2O4)3]·2H2O 7, Na[Fe(C2O4)3]·(H-L6)2·2H2O 8 (with L1=4-dimethylaminopyridine, L2=2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine, L3=2-aminobenzimidazole, L4=1,4-bis-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzene, L5=1,4-bis((2-methylimidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene, L6=2-methylbenzimidazole). Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analyses. Compound 3 is a 2D H-bonded supramolecular architecture. Others are 3D supramolecular structures. Compound 1 shows a [Fe(C2O4)2(H2O)2]- unit and 3D antionic H-bonded framework. Compound 2 features a [Fe(C2O4)Cl2]- anion and 1D iron-oxalate-iron chain. Compound 3 features a [Fe2(C2O4)3Cl4]4- unit. Compound 4 features distinct [Fe2(C2O4)Cl8]4- units, which are mutual linked by water molecules to generated a 2D H-bonded network. Compound 5 features infinite ladder-like chains constructed by [Al(C2O4)3]3- units and K+ cations. The 1D chains are further extended into 3D antionic H-bonded framework through O-H···O H-bonds. Compounds 6-8 show 2D [KAl(C2O4)3]2- layer, [KCr(C2O4)3]2- layer and [NaFe(C2O4)3]2- layer, respectively.

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  17. Metalloradical-catalyzed aliphatic carbon-carbon activation of cyclooctane.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yun Wai; Chan, Kin Shing

    2010-05-26

    The aliphatic carbon-carbon activation of c-octane was achieved via the addition of Rh(ttp)H to give Rh(ttp)(n-octyl) in good yield under mild reaction conditions. The aliphatic carbon-carbon activation was Rh(II)(ttp)-catalyzed and was very sensitive to porphyrin sterics.

  18. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  19. Hypervelocity technology carbon/carbon testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, John V.; Kretz, Lawrence O.

    The paper describes the procedures used at the Structures Test Laboratory of the Wright Laboratory's Flight Dynamics Directorate to test a carbon/carbon hot structure representing a typical hypersonic gliding body, and presents the results of tests. The forebody was heated to 1371 C over 13 test runs, using radiant quartz lamps; a vertical shear force of 5.34 kN was introduced to the nose at a stabilized temperature of 816 C. Test data were collected using prototype high-temperature strain gages, in-house-designed high-temperature extensometers, conventional strain gages, and thermocouples. Video footage was taken of all test runs. Test runs were successfully completed up to 1371 C with flight typical thermal gradients at heating rates up to 5.56 C/sec. Results showed that, overall, the termal test control systems performed as predicted and that test temperatures and thermal gradients were achieved to within about 5 percent in most cases.

  20. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  1. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  2. Authigenic carbonate and the history of the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Daniel P; Higgins, John A; Macdonald, Francis A; Johnston, David T

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O(2) or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  3. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Catalytic Decomposition of Methane using Bimetallic Fe-Co Catalysts Supported on MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Beh Hoe; Ramli, Irmawati; Yahya, Noorhana; Kean Pah, Lim

    2011-02-01

    This work reports the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic decomposition of methane using bimetallic Fe-Co catalysts supported on MgO. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the as-prepared carbon nanotubes are multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameter in the range of 15nm to 45nm. Purification of as-prepared MWCNTs was carried out by acid and heat treatment method. EDX results show the Fe, Co and MgO catalysts were successfully removed by refluxing the as-prepared MWCNTs in 3M H2SO4.

  4. Tracking the migration of the Indian continent using the carbonate clumped isotope technique on Phanerozoic soil carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Prosenjit; Vasiliev, Mikhail V.; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Sarkar, Soumen; Ghosh, Sampa; Yamada, Keita; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Poulsen, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 140 million years ago, the Indian plate separated from Gondwana and migrated by almost 90° latitude to its current location, forming the Himalayan-Tibetan system. Large discrepancies exist in the rate of migration of Indian plate during Phanerozoic. Here we describe a new approach to paleo-latitudinal reconstruction based on simultaneous determination of carbonate formation temperature and δ18O of soil carbonates, constrained by the abundances of 13C-18O bonds in palaeosol carbonates. Assuming that the palaeosol carbonates have a strong relationship with the composition of the meteoric water, δ18O carbonate of palaeosol can constrain paleo-latitudinal position. Weighted mean annual rainfall δ18O water values measured at several stations across the southern latitudes are used to derive a polynomial equation: δ18Ow = −0.006 × (LAT)2 − 0.294 × (LAT) − 5.29 which is used for latitudinal reconstruction. We use this approach to show the northward migration of the Indian plate from 46.8 ± 5.8°S during the Permian (269 M.y.) to 30 ± 11°S during the Triassic (248 M.y.), 14.7 ± 8.7°S during the early Cretaceous (135 M.y.), and 28 ± 8.8°S during the late Cretaceous (68 M.y.). Soil carbonate δ18O provides an alternative method for tracing the latitudinal position of Indian plate in the past and the estimates are consistent with the paleo-magnetic records which document the position of Indian plate prior to 135 ± 3 M.y. PMID:26931069

  5. Tracking the migration of the Indian continent using the carbonate clumped isotope technique on Phanerozoic soil carbonates.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prosenjit; Vasiliev, Mikhail V; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Sarkar, Soumen; Ghosh, Sampa; Yamada, Keita; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Poulsen, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 140 million years ago, the Indian plate separated from Gondwana and migrated by almost 90° latitude to its current location, forming the Himalayan-Tibetan system. Large discrepancies exist in the rate of migration of Indian plate during Phanerozoic. Here we describe a new approach to paleo-latitudinal reconstruction based on simultaneous determination of carbonate formation temperature and δ(18)O of soil carbonates, constrained by the abundances of (13)C-(18)O bonds in palaeosol carbonates. Assuming that the palaeosol carbonates have a strong relationship with the composition of the meteoric water, δ(18)O carbonate of palaeosol can constrain paleo-latitudinal position. Weighted mean annual rainfall δ(18)O water values measured at several stations across the southern latitudes are used to derive a polynomial equation: δ(18)Ow = -0.006 × (LAT)(2) - 0.294 × (LAT) - 5.29 which is used for latitudinal reconstruction. We use this approach to show the northward migration of the Indian plate from 46.8 ± 5.8°S during the Permian (269 M.y.) to 30 ± 11°S during the Triassic (248 M.y.), 14.7 ± 8.7°S during the early Cretaceous (135 M.y.), and 28 ± 8.8°S during the late Cretaceous (68 M.y.). Soil carbonate δ(18)O provides an alternative method for tracing the latitudinal position of Indian plate in the past and the estimates are consistent with the paleo-magnetic records which document the position of Indian plate prior to 135 ± 3 M.y. PMID:26931069

  6. Porous carbons prepared by direct carbonization of MOFs for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinlong; Li, Xuejin; Yan, Zifeng; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2014-07-01

    Three porous carbons were prepared by direct carbonization of HKUST-1, MOF-5 and Al-PCP without additional carbon precursors. The carbon samples obtained by carbonization at 1073 K were characterized by XRD, TEM and N2 physisorption techniques followed by testing for electrochemical performance. The BET surface areas of the three carbons were in the range of 50-1103 m2/g. As electrode materials for supercapacitor, the MOF-5 and Al-PCP derived carbons displayed the ideal capacitor behavior, whereas the HKUST-1 derived carbon showed poor capacitive behavior at various sweep rates and current densities. Among those carbon samples, Al-PCP derived carbons exhibited highest specific capacitance (232.8 F/g) in 30% KOH solution at the current density of 100 mA/g.

  7. Estimating carbon monoxide exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerley, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Method predicts effects of carbon monoxide on astronauts confined in spacecraft cabin atmospheres. Information on need for low toxicity level also applies to confined spaces. Benefits are applicable to industry and public health.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Memory Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are among the most cited prototypical materials for nanoelectronics and information storage devices, a dominant position that originates from their intrinsic structural and electronic properties. In this chapter we review the developments in memory elements that directly exploit the unique properties of carbon nanotubes. Fundamental operational principles and characteristics are examined for the different types of carbon nanotube-based memory devices along with the current status of experimental fabrication and scalability. These include memory elements based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFET), nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), and electromigration. Many of these devices show tremendous promise for providing enhanced densities, lower power requirements, more efficient read/write processes, and non-volatility of data.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... colorless gas created when fuels (such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. ** Carbon Monoxide can have different effects on people based on its concentration in the ...

  10. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  11. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  12. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sal soda poisoning; Soda ash poisoning; Disodium salt poisoning; Carbonic acid poisoning; Washing soda poisoning ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ...

  13. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production.

  14. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... a chemical produced from the incomplete burning of natural gas or other products containing carbon. ... indoor and camp stoves) Water heaters that use natural gas Note: This list may not be all inclusive.

  15. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  16. Carbon monoxide intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Kales, S.N. )

    1993-11-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning usually results from inhalation of exhaust fumes from motor vehicles, smoke from fires or fumes from faulty heating systems. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity for hemoglobin, with which it forms carboxyhemoglobin. The resulting decrease in both oxygen-carrying capacity and oxygen release can lead to end-organ hypoxia. The clinical presentation is nonspecific. Headache, dizziness, fatigue and nausea are common in mild to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning. In more severe cases, tachycardia, tachypnea and central nervous system depression occur. When carbon monoxide intoxication is suspected, empiric treatment with 100 percent oxygen should be initiated immediately. The diagnosis is confirmed by documenting an elevated carboxyhemoglobin level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is recommended in patients with neurologic dysfunction, cardiac dysfunction or a history of unconsciousness. 26 refs.

  17. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  18. Green Carbon, Black Carbon, White Carbon: Simultaneous Differentiation Between Soil Organic Matter, Pyrogenic Carbon and Carbonates Using Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Peltre, C.; Chan, J.; Baumgartl, T.; Erskine, P.; Apesteguía, M.; Virto, I.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of soil carbon stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of soil carbon in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. The two-step approach is time, labor and cost intensive, and generates additional uncertainties from the calculations. Quantification of the actively cycling pool of soil organic C (SOC) in many soils is further complicated by the potential presence of more recalcitrant/stable forms such as pyrogenic or black carbon (BC) derived from incomplete combustion of vegetation, or even geogenic carbon such as coal. The wide spectrum of materials currently considered BC makes its quantification challenging. The chemical method using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) as markers of condensed aromatic structures indicative of pyrogenic C is highly time, labor and cost intensive, and can generate artifacts. Several research groups are now developing method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of these various forms of soil carbon using thermal analysis techniques such as thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis. The objective of this presentation is to provide a general overview and specific examples of the current progress and technical challenges in this evolving methodology.

  19. Carbon dioxide removal process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  20. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  1. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T.; Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P.; Cook, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  2. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  3. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  4. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  5. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  6. High Level ab initio Predictions of the Energetics of mCO2•(H2O)n (n = 1-3, m = 1-12) Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Thanthiriwatte, Sahan; Duke, Jessica R.; Jackson, Virgil E.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Dixon, David A.

    2012-10-04

    Electronic structure calculations at the correlated molecular orbital theory and density functional theory levels have been used to generate a reliable set of clustering energies for up to three water molecules in carbon dioxide clusters up to n = 12. The structures and energetics are dominated by Lewis acid-base interactions with hydrogen bonding interactions playing a lesser energetic role. The actual binding energies are somewhat larger than might be expected. The correlated molecular orbital MP2 method and density functional theory with the ωB97X exchange-correlation functional provide good results for the energetics of the clusters but the B3LYP and ωB97X-D functionals do not. Seven CO2 molecules form the first solvent shell about a single H2O with four CO2 molecules interacting with the H2O via Lewis acid-base interactions, two CO2 interacting with the H2O by hydrogen bonds, and the seventh CO2 completing the shell. The Lewis acid-base and weak hydrogen bond interactions between the water molecules and the CO2 molecules are strong enough to disrupt the trimer ring configuration for as few as seven CO2 molecules. Calculated 13C NMR chemical shifts for mCO2•(H2O)n show little change with respect to the number of H2O or CO2 molecules in the cluster. The O-H stretching frequencies do exhibit shifts that can provide information about the interactions between water and CO2 molecules.

  7. Lysine-derived mesoporous carbon nanotubes as a proficient non-precious catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongfang; Zhou, Tianbao; Wang, Hui; Feng, Hanqing; Ji, Shan

    2014-12-01

    N-doped carbon nanotubes are highly favored for use as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) because of their relatively low cost and superior catalytic activity. Here, Lysine-derived porous carbon nanotubes (LPCNs) with large inner cavities of ca. 300-400 nm are reported as electrocatalyst for ORR. LPCNs exhibit 28.3 mV of more positive half-wave-potential than that of commercial Pt/C. In addition, LPCNs is much more stable and tolerant to fuel crossover effect than Pt/C. The above superiorities make it a promising candidate for substituting noble metal catalysts as a cathode catalyst for ORR.

  8. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  9. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  10. Structure Evolution of Ordered Mesoporous Carbons Induced by Water Content of Mixed Solvents Water/Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Liang, Shujun; Li, Zhenzhong; Zhai, Yan; Song, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, mesostructure evolution of ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) from the 2-D hexagonal (space group p6mm) to the discontinuous cubic Fdoverline{3}m , then towards the face-centered cubic lattice Fmoverline{3}m , and finally, to the simple cubic Pm3n is achieved by simply adjusting the cosolvent water content of the mixed solvents water/ethanol in the presence of a reverse nonionic triblock copolymer and low molecular resin by evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Experimental results demonstrate that both the cosolvent and the reverse triblock copolymer play a key role in the mesophase transitions of OMCs. Furthermore, the OMCs with Pm3n symmetry are reported for the first time. Finally, the mechanism of mesostructure transition was discussed and proposed.

  11. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  12. Carbon copy deaths: carbon monoxide gas chamber.

    PubMed

    Patel, F

    2008-08-01

    The news media can exert a powerful influence over suicidal behaviour. It has been observed that like-minded individuals are able to preplan a group suicide method using modern communication technology in the form of websites and online chatrooms and mobile phone texting. A case of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is presented to illustrate the recent phenomenon of cyber suicides by suffocation from a burning barbecue (charcoal burner) in 'gas chamber' conversions. Although barbecues (BBQ) are very popular in Britain and widely available, there have been relatively few reported cases of copycat deaths from CO gas suffocation. PMID:18586213

  13. Determination of 210Pb, 210Po, 226Ra, 228Ra and uranium isotopes in drinking water in order to comply with the requirements of the EU ‘Drinking Water Directive.

    PubMed

    Vasile, M; Loots, H; Jacobs, K; Verheyen, L; Sneyers, L; Verrezen, F; Bruggeman, M

    2016-03-01

    The European Union published in 2013 a new Drinking Water Directive with stricter requirements for measuring natural radioactivity. In order to adhere to this, a method for sequential separation of 210Pb, 210Po, 238U and 234U in drinking water was applied using UTEVA® and Sr resins. Polonium-210, 238U and 234U were quantified using alpha-particle spectrometry and 210Pb using liquid scintillation counting. Radium-226 and 228Ra were determined using 3M Empore Radium RAD Disks, and their quantification was done using a Quantulus™ 1220 liquid scintillation counter. PMID:27358946

  14. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability

    PubMed Central

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1), and

  15. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Big Sky Carbon Atlas is an online geoportal designed for you to discover, interpret, and access geospatial data and maps relevant to decision support and education on carbon sequestration in the Big Sky Region. In serving as the public face of the Partnership's spatial Data Libraries, the Atlas provides a gateway to geographic information characterizing CO2 sources, potential geologic sinks, terrestrial carbon fluxes, civil and energy infrastructure, energy use, and related themes. In addition to directly serving the BSCSP and its stakeholders, the Atlas feeds regional data to the NatCarb Portal, contributing to a national perspective on carbon sequestration. Established components of the Atlas include a gallery of thematic maps and an interactive map that allows you to: • Navigate and explore regional characterization data through a user-friendly interface • Print your map views or publish them as PDFs • Identify technical references relevant to specific areas of interest • Calculate straight-line or pipeline-constrained distances from point sources of CO2 to potential geologic sink features • Download regional data layers (feature under development) (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  16. Response of carbon-carbon composites to challenging environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Barrett, David M.; Ransone, Philip O.; Sawyer, J. Wayne

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results from material performance evaluations of oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites intended for multiuse aerospace applications, which cover the effects of the following environmental parameters: the oxidizing nature of the environments (including both high and low oxygen partial pressures), high temperatures, moisture, cyclic temperature service, and foreign-object impact. Results are presented for the carbon-carbon material currently in use as the thermal-protection-system material on Space Shuttle, as well as for newer and more advanced structural forms of carbon-carbon composites.

  17. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  18. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  19. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2011-08-16

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  20. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-01-24

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  1. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  2. Blue Carbon distribution in mangrove forests of the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, M.; Rivera-Monroy, V.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Roy Chowdhury, R.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, coastal ecosystems are critical to maintaining human livelihood and biodiversity. These ecosystems including mangroves, salt marshes, and sea grasses provide essential ecosystem services, such as supporting fisheries by providing important spawning grounds, filtering pollutants and contaminants from coastal waters, and protecting coastal development and communities against storms, floods and erosion. Additionally, recent research indicates that these vegetated coastal ecosystems are highly efficient carbon sinks (i.e. 'Blue Carbon') and can potentially play a significant role in ameliorating the effect of increasing global climate change by capturing significant amounts of carbon into sediments and plant biomass. The term blue carbon indicates the carbon stored in coastal vegetated wetlands (i.e., mangroves, intertidal marshes, and seagrass meadows). As a result of rapid global changes in coastal regions, it is crucial that we improve our understanding of the current and future state of the remaining coastal ecosystems and associated ecosystem services and their vulnerability to global climate change. In this study, we present a continental scale study of mangrove distribution and assess patterns of forest structural development associated to latitude and geomorphological setting. We produced a baseline map of mangrove canopy height and biomass for all mangrove forests of the Americas using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and publicly available land cover maps (Figure 1). The resulting canopy height map was calibrated using ICEsat/Geoscience Laser Altimeter system (GLAS). Biomass was derived from field data and allometry. The maps were validated with field data and results in accuracies that vary spatially around 2 to 3m in height and 20% in biomass. Figure 1: Global distribution of mangrove forests (green) and SRTM elevation data. These data were used to produce large scale maps of mangrove canopy height and biomass.

  3. Measuring black carbon spectral extinction in the visible and infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Peters, D. M.; McPheat, R.; Lukanihins, S.; Grainger, R. G.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents measurements of the spectral extinction of black carbon aerosol from 400 nm to 15 μm. The aerosol was generated using a Miniature Combustion Aerosol Standard soot generator and then allowed to circulate in an aerosol cell where its extinction was measured using a grating spectrometer in the visible and a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared. Size distribution, number concentration, and mass extinction cross sections have also been obtained using single-particle aerosol samplers. A mean mass extinction cross section at 550 nm of 8.3 ± 1.6 m2 g-1 is found which, assuming a reasonable single scatter albedo of 0.2, corresponds to a mass absorption cross section of 6.6 ± 1.3 m2 g-1. This compares well with previously reported literature values. Computer analysis of electron microscope images of the particles provides independent confirmation of the size distribution as well as fractal parameters of the black carbon aerosol. The aerosol properties presented in this work are representative of very fresh, uncoated black carbon aerosol. After atmospheric processing of such aerosols (which could include mixing with other constituents and structural changes), different optical properties would be expected.

  4. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  5. Carbon-particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  6. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  7. The Pyrogenic Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Michael I.; Wynn, Jonathan G.; Saiz, Gustavo; Wurster, Christopher M.; McBeath, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC; includes soot, char, black carbon, and biochar) is produced by the incomplete combustion of organic matter accompanying biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption. PyC is pervasive in the environment, distributed throughout the atmosphere as well as soils, sediments, and water in both the marine and terrestrial environment. The physicochemical characteristics of PyC are complex and highly variable, dependent on the organic precursor and the conditions of formation. A component of PyC is highly recalcitrant and persists in the environment for millennia. However, it is now clear that a significant proportion of PyC undergoes transformation, translocation, and remineralization by a range of biotic and abiotic processes on comparatively short timescales. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the production, stocks, and fluxes of PyC as well as the physical and chemical processes through which it interacts as a dynamic component of the global carbon cycle.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2010-03-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  9. Orbiting Carbon Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Human impact on the environment has produced measurable changes in the geological record since the late 1700s. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 today may cause the global climate to depart for its natural behavior for many millenia. CO2 is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory goals are to help collect measurements of atmospheric CO2, answering questions such as why the atmospheric CO2 buildup varies annually, the roles of the oceans and land ecosystems in absorbing CO2, the roles of North American and Eurasian sinks and how these carbon sinks respond to climate change. The present carbon cycle, CO2 variability, and climate uncertainties due atmospheric CO2 uncertainties are highlighted in this presentation.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  11. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  12. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  13. Soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, Susan; Barbosa de Camargo, Plínio

    The amount of organic carbon (C) stored in the upper meter of mineral soils in the Amazon Basin (˜40 Pg C) represents ˜3% of the estimated global store of soil carbon. Adding surface detrital C stocks and soil carbon deeper than 1 m can as much as quadruple this estimate. The potential for Amazon soil carbon to respond to changes in land use, climate, or atmospheric composition depends on the form and dynamics of soil carbon. Much (˜30% in the top ˜10 cm but >85% in soils to 1 m depth) of the carbon in mineral soils of the Oxisols and Ultisols that are the predominant soil types in the Amazon Basin is in forms that are strongly stabilized, with mean ages of centuries to thousands of years. Measurable changes in soil C stocks that accompany land use/land cover change occur in the upper meter of soil, although the presence of deep roots in forests systems drives an active C cycle at depths >1 m. Credible estimates of the potential for changes in Amazon soil C stocks with future land use and climate change are much smaller than predictions of aboveground biomass change. Soil organic matter influences fertility and other key soil properties, and thus is important independent of its role in the global C cycle. Most work on C dynamics is limited to upland soils, and more is needed to investigate C dynamics in poorly drained soils. Work is also needed to relate cycles of C with water, N, P, and other elements.

  14. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  15. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  16. Carbon wastewater treatment process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; Simmons, G. M.; Dowler, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    A new powdered-carbon treatment process is being developed for the elimination of the present problems, associated with the disposal of biologically active sewage waste solids, and with water reuse. This counter-current flow process produces an activated carbon, which is obtained from the pyrolysis of the sewage solids, and utilizes this material to remove the adulterating materials from the water. Additional advantages of the process are the elimination of odors, the removal of heavy metals, and the potential for energy conservation.

  17. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  18. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  19. Designing rigid carbon foams.

    PubMed

    Park, Sora; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Tománek, David

    2010-08-25

    We use ab initio density functional calculations to study the stability, elastic properties and electronic structure of sp(2) carbon minimal surfaces with negative Gaussian curvature, called schwarzites. We focus on two systems with cubic unit cells containing 152 and 200 carbon atoms, which are metallic and very rigid. The porous schwarzite structure allows for efficient and reversible doping by electron donors and acceptors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of alkali ion batteries. We identify schwarzite structures that act as arrays of interconnected spin quantum dots or become magnetic when doped. We introduce two interpenetrating schwarzite structures that may find their use as the ultimate super-capacitor.

  20. Solid State Carbon Monoxide Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A means for detecting carbon monoxide which utilizes an un-heated catalytic material to oxidize carbon monoxide at ambient temperatures. Because this reaction is exothermic, a thermistor in contact with the catalytic material is used as a sensing element to detect the heat evolved as carbon monoxide is oxidized to carbon dioxide at the catalyst surface, without any heaters or external heating elements for the ambient air or catalytic element material. Upon comparison to a reference thermistor, relative increases in the temperature of the sensing thermistor correspond positively with an increased concentration of carbon monoxide in the ambient medium and are thus used as an indicator of the presence of carbon monoxide.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Yarn-Based Glucose Sensing Artificial Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghan; Ko, Sachan; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lima, Márcio D; Baughman, Ray H; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-04-01

    Boronic acid (BA), known to be a reversible glucose-sensing material, is conjugated to a nanogel (NG) derived from hyaluronic acid biopolymer and used as a guest material for a carbon multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) yarn. By exploiting the swelling/deswelling of the NG that originates from the internal anionic charge changes resulting from BA binding to glucose, a NG MWNT yarn artificial muscle is obtained that provides reversible torsional actuation that can be used for glucose sensing. This actuator shows a short response time and high sensitivity (in the 5-100 × 10(-3) m range) for monitoring changes in glucose concentration in physiological buffer, without using any additional auxiliary substances or an electrical power source. It may be possible to apply the glucose-sensing MWNT yarn muscles as implantable glucose sensors that automatically release drugs when needed or as an artificial pancreas. PMID:26929006

  2. Detection of the J = 6. -->. 5 transition of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, P.F.; Erickson, N.R.; Fetterman, H.R.; Clifton, B.J.; Peck, D.D.; Tannenwald, P.E.; Koepf, G.A.; Buhl, D.; McAvoy, N.

    1981-01-15

    The J = 6..-->..5 rotational transition of carbon monoxide has been detected in emission from the KL ''plateau source'' in the Orion molecular cloud. The corrected peak antenna temperature is 100 K, and the FWHM line width is 26 km s/sup -1/. These observations were carried out using the 3 m telescope of the NASA IRTF (Infrared Telescope Facility) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and constitute the first astronomical data obtained at submillimeter wavelengths with a heterodyne system using a laser local oscillator. Our data support the idea that the high-velocity dispersion CO in Orion is optically thin and set a lower limit to its temperature of approx.180 K.

  3. Electroanalytical study of nifedipine using activated glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, Z; Ozkan, S A; Ozkan, Y

    1998-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of nifedipine have been investigated in aqueous solution by linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry. The method is based both on the reduction and on the oxidation of the drug at a glassy carbon electrode activated by applying a new pre-treatment. The voltammograms of nifedipine on pH, concentration and scan rate have been carefully examined. Both the electroreduction and electrooxidation of nifedipine allow its determination at pH 1.5 in the concentration range of 2 x 10(-5)-6 x 10(-4) M and 8 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-3) M, respectively. The method has been applied to commercial samples (tablets and capsules).

  4. Electron Beam Exposure of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for use as radiator face sheets or fins for space radiator applications. Several traditional white thermal control paints are being considered for the surface of the composite face sheets or fins. One threat to radiator performance is high energy electrons. The durability of the thermal control paints applied to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites was evaluated after extended exposure to 4.5 MeV electrons. Electron exposure was conducted under argon utilizing a Mylar™ bag enclosure. Solar absorptance and infrared emittance was evaluated before and after exposure to identify optical properties degradation. Adhesion of the paints to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composite substrates was also of interest. Adhesion was evaluated on pristine and electron beam exposed coupons using a variation of the ASTM D-3359 tape test. Results of the optical properties evaluation and the adhesion tape tests are summarized.

  5. Deep Recycling of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    While most of the subducted H2O is recycled at shallow and subarc depths, carbon is less readily mobilized and susceptive to complex redox processes involving CO2 in solids, fluids and melts, elemental carbon, Fe- and Si- carbides, and methane. Here I review the various ways of recycling carbon during subduction and present a spectrum of possible reaction products in the mantle. Metamorphic reactions liberate <20% of the subducted CO2 to the subarc region (Connolly 2005, EPSL). Larger amounts might be mobilized through (sediment) melting. Although the wet pelite solidus is only shifted by 30-50 oC (at 3 GPa) with carbonates, the latter remain stable with melts that are saturated in a H2O+CO2-fluid. Complete dissolution of carbonates requires temperatures above any predicted subduction geotherm. Carbonated sediments yield CO2-rich phonolites to 5 GPa but carbonatites at higher pressures. The silicate melts become increasingly potassic with pressure, while the alkali-rich carbonatites have their highest K/Na at 8 GPa, slightly decreasing to 13 GPa and become sodic with the disappearance of residual cpx at ~16 GPa. What may happen when carbonated pelite derived melts migrate into the mantle is illustrated in Central Italy: in this case, it can be experimentally demonstrated that hybridization of ultrapotassic phonolitic melts with ~2 wt% H2O and ~6 wt% CO2 in the mantle results in the primitive parents of the ultrapotassic kamafugite suites which have ~43 wt% SiO2. Hence, despite a crustal isotopic signature of C, O, and Sr in these rocks, the CO2 of the Italian magmatism does not stem from assimilation in the crust but from melts derived from subducted marine carbonates mixed with pelagic clays and then reacted in the mantle. The migration of CO2-bearing fluids and melts into the mantle may lead to a redox-shock. Where high liquid/mantle ratios prevail, carbonatites rest in their oxidized form and may only freeze in relatively cold lithospheric keels where they form

  6. CarbonSat Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Tobehn, Carsten; Ernst, Robert; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Notholt, John

    1 Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the most important manmade greenhouse gases (GHGs) which are driving global climate change. Currently, the CO2 measurements from the ground observing network are still the main sources of information but due to the limited number of measurement stations the coverage is limited. In addition, CO2 monitoring and trading is often based mainly on bottom-up calculations and an independent top down verification is limited due to the lack of global measurement data with local resolution. The first CO2 and CH4 mapping from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT shows that satellites add important missing global information. Current GHG measurement satellites (GOSAT)are limited either in spatial or temporal resolution and coverage. These systems have to collect data over a year or even longer to produce global regional fluxes products. Conse-quently global, timely, higher spatial resolution and high accuracy measurement are required for: 1. A good understanding of the CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks for reliable climate predic-tion; and 2. Independent and transparent verification of accountable sources and sinks in supporting Kyoto and upcoming protocols The CarbonSat constellation idea comes out the trade off of resolution and swath width during CarbonSat mission definition studies. In response to the urgent need to support the Kyoto and upcoming protocols, a feasibility study has been carried out. The proposed solution is a constellation of five CarbonSat satellites in 614km LTAN 13:00, which is able to provide global, daily CO2 and CH4 measurement everywhere on the Earth with high spatial resolution 2 × 2 km and low uncertainty lt;2ppm (CO2) and lt;8ppb (CH4). The unique global daily measurement capability significantly increases the number of cloud free measurements, which enables more reliable services associated with reduced uncertainty, e.g. to 0.15ppm (CO2) per month in 10km and even more timely products. The CarbonSat Constellation in

  7. Pyrolysis of cellulose under ammonia leads to nitrogen-doped nanoporous carbon generated through methane formation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Wang, Bao; Heron, Christopher G; Allen, Marshall J; Morre, Jeff; Maier, Claudia S; Stickle, William F; Ji, Xiulei

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present a simple one-step fabrication methodology for nitrogen-doped (N-doped) nanoporous carbon membranes via annealing cellulose filter paper under NH3. We found that nitrogen doping (up to 10.3 at %) occurs during cellulose pyrolysis under NH3 at as low as 550 °C. At 700 °C or above, N-doped carbon further reacts with NH3, resulting in a large surface area (up to 1973.3 m(2)/g). We discovered that the doped nitrogen, in fact, plays an important role in the reaction, leading to carbon gasification. CH4 was experimentally detected by mass spectrometry as a product in the reaction between N-doped carbon and NH3. When compared to conventional activated carbon (1533.6 m(2)/g), the N-doped nanoporous carbon (1326.5 m(2)/g) exhibits more than double the unit area capacitance (90 vs 41 mF/m(2)).

  8. Phase transitions of boron carbide: Pair interaction model of high carbon limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Sanxi; Huhn, W. P.; Widom, M.

    2015-09-01

    Boron Carbide exhibits a broad composition range, implying a degree of intrinsic substitutional disorder. While the observed phase has rhombohedral symmetry (space group R 3 bar m), the enthalpy minimizing structure has lower, monoclinic, symmetry (space group Cm). The crystallographic primitive cell consists of a 12-atom icosahedron placed at the vertex of a rhombohedral lattice, together with a 3-atom chain along the 3-fold axis. In the limit of high carbon content, approaching 20% carbon, the icosahedra are usually of type B11 Cp, where the p indicates the carbon resides on a polar site, while the chains are of type C-B-C. We establish an atomic interaction model for this composition limit, fit to density functional theory total energies, that allows us to investigate the substitutional disorder using Monte Carlo simulations augmented by multiple histogram analysis. We find that the low temperature monoclinic Cm structure disorders through a pair of phase transitions, first via a 3-state Potts-like transition to space group R3m, then via an Ising-like transition to the experimentally observed R 3 bar m symmetry. The R3m and Cm phases are electrically polarized, while the high temperature R 3 bar m phase is nonpolar.

  9. Cutting and sharpening carbon nanotubes using a carbon nanotube 'nanoknife'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xian Long; Chen, Qing; Liu, Yang; Mao Peng, Lian

    2007-05-01

    A new method has been developed to precisely cut and to sharpen carbon nanotubes using a 'nanoknife', which is a short carbon nanotube adhered to a metal tip. The mechanism for the cutting and the sharpening was proposed to be local vaporization of carbon caused by Joule heating. The 'nanoknife' was also found useful to cut other nanotubes and nanowires. The cutting process was also found useful to construct complex carbon nanotube structures.

  10. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    SciTech Connect

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  11. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  12. Method of Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines is discussed. The process includes the steps of braiding carbon fiber into a rope thereby forming a cylindrically shaped valve stem portion and continuing to braid said fiber while introducing into the braiding carbon fiber rope a carbon matrix plug having an outer surface in a net shape of a valve head thereby forming a valve head portion. The said carbon matrix plug acting as a mandrel over which said carbon fiber rope is braided, said carbon fiber rope and carbon matrix plug forming a valve head portion suitable for mating with a valve seat; cutting said braided carbon valve stem portion at one end to form a valve tip and cutting said braided carbon fiber after said valve head portion to form a valve face and thus provide a composite valve preform; and densifying said preform by embedding the braided carbon in a matrix of carbon to convert said valve stem portion to a valve stem and said valve head portion to a valve head thereby providing said composite valve.

  13. Estimating rates of biologically driven coral reef framework production and erosion: a new census-based carbonate budget methodology and applications to the reefs of Bonaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. T.; Edinger, E. N.; Kench, P. S.; Murphy, G. N.; Smithers, S. G.; Steneck, R. S.; Mumby, P. J.

    2012-09-01

    Census-based approaches can provide important measures of the ecological processes controlling reef carbonate production states. Here, we describe a rapid, non-destructive approach to carbonate budget assessments, termed ReefBudget that is census-based and which focuses on quantifying the relative contributions made by different biological carbonate producer/eroder groups to net reef framework carbonate production. The methodology is presently designed only for Caribbean sites, but has potential to be adapted for use in other regions. Rates are calculated using data on organism cover and abundance, combined with annual extension or production rate measures. Set against this are estimates of the rates at which bioeroding species of fish, urchins and internal substrate borers erode reef framework. Resultant data provide a measure of net rates of biologically driven carbonate production (kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1). These data have potential to be integrated into ecological assessments of reef state, to aid monitoring of temporal (same-site) changes in rates of biological carbonate production and to provide insights into the key ecological drivers of reef growth or erosion as a function of environmental change. Individual aspects of the budget methodology can also be used alongside other census approaches if deemed appropriate for specific study aims. Furthermore, the methodology spreadsheets are user-changeable, allowing local or new process/rate data to be integrated into calculations. Application of the methodology is considered at sites around Bonaire. Highest net rates of carbonate production, +9.52 to +2.30 kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1, were calculated at leeward sites, whilst lower rates, +0.98 to -0.98 kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1, were calculated at windward sites. Data are within the ranges calculated in previous budget studies and provide confidence in the production estimates the methodology generates.

  14. Populations of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd Evans, T.

    2011-09-01

    Carbon stars in the Galaxy do not constitute a single family, but may be divided over several types with distinctive spectroscopic and photometric properties. A subtype of the N stars, characterised by high velocities and weak CN bands, may have been captured by the Milky Way from a cannibalised dwarf galaxy.

  15. Life without Carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Williams, Peter E.

    2006-05-01

    Carbon is the centerpiece of all life on Earth and one of the most abundant elements in the Solar System and Sun-like stars. Yet alien biochemistries and one's choice of a definition of life offer possibility for other forms of life.

  16. Carbon cloth supported electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.; Ammon, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    A flow-by anode is disclosed made by preparing a liquid suspension of about to about 18% by weight solids, the solids comprising about 3.5 to about 8% of a powdered catalyst of platinum, palladium, palladium oxide, or mixtures thereof; about 60 to about 76% carbon powder (support) having a particle size less than about 20 m.mu.m and about 20 to about 33% of an inert binder having a particle size of less than about 500 m.mu.m. A sufficient amount of the suspension is poured over a carbon cloth to form a layer of solids about 0.01 to about 0.05 cm thick on the carbon cloth when the electrode is completed. A vacuum was applied to the opposite side of the carbon cloth to remove the liquid and the catalyst layer/cloth assembly is dried and compressed at about 10 to about 50 MPa's. The binder is then sintered in an inert atmosphere to complete the electrode. The electrode is used for the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in a sulfur based hybrid cycle for the decomposition of water.

  17. Polyimide/carbon Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this product is to design and characterize well-defined conductive nanocomposite materials. The materials will be composed of a polymer matrix composed of rigid-backbone polyimides, and will be filled with modified or unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The ultimate design of this project is to create composite materials with optical clarity and a high conductivity.

  18. Carbon-Fuelled Future

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-09-12

    Whether due to changes in policy or consumption of available fossil fuels, alternative sources of energy will be required, especially given the rising global energy demand. However, one of the main factors limiting the widespread utilization of renewable energy, such as wind, solar, wave or geothermal, is our ability to store energy. Storage of energy from carbon-neutral sources, such as electricity from solar or wind, can be accomplished through many routes. One approach is to store energy in the form of chemical bonds, as fuels. The conversion of low-energy compounds, such as water and carbon dioxide, to higher energy molecules, such as hydrogen or carbon-based fuels, enables the storage of carbon-neutral energy on a very large scale. The author¹s work in this area is supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  19. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    ScienceCinema

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2016-07-12

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  20. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-07-21

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  1. Bench Remarks: Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the properties of carbon dioxide in its solid "dry ice" stage. Suggests several demonstrations and experiments that use dry ice to illustrate Avogadro's Law, Boyle's Law, Kinetic-Molecular Theory, and the effects of dry ice in basic solution, in limewater, and in acetone. (TW)

  2. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  3. Transmissivity of carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drayson, S. R.; Tallamraju, R.; Chaney, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    The line strengths and self- and nitrogen-broadened half widths for selected lines of the 4.6 micron fundamental band of carbon monoxide were determined. The band strength determined at stp. is higher than previously reported measurements. The half widths agree well with other measurements and calculations.

  4. Bioenergy, the Carbon Cycle, and Carbon Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, D. M.

    2003-12-01

    The evolving energy and land-use policies across North America and Africa provide critical case studies in the relationship between regional development, the management of natural resources, and the carbon cycle. Over 50 EJ of the roughly 430 EJ total global anthropogenic energy budget is currently utilized in the form of direct biomass combustion. In North America 3 - 4 percent of total energy is derived from biomass, largely in combined heat and power (CHP) combustion applications. By contrast Africa, which is a major consumer of 'traditional' forms of biomass, uses far more total bioenergy products, but largely in smaller batches, with quantities of 0.5 - 2 tons/capita at the household level. Several African nations rely on biomass for well over 90 percent of household energy, and in some nations major portions of the industrial energy supply is also derived from biomass. In much of sub-Saharan Africa the direct combustion of biomass in rural areas is exceeded by the conversion of wood to charcoal for transport to the cities for household use there. There are major health, and environmental repercussions of these energy flows. The African, as well as Latin American and Asian charcoal trade has a noticeable signature on the global greenhouse gas cycles. In North America, and notably Scandinavia and India as well, biomass energy and emerging conversion technologies are being actively researched, and provide tremendous opportunities for the evolution of a sustainable, locally based, energy economy for many nations. This talk will examine aspects of these current energy and carbon flows, and the potential that gassification and new silvicultural practices hold for clean energy systems in the 21st century. North America and Africa will be examined in particular as both sources of innovation in this field, and areas with specific promise for application of these energy technologies and biomass/land use practices to further energy and global climate management.

  5. Reviews and syntheses: Calculating the global contribution of coralline algae to total carbon burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, L. H.; Kamenos, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The ongoing increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is changing the global marine environment and is causing warming and acidification of the oceans. Reduction of CO2 to a sustainable level is required to avoid further marine change. Many studies investigate the potential of marine carbon sinks (e.g. seagrass) to mitigate anthropogenic emissions, however, information on storage by coralline algae and the beds they create is scant. Calcifying photosynthetic organisms, including coralline algae, can act as a CO2 sink via photosynthesis and CaCO3 dissolution and act as a CO2 source during respiration and CaCO3 production on short-term timescales. Long-term carbon storage potential might come from the accumulation of coralline algae deposits over geological timescales. Here, the carbon storage potential of coralline algae is assessed using meta-analysis of their global organic and inorganic carbon production and the processes involved in this metabolism. Net organic and inorganic production were estimated at 330 g C m-2 yr-1 and 900 g CaCO3 m-2 yr-1 respectively giving global organic/inorganic C production of 0.7/1.8 × 109 t C yr-1. Calcium carbonate production by free-living/crustose coralline algae (CCA) corresponded to a sediment accretion of 70/450 mm kyr-1. Using this potential carbon storage for coralline algae, the global production of free-living algae/CCA was 0.4/1.2 × 109 t C yr-1 suggesting a total potential carbon sink of 1.6 × 109 tonnes per year. Coralline algae therefore have production rates similar to mangroves, salt marshes and seagrasses representing an as yet unquantified but significant carbon store, however, further empirical investigations are needed to determine the dynamics and stability of that store.

  6. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  7. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  8. Poly (Carbonate-Mide) Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L. (Inventor); Maudgal, S. (Inventor); Pratt, J. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A novel series of polymers and copolymers based on a polymide backbone with the incorporation of carbonate moieties along the backbone is presented. The preparation process for the polymers and copolymers is disclosed together with a novel series of dinitrodiphenyl carbonates and diaminodiphenyl carbonates. The novel polyners and copolymers exhibit high temperature capability and because of the carbonate unit, many exhibit a high degree of order and/or crystallinity.

  9. Poly(carbonate-imide) polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Maudgal, Shubha (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A novel series of polymers and copolymers based on a polyimide backbone with the incorporation of carbonate moieties along the backbone. The process for preparing these polymers and copolymers is also disclosed as is a novel series of dinitrodiphenyl carbonates and diaminodiphenyl carbonates. The novel polymers and copolymers exhibit high temperature capability and because of the carbonate unit, many exhibit a high degree of order and/or crystallinity.

  10. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  11. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  12. Advancing Climate and Carbon Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S

    2004-12-14

    We use a recently developed integrated climate/carbon model to perform breakthrough studies of the climate. Two major studies are carried out--namely the effects of CO{sub 2}-fertilized vegetation on global climate and carbon dynamics, and the effect of climate sensitivity on carbon cycle feedback. We have also begun development of a next-generation climate/carbon modeling capability.

  13. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  14. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  15. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The scope and status of the effort to assess the risks associated with the accidental release of carbon/graphite fibers from civil aircraft is presented. Vulnerability of electrical and electronic equipment to carbon fibers, dispersal of carbon fibers, effectiveness of filtering systems, impact of fiber induced failures, and risk methodology are among the topics covered.

  16. The Structures & Properties of Carbon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellini, Olivia M.; Lisensky, George C.; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C.

    2006-01-01

    The four main forms of carbon--diamond, graphite, buckyballs, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--are an excellent vehicle for teaching fundamental principles of chemical bonding, material structure, and properties. Carbon atoms form a variety of structures that are intrinsically connected to the properties they exhibit. Educators can take advantage of…

  17. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  18. CARBON IN FORESTS: QUALITY MATTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon sequestration and global climate change. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Areas vulnerable to climate change with respect to ca...

  19. Low Carbon Development of Hainan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Feng; Kun, Zhang

    With the construction of Hainan international tourism island rising to a national strategy level, the green growth pattern based on low carbon objectives will become a significant part in the development of Hainan's economy. In this paper, low carbon electric power system and differentiation service will be discussed, and some opinions were brought up to have a good impact on Hainan's low carbon development.

  20. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON BLACK CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Report to Congress on Black Carbon describes domestic and international sources of black carbon emissions, and summarizes available scientific information on the climate effects of black carbon. Further, the Report evaluates available black carbon mitigation options and thei...