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Sample records for 3ma magmatic record

  1. Subduction of the South Chile active spreading ridge: A 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Arnaud, N.; Guivel, C.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Scalabrino, B.; Espinoza, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4-3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  2. Subduction of the South-Chile active spreading ridge: a 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Arnaud, Nicolas; Guivel, Christèle; Lagabrielle, Yves; Scalabrino, Bruno; Espinoza, Felipe

    2010-05-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4- 3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  3. Late Pliocene climate change 3.4-2.3 Ma: paleoceanographic record from the Yabuta Formation, Sea of Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Kitamura, A.; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Watanabe, M. E.; Kamiya, T.

    1994-01-01

    Late Pliocene paleoceanographic changes in the Sea of Japan between 3.4 and2.3 Ma were investigated through study of molluscs, diatoms, and ostracodes from the Yabuta Formation in Toyama Prefecture. The period 3.4-2.7 Ma was characterized by relatively high sea level and cool water benthic faunas. A progressive paleoceanographic shift towards colder oceanic conditions and lower sea level occurred beginning near 2.7 Ma, intenifying about 2.5 Ma, when important changes in ostracode and molluscan faunas occurred. Between 2.7 and 2.3 Ma, eight glacial events can be inferred based on drops in sea level of 50-60 m and increasing proportions of cold, shallow water ostracode species whose modern ecology and zoogeography indicate colder winter water temperatures (3-4??C). The glacial events between 2.5 and 2.3 Ma were the most intense. Preliminary interpretation of the faunal and oceanographic events of the Yabuta Formation suggests that they correspond to Northern Hemispheric cooling also known from North Atlantic deep-sea oxygen isotope, IRD, and planktic foraminiferal records, North Pacific diatom and radiolarian record, and the Chinese loess sequences. The eight glacial events may record a 41,000-yr obliquity cycle which characterized other late Pliocene climate proxy records. Inferred sea level drops near 2.5-2.3 Ma of about 50-60 m provide direct evidence from an ocean margin setting that supports deep sea oxygen isotopic evidence indicating major changes in global ice volume changes. ?? 1994.

  4. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80–40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70–43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52–51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  5. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  6. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-23

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  7. A ~1.3Ma paleoecological record from scientific drilling at Lake Malawi, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Andrew S.; Blome, Margaret; Ivory, Sarah; King, John; Cole, Julie; McGlue, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Long records of Quaternary ecological and climatic change are critical to understanding the range of potential responses of ecosystems to environmental forcing. Here we present an integrated lake and watershed paleoecological analysis from drill core records obtained by the Lake Malawi Drilling Project, documenting extraordinary fluctuations in climate, hydrology and ecosystem response for the southern tropics of Africa. High resolution lacustrine and terrestrial paleoecology and sedimentology data sets from these Early Pleistocene-Holocene drill cores provide the most complete record of this duration currently available from Africa. Time series analyses of these records demonstrate strong orbital forcing of regional hydroclimate that drives high-amplitude changes in Malawi ecosystems. Prior to ~600ka we also observe a secondary overprint of watershed processes involving river capture or diversion that may have a tectonic origin. We observe shifts between more arid conditions (shallow alkaline and well mixed lake, with discontinuous desert vegetation) and more humid environments (deep, stratified, freshwater lake with dense forest). These broadly synchronous changes in lake paleoecology, lake sedimentology, and watershed vegetation demonstrate the major role of climate in regulating this system. Transitions between these lake/watershed state extremes is often very abrupt, suggesting that the combined lake/watershed repeatedly passed through hydroclimate thresholds, with important implications for the evolution of the lake's endemic biodiversity and ecosystem. The tempo of lake/watershed state fluctuations changes at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, altering from one of higher frequency/lower amplitude variability prior to 900ka to lower frequency/higher amplitude variability after that time.

  8. Argon isotopes as recorders of magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layer, P. W.; Gardner, J. E.; Mora Chaparro, J. C.; Arce, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Argon isotopic ratios vary enough between different reservoirs (atmosphere, crust, mantle) and diffuse fast enough through most minerals at magmatic temperatures (700-1200 C) to make them ideal for looking at magma chamber dynamics. Indeed, diffusion is sufficiently fast to allow short time scales to be deciphered, setting argon apart from many other isotopic methods. A mineral's ability to retain "excess" argon (40Ar/36Ar ratios greater than the atmospheric value and apparent ages older than the known eruption age) during post-eruption cooling is key to Ar studies. Previous work shows that both phenocrysts (crystallizing in the magma chamber; e.g. Mt St. Helens; Layer and Gardner, 2001) and xenocrysts (introduced into the magma chamber; e.g Toba; Gardner et al., 2002) preserve excess argon, which enables magma chamber processes to be deciphered through the variable diffusion rates between crystal phases. Single crystal 40Ar/39Ar step-heating of biotite from the 10.5 ka eruption of Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico indicates that they are xenocrystic and resided for only a short (< 1 year) time in the magma before it erupted. The biotite has reaction rims of hornblende, orthopyroxene and plagioclase, and failed to grow experimentally at pressure-temperature conditions of the magma, confirming the xenocrystic nature of this phase. Single-step fusion of plagioclase phenocrysts from eruptions of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, shows evidence of excess (mantle) argon, whereas hornblende from the same eruptions contains little or none. In this case, faster diffusion of Ar in plagioclase than in hornblende allow plagioclase to incorporate excess argon during magma recharge; hornblende does not. Combining such results with other isotopic systems may in fact better determine magma chamber processes. At El Chichon, Sr isotopes suggest magma recharges ocurred (Tepley et al., 2000), whereas the argon isotopes suggest such pulses occurred just before each eruption. The fast and

  9. Millennia of magmatism recorded in crustal xenoliths from Southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Matthijs; Waight, Tod; Nielsen, Troels

    2016-04-01

    Eruption of CO2-rich ultramafic magma involves rapid ascent of mantle-derived magmas loaded with mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts (>30 vol%). The dynamics and duration of such eruptions are increasingly well constrained; the causes are nevertheless largely unclear. To address this issue, we performed a petrological and speedometric analysis of well-preserved crustal xenoliths from aillikite dikes at Sisimiut and Sarfartôq alkaline provinces, W Greenland. The xenoliths represent mafic granulites, scavenged from c. 25-36 km depth within the mid-to-lower crust. The rocks are infiltrated by various types of melt in grain boundaries, cracks and veins. Zirconium-in rutile thermometry and Fe-in-rutile speedometry indicate melt temperature of c. 1,015 °C and melt exposure time of a few hours for the host aillikite, implying an average ascent rate of c. 2 m/s. This is slower than average ascent rates of mantle cargo (4-40 m/s [1]), suggesting a slowing-down of transport at shallow levels. Local diffusive zoning in garnet indicates up to several millenia of melt-assisted mass transport. This demonstrates a two-stage magmatic process of rapid melt ascent preceded by a previously unrecognized long magmatic episode. Melt infiltration at Sismiut lasted 10 times longer than at Sarfartôq, and unlike at Sarfartôq was initially associated with carbonate- and sulfide-rich melt. This contrast reflects a fundamental difference in the devolatilization efficiency of parental carbonatite magma. The rapid development of the Sarfartôq system is ascribed to the local lithospheric mantle being highly depleted [2] and rich in the decarbonation reactant orthopyroxene [3]. A link is also proposed between this feature, and the occurrence of REE-carbonatite and diamond-bearing mantle cargo at that particular location. References [1] Sparks, R.S.J. et al., 2006. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 155, 8-48. [2] Bizzarro, M. and Stevenson, R.K., 2003. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 146, 223-240. [3] Russell

  10. Records of magmatic change as preserved in zircon: examples from the Yellowstone Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Zircon crystals have been used as proxies for their host magmatic composition and as records of the evolution and differentiation of silicic magma systems through the use of integrated techniques such as cathodoluminescence imaging, LA-ICPMS trace element analysis, thermometry, and high-precision CA-IDTIMS U/Pb dating. This petrochronologic approach can aid in identifying crystal populations arising from discrete pulses of magmatism, reconstructing the growth histories of those populations, quantifying the chemical evolution of the host magma, and determining the timing and tempo of that chemical evolution. The Yellowstone Volcanic Field hosts both large and small volume silicic eruptions whose zircon records can provide insights to magmatic processes using a petrochronologic approach. Morphological and thermochemical trends preserved in zircon grains extracted from the three Yellowstone super-eruptions and a small volume precursory eruption indicate that magmatism in the volcanic field is punctuated, characterized by numerous pulses of melting, differentiation, and solidification occurring prior to eruption. U/Pb zircon dating constrains magma assembly to geologically short timescales, with populations of earlier solidified zircon incorporated into the nascent magma just prior to eruption. This requires punctuated intervals of high magmatic flux be superimposed on longer durations of a much lower background flux. Thus super-eruptions within the Yellowstone Volcanic Field result from rapid production and evolution of magma, and preceded by periods of smaller volume magma production that undergo similar differentiation processes over comparable timescales.

  11. Stratigraphic Record of Vertical Crustal Motions in the Past 2-3 Ma Along the Southern San Andreas Fault, Mecca Hills, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, J. C.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks exposed on the NE margin of Coachella Valley in the Mecca Hills, southern California, record vertical crustal motions along the San Andreas and associated strike-slip faults. A complex history of subsidence, transport, deposition, and uplift can be interpreted from mapping and measuring of sedimentary rocks, analysis of sedimentary lithofacies, and determination of transport directions from clast imbrications and cross-bedding. The 330 m-thick Mecca Fm rests non-conformably on Pre-Cambrian and Cretaceous crystalline rocks SW of the Painted Canyon Fault (PCF), and is not present NE of the PCF. The Mecca Fm is likely late Pliocene or early Pleistocene in age (Boley et al., 1994), and consists of red boulder conglomerate with imbricated clasts showing SSE to WSW paleoflow. It fines up into pebbly sandstone and is gradationally overlain by the lower member of the Palm Spring Formation (PSF). The PSF is likely younger than 2.0-2.6 Ma based on paleomagnetic studies (Boley et al., 1994) and older than the 0.74-Ma Thermal Canyon Ash high in the section (Rymer, 1989). The lower PSF is 340 m thick, with overall SE paleoflow and 3 lithofacies: (1) laterally extensive fluvial sandstone and siltstone; (2) plutonic-clast conglomerate; and (3) a thin lacustrine limestone unit that correlates across the PCF. The contact between the lower and upper members of the PSF changes from a conformable contact in a small area of the central Mecca Hills to an angular unconformity over a much larger area. The upper PSF is ~650 m thick (similar thickness across the PCF), displays overall transport to the SSE (with local exceptions), and has at least 7 lithofacies: (1) alluvial-fan pebbly sandstone and conglomerate; (2) fluvial sandstone and siltstone; (3) fluvial sandstone with conspicuous arkosic composition; (4) marginal-lacustrine bedded siltstone and sandstone; (5) eolian dune sandstone (6) lacustrine laminated siltstone and mudstone; and (7) local red conglomerate. The

  12. Comparing magnetic and magmatic fabrics to constrain the magma flow record in La Gloria pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, Italo; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Gelman, Sarah E.; Bachmann, Olivier; Parada, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    This contribution illustrates a case study of a pluton (La Gloria pluton; LGP) where magnetic and magmatic fabrics are locally decoupled. We compare the magmatic fabric with the available magnetic fabric data to explore their abilities and elucidate the magma flow record of LGP. Results indicate that magnetic (controlled by multi-domain magnetite) and magmatic fabrics are generally consistent throughout LGP. Foliations define an axisymmetric pattern that gradually changes from vertical near lateral margins to less steep in the pluton interior, whereas lineations are subhorizontal following the elongation direction of the pluton. However, samples at the pluton center show marked differences between both fabrics: magnetic fabrics indicate subhorizontal magnetic lineations and foliations, and magmatic fabrics indicate subvertical lineations and foliations. Both magnetic and magmatic fabrics are interpreted to record strain caused by magma flow during thermal convection and lateral magma propagation at the transition between low and high crystallinity stages. We suggest that fabrics acquisition and consistency were determined by shear conditions (pure/simple shear rates ratio) and the orientation of the magma flow direction with respect to a rigid boundary (critical crystalline region) of the pluton. Magmatic fabric differs at the center of the pluton because pure shear is dominant and ascendant flows are orthogonal to the horizontal rigid boundary. LGP represents a whole-scale partly molten magma reservoir, where both thermal convection and lateral propagation of the magma are recorded simultaneously. This study highlights the importance of characterizing both fabrics to properly interpret magma flow recorded in plutons.

  13. Signature of magmatic processes in strainmeter records at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagagli, M.; Montagna, C. P.; Papale, P.; Longo, A.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera, Southern Italy, is characterized by episodes of ground deformation, seismicity, and enhanced fumarolic activity; whether its origin is purely hydrothermal or magmatic is highly debated. We have identified ground deformation patterns in strainmeter records from a heightened unrest period in late 2006, closely resembling synthetic signals from numerical simulations of shallow magma chamber replenishment and mixing. Together with other recent findings, our results depict a situation whereby periodic arrivals of deep magma feed a shallow intrusion at 3-4 km depth. These results suggest that the analysis of strainmeter records, coupled with advanced numerical simulations of magma dynamics, could lead to new approaches in imaging subsurface dynamic processes in volcanic areas.

  14. Two billion years of magmatism recorded from a single Mars meteorite ejection site.

    PubMed

    Lapen, Thomas J; Righter, Minako; Andreasen, Rasmus; Irving, Anthony J; Satkoski, Aaron M; Beard, Brian L; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Jull, A J Timothy; Caffee, Marc W

    2017-02-01

    The timing and nature of igneous activity recorded at a single Mars ejection site can be determined from the isotope analyses of Martian meteorites. Northwest Africa (NWA) 7635 has an Sm-Nd crystallization age of 2.403 ± 0.140 billion years, and isotope data indicate that it is derived from an incompatible trace element-depleted mantle source similar to that which produced a geochemically distinct group of 327- to 574-million-year-old "depleted" shergottites. Cosmogenic nuclide data demonstrate that NWA 7635 was ejected from Mars 1.1 million years ago (Ma), as were at least 10 other depleted shergottites. The shared ejection age is consistent with a common ejection site for these meteorites. The spatial association of 327- to 2403-Ma depleted shergottites indicates >2 billion years of magmatism from a long-lived and geochemically distinct volcanic center near the ejection site.

  15. Two billion years of magmatism recorded from a single Mars meteorite ejection site

    PubMed Central

    Lapen, Thomas J.; Righter, Minako; Andreasen, Rasmus; Irving, Anthony J.; Satkoski, Aaron M.; Beard, Brian L.; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Jull, A. J. Timothy; Caffee, Marc W.

    2017-01-01

    The timing and nature of igneous activity recorded at a single Mars ejection site can be determined from the isotope analyses of Martian meteorites. Northwest Africa (NWA) 7635 has an Sm-Nd crystallization age of 2.403 ± 0.140 billion years, and isotope data indicate that it is derived from an incompatible trace element–depleted mantle source similar to that which produced a geochemically distinct group of 327- to 574-million-year-old “depleted” shergottites. Cosmogenic nuclide data demonstrate that NWA 7635 was ejected from Mars 1.1 million years ago (Ma), as were at least 10 other depleted shergottites. The shared ejection age is consistent with a common ejection site for these meteorites. The spatial association of 327- to 2403-Ma depleted shergottites indicates >2 billion years of magmatism from a long-lived and geochemically distinct volcanic center near the ejection site. PMID:28164153

  16. The Protracted History of Magmatic Evolution Recorded by Zoning in Allanites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Reid, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    Compositional zoning in crystals provides a detailed but nevertheless ambiguous record of melt differentiation in magma chambers because the duration and absolute timing represented by the zoning stratigraphy are essentially unknown. Using a novel marriage of in situ compositional and isotopic analyses of zoning in allanite, we unravel the magmatic history recorded by single crystals and resolve the duration and ages of differentiation in the voluminous rhyolitic magma chamber that produced the 75 ka Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT), Indonesia. Detailed electron probe traverses reveal that allanites from the most-evolved portion of the YTT magma chamber (75 wt.% SiO2) are strongly zoned in composition and single crystals may zone to compositions that match those for allanites from the least-evolved (69 wt.% SiO2) rhyolite reported by Chesner and Ettlinger (1989). Low MnO/MgO, high La/Nd, and greater concentrations of Mg, La, & Ce are characteristic of less-evolved allanite zones, and normal zoning produces trends to higher MnO/MgO, lower La/Nd, and higher concentrations of Mn & Th. Most allanites have similar patterns of oscillatory zoning punctuated by resorbed boundaries and mantled by a near-rim section of normal zoning recording episodic mixing with hotter, less-evolved melts and subsequent growth from more-evolved melts. The core-to-rim differentiation history revealed by these single allanites represents a time scale of up to 150 ky that continued up to the time of eruption, as determined by ion probe 238U-230Th dating. Nonetheless, no single allanite composition is associated with a specific time interval in the magmatic evolution. In fact, compositional variability increases by up to a factor of three within ca. 35 ky of eruption, suggesting an episode of increased crystal and/or melt mixing relatively close to eruption. The magnitude of MnO/MgO and La/Nd variations, as well as parental melt compositions predicted by the zoning, fall within the ranges reported for

  17. Magma flow recorded by magmatic and magnetic fabrics in a shallow granitic pluton: La Gloria Pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, I. J.; Gutiérrez, F. J.; Gelman, S. E.; Bachmann, O.; Parada, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    To better understand the dynamics of a small, shallow, silicic magma reservoir, magmatic and magnetic (AMS) fabrics are compared in samples obtained from La Gloria Pluton (LGP), a 10 Ma granitic intrusion located in southern Andes. The magnetic fabric of LGP, mainly given by magnetite, is characterized by oblate shapes. Magnetic lineations have a NW trend with subhorizontal dip, following the main pluton elongation, while magnetic foliation planes have dips varying gradually from vertical at the walls to subhorizontal toward the center and the roof of the pluton. On the basis of numerical simulations, magnetic fabric was interpreted to represent the shear record induced by magmatic convection along solidification fronts as the reservoir reached its rheological locking point. Magmatic fabric (mineral orientation) was determined on 12 samples along the pluton. Three mutually orthogonal thin sections were produced for each sample, perpendicular to the AMS tensor axes. Size and orientation of individual crystals were obtained by image analysis. A 2-D tensor for two mineral groups (plagioclase and amphibole+biotitie) was defined in each mineral plane projecting the crystal lengths on the main crystal orientation (given by Bingham statistics). A 3-D magmatic fabric tensor was obtained. In order to compare the magmatic and magnetic fabrics, magmatic anisotropy parameters were defined similar to the AMS tensors. Magmatic fabric and anisotropy parameter values vary depending on the location inside the pluton: (1) Samples located at the borders exhibit vertical foliations and lineations with a NW trend, similar to the magnetic fabric tensors and higher anisotropy values for plagioclase than amphibole+biotite,; (2) samples located at the center of the LGP commonly present subvertical foliations/lineations, which differ from the magnetic fabric, and higher magmatic anisotropy degree values for amphibole+biotite than plagioclase. Based on numerical simulations of the fluid

  18. Millennia of magmatism recorded in crustal xenoliths from alkaline provinces in Southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Matthijs A.; Waight, Tod E.; Nielsen, Troels F. D.

    2016-10-01

    Mantle-derived CO2-rich magma ascends rapidly through the lithospheric column, supporting upward transport of large mantle-xenoliths and xenocryst (>30 vol%) loads to the (sub-)surface within days. The regional magmatism during which such pulses occur is typically well characterized in terms of general duration and regional compositional trends. In contrast, the time-resolved evolution of individual ultramafic dyke and pipe systems is largely unknown. To investigate this evolution, we performed a geochemical and speedometric analysis of xenoliths from ultramafic (aillikite) dykes in two Neoproterozoic alkaline provinces in West Greenland: 1) Sarfartôq, which overlies Archean ultra-depleted SCLM and yielded ultra-deep mineral indicators, and 2) Sisimiut, where the SCLM is refertilized and deep xenoliths (>120 km) are lacking. We focused on the rare and understudied crustal xenoliths, which preserve a rich record of melt injection. The xenoliths are derived from 25-36 km depth and were transported to the sub-surface within 4 ± 1h (Fe-in-rutile speedometry), during which they were exposed to the magmatic temperature of 1 , 015 ± 50°C (Zr-in-rutile thermometry). Garnet major-element speedometry shows that before the xenolith-ascent stage the lower crust had already been exposed to a variety of magmas for 700 (Sarfartôq) and 7,100 (Sisimiut) years. The Sisimiut samples contain exotic carbonate- and sulfide-rich assemblages, which occurred during the early stages of melt infiltration. Absence of such exotic assemblages and the faster magmatic development at Sarfartôq are tentatively linked to higher decarbonation kinetics in the more depleted SCLM at this location. The data reveal the so far unrecognized pre-eruptive development of ultramafic systems. This stage involves non-steady state melt-silicate interaction between ascending magmas and the immediate SCLM wall-rock, during which the composition of both is modified. The progress and duration of this interaction

  19. Changes and influencing factors in biogenic opal export productivity in the Bering Sea over the last 4.3 Ma: Evidence from the records at IODP Site U1340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Muhong; Zhang, Lanlan; Su, Xiang; Xiang, Rong

    2016-08-01

    We reconstructed changes in biogenic opal export productivity (BOEP) in the southern Bering Sea (BS) over the last ˜4.3 Ma, based on mass accumulation rate (MAR) of biogenic opal from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1340. The results show that the BOEP in the BS was high and variable between ˜4.3 and ˜1.9 Ma, extremely low and relatively stable from ˜1.9 to ˜1.1 Ma, and then fluctuated frequently (generally high during interglacials and low during glacials) during the last ˜1.1 Ma. One interval of enhanced BOEP from ˜4.3 to ˜3.2 Ma is a response to the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene "Biogenic Bloom Event." Another interval from ˜2.8 to ˜1.9 Ma correlates with global opal burial shifting from high-latitude oceans to upwelling-influenced regions following the intensification of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG). Whereas, the increase in BS opal export productivity during the last ˜1.1 Ma tends to be a "local" phenomenon. Overall, the BOEP shows a similar trend and good correspondence to the input of the Alaskan Stream (AS), which can be traced using the Na2O/K2O ratio. We thus conclude that the AS may be the direct, and primary factor on BOEP variability in the BS during the last ˜4.3 Ma. In addition, although the poor correlation between opal MAR and volcanic glass suggests that BOEP variability was not controlled by long-term variations in the volcanism or ash abundance, increased ash abundance indicated by high contents of volcanic glasses was also a possible reason for enhanced BOEP during the period from ˜4.3 to ˜3.2 Ma and the last ˜0.5 Ma.

  20. Iceland is not a magmatic analog for the Hadean: Evidence from the zircon record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Tamara L.; Miller, Calvin F.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Padilla, Abraham J.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Economos, Rita C.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Jordan, Brennan T.

    2014-11-01

    Tangible evidence of Earth's earliest (Hadean; >4.0 Ga) crust, and the processes and materials that contributed to its formation, exists almost entirely in a record of detrital zircon from Jack Hills, Western Australia, and a few other locations. Iceland, with its thick, juvenile, basaltic crust and relatively abundant silicic rocks, is considered a potential modern analog for the Hadean magmatic environment where >4 Ga zircon formed. We present the first extensive dataset for Icelandic zircon, with trace element and oxygen isotope compositions from samples that span the island's history and full range of tectonic settings. This statistically robust zircon-based comparison between Iceland and the early Earth reveals distinctions in chemistry that suggest fundamental differences in magmatic environments. Whereas the δ18O signature of Hadean zircons generally exceed that of zircons equilibrated with mantle-derived magma (85%≥5.3‰; median 6‰), almost all Icelandic zircons are characterized by a “light” oxygen signature (98%≤5.3‰; median 3‰). Deviations from “juvenile” oxygen values indicate that many Hadean zircons and almost all Icelandic zircons grew from magmas with substantial contributions from materials that had interacted with surface waters. In the Hadean case, the interaction occurred at low temperatures, while in Iceland, it was a high-temperature interaction. Icelandic and Hadean zircons are also distinct in their Ti concentrations (Icelandic median concentration 12 ppm, Hadean median 5 ppm). Titanium in zircon correlates positively with temperature of crystallization, and this difference in median Ti concentration suggests a temperature difference of at least 50 °C. Other differences in trace elements compositions are consistent with the interpretation that Icelandic and Hadean zircons grew in magmas with very different origins and histories (e.g., the heavy rare earth element Yb is almost an order of magnitude higher in Icelandic

  1. How do olivines record magmatic events? Insights from major and trace element zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maisonneuve, C. Bouvet; Costa, F.; Huber, C.; Vonlanthen, P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Reconciling the diverse records of magmatic events preserved by multiple crystals and minerals in the same sample is often challenging. In the case of basaltic-andesites from Volcán Llaima (Chile), Mg zoning in olivine is always simpler than Ca zoning in plagioclase. A model that explains a number of chemical patterns is that Llaima magmas stall in the upper crust, where they undergo decompression crystallization and form crystal-mush bodies. Frequent magma inputs from deeper reservoirs provide the potential for remobilization and eruption. The records of multiple recharge events in Llaima plagioclase versus an apparent maximum of one such event in coexisting olivine are addressed by using trace element zoning in olivine phenocrysts. We have integrated elements that (1) respond to changes in magma composition due to recharge or mixing (Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, ±Ca), with (2) elements that are incorporated during rapid, disequilibrium crystal growth (P, Ti, Sc, V, Al). A more complex history is obtained when these elements are evaluated considering their partition coefficients, diffusivities, and crystal growth rates. The olivine archive can then be reconciled with the plagioclase archive of magma reservoir processes. Olivine (and plagioclase) phenocrysts may experience up to three or more recharge events between nucleation and eruption. Diffusion modeling of major and trace element zoning in two dimensions using a new lattice Boltzmann model suggests that recharge events occur on the order of months to a couple of years prior to eruption, whereas crystal residence times are more likely to be on the order of a few years to decades.

  2. Amphibole reaction rims as a record of pre-eruptive magmatic heating: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J.; Coombs, M.; Dunn, A.; Hayden, L.

    2015-09-01

    Magmatic minerals record the pre-eruptive timescales of magma ascent and mixing in crustal reservoirs and conduits. Investigations of the mineral records of magmatic processes are fundamental to our understanding of what controls eruption style, as ascent rates and magma mixing processes are well known to control and/or trigger potentially hazardous explosive eruptions. Thus, amphibole reaction rims are often used to infer pre-eruptive magma dynamics, and in particular to estimate magma ascent rates. However, while several experimental studies have investigated amphibole destabilization during decompression, only two investigated thermal destabilization relevant to magma mixing processes. This study examines amphibole decomposition experimentally through isobaric heating of magnesio-hornblende phenocrysts within a natural high-silica andesite glass. The experiments first equilibrated for 24 h at 870 °C and 140 MPa at H2O-saturated conditions and ƒO2 ∼ Re-ReO prior to rapid heating to 880, 900, or 920 °C and hold times of 3-48 h. At 920 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 17 μm after 3 h, to 55 μm after 12 h, and became pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 900 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 80 μm after 24 h, to pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 880 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 18 μm after 36 h, to pseudomorphs after 48 h. Reaction rim microlites vary from 5-16 μm in size, with no systematic relationship between crystal size and the duration or magnitude of heating. Time-averaged rim microlite growth rates decrease steadily with increasing experimental duration (from 3.97 ×10-7 mms-1 to 3.1 to 3.5 ×10-8 mms-1). Time-averaged microlite nucleation rates also decrease with increasing experimental duration (from 1.2 ×103mm-3s-1 to 5.3 mm-3 s-1). There is no systematic relationship between time-averaged growth or nucleation rates and the magnitude of the heating step. Ortho- and clinopyroxene

  3. Tectonic record, magmatic history and hydrothermal alteration in the Hercynian Guérande leucogranite, Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballouard, C.; Boulvais, P.; Poujol, M.; Gapais, D.; Yamato, P.; Tartèse, R.; Cuney, M.

    2015-04-01

    309.7 ± 1.3 Ma ago and that a late magmatic activity synchronous with hydrothermal circulation occurred at ca. 303 Ma. These new structural, petrological and geochronological data presented for the Guérande leucogranite highlight the interplay between the emplacement in an extensional tectonic regime, magmatic differentiation and hydrothermal alteration, and provide a general background for the understanding of the processes controlling some mineralization in the western European Hercynian belt.

  4. A temporal record of pre-eruptive magmatic volatile contents at Campi Flegrei: Insights from texturally-constrained apatite analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Michael J.; Isaia, Roberto; Humphreys, Madeleine C. S.; Smith, Victoria C.; Pyle, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Apatite is capable of incorporating all major magmatic volatile species (H2O, CO2, S, Cl and F) into its crystal structure. Analysis of apatite volatile contents can be related to parental magma compositions through the application of pressure and temperature-dependent exchange reactions (Piccoli and Candela, 1994). Once included within phenocrysts, apatite inclusions are isolated from the melt and preserve a temporal record of magmatic volatile contents in the build-up to eruption. In this work, we measured the volatile compositions of apatite inclusions, apatite microphenocrysts and pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions from the Astroni 1 eruption of Campi Flegrei, Italy (Stock et al. 2016). These data are coupled with magmatic differentiation models (Gualda et al., 2012), experimental volatile solubility data (Webster et al., 2014) and thermodynamic models of apatite compositional variations (Piccoli and Candela, 1994) to decipher pre-eruptive magmatic processes. We find that apatite halogen/OH ratios decreased through magmatic differentiation, while melt inclusion F and Cl concentrations increased. Melt inclusion H2O contents are constant at ~2.5 wt%. These data are best explained by volatile-undersaturated differentiation over most of the crystallisation history of the Astroni 1 melt, with melt inclusion H2O contents reset at shallow levels during ascent. Given the high diffusivity of volatiles in apatite (Brenan, 1993), the preservation of volatile-undersaturated melt compositions in microphenocrysts suggests that saturation was only achieved 10 - 103 days before eruption. We suggest that late-stage transition into a volatile-saturated state caused an increase in magma chamber overpressure, which ultimately triggered the Astroni 1 eruption. This has major implications for monitoring of Campi Flegrei and other similar volcanic systems. Piccoli and Candela, 1994. Am. J. of Sc., 294, 92-135. Stock et al., 2016, Nat. Geosci. Gualda et al., 2012. J. Pet., 53, 875

  5. Subduction Initiation and Forearc Magmatism as Recorded in Suprasubduction Zone Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilek, Yildirim

    2013-04-01

    The internal structure-stratigraphy and geochemical signatures of most suprasubduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites indicate a seafloor spreading origin in forearc-incipient arc settings during the early stages of subduction. In general, there is a well developed magmatic stratigraphy in the extrusive sequences of these ophiolites from older MORB-like lavas at the bottom towards younger island arc tholeiite (IAT) and boninitic lavas in the upper parts. A similar progression of the lava chemistry also occurs in crosscutting dike swarms and sheeted dikes, indicating increased subduction influence in the evolution of ophiolitic magmas through time. Lherzolitic peridotites in structurally lower parts of the upper mantle sequences of these ophiolites represent the residue after MORB melt extraction. Harzburgite and harzburgite-dunite associations higher up in the mantle sequences and below the mafic-ultramafic cumulates (transitional Moho) are crosscut by networks of orthopyroxenite (opxt) veins, which include hydrous minerals (amphibole). These orthopyroxenite veins represent a reaction product between the host harzburgite (depleted, residual peridotite) and the migrating Si-rich (boninitic) melt. The harzburgite-dunite-opxt suites characterize melt-residue relationships and melt migration patterns in the mantle wedge during the initial stages of subduction and incipient arc construction. Thus, the SSZ ophiolites that we have examined display a lateral and vertical progression of melt evolution in their crustal and upper mantle components that traces different stages of subduction initiation-related magmatism, reminiscent of the forearc magmatism in some of the modern arc-trench rollback systems as in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec subduction factories. The along-strike continuity for more than 1500 km of this well-documented chemostratigraphy and geochemical progression in different ophiolite belts is strong evidence for contemporaneous subduction initiation

  6. Early Paleozoic magmatism and metallogeny in Northeast China: a record from the Tongshan porphyry Cu deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xinlu; Yao, Shuzhen; Ding, Zhenju; He, Mouchun

    2017-01-01

    The Tongshan Cu deposit is located in the northern segment of the Great Xing'an Range and represents one of the few early Paleozoic porphyry Cu deposits in northeastern China. The granitic rocks in the Tongshan Cu deposit include concealed granodiorite and exposed tonalite, which yield LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages of 478 ± 3 Ma and 214 ± 3 Ma, respectively. The granodiorite has relatively high SiO2 (60.5-63.5 wt%) and Sr (596-786 ppm) contents, low Yb (1.21-1.53 ppm) and Y (9.81-13.0 ppm) contents, and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7038-0.7040), suggesting adakitic affinity. Combined with its positive ɛNd( t) values (3.5-5.4), low Mg# values (41-50), and low contents of Cr (18.6-29.0 ppm) and Ni (7.3-9.1 ppm), we propose an origin by partial melting of a juvenile mafic lower crust in a post-collisional setting after the amalgamation of the Erguna and Xing'an Blocks. The tonalite is characterized by high SiO2 (63.1-65.9 wt%) and Al2O3 (16.0-16.3 wt%) contents, low (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios (0.7041-0.7042), positive ɛNd( t) values (2.6-3.0), along with LILE and LREE enrichments and Nb-Ta-Ti depletions, suggesting an origin by partial melting of juvenile mafic lower crust, coupled with fractional crystallization, in a post-orogenic setting after the collision between the Xing'an and Songnen Blocks. The δD values of ore-forming fluids range from -100 to -93 ‰, and the δ18O values calculated from hydrothermal quartz are between -3 and 10 ‰. The δ34S values of sulfides vary from -2.6 to -1.1 ‰. Field observations, as well as the geochronological and H-O-S isotopic data, suggest that the Cu mineralization at Tongshan was genetically linked with the granodiorite.

  7. A 120 million years record of magmatism and crustal melting in the Kohistan Batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaltegger, U.; Frank, M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2003-04-01

    The Kohistan Arc Complex (KAC) in the Pakistani Himalaya is a volcanic arc terrane with a mantle-crust transition at its bottom and upper crustal volcano-sedimentary sequences above. The KAC features arc-type intrusives with oldest ages of c. 100 Ma, and a huge intrusion of gabbronorite at 85 Ma emplaced during a stage of intra-arc rifting (Schaltegger et al. 2002, Terra Nova 14, 461-468). The rift zone may have evolved into an intra-arc (or back-arc?) basin that persisted and remained marine until the Eocene (c. 50 Ma) i.e. after docking of the KAC against the Karakoram terrane in the north, which is reputed to be older than 75 Ma. The main part of the KAC is comprised of tonalites, diorites, granodiorites and granites that form the so-called Kohistan Batholith. U-Pb and Hf isotopic determinations of zircon from some of these plutons reveal the existence of a 154.0 +- 0.6 Ma old tonalite (compared to the Rb-Sr isochron age of 102 +- 12 Ma of Petterson &Windley, 1985) with an extremely high initial epsilon Hf value of +21. This rock intrudes volcanic units containing pillow basalts. It is thus tentatively interpreted as a tonalite produced by melting of oceanic lithosphere that has been melt-depleted during an ancient melting event. Other plutons are dated at 50 and 30 Ma. With an epsilon Hf around +10, they represent melting of an island-arc to MORB-type source. The 30 Ma-old leucogranite at the Indus confluence contains zircons with a 560 Ma inheritance, which is coupled to a lower epsilon Hf of +3-4, beside newly crystallized grains of 30 Ma with epsilon Hf=10. The Hf isotopes thus do not reveal any systematic change of the source composition with time, as it has been inferred from Sr and Nd isotopes. The Kohistan Batholith containing magmatic remnants of a pre-arc oceanic crust is thus demonstrated to be poly-episodic and composite. The magmatism, including 30 Ma old leucogranites, is derived from depleted mantle sources and does not contain detectable traces

  8. Magmatic interactions as recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts of Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J.; Davidson, J.P.; Clynne, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The silicic lava domes of Chaos Crags in Lassen Volcanic National Park contain a suite of variably quenched, hybrid basaltic andesite magmatic inclusions. The inclusions represent thorough mixing between rhyodacite and basalt recharge liquids accompanied by some mechanical disaggregation of the inclusions resulting in crystals mixing into the rhyodacite host preserved by quenching on dome emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.7037-0.7038) of the inclusions are distinctly lower than those of the host rhyodacite (~0.704-0.7041), which are used to fingerprint the origin of mineral components and to monitor the mixing and mingling process. Chemical, isotopic, and textural characteristics indicate that the inclusions are hybrid magmas formed from the mixing and undercooling of recharge basaltic magma with rhyodacitic magma. All the host magma phenocrysts (biotite, plagioclase, hornblende and quartz crystals) also occur in the inclusions, where they are rimmed by reaction products. Compositional and strontium isotopic data from cores of unresorbed plagioclase crystals in the host rhyodacite, partially resorbed plagioclase crystals enclosed within basaltic andesite inclusions, and partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacitic host are all similar. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in both inclusions and host are lower and close to those of the whole-rock hybrid basaltic andesite values. This observation indicates that some crystals originally crystallized in the silicic host, were partially resorbed and subsequently overgrown in the hybrid basaltic andesite magma, and then some of these partially resorbed plagioclase crystals were recycled back into the host rhyodacite. Textural evidence, in the form of sieve zones and major dissolution boundaries of the resorbed plagioclase crystals, indicates immersion of crystals into a hotter, more calcic magma. The occurrence of partially resorbed plagioclase together with plagioclase

  9. Extensional to compressive Mesozoic magmatism at the SE Eurasia margin as recorded from the Meratus ophiolite (SE Borneo, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, Christophe; Polvé, Mireille; Girardeau, Jacques; Pubellier, Manuel; Maury, René C.; Bellon, Hervé; Permana, Haryadi

    1999-01-01

    The Meratus ophiolitic series (SE Borneo) present a specific assemblage that have recorded (1) a continental extensional episode mostly seen within the peridotites and 2) later subduction-related magmatic events marked by the emplacement of calc-alkaline magmas. These events relate the magmatic activity and geodynamic evolution of the SE Eurasia margin in Mesozoic times. The ophiolitic series comprise ultramafic rocks with minor metavolcanic rocks. The ultramafic rocks include dominant lherzolites and pyroxenites with rather scarce harzburgites and dunites. Spinel peridotite, mineral chemistry data and bulk rock Rare Earth Element (REE) abundances show that most rocks underwent a low degree of partial melting. However, a few samples display significant depletions in Light REE (LREE), which are interpreted as the result of fractional melting under shallow conditions. Plagioclase-bearing peridotites are characterized by high REE abundances which also point to a very low degree of melting followed by reequilibration in the plagioclase facies, as seen from phase chemistry data. These peridotites are locally crosscut by dikelets containing high-temperature K-and Cr-rich amphiboles. Lavas closely associated with the Meratus peridotites have REE compositions ranging from the ones typical of enriched MORB (E-MORB) to normal MORB (N-MORB) types. We believe that the Meratus peridotites represent a fragment of subcontinental lithospheric mantle that locally suffered a low degree of fractional melting during the last stages of a continental rifting phase, in agreement with the presence of metamorphic K- and Cr-rich amphiboles in the peridotites. The E-MORB basalts might result from the melting of an enriched subcontinental lithosphere thermally eroded during the rifting phase by rising asthenosphere which might have produced N-MORB volcanic rocks. Back-arc basin basalts (BABB) now associated with E-MORB and N-MORB have also been found in the metamorphic soles of the

  10. Do Zircon age Spectra Record Magmatic Cyclicity at Soufrière (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, A. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Soufrière Volcanic Center (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles) is a long-lived arc-volcanic system that evolved over the past 5 - 6 Ma. Its most recent volcanic activity between 20 and 40 ka was concentrated within the prominent Qualibou topographic depression and produced two voluminous pyroclastic deposits: Choiseul and the overlying Belfond. In addition, several dacitic lava domes exist within the Qualibou depression. Because evidence of earlier volcanic activity in long-lived magma systems is frequently obliterated by subsequent eruptive or volcano-tectonic events, high spatial resolution U-Th dating of zircon combined with (U-Th)/He dating is a powerful tool to identify magma crystallization episodes at depth and to link these to the eruptive record. U-Th model ages and disequilibrium corrected U-Pb ages for 56 individual zircons from Soufrière lavas (Morne Bonin, Belfond, Terre Blanche) and pumice (Choiseul, Belfond) were determined by secondary ionization mass spectrometry. The majority of results is on unpolished zircons where analysis pits integrate over the outermost ~10 μm of individual grains with a lateral spatial resolution of ~40 μm. Selected grains were subsequently analyzed by (U-Th)/He methods. Belfond and Terre Blanche (U-Th)/He zircon ages (~20 ka) agree with previous 14C charcoal ages, whereas Morne Bonin ages are much older (~250 ka). Overall, the U-Th zircon crystallization age spectrum reveals a remarkable range between ~20 and ~600 ka and displays multiple peaks, among which the most prominent are tentatively identified at ~40 ka, ~80 ka, ~130 ka, ~200 ka and ~500 ka. The distribution of rim ages indicates that most zircons lack overgrowth dating from just prior to the eruption, but the youngest ages for each sample overlap with the eruption ages. Soufrière zircons thus reveal magma intrusion, cooling, and crystallization cycles within the underlying plutonic system for which the volcanic stratigraphic record is sketchy.

  11. Heterogeneously entrapped, vapor-rich melt inclusions record pre-eruptive magmatic volatile contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-MacInnis, Matthew; Esposito, Rosario; Moore, Lowell R.; Hartley, Margaret E.

    2017-04-01

    Silicate melt inclusions (MI) commonly provide the best record of pre-eruptive H2O and CO2 contents of subvolcanic melts, but the concentrations of CO2 and H2O in the melt (glass) phase within MI can be modified by partitioning into a vapor bubble after trapping. Melt inclusions may also enclose vapor bubbles together with the melt (i.e., heterogeneous entrapment), affecting the bulk volatile composition of the MI, and its post-entrapment evolution. In this study, we use numerical modeling to examine the systematics of post-entrapment volatile evolution within MI containing various proportions of trapped vapor from zero to 95 volume percent. Modeling indicates that inclusions that trap only a vapor-saturated melt exhibit significant decrease in CO2 and moderate increase in H2O concentrations in the melt upon nucleation and growth of a vapor bubble. In contrast, inclusions that trap melt plus vapor exhibit subdued CO2 depletion at equivalent conditions. In the extreme case of inclusions that trap mostly the vapor phase (i.e., CO2-H2O fluid inclusions containing trapped melt), degassing of CO2 from the melt is negligible. In the latter scenario, the large fraction of vapor enclosed in the MI during trapping essentially serves as a buffer, preventing post-entrapment modification of volatile concentrations in the melt. Hence, the glass phase within such heterogeneously entrapped, vapor-rich MI records the volatile concentrations of the melt at the time of trapping. These numerical modeling results suggest that heterogeneously entrapped MI containing large vapor bubbles represent amenable samples for constraining pre-eruptive volatile concentrations of subvolcanic melts.

  12. Effects of Prolonged Flat Subduction on the Miocene Magmatic Record of the Central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, L.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Temporal modifications in the chemical compositions of middle to late Miocene rocks from the central Trans- Mexican Volcanic Belt elucidate how a process of prolonged flat subduction influences arc magmatism. These are recorded in the Palo Huerfano-La Joya-Zamorano Volcanic Complex (PH-LJ-Z; 16-9 Ma), a group of andesitic to dacitic stratovolcanoes located at ~500 km from the current trench, and in the Queretaro Volcanic Succession (QVS; 9-6 Ma), a basaltic to basaltic-andesitic plateau which stratigraphically overlies the stratovolcanoes. The two rock groups have typical arc-like trace element patterns, but the PH-LJ-Z suite has higher Sr/Y and LREE(MREE)/HREE ratios with MORB-like Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions; geochemical features that are typical of experimental and natural slab melts. In contrast, rocks from the QVS have an overall weaker subduction signature, do not show slab melt signals, and have higher FeO^{tot} and MgO contents at equivalent Na2O and Mg# (40-70) than the PH-LJ-Z suite. Since Fe in arc magmas is a sensitive proxy of melting pressure and/or water contents (Gaetani &Grove, CMP, 1998), and Na could be either sensitive to slab melt additions (Kelemen et al., Tr. Geoch., 2003) or to the thickness of the mantle column that controls the extent of melting (Plank &Langmuir, EPSL, 1998), the overall chemical differences of both rock suites can only be reconciled if they equilibrated with the mantle wedge at the same pressures but with different amounts of dissolved water. The geochemical evidence thus indicates that the compositional differences between the two magmatic episodes are mainly related to different mechanisms of element recycling that occurred without major changes in the local tectonic configuration. The slab melt features of PH- LJ-Z rocks, and their emplacement at a large distance from the trench, are consistent with a sub-horizontal subduction geometry which favors slab melting at relatively low pressures (Gutscher et al

  13. An assessment of the record in compositional variations from mantle source to magmatism at East Island, Crozet archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyzen, C. M.; Marzoli, A.; Bellieni, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Crozet archipelago, located midway between Madagascar and Antarctica, constitutes the emerged part of the easternmost bank of the Crozet plateau, which lies upon upper Cretaceous oceanic seafloor derived from the Southeast Indian Ridge. It forms an elongated chain of five islands and islets, divided into two groups: an older eastern island group (< 9 Ma) composed by large-scale volcanic landmasses (i.e. East and Possession islands) and a younger western one (< 5.5 Ma) with pint-sized islands. The whole region exhibits some of the most typical gravimetric, seismic and bathymetric characteristics associated with upwelling hotter than average mantle including: a geoid high, a topographic swell, a deep low-velocity zone (up to 2350 km), an anomalous heat flow and a thickened crust (10-16.5 km). Most of these features are exacerbated by the near stationary absolute motion of the Antarctic plate. However, since thirty years, the chemical composition of Crozet archipelago magmas has beneficiated from little interest compared to that of other Earth's hotspots. Because of the occurrence of both a thick and old lithosphere and of a near stagnant absolute plate motion, new data from the Crozet archipelago magmatic record will provide new critical perspective on oceanic island building processes. The data presented here are based on a basaltic suite of ~ 25 samples collected by a 'Terres Australes et Antarctiques Francaises' expedition in 1969 from the northern part of East Island. Our alkali basalts from the Crozet archipelago are distinct from other oceanic within-plate magmatic rocks in showing ubiquitous large depletions in LILE with respect to other incompatible elements, although these rocks constitute one of the most incompatible-element-enriched suites among Earth's oceanic island basalts (OIB). The similarity of their trace element ratios and parallelism of their rare earth element patterns indicate: (1) a mantle source homogeneity over at least 1 Ma; (2) an

  14. Synthesis and screening of 3-MA derivatives for autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyang; Wang, Xin; Guo, Haijing; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Yu, Li

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is a conserved degradation process, which plays important pathophysiological roles. The lack of effective inhibitors of autophagy has been an obstacle in both basic research and understanding the physiological role of autophagy in disease manifestation. The most widely used inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), is poorly soluble at room temperature and is effective only at high concentrations. In this study, we synthesized a library of small compounds by chemically modifying 3-MA and screened this library for autophagy inhibitors. Three 3-MA derivatives generated through this approach showed improved solubility and effectiveness in inhibiting autophagy. We demonstrated that chemical modification of an existing autophagy inhibitor is an effective method to generate improved autophagy inhibitors.

  15. Dissolved water distribution in vesicular magmatic glass records both decompressive bubble growth and quench resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E.; Humphreys, M.; Nichols, A. R.; Burgisser, A.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution in magma varies over the lifetime of an eruption due to a variety of processes, including decompressive degassing of the melt, cooling during the quench from melt to glass, and post-emplacement hydration under ambient conditions. Correct interpretation of water distributions in erupted pyroclasts can therefore offer crucial insights into the dynamics of eruption mechanisms and emplacement histories. Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles in magma. Bubbles grow as volatile species in the melt, of which water is volumetrically the most important, diffuse down a concentration gradient towards and across the bubble wall. On cooling, the melt quenches to glass, preserving the spatial distribution of water concentration around the bubbles (now vesicles). We use Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the spatial distribution of water around vesicles in experimentally-vesiculated samples. We find that, contrary to expectation, the total water concentration increases (by up to 2 wt.%) in the ~30 microns closest to the vesicle wall. Our samples record significant resorption of water back into the melt around bubbles during the quench process, a process which represents ';regassing' of the magma. We propose that the observed total water resorption profiles result from the increase in the equilibrium solubility of water as temperature decreases during the quench to glass, and that this resorption locally overprints the pre-existing concentration total water profile resulting from bubble growth during decompression. This resorption occurs over the very short timescales of rapid experimental quench (3-10 seconds) resulting in strongly disequilibrium water speciation. Water re-enters the melt as molecular water leading to enrichment in molecular water around vesicles, while the distribution of hydroxyl groups remains

  16. Ca. 2.7 Ga ferropicritic magmatism: A record of Fe-rich heterogeneities during Neoarchean global mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milidragovic, Dejan; Francis, Don

    2016-07-01

    Although terrestrial picritic magmas with FeOTOT ⩾13 wt.% are rare in the geological record, they were relatively common ca. 2.7 Ga during the Neoarchean episode of enhanced global growth of continental crust. Recent evidence that ferropicritic underplating played an important role in the ca. 2.74-2.70 Ga reworking of the Ungava craton provides the impetus for a comparison of ca. 2.7 Ga ferropicrite occurrences in the global Neoarchean magmatic record. In addition to the Fe-rich plutons of the Ungava craton, volumetrically minor ferropicritic flows, pyroclastic deposits, and intrusive rocks form parts of the Neoarchean greenstone belt stratigraphy of the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon and Vermillion domains of the southern and western Superior Province. Neoarchean ferropicritic rocks also occur on five other Archean cratons: West Churchill, Slave, Yilgarn, Kaapvaal, and Karelia; suggesting that ca. 2.7 Ga Fe-rich magmatism was globally widespread. Neoarchean ferropicrites form two distinct groups in terms of their trace element geochemistry. Alkaline ferropicrites have fractionated REE profiles and show no systematic HFSE anomalies, broadly resembling the trace element character of modern-day ocean island basalt (OIB) magmas. Magmas parental to ca. 2.7 Ga alkaline ferropicrites also had high Nb/YPM (>2), low Al2O3/TiO2 (<8) and Sc/Fe (⩽3 × 10-4) ratios, and were enriched in Ni relative to primary pyrolite mantle-derived melts. The high Ni contents of the alkaline ferropicrites coupled with the low Sc/Fe ratios are consistent with derivation from olivine-free garnet-pyroxenite sources. The second ferropicrite group is characterized by decisively non-alkaline primary trace element profiles that range from flat to LREE-depleted, resembling Archean tholeiitic basalts and komatiites. In contrast to the alkaline ferropicrites, the magmas parental to the subalkaline ferropicrites had flat HREE, lower Nb/YPM (<2), higher Al2O3/TiO2 (8-25) and Sc/Fe (⩾4 × 10-4) ratios, and

  17. The Sedimentary Record of an Intraoceanic Magmatic Arc, from Inception through Maturation to Abandonment: IODP Expedition 351, Site U1438

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Barth, A. P.; Brandl, P. A.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Jiang, F.; Kanayama, K.; Kusano, Y.; Li, H.; McCarthy, A.; Meffre, S.; Savov, I. P.; Tepley, F. J., III; Yogodzinski, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 351 recovered an unprecedented ~1.4-km thick volcaniclastic sedimentary record documenting the initiation and subsequent evolution of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) intra-oceanic arc-basin system. The oldest sedimentary rocks in the 50 m above igneous basement may correspond to the time of subduction initiation to the east. They are lithologically complex, consisting of a mix of variably tuffaceous mudstone, sandstone and breccia-conglomerate with some basaltic andesite passing upsection into 50 m of reddish-brown, radiolarian-bearing hemipelagic mudstone with thin volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone beds. Coarser volcaniclastic rocks (andesitic average whole rock composition) then dominate the overlying section from 1360 to 160 mbsf. Variably graded tuffaceous sandstone to conglomerate and breccia beds range from a few cm to 9 m in thickness and exhibit a wide range of bedding contact relationships and sedimentary structures, including partial to complete Bouma sequences. Gravel to silt-sized volcaniclastic sediment was likely delivered to the site by gravity flows ranging from low- to high-concentration turbidity currents to debris flows. The depositional setting was ~ 50 km from the main arc front (Palau-Kyushu Ridge, PKR), so these may represent very distal apron to fan deposits. The sharp decline in coarse volcanic sediment supply and switch to hemipelagic mud accumulation at ~160mbsf is coincident with the C. 25 Ma transformation of the KPR to a remnant arc by backarc spreading in the adjacent Shikoku Basin and the eastward migration of magmatic arc activity to the IBM.

  18. Recording the transition from flare-up to steady-state arc magmatism at the Purico-Chascon volcanic complex, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Dale H.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Tepley, Frank; Schmitt, Axel K.; Loewen, Matthew W.

    2015-07-01

    The long-term evolution of continental magmatic arcs is episodic, where a few transient events of high magmatic flux or flare-ups punctuate the low-flux magmatism or "steady state" that makes up most of the arc history. How this duality manifests in terms of differences in crustal architecture, magma dynamics and chemistry, and the time scale over which transitions occur is poorly known. Herein we use multiscale geochemical and isotopic characteristics coupled with geothermobarometry at the Purico-Chascon Volcanic Complex (PCVC) in the Central Andes to identify a transition from flare-up to steady state arc magmatism over ∼800 kyr during which significant changes in upper crustal magmatic dynamics are recorded. The PCVC is one of the youngest volcanic centers related to a 10-1 Ma ignimbrite flare-up in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes. Activity at the PCVC initiated 0.98 ± 0.03 Ma with the eruption of a large 80-100 km3 crystal-rich dacite ignimbrite. High, restricted 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios between 0.7085 and 0.7090 in the bulk rock and plagioclase crystals from the Purico ignimbrite, combined with mineral chemistry and phase relationships indicate the dacite magma accumulated and evolved at relatively low temperatures around 800-850 °C in the upper crust at 4-8 km depth. Minor andesite pumice erupted late in the ignimbrite sequence records a second higher temperature (965 °C), higher pressure environment (17-20 km), but with similar restricted radiogenic bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7089-0.7091 to the dacites. The compositional and isotopic characteristics of the Purico ignimbrite implicate an extensive zone of upper crustal mixing, assimilation, storage and homogenization (MASH) between ∼30 and 4 km beneath the PCVC ∼1 Ma. The final eruptions at the PCVC < 0.18 ± 0.02 Ma suggest a change in the magmatic architecture beneath the PCVC. These eruptions produced three small <6 km3 crystal-rich dacite lava domes with radiogenic bulk rock

  19. Constraining the magma flow record based on magmatic and magnetic data in La Gloria Pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, F. J.; Payacán, I.; Gelman, S. E.; Bachmann, O.; Creative Physical Petrology Team

    2013-05-01

    The magmatic origin of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is examined in comparison with magmatic anisotropy data in a small, shallow, silicic magma reservoir in the upper crust. La Gloria Pluton (LGP) is a 10 Ma granodiorite/quartz monzonite of about 250 km3 located in the southern Andes, central Chile. LGP represents a particularly simple case of a silicic intrusion that was assembled in only a few pulses and cooled over a short time interval. Hornblende, biotite and minor magnetite are ubiquitous mafic phases. The AMS tensor indicates that magnetic fabric has an oblate shape (i.e. magnetic foliation is higher than magnetic lineation). Lineations are weak (values up to 1.05), have a N-NW trend with a nearly horizontal dip and are interpreted to represent axisymmetric convection parallel to the main pluton elongation. Foliations are more pronounced (values up to 1.14), having NW trends and dips that vary gradually from vertical at the walls, to horizontal at the center and near the roof of the chamber. We selected 12 samples from AMS sites to obtain petrographic data (well-distributed throughout the pluton, containing samples from the walls, the center and the roof of LGP), and then, determine the magmatic fabric (anisotropy, lineation, foliation). We made 3 oriented thin sections per sample oriented with the AMS. Magmatic anisotropy data were obtained by measuring mineral length, width and orientation in photomicrographs of the three main planes of the AMS tensor, producing 3-D mineral data which were collected for plagioclase and amphibole + bitotite independently. For each site, a Bingham distribution with 95% of confidence is used to determine the mean mineral orientations and their angle difference with the AMS axes. Magmatic anisotropy tensor and rotations with respect to the AMS tensor are determined using both eigenvalues and minimization algorithms. Preliminary results indicate that crystals are coherently oriented in both mineral groups, and

  20. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  1. Carbon isotopes in aquatic plants, Long Valley Caldera, California as records of past hydrothermal and magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, John B., Jr.; Reynolds, Jesse L.; Connolly, Nathan T.; Getz, Shari L.; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Winship, Lawrence J.; Hainsworth, Laura J.

    Hot and cold springs contribute “dead” (14C free) dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the Owens River and Hot Creek. Headwaters aquatic plants have modern 14C, but live plants downstream of the intracaldera springs are depleted in 14C, (as low as 19% modern, with apparent ages up to 13.3 kyrs). In an abandoned meander of the upper Owens River, preserved streambed plants are buried by 600 year old Inyo Craters pumice. Apparent 14C ages of these plants exceed true ages by ∼ 1100 years indicating that they also incorporated dead DIC as they grew. The preserved plants are downstream of Big Springs, whose elevated dead DIC may represent magmatic ‘CO2. The buried plants incorporated ∼10% dead carbon, although modern plants here have ∼50% dead carbon, suggesting that more magmatic CO2 is now entering the upper Owens River than at the time of the Inyo Craters eruptions 600 years ago.

  2. Tibet and Beyond: Magmatic Records from CIA (Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia) and Southern Tibet with Implications for Asian Orogeny and Continental Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sun-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study, based on an ongoing joint research project "Tibet and Beyond", presents a synthesis of principal magmatic records from the CIA (Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia) and Tibet-Himalaya orogens resulting from the continental collisions of Arabia and India, respectively, with Eurasia. In both orogens, through this and other recent studies, the temporal and spatial variations in magmatism pre-, syn- and post-dating the collisions can now be much better defined, thus improving our understanding of collision zone magmatism that appears to have evolved with changes in the lithospheric structures over time and space by collisional processes. The two "collisional" Tethyan orogens were preceded by accretionary orogenic processes, which not only had produced a substantial amount of juvenile continental crust but also fulfill the "orogenic cycle" that evolved from an accretionary into a collisional system. Geochemical data reveal that in contrast to generating vast portions of juvenile crust in the early, accretionary stages of orogenic development, crustal recycling plays a more important role in the later, collisional stages. The latter, as exemplified in SE Turkey and southern Tibet, involves addition of older continental crust material back into the mantle, which subsequently melted and caused compositional transformation of the juvenile crust produced in the accretionary stages. Similar features are observed in young volcanic rocks from eastern Taiwan, the northern Luzon arc complex and part of the active subduction/accretion/collision system in Southeast Asia that may evolve one day to resemble the eastern Tethyan and central Asian orogenic belts by collision with the advancing Australian continent.

  3. Crustal migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids recorded by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Shelly, D. R.; King, J. C.; McGeehin, J. P.; Mangan, M.; Evans, W. C.

    2014-03-01

    Unrest at Mammoth Mountain over the past several decades, manifest by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated He3/He4 ratios in fumarolic gases has been driven by the release of CO2-rich fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Recent unrest included the occurrence of three lower-crustal (32-19 km depth) seismic swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 that were consistently followed by peaks in the occurrence rate of shallow (⩽10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured C14 in the growth rings (1998-2012) of a tree growing in the largest (∼0.3 km) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK) and applied atmospheric CO2 concentration source area modeling to confirm that the tree was a reliable integrator of magmatic CO2 emissions over most of this area. The tree-ring C14 record implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season that immediately followed the largest (February 2010) peak in the occurrence rate of shallow earthquakes. Migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, while the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled the temporal pattern of surface CO2 emissions.

  4. Crustal migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids recorded by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Shelly, David R.; King, John C.; McGeehin, John P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Evans, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Unrest at Mammoth Mountain over the past several decades, manifest by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated 3He/4He ratios in fumarolic gases has been driven by the release of CO2-rich fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Recent unrest included the occurrence of three lower-crustal (32–19 km depth) seismic swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 that were consistently followed by peaks in the occurrence rate of shallow (≤10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured 14C in the growth rings (1998–2012) of a tree growing in the largest (∼0.3 km2) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK) and applied atmospheric CO2 concentration source area modeling to confirm that the tree was a reliable integrator of magmatic CO2 emissions over most of this area. The tree-ring 14C record implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season that immediately followed the largest (February 2010) peak in the occurrence rate of shallow earthquakes. Migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, while the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled the temporal pattern of surface CO2 emissions.

  5. Exploring African Aridification and Wet/dry Cycles Over the Last 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, C.; Tierney, J. E.; DeMenocal, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    Marine sediment records document a gradual increase in aeolian dust supply from Africa over the last 3 Ma in the Atlantic, Gulf of Aden, and Mediterranean (Larrasoaña et al., 2003, deMenocal 2004), with 'steps' in period and amplitude at ~2.8 Ma, ~1.7 Ma, and ~1.0 Ma. However, Mediterranean sapropel sequences document regular, precession-paced wet/dry cycles from changes in the strength of the African monsoon and Nile runoff since at least the Miocene (Rossignol-Strick, 1985, Krijgsman et al., 1995, Lourens et al., 1996). The influence of long-term drying trends in Africa on the movements and strength of the African monsoon over the late Pliocene and Pleistocene is not understood. We have constructed a biomarker-based African climate record by analyzing concentrations and δ D from long-chain, saturated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) in eastern Mediterranean ODP Site 967 sediments from 2.8 - 3.1 Ma and 1.6 - 1.8 Ma. Long-chain fatty acids are produced in the leaf waxes of terrestrial plants (Eglinton and Hamilton, 1967) and are transported to marine sediments via aeolian and fluvial action. Sapropel sediments corresponding with precession minima and enhanced Nile River runoff (Rossignol-Strick, 1985) contain much higher concentrations of FAMEs than carbonate-rich sediments. Comparisons of the two intervals will be presented to illustrate changes in monsoon strength from 3 Ma to 1.6 Ma.

  6. From birth to death of arc magmatism: The igneous evolution of Komandorsky Islands recorded tectonic changes during 50 Ma of westernmost Aleutian history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfig, T. W.; Portnyagin, M.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F. F.; van den Bogaard, P.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Komandorsky Islands form the westernmost end of the Aleutian Island Arc. Four igneous complexes, spanning almost 50 Ma of magmatism, have previously been identified (Ivaschenko et al., 1984: Far East Scientific Centre, Vladivostok, 192 pp.). The petrogenesis of this protracted magmatic record and accurate absolute ages of events, however, remain poorly constrained. Our study investigates the relationship between magma composition and tectonic setting. The Komandorsky igneous basement formed in subduction zone setting. It hosts some of the oldest igneous rocks of the entire Aleutian Arc with the onset of magmatism occurring at 47 Ma. This early stage was characterized by classic fluid-dominated arc volcanism, which produced two coeval but likely genetically unrelated magmatic series of tholeiitic mafic and tholeiitic to calc-alkaline felsic rocks. To date, no boninites have been found and therefore arc initiation is different at the Aleutians than at Izu-Bonin-Marianas or the oldest rocks in the Aleutians have yet to be discovered. The prolonged production of the contrasting basalt-rhyolite association on Komandorsky Islands had lasted ~25 Ma and ceased around the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Concurrently to this long-lasting activity, a gradual transition to a different mode of arc magmatism took place reflected by newly discovered Sr-enriched, HREE-depleted calc-alkaline basaltic andesitic lavas of mid-upper Eocene age spanning a time of at least ~7 Ma. This so-called Transition Series displays a moderate garnet signature marking the increased contribution of a slab-melt component to the magma sources of the Komandorsky Islands. Slab-melt contribution increased with decreasing age leading to strongly adakitic magmatism as early as ~33 Ma (Lower Oligocene), reflected by eruption of high-Sr (up to 2,500 ppm), highly HREE-depleted Adak-type magnesian basaltic andesites and andesites. These remarkable magmas became predominant during the Lower Miocene. They were

  7. The thermal evolution of a episodic, convergent-margin, magmatic center: Evidence from the Tatoosh Magmatic Complex, Mount Rainier National Park, southern Washington Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Use of Mount Rainier as an IAVCEI Decade Volcano requires an assessment of long-term, magmatic activity cycles. Recent activity could represent either a waxing or waning step, relative to the main cone. The Tertiary record at Mount Rainier, represented by the Tatoosh complex, suggests evolution into larger and more energetic systems. This sequence included bimodal dikes and sills (Chinook Pass episode), through dacitic dome and pyroclastic eruptions (Sourdough Mountains episode), shallow monzonitic plutons, culminating in large granodiorite plutons (White River episode). Limited geochronology, geochemistry and field relations support this conceptual model. Simple thermal modeling of this hypothesis suggests that for the first two episodes, transport was insufficient to support a magma chamber. This is consistent with field relations. Repeated magmatism could have perturbed the geotherm, allowing a magma chamber during White River time. This suggests a potential 3 million-year-long, volcanic source for dacitic clasts of the Ellensburg Formation. Uplifts from such a thermal load would be consistent with independent estimates of Miocene deformation in the Washington Cascades. A 7 million year cycle for magmatism at Mount Rainier is consistent with the rock record and the cooling of a 0.5-km accumulation zone of melt at the mid crust. This suggests that any current activity at Mount Rainier could relate to the 0.7-Ma stratovolcano or the Lily Creek Formation (3 Ma). These results indicate the detailed petrologic and geochronological work in the Tatoosh complex necessary to Decade Volcano studies at Mount Rainier.

  8. Magmatic tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Aams, A.I.; McMurtry, G.M.; Shevenell, L.; Pettit, D.R.; Stimac, J.A.; Werner, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium ({sup 3}H) of deep origin (<0.1 T.U. or <0.32 pCi/kg H{sub 2}O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable {sup 3}H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics.

  9. Bloc tectonic rotations recorded in the Neogene and Quaternary magmatic rocks from Northwestern Algeria: preliminary paleomagnetic results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Messaoud Derder, Mohamed; Robion, Philippe; Maouche, Said; Bayou, Boualem; Amenna, Mohamed; Henry, Bernard; Missenard, Yves; Ouabadi, Aziouz; Bestandji, Rafik; Ayache, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The seismic activity of the Western Mediterranean area is partly concentrated in northern Africa, particularly in northern Algeria, as it was shown by the strong earthquakes of Zemmouri 21 May 2003 Mw=6.9 and the El Asnam 10 October 1980 Ms= 7.3. This seismicity is due to the convergence between Africa and Eurasia plates since the Oligocene. This convergence involves a tectonic transpression with N-S to NNW-SSE shortening direction, which is expressed by active deformation along the plate boundary. Along the Tellian Atlas (Northern Algeria), active structures define NE-SW trending folds and NE-SW sinistral transpressive faults affecting the intermountain and coastal Neogene to Quaternary sedimentary basins (e.g. Cheliff and Mitidja Plioquaternary intramontaneous basins, …). The NE-SW reverse active faults are coupled with NW-SE to E-W trending strike-slip deep faults. The active deformation in northern Algeria can be explained by a kinematics model of blocks rotation: the transpressive tectonics with NNW-SSE direction of convergence defines NE-SW oriented blocks, which have been subjected to clockwise rotation. In north Algeria, paleomagnetic studies were carried out in the central area, on Neogene sedimentary and magmatic formations (Derder et al, 2009, 2011; 2013). They pointed out tectonic rotation of large blocks, in agreement with the kinematic model. Narrow zones represent important shear zone with strong rotation of smaller blocks (Derder et al., 2013). A new paleomagnetic study was conducted on the recent magmatic rocks outcropping in the Northwestern Algeria, in order to validate this model on a regional scale. The study is still in progress and the preliminary results show presence of systematic clockwise blocks rotation. These results confirm that the Africa-Europe convergence is partly accommodated in northern Africa by blocks rotations. They highlight that rotations are not homogeneous in north Algeria and thus the importance of future works in this

  10. Magmatic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past three decades, the term "magmatic enclave" has become widely accepted for small (typically <1 m) spheroidal bodies of igneous rock that are compositionally distinct from their coeval lava or intrusive hosts (e.g., Didier and Barbarin, 1991). Certain magmatic enclaves are crystal cumulates but most are globs of magma more mafic and hotter than their host. Understanding the origins and scientific utility of enclaves is aided by their common occurrence in both plutonic and volcanic rocks. Enclaves were noticed and described by geologists and petrographers for decades (e.g., Lacroix, 1890; Pabst, 1928; Williams, 1931) before it was demonstrated that many enclaves were introduced into their hosts while both were in a magmatic state: For example, in plutons by Wager and Bailey (1953), Walker and co-workers (1960's), Didier (1973), Wiebe (1980), and Vernon (1984), and in volcanic rocks by Wilcox (1944), Eichelberger (1980), and Bacon (1986). Spheroidal forms, crenulated or fine-grained margins, and crystal textures of enclaves are evidence of magmatic behavior. On entrapment, an enclave rapidly loses heat to its host and grows groundmass crystals whose size and morphology reflect the degree of enclave undercooling that is closely related to compositional contrast. At depth, some of the water dissolved in enclave magma may enter hydrous silicates but much can exsolve, including during partial crystallization. Vapor exsolution creates spherical vesicles and irregular gas pockets between crystals that give most volcanic enclaves porous textures. A vapor pressure gradient between an incompletely crystallized rigid enclave interior and host magma can drive residual melt into segregation vesicles and even out of the enclave by gas-driven filter pressing. Such enclaves have cores with cumulate-like compositions. Felsic droplets in mafic inclusions in plutonic rocks are interpreted as crystallized segregation vesicles. Enclaves are samples of magma that may not

  11. The Shevlin Park Tuff, Central Oregon Cascade Range: Magmatic Processes Recorded in an Arc-Related Ash-Flow Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrey, R. M.; Donnelly-Nolan, J.; Taylor, E. M.; Champion, D.; Bullen, T.

    2001-12-01

    The circa 260 ka Shevlin Park Tuff is found throughout an area of some 400 square km west of the city of Bend, OR. The tuff is composed of several flow units, the lowest of which was mapped separately in the past as the Century Drive Tuff. We have found the Century Drive to be chemically and paleomagnetically similar to the Shevlin Park. The spatial distribution and pumice imbrication of the Shevlin Park suggest a source at an elevation near 2000 m on the Bend Highland 5-6 km east of Broken Top volcano. Deposition of the Shevlin Park may have been preceded by a Plinian airfall eruption, now mainly preserved in the Columbia Canal irrigation ditch, which is likely equivalent in the distal tephra record to the Summer Lake NN layer. Despite our extensive database of bulk pumice and glass geochemistry, we cannot corroborate an earlier correlation of the Shevlin Park with the Summer Lake JJ tephra. The Shevlin Park Tuff is compositionally bimodal, with black pumice ranging from 55-62% silica, and commonly paler silicic pumice from 64-68%. Lower flow units appear to contain proportionally more silicic pumice and slightly more fractionated (lower MgO) mafic pumice. Mafic pumice is much more heterogeneous for a given silica percentage than silicic pumice, especially in P, Fe/Mg, and Sr. Both types of pumice are crystal-poor, and thus the bulk pumice and glass compositions are similar. Phenocrysts present in pumice include plagioclase (dominantly reversely zoned An30-40, but ranging up to skeletal An82), two pyroxenes (typically reversely zoned), olivine (Fo71-76), magnetite, and ilmenite. The phenocryst assemblage and mineral chemistry of the Columbia Canal pumice are similar, with the exception of slightly more Fe-rich opx. Mixing of mafic and silicic magma appears to be the dominant process in the generation of the wide compositional range within the Shevlin Park. A simple mixing model can account for most of the major and trace element, and Sr isotopic variations. The

  12. The physical hydrology of magmatic-hydrothermal systems: High-resolution 18O records of magmatic-meteoric water interaction from the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Baumgartner, Lukas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are important economic Cu, Au, Mo and Sn resources (Sillitoe, 2010, Kesler, 1994). The ore formation is a result of superimposed enrichment processes and metals can precipitate due to fluid-rock interaction and/or temperature drop caused by convection or mixing with meteoric fluid (Heinrich and Candela 2014). Microthermometry and LA-ICP MS trace element analyses of fluid inclusions of a well-characterized quartz sample from the Yankee Lode quartz-cassiterite vein deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) suggest that tin precipitation was driven by dilution of hot magmatic water by meteoric fluids (Audétat et al.1998). High resolution in situ oxygen isotope measurements of quartz have the potential to detect changing fluid sources during the evolution of a hydrothermal system. We analyzed the euhedral growth zones of this previously well-studied quartz sample. Growth temperatures are provided by Audétat et al. (1998) and Audétat (1999). Calculated δ 18O values of the quartz- and/or cassiterite-precipitating fluid show significant variability through the zoned crystal. The first and second quartz generations (Q1 and Q2) were precipitated from a fluid of magmatic isotopic composition with δ 18O values of ˜ 8 - 10 ‰. δ 18O values of Q3- and tourmaline-precipitating fluids show a transition from magmatic δ 18O values of ˜ 8 ‰ to ˜ -5 ‰. The outermost quartz-chlorite-muscovite zone was precipitated from a fluid with a significant meteoric water component reflected by very light δ 18O values of about -15 ‰ which is consistent with values found by previous studies (Sun and Eadington, 1987) using conventional O-isotope analysis of veins in the distal halo of the granite intrusion. Intense incursion of meteoric water during Q3 precipitation (light δ 18O values) agrees with the main ore formation event, though the first occurrence of cassiterite is linked to Q2 precipitating fluid with magmatic-like isotope signature. This

  13. Radiocarbon studies of plant leaves and rings from mammoth mountain, CA: A long-term record of magmatic CO2 release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, A.C.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Southon, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of 14C in tree rings provides a measure of the flux of magmatic CO2 from Mammoth Mountain both before and after 1994 when copious diffuse emissions were first discovered and linked to tree kill. We analyzed the annual rings of trees with two main purposes: (1) to track changes in the magnitude of magmatic CO2 emission over time, and (2) to determine the onset of magmatic CO2 emission at numerous sites on Mammoth Mountain. The onset of CO2 emission at different areas of tree kill was determined to be in 1990, closely following the seismic events of 1989. At Horseshoe Lake (HSL), CO2 emission was found to have peaked in 1991 and to have subsequently declined by a factor of two through 1998. The tree-ring data also show that emissions of magmatic carbon from cold springs below the tree-kill areas occurred well before 1989. Trees located on the margins of the kill areas or otherwise away from zones of maximum gas discharge were found to be better integrators of magmatic CO2 emission than those located in the center of tree kills. Although quantitative extrapolations from our data to a flux history will require that a relationship be established between 14C depletion in tree rings and average annual magmatic CO2 flux, the pattern of 14C depletion in tree rings is likely to be the most reliable indicator of the long-term changes in the magnitude of CO2 release from Mammoth Mountain. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Origin and evolution of Pliocene Pleistocene granites from the Larderello geothermal field (Tuscan Magmatic Province, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, A.; Gianelli, G.; Puxeddu, M.; Ruggieri, G.

    2005-04-01

    Extensive, mainly acidic peraluminous magmatism affected the Tuscan Archipelago and the Tuscan mainland since late Miocene, building up the Tuscan Magmatic Province (TMP) as the Northern Apennine fold belt was progressively thinned, heated and intruded by mafic magmas. Between 3.8 and 1.3 Ma an intrusive complex was built on Larderello area (Tuscan mainland) by emplacement of multiple intrusions of isotopically and geochemically distinct granite magmas. Geochemical and isotopic investigations were carried out on granites cored during drilling exploration activity on the Larderello geothermal field. With respect to the other TMP granites the Larderello intrusives can be classified as two-mica granites due to the ubiquitous presence of small to moderate amounts of F-rich magmatic muscovite. They closely resemble the almost pure crustal TMP acidic rocks and do not show any of the typical petrographic features commonly observed in the TMP hybrid granites (enclaves, patchy zoning of plagioclase, amphibole clots). On the basis of major and trace elements, as well as REE patterns, two groups of granites were proposed: LAR-1 granites (3.8-2.3 Ma) originated by biotite-muscovite breakdown, and LAR-2 granites (2.3-1.3 Ma) generated by muscovite breakdown. At least three main crustal sources (at 14-23 km depth), characterized by distinct ɛNd( t) and 87Sr/ 86Sr values, were involved at different times, and the magmas produced were randomly emplaced at shallow levels (3-6 km depth) throughout the entire field. The partial melting of a biotite-muscovite-rich source with low ɛNd( t) value (about -10.5) produced the oldest intrusions (about 3.8-2.5 Ma). Afterwards (2.5-2.3 Ma), new magmas were generated by another biotite-rich source having a distinctly higher ɛNd( t) value (-7.9). Finally, a muscovite-rich source with high ɛNd( t) (about -8.9) gave origin to the younger group of granites (2.3-1.0 Ma). The significant Sr isotope disequilibrium recorded by granites belonging to

  15. Detailed paragenesis and Li-mica compositions as recorders of the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of the Maoping W-Sn deposit (Jiangxi, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, Hélène; Marignac, Christian; Mercadier, Julien; Cuney, Michel; Richard, Antonin; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Charles, Nicolas; Lespinasse, Marc-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Li-micas have been used as indicators of the evolution of granites. However, hydrothermal Li-micas are less documented. World-class W-Sn deposits associated with Early Yanshanian granites (South Jiangxi, China) show magmatic and hydrothermal Li-micas which could help unravelling the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of rare metal deposits. Six types of Li-micas have been identified in the vein system of the Maoping W-Sn deposit through detailed petrography and EPMA and LA-ICP-MS analyses, by chronological order: (i) late-magmatic Li-micas in feldspar veins, associated with late crystallization of a peraluminous melt; (ii) hydrothermal Fe-Li micas (Fe-Li mica veins and selvages); (iii) hydrothermal Fe-Li micas in W-Sn veins; (iv) Fe-Li micas in later banded quartz veins; (v) Li-muscovite in the final stages; and finally (vi) micas associated with alteration at each stage. Based on oscillatory variations and trends in major elements composition, the chemical variations in Li-micas from the successive stages and in hydrothermal micas that crystallized in the veins are interpreted to reflect mixing between at least three fluids of possible magmatic, meteoric and metamorphic origins. The crystallization of zircons and REE minerals, combined with variations of major and trace element concentrations in the Li-micas, notably an enrichment of rare metals (W-Sn-Ta-Nb) in the Li-micas, implies emplacement of a hidden peralkaline REE-rich magma during the crystallization of the banded quartz veins, a source which was different to the pre-existing peraluminous granites. The possible involvement of both peraluminous and peralkaline intrusives suggests the existence of polyphase magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the Maoping deposit, during the Yanshanian event (190-80 Ma).

  16. Recrystallization and hydrothermal growth of high U-Th zircon in the Weondong deposit, Korea: Record of post-magmatic alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyun; Song, Yungoo; Chung, Donghoon; Kang, Il-Mo; Khulganakhuu, Chuluunbaatar; Yi, Keewook

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate zircons with high U and Th contents of 12,000-24,000 and 11,000-40,000 ppm, respectively, from leucocratic granite in the Weondong region of South Korea. Hydrothermally epitaxial growth textures are observed in addition to four distinct textures with different backscattered electron (BSE) intensities within single zircon crystals. We describe the internal textures of the zircon crystals and define the chemical characteristics of each textural domain. The zircon crystals show internally recrystallized and externally crystallized textures, supporting the concept of post-magmatic fluid control. After crystallization of the primary zircon by late magmatism, four types of secondary textures were developed. The type-I domain shows patchy forms within the primary domain due to the structural and chemical recrystallization of self-irradiated zircon by a fluid-dominated diffusion reaction process. The type-II domain is characterized by a pure zircon composition, mineral inclusions (mainly thorite), and micropores due to chemical recrystallization by a coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process during interaction with aqueous fluids. The type-III domain is the purest zircon, is interconnected with type-II, and formed by a second coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process. The type-IV domain is the hydrothermal recrystallization/overgrowth texture formed by the direct crystallization process from fluorine-enriched, zircon-saturated aqueous fluid. These results indicate that the zircon crystals were formed sequentially or intermittently through multi-genetic processes by post-magmatic fluids. Furthermore, we conclude that F-enriched post-magmatic fluid migrated large amounts of zirconium, resulting in the typical overgrowth texture of zircon.

  17. Timing of porphyry (Cu-Mo) and base metal (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) mineralisation in a magmatic-hydrothermal system—Morococha district, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchpole, Honza; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Bendezú, Aldo; Ovtcharova, Maria; Spikings, Richard; Stein, Holly; Fontboté, Lluís

    2015-12-01

    The Morococha district in central Peru is characterised by economically important Cordilleran polymetallic (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) vein and replacement bodies and the large Toromocho porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in its centre. U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology data for various porphyry-related hydrothermal mineralisation styles record a 3.5-Ma multi-stage history of magmatic-hydrothermal activity in the district. In the late Miocene, three individual magmatic-hydrothermal centres were active: the Codiciada, Toromocho, and Ticlio centres, each separated in time and space. The Codiciada centre is the oldest magmatic-hydrothermal system in the district and consists of a composite porphyry stock associated with anhydrous skarn and quartz-molybdenite veins. The hydrothermal events are recorded by a titanite U-Pb age at 9.3 ± 0.2 Ma and a molybdenite Re-Os age at 9.26 ± 0.03 Ma. These ages are indistinguishable from zircon U-Pb ages for porphyry intrusions of the composite stock and indicate a time span of 0.2 Ma for magmatic-hydrothermal activity. The small Ticlio magmatic-hydrothermal centre in the west of the district has a maximum duration of 0.3 Ma, ranging from porphyry emplacement to porphyry mineralisation at 8.04 ± 0.14 Ma (40Ar/39Ar muscovite cooling age). The Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre has a minimum of five recorded porphyry intrusions that span a total of 1.3 Ma and is responsible for the formation of the giant Toromocho Cu-Mo deposit. At least two hydrothermal pulses are identified. Post-dating a first pulse of molybdenite mineralisation, wide-spread hydrous skarn covers an area of over 6 km2 and is recorded by five 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages at 7.2-6.8 Ma. These ages mark the end of the slowly cooling and long-lived Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre soon after last magmatic activity at 7.26 ± 0.02 Ma. District-wide (50 km2) Cordilleran base metal vein and replacement bodies post-date the youngest recorded porphyry mineralisation event at Toromocho

  18. The last stages of the Avalonian-Cadomian arc in NW Iberian Massif: isotopic and igneous record for a long-lived peri-Gondwanan magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonaegui, Pilar; Arenas, Ricardo; Albert, Richard; Sánchez Martínez, Sonia; Díez Fernández, Rubén; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-06-01

    The upper allochthonous units of NW Iberian Massif contain an extensive Cambrian magmatism (c. 500 Ma), covering felsic to mafic compositions. The magmatic activity generated large massifs of granitoids and gabbros, with calc-alkaline and tholeiitic compositions respectively. Petrological and geochemical features of these massifs are characteristic of volcanic arc. The plutons intruded siliciclastic sedimentary series deposited in the periphery of the West Africa Craton. U-Pb/Hf isotopic compositions of detrital zircon in the siliciclastic host series, indicate continental arc activity between c. 750 Ma and c. 500 Ma. It was characterized by a large variety of isotopic sources, including from very old continental input, even Archean, to the addition of a significant amount of juvenile mafic material. These isotopic sources experienced an extensive mixing that explains the composition and isotopic features (εHft from - 50 until + 15) of the represented Cambrian plutons. The Cambrian igneous rocks of the upper units of NW Iberia are related to the latest activity of the Avalonian-Cadomian arc. From the Middle Cambrian arc activity in the periphery of Gondwana was replaced by pronounced extension associated with the development of continental rifting, which finally led to separation of the microcontinent Avalonia. Subsequent drifting of Avalonia to the North caused progressive opening one of the main Paleozoic ocean, the Rheic Ocean.

  19. Low-Degree Partial Melting Experiments of CR and H Chondrite Compositions: Implications for Asteroidal Magmatism Recorded in GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of differentiated meteorites have revealed a diversity of differentiation processes on their parental asteroids; these differentiation mechanisms range from whole-scale melting to partial melting without the core formation [e.g., 1]. Recently discovered paired achondrites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (hereafter referred to as GRA) represent unique asteroidal magmatic processes. These meteorites are characterized by high abundances of sodic plagioclase and alkali-rich whole-rock compositions, implying that they could originate from a low-degree partial melt from a volatile-rich oxidized asteroid [e.g., 2, 3, 4]. These conditions are consistent with the high abundances of highly siderophile elements, suggesting that their parent asteroid did not segregate a metallic core [2]. In this study, we test the hypothesis that low-degree partial melts of chondritic precursors under oxidizing conditions can explain the whole-rock and mineral chemistry of GRA based on melting experiments of synthesized CR- and H-chondrite compositions.

  20. Record of Permian-Early Triassic continental arc magmatism in the western margin of the Jiamusi Block, NE China: petrogenesis and implications for Paleo-Pacific subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wenchun; Dong, Yu; Bi, Junhui; Wang, Zhihui; Ji, Zheng; Yang, H.; Ge, W. C.; Dong, Y.; Bi, J. H.; Wang, Z. H.; Ji, Z.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report zircon U-Pb ages, Hf isotopes and whole-rock geochemical data for the Permian to Early Triassic granitoids from the western margin of the Jiamusi Block (WJB), NE China. The intermediate to felsic (SiO2 = 59.67-74.04 wt%) granitoids belong to calc-alkaline series and are characterized by enrichments in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements with pronounced negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, revealing typical continental magmatic arc geochemical signatures. The zircon U-Pb determinations on the granodiorite, monzogranite, syenogranite and quartz diorite samples yielded ages between ca. 275-245 Ma, which, together with the published coeval intrusive rocks, indicates that Permian to Early Triassic continental arc magmatism occurred extensively in the WJB. The low and mainly negative zircon ɛ Hf(t) values between -7.6 and +1.6 and the zircon Hf model ages of 1.2-1.8 Ga, which are significantly older than their crystallization ages, suggest that they were mainly derived from reworking of ancient crustal materials with a limited input of juvenile components. The geochemical systematics and petrogenetic considerations indicate that the studied granitoids were generated from a zone of melting, assimilation, storage, and homogenization, i.e., a MASHed zone at the base of Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic continental crust, where large portions of igneous rocks and minor clay-poor sediments involved in the source region. In combination with regional geological data, we argue that the Jiamusi Block was unlikely the rifted segment of the Songliao Block and two possible geodynamical models were proposed to interpret the formation of the ca. 275-245 Ma granitoids in the WJB. In the context of Permian global plate reconstruction, we suggest that Paleo-Pacific plate subduction was initiated in the Permian to Early Triassic beneath the Jiamusi Block, and even whole eastern NE China.

  1. Continental Arc Magmatism and its Abrupt Termination by Ridge Subduction or Ridge Jump Along the Proto-Pacific Margin of Gondwana, Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica: A Zircon U-Pb Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, S. B.

    2003-12-01

    The Paleozoic and Mesozoic development and subsequent fragmentation of Gondwanaland's Pacific margin is recorded in igneous and metamorphic rocks cropping out in the Marie Byrd Land (MBL) continental block of West Antarctica, recognized on geologic and paleomagnetic grounds to comprise a distinct microplate. Widespread occurrence of metaluminous granitoids dated by the zircon U-Pb method as mid- to late Paleozoic shows that convergence-related magmatism dominated the early evolution of this margin. Dates for granodiorites, monzogranites and granites from the Ruppert and Hobbs Coasts of western MBL reveal a prolonged period of subduction-related calc-alkaline magmatism between at least 320 ñ 3 Ma (age of the oldest granodiorite dated) and 110 ñ1 Ma (the age of the Mt. Prince granite). The latter is intruded by swarms of mafic and intermediate dikes believed to record the onset of rifting that led to separation of the New Zealand microcontinent from MBL. The dikes have been dated by zircon U-Pb at 101 ñ 1 Ma. Thus, the regime along the Ruppert and Hobbs Coasts had shifted from subduction-related to rift-related magmatism within a mere ~9-m.y. period. In the Kohler Range and the Pine Island Bay areas of eastern MBL, the calc-alkaline magmatism did not terminate until 96 ñ 1 Ma, based on U-Pb dating of zircons from one granitoid sample, or 94 ñ 3 Ma based on zircons from another. No continental separation occurred to the east of MBL. The margins of the Thurston Island and Antarctic Peninsula blocks went directly from convergent to inactive. With their zircon U-Pb ages clustering around 100 ñ 2 Ma, dike-free "anorogenic" syenites and quartz syenites along the Ruppert and Hobbs Coasts show that the transition to extensional magmatism was rapid in the west. This is also reflected by the fact that from the onset of rifting at 101 ñ 1 Ma to formation of oceanic crust between MBL and Greater New Zealand (Campbell Plateau, Chatham Rise, North Island and South Island

  2. Mineral-Scale Sr and Pb Isotopic Variations as Recorders of Magma Differentiation Processes in the Fish Canyon Magmatic System, San Juan Volcanic Field, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, B. L.; Davidson, J. P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    The use of crystal isotope microstratigraphy, through microanalysis for Sr and more recently Pb isotopes, shows that inter- and intra-crystalline isotopic and compositional heterogeneities exist within many volcanic rocks. Here we report preliminary Sr and Pb isotope data for sanidine, plagioclase and biotite (Sr only) crystals separated from representative samples of the 5000km3, 28Ma Fish Canyon Tuff and the pre-caldera Pagosa Peak Dacite, from the La Garita Caldera, San Juan Volcanic Field, U.S.A. Age-corrected whole-rock 87Sr/86Sr values define a small range (0.7063 to 0.7065), whereas plagioclase values range from 0.7063 to 0.7072 and sanidines define a more limited range 0.7063 to 0.7067. These ranges in 87Sr/86Sr cannot be solely attributed to radiogenic ingrowth during residence in the Fish Canyon magma reservoir, as the 87Rb/86Sr values (plagioclase; 0.003 to 0.011, sanidine; 0.30 to 0.73) are too low to significantly affect 87Sr/86Sr over magmatic timescales. Biotites exhibit a much greater range in initial Sr isotope ratios (0.7202 to 0.7295), but with even higher 87Rb/86Sr ratios of 8 to 12, more than 50 Myrs would be needed to evolve such ratios from the whole-rock ratio. Similarly, large ranges of Pb isotope ratios in sanidines and plagioclase, cannot be produced given the U/Pb ratios of these phases on any geologically reasonable timescale. We interpret the isotopic variations to represent open system processes in the generation of the Fish Canyon magma either by 1) crystallisation from heterogeneous isotopically modified (ultimately mantle-derived) magmas during interaction with old, heterogeneous crust, and/or 2) the direct incorporation of xenocrystic phases from the crust to produce an isotopically heterogeneous magma (and rock) at the mineral scale. Small but significant variations in 39Ar/40Ar total fusion ages for each of the studied phases, are consistent with the latter interpretation, suggesting that the crystal population is a mixture of

  3. The Influence of Crystal Mush on Magmatism Under Arc Volcanoes Recorded in Zircon from the Lassen Volcanic Center, California and Mount Hood, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemetti, E. W.; Clynne, M. A.; Kent, A. J.; Bertolett, E. M.; Hernandez, L. D.; Coble, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many arc volcanoes are constructed by repeated tapping of complex subvolcanic magmatic plumbing containing new and inherited crystals and liquids that interact in the hours to millennia prior to an eruption. This process is often modulated by long-lived (10-100 k.y.) shallow (<5 km) silicic crystal mush. Constraining the development and growth of mush zones is therefore essential in predicting a volcano's future behavior. The Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC) in California and Mount Hood (MH) in Oregon are two of the most recently active Cascade volcanoes, with last major eruptions in 1915 and ~1780-81 respectively. We performed U-Th/U-Pb dating of LVC and MH zircon from lavas and tephras erupted between 0.1-825 ka. In the LVC, the Rockland Tephra (611 ka; Ar/Ar) contains zircon from 800-520 ka, spanning the age of the Rockland caldera complex (825-611 ka eruption ages). During the Lassen Domefield (315-0.1 ka eruption ages), zircon ages vary from secular equilibrium to 15 ka, overlapping with the Bumpass Sequence (315-190 ka eruption ages) and an eruptive hiatus (190-90 ka eruption ages). Nine of 116 Lassen Domefield zircon are in secular equilibrium (>350 ka). These data support a model of long-lived zircon-saturated silicic mushes existing under the LVC during the Rockland caldera complex stage and since the end of the Brokeoff Volcano stage (590-385 ka eruption ages). Preliminary zircon data from the Old Maid stage (~0.2 ka eruption age) at MH indicate two broad age groups. Younger zircon (<10 ka) suggest reactivation and/or expansion of mush following Polallie phase (20-12 ka eruption ages), Timberline (~1.5 ka eruption age), and Old Maid eruptions. Older zircon (>100 ka) are generally consistent with U-Th ages from plagioclase (~120 ka U-Th), indicating a long-lived zircon-saturated crystal mush tapped by Timberline and Old Maid lavas. At both of these volcanoes, silicic crystal mushes interact with intruding mafic magma, producing monotonous mixed andesite

  4. Bi-directional subduction of the South Tianshan Ocean during the Late Silurian: Magmatic records from both the southern Central Tianshan Block and northern Tarim Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Ge, Maohui

    2016-10-01

    The subduction polarity of the South Tianshan Ocean (STO) is a matter of debate, primarily in that the Paleozoic structures of Tianshan orogenic belt have been strongly overprinted by the Cenozoic intra-continental deformation. Indentifying the arc-related magmatic rocks may provide a convincible clue for understanding the closure process of the STO. In this study, whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotope were presented on the andesite and monzonite from the Bayanbulak area of the southern Central Tianshan Block (CTB) and on the quartz diorite from the Ouxidaban area of the northern Tarim Craton. Geochemically, all the samples are Na-rich, enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements (Rb, Ba, U, K and Pb), and depleted in high strength field elements (Nb, Ta and Ti), like most arc-type igneous rocks. The Bayanbulak andesite samples display high MgO, Fe2O3T, TiO2 and Mg# values, and positive εHf(t) values, indicating magma source from the wedge mantle. But the existence of xenocrystic zircons implies that continental crust material were involved during magma ascend, suggesting a continental arc setting for the Bayanbulak andesite. The Bayanbulak monzonite and the Ouxidaban quartz diorite samples display relatively higher SiO2 contents, and lower MgO, Fe2O3T and TiO2 concentrations, indicating crustal sources. But the Mg# values of the Bayanbulak monzonite and the Ouxidaban quartz diorite are 48.76-51.85 and 50.31-53.73, and the εHf(t) values are -2.5 to 8.7 and -1.7 to 4.1, indicating that their magma sources were also mixed by mantle-derived components. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating results reveal that the Bayanbulak andesite, the Bayanbulak monzonite and the Ouxidaban quartz diorite were formed at 423, 424 Ma, and 421 Ma, respectively. The age and geochemical data indicate that both the southern CTB and northern Tarim Craton were active continental margins during the Late Silurian, favoring a bi-directional subduction

  5. Configuration and Correlation of Fluvial Terrace Deposits In the Lower Rio Salado Valley: A Record of Magmatic Uplift and Active Normal Faulting in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, B. D.; Axen, G. J.; Phillips, F. M.; Harrison, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Salado is a western tributary of the Rio Grande whose valley is flanked by six major terrace levels. The Rio crosses several active rift-related normal faults and the active, mid-crustal Socorro Magma Body (SMB; a sill at 19 km depth that is actively doming the land surface), providing an unusual opportunity to explore the effects of deep magma emplacement and active faulting on the terraces. Rio Salado terraces were mapped using a high-resolution DEM and digital color stereophotographs and were projected onto a valley-parallel vertical plane to construct longitudinal profiles. Three new soil pits were described to aid terrace correlation. A net incision rate of 0.41 ± 0.06 m/ka was inferred from the correlation of a major fill-cut terrace to the 122 ± 18 ka Airport surface ~25 km south of the Rio Salado. This incision rate is >1.5 times more rapid than estimated rates nearby or in other parts of New Mexico, but yields age estimates for other terraces that are consistent with soil development. Terrace gradients in the Rio Salado have increased through time, indicating either stream response to Rio Grande incision or footwall tilting from the Quaternary Loma Blanca fault (LBF). Two terraces in the LBF hanging wall are back-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts, suggesting a listric geometry for the LBF. However, two others (Qtf and Qtc) are east-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts. Both Qtf and Qtc merge eastward with the next youngest terrace in the flight, and Qtc is arched, consistent with an earlier episode of surface uplift above the SMB. Future work will involve (a) additional terrace mapping over the SMB, (b) cosmogenic 36Cl depth profile dating of the Rio Salado terraces to determine incision rates, allow regional terrace correlations, and constrain fault-slip slip rates and the record of SMB-related surface uplift, and (c) numerical modeling of SMB inflation constrained by uplift signals.

  6. Uralian magmatism: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fershtater, G. B.; Montero, P.; Borodina, N. S.; Pushkarev, E. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Bea, F.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is an attempt to summarize current knowledge of Uralian magmatism, focusing on those aspects relevant for understanding its geodynamic evolution. The Urals consist of three tectonomagmatic domains: a Suture Sector, in the west, and two N-S imbricated Island-Arc Continental Sectors in the east. The Suture Sector comprises lower Palaeozoic mafic-ultramafic complexes which show eastward impoverishment in LILE, thus reflecting the transition of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle of the Russian plate to the suboceanic lithospheric mantle of the subducted Uralian palaeo-ocean. The two Island-Arc Continental Sectors represent the transition from oceanic to continental environments in the middle and south Urals. Collisional magmatism started in the Silurian and persisted till the Permian, migrating progressively eastward and increasing in abundance of LILE and {87Sr }/{86Sr initial}. Magmatic polarity is very similar to that of modern subduction zones and indicates that the subducted slab was dipping eastward during that period. The Northern and Southern Island-Arc Continental Sectors show many similarities regarding the nature and spatial-temporal distribution of magmatism, but there are also some important differences which probably indicate somewhat different geodynamic regimes. In the Northern Sector, Carboniferous tonalite-granodiorite batholiths have features compatible with an origin by melting of the oceanic crust in the subducted slab. In the Southern Sector, however, Carboniferous tonalite-granodiorite batholiths have features more consistent with a melting event within the lower continental crust above the subduction zone than with melting within the subducted slab. Upper Carboniferous-Permian granites have high {87Sr }/{86Sr initial} in the north (e.g., 0.7120 in the Murzinka batholith) but very low {87Sr }/{86Sr initial} in the south (e.g., 0.7045 in the Dzhabyk batholith) in spite of rocks from both batholiths being equally peraluminous and

  7. Venus magmatic and tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Two years beyond the initial mapping by the Magellan spacecraft, hypotheses for the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus have become refined and focused. We present our view of these processes, attempting to synthesize aspects of a model for the tectonic and magmatic behavior of the planet. The ideas presented should be taken collectively as an hypothesis subject to further testing. The quintessence of our model is that shear and buoyancy forces in the upper boundary layer of mantle convection give rise to a spatially and temporally complex pattern of strain in a one-plate Venusian lithosphere and modulate the timing and occurrence of magmatism on a global basis.

  8. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (

  9. Magmatism on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Thorey, Clément; Pinel, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism on the Moon is dominated by large fissure eruptions of mare basalt and seems to lack large, central vent, shield volcanoes as observed on all the other terrestrial planets. Large shield volcanoes are constructed over millions to several hundreds of millions of years. On the Moon, magmas might not have been buoyant enough to allow for a prolonged activity at the same place over such lengths of time. The lunar crust was indeed formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean, resulting in a particularly light and relatively thick crust. This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the denser primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basins where at least part of the crust was removed by the impact process. Thus, the ascent of lunar magmas might have been limited by their reduced buoyancy, leading to storage zone formation deep in the lunar crust. Further magma ascent to shallower depths might have required local or regional tensional stresses. Here, we first review evidences of shallow magmatic intrusions within the lunar crust of the Moon that consist in surface deformations presenting morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. We then study the preferential zones of magma storage in the lunar crust as a function of the local and regional state of stress. Evidences of shallow intrusions are often contained within complex impact craters suggesting that the local depression caused by the impact exerted a strong control on magma ascent. The depression is felt over a depth equivalent to the crater radius. Because many of these craters have a radius less than 30km, the minimum crust thickness, this suggests that the magma was already stored in deeper intrusions before ascending at shallower depth. All the evidences for intrusions are also preferentially located in the internal

  10. A historical overview of Moroccan magmatic events along northwest edge of the West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenne, Moha; Souhassou, Mustapha; Arai, Shoji; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane

    2017-03-01

    the Internal Maghrebian flysch nappes as well as in the external Mesorif. This event consists of Middle-Upper Jurassic MORB tholeiites emplaced during opening of the Alpine Tethys ocean. The Central High Atlas also records Early Cretaceous alpine Tethys magmatism associated with the aborted Atlas rift, or perhaps linked to plume activity on the edge of the WAC. Cenozoic magmatism is associated with Tertiary and Quaternary circum-Mediterranean alkaline provinces, and is characterized by an intermittent activity over 50 Ma from the Anti-Atlas to the Rif Mountain along a SW-NE volcanic lineament which underlines a thinned continental lithosphere.

  11. Magmatic history of Red Sea rifting: perspective from the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    An early stage of magmatism related to Red Sea rifting is recorded by a Tertiary dyke complex and comagmatic volcanic rocks exposed on the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain. Field relations and new K/Ar dates indicate episodic magmatism from approx 30 m.y. to the present day and rift-related magmatism as early as 50 m.y. Localized volcanism and sheeted dyke injection ceased at approx 20 m.y. and were replaced by the intrusion of thick gabbro dykes, marking the onset of sea-floor spreading in the central Red Sea. Differences in the depths and dynamics of mantle-melt extraction and transport may account for the transition from mixed alkaline-subalkaline bimodal magmatism of the pre-20 m.y. rift basin to exclusively subalkaline (tholeiitic) magmatism of the Red Sea spreading axis and the alkali basalt volcanism inland.-L.C.H.

  12. Magmatic differentiation in a chaotic background: A comparison of multiphase simulations and magmatic chronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    The location and timescales of silicic magma production has received much recent attention and these questions are at the forefront of understanding incubation times for eruptive episodes and ultimately, the production of continental crust. While idealizations of differentiation in simplified magma reservoir geometries have been useful to frame end-member behavior, most magmatic systems, and particular large magma reservoirs, are open systems with time varying geometries. Evidence of open systems and assembly of magmatic systems incrementally are present in a range of plutonic and volcanic rocks. To evaluate the timescales of silicic magma production, a 3D multiphase dynamics model was implemented that includes heat transfer, phase change and magma dynamics. The size of the magmatic systems under consideration are not prescribed, but rather grow or shrink in response to the flux of heat and intrusions. To compare simulations to a range of data, major element chemistry, phase assemblage, and tracking of representative crystals are made through time. A particular focus of this presentation is a comparison of dynamic processes to proxies used as chronometers. This includes recording the timescale of appearance of different phases that can be compared to timescales inferred from diffusion profiles and monitoring zircon saturation and dispersal. Both the differentiation timescale and timescales of the major growth of zircons are a relatively small fraction of the melt-present lifetime of magma reservoirs, and in particular, typically represent relatively smaller fractions for larger magmatic systems. Melt can exist at low melt fraction (<0.2) for timescales of 100s kyr for the largest systems, while spending only a small amount of time at high melt fraction. Nevertheless, these reservoirs can be assembled incrementally with magma fluxes in the ranges estimated for arcs. A mid-upper crust location is important to have phase assemblages with sufficient leverage to produce

  13. Apatite as a Tool for Tracking Magmatic CO2 Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, J.; Humphreys, M.; Brooker, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 plays a fundamental role in the evolution of magmatic and volcanic systems, but its low solubility in silicate melts means that direct records of magmatic CO2 concentrations remain elusive. The phosphate mineral apatite is unique among igneous minerals in its capacity to accommodate all major magmatic volatiles (H2O, F, Cl, CO2 and S). Although interest in apatite as a tool for tracking magmatic volatile contents (namely H2O, F, and Cl) has increased in recent years, its potential as a record of magmatic CO2contents remains untapped. We present the results of high-temperature, high-pressure experiments investigating the partitioning behaviour of CO2 between apatite and basaltic melt. Experiments were run in piston cylinder apparatus at 1 GPa and 1250 °C, with a slow initial cooling ramp employed to facilitate crystal growth. Each charge contained the starting basaltic powder doped with Ca-phosphate and variable proportions of H2O, CO2, and F. Run products are glass-rich charges containing 15-25 vol% large, euhedral apatite crystals (± cpx and minor biotite). Experimental apatites and glasses have been characterised by BSE imaging, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe. Apatites range in composition from near-endmember fluorapatite (3.0 wt% F), to near-endmember hydroxyapatite (1.7 wt% H2O), to carbon-rich apatite containing up to 1.6 wt% CO2. Apatite compositions are stoichiometric if all anions (F-, OH-, and CO32—) lie in the channel site, suggesting an "A-type" substitution under these conditions (i.e. CO32— + [] = 2X—, where X is another channel anion and [] is a vacancy; e.g. Fleet et al. 2004). Importantly, CO2 partitions readily into apatite at all fluid compositions considered here. CO2 is also more compatible in apatite than water at our run conditions, with calculated H2O-CO2 exchange coefficients close to or greater than 1. Our results indicate that when channel ions are primarily occupied by H2O and CO2 (i.e. F- and Cl-poor magmatic systems

  14. Changing magmatic and tectonic styles along the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana and the onset of early Paleozoic magmatism in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encarnación, John; Grunow, Anne

    1996-12-01

    Basement rocks of the Transantarctic Mountains are believed to record a change in the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana from a passive to a tectonically active margin. Widespread emplacement of calc-alkaline batholiths (Granite Harbor intrusives) occurred during the active margin phase. We present new concordant zircon and titanite U-Pb ages for these magmatic rocks in southern Victoria Land and the Scott Glacier area. Most magmatic rocks previously associated with a pre-late Early Cambrian (>530 Ma) deformational event(s) (Beardmore orogeny) have yielded younger crystallization ages. The lack of definite arc magmatism prior to ˜530 Ma suggests that deformation may have been associated with a strike or oblique-slip regime, although shallow subduction without significant arc magmatism cannot be ruled out. Local transpressional and transtensional domains may account for compressional deformation and rare alkaline and carbonatite magmatism during this early period. The oldest and most voluminous magmatic rocks were emplaced after ˜530 Ma. This magmatism has been associated with active subduction, and suggests a fundamental change in the plate boundary at ˜530 Ma. Ductile shearing of plutons and contractional deformation of supracrustal rocks after ˜530 Ma (Ross orogeny) may have been due to transpressional tectonics in an oblique subduction setting and/or a collision. Compressional deformation associated with the Ross orogeny may have ceased by ˜500 Ma along the southern Victoria Land-Scott Glacier segment of the Antarctic margin, as indicated by undeformed magmatic rocks of this age, although magmatic activity continued to at least ˜485 Ma.

  15. Neutron production in deuterium gas-puff z-pinch with outer plasma shell at current of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Frusov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Varlachev, V. A.; Turek, K.; Krasa, J.

    2015-11-01

    Z-pinch experiments at the current of about 3 MA were carried out on the GIT-12 generator. The outer plasma shell of deuterium gas-puff was generated by the system of 48 plasma guns. This configuration exhibits a high efficiency of the production of DD fusion neutrons with the yield of above 1012 neutrons produced in a single shot with the duration of about 20 ns. The maximum energy of the neutrons produced in this pulse exceeded 30 MeV. The neutron radiation was measured using scintillation TOF detectors, CR-39 nuclear track detectors, bubble detectors BD-PND and BDS-10000 and by several types of nuclear activation detectors. These diagnostic tools were used to measure the anisotropy of neutron fluence and neutron energy spectra. It allows us to estimate the total number of DD neutrons, the contribution of other nuclear reactions, the amount of scattered neutrons, and other parameters of neutron production. This work was supported by the MSMT grants LH13283, LD14089.

  16. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA potentiates purvalanol-induced apoptosis in Bax deficient HCT 116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coker-Gurkan, Ajda; Arisan, Elif Damla; Obakan, Pinar; Guvenir, Esin; Unsal, Narcin Palavan

    2014-10-15

    The purine-derived analogs, roscovitine and purvalanol are selective synthetic inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) induced cell cycle arrest and lead to apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Although a number of studies investigated the molecular mechanism of each CDK inhibitor on apoptotic cell death mechanism with their therapeutic potential, their regulatory role on autophagy is not clarified yet. In this paper, our aim was to investigate molecular mechanism of CDK inhibitors on autophagy and apoptosis in wild type (wt) and Bax deficient HCT 116 cells. Exposure of HCT 116 wt and Bax(-/-) cells to roscovitine or purvalanol for 24h decreased cell viability in dose-dependent manner. However, Bax deficient HCT 116 cells were found more resistant against purvalanol treatment compared to wt cells. We also established that both CDK inhibitors induced apoptosis through activating mitochondria-mediated pathway in caspase-dependent manner regardless of Bax expression in HCT 116 colon cancer cells. Concomitantly, we determined that purvalanol was also effective on autophagy in HCT 116 colon cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA treatment enhanced the purvalanol induced apoptotic cell death in HCT 116 Bax(-/-) cells. Our results revealed that mechanistic action of each CDK inhibitor on cell death mechanism differs. While purvalanol treatment activated apoptosis and autophagy in HCT 116 cells, roscovitine was only effective on caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Another important difference between two CDK inhibitors, although roscovitine treatment overcame Bax-mediated drug resistance in HCT 116 cells, purvalanol did not exert same effect.

  17. Post-rift magmatic evolution of the eastern North American "passive-aggressive" margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Sarah E.; Gazel, Esteban; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Bizimis, Michael; McAleer, Ryan; Biryol, C. Berk

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of passive margins requires knowledge of temporal and chemical constraints on magmatism following the transition from supercontinent to rifting, to post-rifting evolution. The Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) is an ideal study location as several magmatic pulses occurred in the 200 My following rifting. In particular, the Virginia-West Virginia region of the ENAM has experienced two postrift magmatic pulses at ˜152 Ma and 47 Ma, and thus provides a unique opportunity to study the long-term magmatic evolution of passive margins. Here we present a comprehensive set of geochemical data that includes new 40Ar/39Ar ages, major and trace-element compositions, and analysis of radiogenic isotopes to further constrain their magmatic history. The Late Jurassic volcanics are bimodal, from basanites to phonolites, while the Eocene volcanics range from picrobasalt to rhyolite. Modeling suggests that the felsic volcanics from both the Late Jurassic and Eocene events are consistent with fractional crystallization. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics for the Late Jurassic event suggests HIMU and EMII components in the magma source that we interpret as upper mantle components rather than crustal interaction. Lithospheric delamination is the best hypothesis for magmatism in Virginia/West Virginia, due to tectonic instabilities that are remnant from the long-term evolution of this margin, resulting in a "passive-aggressive" margin that records multiple magmatic events long after rifting ended.

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of biogenic carbonate and opal in deep-sea sediments from the eastern equatorial Pacific: implications for ocean history since 1.3 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Pisias, N. G.

    1999-12-01

    High-resolution records of glacial-interglacial variations in biogenic carbonate, opal, and detritus (derived from non-destructive core log measurements of density, P-wave velocity and color; r≥0.9) from 15 sediment sites in the eastern equatorial (sampling resolution is ˜1 kyr) clear response to eccentricity and precession forcing. For the Peru Basin, we generate a high-resolution (21 kyr increment) orbitally-based chronology for the last 1.3 Ma. Spectral analysis indicates that the 100 kyr cycle became dominant at roughly 1.2 Ma, 200-300 kyr earlier than reported for other paleoclimatic records. The response to orbital forcing is weaker since the Mid-Brunhes Dissolution Event (at 400 ka). A west-east reconstruction of biogenic sedimentation in the Peru Basin (four cores; 91-85°W) distinguishes equatorial and coastal upwelling systems in the western and eastern sites, respectively. A north-south reconstruction perpendicular to the equatorial upwelling system (11 cores, 11°N-8°S) shows high carbonate contents (≥50%) between 6°N and 4°S and highly variable opal contents between 2°N and 4°S. Carbonate cycles B-6, B-8, B-10, B-12, B-14, M-2, and M-6 are well developed with B-10 (430 ka) as the most prominent cycle. Carbonate highs during glacials and glacial-interglacial transitions extended up to 400 km north and south compared to interglacial or interglacial-glacial carbonate lows. Our reconstruction thus favors glacial-interglacial expansion and contraction of the equatorial upwelling system rather than shifting north or south. Elevated accumulation rates are documented near the equator from 6°N to 4°S and from 2°N to 4°S for carbonate and opal, respectively. Accumulation rates are higher during glacials and glacial-interglacial transitions in all cores, whereas increased dissolution is concentrated on Peru Basin sediments close to the carbonate compensation depth and occurred during interglacials or interglacial-glacial transitions.

  19. Time scales of pulsatory magmatic construction and solidification in Miocene subvolcanic magma systems, Eldorado Mountains, Nevada (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. S.; Miller, C. F.; Cates, N. L.; Wooden, J. L.; Means, M. A.; Ericksen, S.

    2004-05-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution geochronology applied to volcanic rocks have illuminated residence times of magma in subvolcanic magma chambers, and thereby provided valuable constraints on the evolution of upper crustal magmatic systems. Subvolcanic plutons record an important complementary physical and temporal record of magma processing and solidification of shallowly emplaced magma bodies. Our detailed field, geochemical, and isotopic investigations of the Miocene Aztec Wash and Searchlight plutons (Eldorado Mountains, Nevada) have shown that both systems experienced mafic and felsic input, both solidified primarily by vertical accumulation of solidified products, and both were vented during their life spans. However, the final captured records are different in that Searchlight is dominated by relatively homogeneous felsic cumulates, whereas Aztec Wash records repeated input and mingling of mafic and felsic magmas. New in situ ion microprobe U/Pb dating (Stanford/USGS SHRIMP-RG) of zircon (partially corroborated by U/Pb TIMS), combined with our earlier and ongoing field and isotopic studies, now reveal clear differences in the magmatic life spans and lifecycles of the two systems. U/Pb ion probe ages of 123 zircon spots from 5 samples from Aztec Wash document 200 ky of construction. Three samples from the lower middle part of the pluton are all 15.8 Ma (1σ ) errors for individual samples ~0.15 Ma; MSWD's ~1.0), and a single sample at the top is 15.6±0.2 Ma (MSWD 0.3); a late dike is 15.5±0.1 Ma (MSWD 1.0). Ages from 136 spots from 6 samples from the Searchlight pluton record 2 million years of construction (all age errors are 1σ )). The oldest dated unit is a mafic pod from lower Searchlight pluton that yielded a 206Pb/238U age of 17.7±0.3 Ma (MSWD 0.6). A granite from a thick felsic sheet in the interior of Searchlight pluton, interpreted to be the last material to crystallize, yielded a 206Pb/238U age of 16.2±0.2 (MSWD 3.5), but has a distinct 15

  20. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  1. Late Miocene to Quaternary Transition in Magmatism and Tectonics, Sierra Nevada - Basin and Range Boundary, Northern California-Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytulak, J.; Cousens, B. L.; Henry, C. D.

    2001-12-01

    During the late Miocene and early Pliocene, the Ancestral Cascades Arc (ARC) in northern CA and western NV shut off as the Mendocino triple junction migrated northward. At the same time, Basin and Range extension migrated westward into the Sierra Nevada block, with major episodes at 12 and 3 Ma. These tectonic events are reflected in a complex transition in magmatic composition and style. We are using geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar data to evaluate magma petrogenesis, the timing of volcanism, and the relationship between volcanism and tectonism in this poorly understood region of Mio-Pliocene arc volcanism. The ARC erupted highly porphyritic, pyroxene- or hornblende-plagioclase andesites to dacites, termed the Kate Peak Formation, from numerous stratovolcano complexes over basement rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith. Our new and published dating indicate activity from \\sim16 to 4 Ma. Immediately west of Reno, sequences dominated by poorly-phyric, olivine- and pyroxene-basaltic andesite, commonly termed Lousetown Formation, began to erupt as early as 10 Ma and continued to \\sim1 Ma. Early episodes, at 10.3 and 4 Ma, were contemporaneous with continued arc magmatism. Further, post-arc mafic volcanism continued in the area north of Lake Tahoe between 2.9 and 1.2 Ma. Although the change from hydrous intermediate rocks to \\sim anhydrous mafic rocks suggests a fundamental change in magmatic sources and tectonic setting, the mafic rocks have normalized incompatible element patterns and radiogenic isotope compositions that include a strong subduction component that is virtually indistinguishable from that in ARC intermediate lavas. Thus mafic and intermediate magmas, including post-arc magmas, share a common, fluid-modified, mantle wedge source. Additionally, the timing of mafic magmatism coincides only imprecisely with extension. No mafic magmas erupted before the beginning of extension at any location, but the earliest activity followed extension by \\sim2Ma

  2. Magmatic Evolution of the Skye Igneous Center, Western Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, S. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Spera, F. J.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemically complex igneous suites are the result of interplay between deep and crustal-level processes. Quantitatively modeling the contribution that crustal-level processes such as magma recharge, crustal assimilation, and fractional crystallization have is critical for developing realistic models of how magma transport/storage systems evolve. The Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, and Fractional Crystallization simulator (EC-RAFC, Spera & Bohrson, 2001, 2002; Bohrson & Spera, 2001, 2003) provides a means to model thermal, compositional, and magma volume data for complex magmatic systems. The Skye igneous center, western Scotland, spanning the period 60.53 +/- 0.08 Ma - 53.5 +/- 0.8 Ma and characterized by a well-documented suite of lavas and intrusive rocks of picritic to granitic composition, is the first natural data set to which the EC-RAFC model has been applied in detail. Based on analysis of published field, stratigraphic, petrographic, and chemical data, we propose that the Skye Tertiary magmatic sequence be divided into four petrogenetically related lineages. EC-RAFC results indicate that each lineage is characterized by a unique parental magma that has undergone distinct episodes of RAFC. Model results, constrained by published data on the nature of the crust beneath Skye, indicate that the character of the assimilant changes upsection, suggesting that the associated magma reservoirs migrated to shallower levels as the magmatic system matured. The magmatic products of each group also record the fingerprint of multiple episodes of magma recharge, where the character of the recharge magma also evolves with time. The image of the magma transport system that emerges is one in which magma is initially intruded at lower crustal levels and undergoes a distinct RAFC episode. Residual magma from this event then migrates to shallower levels, where mid-crustal wallrock is assimilated; recharge magma is characterized by increasingly crustal chemical and

  3. Characteristic Time Scales of Characteristic Magmatic Processes and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    Every specific magmatic process, regardless of spatial scale, has an associated characteristic time scale. Time scales associated with crystals alone are rates of growth, dissolution, settling, aggregation, annealing, and nucleation, among others. At the other extreme are the time scales associated with the dynamics of the entire magmatic system. These can be separated into two groups: those associated with system genetics (e.g., the production and transport of magma, establishment of the magmatic system) and those due to physical characteristics of the established system (e.g., wall rock failure, solidification front propagation and instability, porous flow). The detailed geometry of a specific magmatic system is particularly important to appreciate; although generic systems are useful, care must be taken to make model systems as absolutely realistic as possible. Fuzzy models produce fuzzy science. Knowledge of specific time scales is not necessarily useful or meaningful unless the hierarchical context of the time scales for a realistic magmatic system is appreciated. The age of a specific phenocryst or ensemble of phenocrysts, as determined from isotopic or CSD studies, is not meaningful unless something can be ascertained of the provenance of the crystals. For example, crystal size multiplied by growth rate gives a meaningful crystal age only if it is from a part of the system that has experienced semi-monotonic cooling prior to chilling; crystals entrained from a long-standing cumulate bed that were mechanically sorted in ascending magma may not reveal this history. Ragged old crystals rolling about in the system for untold numbers of flushing times record specious process times, telling more about the noise in the system than the life of typical, first generation crystallization processes. The most helpful process-related time scales are those that are known well and that bound or define the temporal style of the system. Perhaps the most valuable of these

  4. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2014-04-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation, altering the structure, porosity and permeability of the material, and the magnetic signature typifies local electric currents in faults. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV. Frictional melting of Soufrière Hills andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) thought to be required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is a common consequence of seismogenic magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may govern the ascent of magma in the upper conduit.

  5. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2013-10-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes (Cashman et al., 2008; Kennedy and Russell, 2011) and of thermal anomalies (Kendrick et al., 2012), key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation with an isothermal remanent magnetisation signature that typifies local electric currents in faults. The pseudotachylyte presents an impermeable barrier, which is thought to have influenced the degassing pathway. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV (Neuberg et al., 2006). Frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is an inevitable consequence of seismogenic, conduit-dwelling magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may have an important influence on magma ascent dynamics.

  6. Magmatic and tectonic modification of convergent margins: An example from southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, David W.

    strike variations in pluton chemistry, spacing and thermal characteristics can be explained by oblique-ridge subduction along a curved continental margin. Inland, arc magmatism exhibits a flare-up in activity that tracks eastward migration of magmatism in the forearc, but precedes it by 1-3 Ma.

  7. Long-lasting Cadomian magmatic activity along an active northern Gondwana margin: U-Pb zircon and Sr-Nd isotopic evidence from the Brunovistulian Domain, eastern Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soejono, Igor; Janoušek, Vojtěch; Žáčková, Eliška; Sláma, Jiří; Konopásek, Jiří; Machek, Matěj; Hanžl, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Cadomian magmatic complexes of the Brunovistulian Domain crop out at the eastern termination of the Bohemian Massif. However, the age, nature and geotectonic affinity of some of pre-Variscan (meta-)igneous rock complexes from this domain are still unknown. Geochronological and geochemical study of the granitic rocks across the Brunovistulian Domain reveals new information about the timing and nature of this magmatic activity originally situated along the northern margin of Gondwana. Zircon U-Pb data (601 ± 3 Ma, Brno Massif; 634 ± 6 Ma, paraautochtonous core of the Svratka Dome; 568 ± 3 Ma, Bíteš orthogneiss) from the allochtonous Moravicum indicate the prolonged magmatic activity within the Brunovistulian Domain during the Ediacaran. The major- and trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic signatures show heterogeneous geochemical characteristics of the granitic rocks and suggest a magmatic-arc geotectonic setting. The two-stage Depleted Mantle Nd model ages (c. 1.3-2.0 Ga) indicate derivation of the granitic rocks from a relatively primitive crustal source, as well as from an ancient and evolved continental crust of the Brunovistulian Domain. These results constrain the magmatic-arc activity to c. 635-570 Ma and provide a further evidence for a long-lived (at least c. 65 Myr) and likely episodic subduction-related magmatism at the northern margin of Gondwana. The presence of granitic intrusions derived from variously mature crustal sources at different times suggests heterogeneous crustal segments to having been involved in the magmatic-arc system during its multistage evolution.

  8. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Epidote is a major magmatic mineral in tonalite and granodiorite in a belt coextensive with the Mesozoic accreted terranes between northern California and southeastern Alaska. Textural and chemical evidence indicates that epidote crystallized as a relatively late but magmatic mineral that formed through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations concur with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total pressure. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high pressures, corresponding to lower crustal depths, under fairly oxidizing conditions. 23 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  9. Updated Magmatic Flux Rate Estimates for the Hawaii Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have estimated the magmatic flux rate along the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain using a variety of methods and arriving at different results. These flux rate estimates have weaknesses because of incomplete data sets and different modeling assumptions, especially for the youngest portion of the chain (<3 Ma). While they generally agree on the 1st order features, there is less agreement on the magnitude and relative size of secondary flux variations. Some of these differences arise from the use of different methodologies, but the significance of this variability is difficult to assess due to a lack of confidence bounds on the estimates obtained with these disparate methods. All methods introduce some error, but to date there has been little or no quantification of error estimates for the inferred melt flux, making an assessment problematic. Here we re-evaluate the melt flux for the Hawaii plume with the latest gridded data sets (SRTM30+ and FAA 21.1) using several methods, including the optimal robust separator (ORS) and directional median filtering techniques (DiM). We also compute realistic confidence limits on the results. In particular, the DiM technique was specifically developed to aid in the estimation of surface loads that are superimposed on wider bathymetric swells and it provides error estimates on the optimal residuals. Confidence bounds are assigned separately for the estimated surface load (obtained from the ORS regional/residual separation techniques) and the inferred subsurface volume (from gravity-constrained isostasy and plate flexure optimizations). These new and robust estimates will allow us to assess which secondary features in the resulting melt flux curve are significant and should be incorporated when correlating melt flux variations with other geophysical and geochemical observations.

  10. Properties of truly magmatic epidote

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.W.; Vance, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Euhedral phenocrysts of prismatic epidote up to 4mm in length are present (2 modal %) in a sample of porphyritic rhyodacite (69.5% SiO/sub 2/) in the authors undergraduate teaching collection. The sample is believed to be a Tertiary dike-rock from Ward, Boulder County, Colorado. Phenocrysts of corroded quartz, oscillatory-zoned plagioclase (An30-40), kinked and bent biotite, and very pale yellow pleochroic epidote (Fe/(Fe+Al) = 0.21, 2V(-) large, lamellar twinning on (100)) are set in a finely crystalline groundmass of quartz, potash feldspar (Or92) and oligoclase (An26). Rare small euhedral garnets (Al54Pyl3Gr22 Sp8An3) are enclosed in plagioclase and biotite phenocrysts. Some of the epidote prisms have very pale brown allanitic cores, which are oscillatory-zoned and in part embayed. The bulk of the epidote, however, is poor in allanite component. Critical igneous textural features of the allanite-poor epidote are: euhedral form; euhedral oscillatory zoning; clustering of phenocrysts in synneusis relation; and the presence of euhedral inclusions of zircon that apatite. Since phenocrysts constitute only 26 modal % of the rock, crystallization of epidote, in fact, took place relatively early in the rock's cooling history. A description of this rock is provided as a petrographic guide to those using allegedly magmatic epidote in silicic plutonic rocks as an indicator of minimum pressure of crystallization.

  11. The origin of hydrous, high-δ18O voluminous volcanism: diverse oxygen isotope values and high magmatic water contents within the volcanic record of Klyuchevskoy volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Sara; Bindeman, Ilya; Wallace, Paul; Ponomareva, Vera; Portnyagin, Maxim

    2009-02-01

    Klyuchevskoy volcano, in Kamchatka’s subduction zone, is one of the most active arc volcanoes in the world and contains some of the highest δ18O values for olivines and basalts. We present an oxygen isotope and melt inclusion study of olivine phenocrysts in conjunction with major and trace element analyses of 14C- and tephrochronologically-dated tephra layers and lavas spanning the eruptive history of Klyuchevskoy. Whole-rock and groundmass analyses of tephra layers and lava samples demonstrate that both high-Mg (7-12.5 wt% MgO) and high-Al (17-19 wt% Al2O3, 3-6.5 wt% MgO) basalt and basaltic andesite erupted coevally from the central vent and flank cones. Individual and bulk olivine δ18O range from normal MORB values of 5.1‰ to values as high as 7.6‰. Likewise, tephra and lava matrix glass have high-δ18O values of 5.8-8.1‰. High-Al basalts dominate volumetrically in Klyuchevskoy’s volcanic record and are mostly high in δ18O. High-δ18O olivines and more normal-δ18O olivines occur in both high-Mg and high-Al samples. Most olivines in either high-Al or high-Mg basalts are not in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with their host glasses, and Δ18Oolivine-glass values are out of equilibrium by up to 1.5‰. Olivines are also out of Fe-Mg equilibrium with the host glasses, but to a lesser extent. Water concentrations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from five tephra samples range from 0.4 to 7.1 wt%. Melt inclusion CO2 concentrations vary from below detection (<50 ppm) to 1,900 ppm. These values indicate depths of crystallization up to ~17 km (5 kbar). The variable H2O and CO2 concentrations likely reflect crystallization of olivine and entrapment of inclusions in ascending and degassing magma. Oxygen isotope and Fe-Mg disequilibria together with melt inclusion data indicate that olivine was mixed and recycled between high-Al and high-Mg basaltic melts and cumulates, and Fe-Mg and δ18O re-equilibration processes were incomplete. Major and trace elements in

  12. Cryogenian alkaline magmatism in the Southern Granulite Terrane, India: Petrology, geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Ram Mohan, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Shaji, E.; Satyanarayanan, M.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) in India preserves the records of the formation and recycling of continental crust from Mesoarchean through Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic and Cambrian, involving multiple subduction-accretion-collision associated with major orogenic cycles. A chain of unmetamorphosed and undeformed alkaline magmatic intrusions occurs along the northern margin of the SGT aligned along paleo-suture zones. Here we investigate two representative plutons from this suite, the Angadimogar syenite (AM) and the Peralimala alkali granite (PM) through field, petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf studies. Magma mixing and mingling textures and mineral assemblages typical of alkaline rocks are displayed by these plutons. The whole-rock major and trace element data characterize their alkaline nature. In trace element discrimination diagrams, the AM rocks straddle between the VAG (volcanic-arc granites) and WPG (within plate granites) fields with most of the samples confined to the VAG field, whereas the PM rocks are essentially confined to the WPG field. The diversity in some of the geochemical features between the two plutons is interpreted to be the reflection of source heterogeneities. Most zircon grains from the AM and PM plutons display oscillatory zoning typical of magmatic crystallization although some grains, particularly those from the PM pluton, show core-rim structures with dark patchy zoned cores surrounded by irregular thin rims resulting from fluid alteration. The weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of the magmatic zircons from three samples of the AM syenite are in the range of 781.8 ± 3.8 Ma to 798 ± 3.6 Ma and those from two samples of the PM alkali granite yield ages of 797.5 ± 3.7 Ma and 799 ± 6.2 Ma. A mafic magmatic enclave from the AM pluton shows weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 795 ± 3.3 Ma. The AM and PM plutons also carry rare xeneocrystic zircons which define upper intercept concordia ages of 3293 ± 13 Ma and 2530

  13. Magmatism and the Shallowing of the Chilean Flatslab in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magmatic history of the flatslab region between the Central and Southern Andean volcanic zones reflects shallowing of the slab, lithospheric thinning, narrowing of the asthenospheric wedge, crustal thickening and forearc removal by subduction erosion. Newly revised contours on the northern margin of the modern flatslab (Mulcahy et al. 2014) show the flattest part extends from ~28° to 33°S and is bounded by Pleistocene volcanic activity. An eastward broadening of the magmatic arc began after 18 Ma as westward drift of South America accelerated, but the most distinctive retroarc magmatism occurred after near normal subduction of the southward drifting Juan Fernandez Ridge began at ~11 Ma and ended as magmatism ceased in the Pampean ranges, ~ 700 km east of the trench at ~4.7 Ma. Recent seismic work in the retroarc area indicate a ~60 km thick crust under the Precordillera fold-thrust belt with transitions at ~20 and ~40 km that are considered to be the top of crystalline basement and an eclogitic facies transition. Chemical constraints from ~15-7 Ma magmatic rocks suggest eclogization is related to crustal thickening over the shallowing slab in accord with field relations for major thrusting in the region by ~8-7 Ma. High Ba/Th ratios in <9 Ma volcanic rocks are interpreted to reflect phengite breakdown in the mantle wedge with the fluids facilitating eclogization of the lower crust. Evidence for mantle melt contributions in the magmas up until ~7 Ma comes from more primitive isotopic values in 1088-1251 Ma amphibolite and granulite facies xenoliths (eNd = 0 to -3; 87Sr/86Sr =704-0.710) than in Miocene volcanic rocks (eNd = 0-1.7; 0.70325-0.70345; zircon eHf ~ 0). From ~8 to 3 Ma, the active volcanic arc front near 28°S and 33°S was translated ~ 40-50 km eastward in a suspected response to forearc removal by subduction erosion. Given the position of the arc and distance to the trench, the same amount of forearc was likely removed in the intervening flatslab

  14. Sr isotopic microsampling of magmatic rocks; a review (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Sr isotopes have been used since the 1960s as powerful tracers of source for igneous rocks. In the past 10 years in-situ isotopic microsampling has afforded us tremendous progress in our capacity to understand magmatic processes. This progress is underpinned by analytical advances particularly in sample extraction through laser or micromill and in multicollector mass spectrometer improvements to sensitivity and precision. Perhaps the biggest surprise was the recognition in the 1990s that young magmatic rocks are commonly isotopically heterogeneous at the component (inter- or intra- crystal) scale. Given that melting and fractionation do not affect 87Sr/86Sr we would not a priori expect isotopic variations within or among crystals in a young igneous rock. This observation alone attests to open system behavior in magmas, and tells us that many of the crystals have been mechanically aggregated and not grown directly from the melt in which they are found solidified (a conclusion that can also commonly be drawn from cursory petrographic examination). This recognition in turn means that we can make use of the crystals as recorders of the isotopic environments in which they crystallise: If a crystal grows progressively from a melt which changes its isotopic composition through processes such as contamination and mixing, then the only record of the melt evolution is in the core-rim compositions of the crystals - analogous to the environmental record of tree rings. Plagioclase crystals in mafic enclaves from Lassen (CA) and Purico-Chascon (Chile), for instance, have isotopic records that reflect origination from the more silicic host. Core-rim records of evolution can also be integrated with textural measurements. At Stromboli we have shown how isotopic zoning correlates with crystal size distribution. The detailed records of single crystals can be complemented by multi crystal core analyses which can be used to distinguish specific populations. This approach was used on

  15. Crystals and Crystals: On the Mythology of Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B.

    2008-12-01

    The intimate records of the deep functioning of magmatic systems reside in the temporal and spatial records of magma flux, composition and crystal load. The records for a single system are piecemeal: Plutons show good spatial records, but poor temporal records. Volcanoes give through lava sequences good temporal records, but no spatial context. Because of this dichotomy, two, almost mutually exclusive, branches of magmatology have developed, whereas in Nature there is only a single process. The processes envisioned in these schools necessary to deliver the end rock record are distinct. It is our tools and historic perspectives that have steered the science, not the subject itself. Due to this approach an almost mythical conception of how magmas function has become commonplace. The circumvention of this dilemma rests in carefully evaluating the records on hand in the light of a broad understanding of the fundamental mechanics of how magma lives and dies. It is these basic principles that promise to unify plutonic and volcanic evidence to reveal the full nature of magmatism on all scales. The two most basic features of all magmatic processes are the universal presence of solidification fronts and the presence or absence of a crystal cargo. Almost without exception (e.g., shallow pressure quenching) all first generation crystals grow in marginal solidification fronts (SFs) bordering all magmas. The package of isotherms bounded by the liquidus and solidus define SFs, which propagate in response to the rate of cooling. All physical and chemical processes occurring within SFs compete with the advancement or retreat of solidification. SFs are governed by crystallinity regimes: Suspension Zone (<25 % xtals), Capture Front (~25 %), Mush Zone (25-55%), Rigidity Front (~55%; Critical Crystallinity), and Rigid Crust Zone (>55% xtals). Magmas are laced with nuclei that multiply and grow when overtaken. Crystal growth rates are bounded; tiny crystals reside at the front of SFs

  16. Magmatic gas scrubbing: Implications for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Gerlach, T.M.; Reed, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the abundance of SO2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915??C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25??C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H2S(g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO2(g) and most HCl(g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl(g) degassing from pH 100 t/d (tons per day) of SO2(g) in addition to CO2(g) and H2S(g) should be taken as a criterion of magma intrusion. Finally, the modeling suggests that the interpretation of gas-ratio data requires a case-by-case evaluation since ratio changes can often be produced by several mechanisms; nevertheless, several gas ratios may provide useful indices for monitoring the drying out of gas pathways. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. The magmatic history of the Vetas-California mining district, Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla Figueroa, Luis C.; Bissig, Thomas; Valencia, Víctor; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The Vetas-California Mining District (VCMD), located in the central part of the Santander Massif (Colombian Eastern Cordillera), based on U-Pb dating of zircons, records the following principal tectono-magmatic events: (1) the Grenville Orogenic event and high grade metamorphism and migmatitization between ˜1240 and 957 Ma; (2) early Ordovician calc-alkalic magmatism, which was synchronous with the Caparonensis-Famatinian Orogeny (˜477 Ma); (3) middle to late Ordovician post-collisional calc-alkalic magmatism (˜466-436 Ma); (4) late Triassic to early Jurassic magmatism between ˜204 and 196 Ma, characterized by both S- and I-type calc-alkalic intrusions and; (5) a late Miocene shallowly emplaced intermediate calc-alkaline intrusions (10.9 ± 0.2 and 8.4 ± 0.2 Ma). The presence of even younger igneous rocks is possible, given the widespread magmatic-hydrothermal alteration affecting all rock units in the area. The igneous rocks from the late Triassic-early Jurassic magmatic episodes are the volumetrically most important igneous rocks in the study area and in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera. They can be divided into three groups based on their field relationships, whole rock geochemistry and geochronology. These are early leucogranites herein termed Alaskites-I (204-199 Ma), Intermediate rocks (199-198 Ma), and late leucogranites, herein referred to as Alaskites-II (198-196 Ma). This Mesozoic magmatism is reflecting subtle changes in the crustal stress in a setting above an oblique subduction of the Panthalassa plate beneath Pangea. The lower Cretaceous siliciclastic Tambor Formation has detrital zircons of the same age populations as the metamorphic and igneous rocks present in the study area, suggesting that the provenance is related to the erosion of these local rocks during the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous, implying a local supply of sediments to the local depositional basins.

  18. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three epidote-bearing tonalitic plutons from the North American Cordillera were studied in detail. These three plutons have close petrographic and chemical similarities. Epidote is always euhedral against biotite but shows highly embayed, vermiform contacts with plagioclase and quartz. Rounded to highly embayed hornblendes are enclosed in epidote as well as in magmatic plagioclase. The pistacite content of epidote, atomic Fe3+/(Fe3+ + Al), is approx 23-27%. These and other textural relations, the lack of alteration of minerals, and the involvement of epidote in flow banding show that the epidote is magmatic, crystallized later through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations agree with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total P. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high P, corresponding with lower crustal depth, under fairly oxidizing conditions.-L.di H.

  19. Rb-Sr and oxygen isotopic study of alkalic rocks from the Trans-Pecos magmatic province, Texas: Implications for the petrogenesis and hydrothermal alteration of continental alkalic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Malek, D.J.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1988-10-01

    Rb-Sr and O isotopic data for mid-Tertiary alkalic rocks from the Trans-Pecos magmatic province of west Texas demonstrate that hydrothermal alteration and fluid/rock (cation exchange) interactions have affected the isotope geochemistry of these rocks. Strontium and O isotopic data for late-stage minerals in an alkali basalt (hawaiite) still record two episodes of fluid/rock interactions. These data suggest that later meteoric fluids introduced Sr with a Cretaceous marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio into minerals with significant cation exchange capacity. Dilute HCl leaching experiments demonstrate the removal of this labile or exchangeable Sr from the alkali basalt. Rb-Sr isotopic data for the leached alkali basalt and handpicked calcite record a crystallization age of 42 Ma, consistent with K-Ar data for an unaltered alkali basalt (hawaiite) dike from the same area (42.6 {plus minus} 1.3 Ma). Leaching experiments on one phonolite suggest the Sr isotopic variability in unleached phonolite and nepheline trachyte samples may be attributed to Sr in secondary calcite and zeolites, which have an upper Cretaceous marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio. Rb-Sr isotopic data for leached phonolite and sanidine separate yield an age of 36.5 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma, within analytical uncertainty of a K-Ar biotite age (36.0 {plus minus} 1.1 Ma) of another phonolite. These leaching experiments demonstrate that the Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of hydrothermally-altered continental alkalic rocks may be significantly improved, providing more reliable geochronologic and isotopic tracer information necessary in constructing precise models of mantle sources.

  20. Seismic image of the Mount Spurr magmatic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimenisonal P-wave velocity structure of Moutn Spurr is determined to depths of 10km by tomographic inversion of 3754 first-arriving P-wave times from local earthquakes recorded by a permanent network of 11 seismographs. Results show a prominent low-velocity zone extending from the surface to 3-4km below sea level beneath the southeastern flank of Crater Peak, spatially coincident with a geothermal system. P-wave velocities in this low-velocity zone are approximately 20% slower than those in the shallow crystalline basement rocks. Beneath Crater Peak an approximately 3km-wide zone of relative low velocities correlates with a near-vertical band of seismicity, suggestive of a magmatic conduit. No large low-velocity zone indicative of a magma chamber occurs within the upper 10km of the crust. These observations are consistent with petrologic and geochemical studies suggesting that Crater Peak magmas originate in the lower crust or upper mantle and have s short residence time in the shallow crust. Earthquakes relocaetd using the three-dimensional velocity structure correlate well with surface geology and other geophysical observations; thus, they provide additional constraints on the kinematics of the Mount Spurr magmatic system.

  1. Bidirectional feedback observed between a magmatic intrusion and shallow earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Susanna; Elliott, John; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Biggs, Juliet; Mothes, Patricia; Jarrín, Paúl; Yépez, Marco; Aguaiza, Santiago; Lundgren, Paul; Samsonov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Moderate volcano-tectonic earthquakes (M 5-6) during volcanic unrest are unusual, and tend to be associated with major stress perturbations to the crust, occurring during episodes of rifting or the onset of volcanic eruptions. The feedback from such events may be positive, easing magma ascent and eruption, or, as we demonstrate here, negative, hindering any further magma movement. We present measurements of deformation at Chiles-Cerro Negro volcanoes on the Ecuador-Colombian border. There was previously no record of historical activity at either volcano, but between 2013 and early 2015 there were three episodes of unrest characterised by swarms of volcano-tectonic earthquakes of increasing energy and duration and thought to be associated with the hydrothermal system. In October 2014, magmatic processes not only caused many thousands of small earthquakes per day, but culminated in a Mw 5.6 earthquake located on a system of active tectonic faults that last ruptured in 1868. We find that inflation of a mid-crustal magmatic source ~10 km south of the volcanoes ceased abruptly at the time of the earthquake, after which time the rate of seismicity also began a gradual decline. The Chiles-Cerro Negro unrest is therefore an interesting example of magma ascent triggering a moderate earthquake on a tectonic fault and subsequently being inhibited by co-seismic stress changes. This is an important observation for the interpretation of moderate earthquakes during volcanic unrest in terms of evolving hazard.

  2. Igneous geology of the Carlin trend, Nevada: The importance of Eocene magmatism in gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressel, Michael Walter, Jr.

    Igneous rocks of five ages are present in the Carlin trend, Nevada, and include: (1) Paleozoic basalt of the Roberts Mountains allochthon, (2) the Jurassic (˜158 Ma) Goldstrike intrusive complex, which includes the Goldstrike diorite laccolith and abundant dikes and sills, (3) a Cretaceous (112 Ma) granite stock, (4) lavas and intrusions of the Emigrant Pass volcanic field and widespread epizonal plugs and dikes of Eocene (˜40-36 Ma) age that range from rhyolite through basalt, and (5) Miocene (15 Ma) rhyolite lava and tuff. Jurassic and Eocene igneous rocks are by far the most important volumetrically and are spatially associated with nearly all ore deposits of the Carlin trend. This study focuses on the field relations, isotopic dating, and geochemistry of Eocene dikes that intrude sedimentary rocks in many deposits of the Carlin trend, because they are the youngest pre-mineral rocks and have simpler alteration histories than other host rocks. In the Beast, Genesis, Deep Star, Betze-Post, Rodeo-Goldbug, Meikle-Griffin, and Dee-Storm deposits, Eocene dikes are altered, commonly mineralized, and locally constitute ore. Gold-bearing dikes and sedimentary rocks have similar ore mineralogy, including arsenian pyrite, marcasite, and arsenopyrite, with late barite and stibnite. At Beast, as much as half the ore is hosted in a 37.3 Ma rhyolite dike. Post-gold alunite is ˜18.6 Ma. At Meikle and Griffin, porphyritic dacite dikes yield concordant U/Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar biotite emplacement ages of ˜39.2 Ma, and illite from the same QSP-altered dacite, with as much 9 ppm Au, yields similar, although imprecise 40Ar/39Ar ages. Thus, gold mineralization at these deposits closely followed emplacement of Eocene dikes. Carlin-type gold deposits in northeastern Nevada have been variously interpreted as partly syngenetic with Paleozoic carbonate rocks, products of Mesozoic contraction and metamorphism with or without significant magmatism, and of Tertiary age and related or

  3. Remelting and Remobilization in a Magmatic Arc: the St Peter Suite, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symington, N.; Weinberg, R. F.; Hasalova, P.

    2013-12-01

    Thermo-mechanical models of magmatic arcs suggest that intermittent intrusion of magma batches should lead to remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks as a result of fluctuations in temperature and water content. However, examples of remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks, formed during arc-building, are surprisingly rare. We investigate the evolution of magmatic rocks of the Palaeoproterozoic St Peter Suite, in the Gawler Craton, South Australia. This suite records multiple intrusions, magma hybridization, and the remelting and remobilization of these intrusions to form migmatites and newly-formed leucocratic magmas. In this paper we detail first how multiple magma batches interact with one another as liquids and mushes during syn-magmatic deformation phases, and then detail the nature of migmatites resulting from anatexis of these same magmatic rocks and the resulting channel ways that allowed for magma remobilization. LA-ICP/MS U/Pb zircon dating yielded crystallization ages of 1647×12 Ma for an early dioritic-to-granitic suite, and 1604×12 Ma for a later magmatic suite of broadly similar composition. Both these suites underwent anatectic events. Titanite from late-formed leucosomes found within D2 shear zones in the older suite, yielded SHRIMP U/Pb age of 1605×7 Ma, within error of the age of the younger suite. We therefore infer that intrusion, crystallization and remelting/remobilization of this younger suite of rocks occurred within 10-15 M.yr. We propose that the St Peter Suite exposures represent a frozen-in record of a continuous, multi-stage, repetitive process, common to the core of arcs where multiple magma intrusions drive multiple hybridization events and fluctuations in temperature and water-content trigger remelting and remobilization of the more fractionated sectors of earlier intrusive. Thus, the St Peter Suite record many of the key processes expected in arcs, including the prediction that early intrusive arc

  4. The Lesser Antilles volcanic chain: a study in arc magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, R.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Heath, E.

    2000-03-01

    The Lesser Antilles volcanic arc is related to subduction of the American plate under the Caribbean plate. The rate of subduction is low, 2-4 cm a -1, and this has been reflected, at least over the past 0.1 Ma, in relatively low magma production rates (3-5 km 3 Ma -1 km -1 of arc). The arc is segmented; a northern segment trends 330° and the Benioff zone dips at 50-60°, whilst the southern segment trends 020° and the dip varies from 45° to 50° in the north to vertical in the south. Pleistocene-Recent volcanism (<2 Ma) occurs in narrow zones less than 10 km wide and seems to define three segments, the break between the central and southern segments being in the same location as the kink in the Benioff zone. Magma production over the past 0.1 Ma has been higher in islands of the central segment (8-40 km 3) than in the northern and southern segments (0-5 km 3); the variations may be related to the degree of obliquity of subduction along the arc. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the arc are divided into low-K and medium-K series, each of which contains basaltic (MgO>6%) members ranging from hypersthene- to nepheline-normative. It is likely that all the Lesser Antilles eruptives had picritic (or, more rarely, ankaramitic), possibly silica-undersaturated, primary magmas. The medium-K rocks show wide variations in trace-element and isotopic characteristics. A generalised sequence of phenocryst assemblages, applicable to both groups, is: olivine+spinel±clinopyroxene→olivine+spinel+clinopyroxene+plagioclase→plagioclase+clinopyroxene+titanomagnetite+orthopyroxene±amphibole±quartz. Phenocryst crystallisation temperatures were: basalts 1180-1130°C; basaltic andesites 1060-1050°C; and andesites-dacites 960-740°C. Magmas inferred to be primary to the eruptive suites equilibrated within the spinel peridotite facies in the mantle wedge at pressures between 1.5 and 3 GPa. fO 2 conditions of magma crystallisation were rather oxidising (NNO +0.5 to NNO +3). Estimates of

  5. Simulating the Thermochemical Magmatic and Tectonic Evolution of Venus's Mantle and Lithosphere: Intrusive vs. Extrusive Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul; Armann, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Here we extend the models of [1]. Numerical convection models of the thermochemical evolution of Venus are compared to present-day topography and geoid, recent resurfacing history and surface deformation. The models include melting, magmatism, decaying heat-producing elements, core cooling, realistic temperature-dependent viscosity and either stagnant lid or episodic lithospheric overturn. In [1] it was found that in stagnant lid convection the dominant mode of heat loss is magmatic heat pipe, which requires massive magmatism and produces very thick crust, inconsistent with observations. Partitioning of heat-producing elements into the crust helps but does not help enough. Episodic lid overturn interspersed by periods of quiescence effectively loses Venus's heat while giving lower rates of volcanism and a thinner crust. Calculations predict 5-8 overturn events over Venus's history, each lasting ~150 Myr, initiating in one place and then spreading globally. During quiescent periods convection keeps the lithosphere thin. Magmatism keeps the mantle temperature constant over Venus's history. Crustal recycling occurs by entrainment in stagnant lid convection, and by lid overturn in episodic mode. Venus-like amplitudes of topography and geoid can be produced in either stagnant or episodic modes, with a viscosity profile that is Earth-like but shifted to higher values. The basalt density inversion below the olivine-perovskite transition causes compositional stratification around 730 km; breakdown of this layering increases episodicity but far less than episodic lid overturn. The classical stagnant lid mode with interior temperature rheological temperature scale lower than TCMB is not reached because mantle temperature is controlled by magmatism while the core cools slowly from a superheated start. Core heat flow decreases with time, possibly shutting off the dynamo, particularly in episodic cases. Here we extend [1] by considering intrusive magmatism as an alternative to

  6. The Upper Miocene magmatism of the Island of Elba (Central Italy): compositional characteristics, petrogenesis and implications for the origin of the Tuscany Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Giampiero; Peccerillo, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Late Miocene intrusive magmatism of the Island of Elba, Tuscany (central Italy), consists of stocks, laccoliths, sills, and dikes showing dominant monzogranite and granodiorite compositions, with minor leucogranitic dike-sill complexes, aplites and pegmatites. A few mafic rocks occur as dikes, and as microgranular enclaves hosted inside the main intrusions. The Elba magmatism belongs to the Tuscan Magmatic Province, an 8.5 to 0.3 Ma old association of mafic to felsic rocks, of mantle and crustal origin, cropping out in Tuscany and northern Latium. Major and trace element abundances of Elba rocks are extremely variable, testifying to complex origin and evolutionary history for magmas. 87Sr/86Sr (~ 0.708-0.723) and 143Nd/144Nd (~0.5121-0.5124) are close or within the field of upper continental crust, with mafic dikes showing the lowest Sr- and the highest Nd-isotope ratios. Petrological, geochemical and textural data of Elba igneous rocks are better explained by invoking a leading role for multiple mixing processes between crust-derived felsic magmas and mafic-intermediate melts of ultimate mantle origin, accompanied by fractional crystallisation. Proxies of crustal anatectic melts are represented by some highly radiogenic-Sr rocks from northern Monte Capanne pluton. Crustal magmas were formed by melting of sedimentary rocks, likely metagreywakes, at pressures exceeding 0.3 GPa. Mafic-intermediate magmas have calcalkaline to shoshonitic compositions and originated in an anomalous mantle, moderately contaminated by siliceous sediments. Selective enrichments in Sr, Ba and LREE are shown by some intermediate rocks (Orano dikes), revealing the occurrence of a distinct magma type at Elba. Similar compositions are also observed at Capraia island, San Vincenzo and Campiglia (southern Tuscany), suggesting a regional relevance for this magma type. Sr-Ba-LREE-rich rocks do not show obvious genetic relationships with other Tuscany magmas and may represent a distinct end

  7. Aspects of the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Gottfried, D.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1973-01-01

    Bismuth has been determined in 74 rocks from a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite, two calc-alkaline batholith suites and in 66 mineral separates from one of the batholiths. Average bismuth contents, weighted for rock type, of the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite, the Southern California batholith and the Idaho batholith are, 32, 50 and 70 ppb respectively. All three bodies demonstrate an enrichment of bismuth in residual magmas with magmatic differentiation. Bismuth is greatly enriched (relative to the host rock) in the calcium-rich accessory minerals, apatite and sphene, but other mineral analyses show that a Bi-Ca association is of little significance to the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth. Most of the bismuth, in the Southern California batholith at least, occurs in a trace mineral phase (possibly sulfides) present as inclusions in the rock-forming minerals. ?? 1973.

  8. Variations in magmatic processes among igneous asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Six asteroid classes (types V, E, A, R, M, S) are composed primarily of differentiated assemblages produced by igneous processes within their parent planetesimals. These are identified by surface materials which deviate from a chondritic composition to a degree that require igneous chemical fractionation processes. There are large variations among these igneous asteroids in the peak temperatures attained, in the efficiency of magmatic phase separation, and in the depth within the original parent body exposed at the present surface. These variations provide important constraints on the nature of asteroidal heating events, on the differentiation processes within small planetary bodies, and on the disruption of those parent bodies. Variations due to depth within the parent body and due to degree of magmatic differentiation are detailed.

  9. Late Triassic syn-exhumation magmatism in central Qiangtang, Tibet: Evidence from the Sangehu adakitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Wang, Bao-di; Ma, Long; Gao, Rui; Chen, Li; Li, Xiao-bo; Wang, Li-quan

    2016-12-01

    The geodynamic setting of Late Triassic magmatic activity along the Longmu Co-Shuanghu suture zone (LSSZ) in central Qiangtang, Tibet is a matter of debate. This paper presents zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages, zircon Hf isotopic compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data for the Sangehu (SGH) granitic intrusion in central Qiangtang, and addresses the petrogenesis of Late Triassic magmatism, and the history of collision between the northern and southern Qiangtang terranes. The SGH pluton consists mainly of biotite adamellite with mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs), and small amounts of K-feldspar granite. The biotite adamellite, MMEs, and K-feldspar granite give ages of 207.8 ± 3.0 Ma, 212.4 ± 31 Ma, and 211.6 ± 3.8 Ma, respectively. The MMEs show magmatic textures and acicular apatite, and are coeval with the host biotite adamellite, suggesting they were produced by magma mixing. All samples from the SGH pluton show high Sr and low Y contents, and positive Eu anomalies, similar to adakitic rocks. The high K2O contents and low Mg#, Cr, and Ni contents, and enriched Hf isotopic characteristics of the zircons indicate that these magmas were derived from the partial melting of thickened crust. However, the whole-rock geochemical data and zircon Hf isotopic compositions also reveal heterogeneity at the source. The combined magmatic and metamorphic records suggest that Triassic magmatic activity in central Qiangtang was closely related to the collision of the northern and southern Qiangtang terranes. The large-scale Late Triassic (225-200 Ma) magmatic event in central Qiangtang may have resulted from the breakoff of the Longmu Co-Shuanghu Tethys Ocean lithospheric slab in the early Late Triassic (236-230 Ma). The Late Triassic magmatic rocks, including adakitic rocks, are coeval with retrograde high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks in central Qiangtang, and show characteristics of syn-exhumation magmatism. The early adakitic rocks (>220 Ma

  10. Magmatic responses to Late Cretaceous through Oligocene tectonic evolution of the western Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E.; Jones, J. V., III; Karl, S.; Ayuso, R. A.; Bradley, D. C.; Box, S. E.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    New geochemistry, U/Pb geochronology, and radiogenic isotopes, together with existing datasets, contribute to a refined model of the petrogenetic history of magmatism in the western Alaska Range. Plutons within the study area were emplaced into Kahiltna basin Mesozoic turbiditic strata. The Kahiltna sequence overlies Mesozoic Peninsular oceanic terrane rocks in the SE half of the basin and Proterozoic to Paleozoic Farewell continental terrane rocks to the NW. This study focuses on successive intrusion suites, most of which are thought to intrude Kahiltna or underlying Farewell terrane rocks, but include older, perhaps more deeply exhumed rocks emplaced in Peninsular terrane basement to the SE. The chemically diverse sequence records magmatism associated with major tectonic reorganization events on the southern Alaska circum-Pacific subduction margin. The oldest pluton suite (~100-80 Ma) is mostly intermediate to evolved calcalkaline granite and coincides with final closure of the Kahiltna basin and a regional transition to transpression-dominated tectonics. The post-closure magmatic pulse (~75-67 Ma) is compositionally varied, including primitive subalkaline melts, peraluminous high-K granites, and a subset of sodic, adakite-like granites. A Paleocene (~63-57 Ma) magmatic flare-up follows, dominated by extremely fractionated subalkaline melts. Rare, more primitive melts of this suite are metaluminous, from gabbro to syenite. This stage may represent relaxed melt productivity or shallowing of the slab dip, yielding more laterally diffuse melting. An early Eocene magmatic hiatus precedes middle Eocene circum-Pacific tectonic reorganization, regionally resulting in initiation of proto-Aleutian/Meshik arc magmatism, and locally in the 44-37 Ma emplacement of subalkaline intermediate to felsic plutons associated with andesite to rhyolite volcanic deposits. An Oligocene (~31-25 Ma) magmatic pulse involved emplacement of a compositionally variable suite ranging from

  11. East Asia: Seismotectonics, magmatism and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Sheng; Ohtani, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we review the significant recent results of geophysical studies and discuss their implications on seismotectonics, magmatism, and mantle dynamics in East Asia. High-resolution geophysical imaging revealed structural heterogeneities in the source areas of large crustal earthquakes, which may reflect magma and fluids that affected the rupture nucleation of large earthquakes. In subduction zone regions, the crustal fluids originate from the dehydration of the subducting slab. Magmatism in arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab. The intraplate magmatism has different origins. The continental volcanoes in Northeast Asia (such as Changbai and Wudalianchi) seem to be caused by the corner flow in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and the deep dehydration of the stagnant slab as well. The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is possibly caused by a similar process in BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China seems to be a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and the Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle. The occurrence of deep earthquakes under the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin may be related to a metastable olivine wedge in the subducting Pacific slab. The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which may trigger upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and cause the slab-plume interactions. Some of these issues, such as the origin of intraplate magmatism, are still controversial, and so further detailed studies are needed from now.

  12. Remelting and Remobilization in a Magmatic Arc: the St Peter Suite, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symington, Neil; Weinberg, Roberto; Hasalová, Pavlina

    2014-05-01

    Thermo-mechanical models of magmatic arcs suggest that intermittent intrusion of magma batches should lead to remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks as a result of fluctuations in temperature and water content. However, examples of remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks, formed during arc-building, are surprisingly rare. We investigate the evolution of magmatic rocks of the Palaeoproterozoic St Peter Suite, in the Gawler Craton, South Australia. This suite records multiple intrusions, magma hybridization, and the remelting and remobilization of these intrusions to form migmatites and newly-formed leucocratic magmas. In this paper we detail first how multiple magma batches interact with one another as liquids and mushes during syn-magmatic deformation phases, and then detail the nature of migmatites resulting from anatexis of these same magmatic rocks and the resulting channel ways that allowed for magma remobilization. LA-ICP/MS U/Pb zircon dating yielded crystallization ages of 1647±12 Ma for an early diorite-to-granite suite, and 1604±12 Ma for a later magmatic suite of broadly similar composition. Both these suites underwent anatectic events. Titanite from late-formed leucosomes found within D2 shear zones in the older suite, yielded SHRIMP U/Pb age of 1605±7 Ma, within error of the age of the younger suite. We therefore infer that intrusion, crystallization and remelting/remobilization of this younger suite of rocks occurred within 10-15 M.yr. Thus, the St Peter Suite exposures record many of the key processes expected in arcs, including the prediction that early intrusive arc rocks remelt to form younger more fractionated magmas.

  13. New Seismic and Magmatic Constraints on the Geometry and Timing of Shallowing of the Central Andean Chilean-Pampean Flatslab Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.; Mulcahy, P.; Chen, C.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The shape and evolution of the Central Andean Chilean-Pampean flatslab segment provide modern analogues in numerous studies of flatslab segments of subducting oceanic plates. A revised geometry for the Wadati-Benioff Zone of the Chilean-Pampean flatslab that incorporates 271 well-constrained mantle earthquakes recorded during the 2007-2009 southern Puna seismic experiment (25°-28°S; 70°-65°W) shows that the northern boundary of the flatslab shoals more abruptly southward giving a more symmetric form with a more northerly bend to the flatslab than seen in previous models. The prime evidence for a sharper bend to the north comes from the three distinctive earthquake hypocenter clusters at 110 to 160 km, which form the so-called Pipanaco earthquake nest under the region at 27.5° to 29°S and 68° to 66°W, and whose origins can be attributed to local bending stresses in the subducting plate. This northern bend also passes under the Incapillo Caldera arc volcanic complex near 28°S, which is the southernmost center in the Central Volcanic Zone with post-Pliocene activity until reaching the Tupungato in the Southern Volcanic Zone on the southern side of the flat-slab at 33°S. Support for this northern bend forming largely after near normal subduction of the Juan Fernandez ridge began on the Nazca plate in the middle of the shallowing flatslab at ~10 Ma comes from the ~9-3 Ma Pircas Negras glassy andesites and related lavas at 27° to 28°S, whose chemistry and locations have been suggested to reflect the bending. Further support for the flatslab principally forming at this time comes from the ~45-50 km eastward displacements of the volcanic arcs on both the northern and southern margins of the present flat-slab at ~ 9-3 Ma and the magmatic and deformational history recorded above the area of the flat-slab region. At the same time, the Albarracín region ignimbrites in the central Argentine Precordillera above the main part of the flatslab have recently confirmed

  14. Modelling magmatic gas scrubbing in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Rossella; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Valenza, Mariano; Bergsson, Baldur; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Rakel Guðjónsdóttir, Sylvía

    2015-04-01

    In volcano-hosted hydrothermal systems, the chemistry of deeply rising magmatic gases is extensively modified by gas-water-rock interactions taking place within the hydrothermal reservoir, and/or at shallow groundwaters conditions. These reactions can scrub reactive, water-soluble species (S, halogens) from the magmatic gas phase, so that their quantitative assessment is central to understanding the chemistry of surface gas manifestations, and brings profound implications to the interpretation of volcanic-hydrothermal unrests. Here, we present the results of numerical simulations of magmatic gas scrubbing, in which the reaction path modelling approach (Helgeson, 1968) is used to reproduce hydrothermal gas-water-rock interactions at both shallow (temperature up to 109°C; low-T model runs) and deep reservoir (temperature range: 150-250 °C; high-T model runs) conditions. The model was built based upon the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery and Daveler, 1992), and consisted into a step by step addition of a high-temperature magmatic gas to an initial meteoric water, in the presence of a dissolving aquifer rock. The model outputted, at each step of gas addition, the chemical composition of a new aqueous solution formed after gas-water-rock interactions; which, upon reaching gas over-pressuring (PgasTOT > Psat(H2O) at run T), is degassed (by single-step degassing) to separate a scrubbed gas phase. As an application of the model results, the model compositions of the separated gases are finally compared with compositions of natural gas emissions from Hekla volcano (T< 100°C) and from Krisuvik geothermal system (T> 100°C), resulting into an excellent agreement. The compositions of the model solutions are also in fair agreement with compositions of natural thermal water samples. We conclude that our EQ3/6-based reaction path simulations offer a realistic representation of gas-water-rock interaction processes occurring underneath active magmatic-hydrothermal systems

  15. Magmatic systems of large continental igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) of the modern type are known from the middle Paleoproterozoic and have a great abundance in the Phanerozoic. The most researches considered their appearance with ascending of the mantle thermochemical superplumes which provided simultaneously eruption of the same type of lavas on the huge territories. Judging on presence among them different subprovinces, formation of concrete magmatic systems were linked with protuberances (secondary plumes) on the superplumes surfaces. We suggest that origin of such plumes was linked with local enrichment of upper part of the superplumes head beneath roofing by fluid components; it led to lowering of the plume material density and initiated ascending of the secondary plumes. As a result, their heads, where partial melting occurred, can reach the level of the upper crust as it follows from absence of lower-crustal rocks among xenoliths in basalts, although mantle xenoliths existed in them. Important feature of LIPs is presence of two major types of mafic lavas: (1) geochemical-enriched alkali Fe-Ti basalts and picrites, and (2) basalts of normal alkalinity (tholeiites) with different contents of TiO2. At that the first type of mafites are usually typical for lower parts of LIPs which initially developed as continental rifts, whereas the second type composed the upper part of the traps' cover. Magmatic systems of the LIPs are subdivided on three levels of different deep: (1) zones of magma generation, (2) areas of transitional magma chambers where large often layered intrusive bodies are formed, and (3) areas on surface where lava eruptions and subvolcanic intrusions occurred. All these levels are linked by feeder dykes. The least known element of the system is area of magma generation, and, especially, composition of melting substratum. Important information about it is contained in aforementioned mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites. They practically everywhere are represented by two

  16. High energy axial ion beam generated by deuterium gas-puff Z-pinch at the current level of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Cikhardt, J.; Batobolotova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Orcikova, H.; Turek, K.; Shishlov, A.; Labetsky, A.; Kokshenev, V.; Ratakhin, N.; GIT-12 Team

    2014-10-01

    The contribution presents results from Z-pinch experiments with a plasma shell on deuterium gas-puff (with deuterium linear mass of about 100 μg/cm) carried out on the GIT-12 generator at IHCE in Tomsk at the current level slightly below 3 MA. The first purpose of experiments was to study the influence of different parameters on the production of neutrons. Neutron yield up to 5 ×1012 neutrons/shot was measured in the shot with LiF catcher. The second purpose was the examination of high-energy ions generated on the Z-pinch axis using RCF and CR-39. Very interesting results were provided by ion pinhole camera, where the influence of magnetic field on the ion beam could be studied. One of the conclusions is that the ions with energy below 10 MeV were significantly deflected by magnetic field. Work supported by MEYS CR research Programs No. ME090871, No. LG13029, by GACR Grant No. P205/12/0454, Grant CRA IAEA No. 17088 and RFBR Grant No. 13-08-00479-a.

  17. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  18. Changes in magmatic oxidation state induced by degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brounce, M. N.; Stolper, E. M.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Temporal variations in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the mantle may have been transmitted to Earth's atmosphere and oceans by volcanic degassing. However, it is unclear how redox states of volatiles relate to their source magmas because degassing and assimilation can impact fO2 before or during eruption. To explore this, we present µ-XANES measurements of the oxidation states of Fe and S and laser fluorination measurements of 18O/16O ratios in submarine glasses from two settings where degassing is recorded: 1) submarine glasses from the Reykjanes Ridge as it shoals to Iceland, including subglacial glasses from the Reykjanes Peninsula; and 2) submarine glasses from Mauna Kea recovered by the Hawaii Shield Drilling Program (HSDP). Glasses from both settings are basalts with 5.5-9.9 wt% MgO and 350-1790 ppm S. Submarine Reykjanes glasses are sulfide saturated. Subglacial Reykjanes and HSDP glasses are not sulfide saturated, and S and H2O contents are consistent with S+H2O degassing. Submarine Reykjanes glasses have 18O/16O indistinguishable from MORB and become progressively 18O-depleted as MgO decreases. Subglacial glasses have lower 18O/16O than submarine glasses at a given MgO, but both sample types project to a common 18O/16O near 10 wt% MgO, suggesting that 18O-depletion in these lavas is generated by fractional crystallization and assimilation of an 18O-depleted crustal component. The oxidation state of Fe increases only slightly as 18O/16O decrease, suggesting that the assimilant is not oxidized enough to change magmatic fO2. Fe and S do not oxidize or reduce with decreasing S or H2O, suggesting that relatively reduced magmas at depth degassed S+H2O without changing magmatic fO2, and that the fO2 of these lavas reflect the fO2of their mantle source. The oxidation states of Fe and S in HSDP glasses are broadly correlated and samples with the highest S concentrations are the most oxidized. Both Fe and S reduce with decreasing S and H2O contents. This suggests

  19. Precise U-Pb Zircon Constraints on the Earliest Magmatic History of the Carolina Terrane.

    PubMed

    Wortman; Samson; Hibbard

    2000-05-01

    The early magmatic and tectonic history of the Carolina terrane and its possible affinities with other Neoproterozoic circum-Atlantic arc terranes have been poorly understood, in large part because of a lack of reliable geochronological data. Precise U-Pb zircon dates for the Virgilina sequence, the oldest exposed part, constrain the timing of the earliest known stage of magmatism in the terrane and of the Virgilina orogeny. A flow-banded rhyolite sampled from a metavolcanic sequence near Chapel Hill, North Carolina, yielded a U-Pb zircon date of 632.9 +2.6/-1.9 Ma. A granitic unit of the Chapel Hill pluton, which intrudes the metavolcanic sequence, yielded a nearly identical U-Pb zircon date of 633 +2/-1.5 Ma, interpreted as its crystallization age. A felsic gneiss and a dacitic tuff from the Hyco Formation yielded U-Pb zircon dates of 619.9 +4.5/-3 Ma and 615.7 +3.7/-1.9 Ma, respectively. Diorite and granite of the Flat River complex have indistinguishable U-Pb upper-intercept dates of 613.9 +1.6/-1.5 Ma and 613.4 +2.8/-2 Ma. The Osmond biotite-granite gneiss, which intruded the Hyco Formation before the Virgilina orogeny, crystallized at 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma. Granite of the Roxboro pluton, an intrusion that postdated the Virgilina orogeny, yielded a U-Pb upper intercept date of 546.5 +3.0/-2.4 Ma, interpreted as the time of its crystallization. These new dates both provide the first reliable estimates of the age of the Virgilina sequence and document that the earliest known stage of magmatism in the Carolina terrane had begun by 633 +2/-1.5 Ma and continued at least until 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma, an interval of approximately 25 m.yr. Timing of the Virgilina orogeny is bracketed between 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma and 586+/-10 Ma (reported age of the upper Uwharrie Formation). The U-Pb systematics of all units studied in the Virgilina sequence are simple and lack any evidence of an older xenocrystic zircon component, which would indicate the presence of a continental

  20. ASTEROIDAL GRANITE-LIKE MAGMATISM 4.53 GYR AGO

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, Kentaro; Bischoff, Addi

    2009-07-10

    Constraining the timescales for the evolution of planetary bodies in our solar system is essential for a complete understanding of planet-forming processes. However, frequent collisions between planetesimals in the early solar system obscured and destroyed much of the primitive features of the old, first-generation planetary bodies. The presence of differentiated, achondritic clasts in brecciated chondrites and of chondritic fragments in achondritic breccias clearly witness multiple processes such as metamorphism, magmatism, fragmentation, mixing, and reaccretion. Here, we report the results of ion microprobe Pb-Pb dating of a granite-like fragment found in a meteorite, the LL3-6 ordinary chondrite regolith breccia Adzhi-Bogdo. Eight spot analyses of two phosphate grains and other co-genetic phases of the granitoid give a Pb-Pb isochron age of 4.48 {+-} 0.12 billion years (95% confidence) and a model age of 4.53 {+-} 0.03 billion years (1{sigma}), respectively. These ages represent the crystallization age of a parental granite-like magma that is significantly older than those of terrestrial (4.00-4.40 Gyr) and lunar granites (3.88-4.32 Gyr) indicating that the clast in Adzhi-Bogdo is the oldest known granitoid in the solar system. This is the first evidence that granite-like formation is not only a common process on Earth, but also occurred on primitive asteroids in the early solar system 4.53 Gyr ago. Thus, the discovery of granite magmatism recorded in a brecciated meteorite provides an innovative idea within the framework of scenarios for the formation and evolution of planetary bodies and possibly exoplanetary bodies.

  1. Magmatic Processes and Systems Deduced from Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J.; Bezard, R. C.; Morgan, D. J.; Ginibre, C.

    2014-12-01

    When crystals grow in liquids the composition of their outermost layer will reflect that of the host with which they are in equilibrium and will therefore record the liquid composition, pressure and temperature.. Following separation from their sources, magmas differentiate. This change in liquid composition is driven largely by crystallisation in response to cooling or decompression. Other open system processes such as mixing and contamination are common. These can lead to abrupt changes in trace element and isotopic composition, accompanied by petrographic features, such as dissolution surfaces or zones of melt inclusions. Where such careful mineral-scale studies have been performed, the prevalence of open system processes is clear. In many cases these are shown by core-rim isotopic variations. Crystal-scale compositional variations in the context of whole rock compositions and petrography have allowed us to show crustal assimilation even from regions of supposedly oceanic crust such as the Lesser Antilles. In tandem with tracking magma evolution, core-rim analyses of appropriate crystals have also provided diffusion profiles which reflect timescales of magmatic processes. A key point, long recognised by Bruce Marsh, is that in situ geochemical data should be considered in a petrographic context in order to gain the most (and most credible) insights on the workings of magma systems from hand specimen to whole volcano/pluton scales: The petrographic microscope is not dead yet Identification of magmatic processes from in situ scrutiny allows us to synthesise the architectures and inner workings of magma systems. The evidence for interaction among magmas in many systems is compelling and suggests that many exist as stacked dike-sill arrangements with wall-rock focussed crystal growth and mush zones. These are consistent with many of the systematics suggested some time ago by Bruce Marsh

  2. Permian-Triassic Magmatism Along the Southern Gondwana Margin: Correlating Proximal and Distal Volcanic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, M. P.; Weislogel, A. L.; Fildani, A.

    2014-12-01

    Active margins are dominated by erosion, structural deformation, tectonic dissection, and igneous intrusions. These destructive processes lead to an incomplete record of past magmatism in active margins. Volcanic airfall tuffs that are transported and deposited in distal sedimentary basins may be more likely to be preserved in the rock record. Tuffs, however, may be affected by atmospheric fractionation during transport, postdepositional weathering, and diagenesis during burial, potentially altering ash texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry. We use outcrop observations, stratigraphic relationships, whole rock geochemistry, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and zircon rare-earth element geochemistry from Permian-Triassic strata of South Africa and South America to correlate distal volcanic ashes to proximal volcanic deposits and plutonic suites within southern Gondwana. U-Pb zircon signals of the tuffs are treated as "detrital"; the distinct zircon signals were then used to correlate distal airfall ashes to potential magmatic sources. This suggests that airfall fractionation of zircon populations is not a significant concern in tuff geochronology. Additionally, zircon inheritance may be a useful tool in matching far-traveled ashes with parental magmatic suites. Although previous studies have shown that the geochemistry of volcanic tuff deposits varies with distance from the volcanic vent, we employ whole rock and zircon REE compositions to differentiate distinct magmatic periods using distal ashes that were deposited >750 km from the volcanic source. The results of this study support a geochronologic interpretation that the Karoo strata of S. Africa are >10 Ma younger than previously thought based on biostratigraphy. Since the Karoo basin is heavily studied as a record of the end-Permian extinction and paleoclimate change, our results have major implication for this key time in Earth History.

  3. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  4. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  5. Tritium and stable isotopes of magmatic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; McMurtry, G. M.

    2000-04-01

    To investigate the isotopic composition and age of water in volcanic gases and magmas, we analyzed samples from 11 active volcanoes ranging in composition from tholeiitic basalt to rhyolite: Mount St. Helens (USA), Kilauea (USA), Pacaya (Guatemala), Galeras (Colombia), Satsuma Iwo-Jima (Japan), Sierra Negra and Alcedo (Ecuador), Vulcano (Italy), Parı´cutin (Mexico), Kudryavy (Russia), and White Island (New Zealand). Tritium at relatively low levels (0.1-5 T.U.) is found in most emissions from high-temperature volcanic fumaroles sampled, even at discharge temperatures >700°C. Although magmatic fluids sampled from these emissions usually contain high CO 2, S total, HCl, HF, B, Br, 3He R/ RA, and low contents of air components, stable isotope and tritium relations of nearly all such fluids show mixing of magmatic volatiles with relatively young meteoric water (model ages≤75 y). Linear δD/ δ18O and 3H/ δ18O mixing trends of these two end-members are invariably detected at arc volcanoes. Tritium is also detected in fumarole condensates at hot spot basalt volcanoes, but collecting samples approaching the composition of end-member magmatic fluid is exceedingly difficult. In situ production of 3H, mostly from spontaneous fission of 238U in magmas is calculated to be <0.001 T.U., except for the most evolved compositions (high U, Th, and Li and low H 2O contents). These values are below the detection limit of 3H by conventional analytical techniques (about 0.01 T.U. at best). We found no conclusive evidence that natural fusion in the Earth produces anomalous amounts of detectable 3H (>0.05 T.U.).

  6. The Tertiary dike magmatism in the Southern Alps: geochronological data and geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergomi, Maria Aldina; Zanchetta, Stefano; Tunesi, Annalisa

    2015-03-01

    The relationships between tectonics and magmatic activity in the Alps are still debated. Despite an active subduction since the Late Cretaceous, no arc-related magmatism is recorded prior of the Middle Eocene. The emplacement of plutons along the Insubric Fault in a short time span (~34-28 Ma) has been generally interpreted in terms of the slab break-off model. The Tertiary magmatism, however, is also characterized by the occurrence of widespread calcalkaline dikes not necessarily intruded along the Insubric Fault. The geochemical features of dikes vary along the Alps belt and are interpreted in terms of mantle source heterogeneity and degree of crustal contamination. U-Pb zircon dating of studied dikes indicates intrusion ages in the 42- to 34-Ma time interval. These data provide evidence for a pre-Oligocene magmatic activity that was not solely limited to the Adamello batholith. Moreover, it appears that dikes rejuvenate from SE to NW, in an opposite direction with respect to the Alpine subduction polarity. Thus, a more complex geodynamic scenario than the slab break-off model must be envisaged. The absence of arc magmatism prior to the Middle Eocene can be explained by the low-angle subduction of the Tethyan slab that confined the mantle partial melting zone away from the orogenic wedge. The onset of the Apennines subduction at 55-50 Ma caused the Alpine slab to retreat. The partial melting zone progressively migrated beneath the orogenic wedge and finally reached the axial belt in the Late Eocene, when the Alpine collision was completed. Only at this stage, slab break-off occurred and promoted the intrusion of the Periadriatic plutons.

  7. Filling in the juvenile magmatic gap: Evidence for uninterrupted Paleoproterozoic plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, C. A.; Bekker, A.; Sylvester, P. J.; Wodicka, N.; Stern, R. A.; Chacko, T.; Heaman, L. M.

    2014-02-01

    Despite several decades of research on growth of the continental crust, it remains unclear whether the production of juvenile continental crust has been continuous or episodic throughout the Precambrian. Models for episodic crustal growth have gained traction recently through compilations of global U-Pb zircon age frequency distributions interpreted to delineate peaks and lulls in crustal growth through geologic time. One such apparent trough in zircon age frequency distributions between ∼2.45 and 2.22 Ga is thought to represent a pause in crustal addition, resulting from a global shutdown of magmatic and tectonic processes. The ∼2.45-2.22 Ga magmatic shutdown model envisions a causal relationship between the cessation of plate tectonics and accumulation of atmospheric oxygen over the same period. Here, we present new coupled U-Pb, Hf, and O isotope data for detrital and magmatic zircon from the western Churchill Province and Trans-Hudson orogen of Canada, covering an area of approximately 1.3 million km2, that demonstrate significant juvenile crustal production during the ∼2.45-2.22 Ga time interval, and thereby argue against the magmatic shutdown hypothesis. Our data is corroborated by literature data showing an extensive 2.22-2.45 Ga record in both detrital and magmatic rocks on every continent, and suggests that the operation of plate tectonics continued throughout the early Paleoproterozoic, while atmospheric oxygen rose over the same time interval. We argue that uninterrupted plate tectonics between ∼2.45 and 2.22 Ga would have contributed to efficient burial of organic matter and sedimentary pyrite, and the consequent rise in atmospheric oxygen documented for this time interval.

  8. Magmatic cycles pace tectonic and morphological expression of rifting (Afar depression, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Dumont, S.; Grandin, R.; Williams, A.; Blard, P.-H.; Schimmelpfennig, I.; Vye-Brown, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Benedetti, L.; Yirgu, G.

    2016-07-01

    The existence of narrow axial volcanic zones of mid-oceanic ridges testifies of the underlying concentration of both melt distribution and tectonic strain. As a result of repeated diking and faulting, axial volcanic zones therefore represent a spectacular topographic expression of plate divergence. However, the submarine location of oceanic ridges makes it difficult to constrain the interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes in time and space. In this study, we use the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) magmatic rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia) to provide quantitative constraints on the response of tectonic processes to variations in magma supply at divergent plate boundaries. The DMH magmatic rift segment is considered an analogue of an oceanic ridge, exhibiting a fault pattern, extension rate and topographic relief comparable to intermediate- to slow-spreading ridges. Here, we focus on the northern and central parts of DMH rift, where we present quantitative slip rates for the past 40 kyr for major and minor normal fault scarps in the vicinity of a recent (September 2005) dike intrusion. The data obtained show that the axial valley topography has been created by enhanced slip rates that occurred during periods of limited volcanism, suggestive of reduced magmatic activity, probably in association with changes in strain distribution in the crust. Our results indicate that the development of the axial valley topography has been regulated by the lifetimes of the magma reservoirs and their spatial distribution along the segment, and thus to the magmatic cycles of replenishment/differentiation (<100 kyr). Our findings are also consistent with magma-induced deformation in magma-rich rift segments. The record of two tectonic events of metric vertical amplitude on the fault that accommodated the most part of surface displacement during the 2005 dike intrusion suggests that the latter type of intrusion occurs roughly every 10 kyr in the northern part of the DMH segment.

  9. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  10. Rhenium and Iridium Partitioning in Silicate and Magmatic Spinels: Implications for Planetary Magmatism and Mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements Re, Ru and Ir partition strongly into spinel structures with large octahedral sites. New experimental results for both magmatic and silicate spinels will be presented with a few planetary implications. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Chemistry of Post 12 Ma Los Frailes Volcanic Complex Ignimbrites in Bolivia and the Role of Magmatism in the Uplift of the Central Andean Altiplano Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.; Keller, C. B.; Coira, B.; Jiménez, N.; Caffe, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    The giant (~2000 km3) backarc Los Frailes volcanic complex in the Bolivian Altiplano of the Central Andes records the late Oligocene to Pleistocene magmatic history of the Altiplano plateau whose time and processes of uplift are controversial. Most previous studies of the Los Frailes complex have concentrated on pre-12 Ma volcanic rocks that host Sn-Ag deposits including the world’s largest silver deposit at Cerro Rico. Here, we combine sparse pre-existing chemical data from post 12 Ma volcanic rocks with new major and trace element analyses to show that the voluminous post-12 Ma ignimbrites are predominantly peraluminous, K-rich biotite-bearing andesites and dacites (58-69% SiO2) that can contain calcic feldspar, orthopyroxene, cordierite, and ilmenite. Trace element data show that the ignimbrites have very steep REE patterns (La/Yb = 30-90) marked by HREE depletion (Sm/Yb = 5-9) requiring garnet as a deep-crustal restitic phase in a very thick crust. The presence of cordierite crystals in some ignimbrites requires final equilibration of the erupted magmas at depths of less than ~14 km (< 450 MPa). Other prominent chemical features include LIL enrichment (to 90 ppm La), non-arc like Ba/La ratios (<20) and HFSE/LREE ratios (La/Ta=35-50) as high as those in frontal arc magmas. Sparse 87Sr/86Sr ratios near 0.712 show the magmas contain significant crustal contributions. The least silicic ignimbrites with the lowest La/Yb ratios (25-35) are the voluminous ~7 Ma Livicucho/Condor Nasa andesites/dacites in the northern part of the complex. These ignimbrites erupted during an ~ 8.5 to ~6 Ma peak in backarc ignimbrite activity in the northern Puna to the south and the Altiplano to the north. These eruptions are approximately coincident with the 10-7 Ma period of rapid plateau uplift proposed by Molnar and Garzione (2007). Other widespread ignimbrites from across the main part of the Los Frailes plateau have chemical features in common with an ignimbrite flow dated at 2

  12. U-Pb SHRIMP-RG zircon ages and Nd signature of lower Paleozoic rifting-related magmatism in the Variscan basement of the Eastern Pyrenees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, F.J.; Iriondo, A.; Dietsch, C.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Peucat, J.J.; Cires, J.; Reche, J.; Capdevila, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ages of orthogneisses exposed in massifs of the Variscan chain can determine whether they are part of a pre-Neoproterozoic basement, a Neoproterozoic, Panafrican arc, or are, in fact, lower Paleozoic, and their isotopic compositions can be used to probe the nature of their source rocks, adding to the understanding of the types, distribution, and tectonic evolution of peri-Gondwanan crystalline basement. Using SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology and Nd isotopic analysis, pre-Variscan metaigneous rocks from the N??ria massif in the Eastern Pyrenean axial zone and the Guilleries massif, 70km to the south, have been dated and their Nd signatures characterized. All dated orthogneisses from the N??ria massif have the same age within error, ~457Ma, including the Ribes granophyre, interpreted as a subvolcanic unit within Caradocian sediments contemporaneous with granitic magmas intruded into Cambro-Ordovician sediments at deeper levels. Orthogneisses in the Guilleries massif record essentially continuous magmatic activity during the Ordovician, beginning at the Cambro-Ordovician boundary (488??3Ma) and reaching a peak in the volume of magma in the early Late Ordovician (~460Ma). Metavolcanic rocks in the Guilleries massif were extruded at 452??4Ma and appear to have their intrusive equivalent in thin, deformed veins of granitic gneiss (451??7Ma) within metasedimentary rocks. In orthogneisses from both massifs, the cores of some zircons yield Neoproterozoic ages between ~520 and 900Ma. The age of deposition of a pre-Late Ordovician metapelite in the Guilleries massif is bracketed by the weighted average age of the youngest detrital zircon population, 582??11Ma, and the age of cross-cutting granitic veins, 451??7Ma. Older detrital zircons populations in this metapelite include Neoproterozoic (749-610Ma; n=10), Neo- to Mesoproterozoic (1.04-0.86Ga; n=7), Paleoproterozoic (2.02-1.59Ga; n=5), and Neoarchean (2.74-2.58Ga; n=3). Nd isotopic analyses of the N??ria and Guilleries

  13. Permian magmatic sequences of the Bilihe gold deposit in central Inner Mongolia, China: Petrogenesis and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunhua; Nie, Fengjun

    2015-08-01

    The Bilihe gold deposit is located in the eastern section of the Ondor Sum-Yanji Suture at the southern margin of the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt (XMOB) and the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC), central Inner Mongolia. The magmatic rocks in the ore district are generally high-K calc-alkaline, enriched in LREE, Zr, and Hf, and depleted in HREE, Nb, Ta, and P. The magmatic evolution sequences are norite gabbro → granodiorite porphyry → granite or norite gabbro → andesite → dacite porphyry → granodiorite, which show a trend of decreasing TiO2, FeO, MgO, CaO, and P2O5 with increasing SiO2. In the Bilihe ore district, hydrothermal processes were coeval with granitic magmatism for a period of ~ 17 Myr (272-255 Ma). The ages of the granite, granodiorite porphyry, granodiorite, and dacite porphyry are 271.5-264.1 Ma, 269.8-255.8 Ma, 268.3 Ma, and 268.6-259.4 Ma, respectively. The magmatic rocks contain magmatic, hydrothermal, and magmatic-hydrothermal zircons. The magmatic zircons have δCe > 4, La < 3 ppm, and SmN/LaN > 2.5; the hydrothermal zircons have δCe < 4, La > 3 ppm, and SmN/LaN < 2.5. The Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios of granodiorite are 12.7-14.99 and 40.2-46.56, respectively. The Zr/Hf ratios successively increase in the sequence of granite (27.4-29.02) → granodiorite porphyry (29.19-32.18) → dacite porphyry (33.54-38.5) → norite gabbro (36.75-38.37), and their Nb/Ta ratios are 9.09-12.38. Zircons in granodiorite yield ε Hf (t) values of - 0.29 to - 56 (n = 13) and 2.07-7.62 (n = 5), and they give a Hf two-stage model age (tDM2) of 807-4765 Ma. The ε Hf (t) values of the zircons in granite, granodiorite porphyry, and dacite porphyry are - 0.46 to 8.03, 3.17 to 10.32, and - 0.78 to 6.58, respectively, and their Hf tDM2 ages are 787-1324 Ma, 638-1091 Ma, and 868-1343 Ma, respectively. Dehydration partial melting of subducted oceanic crust resulted in the formation of dacite porphyry; partial melting of depleted mantle resulted in

  14. Magmatic heat and the El Nino cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.; Moore, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Large submarine lava flows with apparent volumes exceeding 10 km3 have recently been imaged on the deep ocean floor in various parts of the Pacific by means of GLORIA and SeaMarc side-looking sonar surveys. Such flows may produce thermal anomalies large enough to perturb the cyclic processes of the ocean and could be a factor in the genesis of El Nino phenomena. We find that known volume rates of mid-ocean magma production could generate repetitive thermal anomalies as large as 10% of the average El Nino sea surface anomaly at intervals of about 5 years (the mean interval of El Nino events between 1935 and 1984). Likewise, estimated rates of eruption, cooling of lava on the seafloor, and transfer of heat to the near-surface environment could reasonably produce a thermal anomaly comparable to that associated with El Nino. Larger magmatic events, associated with fluctuations in the total magmatic power and seismicity along the East Pacific Rise, are possible at longer intervals and may explain the extreme size of some El Nino events, such as that of 1982-1983. -Authors

  15. Claritas rise, Mars: Pre-Tharsis magmatism?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Williams, J.-P.; Ruiz, J.; McGuire, P.C.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Wang, R.; Scharenbroich, L.; Hare, T.M.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Baker, V.R.; Wheelock, S.J.; Ferris, J.C.; Miyamoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    Claritas rise is a prominent ancient (Noachian) center of tectonism identified through investigation of comprehensive paleotectonic information of the western hemisphere of Mars. This center is interpreted to be the result of magmatic-driven activity, including uplift and associated tectonism, as well as possible hydrothermal activity. Coupled with its ancient stratigraphy, high density of impact craters, and complex structure, a possible magnetic signature may indicate that it formed during an ancient period of Mars' evolution, such as when the dynamo was in operation. As Tharsis lacks magnetic signatures, Claritas rise may pre-date the development of Tharsis or mark incipient development, since some of the crustal materials underlying Tharsis and older parts of the magmatic complex, respectively, could have been highly resurfaced, destroying any remanent magnetism. Here, we detail the significant characteristics of the Claritas rise, and present a case for why it should be targeted by the Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Mars Express spacecrafts, as well as be considered as a prime target for future tier-scalable robotic reconnaissance. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Tectonics and magmatism of ultraslow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Kokhan, A. V.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The tectonics, structure-forming processes, and magmatism in rift zones of ultraslow spreading ridges are exemplified in the Reykjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich, Gakkel, and Southwest Indian ridges. The thermal state of the mantle, the thickness of the brittle lithospheric layer, and spreading obliquety are the most important factors that control the structural pattern of rift zones. For the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges, the following are crucial factors: variations in the crust thickness; relationships between the thicknesses of its brittle and ductile layers; width of the rift zone; increase in intensity of magma supply approaching the Iceland thermal anomaly; and spreading obliquety. For the Knipovich Ridge, these are its localization in the transitional zone between the Gakkel and Mohns ridges under conditions of shear and tensile stresses and multiple rearrangements of spreading; nonorthogonal spreading; and structural and compositional barrier of thick continental lithosphere at the Barents Sea shelf and Spitsbergen. The Mohns Ridge is characterized by oblique spreading under conditions of a thick cold lithosphere and narrow stable rift zone. The Gakkel and the Southwest Indian ridges are distinguished by the lowest spreading rate under the settings of the along-strike variations in heating of the mantle and of a variable spreading geometry. The intensity of endogenic structure-forming varies along the strike of the ridges. In addition to the prevalence of tectonic factors in the formation of the topography, magmatism and metamorphism locally play an important role.

  17. Magmatic unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie

    2005-09-01

    Mammoth Mountain, which stands on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern California, last erupted ˜57,000 years BP. Episodic volcanic unrest detected beneath the mountain since late 1979, however, emphasizes that the underlying volcanic system is still active and capable of producing future volcanic eruptions. The unrest symptoms include swarms of small ( M ≤ 3) earthquakes, spasmodic bursts (rapid-fire sequences of brittle-failure earthquakes with overlapping coda), long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) volcanic earthquakes, ground deformation, diffuse emission of magmatic CO 2, and fumarole gases with elevated 3He/ 4He ratios. Spatial-temporal relations defined by the multi-parameter monitoring data together with earthquake source mechanisms suggest that this Mammoth Mountain unrest is driven by the episodic release of a volume of CO 2-rich hydrous magmatic fluid derived from the upper reaches of a plexus of basaltic dikes and sills at mid-crustal depths (10-20 km). As the mobilized fluid ascends through the brittle-plastic transition zone and into overlying brittle crust, it triggers earthquake swarm activity and, in the case of the prolonged, 11-month-long earthquake swarm of 1989, crustal deformation and the onset of diffuse CO 2 emissions. Future volcanic activity from this system would most likely involve steam explosions or small-volume, basaltic, strombolian or Hawaiaan style eruptions. The impact of such an event would depend critically on vent location and season.

  18. Magmatic unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.; Prejean, S.

    2005-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain, which stands on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern California, last erupted ???57,000 years BP. Episodic volcanic unrest detected beneath the mountain since late 1979, however, emphasizes that the underlying volcanic system is still active and capable of producing future volcanic eruptions. The unrest symptoms include swarms of small (M ??? 3) earthquakes, spasmodic bursts (rapid-fire sequences of brittle-failure earthquakes with overlapping coda), long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) volcanic earthquakes, ground deformation, diffuse emission of magmatic CO2, and fumarole gases with elevated 3He/4He ratios. Spatial-temporal relations defined by the multi-parameter monitoring data together with earthquake source mechanisms suggest that this Mammoth Mountain unrest is driven by the episodic release of a volume of CO2-rich hydrous magmatic fluid derived from the upper reaches of a plexus of basaltic dikes and sills at mid-crustal depths (10-20 km). As the mobilized fluid ascends through the brittle-plastic transition zone and into overlying brittle crust, it triggers earthquake swarm activity and, in the case of the prolonged, 11-month-long earthquake swarm of 1989, crustal deformation and the onset of diffuse CO2 emissions. Future volcanic activity from this system would most likely involve steam explosions or small-volume, basaltic, strombolian or Hawaiaan style eruptions. The impact of such an event would depend critically on vent location and season.

  19. New evidence for geologically instantaneous emplacement of earliest Jurassic Central Atlantic magmatic province basalts on the North American margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, W. E.; Renne, P. R.; Ruppel, C.

    2000-09-01

    Dikes in the southeastern United States represent a major component of the Central Atlantic magmatic province and record kinematics of Pangean breakup near the critical, predrift junction of three major continental masses. Until now, the age of these dikes had not been determined with the same precision as those of Central Atlantic magmatic province basalts on other parts of the circum-Atlantic margin. Our new results for three dike samples from the South Carolina Piedmont yield plateau ages of 198.8 ± 2.2, 199.5 ± 1.8, and 199.7 ± 1.5 Ma. For comparison, we present new age determinations of the benchmark Watchung flows I and III of the Newark basin: 201.0 ± 2.1 and 198.8 ± 2.0 Ma, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that basaltic volcanism responsible for the dikes, flows, and sills of eastern North America occurred within ˜1 m.y. of 200 Ma. The timing, brief duration, and extent of the Central Atlantic magmatism imply that it may have been causally related to Triassic-Jurassic mass extinctions. The distribution and timing of this magmatism and the absence of regional uplift or an identifiable hotspot track lead us to favor strong lithospheric control on the origin of the Central Atlantic magmatic province, consistent with the modern generation of plume incubation or edge-driven convection models.

  20. Magmatism and Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits of the Southern Ancestral Cascade Arc, Western Nevada and Eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Henry, Christopher D.; Vikre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Many epithermal gold-silver deposits are temporally and spatially associated with late Oligocene to Pliocene magmatism of the southern ancestral Cascade arc in western Nevada and eastern California. These deposits, which include both quartz-adularia (low- and intermediate-sulfidation; Comstock Lode, Tonopah, Bodie) and quartz-alunite (high-sulfidation; Goldfield, Paradise Peak) types, were major producers of gold and silver. Ancestral Cascade arc magmatism preceded that of the modern High Cascades arc and reflects subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Ancestral arc magmatism began about 45 Ma, continued until about 3 Ma, and extended from near the Canada-United States border in Washington southward to about 250 km southeast of Reno, Nevada. The ancestral arc was split into northern and southern segments across an inferred tear in the subducting slab between Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak in northern California. The southern segment extends between 42°N in northern California and 37°N in western Nevada and was active from about 30 to 3 Ma. It is bounded on the east by the northeast edge of the Walker Lane. Ancestral arc volcanism represents an abrupt change in composition and style of magmatism relative to that in central Nevada. Large volume, caldera-forming, silicic ignimbrites associated with the 37 to 19 Ma ignimbrite flareup are dominant in central Nevada, whereas volcanic centers of the ancestral arc in western Nevada consist of andesitic stratovolcanoes and dacitic to rhyolitic lava domes that mostly formed between 25 and 4 Ma. Both ancestral arc and ignimbrite flareup magmatism resulted from rollback of the shallowly dipping slab that began about 45 Ma in northeast Nevada and migrated south-southwest with time. Most southern segment ancestral arc rocks have oxidized, high potassium, calc-alkaline compositions with silica contents ranging continuously from about 55 to 77 wt%. Most lavas are porphyritic and contain coarse plagioclase

  1. Chemical mass transfer in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    1985-07-01

    Numerical examples of the approach described in Part I of this series (Ghiorso, 1985) are presented in this paper. These examples include the calculation of the compositions and proportions of liquid and solid phases produced during (1) the equilibrium crystallization of a basaltic andesite at 1 bar, (2) the fractional crystallization of an olivine tholeiite at 1 bar and elevated pressures, (3) the fractional and equilibrium crystallization of an olivine boninite at 1 bar, and (4) the (a) isothermal and (b) isenthalpic assimilation of olivine (Fo90) into a liquid/solid assemblage of quartz dioritic composition at ˜1,125° C and 3 kbars. The numerical results on the crystallization of the basaltic andesite are verified by comparison with experimental data while those calculations performed using olivine tholeiitic and olivine boninitic compositions are favorably compared against whole rock and mineral analytical data and petrographic and field observations. In each of the examples presented, the heat effects associated with the modelled process are calculated (e.g. heat of crystallization, heat of assimilation), and free energies of crystallization are examined as a function of the degree of mineral supersaturation. The former quantities are on the order of 173 cal/grm for the cooling and fractional crystallization of an olivine tholeiite to a rhyolitic residuum (corresponding to a 400° C temperature interval). The latter represents an important petrological parameter, in that it quantifies the driving force for the rate of crystal growth and rate of nucleation in magmatic systems. Calculated free energies of crystallization are small (on the order of hundreds of calories per mole per 25° C of undercooling) which indicates that the kinetics of crystallization in magmatic systems are affinity controlled. Melt oxygen fugacity and the degree of oxygen metasomatism play a major role in controlling the fractionation trends produced from crystallizing basaltic liquids

  2. Petrological variability in recent magmatism at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount is known for its compositional homogeneity. We report on petrological variability in lavas from the summit caldera and rims of Axial Seamount during the last ~1.2ka and its implications for shallow crustal magma dynamics. AUVs have mapped the summit at ~1 m resolution, and ROVs have collected numerous lavas and volcaniclastic cores. Geospatial, superpositional, compositional, and age constraint data were used to outline flow units and construct geologic maps. Nearly 200 glasses from summit lavas were analyzed for major elements. A subset of ~20 samples were analyzed for selected trace elements, Pb-, U-, and Th- isotope ratios, and 226Ra and 210Pb. The results a) confirm a high degree compositional homogeneity, b) demonstrate a more restricted range in Pb-isotope ratios than previous data, c) indicate uniform compositional source component(s) genetically linked to that of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, and d) expand the dataset of distinctly-low 230Th/232Th lavas and subdivide them into geospatial groups. Hundreds of volcaniclastic grains collected from subsurface depths of up to several tens of cm analyzed for major elements extend the record of summit magmatism beyond what is exposed. Summit lava glasses are compositionally N-MORB. Summit volcaniclastics range to higher MgO (+1%); thus, magmatism likely included more mafic episodes than is recorded in the flows as yet sampled or that volcaniclastics preferentially sample higher temperature lavas. Negative correlation of CaO/Al2O3 with MgO in all glasses suggests fractionation from parental melt(s) of plag ± ol but not cpx. K2O/TiO2 ranges are typical for much of the JdFR. Summit lavas range from aphyric to ~35% plag phyric ± a few % ol. Plag-phyric summit lavas tend to have greater MgO (>7.5%), lower CaO/Al2O3 (<0.80), and lower K2O/TiO2 (<0.10) compared to aphyric lavas. For ~18 caldera flows with absolute or relative age control, plag-phyric lavas are older than aphyric lavas, the oldest of

  3. Towards an integrated magmatic, structural and metamorphic model for the 1.1-0.9 Ga Sveconorwegian orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagstad, Trond; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Røhr, Torkil S.; Marker, Mogens K.

    2013-04-01

    Orogeny involves magmatic, metamorphic, deformational and erosional processes that are caused by or lead to crustal thickening and the development of high topography. In general, these processes operate along the margins of continental plates, either as a result of subduction of oceanic crust (accretionary) or collision between two or more continental plates (collisional). Many of these processes are common to accretionary and collisional orogeny, and do not uniquely discriminate between the two. With only a fragmented geological record, unravelling the style of orogenesis in ancient orogens may, therefore, be far from straightforward. Adding to the complexity, modern continental margins, e.g., the southern Asian margin, display significant variation in orogenic style along strike, rendering along-strike comparisons and correlations unreliable. The late Mesoproterozoic Sveconorwegian province in SW Baltica is traditionally interpreted as the eastward continuation of the Grenville province in Canada, resulting from collision with Amazonia and forming a central part in the assembly of the Rodinia supercontinent. We recently proposed that the Sveconorwegian segment of this orogen formed as a result of accretionary processes rather than collision. This hypothesis was based mainly on considerations of the Sveconorwegian magmatic evolution. Here, we show how the metamorphic/structural record supports (or at least may be integrated in) our model as well. The key elements in our accretionary model are: 1) formation of the Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB) between 1070 and 1020 Ma, most likely representing a continental arc batholith. Coeval deformation and high-grade metamorphism farther east in the orogen could represent deformation in the retroarc. 2) cessation of SMB magmatism at 1020 Ma followed by UHT conditions at 1010-1005 Ma, with temperatures in excess of 1000°C at 7.5 kbar. Subduction of a spreading ridge at ca. 1020 Ma would result in an end to arc magmatism and

  4. Contrasting magmatic structures between small plutons and batholiths emplaced at shallow crustal level (Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Lucio P.; D'Eramo, Fernando J.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Demartis, Manuel; Tubía, José María; Coniglio, Jorge E.; Radice, Stefania; Maffini, M. Natalia; Aragón, Eugenio

    2016-11-01

    Processes like injection, magma flow and differentiation and influence of the regional strain field are here described and contrasted to shed light on their role in the formation of small plutons and large batholiths their magmatic structures. The final geometric and compositional arrangement of magma bodies are a complex record of their construction and internal flow history. Magma injection, flow and differentiation, as well as regional stresses, all control the internal nature of magma bodies. Large magma bodies emplaced at shallow crustal levels result from the intrusion of multiple magma batches that interact in a variety of ways, depending on internal and external dynamics, and where the early magmatic, growth-related structures are commonly overprinted by subsequent history. In contrast, small plutons emplaced in the brittle-ductile transition more likely preserve growth-related structures, having a relatively simple cooling history and limited internal magma flow. Outcrop-scale magmatic structures in both cases record a rich set of complementary information that can help elucidate their evolution. Large and small granitic bodies of the Sierra Pampeanas preserve excellent exposures of magmatic structures that formed as magmas stepped through different rheological states during pluton growth and solidification. These structures reveal not only the flow pattern inside magma chambers, but also the rheological evolution of magmas in response to temperature evolution.

  5. Permian basic magmatism, Upper Eocene and Lower Oligocene metamorphism in the Furgg zone (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liati, A.; Gebauer, D.; Froitzheim, N.

    2003-04-01

    The Furgg zone (Western Alps) separates the Monte Rosa nappe from the Bernhard and Zermatt nappes. It consists mainly of a schist-, leucocratic gneiss-, quartzite- and metacarbonate-matrix containing boudins of amphibolitised eclogites. Controversial views exist on the nature, origin and extent of the Furgg zone (cf. Dal Piaz, 2001). We dated by SHRIMP (GSC, Ottawa) magmatic and metamorphic zircon domains of a metabasite in the area of Stockknubel (north of the western part of the Monte Rosa nappe). This metabasite is a strongly retrogressed eclogite occurring in form of a boudin, ca. 1 m long, within leucocratic schists. Based on cathodoluminescence (CL)-imaging, zircons from this rock consist of large oscillatory zoned (magmatic) domains surrounded by metamorphic (recrystallisation) rims, bright in CL, with ghost oscillatory zoning. Bright CL-domains are irregularly dispersed also inside the magmatic domains, due to fluid circulation along fractures during metamorphism(s). Eight spot analyses on the magmatic domains yield a Permian weighted mean age at 269 ± 3 Ma (95% c.l.), corresponding to the crystallisation time of the gabbroic protolith of this metabasite. This age is in agreement with a ca. 272 Ma age reported for the crystallisation of an orthogneiss at Mattmark (farther east in the Furgg zone; Liati et al., 2001), as well as for Monte Rosa granites. The new Permian protolith age of the metabasic rock in Stockknubel, together with a 510 ± 5 Ma age reported for an eclogite boudin from the eastern part of the Furgg zone, is in agreement with the 'mélange hypothesis' for the origin of the Furgg zone (e.g. Froitzheim, 2001). 11 spot analyses on metamorphic domains indicate a strong influence of the Lepontine event at 31.5 ± 1.0 Ma (weighted mean of 8 analyses), accompanied by influx of high amounts of fluids. Of great interest are metamorphic rim analyses at ca. 38-39 Ma, together with a series of data scattering between this and the ca. 31.5 Ma age. The

  6. Strain distribution across magmatic margins during the breakup stage: Seismicity patterns in the Afar rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.; Gregg, T.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Aronovitz, A.; Campbell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Fault patterns record the strain history along passive continental margins, but geochronological constraints are, in general, too sparse to evaluate these patterns in 3D. The Afar depression in Ethiopia provides a unique setting to evaluate the time and space relations between faulting and magmatism across an incipient passive margin that formed above a mantle plume. The margin comprises a high elevation flood basalt province with thick, underplated continental crust, a narrow fault-line escarpment underlain by stretched and intruded crust, and a broad zone of highly intruded, mafic crust lying near sealevel. We analyze fault and seismicity patterns across and along the length of the Afar rift zone to determine the spatial distribution of strain during the final stages of continental breakup, and its relation to active magmatism and dike intrusions. Seismicity data include historic data and 2005-2007 data from the collaborative US-UK-Ethiopia Afar Geodynamics Project that includes the 2005-present Dabbahu rift episode. Earthquake epicenters cluster within discrete, 50 km-long magmatic segments that lack any fault linkage. Swarms also cluster along the fault-line scarp between the unstretched and highly stretched Afar rift zone; these earthquakes may signal release of stresses generated by large lateral density contrasts. We compare Coulomb static stress models with focal mechanisms and fault kinematics to discriminate between segmented magma intrusion and crank- arm models for the central Afar rift zone.

  7. Paleoproterozoic magmatic and metamorphic events link Yangtze to northwest Laurentia in the Nuna supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Cawood, Peter A.; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Jun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Zircons from granitic gneisses in North Vietnam have magmatic cores dated at 2.28-2.19 Ga, and constitute the first reported evidence of continental crust with these ages in the Yangtze Block of the South China Craton. Overgrowths on zircon rims indicate two periods of metamorphism at 1.97-1.95 Ga and ∼1.83 Ga. These events, along with a previously reported ∼2.36 Ga metamorphic overgrowth on ∼2.9 Ga crystallized zircons from the same region, suggest a sequence of events similar to that recorded for the northwestern region of Laurentia and possibly Siberia, which are associated with assembly of the Nuna supercontinent. These include the 2.4-2.3 Ga Arrowsmith Orogen and a range of events in the interval 2.32-1.80 Ga, including accretionary magmatism in northwestern Laurentia and Siberia (2.32-2.07 Ga), the Thelon orogeny (2.02-1.96 Ga) and the 1.85-1.80 Ga collision between the Superior and Hearne-Rae cratons during the Trans-Hudson Orogen in Laurentia, and the Akitkan Orogen in Siberia (2.03-1.86 Ga). Subsequent attempted breakup of Nuna may be represented by ca. 1.80 to 1.59 Ga consanguineous extension related sedimentation and magmatism in the southwestern Yangtze Block and northwestern Laurentia. These correlations favor location of the Yangtze Block adjacent to northwest Laurentia, and possibly Siberia, within the Nuna supercontinent.

  8. Magmatic differentiation processes at Merapi Volcano: inclusion petrology and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troll, Valentin R.; Deegan, Frances M.; Jolis, Ester M.; Harris, Chris; Chadwick, Jane P.; Gertisser, Ralf; Schwarzkopf, Lothar M.; Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Sumarti, Sri; Preece, Katie

    2013-07-01

    Indonesian volcano Merapi is one of the most hazardous volcanoes on the planet and is characterised by periods of active dome growth and intermittent explosive events. Merapi currently degasses continuously through high temperature fumaroles and erupts basaltic-andesite dome lavas and associated block-and-ash-flows that carry a large range of magmatic, coarsely crystalline plutonic, and meta-sedimentary inclusions. These inclusions are useful in order to evaluate magmatic processes that act within Merapi's plumbing system, and to help an assessment of which phenomena could trigger explosive eruptions. With the aid of petrological, textural, and oxygen isotope analysis we record a range of processes during crustal magma storage and transport, including mafic recharge, magma mixing, crystal fractionation, and country rock assimilation. Notably, abundant calc-silicate inclusions (true xenoliths) and elevated δ18O values in feldspar phenocrysts from 1994, 1998, 2006, and 2010 Merapi lavas suggest addition of limestone and calc-silicate materials to the Merapi magmas. Together with high δ13C values in fumarole gas, crustal additions to mantle and slab-derived magma and volatile sources are likely a steady state process at Merapi. This late crustal input could well represent an eruption trigger due to sudden over-pressurisation of the shallowest parts of the magma storage system independently of magmatic recharge and crystal fractionation. Limited seismic precursors may be associated with this type of eruption trigger, offering a potential explanation for the sometimes erratic behaviour of Merapi during volcanic crises.

  9. Geothermal constraints on Emeishan mantle plume magmatism: paleotemperature reconstruction of the Sichuan Basin, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chuanqing; Hu, Shengbiao; Qiu, Nansheng; Jiang, Qiang; Rao, Song; Liu, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    The Middle-Late Permian Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in southwestern China represents a classic example of a mantle plume origin. To constrain the thermal regime of the ELIP and contemporaneous magmatic activity in the northeastern Sichuan Basin, maximum paleotemperature profiles of deep boreholes were reconstructed using vitrinite reflectance (Ro) and apatite fission track data. Two heating patterns were identified: (1) heating of the overlying lithosphere by magma storage regions and/or magmatic activity related to the mantle plume, which resulted in a relatively strong geothermal field and (2) direct heating of country rock by stock or basalt. Borehole Ro data and reconstructed maximum paleotemperature profiles near the ELIP exhibit abrupt tectonothermal unconformities between the Middle and Late Permian. The profiles in the lower subsections (i.e., pre-Middle Permian) exhibited significantly higher gradients than those in the upper subsections. Distal to the basalt province, high paleo-geotemperatures (hereafter, paleotemperatures) were inferred, despite deformation of the paleogeothermal curve due to deep faults and igneous rocks within the boreholes. In contrast, Ro profiles from boreholes without igneous rocks (i.e., Late Permian) contained no break at the unconformity. Paleotemperature gradients of the upper and the lower subsections and erosion at the Middle/Late Permian unconformity revealed variations in the thermal regime. The inferred spatial distribution of the paleothermal regime and the erosion magnitudes record the magmatic and tectonic-thermal response to the Emeishan mantle plume.

  10. Schlieren-bound Magmatic Structures Formed by the Unmixing of Granitic Magmas: A Case Study from Pothole Dome, Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardill, K. E.; Paterson, S. R.; Memeti, V.

    2015-12-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the mobility of crystal mush zones in granitic magmas and their ability to mix and interact with intrusive batches to form compositional heterogeneity in plutons. Magmatic structures, localized zones of compositional diversity, enable evaluation of the significance of magmatic flow and convection vs. chemical diffusion in magmatic systems by determining their mode of formation. With further study, magmatic structures are potentially powerful tools recording syn-emplacement tectonic activity. Pothole Dome, in the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite of the Tuolumne Intrusive Complex is an ideal location to investigate magmatic structures since a variety of plumes, pipes, mafic ellipsoids, and schlieren troughs are densely clustered. Previous workers have established patterns in the orientations of different Pothole Dome magmatic structures that are indicative of a broad pattern of movement and younging directions at the kilometer scale. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical and isotopic data compare variations between the normal Cathedral magmas and a plume, trough, tube, potassium feldspar cluster and granitic dyke to investigate plausible mechanisms for the formation of the distinct compositional diversity formed in the structures. Schlieren, abundant in biotite, hornblende, apatite, sphene and zircon show relatively high levels of titanium, calcium and magnesium relative to the feldspar cluster and dyke. Schlieren are also enriched in minor elements including Zr, Y, Sr and Ce relative to the felsic structures. Both elemental and isotopic data for schlieren defining the plumes and troughs and the late leucogranitic dikes and k-feldspar clusters all plot outside the typical mixing line for Cathedral Peak Granodiorite compositions. We postulate that this may be a result of an unmixing process during physical flow of previously mixed populations of chemically distinct crystals in the Cathedral Peak.

  11. Crustal migration of magmatic CO2 tracked by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Shelly, D. R.; King, J.; McGeehin, J. P.; Mangan, M.; Evans, W.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a dacitic dome complex situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, eastern California. Since 1989, unrest at Mammoth Mountain has been expressed by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated 3He/4He ratios in fumarolic gases, all apparently driven by the release of CO2-rich aqueous fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Three lower-crustal (32-19 km depth) seismic swarms occurred beneath the mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 and were consistently followed several months later by peaks in the frequency of shallow (≤10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured the radiocarbon depletion relative to global background values in the annual rings (1998-2012) of a tree growing in the largest (~0.3 km2) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK). We modeled the ground surface area, on average, that emitted the magmatic CO2 photosynthesized by the study tree (the magmatic CO2 source area) using measured atmospheric parameters. Results indicated that the tree integrated magmatic CO2 emissions over the majority of the HLTK area. The tree-ring radiocarbon record and magmatic CO2 source area modeling together implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season immediately after the largest (February 2010) peak in shallow earthquake frequency. Propagation of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, whereas the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled temporal variations in surface CO2 emissions.

  12. Migrating shoshonitic magmatism tracks Izu-Bonin-Mariana intra-oceanic arc rift propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Yuasa, M.; Tamura, Y.; Shukuno, H.; Stern, R. J.; Naka, J.; Joshima, M.; Taylor, R. N.

    2010-05-01

    The southernmost Izu-Bonin arc and northernmost Mariana arc are characterized by K-rich and shoshonitic lavas, referred to as the alkalic volcano province (AVP). These compositions are unusual for intra-oceanic arcs and the interpretation of the AVP is controversial. Rifting to form the Mariana Trough back-arc basin occurs just south of the AVP although back-arc seafloor spreading has not begun. Here we report the results of dredge sampling of the West Mariana Ridge (WMR) in the region of rift propagation; this recovered exclusively medium K to shoshonitic basalts that show clear arc-like geochemical signatures. Ar-Ar ages of WMR shoshonitics systematically young northward. Age of c. 6 Ma was obtained at 21.5°N, c. 3 Ma at 23-23.5°N, and zero-age shoshonites occur on Io-to Island (formerly Iwo Jima) at 24.8°N. Shoshonitic magmatism migrated northward at 4.3 cm/year, in advance of northward-propagating Mariana Trough rifting. This implies that AVP shoshonitic magmatism manifests processes and sources that are uniquely associated with earliest back-arc basin rifting. High-precision Pb isotopic analyses reveal that WMR lavas form a single trend between 2 components, one with lower 206Pb/ 204Pb and high Δ7/4 (arc-like), and another with high 206Pb/ 204Pb as well as low Δ 7/4 and 8/4 (HIMU-like). These components could correspond respectively to subducted pelagic sediment and subducted seamounts and volcaniclastics with HIMU isotopic signature. These slab-derived components alone, however, cannot fully explain chemical characteristics of WMR shoshonitic lavas. These lavas require a component with high Δ7/4 and high Ce/Pb, which is not likely to be either pelagic sediment or seamount volcanics. This component is only expressed when rifting begins, suggesting that it resides in enriched lithosphere or uppermost asthenosphere, which is easily melted due to decompression caused by rifting, when the lithosphere is first ruptured. This component might be linked to slow

  13. Magmatic evolution of the Sarapiqui Miocene Arc, Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Alvarado, G. E.; Carr, M. J.; Obando, J.; Alfaro, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Sarapiqui Miocene Arc (22.2-11.4 Ma) is located in the modern back-arc region of northern Costa Rica, Central America. The arc basement is represented by serpentinized peridotites, Albian silicic pelagites, and Paleocene to Middle Eocene turbidites. Magmatic units vary from basalts to rhyolites and include lavas, pyroclastic deposits, and a few subvolcanic bodies. The magmatic evolution of the Sarapiqui Miocene Arc consists of three distinct stages: 1) Jardin Basalts (22.2 Ma) showing a primary tendency with high MgO, Ni, Cr, and Nb, high initial La/Yb ratios, and low Ba/La which increase with the slab fluids addition; 2) Arrepentidos Basaltic-andesites, Chaparron Pyroclasts, Hito Sar Basalts, Boca Tapada Gabro, and Chamorro Andesites, that represent the island arc evolution from 17.2 to 11.4 Ma; and 3) Crucitas Rhyolites (14.3 Ma) characterizated by low TiO2 and very high Ba/La ratios represent non-cogenetic, but contemporaneous felsic magmas produced by remelting of pre-existing intrusives. The REE patterns indicate a plagioclase rich, amphibole bearing source for this last unit. The Zr/Nb ratios (7-36) are evidence of the coalescing of a minor OIB source with a dominant MORB source, both modified by subduction. 87Sr/86Sr correlate positively with Ba/La; however, they are still within the OIB field. An inverse model using the REEs of the mafic units is consistent with a source mantle composition of garnet peridotite. All but one of the units show LILE enrichments and HFSE depletions typical of the island arc environment. The exception is a suite of near primary magmas, included in the Jardin Basalts, which probably originated by decompression melting. The Ba/La and La/Yb ratios of the Sarapiqui Miocene Arc are very similar to those of the modern Northern Costa Rican Arc, suggesting that the subduction fluid composition and the degree of partial melting have not changed significantly in the last 20 Ma.

  14. Spatial and temporal variation of OIB-like magmatism in the Western Pacific: Plume or non-plume related enriched magmatism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Ohara, Y.; Tani, K.; Yuasa, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages as well as geochemical data for samples recovered from bathymetric highs in the West Philippine Basin (WPB) and Daito Ridge group in the Philippine Sea. This data defines the volcanic history of OIB-like magmatism in and around the WPB and enables a tectonic reconstruction of the early history of the Philippine Sea. The prominent bathymetric features in the WPB include broad highs (plateaus) of Benham Rise and Urdaneta Plateau which lie at equal distances from the extinct spreading centre of the WPB. The northern margin of the WPB is marked by Daito Ridge group, including Oki-Daito and Daito Ridges, and Amami Plateau as well as the recently-defined Oki-Daito Rise. New drilling and dredge sampling from these bathymetric features as well as from the WPB, recovered dominantly basaltic lavas with minor but significant quantites of more differentiated volcanic rocks. Basalts with OIB-like geochemical characteristics (an overall enrichment of incompatible elements and associated radiogenic isotopes) were found from these bathymetric highs and some locations on the Daito Ridge group. In addition, basalts from the WPB are found to have variable enrichment relative to N-MORB. The age range obtained from OIB-like basalts from Urdaneta Plateau (34.6 to 38.0Ma) agrees with that reported from the Benham Rise. Meanwhile, older ages of around 40-42 Ma were obtained from basalts from the Oki-Daito Rise, north of Urdaneta Plateau. These ages overlap with those we have determined from the Minami-Daito Basin (Hickey-Vargas, 1998). This implies that Urdaneta Plateau and Oki-Daito Rise represent age-progressive record of OIB-like magmatism in the West Philippine Basin, and the source for the OIB-like magmatism existed near the spreading center of the West Philippine Basin at 34-42 Ma. Significantly, the OIB-like magmatism is not restricted to the plateaus, but is also found on the WPB floor. This might indicate that besides the continuous supply of the

  15. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  16. Collision zone magmatism aids continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Ralf, Halama; Gevorg, Navasardian; Chuck, Connor; Massimo, D'Antonio; Samuele, Agostini; Osamu, Ishizuka; Sergei, Karapetian; Arkadi, Karakhanian

    2014-05-01

    The continental crust has a broadly andesitic bulk composition and is predominantly generated at convergent margins. However, estimates of the bulk composition of oceanic arcs indicate a bulk composition closer to basalt than to andesite. Hence, reworking processes that transform basaltic island arc crust into andesitic continental crust are essential[1] and explaining growth of andesitic continental crust via accretion of arc crustal fragments remains problematic. Recent studies of magmatism in the Great Tibetan Plateau[2], as site of multiple and still active continent-continent collisions, have proposed that andesitic CC is generated via amalgamation of large volumes of collision-related felsic magmas generated by melting of hydrated oceanic crust with mantle geochemical signatures. We aim to test this hypothesis by evaluating geochemical data from the volcanically and tectonically active Lesser Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and E. Turkey), as the only other region where active continent-continent collision takes place. We will benefit from the newly compiled volcano-tectonic database of collision-related volcanic and plutonic rocks of Armenia that is comparable in quality and detail to the one available on Tibet. Our dataset combines several detailed studies from the large Aragats shield volcano[3] and associated monogenetic volcanic fields (near the capital city of Yerevan), as well as > 500 Quaternary to Holocene volcanoes from Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik volcanic highlands (toward Armenia-Nagorno-Karabakh-Azerbaijan-Iran border). The Armenian collision-related magmatism is diverse in volume, composition, eruption style and volatile contents. Interestingly, the majority of exposed volcanics are andesitic in composition. Nearly all collision-related volcanic rocks, even the highly differentiated dacite and rhyolite ignimbrites, have elevated Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios varying only little (average ~ 0.7043 and ~ 0

  17. Mesozoic mafic alkaline magmatism of southern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian

    2004-11-01

    More than 100 volcanic necks in central Scania (southern Sweden) are the product of Jurassic continental rift-related mafic alkaline magmatism at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield. They are mainly basanites, with rarer melanephelinites. Both rock groups display overlapping primitive Mg-numbers, Cr and Ni contents, steep chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns (LaN /YbN = 17 27) and an overall enrichment in incompatible elements. However, the melanephelinites are more alkaline and have stronger high field strength element enrichment than the basanites. The existence of distinct primary magmas is also indicated by heterogeneity in highly incompatible element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb, La/Nb). Trace element modelling indicates that the magmas were generated by comparably low degrees of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source. Such a source can best be explained by a metasomatic overprint of the mantle lithosphere by percolating evolved melts. The former existence of such alkaline trace element-enriched melts can be demonstrated by inversion of the trace element content of green-core clinopyroxenes and anorthoclase which occur as xenocrysts in the melanephelinites and are interpreted as being derived from crystallization of evolved mantle melts. Jurassic magmatic activity in Scania was coeval with the generation of nephelinites in the nearby Egersund Basin (Norwegian North Sea). Both Scanian and North Sea alkaline magmas share similar trace element characteristics. Mantle enrichment processes at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield and the North Sea Basin generated trace element signatures similar to those of ocean island basalts (e.g. low Zr/Nb and La/Nb) but there are no indications of plume activity during the Mesozoic in this area. On the contrary, the short duration of rifting, absence of extensive lithospheric thinning, and low magma volumes argue against a Mesozoic mantle plume. It seems likely that the metasomatic imprint resulted from the

  18. Volatile Exsolution Experiments: Sampling Exsolved Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, B.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    In magmatic arcs the conditions of volatile exsolution exert a direct control on the composition of exsolved magmatic volatiles phases (MVPs), as well as on their parental magmas. The ability to accurately assess the exchange of major and trace elements between MVPs and magmas is key to understanding the evolution of arc magmas. The trace element signatures measured in arc volcanoes, fumaroles, and hydrothermal ore deposits are greatly influenced by the role of MVPs. In order to investigate the interplay and evolution of melts and MVPs we need experimental methods to simulate MVP exsolution that impose minimal external constraints on their equilibration. Previous experiments have focused on evaluating the exchange of elements between aqueous fluids and silicate melts under equilibrium conditions[1,2]. However, the large mass proportion of fluid to melt in these experiment designs is unrealistic. As a result, the idealized compositions of the aqueous fluids may exert a strong control on melt compositions for which they are out of equilibrium, especially at low melt fractions. In contrast, other experiments have focused on the melt during crystallization but must calculate MVP compositions by mass balance[3]. In order to investigate MVPs and magmas during this critical period of MVP exsolution, we present a new two-stage fluid-melt experimental design. Stage one experiments generate super-liquidus hydrous melts using Laguna del Maule rhyolites and dactites, as analogues for ascending arc magmas. Stage two experiments allow aliquots of stage one melt/glass to crystallize and exsolve MVPs. The design then uses pressure cycling to promote infiltration of in-situ fractured quartz[4] and traps the MVPs as synthetic fluid inclusions. We present results from trial stage 2 experiments, which produced synthetic fluid inclusions consistent with literature values of fluid-melt Cl partitioning[5] and of sufficient size for LA-ICPMS analysis. Trace element partitioning for Li, Na

  19. Magmatic volatiles and the weathering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The sources for volatiles on Mars have been the subject of many hypotheses for exogenous influences including late accretion of volatile-enriched material, impact devolatilization to create massive early atmospheres, and even major bombardment by comets. However, the inventory of chemically active volatiles observable at the contemporary surface of Mars is consistent with domination by endogenous, subsequent planetary processes, viz., persistent magmatic outgassing. Volcanism on Mars has been widespread in both space and time. Notwithstanding important specific differences between the mantles of Earth and Mars, the geochemical similarities are such that the suite of gases emitted from Martian volcanic activity should include H2O, CO2, S-containing gases (e.g. H2S and/or SO2), and Cl-containing gases (e.g., Cl2 and/or HCl). H2O and CO2 exist in the atmosphere of Mars. Both are also present as surface condensates. However, spectroscopic observations of the Martian atmosphere clearly show that the S- and Cl-containing gases are severely depleted, with upper limits of less than or equal to 10(exp -7) the abundance of CO2. Likewise, there is no evidence of polar condensates of compounds of these elements as there is for CO2 and H2O. Within the soil, on the other hand, there has been direct measurement of incorporated H2O and abundant compounds containing S and Cl. Barring some as yet implausible geochemical sequestering process, the S/Cl ratio of about 6:1 in Martian soils implies a limit of 5% on the contribution of matter of solarlike composition (e.g., carbonaceous chondrite or cometary material) to these volatiles. Hence, exogenous sources are minor or not yet observed. From analysis of elemental trends in Martian soils, it has been recently shown that a simple two-component model can satisfy the Viking in situ measurements. Component A includes Si and most or all the Al, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Component B, taken as 16 +/- 3% by weight of the total, contains S and most or

  20. Martian Magmatic-Driven Hydrothermal Sites: Potential Sources of Energy, Water, and Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Magmatic-driven processes and impact events dominate the geologic record of Mars. Such recorded geologic activity coupled with significant evidence of past and present-day water/ice, above and below the martian surface, indicate that hydrothermal environments certainly existed in the past and may exist today. The identification of such environments, especially long-lived magmatic-driven hydrothermal environments, provides NASA with significant target sites for future sample return missions, since they (1) could favor the development and sustenance of life, (2) may comprise a large variety of exotic mineral assemblages, and (3) could potentially contain water/ice reservoirs for future Mars-related human activities. If life developed on Mars, the fossil record would presumably be at its greatest concentration and diversity in environments where long-term energy sources and water coexisted such as at sites where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity occurred. These assertions are supported by terrestrial analogs. Small, single-celled creatures (prokaryotes) are vitally important in the evolution of the Earth; these prokaryotes are environmentally tough and tolerant of environmental extremes of pH, temperature, salinity, and anoxic conditions found around hydrothermal vents. In addition, there is a great ability for bacteria to survive long periods of geologic time in extreme conditions, including high temperature hydrogen sulfide and sulfur erupted from Mount St. Helens volcano. Our team of investigators is conducting a geological investigation using multiple mission-derived datasets (e.g., existing geologic map data, MOC imagery, MOLA, TES image data, geophysical data, etc.) to identify prime target sites of hydrothermal activity for future hydrological, mineralogical, and biological investigations. The identification of these sites will enhance the probability of success for future missions to Mars.

  1. Martian Magmatic-Driven Hydrothermal Sites: Potential Sources of Energy, Water, and Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-07-01

    Magmatic-driven processes and impact events dominate the geologic record of Mars. Such recorded geologic activity coupled with significant evidence of past and present-day water/ice, above and below the martian surface, indicate that hydrothermal environments certainly existed in the past and may exist today. The identification of such environments, especially long-lived magmatic-driven hydrothermal environments, provides NASA with significant target sites for future sample return missions, since they (1) could favor the development and sustenance of life, (2) may comprise a large variety of exotic mineral assemblages, and (3) could potentially contain water/ice reservoirs for future Mars-related human activities. If life developed on Mars, the fossil record would presumably be at its greatest concentration and diversity in environments where long-term energy sources and water coexisted such as at sites where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity occurred. These assertions are supported by terrestrial analogs. Small, single-celled creatures (prokaryotes) are vitally important in the evolution of the Earth; these prokaryotes are environmentally tough and tolerant of environmental extremes of pH, temperature, salinity, and anoxic conditions found around hydrothermal vents. In addition, there is a great ability for bacteria to survive long periods of geologic time in extreme conditions, including high temperature hydrogen sulfide and sulfur erupted from Mount St. Helens volcano. Our team of investigators is conducting a geological investigation using multiple mission-derived datasets (e.g., existing geologic map data, MOC imagery, MOLA, TES image data, geophysical data, etc.) to identify prime target sites of hydrothermal activity for future hydrological, mineralogical, and biological investigations. The identification of these sites will enhance the probability of success for future missions to Mars.

  2. Monitoring the State of the Magmatic Structures of Elbrus Volcano Based on Observation of Lithosphere Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Milyukov, Vadim; Myasnikov, Andrey; Mironov, Alexey

    2008-06-24

    An analysis of crustal strain recorded by the Baksan laser interferometer revealed a shallow magma chamber in the structure of Elbrus Volcano (The Northern Caucasus, Russia). The analysis is based on estimation of parameters of magmatic structures resonant modes excited by teleseismic signals. The resonance parameters we have found were interpreted in the framework of contemporary models of magma resonators. The depth and dimension of the magma chamber, as well as the properties of the magma fluid were estimated. It was suggested the changing the magma state due to rising the intrachamber pressure.

  3. Does magmatism influence low-angle normal faulting?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Thompson, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Synextensional magmatism has long been recognized as a ubiquitous characteristic of highly extended terranes in the western Cordillera of the United States. Intrusive magmatism can have severe effects on the local stress field of the rocks intruded. Because a lower angle fault undergoes increased normal stress from the weight of the upper plate, it becomes more difficult for such a fault to slide. However, if the principal stress orientations are rotated away from vertical and horizontal, then a low-angle fault plane becomes more favored. We suggest that igneous midcrustal inflation occurring at rates faster than regional extension causes increased horizontal stresses in the crust that alter and rotate the principal stresses. Isostatic forces and continued magmatism can work together to create the antiformal or domed detachment surface commonly observed in the metamorphic core complexes of the western Cordillera. Thermal softening caused by magmatism may allow a more mobile mid-crustal isostatic response to normal faulting.

  4. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon

    PubMed Central

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H2O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher. PMID:20547878

  5. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, Francis M; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-06-22

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H(2)O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher.

  6. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  7. Cenozoic extension and magmatism in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, S. J.; Spencer, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Basin and Range Province of Arizona was the site of two episodes of Cenozoic extension that can be distinguished on the basis of timing, direction and style of extension, and associated magmatism. The first episode of extension occurred during Oligocene to mid-Miocene time and resulted in the formation of low-angle detachment faults, ductile shear zones (metamorphic core complexes), and regional domains of tilted fault blocks. Evidence for extreme middle Tertiary crustal extension in a NE to SW to SW to ENE to WSW direction has been recognized in various parts of the Basin and Range of Arizona, especially in the Lake Mead area and along the belf of metamorphic core complexes that crosses southern Arizona from Parker to Tucson. New geologic mapping and scrutiny of published geologic maps indicates that significant middle Tertiary extension is more widely distributed than previously thought. The state can be subdivided into regional tilt-block domains in which middle Tertiary rocks dip consistently in one direction. The dip direction in any tilt-block domain is generally toward the breakaway of a low-angle detachment fault that underlies the tilt-block domain; we interpret this an indicating that normal faults in the upper plate of a detechment fault are generally synthetic, rather than antithetic, with respect to the detachment fault.

  8. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Prolonged post-rift magmatism on highly extended crust of divergent continental margins (Baiyun Sag, South China Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fang; Alves, Tiago M.; Wu, Shiguo; Li, Wei; Huuse, Mads; Mi, Lijun; Sun, Qiliang; Ma, Benjun

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic, borehole and geochemical data reveal a prolonged phase of post-rift magmatism on highly extended crust of the Baiyun Sag, South China Sea. Two volcanic complexes are identified and described in the context of continental rifting and diachronous continental breakup of the South China Sea. Biostratigraphic data from exploration wells BY7-1 and BY2, complemented by K-Ar datings from core samples, confirm that magmatic activity in the Baiyun Sag occurred in two main stages: (1) a first episode at the base of the Miocene (23.8 Ma); and (2) a second episode occurring at the end of the Early Miocene (17.6 Ma). The relative location of volcanic complexes in the Baiyun Sag, and their stratigraphic position, reveals prolonged magmatism inboard of the ocean-continent transition zone during continental breakup. We suggest that magmatism in the Baiyun Sag reflects progressive continental breakup in the South China Sea, with the last volcanic episode marking the end of a breakup sequence representing the early post-rift tectonic events associated with the continental breakup process. Seismic and borehole data from this breakup sequence records diachronous magma emplacement and complex changes in depositional environments during continental breakup.

  10. Brumalia Tholus: Magmatic Intrusion on Vesta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, Debra L.; DeSanctis, M. Christina; Raymond, Carol A.; Ammannito, Eleonora; Frigeri, Alessandro; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Williams, David; Russell, Christopher T.

    2013-04-01

    Geologic mapping of Vesta was based on Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) images and compositional data from the Visible & Infrared Spectrometer (VIR). Mapping reveals that while the equatorial region of Vesta displays numerous wide, flat-floored troughs [1], these troughs do not cut the Vestalia Terra plateau (VT) [2]. However, three large pit crater chains are observed on the VT surface [2,3]. Pit crater chains are hypothesized to form when dilational motion on buried normal faults causes overlying material to collapse into the opening portions of the buried fault [4]. The merged pits of the VT pit crater chains show signs of collapse but distinct fault faces can also be observed [3]. It has thus been suggested that the VT pit crater chains are representative of subsurface faulting of the plateau [2]. The pit crater chain Albalonga Catena phases from being a topographically low feature of merged pits into being the topographically high Brumalia Tholus, an elongate hill. If Albalonga Catena represents a buried normal fault, then the topographic high that emerges along its length could have been formed by a magmatic intrusion utilizing the subsurface fracture as a conduit to the surface. Brumalia Tholus should thus be comprised of diogenite, a plutonic vestan material. Teia crater impacts Brumalia Tholus and likely samples Brumalia's core material. FC data indicates that Teia ejecta have a smeared, flow-like texture and a distinct compostion. VIR analysis has shown that while background VT material is howarditic [5], these Teia ejecta are more diogenitic. VIR also detected small diogenite deposits on top of Brumalia Tholus. The identification of diogenite on the top of Brumalia Tholus and in the Teia ejecta is consistent with the hill being the surface representation of a magmatic intrusion. We present a possible sequence of events. Global equatorial fracturing and faulting occurred, resulting in sub-surface faulting of VT. The surface of VT was covered by

  11. Fluid Dynamic Experiments on Mush Column Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan-Brown, R. E.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    A vertically extensive stack of sills interconnected by pipe-like conduits extending from the mantle through the lithosphere and capped by a volcanic center is a magmatic mush column. At any instant at various locations it contains fractionated and primitive melts as pools of nearly crystal-free magma, pools of crystal-rich magma, thick beds of cumulates, open conduits, and conduits congested by cognate and wall debris. All boundaries of the system are sheathed by solidification fronts. With the wide range of local, characteristic length scales there is a commensurate range of solidification time scales. This creates a complicated series of resistances to magma flow and provides a variety of distinct local physical environments for the chemical modification of magma. The system is driven by over-pressure from the addition of new melt from below. The over-pressure propagates upward by moving magma which flushes conduits, disrupts cumulate beds, and pools or purges sills. A critical aspect of this process is the entrainment, transport, and deposition of crystals throughout the system. Picritic lavas charges with entrained (tramp) olivine of a wide compositional range erupted at many systems (e.g. Jan Mayen, Kilauea, Reunion, etc.) are the final expression of this process. That the size and abundance of these crystals is correlated with eruptive flux (Murata & Richter, AJS, 1966) suggests an important indicator of the overall dynamics of the mush column. A mush column of this basic nature is observed is observed in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica and is inferred beneath Hawaii and the ocean ridges. We have attempted to model this process by studying the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles in a vertical stack of sills (Plexiglas tanks) connected by resistive conduits (check valves), over-pressured from the base, and open at the top. The system is about two meters in height with water and oil as fluids and particles with Reynolds numbers

  12. U-Pb zircon and geochemical evidence for bimodal mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic base-metal mineralization in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Wooden, J.L.; Hopkins, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    New SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon ages and trace element geochemical data for mafic and felsic metaigneous rocks of the pericratonic Yukon-Tanana terrane in east-central Alaska help define the tectonic setting of mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic hydrothermal Zn-Pb-Ag mineralization along the ancient Pacific margin of North America. We compare data from similar greenschist-facies sequences of bimodal volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with carbonaceous and siliciclastic marine sedimentary rocks, in the Wood River area of the Alaska Range and the Salcha River area of the Yukon-Tanana Upland, and from amphibolite-facies augen gneiss and mafic gneiss (amphibolite) in the Goodpaster River area of the upland. Allowing for analytical uncertainties, igneous crystallization age ranges of 376-353 Ma, 378-346 Ma, and 374-358 Ma are indicated by 13 new SHRIMP U-Pb dates for the Wood River, Salcha River, and Goodpaster River areas, respectively. Bimodal magmatism is indicated by Late Devonian crystallization ages for both augen gneiss (371 ?? 3 and 362 ?? 4 Ma) and associated orthoamphibolite (369 ?? 3 Ma) in the upland and by stratigraphic interleaving of mafic and felsic rocks in the Alaska Range. Metabasites in all three study areas have elevated HFSE (high field strength element) and REE (rare earth element) contents indicative of generation in a within-plate (extensional) tectonic setting. Within-plate trace element signatures also are indicated for peralkaline metarhyolites that host the largest volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield district in the Wood River area and for metarhyolite tuff interlayered with the carbonaceous Nasina assemblage, which hosts sedimentary exhalative sulfide occurrences in the Salcha River area. Most of the other felsic metaigneous samples from the Alaska Range and the Yukon-Tanana Upland have geochemical signatures that are similar to those of both average upper continental crust

  13. Neoarchean arc magmatism followed by high-temperature, high-pressure metamorphism in the Nilgiri Block, southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Vinod O.; Sajeev, K.; Hokada, T.; Horie, K.; Itaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Nilgiri Block, southern India is an exhumed lower crust formed through arc magmatic processes in the Neoarchean. The main lithologies in this terrane include charnockites, gneisses, volcanic tuff, metasediments, banded iron formation and mafic-ultramafic bodies. Mafic-ultramafic rocks are present towards the northern and central part of the Nilgiri Block. We examine the evolution of these mafic granulites/metagabbros by phase diagram modeling and U-Pb sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) dating. They consist of a garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase-hornblende-ilmenite ± orthopyroxene ± rutile assemblage. Garnet and clinopyroxene form major constituents with labradorite and orthopyroxene as the main mineral inclusions. Labradorite, identified using Raman analysis, shows typical peaks at 508 cm- 1, 479 cm- 1, 287 cm- 1 and 177 cm- 1. It is stable along with orthopyroxene towards the low-pressure high-temperature region of the granulite facies (M1 stage). Subsequently, orthopyroxene reacted with plagioclase to form the peak garnet + clinopyroxene + rutile assemblage (M2 stage). The final stage is represented by amphibolite facies-hornblende and plagioclase-rim around the garnet-clinopyroxene assemblage (M3 stage). Phase diagram modeling shows that these mafic granulites followed an anticlockwise P-T-t path during their evolution. The initial high-temperature metamorphism (M1 stage) was at 850-900 °C and ~ 9 kbar followed by high-pressure granulite facies metamorphism (M2 stage) at 850-900 °C and 14-15 kbar. U-Pb isotope studies of zircons using SHRIMP revealed late Neoarchean to early paleoproterozoic ages of crystallization and metamorphism respectively. The age data shows that these mafic granulites have undergone arc magmatism at ca. 2539.2 ± 3 Ma and high-temperature, high-pressure metamorphism at ca. 2458.9 ± 8.6 Ma. Thus our results suggests a late Neoarchean arc magmatism followed by early paleoproterozoic high-temperature, high

  14. Hercynian post-collisional magmatism in the context of Paleozoic magmatic evolution of the Tien Shan orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Reimar; Konopelko, Dmitry; Biske, Georgy; Divaev, Farid; Sergeev, Sergei

    2011-10-01

    The Hercynian Tien Shan (Tianshan) orogen formed during Late Palaeozoic collision between the Karakum-Tarim and the Kazakhstan paleo-continents. In order to constrain timing of Hercynian post-collisional magmatism, 27 intrusions were sampled for U-Pb zircon dating along a ca. 2000 km - long profile in Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. The samples were dated utilizing sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP-II). The obtained ages, together with previously published age data, allowed the timing of Hercynian post-collisional magmatism to be constrained and interpreted in the context of the Paleozoic magmatic evolution of the region. Apart from Hercynian post-collisional magmatism, two older magmatic episodes have been recognized, and the following sequence of events has been established: (1) approximately 10 Ma after cessation of continuous Caledonian magmatism a number of Late Silurian-Early Devonian intrusions were emplaced in the Middle and Northern Tien Shan terranes between 420 and 390 Ma. The intrusions probably formed in an extensional back arc setting during coeval subduction under the margins of Caledonian Paleo-Kazakhstan continent; (2) the next relatively short Late Carboniferous episode of subduction under Paleo-Kazakhstan was registered in the Kurama range of the Middle Tien Shan. Calc-alkaline volcanics and granitoids with ages 315-300 Ma have distinct metallogenic affinities typical for subduction-related rocks and are not found anywhere outside the Middle Tien Shan terrane west of the Talas-Farghona fault; (3) the Early Permian Hercynian post-collisional magmatism culminated after the closure of the Paleo-Turkestan ocean and affected the whole region across terrane boundaries. The post-collisional intrusions formed within a relatively short time span between 295 and 280 Ma. The model for Hercynian post-collisional evolution suggests that after collision the Tien Shan was affected by trans-crustal strike-slip motions which provided suitable conduits

  15. The origin of along-rift variations in faulting and magmatism in the Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, Derek; Bastow, Ian D.; Corti, Giacomo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Rooney, Tyrone O.

    2015-03-01

    The geological record at rifts and margins worldwide often reveals considerable along-strike variations in volumes of extruded and intruded igneous rocks. These variations may be the result of asthenospheric heterogeneity, variations in rate, and timing of extension; alternatively, preexisting plate architecture and/or the evolving kinematics of extension during breakup may exert first-order control on magmatism. The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) in East Africa provides an excellent opportunity to address this dichotomy: it exposes, along strike, several sectors of asynchronous rift development from continental rifting in the south to incipient oceanic spreading in the north. Here we perform studies of volcanic cone density and rift obliquity along strike in the MER. By synthesizing these new data in light of existing geophysical, geochemical, and petrological constraints on magma generation and emplacement, we are able to discriminate between tectonic and mantle geodynamic controls on the geological record of a newly forming magmatic rifted margin. The timing of rift sector development, the three-dimensional focusing of melt, and the ponding of plume material where the rift dramatically narrows each influence igneous intrusion and volcanism along the MER. However, rifting obliquity plays an important role in localizing intrusion into the crust beneath en echelon volcanic segments. Along-strike variations in volumes and types of igneous rocks found at rifted margins thus likely carry information about the development of strain during rifting, as well as the physical state of the convecting mantle at the time of breakup.

  16. Along-rift Variations in Deformation and Magmatism in the Ethiopian and Afar Rift Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, D.; Bastow, I. D.; Corti, G.; Mazzarini, F.; Rooney, T. O.

    2015-12-01

    The geological record at rifts and margins worldwide often reveals along-strike variations in volumes of extruded and intruded igneous rocks. These variations may be the result of asthenospheric heterogeneity, variations in rate, and timing of extension; alternatively, preexisting plate architecture and/or the evolving kinematics of extension during breakup may exert first-order control on magmatism. The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide an excellent opportunity to address this since it exposes, along strike, several sectors of asynchronous rift development from continental rifting in the south to incipient oceanic spreading in the north. Here we perform studies of distribution and style of volcanism and faulting along strike in the MER and Afar. We also incorporate synthesis of geophysical, geochemical, and petrological constraints on magma generation and emplacement in order to discriminate between tectonic and mantle geodynamic controls on the geological record of a newly forming magmatic rift. Along-rift changes in extension by magma intrusion and plate stretching, and the three-dimensional focusing of melt where the rift dramatically narrows each influence igneous intrusion, volcanism and subsidence history. In addition, rift obliquity plays an important role in localizing intrusion into the crust beneath en echelon volcanic segments. Along-strike variations in volumes and types of igneous rocks found at rifted margins thus likely carry information about the development of strain during rifting, as well as the physical state of the convecting mantle at the time of breakup.

  17. Pre-collisional, Tonian (ca. 790 Ma) continental arc magmatism in southern Mantiqueira Province, Brazil: Geochemical and isotopic constraints from the Várzea do Capivarita Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martil, Mariana Maturano Dias; de Fátima Bitencourt, Maria; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll; Koester, Edinei; Pimentel, Márcio Martins

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on the pre-collisional mature arc magmatism (ca. 790 Ma) recorded in orthogneisses from the Várzea do Capivarita Complex (VCC), southern Mantiqueira Province (PM), Brazil. The complex comprises ortho- and paragneisses tectonically interleaved during a transpressive high grade regime (ca. 650 Ma), possibly related to oblique collision. The VCC orthogneisses are metaluminous to peraluminous calc-alkaline rocks, with high 87Sr/86Sr(i) ratios from 0.71628 to 0.72509 and εNd(790) values from - 7.19 to - 10.06. The VCC magmatism is correlated with other ca. 800 Ma arc sequences from southern PM, as the Porongos Metamorphic Complex (PMC) metavolcanic rocks and the orthogneisses from Cerro Bori (CB), Uruguay. All associations show signatures typical of accretionary orogens, TDM and Meso to Paleoproteroic inheritance ages, and strong evidence of crustal assimilation/contamination. Their high K contents, and the tendency to move toward the post-collisional field in geotectonic diagrams suggest that they were generated in thick-crust, mature arc environments. In contrast, the CB sequence exhibits a less mature continental-arc character, suggestive of thinner crust or shorter distance to the active margin. VCC and CB orthogneisses, and part of the PMC metavolcanic rocks may be interpreted as part of the same magmatism, or at least as fragments of similar magmatic arcs. However, VCC magmatism is distinct from continental arc sequences in the São Gabriel Block (ca. 700-750 Ma). Isotope signatures for this younger magmatism indicate major contribution of Neoproterozoic juvenile sources, with only little amounts of reworked, old continental crust. Geochemical and Sr-Nd signatures presented in this paper suggest that at least part of the PMC metavolcanic rocks are the protoliths of the VCC orthogneisses. This, together with the isotope evidence of similarity between VCC and PMC igneous and sedimentary fractions, corroborates the hypothesis that the VCC and PMC

  18. Three stages in the Late Paleozoic to Triassic magmatism of southwestern Gondwana, and the relationships with the volcanogenic events in coeval basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ana María; Llambías, Eduardo J.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Castro, Carlos E.

    2015-11-01

    The intermediate to acid Choiyoi Magmatic Province is the most conspicuous feature along the Late Paleozic continental margin of southwestern Gondwana, and is generally regarded as the possible source for the widespread ash fall deposits interlayered with sedimentary sequences in the adjacent Gondwana basins. The Choiyoi magmatism is geologically constrained between the early Permian San Rafael orogenic phase and the Triassic extensional Huarpica phase in the region of Argentine Frontal Cordillera, Precordillera and San Rafael Block. In order to better assess the Choiyoi magmatism in Argentine Frontal Cordillera, we obtained 6 new LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages between 278.8 ± 3.4 Ma and 252.5 ± 1.9 Ma from plutonic rocks of the Colangüil Batholith and an associated volcanic rock. The global analysis of age data compiled from Chilean and Argentine Late Paleozoic to Triassic outcrops allows us to identify three stages of magmatism: (1) pre-Choiyoi orogenic magmatism, (2) Choiyoi magmatism (286-247 Ma), and (3) post-Choiyoi magmatism related to extensional tectonics. In the Choiyoi stage is there an eastward shift and expansion of the magmatism to the southeast, covering an extensive region that defines the Choiyoi magmatic province. On the basis of comparison with the ages from volcanogenic levels identified in the coeval Gondwana basins, we propose: (a) The pre-Choiyoi volcanism from the Paganzo basin (320-296 Ma) probably has a local source in addition to the Frontal Cordillera region. (b) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events identified in the Paraná basin (304-275 Ma) are likely to have their source in the Chilean Precordillera. (c) The early stage of the Choiyoi magmatism found in the Sauce Grande basin (284-281 Ma) may have come from the adjacent Las Matras to Chadileuvú blocks. (d) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events in the Karoo basins (302-253 Ma) include the longest Choiyoi interval, and as a whole bear the best resemblance to the age records along the Chilean and

  19. Arabian Shield magmatic cycles and their relationship with Gondwana assembly: Insights from zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, F. A.; Foden, J. D.; Collins, A. S.; Payne, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Shield preserves a protracted magmatic record of amalgamated juvenile terranes that host a diverse range of early Neoproterozoic to Cambrian granitoids intruding volcanosedimentary basin assemblages that have corollaries in other parts of the East African Orogen. New zircon U-Pb geochronology of 19 granitoids intruding eight Arabian Shield terranes, define four discrete magmatic events: island arc (∼845 Ma), syncollisional (∼710 Ma), post-tectonic (∼620 Ma) and anorogenic (∼525 Ma). Zircon Lu-Hf isotopic analyses indicate that all studied granitoids are juvenile with typical εHf values of >+5 to +10 and Stenian-Tonian (∼1100-900 Ma) model ages, regardless of their precise intrusive ages or spatial relationship. Subtle changes in isotopic signatures between ∼850 and 600 Ma, suggest the result from changes in granite source materials brought about by; basaltic underplating, limited crustal interaction with Palaeoproterozoic basement and a change to lithospheric delamination/subduction roll-back processes driving juvenile ANS crustal growth. The cycle of granite intrusion reflects accretionary cycles initiated during Mozambique Ocean closure and during Gondwana amalgamation and final assembly. Post-tectonic magmatism is divided into a ∼636-600 Ma phase and post 600 Ma event that reflects first subduction and then within-plate related processes. The identification of magmatism at ∼525 Ma is now the youngest granitoid identified so far in the Saudi Arabian Shield and may change the identified age of the regional, basal Palaeozoic unconformity. This late magmatism may be generated by the Najd Fault reactivation correlating with the Malagasy/Kunnga Orogeny that marked the final stages of Gondwana assembly.

  20. The southern margin of the Caribbean Plate in Venezuela: tectono-magmatic setting of the ophiolitic units and kinematic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, Giuseppe; Beccaluva, Luigi; Coltorti, Massimo; Siena, Franca; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2002-07-01

    The southern Caribbean Plate margin in Venezuela consists of a W-E elongated deformed belt, composed of several tectonic units dismembered along the northern part of the South America continental Plate since the Late Cretaceous. The present review, based on petrology and tectono-magmatic significance of each unit, makes it possible to define the main geotectonic elements and to reconstruct the paleogeographic domains from Late Jurassic to Tertiary: (a) Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) proto-Caribbean oceanic basin (Loma de Hierro Unit); (b) oceanic plateau (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands basement); (c) rifted continental margin (Cordillera de La Costa and Caucagua-El Tinaco Units) with Within Plate Tholeiitic (WPTh) magmatism; (d) an intra-oceanic subduction zone represented by Island Arc Tholeiitic (IAT) magmatism (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units) of Early Cretaceous age; (e) an Early Cretaceous ocean-continent subduction trench filled by melange (Franja Costera); (f) a new intra-oceanic subduction zone, represented by the tonalitic arc magmatism of Late Cretaceous age (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands). Regional tectonic constraints and coherent kinematic reconstruction suggest an original "near-Mid America" location of the Jurassic-Cretaceous "proto-Caribbean" oceanic realm. From Early to Late Cretaceous one sub-continental subduction with melanges (Franja Costera Unit) and two main stages of intra-oceanic arc magmatism are recorded in the so-called "eo-Caribbean" phases. The first consists of generally metamorphosed and deformed volcano-plutonic sequences with IAT affinity (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units), probably in relation to a southeastward-dipping subduction. The second is mainly represented by generally unmetamorphosed tonalitic intrusives cutting the oceanic plateau in the Dutch and Venezuelan Islands, and related to the new intra-oceanic subduction with reverse lithospheric sinking. The latter probably marked the onset of the Aves/Lesser Antilles arc

  1. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  2. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-11

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  3. Crustal Strain Patterns in Magmatic and Amagmatic Early Stage Rifts: Border Faults, Magma Intrusion, and Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Tiberi, C.; Aman, M.; Weinstein, A.; Lambert, C.; Drooff, C.; Oliva, S. J. C.; Peterson, K.; Bourke, J. R.; Rodzianko, A.; Gallacher, R. J.; Lavayssiere, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Khalfan, M.; Mulibo, G. D.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Palardy, A.; Albaric, J.; Gautier, S.; Muirhead, J.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    Rift initiation in thick, strong continental lithosphere challenges current models of continental lithospheric deformation, in part owing to gaps in our knowledge of strain patterns in the lower crust. New geophysical, geochemical, and structural data sets from youthful magmatic (Magadi-Natron, Kivu), weakly magmatic (Malawi, Manyara), and amagmatic (Tanganyika) sectors of the cratonic East African rift system provide new insights into the distribution of brittle strain, magma intrusion and storage, and time-averaged deformation. We compare and contrast time-space relations, seismogenic layer thickness variations, and fault kinematics using earthquakes recorded on local arrays and teleseisms in sectors of the Western and Eastern rifts, including the Natron-Manyara basins that developed in Archaean lithosphere. Lower crustal seismicity occurs in both the Western and Eastern rifts, including sectors on and off craton, and those with and without central rift volcanoes. In amagmatic sectors, lower crustal strain is accommodated by slip along relatively steep border faults, with oblique-slip faults linking opposing border faults that penetrate to different crustal levels. In magmatic sectors, seismicity spans surface to lower crust beneath both border faults and eruptive centers, with earthquake swarms around magma bodies. Our focal mechanisms and Global CMTs from a 2007 fault-dike episode show a local rotation from ~E-W extension to NE-SE extension in this linkage zone, consistent with time-averaged strain recorded in vent and eruptive chain alignments. These patterns suggest that strain localization via widespread magma intrusion can occur during the first 5 My of rifting in originally thick lithosphere. Lower crustal seismicity in magmatic sectors may be caused by high gas pressures and volatile migration from active metasomatism and magma degassing, consistent with high CO2 flux along fault zones, and widespread metasomatism of xenoliths. Volatile release and

  4. Apatite: A New Tool For Understanding The Temporal Variability Of Magmatic Volatile Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. J.; Humphreys, M.; Smith, V.; Pyle, D. M.; Isaia, R.

    2015-12-01

    The apatite crystal structure is capable of incorporating H2O, F and Cl, as well as trace CO2 and sulphur. These can be related to parental magma compositions through application of a series of pressure and temperature-dependent exchange reactions (Piccoli and Candela, 1994), permitting apatite crystals to preserve a record of all major volatile species in the melt. Furthermore, due to the general incompatibility of P in other rock-forming minerals, apatite is ubiquitous in igneous systems and often begins crystallising early, such that apatite inclusions within phenocrysts record melt volatile contents throughout magmatic differentiation. In this work, we compare the compositions of apatite inclusions and microphenocrysts with pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions from the Astroni 1 eruption of Campi Flegrei, Italy. These data are coupled with magmatic differentiation models (Gualda et al., 2012), experimental volatile solubility data (Webster et al., 2014) and thermodynamic models of apatite compositional variations (Piccoli and Candela, 1994) to determine a time-series of magmatic volatile evolution in the build-up to eruption. We find that apatite halogen/OH ratios decreased through magmatic differentiation, while melt inclusion F and Cl concentrations increased. Melt inclusion H2O contents are constant at ~2.5 wt%. These data are best explained by volatile-undersaturated differentiation over most of the crystallisation history of the Astroni 1 melt, with melt inclusion H2O contents reset during ascent, due to rapid H diffusion through the phenocryst hosts (Woods et al., 2000). Given the rapid diffusivity of volatiles in apatite (Brenan, 1993), preservation of undersaturated compositions in microphenocrysts suggests that saturation was only achieved a few days to months before eruption and that it may have been the transition into a volatile-saturated state that ultimately triggered eruption. Piccoli and Candela, 1994. Am. J. of Sc., 294, 92-135. Gualda et al., 2012

  5. Magmatism and Geodynamics of Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, Mehmet; Oyan, Vural; Sharkov, Evgenii V.; Chugaev, Andrey V.; Genç, Ş. Can; Ünal, Esin; Aysal, Namık; Duru, Olgun; Kavak, Orhan

    2013-04-01

    Eastern Turkey has been an active collision zone for the last 15 My between the Arabian Plate and Eurasian continent. The collision initiated after the closure of the southern branch of the Neotethys Ocean by northward subduction beneath E Anatolia at ~15 Ma. The collision-related volcanism started immediately after the closure of the ocean (again at around 15 Ma) in the north of the present day Lake Van with the eruption of mostly intermediate to acid lavas displaying distinct subduction characteristics. Both continental collision and the magmatism are still active, because the Arabian plate still converges to Anatolia with a velocity of ~2.5 cm/y. The overriding Anatolian block experienced a major uplift event around 10 Ma. The region once resided below the sea level merged as a widespread plateau ~2 km above the sea level as part of a regional dome structure with ~1000 km diameter, extending from Central Anatolia in the West to Azerbaijan in the East. The first alkaline lavas derived from a relatively more enriched source erupted to the surface in the N of Lake Van coeval with the initiation of the uplift at around 10 Ma. The underthrusting Arabian platform, on the other hand, was deformed as a result of both crustal-scale east-west folds adjacent to the major thrust zone and extensional deformations perpendicular to the suture zone. Alkaline within-plate lavas with no subduction component erupted through these extension zones. This intraplate volcanism focused on the Karacadaǧ volcanic complex that covers an area of ~10,000 km2. Early Stage volcanism of Karacadaǧ was dominated by magmas derived from a shallower metasomatized (litospheric) mantle source, while magmas of the later stages were derived from deeper (asthenospheric) sources. The Karacadaǧ volcanic area of SE Anatolia was sourced by a garnet bearing, deep asthenospheric mantle which is similar to that of Afar in terms of its Pb isotopic ratios. This brings into question whether the mantle material

  6. The magmatic and thermal history of the Dufek Complex, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnes, J. D.; Cheadle, M. J.; Gee, J. S.; Grimes, C. B.; Swapp, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Jurassic (~180Ma) Dufek Complex in the Pensacola Mountains of Antarctica is arguably one of the largest layered mafic intrusions in the world, with a minimum areal extent of 6600km2. However the mechanisms by which it grew are unclear. Gradually varying, decreasing upward trends in plagioclase and pyroxene mineral compositions suggest that it grew by a few large (kilometers thick) injections of magma, but it's hard to understand how these thick "vats" of magma are rheologically stable in the continental crust. Alternatively, it could have grown by repeated replenishments of small volumes of magma, the evidence for which is somehow hidden in the broad scale mineral composition trends. This research documents the thermal and magmatic history of a well-sampled 104m representative section of the Aughenbaugh Gabbro. To test whether magma replenishment is a major factor in constructing this intrusion, we have systematically documented changes in lithology, mineral compositions, and texture across a series of 10-70 cm thick, xenolith bearing, sharp based, modally graded pyroxene-rich layers, which might represent magmatic replenishment events. The section consists of gabbronorites and norites with 19-84 vol.% plagioclase and 14-63 vol.% inverted pigeonite (IP). Clinopyroxene (cpx) is intercumulus and varies from 0-18 vol.%. Modal layering is rare. The rocks have a relatively fine grain size of 0.5-2.25 mm and generally exhibit poorly equilibrated textures. Plagioclase compositions range from An62.0-An66.0 ± 0.3 in grain cores, and An60.9-An65.6 ± 0.3 in grain rims. The An content of the cumulus plagioclase decreases with increasing plagioclase modal abundance. The Mg# of IP ranges from 56.9-62.6 ± 0.3 and shows no zonation, as it has re-equilibrated. The Mg# of cpx varies from 64.9-66.4 ± 0.3. The Mg# of both the IP and the cpx increases in the pyroxene-rich layers. True dihedral angles were measured using a universal stage. The mean dihedral angle of plagioclase

  7. Paleo- and Neoproterozoic magmatic and tectonometamorphic evolution of the Isla Cristalina de Rivera (Nico Pérez Terrane, Uruguay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyhantçabal, Pedro; Wagner-Eimer, Martin; Wemmer, Klaus; Schulz, Bernhard; Frei, Robert; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2012-10-01

    The Isla Cristalina de Rivera crystalline complex in northeastern Uruguay underwent a multistage magmatic and metamorphic evolution. Based on SHRIMP U-Pb zircon, Th-U-Pb monazite (CHIME-EPMA method) and K-Ar age data from key units several events can be recognized: (1) multistage magmatism at 2,171-2,114 Ma, recorded on zircon of the granulitic orthogneisses and their 2,093-2,077 Ma overgrowths; (2) a distinct amphibolite facies metamorphism at ~1,980 Ma, recorded by monazite; (3) greenschist facies reworking and shearing at ca. 606 Ma (monazite and K-Ar on muscovite) along the Rivera Shear Zone, and finally (4) intrusion of the post-tectonic Sobresaliente and Las Flores granites at around 585 Ma. Lithological similarities, geographic proximity and coeval magmatic and metamorphic events indicate a similar tectonometamorphic evolution for the Isla Cristalina de Rivera, the Valentines Block in Uruguay and the Santa María Chico Granulitic Complex in southern Brazil, since at least 2.1 Ga.

  8. Constraining Slab Breakoff Induced Magmatism through Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburn, R.; Van Hunen, J.; Maunder, B. L.; Magni, V.; Bouilhol, P.

    2015-12-01

    Post-collisional magmatism is markedly different in nature and composition than pre-collisional magmas. This is widely interpreted to mark a change in the thermal structure of the system due to the loss of the oceanic slab (slab breakoff), allowing a different source to melt. Early modelling studies suggest that when breakoff takes place at depths shallower than the overriding lithosphere, magmatism occurs through both the decompression of upwelling asthenopshere into the slab window and the thermal perturbation of the overriding lithosphere (Davies & von Blanckenburg, 1995; van de Zedde & Wortel, 2001). Interpretations of geochemical data which invoke slab breakoff as a means of generating magmatism mostly assume these shallow depths. However more recent modelling results suggest that slab breakoff is likely to occur deeper (e.g. Andrews & Billen, 2009; Duretz et al., 2011; van Hunen & Allen, 2011). Here we test the extent to which slab breakoff is a viable mechanism for generating melting in post-collisional settings. Using 2-D numerical models we conduct a parametric study, producing models displaying a range of dynamics with breakoff depths ranging from 150 - 300 km. Key models are further analysed to assess the extent of melting. We consider the mantle wedge above the slab to be hydrated, and compute the melt fraction by using a simple parameterised solidus. Our models show that breakoff at shallow depths can generate a short-lived (< 3 Myr) pulse of mantle melting, through the hydration of hotter, undepleted asthenosphere flowing in from behind the detached slab. However, our results do not display the widespread, prolonged style of magmatism, observed in many post-collisional areas, suggesting that this magmatism may be generated via alternative mechanisms. This further implies that using magmatic observations to constrain slab breakoff is not straightforward.

  9. Intermittent 1630 1220 Ma magmatism in central Mazatzal province: New geochronologic piercing points and some tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapani Rämö, O.; McLemore, Virginia T.; Hamilton, Michael A.; Kosunen, Paula J.; Heizler, Matt; Haapala, Ilmari

    2003-04-01

    The northern Burro Mountains in southwestern New Mexico reveal three distinct, intimately juxtaposed Mesoproterozoic magmatic suites in southern Laurentia. At 1633 Ma, the newly formed Mazatzal crust was intruded by tholeiitic diabase with a depleted-mantle type Nd isotope composition but with enriched incompatible trace element abundances. A potassic granite-minette suite was emplaced ca. 1460 Ma, and a tholeiitic A-type granite-anorthosite suite intruded ca. 1225 1220 Ma. The diabase-minette-anorthosite sequence and the associated silicic rocks record dominantly juvenile additions to the cratonic margin and imply subcontinental enrichment events ca. 1650 Ma (accretion), prior to 1460 Ma (potassic metasomatism), and ca. 1220 Ma (magmatic underplating). The latter two may have been controlled by a major transcurrent structure along the south margin of Laurentia.

  10. Ordovician magmatism in the Lévézou massif (French Massif Central): tectonic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotout, Caroline; Pitra, Pavel; Poujol, Marc; Van Den Driessche, Jean

    2017-03-01

    New U-Pb dating on zircon yielded ca. 470 Ma ages for the granitoids from the Lévézou massif in the southern French Massif Central. These new ages do not support the previous interpretation of these granitoids as syn-tectonic intrusions emplaced during the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous thrusting. The geochemical and isotopic nature of this magmatism is linked to a major magmatic Ordovician event recorded throughout the European Variscan belt and related to extreme thinning of continental margins during a rifting event or a back-arc extension. The comparable isotopic signatures of these granitoids on each side of the eclogite-bearing leptyno-amphibolitic complex in the Lévézou massif, together with the fact that they were emplaced at the same time, strongly suggest that these granitoids were originally part of a single unit, tectonically duplicated by either isoclinal folding or thrusting during the Variscan tectonics.

  11. Ordovician magmatism in the Lévézou massif (French Massif Central): tectonic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotout, Caroline; Pitra, Pavel; Poujol, Marc; Van Den Driessche, Jean

    2016-08-01

    New U-Pb dating on zircon yielded ca. 470 Ma ages for the granitoids from the Lévézou massif in the southern French Massif Central. These new ages do not support the previous interpretation of these granitoids as syn-tectonic intrusions emplaced during the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous thrusting. The geochemical and isotopic nature of this magmatism is linked to a major magmatic Ordovician event recorded throughout the European Variscan belt and related to extreme thinning of continental margins during a rifting event or a back-arc extension. The comparable isotopic signatures of these granitoids on each side of the eclogite-bearing leptyno-amphibolitic complex in the Lévézou massif, together with the fact that they were emplaced at the same time, strongly suggest that these granitoids were originally part of a single unit, tectonically duplicated by either isoclinal folding or thrusting during the Variscan tectonics.

  12. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2013-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  13. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, A. L.; Masurenkov, Yu. P.; Pouzich, I. N.; Laverova, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  14. Mantle refertilization and magmatism in old orogenic regions: The role of late-orogenic pyroxenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Chazot, Gilles; Kornprobst, Jacques; Dallai, Luigi; Vannucci, Riccardo; Grégoire, Michel; Bertrand, Hervé; Boivin, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pyroxenites and garnet pyroxenites are mantle heterogeneities characterized by a lower solidus temperature than the enclosing peridotites; it follows that they are preferentially involved during magma genesis. Constraining their origin, composition, and the interactions they underwent during their subsequent evolution is therefore essential to discuss the sources of magmatism in a given area. Pyroxenites could represent either recycling of crustal rocks in mantle domains or mantle originated rocks (formed either by olivine consuming melt-rock reactions or by crystal fractionation). Petrological and geochemical (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd and O isotopes) features of xenoliths from various occurrences (French Massif-Central, Jordan, Morocco and Cameroon) show that these samples represent cumulates crystallized during melt percolation at mantle conditions. They formed in mantle domains at pressures of 1-2 GPa during post-collisional magmatism (possibly Hercynian for the French Massif-Central, and Panafrican for Morocco, Jordan and Cameroon). The thermal re-equilibration of lithospheric domains, typical of the late orogenic exhumation stages, is also recorded by the samples. Most of the samples display a metasomatic overprint that may be either inherited or likely linked to the recent volcanic activity that occurred in the investigated regions. The crystallization of pyroxenites during late orogenic events has implications for the subsequent evolution of the mantle domains. The presence of large amounts of mantle pyroxenites in old orogenic regions indeed imparts peculiar physical and chemical characteristics to these domains. Among others, the global solidus temperature of the whole lithospheric domain will be lowered; in turn, this implies that old orogenic regions are refertilized zones where magmatic activity would be enhanced.

  15. Cretaceous alkaline intra-plate magmatism in the Ecuadorian Oriente Basin: Geochemical, geochronological and tectonic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Roberto; Baby, Patrice; Duncan, Robert

    2005-08-01

    Small volumes of Cretaceous alkaline basaltic magmas have been identified in the sedimentary infill of the Ecuadorian Oriente foreland basin. They are characterized by a restricted range of compositional variation, low LILE/HFSE ratios and Sr-Nd isotope values within the range of oceanic island basalts (OIB). Reflection seismic data show that a pre-existing NNE-SSW Triassic and Jurassic rift controls the location and occurrence of these alkaline eruptive sites. Radiometric ages ( 40Ar- 39Ar, incremental heating method) and the biostratigraphic record of their surrounding sediments indicate a NNE-SSW systematic age variation for the emplacement of this alkaline volcanism: from Albian (110 ± 5.2 Ma) in the northern part of the Oriente Basin, to Campanian (82.2 ± 2.0 Ma) in the west-central part. The geochemical, geochronological and tectonic evidences suggest that asthenospheric mantle has upwelled and migrated to the SSW, into the region underlying the pre-existing Triassic and Jurassic rift (thin-spot?). We propose that subduction was abandoned, subsequent to the accretion of allochthonous terranes onto the Ecuadorian and Colombian margin in the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, causing the relict slab material, corresponding to the eastwards-directed leading plate, to roll-back. Unmodified asthenospheric mantle migrated into the region previously occupied by the slab. This resulted in partial melting and the release of magmatic material to the surface in the northern part of the Oriente Basin since at least Aptian times. Then, magmatism migrated along the SSW-trending Central Wrench Corridor of the Oriente Basin during the Upper Cretaceous, probably as a consequence of the lateral propagation of the transpressive inversion of the Triassic-Jurassic rift. Eventually, the Late Cretaceous east-dipping Andean subduction system was renewed farther west, and the development of the compressional retro-foreland Oriente Basin system halted the Cretaceous alkaline

  16. Magmatic-hydrothermal molybdenum isotope fractionation and its relevance to the igneous crustal signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greber, Nicolas D.; Pettke, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.

    2014-03-01

    We analysed the Mo isotope composition of a comprehensive series of molybdenite samples from the porphyry-type Questa deposit (NM, USA), as well as one rhyolite and one granite sample, directly associated with the Mo mineralization. The δ98Mo of the molybdenites ranges between - 0.48‰ and + 0.40‰, with a median at - 0.05‰. The median Mo isotope composition increases from early magmatic (- 0.29‰) to hydrothermal (- 0.05‰) breccia mineralization (median bulk breccia = - 0.17‰) to late stockwork veining (+ 0.22‰). Moreover, variations of up to 0.34‰ are found between different molybdenite crystals within an individual hand specimen. The rhyolite sample with 0.12 μg g- 1 Mo has δ98Mo = - 0.57‰ and is lighter than all molybdenites from the Questa deposit, interpreted to represent the igneous leftover after aqueous ore fluid exsolution. We recognize three Mo isotope fractionation processes that occur between about 700 and 350 °C, affecting the Mo isotope composition of magmatic-hydrothermal molybdenites. ∆1Mo: Minerals preferentially incorporate light Mo isotopes during progressive fractional crystallization in subvolcanic magma reservoirs, leaving behind a melt enriched in heavy Mo isotopes. ∆2Mo: Magmatic-hydrothermal fluids preferentially incorporate heavy Mo isotopes upon fluid exsolution. ∆3Mo: Light Mo isotopes get preferentially incorporated in molybdenite during crystallization from an aqueous fluid, leaving behind a hydrothermal fluid that gets heavier with progressive molybdenite crystallization. The sum of all three fractionation processes produces molybdenites that record heavier δ98Mo compositions than their source magmas. This implies that the mean δ98Mo of molybdenites published so far (~ 0.4‰) likely represents a maximum value for the Mo isotope composition of Phanerozoic igneous upper crust.

  17. The link between Hawaiian mantle plume composition, magmatic flux, and deep mantle geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Lauren N.; Weis, Dominique; Garcia, Michael O.

    2017-04-01

    Oceanic island basalts sample mantle reservoirs that are isotopically and compositionally heterogeneous. The Hawaiian-Emperor chain represents ∼85 Myr of volcanism supplied by a deep mantle plume. Two geographically and geochemically delineated trends, Kea and Loa, are well documented within the Hawaiian Islands. Enriched Loa compositions originate from subduction recycled or primordial material stored in deep mantle reservoirs such as the large low shear velocity province (LLSVP) below Hawai'i. Loa compositions have not been observed along the Emperor Seamounts (>50 Ma), whereas lavas on the Hawaiian Islands (<6.5 Ma) sample both Kea and Loa sources. Lead isotopes in shield lavas along the Northwest Hawaiian Ridge (NWHR) spanning ∼42 Myr between the bend in the chain and the Hawaiian Islands record the geochemical evolution of the Hawaiian mantle plume over a time period when many geophysical parameters (volcanic propagation rate, magmatic flux, mantle potential temperature) increased significantly. Along the NWHR, the Loa geochemical component appears ephemerally, which we link to the sampling of different lower mantle compositional domains by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The plume initially sampled only the deep Pacific mantle (Kea component) from outside the LLSVP during the formation of the Emperor Seamounts. Southward migration and anchoring of the plume on the LLSVP led to entrainment of increasing amounts of LLSVP material (Loa component) along the NWHR as documented by an increase in 208Pb*/206Pb* with decreasing age. The correlation between 208Pb*/206Pb* and magmatic flux suggests source composition affects the magmatic flux, and explains why the Hawaiian mantle plume has dramatically strengthened through time.

  18. Permian Basin maturation: proof for pervasive magmatic heat flow in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, Damien; van Wees, Jan Diederik; Fattah, Rader Abdul; Nelskamp, Suzanne; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-05-01

    The area of the Permian Basin is marked by significant Stephanian-Permian magmatism that is related to the Variscanorogenic collapse, resulting in pervasive mantle upwelling. Large extrusive evidence is visible in the North German Basin and in the Central North Sea. Theoretical models for tectonic heat flow and maturity evolution show that mantle upwelling, underplating, and intrusions are likely to have a significant effect on maturity-depth trends. Tectonic modelling of selected wells shows that tectonic subsidence and exhumation can be reconciled with a significant heat flow pulse at the Stephanian-Permian, and this could well explain the widespread elevated depth gradient of maturity in Carboniferous rocks. The quantitative assessment of heat flow, which is based on a kinematic model of the process of orogenic collapse, shows that the mantle upwelling and underplating at the base of the crust proposed by earlier studies in fact provides insufficient heat flow to explain strongly elevated maturity-depth trends. However, the Southern part of the Texel IJsselmeer High shows unusually high maturation values that cannot be explained by the simple effect of burial alone. This area of high maturation is also associated with evidence of intrusive magmatic rocks. By modelling five wells in the Texel IJsselmeer High, we conclude that the burial of the sediments and a shallow intrusion in the upper crust provide an elevated heat flow mechanism that has a regional impact, consistent with observed high maturity-depth trends. In each well, the model that best matches the elevated maturity data of the Carboniferous demonstrates the impact of a large intrusion emplacement in the upper crust at the time of the collapse of the Variscan orogen. The impact of this magmatic intrusion at such a shallow depth is extremely likely to have brought the maturity to the gas window during the heat pulse, and, based on the tectonic subsidence record, the model allows us to position this

  19. Quaternary Magmatism in the Cascades - Geologic Perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes

    2007-01-01

    Foreward The Cascade magmatic arc is a belt of Quaternary volcanoes that extends 1,250 km from Lassen Peak in northern California to Meager Mountain in Canada, above the subduction zone where the Juan de Fuca Plate plunges beneath the North American Plate. This Professional Paper presents a synthesis of the entire volcanic arc, addressing all 2,300 known Quaternary volcanoes, not just the 30 or so visually prominent peaks that comprise the volcanic skyline. Study of Cascade volcanoes goes back to the geological explorers of the late 19th century and the seminal investigations of Howel Williams in the 1920s and 1930s. However, major progress and application of modern scientific methods and instrumentation began only in the 1970s with the advent of systematic geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the entire arc. Initial stimulus from the USGS Geothermal Research Program was enhanced by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Together, these two USGS Programs have provided more than three decades of stable funding, staffing, and analytical support. This Professional Paper summarizes the resultant USGS data sets and integrates them with the parallel contributions of other investigators. The product is based upon an all-encompassing and definitive geological database, including chemical and isotopic analyses to characterize the rocks and geochronology to provide the critical time constraints. Until now, this massive amount of data has not been summarized, and a systematic and uniform interpretation firmly grounded in geological fact has been lacking. Herein lies the primary utility of this Cascade volume. It not only will be the mandatory starting point for new workers, but also will provide essential geological context to broaden the perspectives of current investigators of specific Cascade volcanoes. Wes Hildreth's insightful understanding of volcanic processes and his uncompromising scientific integrity make him

  20. Detrital geochronology of unroofing magmatic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malusà, Marco Giovanni; Villa, Igor Maria; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Tectonic reconstructions performed in recent years are increasingly based on petrographic (Dickinson & Suczek, 1979; Garzanti et al., 2007) and geochronological (Brandon et al., 1998; DeCelles et al., 2004) analyses of detrital systems. Detrital age patterns are traditionally interpreted as a result of cooling induced by exhumation (Jäger, 1967; Dodson, 1973). Such an approach can lead to infer extremely high erosion rates (Giger & Hurford 1989) that conflict with compelling geological evidence (Garzanti & Malusà, 2008). This indicates that interpretations solely based on exhumational cooling may not have general validity (Villa, 2006). Here we propose a new detrital geochronology model that takes into account the effects of both crystallization and exhumational cooling on geochronometers, from U-Pb on zircon to fission tracks on apatite. This model, specifically designed for unroofing magmatic complexes, predicts both stationary and moving mineral-age peaks. Because its base is the ordinary interaction between endogenic and exogenic processes, it is applicable to any geological setting. It was tested on the extremely well-studied Bregaglia-Bergell pluton in the Alps, and on the sedimentary succession derived from its erosion. The consistency between predicted and observed age patterns validates the model. Our results demonstrate that volcanoes were active on top of the growing Oligocene Alps, and resolve a long-standing paradox in quantitative erosion-sedimentation modelling, the scarcity of sediment during apparently fast erosion. Dickinson, W. R. & Suczek, C. A. Plate tectonics and sandstone composition. Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. Bull. 63, 2164-2172 (1979). Garzanti, E., Doglioni, C., Vezzoli. G. & Andò, S. Orogenic belts and orogenic sediment provenance. J. Geol. 115, 315-334 (2007). Brandon, M. T., Roden-Tice, M. K. & Garver, J. I. Cenozoic exhumation of the Cascadia accretionary wedge in the Olympic Mountains, northwest Washington State. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull

  1. Early Yellowstone hotspot magmatism and gold metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, Willis; Unger, Derick; Saunders, James; Kamenov, George

    2009-11-01

    compatible with regional crustal units that host the gold ores, or the silicic igneous lithologies of the region, but have the same lead isotopic composition as basalts of the earliest Yellowstone plume (represented by the earliest lavas of the Columbia River basalt province, the Steens basalts, and Stonyford Volcanic Complex; Hanan et al., 2008). We propose that the gold studied and its traces of alloyed lead were derived together from the mantle, released from basaltic magma chambers of the province, and carried by low-density fluids into shallow geothermal systems during the earliest stages of Yellowstone hotspot magmatism.

  2. Tonian granitic magmatism of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Ignez P.; de Fatima L. de Brito, Maria; de A. Lages, Geysson; da Silva Filho, Adejardo F.; Santos, Lucilene; Brasilino, Roberta G.

    2016-07-01

    Tonian granitoids, today augen-gneisses and migmatites, showing crystallization ages ranging from 870 Ma to 1000 Ma occur in the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. The majority of them have ages within the 925-970 Ma interval. Few intrusions with ages of ∼1.0 Ga and <900 Ma occur in the Transversal and South subprovinces. The Tonian granitoids constitute the most expressive magmatic rocks of the Cariris Velhos event. The studied granitoids (herein CVG -Cariris Velhos granitoids) intrude slightly older bimodal (but mostly felsic) volcanic successions and metasedimentary sequences in the Transversal and South subprovinces. Tonian granitoids are unknown in the North subprovince. The CVG comprise mainly coarse-grained augen-gneisses of granite to granodiorite composition. Fe-rich biotite (annite) is the main mafic mineral phase, constituting up to 15% of the modal composition. Garnet, muscovite and tourmaline occur as accessory phases in many plutons. The CVG augen-gneisses have high SiO2 (>71%) and alkali contents, they vary from slightly peraluminous to slightly metaluminous, and from slightly magnesian to typical ferrroan rocks. In the migmatized orthogneisses the SiO2 contents are usually <70%. Trace element variations in the CVG are extensive, reflecting the migmatization recorded in some plutons and/or distinct sources. They are Ca-, Sr- and Nb-poor, showing variable Ba (100-1260 ppm), Rb (164-400 ppm) and Zr (144-408 ppm) contents, and high abundances of Y (>40 ppm). The chondrite normalized REE patterns are characterized by strong to moderate negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.23-0.70). In general, the spidergram patterns show deep troughs at Ti, P, Ba and Sr and less pronounced Nb-Ta troughs. These patterns are similar to those reported for anorogenic granites evolved from mixtures of magmas from both crustal and mantle sources. The CVG exhibit TDM model ages ranging from 1.9 to 1.1Ga, with slightly negative to slightly positive ƐNd(t) values, suggesting the

  3. The distribution of intraplate volcanism and controls on the generation of intraplate magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Rushmer, T. A.; Smith, I. E.

    2011-12-01

    Although volumetrically subordinate to mid-ocean ridge and volcanic arc magmatism, intraplate volcanism (as typified by the magmatic products of Ocean Islands) is probably the most ubiquitous form of volcanism on Earth. It is semantically associated with plate interiors (and thus also hot spot volcanism), but is also produced in a variety of plate margin settings. Thus it characterizes the circum-Pacific rim, the Caribbean, west Antarctica, and widespread regions affected by the collision of fragments of Gondwana with Laurasia (e.g. the circum Mediterranean and central East Asia). In these settings, volcanism is typically dispersed rather than focussed, and need not be obviously associated with particular tectonic features and events (in contrast to mid-ocean ridge and arc volcanism). Typically, volcanism is also prolonged and may be erupted intermittently and in small volumes for tens of millions of years. A key feature of these plate margin settings is that they involve either plate convergence (e.g. the circum Mediterranean and Central America) or a past history of plate convergence (e.g. eastern Australia). Intraplate volcanism is notably absent from many rifted continental margins where this requirement is not fulfilled (e.g. Western Australia and east Antarctica). Although rare in the Pre-Cambrian record, evidence of intraplate style magmatism extends as far back as the Archaean. Compositionally, intraplate magmas are distinguished both by their diversity and by strong relative enrichments in incompatible elements, including Nb. These features cannot be attributed simply to enriched sources, because Nd and Sr isotopes are consistent with sources that were (in most cases) depleted in incompatibles relative to the primitive mantle. Instead, the incompatible element characteristics of most intraplate basalts appear to be dominated by the consequences of near-solidus melting of normal mantle sources. In this case, the conditions required to initiate intraplate

  4. Longevity of Crystal Cargo vs. Transience of Melts in Magmatic Plumbing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, J.; Kronz, A.; Worner, G.; Schmitt, A. K.; Economos, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magmatic plumbing systems, particularly in continental arcs, have long been recognized as sites of open system processes. Disequilibrium textures or zoning in phenocrysts result if crystallization is coeval with assimilation or mixing. Radiometric dating measures a crystal's age, but not necessarily the amount of time spent at magmatic temperatures, or its residence time in the melt in which it is erupted [1]. Indeed, the relative amount of time spent by melts vs. crystals in any particular crustal reservoir may be very different. At Parinacota Volcano (central Andes), eruptions transitioned from tapping of a stagnant, silicic, crystal-rich mush to a more dynamic, mafic, crystal-poor magma over ca. 30 k.y., when recharge increased and mafic magmas transited the crust much faster [2]. Bulk lava chemistry and isotopic composition during initial stages of this transition (47-28 ka) indicate that the magmatic system was compartmentalized: one part evolved to more silicic compositions consistent with fractional crystallization, whereas the other became slightly more mafic by recharge. Despite heterogeneity of host melts erupted during this change in magmatic regime, the crystal cargoes in these magmas are homogenous in terms of mineral phases present, their major and trace element chemistry, age, and recorded P-T conditions and thus are likely to be derived from the same long-lived crystal-rich reservoir. In contrast to the minerals, the bulk composition of lavas varied on timescales of hundreds to thousands of years - evidence that melts reside in the system relatively briefly. In contrast, U-Th dating indicates the crystal cargo is much older (up to 350 k.y.), especially in the case of zircon. Reconciling these two lines of evidence suggests that: (1) the same cohort of crystals remains in the magma reservoir for periods of time much longer than it takes to build a volcano, (2) the presence of any given melt is ephemeral, and (3) the capacity of melts to transport

  5. The development of extension and magmatism during continent-ocean transition: evidence from Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, Ian; Keir, Derek; Booth, Adam; Corti, Giacomo; Magee, Craig; Jackson, Christopher; Wilkinson, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The geological record at rifts and margins worldwide often reveals along-strike variations in volumes of extruded and intruded igneous rocks. These variations may be the result of asthenospheric heterogeneity, variations in rate and timing of extension. Preexisting plate architecture and/or the evolving kinematics of extension during breakup may also influence magmatism strongly. The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide an excellent opportunity to address these issues since they expose, along strike, several sectors of ongoing, asynchronous rift development from embryonic continental rifting in the south to incipient oceanic spreading in the north. A consensus has now emerged from a variety of disciplines in Ethiopia that a considerable proportion of extension in Ethiopia is accommodated by focused dyke intrusion in narrow axial zones, without marked crustal (and plate?) thinning. These "magmatic segments" may mark the final breakup boundary and location of an incipient oceanic spreading centre. However, observations of markedly thinned crust and a pulse in Quaternary-Recent basaltic volcanism within the Danakil Depression have recently been cited as evidence that an abrupt, late stage of localised plate stretching may instead mark the final stages of continent-ocean transition (Bastow & Keir, 2011). We explore this hypothesis using recently-acquired seismic reflection data and accompanying borehole geological constraints from Danakil. Thick sequences of evaporites have been deposited in an asymmetric basin, whose subsidence has been controlled primarily by a major, east dipping normal fault. Surprisingly, no significant magmatism is observed in the upper ~1000m. Age constraints on a potash-bearing sequence presently being mined in the basin point towards rapid basin infill in the last several tens-to-hundreds of thousands of years. Basin formation cannot be easily attributed to the effects of magmata intrusion. Instead, an abrupt, localised, late-stage, plate

  6. The volcaniclastic series from the Luang Prabang Basin, Laos: A witness of a triassic magmatic arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Camille; Bourquin, Sylvie; Poujol, Marc; Hallot, Erwan; Dabard, Marie-Pierre; Nalpas, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of South East Asia (SEA) during the early Mesozoic is still poorly understood and a number of models have recently been put forward to account for the geodynamic evolution of SEA. The Luang Prabang Basin (north Laos), located in the core of a "paleogeographic jigsaw" in SEA, recorded a long lasting volcanism that spanned for ∼ 35 my from the earliest Triassic up to Late Triassic as evidenced by combined stratigraphic and geochronological (U-Pb/zircon) analyses performed on both volcanic and volcaniclastic series. The volcanic rocks are arc tholeiites and calk-alkaline andesites to dacites. The volcaniclastic rocks contain, in part, volcaniclasts produced contemporaneously with sedimentation. Both the volcanic and volcaniclastic series display geochemical features characteristic of a subduction related volcanism. Therefore, the Luang Prabang Basin documents a magmatic arc in a good agreement with the recent recognition of neighboring ophiolitic rocks in the Luang Prabang area. Following a passive margin setting that prevailed from the late Carboniferous to the late Permian, an active margin then initiated along the western margin of the Indochina Block. This active magmatic arc developed as the result of an east-dipping subduction below the Indochina Block during most of the Triassic, at least from ca. 250 to 215 Ma. Subsequently, this oceanic subduction episode must have been followed by a continental collision of the Indochina Block with the eastern Simao Block, at a period that remains to be defined.

  7. The magmatic plumbing system of the Askja central volcano, Iceland, as imaged by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.; Roecker, Steven

    2016-10-01

    The magmatic plumbing system beneath Askja, a volcano in the central Icelandic highlands, is imaged using local earthquake tomography. We use a catalog of more than 1300 earthquakes widely distributed in location and depth to invert for the P wave velocity (Vp) and the Vp/Vs ratio. Extensive synthetic tests show that the minimum size of any velocity anomaly recovered by the model is 4 km in the upper crust (depth < 8 km below sea level (bsl)), increasing to 10 km in the lower crust at a depth of 20 km bsl. The plumbing system of Askja is revealed as a series of high-Vp/Vs ratio bodies situated at discrete depths throughout the crust to depths of over 20 km. We interpret these to be regions of the crust which currently store melt with melt fractions of 10%. The lower crustal bodies are all seismically active, suggesting that melt is being actively transported in these regions. The main melt storage regions lie beneath Askja volcano, concentrated at depths of 5 km bsl with a smaller region at 9 km bsl. Their total volume is 100 km3. Using the recorded waveforms, we show that there is also likely to be a small, highly attenuating magmatic body at a shallower depth of about 2 km bsl.

  8. Formation of non-magmatic iron-meteorite group IIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation (INAA) data for metal in 22 nonmagmatic IIE meteorites show narrow ranges in Ir and other refractory siderophiles; the Ir range is a factor of 2.6, a factor of ∼2 smaller than in nonmagmatic IAB-MG, and orders of magnitude smaller than in the large magmatic groups. Siderophile data show no evidence of fractional crystallization. IIE irons can be split into two sets, a larger main-set and a set of 6 Cu- (or FeS) rich irons. Elemental concentrations in metal from veins in H5 chondrite Portales Valley fall within the IIE range with the exceptions of Co (high) and Ga (low). H-group-chondrite and Au-normalized IIE abundances for siderophiles show that IIE irons are ∼30% higher than H in refractory siderophiles Re, Ir and W and are about 30% lower than H chondrites in the volatiles Ga and Sb, inconsistent with proposals that IIE irons formed from H chondrites. The IIE fractionations contrast with those in L chondrites which are about 15% lower than H in the three refractory elements and 40% higher than H in volatiles indicating that IIE irons did not form from H chondrites but from a more reduced and siderophile-rich kind of ordinary chondrite ("HH" chondrites). Most O-isotope data support a close relationship between IIE irons and H or HH chondrites; lower Δ17O in primitive (chondritic) silicates support an HH classification. Literature isotopic data for Ru and Mo also show that IIE metal formed from an ordinary chondrite parent; it appears that the silicates and metal were formed by melting of a single asteroid. There is no evidence for radiogenic (26Al) heating; this, the rapid cooling recorded in the sizes of parental gamma crystal in the metal and the absence of fractional crystallization strongly support the hypothesis that IIE melting was the result of impacts. To summarize, the weight of the evidence favors the conclusion that IIE meteorites were formed by one or more impacts on an HH asteroid. The target probably had a

  9. Temporal, geomagnetic and related attributes of kimberlite magmatism at Ekati, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Grant; Grütter, Herman; Carlson, Jon

    2004-09-01

    This paper outlines the development of a multi-disciplinary strategy to focus exploration for economic kimberlites on the Ekati property. High-resolution aeromagnetic data provide an over-arching spatial and magnetostratigraphic framework for exploration and kimberlite discovery at Ekati, and hence also for this investigation. The temporal, geomagnetic, spatial and related attributes of kimberlites with variable diamond content have been constrained by judiciously augmenting the information gathered during routine exploration with detailed, laboratory-based or field-based investigations. The natural remanent magnetisation of 36 Ekati kimberlites has been correlated with their age as determined by isotopic dating techniques, and placed in the context of a well-constrained geomagnetic polarity timescale. Kimberlite magmatism occurred over the period 75 to 45 Ma, in at least five temporally discrete intrusive episodes. Based on current evidence, the older kimberlites (75 to 59 Ma) have low diamond contents and are distributed throughout the property. Younger kimberlites (56 to 45 Ma) have moderate to high diamond contents and occur in three distinct intrusive corridors with NNE to NE orientations. Economic kimberlite pipes erupted at 55.4±0.4 Ma along the A154-Lynx intrusive corridor, which is 7 km wide and oriented at 015°, and at 53.2±0.3 Ma along the Panda intrusive corridor, which is 1 km wide and oriented at 038°. The intrusion ages straddle a paleopole reversal at Chron C24n, consistent with the observation that the older economic kimberlites present as aeromagnetic "low" anomalies while the younger economic pipes are characterised as aeromagnetic "highs". The aeromagnetic responses for these kimberlites are generally muted because they contain volcaniclastic rock types with low magnetic susceptibility. Kimberlites throughout the Ekati property carry a primary natural magnetic remanence (NRM) vector in Ti-bearing groundmass magnetite, and it dominates over

  10. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    magmas suggest that evolved calc-alkaline arc magmatism may extend to the late Eocene, at least ~ 10 million years earlier than previously estimated. The crystallisation ages for intrusive rocks associated with mineralisation at Cobre Panama imply that the deposit formed in the early Oligocene, between a period of late Cretaceous to Eocene magmatism (ca. 66-42 Ma; Chagres-Bayano arc) and Cordilleran arc magmatism (22-7 Ma). Similarities in the timing of intrusive suite emplacement and the fingerprinting of magmatic fractionation processes between the Cobre Panama porphyry deposit and the Cerro Colorado porphyry deposit in western Panama (ca. 5.3 Ma) suggest that these features provide favourable geodynamic and geochemical prerequisites for the formation of porphyry deposits along the Panamanian magmatic arc during the Cenozoic.

  11. A granulite record of multistage metamorphism and REE behavior in the Dabie orogen: Constraints from zircon and rock-forming minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shui-Jiong; Li, Shu-Guang; An, Shi-Chao; Hou, Zhen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    A combined study of mineral inclusions, U-Pb ages and trace elements was carried for zircon and coexisting minerals from granulite in the North Dabie Terrane (NDT) of the Dabie-Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHP) zone, east-central China. The results provide insights into the exhumation history of NDT and into rare earth element (REE) behavior during retrogression. Besides inherited cores and one magmatic rim, zircons separated from the granulite record three episodes of metamorphism under different P-T conditions: (1) 223.8 ± 2.3 Ma for domains that contain Grt + Cpx ± Rt ± F - Ap ± Aln inclusions without plagioclase and show flat HREE patterns without negative Eu anomalies, representing peak eclogite-facies event; (2) 213.3 ± 2.1 Ma for domains that contain Pl ± Cpx ± Grt ± Qtz ± Ap inclusions and show rather flat HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies, corresponding to granulite-facies retrogression; (3) 199.9 ± 3.3 Ma for domains that contain Amp ± Pl ± Qtz ± Ap inclusions and show high REE contents with steep HREE patterns and remarkable negative Eu anomalies, representing amphibolite-facies overprinting. Therefore, the UHP eclogite in NDT experienced decompression heating during the initial exhumation, with local hydration in the late stage of the Triassic continental collision. Garnet in the granulite is composed of a corroded core with embayed outline and spongy texture and an overgrowth rim. There is equilibrium distribution of HREE between garnet rim and granulite-facies zircon domain, confirming the geological interpretation of 213.3 ± 2.1 Ma for the granulite-facies metamorphism. There is the prograde HREE depletion in porphyroblastic garnet from core to rim and the continuous decrease of HREE from the eclogitic to granulitic zircons, suggesting that the metamorphic transformation from eclogite-facies to granulite-facies took place in a closed system. On the other hand, the amphibolitic zircons show steep HREE patterns and

  12. Petrogenesis of Sveconorwegian magmatism in southwest Norway; constraints from zircon U-Pb-Hf-O and whole-rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Nick M. W.; Slagstad, Trond; Parrish, Randall R.; Norry, Michael J.; Marker, Mogens; Horstwood, Matthew S. A.; Røhr, Torkil

    2013-04-01

    The Sveconorwegian orogen is traditionally interpreted as a Himalayan-scale continental collision, and the eastward continuation of the Grenville Province of Laurentia; however, it has recently been proposed that it represents an accretionary orogen without full-scale continental collision (Slagstad et al., in press). We suggest that magmatism is one of the key constraints to differentiate between different types of orogens; thus, detailed investigation of the timing and petrogenesis of the magmatic record is a requirement for better understanding of the Sveconorwegian orogen as a whole. Here, we present new U-Pb geochronology, zircon Hf-O isotope, and whole-rock geochemical data to constrain the petrogenesis of the early -Sveconorwegian Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB). The SMB is a batholithic-scale complex of intrusions that intrudes into most of the Rogaland-Hardangervidda Block in southwest Norway. Current age constraints put emplacement between ~1050 to 1020 Ma. New ages from the Suldal region indicate that the onset of SMB magmatism can be put back to 1070 Ma, which is some 30-50 Myrs prior to high-grade metamorphism. Average initial ɛHf signatures range from ~0 to 4; these overlap with later post-Sveconorwegian granites and with early-/pre-Sveconorwegian ferroan (A-type) granites. Average δ18O signatures range from ~5.7 to 8.7, except for one anomalous granite at ~11.6. The Hf-O signatures are compatible with a mixed mantle-crustal source. Crustal sources may include ~1500 Ma Telemarkian or ~1200 Ma juvenile crust. Hf-O bulk-mixing modelling using a 1500 Ma crustal source indicates >50 % mantle input. Although much further mapping and geochronological work is required, granitic magmatism appears to have persisted throughout much of the ~1100 to 900 Ma period that spans the Sveconorwegian orogen. This magmatism is consistently ferroan (i.e. dry); however, the SMB marks a clear transition to magnesian (i.e. wet) magmatism, with a return to ferroan magmatism at

  13. The time-space distribution of Eocene to Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian polymetallic province and its metallogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissig, Thomas; Ullrich, Thomas D.; Tosdal, Richard M.; Friedman, Richard; Ebert, Shane

    2008-07-01

    Eocene to late Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian high-plain (approx. between Cerro de Pasco and Huancayo; Lats. ˜10.2-12°S) and east of the Cordillera Occidental is represented by scattered shallow-level intrusions as well as subaerial domes and volcanic deposits. These igneous rocks are calc-alkalic and range from basalt to rhyolite in composition, and many of them are spatially, temporally and, by inference, genetically associated with varied styles of major polymetallic mineralization. Forty-four new 40Ar- 39Ar and three U/Pb zircon dates are presented, many for previously undated intrusions. Our new time constraints together with data from the literature now cover most of the Cenozoic igneous rocks of this Andean segment and provide foundation for geodynamic and metallogenetic research. The oldest Cenozoic bodies are of Eocene age and include dacitic domes to the west of Cerro de Pasco with ages ranging from 38.5 to 33.5 Ma. South of the Domo de Yauli structural dome, Eocene igneous rocks occur some 15 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and include a 39.34 ± 0.28 Ma granodioritic intrusion and a 40.14 ± 0.61 Ma rhyolite sill, whereas several diorite stocks were emplaced between 36 and 33 Ma. Eocene mineralization is restricted to the Quicay high-sulfidation epithermal deposit some 10 km to the west of Cerro de Pasco. Igneous activity in the earliest Oligocene was concentrated up to 70 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and is represented by a number of granodioritic intrusions in the Milpo-Atacocha area. Relatively voluminous early Oligocene dacitic to andesitic volcanism gave rise to the Astabamba Formation to the southeast of Domo de Yauli. Some stocks at Milpo and Atacocha generated important Zn-Pb (-Ag) skarn mineralization. After about 29.3 Ma, magmatism ceased throughout the study region. Late Oligocene igneous activity was restricted to andesitic and dacitic volcanic deposits and intrusions around Uchucchacua (approx. 25 Ma) and felsic

  14. Late Mesozoic magmatism and Cenozoic tectonic deformations of the Barents Sea continental margin: Effect on hydrocarbon potential distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipilov, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is focused on the two tectonic-geodynamic factors that made the most appreciable contribution to the transformation of the lithospheric and hydrocarbon potential distribution at the Barents Sea continental margin: Jurassic-Cretaceous basaltic magmatism and the Cenozoic tectonic deformations. The manifestations of Jurassic-Cretaceous basaltic magmatism in the sedimentary cover of the Barents Sea continental margin have been recorded using geological and geophysical techniques. Anomalous seismic units related to basaltic sills hosted in terrigenous sequences are traced in plan view as a tongue from Franz Josef Land Archipelago far to the south along the East Barents Trough System close to its depocentral zone with the transformed thinned Earth's crust. The Barents Sea igneous province has been contoured. The results of seismic stratigraphy analysis and timing of basaltic rock occurrences indicate with a high probability that the local structures of the hydrocarbon (HC) fields and the Stockman-Lunin Saddle proper were formed and grew almost synchronously with intrusive magmatic activity. The second, no less significant multitectonic stress factor is largely related to the Cenozoic stage of evolution, when the development of oceanic basins was inseparably linked with the Barents Sea margin. The petrophysical properties of rocks from the insular and continental peripheries of the Barents Sea shelf are substantially distinct as evidence for intensification of tectonic processes in the northwestern margin segment. These distinctions are directly reflected in HC potential distribution.

  15. Progress report on new results of the study of multi-planar and compact cylindrical wire arrays at 0.8-1.3 MA current at UNR Zebra generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Presura, R.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Wilcox, P. G.; Osborne, G. C.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2008-11-01

    The studies that include the measurements of radiation yields, time-gated spectra and images, streak camera and laser probing images, spectral modeling, and magnetostatic and MHD simulations focus on Z-pinch plasma implosion and radiation features (including bright spots properties). The experiments with small size (3-10 mm) single-, double-, triple-, cross- planar, and compact cylindrical wire arrays from various materials at nominal as well as enhanced currents up to 1.3 MA were performed on the Zebra generator. The largest x-ray yields and powers were ranged for W and Mo. Observed multi-step precursor formation in multi-planar arrays may open new paths for radiation pulses shaping. Implosion and spectroscopic features specific for enhanced currents are discussed.

  16. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  17. A model for northern Vermont's Acadian magmatism with insight from Italy's Tuscan magmatic province

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, D.S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    S-type Devonian acidic intrusives in northern Vermont occur scattered throughout the turbiditic flysch sequence and pervasive horizon of mafic Standing Pond Volcanics of the Connecticut Valley--Gaspe Trough (CVGT). These granitoids formed in a successor basin that opened over the stalled Taconic subduction zone located between the Bronson Hill--Boundary Mountain Volcanic arc (east) and the ophiolite-bearing accretionary complex of the Green Mountains (west). Contact aureoles surrounding the granitoids are superimposed over low-pressure facies series metamorphic isograds that have concentric pattern correlated with the centers of intrusion. Italy's Tuscan Magmatic Province, also dominated by S-type acidic intrusives, developed between 7 and 2 Ma in a successor basin over an extinct subduction zone. In that case, the basin and its plutons developed when the Corsica-Sardinia plate pulled back to form the Tyrrhenian Sea after having collided with Italy to form the Apennine range approximately 10 m.y. earlier. In this model for northern Vermont, a volcanic arc and accretionary complex developed during Ordovician subduction, perhaps with continuing trench--arc separation due to shallow subduction. When the leading edge of continental North America entered the subduction zone, the process stalled and the subducted Iapetus slab continued to lose heat and increase density, promoting its separation from the overlying plate. Upwelling under the former forearc region rifted the crust to form the CVGT. The mantle-derived mafic melts rose, transferring heat to metamorphose and partially melt the basin fill. The Standing Pond Volcanics represent this melt that reached the surface at one stage and flooded the basin. Northern Vermont's granitoids rose, penetrating the domed strata above their source region, as extensional tectonism was replaced by Acadian compression.

  18. Late Triassic alkaline complex in Sulu UHP terrane: Implications for post-collisional magmatism along the continental subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Song, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In order to insight into crust-mantle interaction triggered by partial melting of the subudcted continental crust during its exhumation, we carried out a combined study on Shidao alkaline complex in the Sulu ultrahigh pressure (UHP) terrane. The alkaline complex is composed of shoshonitic to ultrapotassic gabbro, pyroxene syenite, amphibole syenite, quartz syenite, and granite. Field researches suggest that the mafic rocks are earlier than the felsic ones in sequence. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating on them gives Late Triassic ages of 214 ± 2 to 200 ± 3 Ma from mafic to felsic rocks. These ages are a bit younger than Late Triassic ages for partial melting of the Sulu UHP terrane during exhumation, indicating syn-exhumation magmatism during continental collision. The alkaline rocks have wide ranges of SiO2 (49.7 - 76.7 wt.%), MgO (8.25 - 0.03 wt.%),total Fe2O3 (9.23 - 0.47 wt.%), CaO (8.39 - 0.39 wt.%), Ni (126.0 - 0.07 ppm), and Cr (182.0 - 0.45 ppm) contents. Other major oxides are regularly changed with SiO2. The alkaline rocks have characteristics of arc-like patterns in the trace element distribution, e.g., enrichment of LREE and LILE (Rb, Ba, Th and U), depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, P and Ti), and positive Pb anomalies. From the mafic to felsic rocks, (La/Yb)N ratios and contents of the total REE, Sr and Ba are decreased but Rb contents are increased. The alkaline rocks also display features of A2-type granitoids, suggesting a post-collisional magmatism. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70575 and 0.70927) and negative ɛNd(t) values (-18.6 to -15.0) for whole-rock. The homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ɛNd(t) values of the alkaline rocks are almost unchanged with SiO2 and MgO contents, suggesting a fractional crystallization (FC) process from a same parental magma. Our studies suggest a series of crust-mantle interaction processes along the continental subduction interface as follows: (1) melts from partial melting of the subducted continental

  19. Triassic granitoids in the eastern Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt, SW China: Magmatic response to geodynamics of the deep lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Sun, Min; Zhao, Yongjiu; Wilde, Simon; Long, Xiaoping; Yan, Danping

    2010-02-01

    The Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt (SGFB), SW China, was developed from a passive continental margin into an orogenic belt with the consumption of the Paleo-Tethys. During the evolution of the SGFB, numerous Late Triassic granitic plutons formed and exhibited a progressive development from adakite/I-type granite, high Ba-Sr granite, A-type granite and monzonite. Representative Late Triassic plutons were studied to unravel the bewildering evolution of the eastern SGFB. The Menggu Pluton (224 ± 3 Ma) consists of granites with high alkali (K 2O+Na 2O = 7.85-10.4 wt.%) and adakitic characteristics (Sr/Y = 19-38). The ɛNd T values (- 2.77 to - 5.03), initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.7050-0.7063) and low Nb/Ta ratios (8-10) are indicative of an origin by partial melting of amphibolitic lower crust. Rocks from the Niuxingou Pluton (215 ± 3 Ma) are richer in K than Na (K 2O/Na 2O = 1.1-1.5) and contain high Sr (1006-1662 ppm) and Ba (1277-2009 ppm), typical of shoshonite and high Ba-Sr granite. They have less enriched ɛNd T values (+ 0.08 to - 2.04) and less radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr i ratios (0.7047-0.7048), and formed from a mixed melt derived from upwelling asthenosphere and the overlying metasomatised lithospheric mantle. The Taiyanghe Pluton (205 ± 3 Ma) consists of monzonites, with high Al 2O 3 (> 20 wt.%), but low MgO (0.94-1.39 wt.%). The rocks are richer in Na than K (K 2O/Na 2O < 0.7), contain high large ion lithophile element (LILE) (681-834 ppm Sr and 2142-9453 ppm Ba) and display strongly fractionated REE patterns ((La/Yb) N = 35-63). These features, together with their enriched Nd-Sr isotopic compositions (ɛNd T = - 4.78 to - 6.50; 87Sr/ 86Sr i = 0.7074-0.7090), suggest that the monzonite probably formed from low degrees of partial melting of metasomatised lithospheric mantle. Although a continuous compressional regime during the Mid- and Late Triassic has been invoked for the SGFB, the generation of crustally derived adakitic and shoshonitic plutons reflect

  20. Magmatic versus sedimentary volcanism: similarities of two different geological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Adriano

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary volcanoes (or more commonly called mud volcanoes) are geological phenomena that are present in sedimentary basins of passive and active margins. At these localities gas and water related to hydrocarbon diagenetic and catagenetic production generate overpressure facilitating the rise of mobile and ductily deformable materials that breach through the denser overlying rocks. The results are surface powerful manifestations of mud eruptions that strikingly resemble to those of magmatic volcanoes. Magmatic and sedimentary volcanoes share many other similarities. Initially both systems are essentially gas driven and the subsurface plumbing systems are characterized by intrusions and a complex system of fractures and conduits that bifurcate from a central feeder channel that manifest in the surface as numerous satellite seeps and vents. In both cases are inferred secondary shallower chambers where reactions take place. Comparable structural morphologies (e.g. conical, elongated, pie-shaped, multicrater, swap-like, caldera collapse, subsiding flanks, plateau-like) and/or alteration of the original shape are in both cases related to e.g. density and viscosity of the erupted solids, to the gas content, to the frequency of the eruptions, and to the action of meteoric factors (e.g. strong erosion by rain, wind, temperature changes etc. etc.). Like for magmatic volcanoes, the periodicity of the eruptive activity is related to the time required to charge the system and create new overpressure, as well as how the structure seals during periods of dormancy. Earthquakes are documented to be a powerful trigger capable to activate faults (often hosting magmatic and sedimentary volcanoes) and/or facilitating the breaching of the upper layers, and allowing the rise of deeper charged fluids. Finally, both systems significantly contribute as active source for CH4 (sedimentary) and CO2 (magmatic) resulting of great importance for global budget estimates of sensitive gasses. The

  1. Chemical evolution of a magmatic system: The Paintbrush Tuff, SW Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, T.P.; Vogel, T.A.; Schuraytz, B.C.

    1987-09-01

    The chemical and thermal evolution of a single magmatic system is recorded in a series of four ash-flow sheets, the Paintbrush Tuff, that were erupted from the same caldera within a span of 600,000 years. The chemistry of individual glassy pumices, collected from the tops and bottoms of the ash-flow sheets, are used to quantitatively evaluate possible fractionation mechanisms, such as magma mixing and fractional crystallization. The glassy pumices are used because they most nearly approximate the magma in the chamber. All of the chemical variation within the Paintbrush Tuff can be accounted for by fractional crystallization or magma mixing operating alone and/or in conjunction. No other fractionation processes need by invoked. Also, volume estimates based on quantitative modeling reveal that the size of the ash-flow sheets do not reflect the size of their associated reservoirs.

  2. Implications of estimated magmatic additions and recycling losses at the subduction zones of accretionary (non-collisional) and collisional (suturing) orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, D. W.; Von Huene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arc magmatism at subduction zones (SZs) most voluminously supplies juvenile igneous material to build rafts of continental and intra-oceanic or island arc (CIA) crust. Return or recycling of accumulated CIA material to the mantle is also most vigorous at SZs. Recycling is effected by the processes of sediment subduction, subduction erosion, and detachment and sinking of deeply underthrust sectors of CIA crust. Long-term (>10-20 Ma) rates of additions and losses can be estimated from observational data gathered where oceanic crust underruns modern, long-running (Cenozoic to mid-Mesozoic) ocean-margin subduction zones (OMSZs, e.g. Aleutian and South America SZs). Long-term rates can also be observationally assessed at Mesozoic and older crust-suturing subduction zone (CSSZs) where thick bodies of CIA crust collided in tectonic contact (e.g. Wopmay and Appalachian orogens, India and SE Asia). At modern OMSZs arc magmatic additions at intra-oceanic arcs and at continental margins are globally estimated at c. 1.5 AU and c. 1.0 AU, respectively (1 AU, or Armstrong Unit,= 1 km3 a-1 of solid material). During collisional suturing at fossil CSSZs, global arc magmatic addition is estimated at 0.2 AU. This assessment presumes that in the past the global length of crustal collision zones averaged c. 6000 km, which is one-half that under way since the early Tertiary. The average long-term rate of arc magmatic additions extracted from modern OMSZs and older CSSZs is thus evaluated at 2.7 AU. Crustal recycling at Mesozoic and younger OMSZs is assessed at c. 60 km3 Ma-1 km-1 (c. 60% by subduction erosion). The corresponding global recycling rate is c. 2.5 AU. At CSSZs of Mesozoic, Palaeozoic and Proterozoic age, the combined upper and lower plate losses of CIA crust via subduction erosion, sediment subduction, and lower plate crustal detachment and sinking are assessed far less securely at c. 115 km3 Ma-1 km-1. At a global length of 6000 km, recycling at CSSZs is accordingly c. 0

  3. Seismic properties of magmatic processes at laboratory scale: Effects of crystallization and bubble nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Barbara; Cordonnier, Benoit; Ulmer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the dimensions of magmatic reservoirs and possible magmatic ascent. Magma rheology and volcanic eruptive style are to a first order controlled by processes occurring in the conduit or in the chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution. Seismic velocities are strongly affected by these processes (Carrichi et al, 2009) but the only few constrained measurements don't allow yet to establish a link between seismic tomography and the textural state of the volcanic system. Elastic parameters of vapor-saturated, partially molten systems are thus providing fundamental information for the identification of such reservoirs under active and seemingly dormant volcanoes. We investigated a chemically simplified melt analogous to andesite and trachyte, in the system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2 (Picard et al, 2011), which undergoes plagioclase crystallization and bubble exsolution. Using a Paterson-type internally-heated gas pressure apparatus, we measured the ultrasonic velocities at a constant pressure of 250 MPa and at a frequency of 0.1 MHz. Samples have been first heated at 850 °C for 30 minutes. Subsequently, the temperature has been decreased to 650 °C at a rate of 0.5 or 0.1 °C/min and velocities were recorded every 45 minutes. In order to characterize the microstructure evolution, series of cold-seal experiments at identical pressure conditions but with rapid-quenching at each of the recorded temperatures have been undertaken. We will present new experimental results that clarify the dependence of the seismic velocities on the evolution of microstructures (bubble and crystal-size distribution) as well as the evolution of composition (melt and crystals). REFERENCES Caricchi, L., Burlini, L., and Ulmer, P. (2009) Propagation of P and S-waves in magmas with different crystal contents: insights into the crystallinity of magmatic reservoirs. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal

  4. Geology, alteration, and magmatic-hydrothermal history of The Geysers felsite -- potential applications for exploration and development

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The [open quotes]felsite[close quotes] is a shallow, young, granitic intrusive body centrally located within and beneath. The Geysers steam field. The field and the felsite are coaxial, and hydrothermal alteration effected by hot-water dominated geothermal systems antedating the modern steam reservoir shows systematic vertical zonation with respect to the pluton. The research summarized in this communication was undertaken both to clarify the role of the pluton in reservoir evolution, and to characterize critical felsite-specific controls on the fields's deep porosity and permeability. The felsite comprises at least three major intrusive phases. Two are high-silica granites probably older than 1.3 Ma. The third is granodiorite (1 Ma), temporally and chemically equivalent to overlying extrusive dacites of the Clear Lake volcanic field. All three intrusive phases are too old to be heat sources for the modern steam field, but probably were the heat engines for the prior liquid-dominant systems. Younger, deeper magmatic heat sources are strongly implied for the current vapor-dominated regime. Porosity in the felsite is provided by: (1) Extensively mineralized fractures and breccias, probably of both tectonic and high-temperature hydrothermal origin; and (2) miarolitic cavities in the upper levels of the pluton. The latter could be analogous to calcite-dissolution cavities in overlying metagraywacke -- they could serve as storage sites for the fields's liquid water reserves. Porosity in these fractures, breccias, and vugs in partially occluded by hydrothermal vein minerals deposited in prior hotwater-dominated systems --tourmaline, ferroaxinite, quartz, potassium feldspar, epidote, actinolite, prehnite, and many others. Such secondary mineralization conceptually could serve as an excellent exploration guide to potentially productive portions of the felsite beyond the field's present boundaries.

  5. The Plutón Diorítico Moat: Mildly alkaline monzonitic magmatism in the Fuegian Andes of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Guillot, M.; Escayola, M.; Acevedo, R.; Pimentel, M.; Seraphim, G.; Proenza, J.; Schalamuk, I.

    2009-12-01

    The Plutón Diorítico Moat (Moat Dioritic Pluton, PDM) is the largest of several isolated Cretaceous plutons exposed in the Fuegian Andes of Argentina. It is made of a large variety of rock types ranging from ultramafic bodies (pyroxenites and hornblendites) to syenites. The petrological diversity is thought to have been originated by fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived magma combined with minor assimilation of continental crust (AFC). Its geochemical characteristics indicate a mildly-alkaline monzonitic affinity, contrasting with the typical calc-alkaline plutons of the Southern Patagonian Batholith (PB) to the south, in the Chilean archipelago. The PDM original magma is arc-related and its crystallization, as indicated by the Rb-Sr mineral isochron age of 115 ± 3 Ma, is coeval with some plutons of the PB. Therefore a similar tectonic regime is assumed for the emplacement of these plutonic bodies, both south and north of the Beagle channel. Differences in magma sources and degree of partial melting are inferred to account for the contrasting lithological and geochemical characteristics of the PB and PDM. The data suggest that the original magmas of the PDM were generated at greater depths in the mantle, by a smaller degree of partial melting, compared with the PB. The Barros Arana basalts, exposed to the north in Chile, forming a back-arc volcanic complex, display the same mildly-alkaline shoshonitic affinity, and are considered in this study as the volcanic equivalents of the PDM. All the plutons in the Argentinean Fuegian Andes display similar lithological and geochemical characteristics and are, therefore, grouped in this work under the name of Magmatismo Potásico Fueguino ( Fuegian Potassic Magmatism).

  6. Age and origin of earliest adakitic-like magmatism in Panama: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whattam, Scott A.; Montes, Camilo; McFadden, Rory R.; Cardona, Agustin; Ramirez, Diego; Valencia, Victor

    2012-06-01

    40-20 Ma marks a fundamental interval in the evolution of the 70-0 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc system. During this period, there is no evidence of Panamanian magmatic arc activity to the east of the Panama Canal Basin while to the west and in localized regions to the east of the Panama Canal Basin a phase of intrusive-only activity is recorded. Fundamentally, geochemical and geochronological evidence presented herein indicate that this intrusive activity was predominantly 'adakitic-like' and becomes younger from west to east along an approximately W-E striking lineament. Granodiorites of the Petaquilla batholith, western Panama yield LAM-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 29.0 + 0.7, - 0.6 Ma, 28.5 + 0.7, - 0.5 Ma, 28.3 + 0.5, - 0.4 Ma and 26.2 + 0.5, - 0.9 Ma. To the east of the Panama Canal Basin zircons from a hypabyssal diorite of the mainly intermediate Majé subvolcanic suite, cedes a mean 206Pb/238U age of 18.9 + 0.4 Ma. Relative to other 70-5 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc lavas and intrusives, Majé and Petaquilla intrusives yield adakitic-like major and trace element abundances (e.g., > 15 wt.% Al2O3, generally > 3.5 wt.% Na2O, > 400 ppm Sr, < 1.9 ppm Yb, < 18 ppm Y, Sr/Y that ranges to > 120) and strongly fractionated HREE patterns. These 30-26 Ma (Petaquilla) and 19 Ma (Majé) suites are also compositionally similar to a subvolcanic suite of rare, circa 25 Ma adakitic-like, andesitic intrusives which occur within the Panama Canal Basin midway between Petaquilla and Majé and at the same approximate latitude as Petaquilla and Majé. Collectively, the geochemical and geochronological data for the adakitic-like intrusives arc consistent with formation via partial melting of lowermost, mafic crust above a sub-horizontal slab tear that propagated from the west (Petaquilla) to the east (Majé) between 30 and 19 Ma. Our new tectonic model postulates that collision between the Panamanian magmatic arc system and an 'indentor' (e.g., a tract of thickened buoyant

  7. Cambro-Ordovician magmatism in the Araçuaí Belt (SE Brazil): Snapshots from a post-collisional event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.; de Medeiros, Silvia R.; Mendes, Julio C.; Pedrosa-Soares, Antonio C.; Dussin, Ivo; Ludka, Isabel P.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2016-07-01

    The focus of the present work is the rebound of the magmatism at the late stages of orogenic collapse in the Araçuaí Belt, in Brazil. At the end of the orogen bimodal inversely zoned plutons were emplaced along a tectonic corridor following the Atlantic coast of Brazil. This event culminates around 500 Ma. We review geology, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of these plutonic structures in the region of Espírito Santo. New geochemical modeling of trace element data together with new whole rock Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic data depict a gradual process of mantle contamination during different stages of the orogen. In the post-orogenic stage contamination reaches extreme values. Basic rocks reach εNd(0.5Ga) values below -10. Gabbros to peridotites are more enriched in Ba, Zr, LREE and Sr than the surrounding metasediments. Four new U-Pb data sets from determinations in zircon and monazite crystals, (central northern part of the belt) confirm peak magma production around 500 ± 15 Ma, ranging up to 525 ± 3 Ma in one of the structures. Based on the pictured data, we discuss the significance of this magmatism and present a possible model: a process of gradational delamination of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle and adjacent deep continental crust through underplating. As a consequence, an already enriched mantle was dramatically further contaminated. At the end of this event the intrusion of alkaline melts, with less negative εNd (-5) and further enrichment in incompatible elements, point towards a new input of deeper juvenile mantle magma. Our data suggest the possible onset of a hotspot due to the destabilization of the asthenospheric mantle after orogenic collapse.

  8. Feedback between deformation and magmatism in the Lloyds River Fault Zone: An example of episodic fault reactivation in an accretionary setting, Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissenberg, C. Johan; van Staal, Cees R.

    2006-08-01

    The Lloyds River Fault Zone is a 10-15 km wide amphibolite-grade shear zone that formed during the Ordovician Taconic Orogeny. It separates ophiolites and arc-back-arc complexes formed in Iapetus from a peri-Laurentian microcontinent (Dashwoods microcontinent). The Lloyds River Fault Zone comprises three high-strain zones, dominantly composed of mylonitic amphibolites, separated by less deformed plutonic rocks. Structural, age and metamorphic data suggest the Lloyds River Fault Zone accommodated sinistral-oblique underthrusting of ophiolites underneath the Dashwoods microcontinent prior to 471 ± 5 Ma at 800°C and 6 kbar. Plutonic rocks within the Lloyds River Fault Zone comprise two suites dated at 464 ± 2 plus 462 ± 2 and 459 ± 3 Ma, respectively. The younger age of the plutons with respect to some of the amphibolites, evidence for magmatic deformation, and the elongate nature of the plutons parallel to the Lloyds River Fault Zone suggest they were emplaced within the fault zone during deformation. Both intrusive episodes triggered renewed deformation at high temperatures (770-750°C), illustrating the positive feedback between deformation and magmatism. Offshoots of the plutons intruded undeformed ophiolitic gabbros outside the Lloyds River Fault Zone. Deformation localized within the intrusive sheets, coeval with static contact metamorphism of the host gabbros, leading to the development of new, small-scale shear zones. This illustrates that channeling of plutons into shear zones and nucleation of shear zones in melt-rich zones may occur simultaneously within the same fault system.

  9. The Capilla del Monte pluton, Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina: the easternmost Early Carboniferous magmatism in the pre-Andean SW Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, Juan A.; Pankhurst, Robert J.; Rapela, Carlos W.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Alasino, Pablo H.; Saavedra, Julio; Baldo, Edgardo G.; Murra, Juan A.; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario

    2016-07-01

    New geochronological, geochemical, and isotopic data are reported for the Capilla del Monte two-mica granite pluton in the northeastern Sierras de Córdoba. An Early Carboniferous age is established by a U-Pb zircon concordia (336 ± 3 Ma) and a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron (337 ± 2 Ma). Zircon saturation geothermometry indicates relatively high temperatures (735-800 °C). The granites have high average SiO2 (74.2 %), Na2O + K2O (7.8 %), and high field-strength elements, high K2O/Na2O (1.7) and FeO/MgO ratios (5.1), with low CaO content (0.71 %). REE patterns with marked negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* 0.14-0.56) indicate crystal fractionation, dominantly of plagioclase and K-feldspar, from a peraluminous magma enriched in F. Isotope data (87Sr/86Srinitial = 0.7086, ɛ Nd336 = -5.5 to -4.4 with T DM = 1.5 Ga, zircon ɛ Hf336 +0.8 to -6.1; mean T DM = 1.5 Ga) suggest a Mesoproterozoic continental source, albeit with some younger or more juvenile material indicated by the Hf data. The pluton is the easternmost member of a Carboniferous A-type magmatic suite which shows an increase in juvenile input toward the west in this part of the pre-Andean margin. The petrological and geochemical data strongly suggest a similar intraplate geodynamic setting to that of the nearby but much larger, Late Devonian, Achala batholith, although Hf isotope signatures of zircon suggest a more uniformly crustal origin for the latter. Further studies are required to understand whether these bodies represent two independent magmatic episodes or more continuous activity.

  10. Bimodal magmatism produced by progressively inhibited crustal assimilation.

    PubMed

    Meade, F C; Troll, V R; Ellam, R M; Freda, C; Font, L; Donaldson, C H; Klonowska, I

    2014-06-20

    The origin of bimodal (mafic-felsic) rock suites is a fundamental question in volcanology. Here we use major and trace elements, high-resolution Sr, Nd and Pb isotope analyses, experimental petrology and thermodynamic modelling to investigate bimodal magmatism at the iconic Carlingford Igneous Centre, Ireland. We show that early microgranites are the result of extensive assimilation of trace element-enriched partial melts of local metasiltstones into mafic parent magmas. Melting experiments reveal the crust is very fusible, but thermodynamic modelling indicates repeated heating events rapidly lower its melt-production capacity. Granite generation ceased once enriched partial melts could no longer form and subsequent magmatism incorporated less fertile restite compositions only, producing mafic intrusions and a pronounced compositional gap. Considering the frequency of bimodal magma suites in the North Atlantic Igneous Province, and the ubiquity of suitable crustal compositions, we propose 'progressively inhibited crustal assimilation' (PICA) as a major cause of bimodality in continental volcanism.

  11. Bimodal magmatism produced by progressively inhibited crustal assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, F. C.; Troll, V. R.; Ellam, R. M.; Freda, C.; Font, L.; Donaldson, C. H.; Klonowska, I.

    2014-06-01

    The origin of bimodal (mafic-felsic) rock suites is a fundamental question in volcanology. Here we use major and trace elements, high-resolution Sr, Nd and Pb isotope analyses, experimental petrology and thermodynamic modelling to investigate bimodal magmatism at the iconic Carlingford Igneous Centre, Ireland. We show that early microgranites are the result of extensive assimilation of trace element-enriched partial melts of local metasiltstones into mafic parent magmas. Melting experiments reveal the crust is very fusible, but thermodynamic modelling indicates repeated heating events rapidly lower its melt-production capacity. Granite generation ceased once enriched partial melts could no longer form and subsequent magmatism incorporated less fertile restite compositions only, producing mafic intrusions and a pronounced compositional gap. Considering the frequency of bimodal magma suites in the North Atlantic Igneous Province, and the ubiquity of suitable crustal compositions, we propose ‘progressively inhibited crustal assimilation’ (PICA) as a major cause of bimodality in continental volcanism.

  12. CO2-fluxing collapses metal mobility in magmatic vapour

    DOE PAGES

    van Hinsberg, V. J.; Berlo, K.; Migdisov, A. A.; ...

    2016-05-18

    Magmatic systems host many types of ore deposits, including world-class deposits of copper and gold. Magmas are commonly an important source of metals and ore-forming fluids in these systems. In many magmatic-hydrothermal systems, low-density aqueous fluids, or vapours, are significant metal carriers. Such vapours are water-dominated shallowly, but fluxing of CO2-rich vapour exsolved from deeper magma is now recognised as ubiquitous during open-system magma degassing. Furthermore, we show that such CO2-fluxing leads to a sharp drop in element solubility, up to a factor of 10,000 for Cu, and thereby provides a highly efficient, but as yet unrecognised mechanism for metalmore » deposition.« less

  13. Quantifying crustal thickness over time in magmatic arcs

    PubMed Central

    Profeta, Lucia; Ducea, Mihai N.; Chapman, James B.; Paterson, Scott R.; Gonzales, Susana Marisol Henriquez; Kirsch, Moritz; Petrescu, Lucian; DeCelles, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present global and regional correlations between whole-rock values of Sr/Y and La/Yb and crustal thickness for intermediate rocks from modern subduction-related magmatic arcs formed around the Pacific. These correlations bolster earlier ideas that various geochemical parameters can be used to track changes of crustal thickness through time in ancient subduction systems. Inferred crustal thicknesses using our proposed empirical fits are consistent with independent geologic constraints for the Cenozoic evolution of the central Andes, as well as various Mesozoic magmatic arc segments currently exposed in the Coast Mountains, British Columbia, and the Sierra Nevada and Mojave-Transverse Range regions of California. We propose that these geochemical parameters can be used, when averaged over the typical lifetimes and spatial footprints of composite volcanoes and their intrusive equivalents to infer crustal thickness changes over time in ancient orogens. PMID:26633804

  14. Quantifying crustal thickness over time in magmatic arcs.

    PubMed

    Profeta, Lucia; Ducea, Mihai N; Chapman, James B; Paterson, Scott R; Gonzales, Susana Marisol Henriquez; Kirsch, Moritz; Petrescu, Lucian; DeCelles, Peter G

    2015-12-03

    We present global and regional correlations between whole-rock values of Sr/Y and La/Yb and crustal thickness for intermediate rocks from modern subduction-related magmatic arcs formed around the Pacific. These correlations bolster earlier ideas that various geochemical parameters can be used to track changes of crustal thickness through time in ancient subduction systems. Inferred crustal thicknesses using our proposed empirical fits are consistent with independent geologic constraints for the Cenozoic evolution of the central Andes, as well as various Mesozoic magmatic arc segments currently exposed in the Coast Mountains, British Columbia, and the Sierra Nevada and Mojave-Transverse Range regions of California. We propose that these geochemical parameters can be used, when averaged over the typical lifetimes and spatial footprints of composite volcanoes and their intrusive equivalents to infer crustal thickness changes over time in ancient orogens.

  15. Volcanology. A large magmatic sill complex beneath the Toba caldera.

    PubMed

    Jaxybulatov, K; Shapiro, N M; Koulakov, I; Mordret, A; Landès, M; Sens-Schönfelder, C

    2014-10-31

    An understanding of the formation of large magmatic reservoirs is a key issue for the evaluation of possible strong volcanic eruptions in the future. We estimated the size and level of maturity of one of the largest volcanic reservoirs, based on radial seismic anisotropy. We used ambient-noise seismic tomography below the Toba caldera (in northern Sumatra) to observe the anisotropy that we interpret as the expression of a fine-scale layering caused by the presence of many partially molten sills in the crust below 7 kilometers. This result demonstrates that the magmatic reservoirs of present (non-eroded) supervolcanoes can be formed as large sill complexes and supports the concept of the long-term incremental evolution of magma bodies that lead to the largest volcanic eruptions.

  16. Magmas and magmatic rocks: An introduction to igneous petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemost, E.A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book melds traditional igneous petrology with the emerging science of planetary petrology to provide an account of current ideas on active magmatic and volcanic processes, drawing examples from all igneous provinces of the world as well as from the moon and planets. It reviews the history and development of concepts fundamental to modern igneous petrology and includes indepth sections on magmas, magnetic differentiation and volcanology.

  17. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  18. Introduction to Special Section on Open Magmatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, Wes; Grove, Timothy L.; Dungan, Michael A.

    1986-05-01

    The idea that magmatic systems are open to intermittent gains and losses of mass and energy is hardly new. Eruptive, conductive, and hydrothermally convective losses are obvious, and both wall rock assimilation and mixing of discrete magma batches are petrological ideas with long and distinguished conceptual lineages. New ideas of the last decade are largely outgrowths of the mounting evidence that mixing and assimilation are ubiquitous, that heterogeneity and mixing in mantle source regions are common, and that few igneous rock suites are likely to reflect strictly closed-system fractionation of single magma batches. The evidence has accumulated quickly on many fronts, owing in part to the wider availability of high-precision analytical tools and the development of sophisticated methods for modeling the wealth of chemical and isotopic data. Detailed studies of zoned ash flow sheets, zoned and layered plutons, and macroscopically mixed igneous rocks have made petrologists aware that dynamic and nonequilibrium aspects of magma transport play important roles in the evolution of many magmatic systems. Technological advances have permitted routine experimentation over a wide range of pressures, providing kinetic data and phase equilibrum constraints essential to understanding both mantle source processes and magmatic evolution in crustal reservoirs. Finally, the plate tectonic synthesis and seafloor sampling programs have respectively provided the impetus for a detailed assessment of geochemical heterogeneity in a dynamic mantle and an important avenue for accomplishing that assessment.

  19. Formation and Significance of Magmatic Enclaves in From the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B. L.; Vitale, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Deposits from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, record a complicated history of open system magmatic processes that produced a suite of intermediate (56.5 to 63.3% SiO2) lithologies containing rare and variably quenched basaltic to basaltic-andesite enclaves (49.5-57.3% SiO2). The eruption transitioned from an explosive phase (Jan 11-28) to a continuous phase (Jan 28-Feb 10) before ending following a month-long effusive phase in March. Whereas the explosive phase is dominated by a low-silica andesite (LSAS, 56.5-58.7% SiO2) lithology, high-silica andesite (HSA, 62.2-63.3% SiO2) is more common during the continuous phase and dense low-silica andesite (DLSA, 56.4-59.3% SiO2) occurs mostly during the effusive phase. Enclaves occur in all lithologies, although most commonly in DLSA and LSAS. Point-counting of enclaves in outcrop reveals an average abundance of <1 volume percent, however, some DLSA blocks contained in a unusually large pyroclastic flow deposit emplaced at the end of the explosive phase near Rocky Point contain up to 3 volume percent enclaves. Transitional-type enclaves exist, but the two main end-member types of magmatic enclaves are P-type ('primitive') and H-type ('hybrid'). P-type enclaves range from 2-5 cm in diameter and are black with highly vesicular, acicular, and glassy interiors surrounded by quenched and cuspate margins, range in composition from 49.5-52% SiO2, and contain abundant olivine and sparse plagioclase antecrysts. H-type enclaves range in diameter from 1 to 10 cm and are variably gray with poorly vesicular interiors and underdeveloped cuspate margins, range from 52-57.3% SiO2, and contain equant crystals in a glass-poor groundmass with abundant plagioclase antecrysts and rare olivine. Many H-type enclaves, which are the only enclave type observed in the HSA lithology, are indistinguishable from LSAS and DLSA samples in terms of whole-rock composition, mineral compositions, and texture. All enclaves plot linearly in

  20. Magmatic-hydrothermal origin of the early Triassic Laodou lode gold deposit in the Xiahe-Hezuo district, West Qinling orogen, China: implications for gold metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiao-ye; Li, Jian-wei; Hofstra, Albert H.; Sui, Ji-xiang

    2016-12-01

    The Xiahe-Hezuo district in the West Qinling orogen contains numerous Au-(As-Sb) and Cu-Au-(W) deposits. The district is divided into eastern and western zones by the Xiahe-Hezuo Fault. The western zone is exposed at a shallow level and contains sediment-hosted disseminated Au-(As-Sb) deposits, whereas the eastern zone is exposed at a deeper level and contains Cu-Au-(W) skarn and lode gold deposits within or close to granitic intrusions. The Laodou gold deposit in the eastern zone consists of auriferous quartz-sulfide-tourmaline and minor quartz-stibnite veins that are structurally controlled by fault zones transecting the Laodou quartz diorite porphyry stock and enveloped by potassic and phyllic alteration. Both the veins and alteration halos commonly contain quartz, sericite, tourmaline, pyrite, and arsenopyrite, with minor galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, and enargite. Gold occurs mainly as invisible gold in pyrite or arsenopyrite and locally as inclusions less than 50 μm in diameter. The zircon U-Pb age of 247.6 ± 1.3 Ma (2σ) on the host quartz diorite porphyry and the sericite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 249.1 ± 1.6 and 249.0 ± 1.5 Ma (2σ) on two ore-related hydrothermal sericite samples are within analytical errors of one another. At the formation temperature (275 °C) inferred from microthermometric measurements of fluid inclusion, sericite and tourmaline yield calculated δDH2O values of -70 to -45‰ and δ 18OH2O of 5.8 to 9.7‰, while quartz yields calculated δ 18OH2O values of 5.1˜5.7‰. Hydrothermal tourmaline in quartz-sulfide-tourmaline veins has δ 11B of -11.2 to -0.9‰ (mean of -6.3‰) that are similar to the values of magmatic tourmaline (-8.9 to -5.5‰ with a mean of -6.8‰) in the host quartz diorite porphyry. The δ 34S values of sulfide minerals range from -5.9 to +5.8‰ with a mean of -0.6‰ that is typical of magmatic sulfur. Pyrite from hydrothermally altered quartz diorite porphyry and quartz

  1. Mode of rifting in magmatic-rich setting: Tectono-magmatic evolution of the Central Afar rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël; Leroy, Sylvie; Ayalew, Dereje

    2014-05-01

    Observation of deep structures related to break-up processes at volcanic passive margins (VPM) is often a troublesome exercise: thick pre- to syn-breakup seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) usually mask the continent-ocean boundary and hide the syn-rift tectonic structures that accommodate crustal stretching and thinning. Some of the current challenges are about clarifying 1) if tectonic stretching fits the observed thinning and 2) what is the effect of continuous magma supply and re-thickening of the crust during extension from a rheological point of view? The Afar region in Ethiopia is an ideal natural laboratory to address those questions, as it is a highly magmatic rift that is probably close enough to breakup to present some characteristics of VPM. Moreover, the structures related to rifting since Oligocene are out-cropping, onshore and well preserved. In this contribution, we present new structural field data and lavas (U-Th/He) datings along a cross-section from the Ethiopian Plateau, through the marginal graben down to the Manda-Hararo active rift axis. We mapped continent-ward normal fault array affecting highly tilted trapp series unconformably overlain by tilted Miocene (25-7 Ma) acid series. The main extensional and necking/thinning event took place during the end of this Miocene magmatic episode. It is itself overlain by flat lying Pliocene series, including the Stratoid. Balanced cross-sections of those areas allow us to constrain a surface stretching factor of about 2.1-2.9. Those findings have the following implications: - High beta factor constrained from field observations is at odd with thinning factor of ~1.3 predicted by seismic and gravimetric studies. We propose that the continental crust in Central Afar has been re-thickened by the emplacement of underplated magma and SDR. - The deformation in Central Afar appears to be largely distributed through space and time. It has been accommodated in a 200-300 km wide strip being a diffuse incipient

  2. Synchronous alkaline and subalkaline magmatism during the late Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic Ross orogeny, Antarctica: Insights into magmatic sources and processes within a continental arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Peter, Graham; Cottle, John M.

    2016-10-01

    Extensive exposure of intrusive igneous rocks along the Ross orogen of Antarctica-an ancient accretionary orogen on the margin of East Gondwana-provides an exceptional opportunity to study continental arc magmatism. There is significant petrologic and geochemical variability in igneous rocks within a 500-km-long segment of the arc in southern Victoria Land. The conspicuous occurrence of carbonatite and alkaline silicate rocks (nepheline syenite, A-type granite, and alkaline mafic rocks) adjacent to large complexes of subalkaline granitoids is not adequately explained by traditional models for continental arc magmatism. Extensive geochemical analysis (> 100 samples) and zircon U-Pb geochronology (n = 70) confirms that alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism was partially contemporaneous with the emplacement of large subduction-related igneous complexes in adjacent areas. Major pulses of subalkaline magmatism were compositionally distinct and occurred at different times along the arc. Large bodies of subalkaline orthogneiss and granite (sensu lato) were emplaced over similar time intervals (ca. 25 Myr) to the north (ca. 515-492 Ma) and south (ca. 550-525 Ma) of the alkaline magmatic province, although the initiation of these major pulses of magmatism was offset by ca. 35 Myr. Alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism spanned at least ca. 550-509 Ma, overlapping with voluminous subalkaline magmatism in adjacent areas. The most primitive rocks from each area have similarly enriched trace element compositions, indicating some common characteristics of the magma sources along the arc. The samples from the older subalkaline complex have invariably low Sr/Y ratios (< 40), consistent with relatively shallow magma generation and differentiation. The younger subalkaline complex and subalkaline rocks within the area of the alkaline province extend to higher Sr/Y ratios (up to 300), indicative of generation and differentiation at deeper levels. The significant spatial and temporal

  3. Magmatic gas emissions at Holocene volcanic features near Mono Lake, California, and their relation to regional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-02-01

    Silicic lavas have erupted repeatedly in the Mono Basin over the past few thousand years, forming the massive domes and coulees of the Mono Craters chain and the smaller island vents in Mono Lake. We report here on the first systematic study of magmatic CO2 emissions from these features, conducted during 2007-2010. Most notably, a known locus of weak steam venting on the summit of North Coulee is actually enclosed in a large area (~ 0.25 km2) of diffuse gas discharge that emits 10-14 t/d of CO2, mostly at ambient temperature. Subsurface gases sampled here are heavily air-contaminated, but after standard corrections are applied, show average δ13C-CO2 of - 4.72‰, 3He/4He of 5.89RA, and CO2/3He of 0.77 × 1010, very similar to the values in fumarolic gas from Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera immediately to the south of the basin. If these values also characterize the magmatic gas source at Mono Lake, where CO2 is captured by the alkaline lake water, a magmatic CO2 upflow beneath the lake of ~ 4 t/d can be inferred. Groundwater discharge from the Mono Craters area transports ~ 13 t/d of 14C-dead CO2 as free gas and dissolved carbonate species, and adding in this component brings the estimated total magmatic CO2 output to 29 t/d for the two silicic systems in the Mono Basin. If these emissions reflect intrusion and degassing of underlying basalt with 0.5 wt.% CO2, a modest intrusion rate of 0.00075 km3/yr is indicated. Much higher intrusion rates are required to account for CO2 emissions from Mammoth Mountain and the West Moat of the Long Valley Caldera.

  4. Subduction-related magmatism and crustal role in the early stage of the Damara Orogen, Namibia: new constraints from combined U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes from the Goas Magmatic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, L.; Kinnaird, J.; Lehmann, J.; Naydenov, K.; Saalmann, K.; Frei, D.; Gerdes, A.

    2013-12-01

    (homogeneous) crustal material and acquisition of a specific Hf signature before cooling. In agreement with the magmatic and detrital age record of the Damara Orogen obtained from new measurements and from the available literature, the Hf model ages suggest that the reworked crustal components of the Goas Complex can be reconciled with three main specific tectonic events, reflecting involvement of prevalent Paleoproterozoic Eburnean crust, plus Late-Archean and Mesoproterozoic crustal components.

  5. Magmatic and meteoric fluid flow in the Bitterroot extensional detachment shear zone (MT, USA) from ductile to brittle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilichini, Antoine; Siebenaller, Luc; Teyssier, Christian; Vennemann, Torsten W.

    2016-11-01

    The Bitterroot shear zone developed as a rolling-hinge detachment system where a syntectonic granodiorite in the footwall was progressive exhumed beneath a detachment shear zone, providing a record of deformation and fluid-rock interaction during progressive exhumation and cooling. The shear zone displays a high strain gradient over ∼1 km of structural section from the relatively undeformed footwall, where the granodiorite contains a magmatic foliation and lineation, through a mylonite sequence that culminates upward in the fine interlayering of ultramylonite layers and the development of a breccia zone. We measured the stable isotope composition of quartz, muscovite, biotite, chlorite, and epidote across the shear zone and estimated equilibrium temperatures using oxygen isotope thermometry based on mineral pairs. We also measured the hydrogen isotope ratios of hydrous minerals and of quartz fluid inclusions. The main results are: (1) The relatively undeformed footwall granodiorite interacted with magmatic fluids at 500-600 °C; (2) the mylonitic fabric defined by muscovite, biotite, and chlorite developed between 500 and 300 °C and interacted with a fluid system that was connected to the Earth's surface (meteoric fluids), as indicated by the low δD values of hydrous mineral phases, including muscovite; (3) the fluxes of surface fluids were not sufficient to shift the δ18O values of muscovite significantly, but were sufficient to control the δ18O composition of biotite and chlorite during deformation-induced recrystallization and chloritization, and (4) the isotopic composition of fluid inclusions in quartz as well as the δD values of late quartz veins track the mixing of fluid sources between the magmatic and meteoric reservoirs. The distribution of stable isotope compositions in the various tectonites of the granodioritic Bitterroot shear zone, from ductile to brittle, provides a rich spatial and temporal record of the interaction between deformation and

  6. Unroofing history of Late Paleozoic magmatic arcs within the ``Turan Plate'' (Tuarkyr, Turkmenistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, E.; Gaetani, M.

    2002-07-01

    Stratigraphic, sedimentologic and petrographic data collected on the Kizilkaya sedimentary succession (Western Turkmenistan) demonstrate that the "Turan Plate" consists in fact of an amalgamation of Late Paleozoic to Triassic continental microblocks separated by ocean sutures. In the Kizilkaya area, an ophiolitic sequence including pyroxenite, gabbro, pillow basalt and chert, interpreted as the oceanic crust of a back-arc or intra-arc basin, is tectonically juxtaposed against volcaniclastic redbeds documenting penecontemporaneous felsic arc magmatism (Amanbulak Group). A collisional event took place around ?mid-Carboniferous times, when oceanic rocks underwent greenschist-facies metamorphism and a thick volcaniclastic wedge, with pyroclastic rocks interbedded in the lower part, accumulated (Kizilkaya Formation). The climax of orogenic activity is testified by arid fanglomerates shed from the rapid unroofing of a continental arc sequence, including Middle-Upper Devonian back-reef carbonates and cherts, and the underlying metamorphic and granitoid basement rocks (Yashmu Formation). After a short period of relative quiescence, renewed tectonic activity is indicated by a conglomeratic sequence documenting erosion of a sedimentary and metasedimentary succession including chert, sandstone, slate and a few carbonates. A final stage of rhyolitic magmatism took place during rapid unroofing of granitoid basement rocks (Kizildag Formation). Such a complex sequence of events recorded by the Kizilkaya episutural basin succession documents the stepwise assemblage of magmatic arcs and continental fragments to form the Turan microblock collage during the Late Paleozoic. Evolution of detrital modes is compatible with that predicted for juvenile to accreted and unroofed crustal blocks. The deposition of braidplain lithic arkoses in earliest Triassic time indicates that strong subsidence continued after the end of the volcanic activity, possibly in retroarc foreland basin settings

  7. Magmatic and post-magmatic phenomena in the Karkonosze granite and its metamorphic envelope (West Sudetes, SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Andrzej; Ilnicki, Sławomir; Matyszczak, Witold; Marcinowska, Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Mineralogical studies of the Karkonosze granite (ca. 322-312 Ma) and its surroundings in West Sudetes (SW Poland) have provided data on Nb-Ta-REE minerals from pegmatites in the NE part of the pluton and several new finds of Ag minerals and 15 oxygenic Bi phases, hitherto not reported from the massif. The Karkonosze pegmatites are enriched in HREE as fergusonite-(Y) or xenotime-(Y) appear in almost every studied pegmatite, together with a subordinate assemblage of the aeschynite, euxenite or columbite group. The abundance of LREE minerals such as allanite-( Ce) and the monazite group, correlates inversely with the Nb-Ta-Ti minerals, whilst an early generation of monazite-(Ce) revealed an exceptionally high amount of Nd (up to 22 wt.% of Nd2O3 ). The physical and chemical conditions during the magmatic and post-magmatic processes were reconstructed and the effects of contact metamorphism in amphibolites from hornfelsed zones examined. Changes in solution composition and concentration at the early magmatic stage (825-920°C), pegmatitic stage overlapping with hydrothermal (560°C which ended at 160-90°C) and clearly hydrothermal stage (400 to 110°C) were studied in detail by means of melt and fluid inclusions in quartz. Furthermore, post-magmatic fluids, including some enriched in Li and B, were identified in rock-forming quartz from the whole pluton. In turn, study of the amphibolites indicates that the pair cummingtonite + anorthite or the presence of Ca-rich plagioclase with actinolite seem to be reliable mineral proxies of the thermal impact of the granitoid body on amphibolites in its envelope. The inferred conditions of the contact processes (450-550°C, 2.5- 4.8 kbar) point to an elevated geothermal gradient (ca. 32-45°C/km) probably reflecting the heat flow induced by the Karkonosze intrusion. Moreover, despite the textural and mineral changes imposed by regional and contact metamorphism, the amphibolites have their pre-metamorphic (magmatic) geochemical

  8. The riftward migration of focused magmatism in Central Ethiopia: Geochemical evidence of magmatic processes within the Galema Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, A. C.; Chiasera, B.; Rooney, T. O.; Mohr, P.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Ramsey, M.; Grosfils, E. B.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) connects the East African Rift system to the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, and is pivotal for an understanding of the geologic processes active in a continental rift at the initiation of ocean spreading. The Galema Ridge is superimposed on the eastern plateau rim of the northern MER. It was built up through an en-echelon dike swarm and associated cinder cones and lavas. This 70 km-long, ~2 Ma-old magmatic belt is now paralleled by the recent and ongoing intrusive-volcanic activity focused along the Wonji Fault Belt in the eastern floor of the MER. An understanding of the magmatic plumbing system of the Galema Ridge can reveal the cause for step-wise migration of magmatic activity across the MER. The Galema dikes comprise a bimodal suite of hawaiitic basalts and peralkaline rhyolites. The mafic rocks have trace element patterns resembling those of the Wonji basalts, suggesting similar parental magmas. However, major element oxides ratios, and in particular CaO/Al2O3, place the Galema mafics closer to the basalts of the Silti-Debre Zeyit Fault Zone on the western floor of the MER. The ratio data suggest that augite was a more important phase than plagioclase during mafic fractional crystallization under Galema, and that fractional crystallization operated at depths similar to those inferred for the Silti-Debre Zeyit Fault Zone, substantially deeper than beneath the intervening Wonji Fault Belt. Continued fractionation at Galema ended with production of peralkaline rhyolite magmas with ~66% SiO2, marked by a transition for K and Ba from incompatible to compatible, expressing the observed dominance of anorthositic feldspar in the fractionating assemblage. The rhyolitic dikes and lavas exhibit depletion in heavy rare earth elements (REEs) and especially middle REEs. The absence of this pattern from the mafic rocks suggests that amphibole played a significant role in controlling trace element variations in the peralkaline magmas, consistent with

  9. Source and mode of the Permian Panjal Trap magmatism: Evidence from zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and trace element data from the Himalayan ultrahigh-pressure rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Lee, Hao-Yang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Khan, Tahseenullah; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated study of LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age, Hf isotopes, and trace element geochemistry of zircons from the Himalayan eclogites (mafic rocks) and their host gneisses (felsic rocks) from the Kaghan Valley in Pakistan in order to understand the source and mode of their magmatic protoliths and the effect of metamorphism. Zircons from the so-called Group I (high-pressure) eclogites yielded U-Pb mean ages of 259 ± 10 Ma (MSWD = 0.74), whereas those of Group II (ultrahigh-pressure) eclogites yielded 48 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 0.71). In felsic gneisses the central or core domains of zircons yielded ages similar to those from Group I eclogites but zircon overgrowth domains yielded 47 ± 1 Ma (MSWD = 1.9). Trace element data suggest a magmatic origin for Group I-derived (having Th/U ratios: > 0.5) and metamorphic origin for Group II-derived (Th/U < 0.07) zircons, respectively. Zircon Hf isotope data, obtained from the same dated spots, show positive initial 176Hf/177Hf isotopic ratios referred to as "ƐHf(t)" of around + 10 in Group I eclogites; + 7 in Group II eclogites; and + 8 in felsic gneisses zircons, respectively, thus indicate a juvenile mantle source for the protolith rocks (Panjal Traps) with almost no contribution from the ancient crustal material. The similar ƐHf(t) values, identical protolith ages and trace element compositions of zircons in felsic (granites or rhyolites) and mafic (basalt and dolerite) rocks attest to a bimodal magmatism accounting for the Panjal Traps during the Permian. Later, during India-Asia collision in Eocene times, both the felsic and mafic lithologies were subducted to mantle-depths (> 90 km: coesite-stable) and experienced ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism before their final exhumation.

  10. The Timing of Early Magmatism and Extension in the Southern East African Rift: Tracking Geochemical Source Variability with 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology at the Rungwe Volcanic Province, SW Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, G. T.; Class, C.; Maqway, M. D.; Boniface, N.; Manya, S.; Hemming, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    from mica separates of two carbonatite complexes upstream in the drainage basin were dated and yield Jurassic ages of 165.7 ±1.3 Ma for Panda Hill and 154.2 ±0.9 Ma for Mbalizi, older than prior age estimates (Bowden, Nature 1962; Pentel'kov & Voronovskly, Doklady Akad Nauk 1977). These results leave the source of tuffs in the Songwe River Basin unresolved.

  11. Magmatism along the high Paraguay River at the border of Brazil and Paraguay: A review and new constraints on emplacement ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin-Chiaramonti, P.; Gomes, C. B.; De Min, A.; Ernesto, M.; Gasparon, M.

    2015-03-01

    The magmatic rocks from Alto Paraguay (High Paraguay River extensional lineament), western Apa craton, mainly consist of several major circular alkaline complexes and some rhyolitic domes and ignimbrites. The former are characterized by intrusive Na-alkaline rock-types (nepheline syenites and syenites and effusive equivalents) topped by lava flows and ignimbrites. Two main evolved suites were defined using petrochemical and Sr- isotope data: an agpaitic suite in the north and a miaskitic suite in the south. The domes of subalkaline rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites occur to the north of the alkaline complexes, along the Paraguay River, near the town of Fuerte Olimpo. The emplacement ages of the alkaline complexes were constrained using the K-Ar, Ar-Ar, Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd dating methods on whole rocks and/or mineral separates (amphibole, alkali feldspar and biotite). Ages are quite variable (Upper Permian to Middle Triassic), with average K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of 248.8 ± 4.8 and 241.8 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively, and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd age data giving best values from 248 ± 4 to 244 ± 27 Ma and from 256 ± 3 to 257 ± 3 Ma, respectively. In contrast, the Fuerte Olimpo volcanics show a Mesoproterozoic age (1.3 Ga, K-Ar and Ar-Ar radiometric methods; and 1.42 ± 0.24 to 1.30 ± 0.03 Ga, Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd methods, respectively). Rb-Sr systematics (87Sr/86Sr initial ratios ≤ 0.7038) highlight a relatively "primitive" character of the Na-alkaline magmatic source(s), in contrast with the "crustal" values (87Sr/86Sr initial ratio ˜ 0.7105) of the Fuerte Olimpo rhyolites. Thus, magmatism in the Alto Paraguay area is related to two extensional events: a younger event corresponding to the Permian-Triassic alkaline rocks, and an older event connected to the Precambrian volcanic acidic rocks.

  12. U-Pb zircon geochronology of Mesoproterozoic postorogenic rocks and implications for post-Ottawan magmatism and metallogenesis, New Jersey Highlands and contiguous areas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Zartman, R.E.; Moore, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Postorogenic rocks are widespread in Grenville terranes of the north-central Appalachians where they form small, discordant, largely pegmatitic felsic intrusive bodies, veins, and dikes, and also metasomatic calcic skarns that are unfoliated and postdate the regional 1090 to 1030 Ma upper amphibolite- to granulite-facies metamorphism related to the Grenville (Ottawan) Orogeny. Zircons from magmatic and nonmagmatic rocks from northern New Jersey and southern New York were dated to provide information on the regional tectonomagmatic and metallogenic history following Ottawan orogenesis. We obtained U-Th-Pb zircon ages of 1004 ?? 3 Ma for pegmatite associated with the 1020 ?? 4 Ma Mount Eve Granite near Big Island, New York, 986 ?? 4 Ma for unfoliated, discordant pegmatite that intrudes supracrustal marble at the Buckwheat open cut, Franklin, New Jersey, ???990 Ma for a silicate-borate skarn layer in the Franklin Marble at Rudeville, New Jersey, and 940 ?? 2 Ma for a calc-silicate skarn layer at Lower Twin Lake, New York. This new data, together with previously published ages of 1020 ?? 4 to 965 ?? 10 Ma for postorogenic rocks from New Jersey and southern New York, provide evidence of magmatic activity that lasted for up to 60 Ma past the peak of high-grade metamorphism. Postorogenic magmatism was almost exclusively felsic and involved relatively small volumes of metaluminous to mildly peraluminous melt that fractionated from an A-type granite parent source. Field relationships suggest the melts were emplaced along lithosphere-scale fault zones in the Highlands that were undergoing extension and that emplacement followed orogenic collapse by least 30 Ma. Postorogenic felsic intrusions correspond to the niobium-yttrium-fluorine (NYF) class of pegmatites of C??erny?? (1992a). Geochronologic data provide a temporal constraint on late-stage hydrothermal activity and a metallogenic event in New Jersey at ???990 to 940 Ma that mineralized pegmatites with subeconomic to

  13. Anatomy of an extinct magmatic system along a divergent plate boundary: Alftafjordur, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, S.; Trippanera, D.; Porreca, M.; Kissel, C.; Acocella, V.

    2015-08-01

    Recent rifting episodes highlight the role of magmatic systems with propagating dikes on crustal spreading. However, our knowledge of magmatic systems is usually limited to surface observations and geophysical data. Eastern Iceland allows direct access to extinct and eroded deeper magmatic systems. Here we collected field structural and AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) data on 187 and 19 dikes, respectively, in the 10-12 Ma old Alftafjordur magmatic system. At a paleodepth of ~1.5 km, the extension due to diking is at least 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than that induced by regional tectonics, confirming magmatism as the key mechanism for crustal spreading. This magma-induced extension, inferred from the aspect ratio of the magmatic system, was of ~8 mm/yr, lower than the present one. AMS data suggest that most of dikes have geometrically normal fabric, at least at the margins, consistent with prevalent subvertical magma flow and propagation.

  14. Overview of Early Paleozoic magmatism in the eastern Klamath Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, E.T. ); Lindsley-Griffin, N.; Griffin, J.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Igneous rocks of the Yreka and Trinity terranes record a complex history of magmatic events that occurred discontinuously over a 200-m.y. period between the Early Cambrian and the Middle Devonian. Lower Cambrian rocks occur as fault-bounded massifs along the northwestern margin of the Trinity terrane, and as tectonic blocks in melange of the Yreka terrane. The textures and structures of the strongly foliated, ductilely deformed Cambrian rocks indicate a complicated tectonic history prior to their juxtaposition with younger rocks of the Trinity and Yreka terranes. Samples dated as Cambrian (570-565 Ma) consist of tonalite and metagabbro; one tonalite contains inherited Precambrian zircon. Ordovician ultramafic and mafic rocks of the Trinity terrane range in age from 472 to 435 Ma. Two plagiogranites dated at 475 and 469 Ma are presumably also related genetically to the oceanic lithosphere represented by the ultramafic rocks. Basaltic to andesitic pillow lavas, flows and dikes occur locally within the Yreka and Trinity terranes. Within melange, these poorly dated occurrences may be Cambrian, Ordovician, or Silurian in age. However, volcanic rocks that overlie the melange are constrained to be Early to Middle Devonian in age and may be a minor northern manifestation of the well developed Devonian magmatic arc in the Redding terrane to the south. These minor Lower to Middle Devonian volcanics and the dikes that presumable fed them are undeformed, indicating that they were erupted after the Yreka and Trinity terranes were amalgamated. Small swarms of sheeted dikes related to this volcanism suggest eruption during post-amalgamation extension.

  15. Magmatic history and parental melt composition of olivine-phyric shergottite LAR 06319: Importance of magmatic degassing and olivine antecrysts in Martian magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. Brian; Sanborn, Matthew; McSween, Harry Y.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2013-08-01

    Several olivine-phyric shergottites contain enough olivine that they could conceivably represent the products of closed-system crystallization of primary melts derived from partial melting of the Martian mantle. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 has been suggested to represent a close approach to a Martian primary liquid composition based on approximate equilibrium between its olivine and groundmass. To better understand the olivine-melt relationship and the evolution of this meteorite, we report the results of new petrographic and chemical analyses. We find that olivine megacryst cores are generally not in equilibrium with the groundmass, but rather have been homogenized by diffusion to Mg# 72. We have identified two unique grain types: an olivine glomerocryst and an olivine grain preserving a primary magmatic boundary that constrains the time scale of eruption to be on the order of hours. We also report the presence of trace oxide phases and phosphate compositions that suggest that the melt contained approximately 1.1% H2O and lost volatiles during cooling, also associated with an increase in oxygen fugacity upon degassing. We additionally report in situ rare earth element measurements of the various mineral phases in LAR 06319. Based on these reported trace element abundances, we estimate the oxygen fugacity in the LAR 06319 parent melt early in its crystallization sequence (i.e., at the time of crystallization of the low-Ca and high-Ca pyroxenes), the rare earth element composition of the parent melt, and those of melts in equilibrium with later formed phases. We suggest that LAR 06319 represents the product of closed-system crystallization within a shallow magma chamber, with additional olivine accumulated from a cumulate pile. We infer that the olivine megacrysts are antecrysts, derived from a single magma chamber, but not directly related to the host magma, and suggest that mixing of antecrysts within magma chambers may be a common process in Martian magmatic

  16. Isotope fractionation related to kimberlite magmatism and diamond formation

    SciTech Connect

    Galimov, E.M. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper deals with a model of carbon isotope fractionation presumed to accompany the movement of mantle fluids. In the first part of the article, the experimental data and the relationships revealed are generalized and discussed; the remainder of the paper describes the model. The isotope compositions of different forms of carbon related to kimberlite magmatism vary widely. In diamonds, {delta}{sup 13}C values range from {minus}34.5 to +2.8{per thousand}. Carbonate-bearing autholiths in kimberlites occur enriched in {sup 13}C up to +35{per thousand}. Organic matter, including that occurring in fluid inclusions of magmatic minerals of kimberlites, is depleted in {sup 13}C down to {minus}30{per thousand}. It is concluded that the {delta}{sup 13}C-distribution for diamonds is specific for a particular occurrence. Principal differences in isotopic distribution patterns for diamonds of ultrabasic and basic paragenesis exist. Isotopically light diamonds are related only to the latter. The intention of the model is to explain the observed variations of carbon isotope composition of diamond and other carbonaceous substances related to kimberlite magmatism. The model is based on the interaction of reduced sub-asthenospehric fluid with a relatively oxidized lithosphere. It is suggested that diamonds of ultrabasic paragenesis are produced during interaction of the fluid with sheared garnet lbherzolite which is considered to be primitive mantle rock. During contact with the more oxidized mantle, reduced carbon (CH{sub 4}) may partially be converted to CO{sub 2}. Isotope exchange in CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} system, conbined with Rayleigh distillation, may provide a significant isotope fractionation. Diamonds of the basic (eclogitic) paragenesis are considered to be realted to this fractionated carbon. Also, occurrence of carbonate material highly enriched in {sup 13}C is explained by the model.

  17. The Magmatic Structure of Mt. Vesuvius: Isotopic and Thermal Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civetta, L.; D'Antonio, M.; de Lorenzo, S.; Gasparini, P.

    2002-12-01

    Mt. Vesuvius is an active volcano famous for the AD 79 eruption that destroyed Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae. Because of the intense urbanization around and on the volcano, the risk today is very high. Therefore, the knowledge of the structure and behavior of the magmatic system is fundamental both for the interpretation of any change in the dynamics of the volcano and for prediction of eruptions. A review of available and new isotopic data on rocks from Mt. Vesuvius, together with mineralogical and geochemical data and recent geophysical results, allow us to constrain a thermal modeling that describes history and present state of Mt. Vesuvius magmatic system. This system is formed by a "deep", complex magmatic reservoir where mantle-derived magmas arrive, stagnate and differentiate. The reservoir extends discontinuously between 10 and 20 km of depth, is hosted in densely fractured crustal rocks, where magmas and crust can interact, and has been fed more than once since 400 ka. The hypothesis of crustal contamination is favored by the high temperatures reached by crustal rocks as a consequence of repetitive intrusions of magma. From the "deep" reservoir magmas of K-basaltic to K-tephritic to K-phonotephritic composition rise to shallow depths where they stagnate at 3-5 km of depth before plinian eruptions, and through crystallization and mixing processes with the residual portion of the feeding systems, generate isotopically and geochemically layered reservoirs. Alternatively, during "open conduit" conditions deep, volatile-rich magma batches rise from the "deep" reservoir to less than 1 km of depth and mix with the crystal-rich, volatile-poor resident magma, triggering eruptions.

  18. Eruptive and magmatic cycles at Fuego de Colima volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Claude; Camus, Guy; Gourgaud, Alain

    1991-04-01

    The Fuego de Colima volcano displays a pattern of eruptive cyclicity, characterized by lava flows and/or slow effusions in an open crater alternating with short explosive events. Historical accounts, field investigations and petrological data allow us to refine our understanding of the relationships between recurrent acidic (acidic andesite) and "mafic" (andesitic) products and this eruptive behaviour. The second to last (1818-1913) and present (1913-present day) cycles are instructive in this respect: the short explosive events in 1818 and 1913 correspond to the initial mixing stage of a differentiated magmatic body with a new "mafic" input. Mathematical modeling shows that the pyroclastic products of 1913 result from the mixing between an acidic andesite (61.5% SiO 2) and an olivine andesite (˜56% SiO 2) in various ratios. The final andesite mixture is made of ˜38% basaltic andesite and ˜62% acidic andesite. The long effusive/extrusive phases correspond to the ensuing differentiation stage of the new magmatic body. For example, the 1961 lava flows were derived from the final mixed and homogenized magma after the eruption of 1913 by fractionation of ˜7% plagioclase, ˜9% pyroxene (clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene) and 0.7% titanomagnetite. The fractionation of 11% plagioclase, 9% pyroxene and 1.4% titanomagnetite is required to produce the composition of the 1986 summit lava dome from the same parent. In conclusion, at Fuego de Colima, an eruptive cycle begins with a short, violent explosive event related to a mixing process and continues with a long, effusive phase characterized by magmatic differentiation. This scheme differs from others that have been proposed, which consider that the eruptive cycles end with an explosive event.

  19. Lithium isotope traces magmatic fluid in a seafloor hydrothermal system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Yue; Hou, Kejun; Yang, Zhiming; Tian, Shihong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions and hosted gangue quartz from a giant volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in China provide robust evidence for inputting of magmatic fluids into a Triassic submarine hydrothermal system. The δ7Li results vary from +4.5‰ to +13.8‰ for fluid inclusions and from +6.7‰ to +21.0‰ for the hosted gangue quartz(9 gangue quartz samples containing primary fluid inclusions). These data confirm the temperature-dependent Li isotopic fractionation between hydrothermal quartz and fluid (i.e., Δδ7Liquartz-fluid = –8.9382 × (1000/T) + 22.22(R2 = 0.98; 175 °C–340 °C)), which suggests that the fluid inclusions are in equilibrium with their hosted quartz, thus allowing to determine the composition of the fluids by using δ7Liquartz data. Accordingly, we estimate that the ore-forming fluids have a δ7Li range from −0.7‰ to +18.4‰ at temperatures of 175–340 °C. This δ7Li range, together with Li–O modeling , suggest that magmatic fluid played a significant role in the ore formation. This study demonstrates that Li isotope can be effectively used to trace magmatic fluids in a seafloor hydrothermal system and has the potential to monitor fluid mixing and ore-forming process. PMID:26347051

  20. Diabase dikes of the Midcontinent Rift in Minnesota: a record of Keweenawan magmatism and tectonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.C.; Chandler, V.C.

    1985-01-01

    Swarms of both reversed-polarity (R, older) and normal-polarity (N, younger) basaltic dikes help to define the evolution of the Minnesota portion of the Midcontinent Rift of North America. Each swarm, representing fissure-feeders for a package of overlying plateau lavas now eroded away, shows the direction of least principal stress at that time and place in the complex evolution of this abortive but nearly-successful rift. Paleomagnetic pole determinations for Carlton county (CC) and Grand Portage (GP) R dikes are coincident along the Logan Loop of the Proterozoic track, showing essential contemporaneity, though their trends are different (N.30/sup 0/E vs. N. 70-90/sup 0/E.) and they are 250 km apart. These poles match that of the R lavas of the North Shore Volcanic Group (NSVG) and imply a younger age than the R Logan sills and dikes. The geochemistry of the dikes (71 analyses) also correlates well with NSVG flows, ranging from olivine tholeiites to transitional basalts and basaltic andesites and is similar to tholeiites of Columbia River, Parana, and Tertiary No. Atlantic provinces. Though each swarm shows a range of compositions, some are dominantly more evolved, whereas others contain more primitive dikes with higher Al, Mg/Fe, Cr and Ni and lower Fe, Ti, P and LIL's. An early major episode of rifting during the R polarity interval was followed by at least one major N episode in Minnesota before the final one along the present Lake Superior syncline axis. Rifting directions and mantle sources were different for each episode as shown by cross-trending dike sets, indicating complex rift development.

  1. Magmatic carbon dioxide emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Neil, John M.; Howle, James F.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) of magmatic origin is seeping out of the ground in unusual quantities at several locations around the flanks of Mammoth Mountain, a dormant volcano in Eastern California. The most recent volcanic activity on Mammoth Mountain was steam eruptions about 600 years ago, but seismic swarms and long-period earthquakes over the past decade are evidence of an active magmatic system at depth. The CO2 emission probably began in 1990 but was not recognized until 1994. Seismic swarms and minor ground deformation during 1989, believed to be results of a shallow intrusion of magma beneath Mammoth Mountain, probably triggered the release of CO2, which persists in 1998. The CO2 gas is at ambient temperatures and emanates diffusely from the soil surface rather than flowing from distinct vents. The CO2 has collected in the soil by displacing air in the pore spaces and reaches concentrations of greater than 95 percent by volume in places. The total area affected by high CO2 concentrations and high CO2 flux from the soil surface was estimated at 60 hectares in 1997. Coniferous forest covering about 40 hectares has been killed by high CO2 concentrations in the root zone. In more than 300 soil-gas samples collected from depths of 0.5 to 2 m in 1995, CO2 concentrations ranged from background levels (less than 1 percent) to greater than 95 percent by volume. At 250 locations, CO2 flux was measured using a closed chamber in 1996; values, in grams per square meter per day, ranged from background (less than 25) to more than 30,000. On the basis of these data, the total emission of magmatic CO2 in 1996 is estimated to be about 530 megagrams per day. Concentrations of CO2 exceeding Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards have been measured in pits dug in soil and snow, in poorly ventilated buildings, and in below-ground valve-boxes around Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations greater than 10 percent in poorly ventilated spaces are not uncommon on some parts

  2. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  3. Seismic evidence of an extended magmatic sill under Mt. Vesuvius.

    PubMed

    Auger, E; Gasparini, P; Virieux, J; Zollo, A

    2001-11-16

    Mt. Vesuvius is a small volcano associated with an elevated risk. Seismic data were used to better define its magmatic system. We found evidence of an extended (at least 400 square kilometers) low-velocity layer at about 8-kilometer depth. The inferred S-wave (approximately 0.6 to 1.0 kilometer per second) and P-wave velocities (approximately 2.0 kilometer per second) as well as other evidence indicate an extended sill with magma interspersed in a solid matrix.

  4. Mesozoic Magmatism and Base-Metal Mineralization in the Fortymile Mining District, Eastern Alaska - Initial Results of Petrographic, Geochemical, and Isotopic Studies in the Mount Veta Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Slack, John F.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Mortensen, James K.

    2009-01-01

    We present here the initial results of a petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic study of Mesozoic intrusive rocks and spatially associated Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu-Au prospects in the Fortymile mining district in the southern Eagle quadrangle, Alaska. Analyzed samples include mineralized and unmineralized drill core from 2006 and 2007 exploration by Full Metal Minerals, USA, Inc., at the Little Whiteman (LWM) and Fish prospects, and other mineralized and plutonic samples collected within the mining district is part of the USGS study. Three new ion microprobe U-Pb zircon ages are: 210 +- 3 Ma for quartz diorite from LWM, 187 +- 3 Ma for quartz monzonite from Fish, and 70.5 +- 1.1 Ma for altered rhyolite porphyry from Fish. We also present 11 published and unpublished Mesozoic thermal ionization mass spectrometric U-Pb zircon and titanite ages and whole-rock geochemical data for the Mesozoic plutonic rocks. Late Triassic and Early Jurassic plutons generally have intermediate compositions and are slightly foliated, consistent with synkinematic intrusion. Several Early Jurassic plutons contain magmatic epidote, indicating emplacement of the host plutons at mesozonal crustal depths of greater than 15 km. Trace-element geochemical data indicate an arc origin for the granitoids, with an increase in the crustal component with time. Preliminary study of drill core from the LWM Zn-Pb-Cu-Ag prospect supports a carbonate-replacement model of mineralization. LWM massive sulfides consist of sphalerite, galena, and minor pyrite and chalcopyrite, in a gangue of calcite and lesser quartz; silver resides in Sb-As-Ag sulfosalts and pyrargyrite, and probably in submicroscopic inclusions within galena. Whole-rock analyses of LWM drill cores also show elevated In, an important metal in high-technology products. Hypogene mineralized rocks at Fish, below the secondary Zn-rich zone, are associated with a carbonate host and also may be of replacement origin, or alternatively, may be a magnetite

  5. The magmatic and eruptive response of arc volcanoes to deglaciation: insights from southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Harriet; Mather, Tamsin A.; Pyle, David M.; Smith, Victoria C.; Fontijn, Karen; Lachowycz, Stefan; Naranjo, José A.; Watt, Sebastian F. L.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism exerts a major influence on Earth's atmosphere and surface environments. Understanding feedbacks between climate and long-term changes in rates or styles of volcanism is important, but unresolved. For example, it has been proposed that a pulse of activity at once-glaciated volcanoes contributed to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide accelerating early Holocene climate change. In plate-tectonic settings where magmatism is driven by decompression melting there is convincing evidence that activity is modulated by changes in ice- or water-loading across glacial/interglacial cycles. The response of subduction-related volcanoes, where the crust is typically thicker and mantle melting is dominated by flux melting, remains unclear. Since arc volcanoes account for 90% of subaerial eruptions, they are the most significant sources of volcanic gases and tephra directly to the atmosphere. Testing the response of arc volcanoes to deglaciation requires careful work to piece together eruption archives. Records of effusive eruptions from long-lived, arc stratovolcanoes are challenging to obtain and date; while deposits from the explosive eruptions, which dominate arc records, are prone to erosion and reworking. Our new high-resolution post-glacial (<18 ka) eruption record from a large stratovolcano in southern Chile (Mocho Choshuenco) provides new insight into the magmatic response following the removal of a regional ice load. We observe significant variations in eruptive flux, eruption size and magma composition across three distinct phases of post-glacial volcanic activity. Phase 1, shortly after deglaciation, was dominated by large explosive eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. During Phase 2 (7.3 - 2.9 ka) eruption rates and eruptive fluxes were lower, and activity was dominated by moderate-scale basaltic-andesite eruptions. For the past 2.4 kyr (Phase 3), eruptive fluxes have been elevated, and dominated by explosive eruptions of intermediate magmas. We propose that

  6. Magmatic gas emissions at Holocene volcanic features near Mono Lake, California, and their relation to regional magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Silicic lavas have erupted repeatedly in the Mono Basin over the past few thousand years, forming the massive domes and coulees of the Mono Craters chain and the smaller island vents in Mono Lake. We report here on the first systematic study of magmatic CO2 emissions from these features, conducted during 2007–2010. Most notably, a known locus of weak steam venting on the summit of North Coulee is actually enclosed in a large area (~ 0.25 km2) of diffuse gas discharge that emits 10–14 t/d of CO2, mostly at ambient temperature. Subsurface gases sampled here are heavily air-contaminated, but after standard corrections are applied, show average δ13C-CO2 of − 4.72‰, 3He/4He of 5.89RA, and CO2/3He of 0.77 × 1010, very similar to the values in fumarolic gas from Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera immediately to the south of the basin. If these values also characterize the magmatic gas source at Mono Lake, where CO2 is captured by the alkaline lake water, a magmatic CO2 upflow beneath the lake of ~ 4 t/d can be inferred. Groundwater discharge from the Mono Craters area transports ~ 13 t/d of 14C-dead CO2 as free gas and dissolved carbonate species, and adding in this component brings the estimated total magmatic CO2 output to 29 t/d for the two silicic systems in the Mono Basin. If these emissions reflect intrusion and degassing of underlying basalt with 0.5 wt.% CO2, a modest intrusion rate of 0.00075 km3/yr is indicated. Much higher intrusion rates are required to account for CO2 emissions from Mammoth Mountain and the West Moat of the Long Valley Caldera.

  7. Evaluating the temporal link between Siberian Traps magmatism and the end-Permian mass extinction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. D.; Bowring, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    , limiting detailed testing of a causal relationship. We present new high-precision U/Pb geochronology on zircon crystals isolated from a suite of shallowly intruded dolerites in the Noril'sk region and two welded tuffs in the Maymecha river-valley. These two sections are the most extensively studied in the magmatic province and although there are thick exposures of lava and volcaniclastic rock elsewhere, the Noril'sk and Maymecha-Kotuy sections are thought to be representative of the entire extrusive stratigraphy. Our dates suggest that intrusive and extrusive magmatism began within analytical uncertainty of the onset of mass extinction, permitting a causal connection with age precision at the ~ × 0.06 Ma level. The new dates also allow projection of the extinction interval and associated chemostratigraphy onto the Siberian trap stratigraphy, which suggests that ~300m of volcanicalstic rocks and ~1800m of lavas in the Maymecha-Kotuy section were erupted just prior to the onset of mass extinction. Comparison of a detailed eruption history to biological and chemical records over the extinction and recovery intervals allows for better evaluation of plausible kill mechanisms.

  8. Anatomy of the Colima volcano magmatic system, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Legrand, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Colima volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in continental north America. It is located within the Colima graben on the western part of the Colima rift zone. Although extensively studied, the internal structure and deep magmatic system remains unknown. This research gives new clues to understand how and where magmas are produced and stored at depth. Using ambient seismic noise, we jointly invert for Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves for both phase and group velocity, which is applied for the first time in a volcanic environment. We invert for both the shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy. The 3D high resolution shear wave velocity model shows a deep, large and well-delineated elliptic-shape magmatic reservoir below the Colima volcano complex at a depth of about 15 km. On the other hand, the radial anisotropy model shows a significant negative feature (i.e., VSV >VSH) revealed from ≥35 km depth until the top of the magma reservoir at about 12 km depth. The latter suggests the presence of numerous vertical fractures where fluids, rooting from a well-known mantle window, can easily migrate upward and then accumulate in the magma reservoir. Furthermore, the convergence of both a low velocity zone and a negative anisotropy suggests that the magma is mainly stored in conduits or inter-fingered dykes as opposed to horizontally stratified magma reservoir.

  9. Kilauea east rift zone magmatism: An episode 54 perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thornber, C.R.; Heliker, C.; Sherrod, D.R.; Kauahikaua, J.P.; Miklius, Asta; Okubo, P.G.; Trusdell, F.A.; Budahn, J.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Meeker, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    On January 29 30, 1997, prolonged steady-state effusion of lava from Pu'u'O'o was briefly disrupted by shallow extension beneath Napau Crater, 1 4 km uprift of the active Kilauea vent. A 23-h-long eruption (episode 54) ensued from fissures that were overlapping or en echelon with eruptive fissures formed during episode 1 in 1983 and those of earlier rift zone eruptions in 1963 and 1968. Combined geophysical and petrologic data for the 1994 1999 eruptive interval, including episode 54, reveal a variety of shallow magmatic conditions that persist in association with prolonged rift zone eruption. Near-vent lava samples document a significant range in composition, temperature and crystallinity of pre-eruptive magma. As supported by phenocryst liquid relations and Kilauea mineral thermometers established herein, the rift zone extension that led to episode 54 resulted in mixture of near-cotectic magma with discrete magma bodies cooled to ???1100??C. Mixing models indicate that magmas isolated beneath Napau Crater since 1963 and 1968 constituted 32 65% of the hybrid mixtures erupted during episode 54. Geophysical measurements support passive displacement of open-system magma along the active east rift conduit into closed-system rift-reservoirs along a shallow zone of extension. Geophysical and petrologic data for early episode 55 document the gradual flushing of episode 54 related magma during magmatic recharge of the edifice.

  10. Magmatic-vapor expansion and the formation of high-sulfidation gold deposits: Chemical controls on alteration and mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henley, R.W.; Berger, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Large bulk-tonnage high-sulfidation gold deposits, such as Yanacocha, Peru, are the surface expression of structurally-controlled lode gold deposits, such as El Indio, Chile. Both formed in active andesite-dacite volcanic terranes. Fluid inclusion, stable isotope and geologic data show that lode deposits formed within 1500. m of the paleo-surface as a consequence of the expansion of low-salinity, low-density magmatic vapor with very limited, if any, groundwater mixing. They are characterized by an initial 'Sulfate' Stage of advanced argillic wallrock alteration ?? alunite commonly with intense silicification followed by a 'Sulfide' Stage - a succession of discrete sulfide-sulfosalt veins that may be ore grade in gold and silver. Fluid inclusions in quartz formed during wallrock alteration have homogenization temperatures between 100 and over 500 ??C and preserve a record of a vapor-rich environment. Recent data for El Indio and similar deposits show that at the commencement of the Sulfide Stage, 'condensation' of Cu-As-S sulfosalt melts with trace concentrations of Sb, Te, Bi, Ag and Au occurred at > 600 ??C following pyrite deposition. Euhedral quartz crystals were simultaneously deposited from the vapor phase during crystallization of the vapor-saturated melt occurs to Fe-tennantite with progressive non-equilibrium fractionation of heavy metals between melt-vapor and solid. Vugs containing a range of sulfides, sulfosalts and gold record the changing composition of the vapor. Published fluid inclusion and mineralogical data are reviewed in the context of geological relationships to establish boundary conditions through which to trace the expansion of magmatic vapor from source to surface and consequent alteration and mineralization. Initially heat loss from the vapor is high resulting in the formation of acid condensate permeating through the wallrock. This Sulfate Stage alteration effectively isolates the expansion of magmatic vapor in subsurface fracture arrays

  11. Paired Magmatic-Metallogenic Belts in Myanmar - an Andean Analogue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Nicholas; Robb, Laurence; Searle, Michael; Morley, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Myanmar (Burma) is richly endowed in precious and base metals, having one of the most diverse collections of natural resources in SE Asia. Its geological history is dominated by the staged closing of Tethys and the suturing of Gondwana-derived continental fragments onto the South China craton during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. The country is located at a crucial geologic juncture where the main convergent Tethyan collision zone swings south around the Namche Barwa Eastern Himalayan syntaxis. However, despite recent work, the geological and geodynamic history of Myanmar remains enigmatic. Plate margin processes, magmatism, metasomatism and the genesis of mineral deposits are intricately linked, and there has long been recognized a relationship between the distribution of certain mineral deposit types, and the tectonic settings which favour their genesis. A better knowledge of the regional tectonic evolution of a potential exploration jurisdiction is therefore crucial to understanding its minerals prospectivity. This strong association between tectonics and mineralization can equally be applied in reverse. By mapping out the spatial, and temporal, distribution of presumed co-genetic mineral deposits, coupled with an understanding of their collective metallogenetic origin, a better appreciation of the tectonic evolution of a terrane may be elucidated. Identification and categorization of metallotects within a geodynamically-evolving terrane thus provides a complimentary tool to other methodologies (e.g. geochemical, geochronological, structural, geophysical, stratigraphical), for determining the tectonic history and inferred geodynamic setting of that terrane through time. Myanmar is one such study area where this approach can be undertaken. Here are found two near-parallel magmatic belts, which together contain a significant proportion of that country's mineral wealth of tin, tungsten, copper, gold and silver. Although only a few 100 km's apart, these belts exhibit a

  12. Timing of magmatism following initial convergence at a passive margin, southwestern U.S. Cordillera, and ages of lower crustal magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Initiation of the Cordilleran magmatic arc in the southwestern United States is marked by intrusion of granitic plutons, predominantly composed of alkali-calcic Fe- and Sr-enriched quartz monzodiorite and monzonite, that intruded Paleoproterozoic basement and its Paleozoic cratonal-miogeoclinal cover. Three intrusive suites, recognized on the basis of differences in high field strength element and large ion lithophile element abundances, contain texturally complex but chronologically distinctive zircons. These zircons record heterogeneous but geochemically discrete mafic crustal magma sources, discrete Permo-Triassic intrusion ages, and a prolonged postemplacement thermal history within the long-lived Cordilleran arc, leading to episodic loss of radiogenic Pb. Distinctive lower crustal magma sources reflect lateral heterogeneity within the composite lithosphere of the Proterozoic craton. Limited interaction between derived magmas and middle and upper crustal rocks probably reflects the relatively cool thermal structure of the nascent Cordilleran continental margin magmatic arc. ?? 2006 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  13. Early Cretaceous (ca. 100 Ma) magmatism in the southern Qiangtang subterrane, central Tibet: Product of slab break-off?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yalin; He, Haiyang; Wang, Chengshan; Wei, Yushuai; Chen, Xi; He, Juan; Ning, Zijie; Zhou, Aorigele

    2016-09-01

    The lack of Early Cretaceous magmatic records with high-quality geochemical data in the southern Qiangtang subterrane has inhibited a complete understanding of the magmatic processes and geological evolution of central Tibet. In this study, we present zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Pb and zircon Hf isotopic data for the newly discovered Moku pluton in the southern Qiangtang subterrane. Zircon U-Pb dating reveals that the Moku granites were emplaced in the Early Cretaceous (ca. 100 Ma) and are coeval with the hosted dioritic enclaves. The granites are slightly peraluminous and high-K calc-alkaline I-type granites and characterized by initial (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios of 0.70605-0.70658, negative ɛ Nd(t) values (-4.44 to -3.35), and Nd isotopic model ages of 1.19-1.29 Ga. The granites have a wide range of zircon ɛ Hf(t) values (-24.4 to 2.6) and concordant ratios of (206Pb/204Pb)t = 18.645-18.711, (207Pb/204Pb)t = 15.656-15.666, and (208Pb/204Pb)t = 38.751-38.836. The coeval dioritic enclaves are medium- to high-K calc-alkaline rocks with zircon ɛ Hf(t) values of -13.3 to +3.6. The geochemical signatures of the host granites and coeval dioritic enclaves indicate that the Moku pluton was most likely generated by partial melting of the ancient lower crust with contributions from mantle-derived melts. Our new data, together with other recently published data, indicate that the ca. 100 Ma magmatic rocks were derived from anatexis of the Qiangtang lower crust that mixed with upwelling asthenosphere materials in response to the slab break-off of the northward subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic lithosphere.

  14. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  15. Gunbarrel mafic magmatic event: A key 780 Ma time marker for Rodinia plate reconstructions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Heaman, L.; LeCheminant, A.N.; Premo, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    Precise U-Pb baddeleyite dating of mafic igneous rocks provides evidence for a widespread and synchronous magmatic event that extended for >2400 km along the western margin of the Neoproterozoic Laurentian craton. U-Pb baddeleyite analyses for eight intrusions from seven localities ranging from the northern Canadian Shield to northwestern Wyoming-southwestern Montana are statistically indistinguishable and yield a composite U-Pb concordia age for this event of 780.3 ?? 1.4 Ma (95% confidence level). This 780 Ma event is herein termed the Gunbarrel magmatic event. The mafic magmatism of the Gunbarrel event represents the largest mafic dike swarm yet identified along the Neoproterozoic margin of Laurentia. The origin of the mafic magmatism is not clear, but may be related to mantle-plume activity or upwelling asthenosphere leading to crustal extension accompanying initial breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia and development of the proto-Pacific Ocean. The mafic magmatism of the Gunbarrel magmatic event at 780 Ma predates the voluminous magmatism of the 723 Ma Franklin igneous event of the northwestern Canadian Shield by ???60 m.y. The precise dating of the extensive Neoproterozoic Gunbarrel and Franklin magmatic events provides unique time markers that can ultimately be used for robust testing of Neoproterozoic continental reconstructions.

  16. Remote OP-FTIR sensing of magmatic gases driving Yasur trachyandesitic explosive activity, Vanuatu island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Burton, M.; Sawyer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Yasur volcano, located in the southern part of the Vanuatu island arc (Tanna island), is a small trachyandesitic cone that has grown in the resurgent (17 cm y-1) Siwi caldera. Since about 1,400 years Yasur has displayed almost continuous Strombolian-Vulcanian explosive activity and is one of the most actively erupting volcanoes worldwide. Using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy from the crater rim (260-300 m slanting distance) and molten lava as the radiation source, we measured during several days the high frequency compositional variations of magmatic gases driving this explosive activity. Our results expand previous observations from a first FTIR measurement in 2005 [1] and complement in-situ gas measurements made in 2007 [2] within our same research framework (French ANR 'VOLGASPEC' project). FTIR absorption spectra allowed simultaneous retrieval of the molar path amounts of volcanic H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl and CO, corrected for air background in case of H2O, CO2 and CO. We observe a rather steady composition of the crater gas release between the explosions (~one every 1-3 mn) and sharp compositional variations (increases of SO2/HCl, CO2/SO2 and CO/CO2 ratios, decrease of H2O/SO2) associated with the explosions, which demonstrate the ascent and bursting of deeper-derived, CO2-SO2-CO-enriched gas slugs. Such abrupt compositional changes of magmatic gases driving explosive activity at Yasur do resemble those recorded at Stromboli volcano [3]. However, in contrast to Stromboli, Yasur explosions generate dense ash clouds whose fast expansion significantly affects the measured column gas amounts at the onset of each event (an effect considered in our data elaboration). When referred to the pressure-related behaviour of dissolved volatiles in the trachyandesitic magma feeding Yasur (melt inclusions [2]), our results provide new constraints on the source depth(s) of the explosions and the magma degassing processes controlling the volcanic activity

  17. Petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of the magmatic suite from the Jianzha Complex, central China: Petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Mo, Xuanxue; Bader, Thomas; Scheltens, Mark; Yu, Xuehui; Dong, Guochen; Huang, Xiongfei

    2014-12-01

    The intermediate-mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Jianzha Complex (JZC) at the northern margin of the West Qinling Orogenic Belt have been interpreted to be a part of an ophiolite suite. In this study, we present new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data and provide a different interpretation. The JZC is composed of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxenite, olivine gabbro, gabbro, and pyroxene diorite. The suite shows characteristics of Alaskan-type complexes, including (1) the low CaO concentrations in olivine; (2) evidence of crystal accumulation; (3) high calcic composition of clinopyroxene; and (4) negative correlation between FeOtot and Cr2O3 of spinels. Hornblende and phlogopite are ubiquitous in the wehrlites, but minor orthopyroxene is also present. Hornblende and biotite are abundant late crystallized phases in the gabbros and diorites. The two pyroxene-bearing diorite samples from JZC yield zircon U-Pb ages of 245.7 ± 1.3 Ma and 241.8 ± 1.3 Ma. The mafic and ultramafic rocks display slightly enriched LREE patterns. The wehrlites display moderate to weak negative Eu anomalies (0.74-0.94), whereas the olivine gabbros and gabbros have pronounced positive Eu anomalies. Diorites show slight LREE enrichment, with (La/Yb)N ratios ranging from 4.42 to 7.79, and moderate to weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.64-0.86). The mafic and ultramafic rocks from this suite are characterized by negative Nb-Ta-Zr anomalies as well as positive Pb anomalies. Diorites show pronounced negative Ba, Nb-Ta and Ti spikes, and typical Th-U, K and Pb peaks. Combined with petrographic observations and chemical variations, we suggest that the magmatism was dominantly controlled by fractional crystallization and crystal accumulation, with limited crustal contamination. The arc-affinity signature and weekly negative to moderately positive εNd(t) values (-2.3 to 1.2) suggest that these rocks may have been generated by partial melting of the juvenile

  18. Magmatic Degassing and the Volatile Depletion of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E.

    2015-12-01

    The detection of highly volatile elements in lunar volcanic glasses and melt inclusions has provided the first definitive evidence for the accretion and retention of these elements in the Moon's interior1,2. Measurement of H in lunar apatite, at levels similar to terrestrial apatite, has added weight to this discovery3,4. These results are at odds with the longest-standing observations that the abundances of highly- and moderately-volatile elements in lunar basalts are as much as 1000 times more depleted than in terrestrial basalts5. We will show that most of these apparent contradictions have arisen due to the previously unappreciated importance of a single widespread process, magmatic degassing. Degassing occurs in all eruptions of magma, with the consequent release of volatile elements into an exsolved vapor phase. We use ours and previously published results to evaluate lunar magmatic degassing and to show that A) volatile element contents for the bulk silicate Moon (BSM) are only moderately depleted compared with the bulk silicate Earth (range 0.5-0.1, avg. 0.25 x BSE), B) they essentially overlap the composition of the terrestrial depleted MORB source and C) the volatile depletion pattern for the BSM is largely flat, and so does not correlate with condensation temperature at 10-4 bars, nor with bond energy for likely ligands. Published high-precision Sr and Pb isotope ratios on well-dated lunar rocks6-8 reveal 87Rb/86Sr and 238U/204Pb ratios of the lunar mantle a factor of 0.3-0.5 and 0.28-0.85 depleted compared to those of the BSE, respectively; lending support to our estimates for the abundances of Rb (0.245 x BSE) and Pb (0.187 x BSE) in the BSM. Before the Moon's extent of volatile depletion can be confidently attributed to the accretion processes, magmatic degassing must be examined and critically evaluated. References [1] Saal et al., 2008. Nature 454, 192. [2] Hauri et al., 2015. FEPS 409, 252. [3] Boyce et al., 2014. Sc. 344, 400. [4] Anand et al

  19. Sublithospheric Triggers for Episodic Silicic Magmatism in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Vogt, K.; Schubert, M.

    2014-12-01

    The melt source and ascent mechanisms for crustal-scale silicic magmatism in subduction zones remain a matter of debate. Recent petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical experiments suggest that important physical controls of this process can be of sublithospheric origin. Firstly, deep sources of silicic magma can be related to episodic development of positively buoyant diapiric structures in the mantle wedge originated from deeply subducted rock mélanges (Gerya and Yuen, 2003; Castro and Gerya, 2008). Partial melting of these rapidly ascending lithologically mixed structures can produce silicic magmas with a relatively constant major element composition and variable time-dependent isotopic ratios inherited from the mélange (Vogt et al., 2013). Secondly, episodic injections of subduction-related mantle-derived mafic magmas into a partially molten hot zone of the arc lower crust can drive ascents of pre-existing felsic crustal magmas toward upper crustal levels. The injection of mafic magma induces overpressure in the lower crustal magma reservoir, which increases crustal stresses and triggers development of brittle/plastic fracture zones serving as conduits for the rapid episodic ascent of felsic magmas (Shubert et al., 2013). Our numerical results thus imply that subduction-related sublithospheric magma intrusions into the lower arc crust may both be the prime source for the generation of silicic magmas and the major physical driving mechanism for their episodic ascent toward upper crustal levels. References:Castro, A., and Gerya, T.V., 2008. Magmatic implications of mantle wedge plumes: experimental study. Lithos 103, 138-148. Gerya, T.V., and Yuen, D.A., 2003. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities from hydration and melting propel "cold plumes" at subduction zones. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 212, 47-62.Schubert, M., Driesner, T., Gerya, T.V., Ulmer, P., 2013. Mafic injection as a trigger for felsic magmatism: A numerical study. Geochemistry, Geophysics

  20. Characterization of gas chemistry and noble-gas isotope ratios of inclusion fluids in magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam alunite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Rye, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and isotope data were obtained for the active gas and noble gas of inclusion fluids in coarse-grained samples of magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam alunite from well-studied deposits (Marysvale, Utah; Tambo, Chile; Tapajo??s, Brazil; Cactus, California; Pierina, Peru), most of which are discussed in this Volume. Primary fluid inclusions in the alunite typically are less than 0.2 ??m but range up to several micrometers. Analyses of the active-gas composition of these alunite-hosted inclusion fluids released in vacuo by both crushing and heating indicate consistent differences in the compositions of magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam fluids. The compositions of fluids released by crushing were influenced by contributions from significant populations of secondary inclusions that trapped largely postdepositional hydrothermal fluids. Thermally released fluids gave the best representation of the fluids that formed primary alunite. The data are consistent with current models for the evolution of magmatic-hydrothermal and magmatic-steam fluids. Magmatic-steam fluids are vapor-dominant, average about 49 mol% H2O, and contain N2, H2, CH4, CO, Ar, He, HF, and HCl, with SO2 the dominant sulfur gas (average SO2/ H2S=202). In contrast, magmatic-hydrothermal fluids are liquid-dominant, average about 88 mol% H2O, and N2, H2, CO2, and HF, with H2S about as abundant as SO2 (average SO2/H2 S=0.7). The low SO2/H2S and N2/Ar ratios, and the near-absence of He in magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, are consistent with their derivation from degassed condensed magmatic fluids whose evolution from reduced-to-oxidized aqueous sulfur species was governed first by rock and then by fluid buffers. The high SO2/H2S and N2/Ar with significant concentrations of He in magmatic-steam fluids are consistent with derivation directly from a magma. None of the data supports the entrainment of atmospheric gases or mixing of air-saturated gases in meteoric water in either magmatic

  1. Transition from adakitic to bimodal magmatism induced by the paleo-Pacific plate subduction and slab rollback beneath SE China: Evidence from petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Xu, Xisheng; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The late Mesozoic magmatic record of SE China is dominated by felsic volcanics and intrusions. However, this magmatism mainly occurred in coastal areas at 110-80 Ma, in contrast to poorly researched dike swarms that were emplaced inland at 165-120 Ma. Here, we focus on Early Cretaceous mafic and felsic dike swarms that provide new insights into the tectono-magmatic evolution of SE China. The swarms were intruded into Neoproterozoic plutons and include granodioritic porphyry, granitic porphyry, and diabase dikes. The granodioritic porphyry (128 ± 2 Ma) dikes are geochemically similar to adakitic rocks, suggesting that inland adakitic magmatism occurred between ca. 175 and ca. 130 Ma. The majority of these adakitic rocks are calc-alkaline and have Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions that are indicative of derivation from a Neoproterozoic magmatic arc source within the lower crust. The granitic porphyry and diabase dikes were emplaced coevally at ca. 130 Ma, and the former contain high alkali and high field strength element (HFSE; e.g., Zr, Nb, Ce, and Y) concentrations that together with their high Ga/Al and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios imply an A-type affinity. The widespread ca. 130 Ma magmatism that formed the A-type granites and coeval diabase dikes defines a NE-SW trending inland belt of bimodal magmatism in SE China. The presence of mafic enclaves in some of the A-type granites, and the Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of the latter are indicative of inadequate mixing between the basement sediment-derived and coeval mantle-derived basaltic melts that define the bimodal magmatism. The transition from adakitic rocks to bimodal magmatism in the inland region of SE China indicates a change in the prevailing tectonic regime. This change was associated with an increase in the dip angle of the northwestward-subducting paleo-Pacific Plate beneath SE China between the Middle Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. This resulted in a transition from a local intra-plate extensional

  2. Timing of Emeishan magmatic activity and implications for the end-Middle Permian biotic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundil, R.; Denyszyn, S. W.; Shellnutt, J. G.; Jost, A. B.; Payne, J. L.; Renne, P. R.; He, B.; Zhong, Y.; Xu, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Evidence from high-resolution geochronology combined with fossil records and proxies for changes in the paleoenvironment suggest that there is a link between large-scale (but short-term) volcanic events and mass extinctions. Synchroneity has been shown between large-scale volcanic events and three of the five most severe mass extinctions: the end-Permian extinction (P-T) coincides with Siberian Traps LIP; the end-Triassic extinction (Tr-J) with Central Atlantic Magmatic Province; and the end-Cretaceous (K-P) with the Deccan Traps LIP. Recent studies also show that the magnitude of the extinction is not a simple function of the size (volume) of the igneous event; rather, the eruption rate and nature of the host rock that is intruded exert important controls on the rate and magnitude of the release of gases that affect climate and ocean chemistry. Consequently, high-resolution geochronological constraints on LIP volcanism, biotic extinctions, and climatic change are essential to understanding the role of magmatism in these evolutionary catastrophes. The end-Guadalupian (latest Middle Permian) extinction event shows a selectivity pattern similar to the better-studied end-Permian extinction. Single zircon U-Pb ages from intrusions related to the late Middle Permian ca 260 Ma Emeishan LIP (central and southwest China) have recently been shown to have intruded within a very narrow time interval between 260 and 257 Ma, broadly overlapping the timing of end-Guadalupian biotic change. New zircon U-Pb ages from felsic volcanic rocks overlying the youngest Emeishan related basalts show that effusive volcanism was terminated between 258 and 259 Ma, suggesting that the main stage of volcanism was very short. Unfortunately, 40Ar/39Ar analyses applied to minerals extracted from basalts have proven notoriously difficult because of thermal overprint in the studied area. Whereas the timing of Emeishan related magmatic activity is now better constrained by our new U-Pb zircon

  3. Quasi-Periodic Slow Earthquakes and Their Association With Magmatic Activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Sandwell, D.; Poland, M.; Myer, D.; Wolfe, C.; Patrick, M.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1998 the mobile south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawai`i, has been the site of multiple slow earthquake (SE) events recorded principally with continuous GPS. One spatially coincident family of these SEs exhibited a high degree of periodicity (774 +/- 7 days) from 1998 to 2005 suggesting the next SE would be in mid-March, 2007. In fact, no anomalous deformation occurred there until the June 17 Father's day dike intrusion that caused up to 1m of opening along Kilauea's east rift zone. We analyzed deformation related to the Father's day event using GPS, tilt, ALOS and Envisat interferometry, microseismicity, and elastic dislocation modeling. Our analysis reveals significant motions of far-field sites that cannot be explained by dike-related deformation and that are very similar to previous SE displacements of the same sites, strongly suggesting that a SE occurred. Inclusion of this event in the overall time series yields SE repeat times of 798 +/- 50 days, apparently maintaining the quasi- periodicity of the Kilauea events. Furthermore, the timing of dike- and SE-related deformation and stress modeling suggest the Father's day dike triggered the slow earthquake. We explore the connection between magmatism and SEs at Kilauea and find a potential correlation between SE-timing and eruptive activity since 2000. This suggests the possibility that a mechanistic understanding of Kilauea SEs may require consideration of magmatic processes in addition to fault zone processes.

  4. Direct determination of europium valence state by XANES in extraterrestrial merrillite: Implications for REE crystal chemistry and martian magmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J.; Burger, P.V.; Sutton, S.R.; McCubbin, F.M.; Newville, M.

    2012-03-15

    The relative proportion of divalent and trivalent Eu has proven to be a useful tool for estimating f{sub O{sub 2}} in various magmatic systems. However, in most cases, direct determination of the Eu valence state has not been made. In this study, direct determination of Eu valence by XANES and REE abundance in merrillite provide insights into the crystal chemistry of these phosphates and their ability to record conditions of magmatism. Merrillite strongly prefers Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+}, with the average valence state of Eu ranging between 2.9 and 3 over approximately six orders of magnitude in f{sub O{sub 2}}. The dramatic shift in the REE patterns of merrillite in martian basaltic magmas, from highly LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched, parallels many other trace element and isotopic variations and reflects the sources for these magmas. The behavior of REE in the merrillite directly reflects the relationship between the eightfold-coordinated Ca1 site and adjacent sixfold Na and tetrahedral P sites that enables charge balancing through coupled substitutions.

  5. Kinetic and dynamic control for magmatic sulfide deposit formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits form by the saturation and separation of sulfide liquid from silicate liquid due to immiscibility. As a silicate melt cools and fractionates under reducing conditions, S concentration increases and S solubility decreases. Hence, at some point, S may become supersaturated, and sulfide melt droplets would nucleate and grow. The droplets would sink through silicate melt due to higher density of the sulfide melt, and accumulate at the bottom of the magma body, possibly with other crystallizing and settling dense minerals such as olivine and chromite. The sulfide layer, if preserved, constitutes the sulfide deposits. Hence, the critical condition for magmatic sulfide deposit formation is for the droplets to settle enough distance to and accumulate at the bottom of a magma body. Otherwise, sulfide droplets would be dispersed in the rock and would not form ores. Because the settling velocity is related to the size of the droplets, the growth kinetics and settling dynamics therefore control the formation of such deposits. In this report, a parametric study of sulfide droplet growth and settling as a magma body cools is carried out using our convective growth and settling models. Single stage exponential cooling with a given time scale is adopted. Because no reliable nucleation theory is available, nucleation is roughly treated by assuming one single nucleation event leading to N critical nuclei once the degree of supersaturation reaches x (both N and x are parameters to be varied). Crystal fractionation that can alter melt composition and viscosity is ignored. Growth starts from the critical nucleus radius. Sulfide droplets are assumed to behave as rigid spheres similar to bubbles. A settling distance of 1 km is assigned as the critical condition for the formation of a sulfide ore deposit. The final result is expressed as the initial S concentration necessary for settling this distance. If cooling time scale is 1000 yr, N = 10000 per cubic meter

  6. Does subduction zone magmatism produce average continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellam, R. M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether present day subduction zone magmatism produces material of average continental crust composition, which perhaps most would agree is andesitic, is addressed. It was argued that modern andesitic to dacitic rocks in Andean-type settings are produced by plagioclase fractionation of mantle derived basalts, leaving a complementary residue with low Rb/Sr and a positive Eu anomaly. This residue must be removed, for example by delamination, if the average crust produced in these settings is andesitic. The author argued against this, pointing out the absence of evidence for such a signature in the mantle. Either the average crust is not andesitic, a conclusion the author was not entirely comfortable with, or other crust forming processes must be sought. One possibility is that during the Archean, direct slab melting of basaltic or eclogitic oceanic crust produced felsic melts, which together with about 65 percent mafic material, yielded an average crust of andesitic composition.

  7. A magmatic probe of dynamic topography beneath western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöcking, M.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.

    2014-12-01

    A region centered on the Yellowstone hotspot and encompassing the Colorado Plateau sits at an elevation 2 km higher than the cratonic North America. This difference broadly coincides with tomographically observed variations in lithospheric thickness: ~120 km beneath western North America, ~240 km beneath the craton. Thermochronology of the Grand Canyon area, sedimentary flux to the Gulf of Mexico, and river profile inversion all suggest that regional uplift occurred in at least two separate stages. High resolution seismic tomographic models, using USArray data, have identified a ring of low velocity material beneath the edges of the Colorado Plateau. Magmatism coincides with these low velocity zones and shows distinct phases: an overall increase in volume around 40 Ma and a change from lithospheric to asthenospheric signatures around 5 Ma. Volcanism is also observed to migrate north-east with time. Here, we attempt to integrate these different observations with lithospheric thickness. A dynamic topography model of progressive lithospheric erosion over a hot mantle plume might account for uplift as well as the temporal and spatial distribution of magmatism across western North America. Thinning of the lithosphere around the edges of the Colorado Plateau in combination with the hotter mantle potential temperature of a plume could create isostatic and dynamic uplift as well as allowing for melt production. To test this model, we have analysed around 100 samples from volcanic centers across western North America by ICP-MS for rare earth elements (REE). Most of the samples are younger than 5 Ma, and all of them have previously been analysed by XRF. Using trace element ratios such as La/Yb and Nb/Y we assess depth of melting and melt fraction, respectively. In addition, we use REE inversion modelling to estimate melt fractions as a function of depth and temperature of melting. The results are compared to existing constraints on lithospheric thickness and mantle potential

  8. Why are plutons dry? Outgassing mechanisms of crustal magmatic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    parmigiani, andrea; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Leclaire, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Magma bodies crystallizing to completion within the crust (i.e., forming plutons) typically undergo significant amounts of second boiling (i.e. cooling and crystallization of dominantly anhydrous minerals lead to volatile saturation and bubble nucleation/growth). The low water content (< 1 wt % H2O) and vanishing residual porosity of most plutons, despite the high volatile concentrations of their magma sources (commonly > 6 wt % H2O for evolved compositions in subduction zones), testify that outgassing from crystalline mushy reservoirs must be an efficient and widespread process. Understanding this outgassing mechanism is key to understand how volatiles are transferred from mantle depths to the surface. From the hydrodynamics point of view, the mass balance of exsolved volatiles in these plutonic bodies is controlled by the difference between the rate of degassing (formation of bubbles by 2nd boiling) and outgassing (transport of gas out of the magma body). In this study, we use pore-scale multiphase modeling to constrain these rates as function of the crystal and volatile contents in the magma. Because second boiling is a slow process, one can consider equilibrium degassing as a valid assumption. Outgassing, on the other end, is controlled by the competition between buoyancy, capillary and viscous forces. Our numerical simulations are used to determine the most efficient setting for gas to escape its magmatic trap. The high viscosity of interstitial melts and capillary forces (due to the non-wetting nature of the gas phase with most of the mineral phases in magmatic systems) strongly limits gas transport until vertically extensive gas channels are generated. We show that channels can readily form in volatile-rich coarse-grained mush zones in the upper crust, and allow efficient outgassing at crystallinities around 50-75 vol%, when millimetric bubbles can still win capillary resistive forces.

  9. On the chemistry of mantle and magmatic volatiles on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2011-03-01

    The surface of Mercury contains ancient volcanic features and signs of pyroclastic activity related to unknown magmatic volatiles. Here, the nature of possible magmatic volatiles (H, S, C, Cl, and N) is discussed in the contexts of formation and evolution of the planet, composition and redox state of its mantle, solubility in silicate melts, chemical mechanisms of magma degassing, and thermochemical equilibria in magma and volcanic gases. The low-FeO content in surface materials (<6 wt%) evaluated with remote sensing methods corresponds to less than 2.3 fO2 log units below the iron-wüstite buffer. These redox conditions imply restricted involvement of hydrous species in nebular and accretion processes, and a limited loss of S, Cl, and N during formation and evolution of the planet. Reduced conditions correspond to high solubilities of these elements in magma and do not favor degassing. Major degassing and pyroclastic activity would require oxidation of melts in near-surface conditions. Low-pressure oxidation of graphite in moderately oxidized magmas causes formation of low-solubility CO. Decompression of reduced N-saturated melts involves oxidation of nitride melt complexes and could cause N2 degassing. Putative assimilation of oxide (FeO, TiO2, and SiO2) rich rocks in magma chambers could have caused major degassing through oxidation of graphite and S-, Cl- and N-bearing melt complexes. However, crustal rocks may never have been oxidized, and sulfides, graphite, chlorides, and nitrides could remain in crystallized rocks. Chemical equilibrium models show that N2, CO, S2, CS2, S2Cl, Cl, Cl2, and COS could be among the most abundant volcanic gases on Mercury. Though, these speciation models are restricted by uncertain redox conditions, unknown volatile content in magma, and the adopted chemical degassing mechanism.

  10. Direct numerical simulations of magmatic differentiation at the microscopic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, J.; Suckale, J.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    A key question in the context of magmatic differentiation and fractional crystallization is the ability of crystals to decouple from the ambient fluid and sink or rise. Field data indicates a complex spectrum of behavior ranging from rapid sedimentation to continued entrainment. Theoretical and laboratory studies paint a similarly rich picture. The goal of this study is to provide a detailed numerical assessment of the competing effects of sedimentation and entrainment at the scale of individual crystals. The decision to simulate magmatic differentiation at the grain scale comes at the price of not being able to simultaneously solve for the convective velocity field at the macroscopic scale, but has the crucial advantage of enabling us to fully resolve the dynamics of the systems from first principles without requiring any simplifying assumptions. The numerical approach used in this study is a customized computational methodology developed specifically for simulations of solid-fluid coupling in geophysical systems. The algorithm relies on a two-step projection scheme: In the first step, we solve the multiple-phase Navier-Stokes or Stokes equation in both domains. In the second step, we project the velocity field in the solid domain onto a rigid-body motion by enforcing that the deformation tensor in the respective domain is zero. This procedure is also used to enforce the no-slip boundary-condition on the solid-fluid interface. We have extensively validated and benchmarked the method. Our preliminary results indicate that, not unexpectedly, the competing effects of sedimentation and entrainment depend sensitively on the size distribution of the crystals, the aspect ratio of individual crystals and the vigor of the ambient flow field. We provide a detailed scaling analysis and quantify our results in terms of the relevant non-dimensional numbers.

  11. Understanding Magmatic Plumbing System Dynamics at Fernandina Island, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, K. C.; McGuire, M.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Fernandina is the most active Galápagos volcano, and is located closest to the seismically defined hotspot. Allan and Simkin (2000) observed that the subaerial edifice is constructed of homogeneous basalts (Mg# = 49 ± 2) with highly variable plagioclase phenocryst contents and sparse olivine. Geist et al. (2006) proposed a magmatic plumbing system in which the volcano is supplied by interconnected sills, the shallowest of which is density-stratified: olivine and pyroxene are concentrated at greater depths, whereas less dense plagioclase mush is higher in the sill. Consequently, olivine-rich lava erupts laterally during submarine events, but plagioclase-rich lava supplies subaerial vents. To test this hypothesis, we examine lavas erupted in 1995, 2005, and 2009. These SW flank eruptions emerged alternatively from en echelon radial fissures on the lower flanks and circumferential fissures near the caldera rim. The 1995 radial fissure unzipped downslope and then formed a cone 4 km from the coast, sending flows to the ocean. In 2005, circumferential fissures erupted five flows south of the 1995 fissure. As in 1995, the 2009 fissures opened down the SW flank before focusing to a cone near the 1995 vents, producing 6 km-long flows that also reached the ocean. By correlating plagioclase crystal size distribution and morphologies with single event chronological sequences, we examine Fernandina's magmatic plumbing system. Modal plagioclase in 1995 lava decreases (20% to <5%) throughout the middle eruptive phase. Early 2005 samples are nearly aphyric (Chadwick et al., 2010), with 1-2% plagioclase. The 2009 eruption has reduced plagioclase, similar to mid-1995 samples. Preliminary observations suggest that less plagioclase-rich mush is being flushed out during early-to-medial event sequences, whereas plag phenocrysts are transported more during later phases. Plausible plumbing dynamics suggest a zone of plagioclase-rich mush that is eroded and incorporated into radial

  12. Magmatic sill intrusions beneath El Hierro Island following the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito-Saz, María Á.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Parks, Michelle M.; García-Cañada, Laura; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2016-04-01

    El Hierro, the most southwestern island of Canary Islands, Spain, is a volcano rising from around 3600 m above the ocean floor and up to of 1500 m above sea level. A submarine eruption occurred off the coast of El Hierro in 2011-2012, which was the only confirmed eruption in the last ~ 600 years. Activity continued after the end of the eruption with six magmatic intrusions occurring between 2012-2014. Each of these intrusions was characterized by hundreds of earthquakes and 3-19 centimeters of observed ground deformation. Ground displacements at ten continuous GPS sites were initially inverted to determine the optimal source parameters (location, geometry, volume/pressure change) that best define these intrusions from a geodetic point of view. Each intrusive period appears to be associated with the formation of a separate sill, with inferred volumes between 0.02 - 0.3 km3. SAR images from the Canadian RADARSAT-2 satellite and the Italian Space Agency COSMO-SkyMed constellation have been used to produce high-resolution detailed maps of line-of-sight displacements for each of these intrusions. These data have been combined with the continuous GPS observations and a joint inversion undertaken to gain further constraints on the optimal source parameters for each of these separate intrusive events. The recorded activity helps to understand how an oceanic intraplate volcanic island grows through repeated sill intrusions; well documented by seismic, GPS and InSAR observations in the case of the El Hierro activity.

  13. Bimodal magmatism of the Tucumã area, Carajás province: U-Pb geochronology, classification and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fernando Fernandes da; Oliveira, Davis Carvalho de; Antonio, Paul Y. J.; D'Agrella Filho, Manoel S.; Lamarão, Claudio Nery

    2016-12-01

    Geological mapping of the Tucumã area has enabled the identification of dike swarms intruded into an Archean basement. The disposition of these dikes is consistent with the well-defined NW-SE trending regional faults, and they can reach up to 20 km in length. They were divided into three main groups: (i) felsic dikes (70% of the dikes), composed exclusively of porphyritic rhyolite with euhedral phenocrysts of quartz and feldspars immersed in an aphyric felsite matrix; (ii) mafic dikes, with restricted occurrence, composed of basaltic andesite and subordinate basalt, with a mineralogical assembly consisting dominantly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and olivine; and (iii) intermediate rocks, represented by andesite and dacite. Dacites are found in outcrops associated with felsic dikes, representing different degrees of hybridization or mixture of mafic and felsic magmas. This is evidenced by a large number of mafic enclaves in the felsic dikes and the frequent presence of embayment textures. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating of felsic dikes yielded an age of 1880.9 ± 3.3 Ma. The felsic dikes are peraluminous to slightly metaluminous and akin to A2, ferroan and reduced granites. The intermediate and mafic dikes are metaluminous and belong to the tholeiitic series. Geochemical modeling showed that mafic rocks evolved by pyroxene and plagioclase crystallization, while K-feldspar and biotite are the fractionate phases in felsic magma. A simple binary mixture model was used to determine the origin of intermediate rocks. It indicated that mixing 60% of rhyolite and 40% basaltic andesite melts could have generated the dacitic composition, while the andesite liquid could be produced by mixing of 60% and 40% basaltic andesite and rhyolite melts, respectively. The mixing of basaltic and andesitic magmas probably occurred during ascent and storage in the crust, where andesite dikes are likely produced by a more homogeneous mixture at high depths in the continental crust

  14. Geochemical Characteristics of Volcanic Rocks from the Southern Okinawa Trough and its Implications for Tectono-magmatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, R.; Hokakubo, S.; Haraguchi, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Woodhead, J.

    2003-12-01

    and lower 143Nd/144Nd; these feature can be explained by significant crustal contamination of mantle-derived magmas. On the other hand, the eastern segment felsic rocks have a similar range of Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes for basalts. We suggest that the marked spatial differences in geochemical characteristics of felsic rocks reflects different stage of the backarc rifting. Geophysical surveys provided evidence that crustal thickness is relatively thin ( ˜ 20km) under the eastern segment, whereas thick continental crust ( ˜ 25-30km) without significant thinning have been proposed in the western segment. Sibuet et al. (1998) proposed the linkage of subducted Gagua Ridge for CBVT rhyolites, because of a sharp change in subduction angle (slab tear?) near 123° E. The CBVT rhyolites are, however, not adakitic. Instead, we suggest mantle flow originated from the magmatism at the Northern Taiwan Volcanic Zone, which commenced since ˜ 3 Ma and was resulted from post-collisional extensional collapse, have important implications for required heat source and comparatively depleted mantle source inferred from mafic inclusion in CBVT rhyolites.

  15. Interaction between hydrothermal and magmatic systems: modelling of magmatic gas release and ascent at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todesco, Micol; Afanasyev, Andrey; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Longo, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    We model the perturbation of a hydrothermal system caused by the gas release from sub-surface magma chambers. First, we simulate the evolution of the magmatic system composed by two magma reservoirs: a small and shallow chamber, filled with degassed phonolite, connected to a deeper reservoir of gas-rich shoshonite through a vertical dyke. The fluid-dynamics governing the replenishment of the upper chamber is computed with a 2D code solving conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for a homogeneous multicomponent, multiphase Newtonian mixture, accounting for exsolution and dissolution of volatiles (H2O+CO2). We then assume that the volatiles that accumulate at the top of the upper chamber, escape from the reservoir and enter a steady state hydrothermal system. The response of the hydrothermal circulation is simulated with two multi-phase, multi-component porous media codes (MUFITS and TOUGH2) that describe the propagation of magmatic volatiles toward the surface. We create a simple model of Campi Flegrei hydrothermal system covering both shallow and deep regions where the temperature exceeds the critical temperature for water. Simulation results suggest that the rate at which volatiles are released from the magma chamber, the permeability distribution and the conditions of the hydrothermal system when degassing takes place can determine very different evolutions: accordingly, carbon dioxide may reach the surface within a time span ranging from weeks to millennia. The simulations indicate also that a single unrest event, associated with volatiles release from the chamber, can result in a periodic behaviour of observable parameters such as gas flux and fumarole composition. Duration of the period is of the order of 10 years, which is comparable with the time span between major unrest events observed at Campi Flegrei.

  16. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd study of granite-charnockite association in the Pudukkottai region and the link between metamorphism and magmatism in the Madurai Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekaran, M. Chandra; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Balakrishnan, S.

    2016-04-01

    Pudukkottai region in the northeastern part of the Madurai Block exposes the garnetiferous pink granite that intruded the biotite gneiss. Charnockite patches are associated with both the rock types. Rb-Sr biotite and Sm-Nd whole-rock isochron ages indicate a regional uplift and cooling at ˜550 Ma. The initial Nd isotope ratios (\\varepsilon _{ {Nd}}t=-20 to -22) and Nd depleted-mantle model ages (TDM = 2.25 to 2.79 Ga) indicate a common crustal source for the pink-granite and associated charnockite, while the biotite gneiss and the charnockite within it represent an older crustal source (\\varepsilon _{ {Nd}}t= -29 and TDM = > 3.2 Ga). The Rb-Sr whole-rock data and initial Sr-Nd isotope ratios also help demonstrate the partial but systematic equilibration of Sr isotope and Rb/Sr ratios during metamorphic mineral-reactions resulting in an `apparent whole-rock isochron'. The available geochronological results from the Madurai Block indicate four major periods of magmatism and metamorphism: Neoarchaean-Paleoproterozoic, Mesoproterozoic, mid-Neoproterozoic and late-Neoproterozoic. We suggest that the high-grade and ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism was preceded by magmatism which `prepared' the residual crust to sustain the high P- T conditions. There also appears to be cyclicity in the tectono-magmatic events and an evolutionary model for the Madurai Block should account for the cyclicity in the preserved records.

  17. Hf isotope study of Palaeozoic metaigneous rocks of La pampa province and implications for the occurrence of juvenile early Neoproterozoic (Tonian) magmatism in south-central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernicoff, C. J.; Zappettini, E. O.; Santos, J. O. S.; Belousova, E.; McNaughton, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    On a global scale, juvenile Tonian (Early Neoproterozoic) magmatic rocks are associated with the extensional events that lead to the breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. In Argentina, no geological record is available for this time interval, lasting from 1000 to 850 Ma. We present indirect evidence for the existence of Tonian extension in Argentina, as supported by Hf and Nd isotope determinations on Phanerozoic magmatic and sedimentary rocks. We mainly focus on our own Hf isotope determinations carried out on U-Pb SHRIMP dated zircons from Palaeozoic metaigneous rocks of La Pampa province, south-central Argentina, i.e. metagabbros of Valle Daza, dioritic orthogneiss of Estancia Lote 8, and metadiorite of Estancia El Carancho, having found that these rocks were derived from sources of ca. 920 to ca 880 Ma, with ɛHf values between +6.83 and + 9.59. Inherited zircons of this age and character identified in these rocks also point to the same source. We also compile additional Hf and Nd studies from previous work on Phanerozoic magmatic and sedimentary rocks. We preliminarily compare the age of the juvenile Tonian sources referred to in our work with that of two extensional events identified in the São Francisco craton, Brazil.

  18. Magmatic occurrences in the Central Arava (southern Israel) based on Geology and Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Ginat; Michael, Rybakov; Boris, Shirman; Michael, Lazar

    2014-05-01

    The Eshet Ridge is located in the Central Arava near Wadi Paran. Geological data were collected using ground magnetic surveys and petrophysical measurements (magnetic susceptibility and density). The goal was to reveal the structure and nature of a concealed magmatic body under the ridge. Integrated gravity and magnetic interpretation together with seismic reflection data (including 2¾ modeling) indicated the presence of a deep-seated basic magmatic intrusion. Occurrence of Fe-mineralized rocks along the ridge supports subsurface data. The magmatic body was intruded in the hard Turonian rocks of the Eshet Ridge. Basic magmatic exposures dating from the Early Miocene were evident along Wadi Ashosh (in the eastern Negev) and its margins 18 km. to the north of the ridge. A new outcrop of basic magmatic intrusion was found southwest of the Tzukim settlement. Magnetic measurements indicated a similarity between their magnetic pattern and the Ashosh basic magmatics, which were dated to 20.4 ± 0.7 Ma. Volcanoclastic tuff pebbles (magnetic susceptibility of around 2-7 * 10-3 SI) surrounded by conglomerate were discovered at two sites in Wadi Demma and Wadi Menuha (streams that drain near the Eshet Ridge and 2 km south of it, respectively). The conglomerates contained mostly limestone, chalk and chert fragments; not more than 5% of which were volcanic pebbles. Two pebbles were dated to 24.4 ± 0.7and 21.5 ± 0.5 Ma. The magmatic outcrops in Wadi Ashosh, the magmatic dyke near Tzukim and the volcanic purple and black pebbles near Wadi Menuha were all dated to the very Late Oligocene-Early Miocene. The magmatic body identified in this study under the Eshet Ridge was termed the Eshet Intrusion and is connected to, and even the source of, all these phenomena.

  19. Timing and duration of garnet granulite metamorphism in magmatic arc crust, Fiordland, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stowell, H.; Tulloch, A.; Zuluaga, C.; Koenig, A.

    2010-01-01

    Pembroke Granulite from Fiordland, New Zealand provides a window into the mid- to lower crust of magmatic arcs. Garnet Sm-Nd and zircon U-Pb ages constrain the timing and duration of high-P partial melting that produced trondhjemitic high Sr/Y magma. Trace element zoning in large, euhedral garnet is compatible with little post growth modification and supports the interpretation that garnet Sm-Nd ages of 126.1??2.0 and 122.6??2.0. Ma date crystal growth. Integration of the garnet ages with U-Pb zircon ages elucidates a history of intrusion(?) and a protracted period of high-temperature metamorphism and partial melting. The oldest zircon ages of 163 to 150. Ma reflect inheritance or intrusion and a cluster of zircon ages ca. 134. Ma date orthopyroxene-bearing mineral assemblages that may be magmatic or metamorphic in origin. Zircon and garnet ages from unmelted gneiss and garnet reaction zones record garnet granulite facies metamorphism at 128 to 126. Ma. Peritectic garnet and additional zircon ages from trondhjemite veins and garnet reaction zones indicate that garnet growth and partial melting lasted until ca. 123. Ma. Two single fraction garnet ages and young zircon ages suggest continued high-temperature re-equilibration until ca. 95. Ma. Phase diagram sections constrain orthopyroxene assemblages to <0.6 GPa @ 650??C, peak garnet granulite facies metamorphic conditions to 680-815??C @ 1.1-1.4. GPa, and a P-T path with a P increase of???0.5. GPa. These sections are compatible with water contents???0.28wt.%, local dehydration during garnet granulite metamorphism, and <0.3. GPa P increases during garnet growth. Results demonstrate the utility of integrated U-Pb zircon and Sm-Nd garnet ages, and phase diagram sections for understanding the nature, duration, and conditions of deep crustal metamorphism and melting. Geochronologic and thermobarometric data for garnet granulite indicate that thickening of arc crust, which caused high-pressure metamorphism in northern

  20. Zircon xenocryst resorption and magmatic regrowth at El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Brenda; Schmitt, Axel K.; Roberge, Julie; Tenorio, Felipe Garcia; Damiata, Brian N.

    2016-02-01

    . This implies that zircon can detect magmatic longevity which is obscured in the major mineral record.

  1. Eruptive history and magmatic stability of Erebus volcano, Antarctica: Insights from englacial tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, N. A.; Kyle, P. R.; Dunbar, N. W.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Erebus is the most active volcano in Antarctica and hosts a persistent convecting and degassing phonolite lava lake in its summit crater. Small Strombolian eruptions occasionally eject volcanic bombs onto the crater rim and floor. 40 years of observations, during the austral summer, show that ash eruptions are rare, but extensive records of small tephra (volcanic ash) layers are found embedded in ablating blue ice areas on the flanks of the volcano. Most tephra are deposited within 15km of the summit, although 3 Erebus phonolite tephra have been located over 200km away. The tephra provide a stratigraphic eruptive sequence of Erebus and gives insight into its explosive history. There is very little age control on the eruptions but based on their phonolitic composition they likely span the past 10-40ka. SEM images and Image Particle Analysis (IPA) of tephra were used to determine shard morphology and shape parameters, respectively. The tephra layers characterized by Pele's hair, glass spheres and budding ash are interpreted to be from Strombolian eruptions. In contrast, layers that are dominated by chemical pitting, quenched textures, mossy and adhering particles are mostly likely from phreatomagmatic eruptions. IPA parameters are characterized by rectangularity, compactness, elongation and circularity. Strombolian particles have larger elongation and circularity values exhibited by their stretched and irregular shape and lower rectangularity and compactness values. Phreatomagmatic tephra are more blocky and have higher rectangularity and compactness values and lower elongation and circularity values than Strombolian particles. Based on imagery, many Erebus tephra layers appear to contain a mixture of Strombolian and phreatomagmatic fragments. These mixed eruptions would likely start as phreatomagmatic and transition into magmatic Strombolian eruptions as the water source is exhausted. Major and trace element analyses of the glass shards were measured by electron

  2. Red-Sea rift magmatism near Al Lith, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    A model of poly-baric mantle-melt derivation, producing several alkalinesubalkaline cycles, best explains magmatism in the Red Sea region. Differences in the depths and dynamics of mantle-melt extraction and transport brought about through changes in crust and mantle structure as the rift and paar developed may account for the transition from mixed alkaline-subalkaline bimodal magmatism of the pre-20 Ma rift basin to exclusively subalkaline (tholeiitic) magmatism at the Red Sea spreading axis and to predominantly alkali basalt volcanism within the Arabian Shield.

  3. Neoproterozoic anorogenic magmatism in the Southern Bahia Alkaline Province of NE Brazil: U-Pb and Pb-Pb ages of the blue sodalite syenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Maria de Lourdes da Silva; Conceição, Herbet; Macambira, Moacir José Buenano; Galarza, Marco Antonio; Cunha, Mônica Pringsheim; Menezes, Rita Cunha Leal; Marinho, Moacyr Moura; Filho, Basílio Elesbão da Cruz; Rios, Débora Correia

    2007-08-01

    Blue sodalite syenite is a rare rock, and the Southern Bahia Alkaline Province (SBAP) is the only place in Brazil where economic deposits are found. This province forms part of the Archaean to Paleoproterozoic São Francisco craton, and contains a few batholiths, a large number of stocks and hundreds of dykes. Its southern part lies close to the tectonic contact between the craton and the Neoproterozoic Araçuaí mobile melt. Blue sodalite-bearing syenites are found in almost all the igneous bodies of the SBAP as dykes or pegmatitic masses hosted by nepheline syenite. Economically viable quantities for the production of dimension stones are found only in the Floresta Azul alkaline complex, the Itaju do Colônia and Rio Pardo stocks and the Itarantim batholith.U-Pb ages obtained for titanite from Itaju do Colônia (732 ± 8 Ma) and Rio Pardo (714 ± 8) and Pb-Pb evaporation ages of zircon from Floresta Azul (696 ± 3 Ma) and Itarantim (722 ± 5 Ma). The geochronology of the SBAP shows that the anorogenic alkaline magmatism persisted for at least 58 Ma, demonstrating an extensional tectonic environment in the southern part of the São Francisco craton at this time. The data show that the rift phase which preceded the formation of the Araçuaí orogen was active until at least 700 Ma. The reported ages are similar to those found for the nepheline syenite host bodies, which supports the conclusions of the previous petrologic study demonstrating that blue sodalite is formed during the crystallization of these bodies. Two different processes are involved. In the magmatic process, sodalite occurs as disseminated and interstitial crystals among alkali feldspar crystals, and is associated with calcite and cancrinite formed by destabilization of nepheline. In the metasomatic process, discontinuous bands of sodalite are in sharp contact with nepheline syenite pegmatite, and its crystal aggregates often contain relict textures of nepheline and albite been replaced by sodalite.

  4. Magmatic and phreatomagmatic volcanic activity at Mt. Takahe, West Antarctica, based on tephra layers in the Byrd ice core and field observations at Mt. Takahe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palais, Julie M.; Kyle, Philip R.; McIntosh, William C.; Seward, Diane

    1988-12-01

    The morphology, grain size characteristics and composition of ash particles in 30 ka to 150 ka tephra layers from the Byrd ice core were examined to characterize the eruptions which produced them and to test the suggestion that they were erupted from Mt. Takahe, a shield volcano in Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica. Volcanic deposits at Mt. Takahe were examined for evidence of recent activity which could correlate with the tephra layers in the ice core. Coarse- and fine-ash layers have been recognized in the Byrd ice core. The coarse-ash layers have a higher mass concentration than the fine-ash layers and are characterized by fresh glass shards > 50 μm diameter, many containing elongate pipe vesicles. The fine-ash layers have a lower mass concentration and contain a greater variety of particles, typically < 20 μm diameter. Many of these particles are aggregate grains composed of glass and crystal fragments showing S and Cl surface alteration. The grain-size distributions of the coarse and fine-ash layers overlap, in part because of the aggregate nature of grains in the fine-ash layers. The coarse-ash layers are interpreted as having formed by magmatic eruption whereas the fine-ash layers are believed to be hydrovolcanic in origin. Mt. Takahe is the favored source for the tephra because: (a) chemical analyses of samples from the volcano are distinctive, being peralkaline trachyte, and similar in composition to the analyzed tephra; (b) Mt. Takahe is a young volcano (< 0.3 Ma); (c) pyroclastic deposits on Mt. Takahe indicate styles of eruption similar to that inferred for the ice core tephra; and (d) Mt. Takahe is only about 350 km from the calculated site of tephra deposition. A speculative eruptive history for Mt. Takahe is established by combining observations from Mt. Takahe and the Byrd ice core tephra. Initial eruptions at Mt. Takahe were subglacial and then graded into alternating subaerial and subglacial activity. The tephra suggest alternating subaerial

  5. Magmatism as a response to exhumation of the Priest River complex, northern Idaho: Constraints from zircon U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, L. M.; Baldwin, J. A.; Crowley, J. L.; Fisher, C. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    Zircon and monazite U-Pb geochronology and zircon Hf isotopes place constraints on the temporal and source relationships between crustal anatexis, magmatism, and exhumation of the Priest River metamorphic core complex, northern Idaho. Granitoids that intruded the migmatitic, pelitic Hauser Lake gneiss include the < 76.5 ± 0.1 Ma Spokane granite, 50.13 ± 0.02 Ma Silver Point quartz monzonite, c. 47.9 Ma Wrencoe granodiorite, < 46.4 ± 1.8 Ma Rathdrum granite, and a < 49.8 ± 0.4 Ma leucocratic dike. Cretaceous magmatism preceded the c. 64 Ma peak metamorphism (recorded by monazite) of the Hauser Lake gneiss, whereas discrete pulses of Eocene magmatic activity post-date the onset of exhumation by 10 Ma. The relative timing of pluton emplacement in the Priest River complex indicates that it was primarily a response to decompression rather than a cause. The mylonitized Silver Point and undeformed Wrencoe plutons bracket the end of a rapid phase of exhumation to c. 50-48 Ma. Zircon εHf(i) values and Lu-Hf isotope evolution indicate that the Silver Point and Wrencoe plutons crystallized from homogeneous magmas sourced from Archean-Proterozoic basement orthogneisses, whereas the Spokane granite and two leucocratic units appear to have been produced by partial melting of the Hauser Lake gneiss. Comparison of the Priest River complex with other deeply exhumed northern Cordilleran complexes indicates variability in the timing and, therefore, relative influences of partial melting and magmatism on the initiation of exhumation, which must be accounted for in numerical models of metamorphic core complex formation and evolution.

  6. Generation and disaggregation of magmatic mush in the premonitory stages of the AD 1783 Laki eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclennan, J.; Neave, D.; Passmore, E.; Thordarson, T.; Fitton, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    found to evolve in situ, producing distinctive overgrowths on plagioclase primocrysts. However, the Laki phenocrysts do not display such overgrowths, and no recognisable zones in the phenocrysts are in equilibrium with melts more evolved than the carrier. This observation is puzzling, and indicates that the Laki mush liquid did not form by in situ crystallisation overgrowth on the mush crystals. Instead, we present a model that accounts for the observations by intrusion of a porphyritic basalt into a shallow magma chamber containing dense, viscous ferrobasalt. Recovery of mushy cumulate nodules from basaltic eruptions combined with recognition of the geochemical consequences of mush disaggregation in magma provide an excellent opportunity for linking the volcanic and plutonic records of magma chamber processes. Advancing understanding of the physical properties of magmatic mushes and the physical processes that lead to their development and disaggregation will improve models of the triggering and evolution of large and environmentally significant basaltic eruptions.

  7. Tracking the evolution of a giant magmatic system from assembly to supereruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotzlaw, J. F.; Schaltegger, U.; Frick, D. A.; Dungan, M. A.; Gerdes, A.; Günther, D.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of large magma bodies prior to eruption are closely related consequences of the balance between the rate of magma influx and the rate of cooling. The products of caldera-related silicic supereruptions, and less voluminous associated precursor and post-caldera activity preserve information about the thermal and chemical states of the system at the moment of evacuation of the magma chamber. Numerous studies of the Oligocene Fish Canyon Tuff (5000 km3; Colorado, USA) and related eruptive products of the La Garita caldera have addressed the origin and evolution of large-volume crystal-rich magmas. We use the presence of zircon in all eruptive products of the Fish Canyon magmatic system to gain a high-resolution geochronologic control on the thermal evolution of the magmatic system by using the trace element composition of U-Pb dated zircons as a proxy for magma crystallinity. New analytical protocols permit to obtain age, chemical and isotopic information from the exact same volume of single zircons (Schoene et al., 2010, GCA) allowing us to trace magma crystallinity as a function of time. Zircon U-Pb dates record ~400,000 years of crystallization. Variations in trace element composition in U-Pb dated zircons can be attributed to trace element fractionation imposed by co-crystallization of titanite. Due to the relatively high modal abundance of titanite in Fish Canyon magma and the extreme compatibility of the rare earth elements (REE) in this phase, titanite is the major control on many trace element concentrations and ratios (e.g. Yb/Dy) in coexisting zircons via varying degrees of depletion of these elements in the host melt. Modeling of compositional variations as a result of fractional crystallization suggests that the range of zircon compositions can be explained by 50-70% crystallization of a fractionating assemblage containing 0.4-0.8 vol.% titanite. The period of cooling centered around 28.4 Ma and is marked by an

  8. CONTROLS OF EXTENSION ON MIOCENE ARC MAGMATISM IN THE CENTRAL SIERRA NEVADA (CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, C.; Putirka, K. D.; Hagan, J. C.; Koerner, A.; Melosh, B. L.

    2009-12-01

    Ancestral Cascades arc volcanism in the central Sierra Nevada occurred in three Miocene pulses, at about 16-13 Ma, 11-9 Ma, and 7-6 Ma. Our work in the Carson Pass to Sonora Pass areas shows that range-front faults clearly controlled the positions of volcanic centers during the second and third magmatic pulses. Voluminous high-K volcanic rocks of the 11-9 Ma Stanislaus Group record the onset of transtensional calving of the Sierra Nevada microplate off the western edge of the Nevadaplano. The Little Walker Caldera or Center formed at a releasing stepover in range-front faults at Sonora Pass, and erupted widesperad trachydacite ignimbrite in three distinct phases (Eureka Valley Tuff). Interstratified with these ignimbrites are widespread trachyandesite (latite), basaltic-trachyandesite (shoshonite) and trachydacite lava flows, in sections up to 500 m thick, whose vents have never been discovered (e.g. Table Mountain Latite). Although some of these lavas may have erupted from vents buried beneath the Little Walker Center, we recognize intrusions and vent facies for them along Sierran range-front and range-crest faults that emanate northwestward from the Little Walker Center between Sonora Pass and Ebbetts Pass. The biggest volcanic centers of the third magmatic pulse also include silicic volcanic rocks, and are sited along normal faults; they include the Markleeville Center southeast of Carson Pass, and the Ebbetts Pass Center. The 8 km diameter Markleeville Center consists of andesites and dacites that formed within the Hope Valley graben. The next fault to the east of the Hope Valley graben, which we name the Grover Hot Springs fault, extends southward to Ebbetts Pass, where it forms an overlapping right (releasing) step with the Noble Canyon fault to the west. The Ebbetts Pass Center lies above this releasing step along the Sierran crest. The base of the Ebbetts Pass Center is 10 km in diameter and is formed of radially-dipping basaltic andesite lava flows and

  9. Petrologic, tectonic, and metallogenic evolution of the Ancestral Cascades magmatic arc, Washington, Oregon, and northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; John, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Present-day High Cascades arc magmatism was preceded by ~40 m.y. of nearly cospatial magmatism represented by the ancestral Cascades arc in Washington, Oregon, and northernmost California (United States). Time-space-composition relations for the ancestral Cascades arc have been synthesized from a recent compilation of more than 4000 geochemical analyses and associated age data. Neither the composition nor distribution of ancestral Cascades magmatism was uniform along the length of the ancestral arc through time. Initial (>40 to 36 Ma) ancestral Cascades magmatism (mostly basalt and basaltic andesite) was focused at the north end of the arc between the present-day locations of Mount Rainier and the Columbia River. From 35 to 18 Ma, initial basaltic andesite and andesite magmatism evolved to include dacite and rhyolite; magmatic activity became more voluminous and extended along most of the arc. Between 17 and 8 Ma, magmatism was focused along the part of the arc coincident with the northern two-thirds of Oregon and returned to more mafic compositions. Subsequent ancestral Cascades magmatism was dominated by basaltic andesite to basalt prior to the post–4 Ma onset of High Cascades magmatism. Transitional tholeiitic to calc-alkaline compositions dominated early (before 40 to ca. 25 Ma) ancestral Cascades eruptive products, whereas the majority of the younger arc rocks have a calc-alkaline affinity. Tholeiitic compositions characteristic of the oldest ancestral arc magmas suggest development associated with thin, immature crust and slab window processes, whereas the younger, calc-alkaline magmas suggest interaction with thicker, more evolved crust and more conventional subduction-related magmatic processes. Presumed changes in subducted slab dip through time also correlate with fundamental magma composition variation. The predominance of mafic compositions during latest ancestral arc magmatism and throughout the history of modern High Cascades magmatism probably

  10. Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP): The Palisade Sill Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, A.; Basu, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    The extensively studied 200Ma Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is considered to be the world's largest continental Large Igneous Province (LIP) covering up to 7 X 106 km2. This igneous province has been linked to the ~200Ma Mesozoic opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean. This opening fragmented the CAMP into several segments that occur on four different tectonic plates today. The CAMP related LIP is different from others in that it constitutes almost entirely of dikes and sills with sparse volcanic outflows. The 200 Ma Palisade Sill, exposed along the Hudson River in northeastern North America is an expression of the CAMP magmatism. On the basis of similar ages of eruption, Palisade Sill tholeiites have been correlated to other CAMP exposures in four continents. We provide an isotopic tracer study of the Palisade Sill basalts and relate them to low-Ti (<2 wt %) CAMP related tholeiites from North and South America, western Europe, and West Africa. We report Nd-Sr-Pb isotopic and multiple trace element data of 19 basalts and gabbros, 3 chilled margin basalts, and 4 sandstones spanning the entire length and thickness of the Palisade Sill in New York and New Jersey. These geochemical data are essential to understand the relationship between mantle geodynamic processes involved in the generation of the CAMP tholeiites prior to the formation of the of the Atlantic Ocean crust. The Palisade Sill basalts of this study yield the typical composition of low-Ti CAMP tholeiites with small LREE enrichments (LaN/SmN = 1.7 to 2.3), radiogenic Sr and negative ɛNd(I) values (87Sr/87Sr(I) = 0.70668 to 0.71037; ɛNd(I) = -0.64 to -3.8), and Pb-isotopic ratios (e.g. 206Pb/204Pb = 18.11 to 18.69) above the NHRL and subparallel to it. These geochemical data indicate the Palisade Sill basalts were derived from a slightly enriched OIB-like mantle source. Further, these rocks were derived by ~15% melting of a slightly depleted spinel peridotite with up to 20% contamination by the

  11. The Role of Magma Mixing in Creating Magmatic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.; Collins, S.; Morgan, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Most magmas derived from the mantle are fundamentally basaltic. An assessment of actual magmatic rock compositions erupted at the earth's surface, however, shows greater diversity. While still strongly dominated by basalts, magmatic rock compositions extend to far more differentiated (higher SiO2, LREE enriched) compositions. Magmatic diversity is generated by differentiation processes, including crystal fractionation/ accumulation, crustal contamination and magma mixing. Among these, magma mixing is arguably inevitable in magma systems that deliver magmas from source-to-surface, since magmas will tend to multiply re-occupy plumbing systems. A given mantle-derived magma type will mix with any residual magmas (and crystals) in the system, and with any partial melts of the wallrock which are generated as it is repeatedly flushed through the system. Evidence for magma mixing can be read from the petrography (identification of crystals derived from different magmas), a technique which is now well-developed and supplemented by isotopic fingerprinting (1,2) As a means of creating diversity, mixing is inevitably not efficient as its tendency is to blend towards a common composition (i.e. converging on homogeneity rather than diversity). It may be surprising then that many systems do not tend to homogenise with time, meaning that the timescales of mixing episodes and eruption must be similar to external magma contributions of distinct composition (recharge?). Indeed recharge and mixing/ contamination may well be related. As a result, the consequences of magma mixing may well bear on eruption triggering. When two magmas mix, volatile exsolution may be triggered by retrograde boiling, with crystallisation of anhydrous phase(s) in either of the magmas (3) or volatiles may be generated by thermal breakdown of a hydrous phase in one of the magmas (4). The generation of gas pressures in this way probably leads to geophysical signals too (small earthquakes). Recent work pulling

  12. Getting the gas out - developing gas networks in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Rust, Alison; Oppenheimer, Julie; Belien, Isolde

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruption style, and explosive potential, are strongly controlled by the pre-eruptive history of the magmatic volatiles: specifically, the more efficient the gas loss prior to eruption, the lower the likelihood of primary (magmatic) explosive activity. Commonly considered gas loss mechanisms include separated flow, where individual bubbles (or bubble clouds) travel at a rate that is faster than the host magma, and permeable flow, where gas escapes through permeable (connected) pathways developed within a (relatively) static matrix. Importantly, gas loss via separated flow is episodic, while gas loss via permeable flow is likely to be continuous. Analogue experiments and numerical models on three phase (solid-liquid-gas) systems also suggest a third mechanism of gas loss that involves the opening and closing of 'pseudo fractures'. Pseudo fractures form at a critical crystallinity that is close to the maximum particle packing. Fractures form by local rearrangement of solid particles and liquid to form a through-going gas fracture; gas escape is episodic, and modulated by the available gas volume and the rate of return flow of interstitial liquid back into the fracture. In all of the gas escape scenarios described above, a fundamental control on gas behaviour is the melt viscosity, which affects the rate of individual bubble rise, the rate of bubble expansion, the rate of film thinning (required for bubble coalescence), and the rate of melt flow into gas-generated fractures. From the perspective of magma degassing, rates of gas expansion and film thinning are key to the formation of an interconnected (permeable) gas pathway. Experiments with both analogue and natural materials show that bubble coalescence is relatively slow, and, in particle-poor melts, does not necessarily create permeable gas networks. As a result, degassing efficiency is modulated by the time scales required either (1) to produce large individual bubbles or bubble clouds (in low viscosity

  13. First Report of Carboniferous Alkalic Magmatism in the Maine Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, D. P.; Bradley, D. C.; McCauley, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Litchfield pluton is a composite alkalic plutonic complex that occupies an area of approximately 7 km2 in south-central Maine. The rocks intrude deformed Silurian meta-sedimentary rocks of the Central Maine Sequence and include sodium amphibole and pyroxene bearing leucosyenites, and coarse-grained nepheline × cancrinite × sodalite syenites (a.k.a. 'Litchfieldite'). While these rocks have attracted the interest of mineral collectors for over a century, poor exposure has discouraged detailed study and the age and petrogenesis of these unusual rocks have remained elusive. Whole rock geochemical analysis of representative samples reveals intermediate compositions in terms of SiO2 content (58-65 wt.%), a strong enrichment in alkali elements (K2O + Na2O = 12-14 wt.%), and negligible amounts of MgO and TiO2. Chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns show varying degrees of light REE enrichment (10-100 times chondritic abundances) that tend to flatten at the heavy REE end. Nearly all of the REE patterns show positive Eu anomalies and various trace element plots reveal a notable enrichment in most high field strength elements (e.g., Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta). Prismatic, elongate, and clear zircons were separated from a sample of coarse-grained nepheline syenite and U-Pb isotopic analysis was carried out using the USGS-Stanford SHRIMP-RG. A weighted mean of 206Pb/238U ages from 13 zircons provides what we interpret to be an igneous crystallization age of 321 × 2 Ma. A single 40Ar/39Ar biotite total gas age of 239 × 1 Ma obtained from the same sample is consistent with previously published mica ages from surrounding country rocks and reflects regional exhumation and slow cooling following the Devonian Acadian Orogeny. Mid-Carboniferous alkaline magmatism is rare in the northern Appalachians and thus the tectonic significance of this particular intrusion is difficult to place into a more regional context. While rocks of this age are lacking in Maine, the intrusion

  14. Magmatic under-plating beneath the Luangwa Rift Valley, Zambia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matende, Kitso Nkooko

    We used aeromagnetic data, and satellite and terrestrial gravity data to examine the thermal and crustal structure beneath the Karoo-aged Luangwa Rift Valley (LRV) in Zambia in order to determine the geodynamic controls of its formation. We computed Curie Point Depth (CPD) values using two-dimensional (2D) power spectrum analysis of the aeromagnetic data, and these results were used to calculate heat flow under the LRV. We also inverted the aeromagnetic data for three-dimensional (3D) magnetic susceptibility distribution. We further determined the crustal thickness beneath the LRV by calculating depths to the Moho using 2D power spectrum analysis of the satellite gravity data. We found that: (1) there is no elevated CPD beneath the LRV, and as such no elevated heat flow anomaly. (2) there are numerous 5-15 km wide magnetic bodies at shallow depth (5-20 km) under the LRV. (3) the Moho beneath the LRV is 50 km deep, compared to 35-45 km depths outside the rift. The gravity-derived Moho depths beneath the LRV differ from Moho depths determined from preliminary results of passive seismic studies but are comparable with those outside the rift. (4) there is a broad long-wavelength positive anomaly in the terrestrial gravity data, possibly related to the presence of dense material at the Moho level. This anomaly is modified by shorter-wavelength positive anomalies at the rift shoulders and floor that might be related to shallow depth magnetic bodies. Also, there are negative short-wavelength anomalies that correlate with rift sediment infill. We subsequently used the ground gravity data to develop 2D forward models to reconcile the observed thermal and crustal characteristics of the LRV. Our models suggest that the deeper Moho beneath the rift is due to the presence of a magmatic under-plated mafic body. The difference between the gravity and passive seismic Moho depths estimates may be because the passive seismic data imaged the top of the under-plated mafic body whereas

  15. Age of Magmatism and Eurekan Deformation in North Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, Christian; Storey, Michael; Holm, Paul M.; Thorarinsson, Sigurjon; Knudsen, Mads F.

    2014-05-01

    The alpine mountains of Northernmost Greenland are composed of Phanerozoic sediments and volcanic rocks that make up a broadly East-West striking orogenic belt. The major components include: 1) Cambrian-Devonian sediments deposited in the Franklinian Basin; 2) Ellesmerian (365-345 Ma) deformation of these sediments into a fold belt; 3) renewed extension and deposition of Carboniferous-Cretaceous sediments and Cretaceous-Paleogene volcanic rocks of the Kap Washington Group; and 4) Eurekan deformation of sediments and volcanic rocks. We present results of 40Ar-39Ar, U-Pb and Rb-Sr dating of volcanic rocks of the Kap Washington Group. This volcanic succesion is part of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province, exceeds 5 km in thickness, and is composed of bimodal alkaline flows, agglomerates and ignimbrites including peralkaline compositions typical of continental rifts such as the East African Rift. Based on zircon U-Pb and amphibole 40Ar-39Ar ages most volcanics were emplaced at 71-68 Ma, but activity continued down to 61 Ma. A thermal resetting age of 49-47 Ma is also identified in 40Ar-39Ar whole-rock data for trachyte flows. Patch perthite feldspars and coeval resetting of Rb-Sr isotopes by hydrothermal fluids provide further support for thermal overprinting, interpreted as a result of Eurekan compressional tectonism. It is striking that North Greenland volcanism terminated at about the same time (c. 61 Ma) as magmatism in the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province began. We suggest that this was a corollary of a change from extensional to compressional tectonism in the High Arctic. In the period when Greenland moved together with Eurasia (>60 Ma), the separation from North America resulted in rift-related alkaline magmatism in the High Arctic. When Greenland subsequently moved as a separate plate (60-35 Ma), overlapping spreading on both sides pushed it northwards and volcanism in the High Arctic stopped due to compression. Evaluation of plate kinematic models

  16. Magmatic Evolution of the Western Azores Islands (Corvo and Flores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea, P.; Galé, C.; Ubide, T.; Widom, E.; Lago, M.; França, Z.; Tierz, P.

    2012-12-01

    Corvo and Flores islands belong to the western group of the Azores archipelago, to the west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Several studies have proposed a common magmatic evolution for both islands. However, most of these studies focus on other Azorean islands. In order to investigate the processes that control the evolution of Corvo and Flores we have studied representative samples of the whole volcanostratigraphical sequence in both islands, including lava flows and dikes. Similarly to other oceanic islands, Corvo and Flores are made up of an alternation of porphyritic rocks and microlitic rocks. The former are picrobasalts and basalts with 5 to 60 volume fraction of large (2-15 mm), primitive antecrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The latter are Mg-poor hawaites to trachytes. The Mg-rich composition of the porphyritic rocks is due to the accumulation of primitive antecrysts within a more evolved groundmass. In contrast, the composition of the microlitic rocks provides information on the differentiation processes that controlled the evolution of both islands. The microlitic rocks present holocrystalline to hypocrystalline textures with a mineral assemblage mainly composed of microcrysts of plagioclase, olivine, clinopyroxene opaque minerals and accessory amphibole and apatite. Their major element whole rock composition can be best modeled by a polybaric fractional crystallization process (MELTS software) starting at 500 MPa with cooling steps of 5 degrees Celsius and a water content of 1 %, starting from the most primitive analyzed microlitic rock (MgO: 9.04%; Cr: 630 ppm; Ni: 200 ppm). Hence, we confirm that both islands derived from a common primary magma. The crystallization of the antecrysts included in the porphyritic rocks was probably related to the initial stages of the differentiation process. On the other hand, the microlitic rocks and the groundmass of the porphyritic rocks are related to the residual melts of the polybaric fractional

  17. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  18. Magmatic Degassing in the Crust Is Mantle Source Dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.

    2014-12-01

    The 4He/40Ar* ratio (where 40Ar* is 40Ar corrected for atmospheric contamination) is known to be sensitive to magmatic degassing due to the different solubilities of He and Ar in silicate melts: 4He/40Ar* increases in the residual liquids because Ar is less soluble than He and therefore degasses more rapidly. Conversely, lithophile isotope ratios and incompatible trace element ratios (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, La/Sm etc) are specifically chosen as these are largely insensitive to magmatic processes, including degassing (as far as mid-ocean ridges are concerned) but rather trace mantle heterogeneities. It is astonishing therefore that correlations between 4He/40Ar* and lithophile isotope ratios (such as 87Sr/86Sr or 143Nd/144Nd) exist in South East Indian Ridge basalts and basaltic glasses [1]. These correlations appear to be the result of enhanced degassing of magmas produced from enriched mantle: enriched mantle probably has higher C contents relative to depleted mantle, therefore degassing of 'enriched' compositions will start at higher pressure and the proportion of volatiles lost will be greater than for 'depleted' lavas. The 4He/40Ar* ratio of the erupted products depends on the proportion of volatiles lost, therefore 4He/40Ar* is higher in lavas derived from enriched as opposed to depleted magmas. Naturally, enriched lavas are also distinct from depleted lavas in their lithophile isotopic composition (high 87Sr/86Sr, low 143Nd/144Nd) and thus the observed correlations between lithophile isotopes and degassing (4He/40Ar*) is created. A simple degassing model suggests that, in order to generate the correlated variability in Sr and Nd isotopes and 4He/40Ar*, the mantle C concentration likely varies by factor ~2 [1]. Thus it is possible to link mantle C variability - which is difficult to asses due to shallow level degassing - with Sr isotopic composition, which is very commonly measured in mid-ocean ridge basalts: Sr isotopes can be used as a proxy for mantle C

  19. Geochemical evidence for a magmatic CO2 degassing event at Mammoth Mountain, California, September-December 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Kessler, R.; Doukas, M.P.

    2000-01-01

    Recent time series soil CO2 concentration data from monitoring stations in the vicinity of Mammoth Mountain, California, reveal strong evidence for a magmatic degassing event during the fall of 1997 lasting more than 2 months. Two sensors at Horseshoe Lake first recorded the episode on September 23, 1997, followed 10 days later by a sensor on the north flank of Mammoth Mountain. Direct degassing from shallow intruding magma seems an implausible cause of the degassing event, since the gas released at Horseshoe Lake continued to be cold and barren of other magmatic gases, except for He. We suggest that an increase in compressional strain on the area south of Mammoth Mountain driven by movement of major fault blocks in Long Valley caldera may have triggered an episode of increased degassing by squeezing additional accumulated CO2 from a shallow gas reservoir to the surface along faults and other structures where it could be detected by the CO2 monitoring network. Recharge of the gas reservoir by CO2 emanating from the deep intrusions that probably triggered deep long-period earthquakes may also have contributed to the degassing event. The nature of CO2 discharge at the soil-air interface is influenced by the porous character of High Sierra soils and by meteorological processes. Solar insolation is the primary source of energy for the Earth atmosphere and plays a significant role in most diurnal processes at the Earth surface. Data from this study suggest that external forcing due largely to local orographic winds influences the fine structure of the recorded CO2 signals.

  20. Late-stage magmatic processes at Albano Maar, Colli Albani, Italy: insights from FTIR analysis of leucites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Roberge, J.; Smith, V.; Giordano, G.; Tomlinson, E.; Menzies, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The recently erupted Albano Maar, one of the Via dei Laghi phreatomagmatic eruptions of Colli Albani, Italy have eruptive deposits that are K-foiditic (9wt% K2O) and silica under-saturated (48-52wt% SiO2). These compositions suggest the melts are low viscosity [1, 2], but they fuelled very explosive eruptions, namely the widespread large Peperino ignimbrite (phreato-Plinian) deposits. Therefore a question asked by researchers is how could these melts explode and would they, if they had not interacted with groundwater? Experimental work has shown that the melt chemistries at Colli Albani require a volatile saturated system [3]. Consequently the CO2 and H2O content of the melts are critical to understanding the petrogenetic processes at Albano Maar. Since the juvenile tephra clasts exhibit extensive late stage micro-crystallization (mainly leucite), analysis of glass is difficult and not representative as the majority of the volatile components may have exsolved from the melt. Melt inclusions are also commonly recrystallized and often leaky so here we unravel the complex volatile histories of the melts using the abundant leucite crystals, which have been shown to contain magmatic water in recent studies [4]. FTIR analysis of leucite phenocrysts and microcrysts within juvenile tephra clasts (syn-eruptive) of all the erupted units at Albano Maar provide an interesting insight into volatile variations and record a late stage CO2 fluxing event, which would have contributed to the explosive nature of the eruptions. This study has also allowed for an increased understanding of the nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) that crucially record volatile speciation and fluxing in high level magmatic systems. [1] Freda et al., 2006, Bul Vol, 68, pp567-591 [2] Cross et al., 2011 IUGG abs [3] Freda et al., 2008, Lithos, pp397-415 [4] Ventura et al., 2008, Am Min, 93, pp1538-1544

  1. The geology and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of magmatic activity and related mineralization in the Nevados del Famatina mining district, La Rioja province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada-Calderón, A. J.; McBride, S. L.; Bloom, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Nevados del Famatina mining district (NFMD) is located in La Rioja province, Argentina. This district contains porphyry-style mineralization (Nevados del Famatina) and high sulfidation veins (La Mejicana). The stratigraphic column in the NFMD begins with Cambrian siltstones which were metamorphosed during the Late Ordovician - Early Silurian and intruded by Late Ordovician-Silurian granitic rocks. These units were covered by Upper Paleozoic and Tertiary continental sedimentary rocks which are intercalated with and overlain by dacitic-rhyodacitic porphyritic rocks (Mogote Formation) emplaced during the Pliocene. All these units are covered by Pleistocene sediments and Quaternary alluvial and colluvial deposits. Magmatic activity and related mineralization in the NFMD have been dated by the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique. Step heating studies of orthoclase and biotite phenocrysts from the Mogote Formation in the NFMD suggest that the igneous rocks were emplaced around 5.0±0.3 Ma ago. However, plateau ages of biotite from the outer carapace of the subjacent granodioritic magma chamber and of muscovite from quartz-sericite alteration at both Nevados del Famatina and La Mejicana are around 3.8±0.2 Ma. Emplacement of the shallow stocks is separated from cooling of the outer carapace of the subjacent granodioritic magma chamber to temperatures below 350° C by a time span of approximately 1 Ma. During this interval, a convective hydrothermal system was established proximal to the granodioritic magma chamber, which resulted in porphyry molybdenumcoppergold mineralization adjacent to the igneous rocks and more distal high sulfidation veins located in fault zones.

  2. Isotopic evidence of magmatism and a sedimentary carbon source at the Endeavour hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T A; Proskurowski, G; Lilley, M D

    2004-01-07

    Stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements made on CO{sub 2} from high temperature hydrothermal vents on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate both magmatic and sedimentary sources of carbon to the hydrothermal system. The Endeavour segment is devoid of overlying sediments and has shown no observable signs of surficial magmatic activity during the {approx}20 years of ongoing studies. The appearance of isotopically heavy, radiocarbon dead CO{sub 2} after a 1999 earthquake swarm requires that this earthquake event was magmatic in origin. Evidence for a sedimentary organic carbon source suggests the presence of buried sediments at the ridge axis. These findings, which represent the first temporally coherent set of radiocarbon measurements from hydrothermal vent fluids, demonstrate the utility of radiocarbon analysis in hydrothermal studies. The existence of a sediment source at Endeavour and the occurrence of magmatic episodes illustrate the extremely complex and evolving nature of the Endeavour hydrothermal system.

  3. Iron isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation in Kilauea Iki lava lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    Magmatic differentiation helps produce the chemical and petrographic diversity of terrestrial rocks. The extent to which magmatic differentiation fractionates nonradiogenic isotopes is uncertain for some elements. We report analyses of iron isotopes in basalts from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii. The iron isotopic compositions (56Fe/54Fe) of late-stage melt veins are 0.2 per mil (???) greater than values for olivine cumulates. Olivine phenocrysts are up to 1.2??? lighter than those of whole rocks. These results demonstrate that iron isotopes fractionate during magmatic differentiation at both whole-rock and crystal scales. This characteristic of iron relative to the characteristics of magnesium and lithium, for which no fractionation has been found, may be related to its complex redox chemistry in magmatic systems and makes iron a potential tool for studying planetary differentiation.

  4. Earthquakes in Fiordland, Southern Chile: Initiation and Development of a Magmatic Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, S.; Service, N. S.

    2007-05-01

    Several efforts in Chile are being conducted in relation to geophysical monitoring with the objective of disaster mitigation. A long and permanent monitoring effort along the country has been the continuous effort resulting in the recognition and delineation of new seismogenic sources. Here we report on the seismo-volcanic crisis that is currently taking place in the in the region close to the triple junction (Nazca, Antarctica and South America) in southern Chile at around latitude 45°S. On January 22, 2007, an intensity V-VI (MMI) earthquake shook the cities of Puerto Aysén, Puerto Chacabuco and Coyhaique. This magnitude 5 event, was the first of a series of earthquakes that have taken place in the region for nearly a month and a half (until end of February, time when this abstract was written). The closest station to the source area -part of the GEOSCOPE network located in Coyhaique, about 80 km away from the epicenters- reveals seismic activity about 3 hours before the first event. Immediately after the first event, more than 20 events per hour were detected and recorded by this station, rate which decreased with time with the exception of those time intervals following larger events. More than six events with magnitude 5 or more have been recorded. Five seismic stations were installed surrounding the epicentral area between 27 - 29 January and are currently operational. After processing some of the recorded events, a sixth station was installed at the closest possible site of the source of the seismic activity. Preliminary analysis of the recorded seismic activity reveals a concentration of hypocenters - 5 to 10 km depth- along an eight-km NNE-SSW vertical plane crossing the Aysén fiord. Harmonic tremor has also been detected. This seismic activity is interpreted as the result of a magmatic process in progress which will most likely culminate in the generation of a new underwater volcanic edifice. Because the seismic activity fully extends across the Ays

  5. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism.

    PubMed

    Stahl, T; Niemi, N A

    2017-03-14

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr(-1) with a c. 0.5 mm yr(-1) tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr(-1) over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting.

  6. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr−1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr−1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr−1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting. PMID:28290529

  7. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr‑1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr‑1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr‑1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting.

  8. Colorado Plateau magmatism and uplift by warming of heterogeneous lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mousumi; Jordan, Thomas H; Pederson, Joel

    2009-06-18

    The forces that drove rock uplift of the low-relief, high-elevation, tectonically stable Colorado Plateau are the subject of long-standing debate. While the adjacent Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift province underwent Cenozoic shortening followed by extension, the plateau experienced approximately 2 km of rock uplift without significant internal deformation. Here we propose that warming of the thicker, more iron-depleted Colorado Plateau lithosphere over 35-40 Myr following mid-Cenozoic removal of the Farallon plate from beneath North America is the primary mechanism driving rock uplift. In our model, conductive re-equilibration not only explains the rock uplift of the plateau, but also provides a robust geodynamic interpretation of observed contrasts between the Colorado Plateau margins and the plateau interior. In particular, the model matches the encroachment of Cenozoic magmatism from the margins towards the plateau interior at rates of 3-6 km Myr(-1) and is consistent with lower seismic velocities and more negative Bouguer gravity at the margins than in the plateau interior. We suggest that warming of heterogeneous lithosphere is a powerful mechanism for driving epeirogenic rock uplift of the Colorado Plateau and may be of general importance in plate-interior settings.

  9. Analog Experiments on Sulfide Foams in Magmatic Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, A. M.; Dahn, D.; Zavala, K.

    2009-05-01

    Metal sulfides form as an immiscible phase from silicate magmas. Dynamic mingling and unmingling of the two phases is important for the development of economic deposits: mingling promotes enrichment of the sulfide in valuable metals, and subsequent unmingling generates massive sulfide. Analog experiments were carried out to investigate mingling processes in immiscible systems, using oil, water and small beads to represent magma, sulfide liquid and silicate crystals. Stirring or injection led to the formation of a foam of analog sulfide droplets within an analog silicate framework. We propose that the partial collapse of such a foam explains massive sulfide lenses at the Voisey's Bay magmatic sulfide deposit, and that crystallization of silicate crystals in the remaining foam walls generates 'net-textured' ores. In the experiments, solid particles had a profound effect on unmingling: analog sulfide droplets were stably contained within analog crystal-rich magma and did not coalesce. We therefore suggest that 'net' and 'leopard' textures in disseminated sulfides indicate mingling of sulfide with crystal-poor magma, whereas isolated disseminated patches of sulfide indicate mingling with a crystal-rich magma.

  10. Late Amazonian subsidence and magmatism of Olympus Mons, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, John; McGovern, Patrick; Simpson, Mariel; Reeves, Ashleigh

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the flow directions of 80 long lava flows in the flexural basin that surrounds Olympus Mons reveal that most are no longer aligned with the regional downslope direction but diverge by an average of 15.4° ± 9.8° in the counterclockwise direction. This misalignment is consistent with topographic change in the basin after the flows were emplaced due to subsidence centered on nearby Olympus Mons. The observed tilting indicates subsidence of 0.62 to 2.13 km at the center of Olympus Mons induced by the addition of 1.33 × 105 to 1.35 × 106 km3 of volcanic material or about 1-10% of the total volume of the present-day edifice. New crater size-frequency measurements for selected areas within the flexural basin indicate that the subsidence took place in the past 210 ± 40 Ma. These findings indicate that previously recognized Late Amazonian volcanic and tectonic events at Olympus Mons signify an important period of magmatic activity during which a substantial portion of the present-day edifice may have been added.

  11. The Mozambique Ridge: a document of massive multistage magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Maximilian D.; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Jacques, Guillaume; Werner, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    The Mozambique Ridge, a prominent basement high in the southwestern Indian Ocean, consists of four major geomorphological segments associated with numerous phases of volcanic activity in the Lower Cretaceous. The nature and origin of the Mozambique Ridge have been intensely debated with one hypothesis suggesting a Large Igneous Province origin. High-resolution seismic reflection data reveal a large number of extrusion centres with a random distribution throughout the southern Mozambique Ridge and the nearby Transkei Rise. Intrabasement reflections emerge from the extrusion centres and are interpreted to represent massive lava flow sequences. Such lava flow sequences are characteristic of eruptions leading to the formation of continental and oceanic flood basalt provinces, hence supporting a Large Igneous Province origin of the Mozambique Ridge. We observe evidence for widespread post-sedimentary magmatic activity that we correlate with a southward propagation of the East African Rift System. Based on our volumetric analysis of the southern Mozambique Ridge we infer a rapid sequential emplacement between ˜131 and ˜125 Ma, which is similar to the short formation periods of other Large Igneous Provinces like the Agulhas Plateau.

  12. Magmatic implications of mantle wedge plumes: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, A.; Gerya, T. V.

    2008-06-01

    Numerical and laboratory experiments beside natural observations suggest that hydration and partial melting along the subducting slab can trigger Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that evolve into partially molten diapiric structures ("cold plumes") that rise through the hot asthenospheric wedge. Mixed cold plumes composed of tectonic melanges derived from subduction channels can transport the fertile subducted crustal materials towards hotter zones of the suprasubduction mantle wedge leading to the formation of silicic melts. We investigate magmatic consequences of this plausible geodynamic scenario by using an experimental approach. Melt compositions, fertility and reaction between silicic melts and the peridotite mantle (both hydrous and dry) were tested by means of piston-cylinder experiments at conditions of 1000°C and pressures of 2.0 and 2.5GPa. The results indicate that silicic melts of trondhjemite and granodiorite compositions may be produced in the ascending mixed plume megastructures. Our experiments show that the formation of an Opx-rich reaction band, developed at the contact between the silicic melts and the peridotite, protect silicic melts from further reaction in contrast to the classical view that silicic melts are completely consumed in the mantle. The mixed, mantle-crust isotopic signatures which are characteristic of many calc-alkaline batholiths are also expected from this petrogenetic scenario.

  13. YELLOWSTONE MAGMATIC-HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM, U. S. A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Pitt, A.M.; ,

    1985-01-01

    At Yellowstone National Park, the deep permeability and fluid circulation are probably controlled and maintained by repeated brittle fracture of rocks in response to local and regional stress. Focal depths of earthquakes beneath the Yellowstone caldera suggest that the transition from brittle fracture to quasi-plastic flow takes place at about 3 to 4 km. The maximum temperature likely to be attained by the hydrothermal system is 350 to 450 degree C, the convective thermal output is about 5. 5 multiplied by 10**9 watts, and the minimum average thermal flux is about 1800 mW/m**2 throughout 2,500 km**2. The average thermal gradient between the heat source and the convecting hydrothermal system must be at least 700 to 1000 degree C/km. Crystallization and partial cooling of about 0. 082 km**3 of basalt or 0. 10 km**3 of rhyolite annually could furnish the heat discharged in the hot-spring system. The Yellowstone magmatic-hydrothermal system as a whole appears to be cooling down, in spite of a relatively large rate of inflation of the Yellowstone caldera.

  14. Numerical model for the evaluation of Earthquake effects on a magmatic system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Deepak; Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A finite element numerical model is presented to compute the effect of an Earthquake on the dynamics of magma in reservoirs with deformable walls. The magmatic system is hit by a Mw 7.2 Earthquake (Petrolia/Capo Mendocina 1992) with hypocenter at 15 km diagonal distance. At subsequent times the seismic wave reaches the nearest side of the magmatic system boundary, travels through the magmatic fluid and arrives to the other side of the boundary. The modelled physical system consists in the magmatic reservoir with a thin surrounding layer of rocks. Magma is considered as an homogeneous multicomponent multiphase Newtonian mixture with exsolution and dissolution of volatiles (H2O+CO2). The magmatic reservoir is made of a small shallow magma chamber filled with degassed phonolite, connected by a vertical dike to a larger deeper chamber filled with gas-rich shoshonite, in condition of gravitational instability. The coupling between the Earthquake and the magmatic system is computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the deformation of the magmatic reservoir walls, along with the conservation equations of mass of components and momentum of the magmatic mixture. The characteristic elastic parameters of rocks are assigned to the computational domain at the boundary of magmatic system. Physically consistent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions are assigned according to the evolution of the seismic signal. Seismic forced displacements and velocities are set on the part of the boundary which is hit by wave. On the other part of boundary motion is governed by the action of fluid pressure and deviatoric stress forces due to fluid dynamics. The constitutive equations for the magma are solved in a monolithic way by space-time discontinuous-in-time finite element method. To attain additional stability least square and discontinuity capturing operators are included in the formulation. A partitioned algorithm is used to couple the magma and thin layer of rocks. The

  15. Applying the Ce-in-zircon oxygen geobarometer to diverse silicic magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claiborne, L. L.; Miller, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    Zircon provides information on age, temperature, and composition of the magma from which it grew. In systems such as Mount St. Helens, where zircon is not coeval with the rest of the crystal cargo, it provides the only accessible record of the extended history of the magmatic system, including cycles of intrusion, crystallization and rejuvenation beneath an active volcano (Claiborne et al., 2010). The rare earth elements, which are present in measureable quantities in zircon, provide information about the composition of the magma from which zircon grew. Unique among the generally trivalent rare earth elements, cerium can exist as either trivalent or tetravalent, depending on the oxidation state of the magma. The tetravalent ion is highly compatible in zircon, in the site that usually hosts tetravalent zirconium, and so the amount of Cerium in zircon relative (relative to what would be expected of trivalent Ce) depends the oxidation state of the magma from which it grew. Trail et al. (2011) proposed a calibration based on experimental data that uses the Ce anomaly in zircon as a direct proxy for magma oxidation (fugacity), describing the relationship between Ce in zircon and magma oxygen fugacity as ln(Ce/Ce*)D = (0.1156±0.0050)xln(fO2)+(13860±708)/T-(6.125±0.484). For systems like Mount St. Helens, where the major minerals record only events in the hundreds to thousands of years leading to eruption, (including the Fe-Ti oxides traditionally relied upon for records of oxidation state of the magmas), this presents a novel approach for understanding more extended histories of oxidation of magmas in the tens and hundreds of thousands of years of magmatism at a volcanic center. This calibration also promises to help us better constrain conditions of crystallization in intrusive portions of volcanic systems, as well as plutonic bodes. We apply this new oxygen geobarometer to natural volcanic and plutonic zircons from a variety of tectonic settings, and compare to

  16. Isotopic evidence for quick freshening of magmatic chlorine in the Lesser Antilles arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Jendrzejewski, N.; Aubaud, C. P.; Bonifacie, M.; Crispi, O.; Dessert, C.; Agrinier, P.

    2012-12-01

    Despite numerous geophysical and geochemical monitoring techniques developed over the last 50 years to detect magma activities in volcanoes, it is still challenging to evaluate the state of magmatic activity during its decreasing phase (transitory quiet stage and/or final stage of the magma intrusion which may last for decades) for those infrequent, slow developing, and dangerous explosive eruptive arc volcanoes, attributed to the interaction between the magma and hydrothermal cells at shallow depths to produce complex phreato-magmatic events. Recent studies have implied that chloride in intrusion-induced thermal springs could be a potential sensitive indicator of shallow magma degassing. However, possible contamination from surface chlorine reservoirs, such as seawater, may overprint the magmatic signature and complicate the interpretation of field observation. Here, based on chlorine isotope examination of various water samples from two recently erupted volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles arc (Soufrière in Guadeloupe: phreatic eruption in1976-1977; Montagne Pelée in Martinique: pelean eruption in 1929-1932), we show that magmatic chlorine is isotopically distinct from surface chlorine (seawater, meteoric water, and ground water). A chlorine isotopic survey on thermal springs in Guadeloupe and Martinique indicate that the magmatic chlorine signature is still present in some of the thermal springs in Guadeloupe but completely disappeared in Martinique. This suggests that magmatic chlorine be rapidly flushed from hydrothermal system within < 30 to 80 years after the magmatic eruption. This enables chlorine isotopes to be a sensitive proxy to monitor shallow magmatic activities, particularly practicable at centennial scale.

  17. Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1980 volcanic eruption: magmatic gas component during the first 16 days

    SciTech Connect

    Stoiber, R.E.; Williams, S.N.; Malinconico, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    Eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens, Washington, showed low rates of sulfur dioxide emission, and ash leachates had low ratios of sulfur to chlorine. These data and the nonvesicularity of ash fragments are indicative of only a small eruptive magmatic component. The low amounts of soluble fluorine on the ashes pose no health problems. Violent magmatic activity is possible, and thus continued geochemical monitoring is advised.

  18. Mount st. Helens, washington, 1980 volcanic eruption: magmatic gas component during the first 16 days.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, R E; Williams, S N; Malinconico, L L

    1980-06-13

    Eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens, Washington, showed low rates of sulfur dioxide emission, and ash leachates had low ratios of sulfur to chlorine. These data and the nonvesicularity of ash fragments are indicative of only a small eruptive magmatic component. The low amounts of soluble fluorine on the ashes pose no health problems. Violent magmatic activity is possible, and thus continued geochemical monitoring is advised.

  19. Role of crustal contribution in the early stage of the Damara Orogen, Namibia: new constraints from combined U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes from the Goas Magmatic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Lorenzo; Kinnaird, Judith; Lehmann, Jeremie; Naydenov, Kalin; Saalmann, Kerstin; Frei, Dirk; Gerdes, Axel

    2014-05-01

    The tholeiitic to calcalkaline Goas intrusive Complex of Namibia reflects the Pan-African plate convergence between the Congo and Kalahari Cratons and marks the first Pan-African magmatic event in the inland branch of the Damara Orogeny. We present new laser-ablation ICP-MS zircon U-Pb geochronology coupled with single-zircon Hf isotopic data obtained on Goas samples, in order to constrain the age of emplacement and investigate the crustal contribution on the magma sources. New ages on magmatic and detrital zircons on a pegmatitic and two metapsammitic samples are also presented, and help in constraining the major geotectonic events which affected the Goas magma sources through time. The new ages bracket the magmatic event between 580 Ma and 545 Ma, providing a better constraint on the timing record of the magmatic suite. Data, furthermore, show that the complex has been emplaced in a relatively short time, with a continuous magmatic activity from early tholeiitic metagabbro/hornblendite to main diorite or granite bodies with calcalkaline affinity. Hf isotopes analysis on zircons show invariably negative ɛHft values (from -34.4 to -3.8), indicating a significant crustal residence time with long-term reworking of multiple and mixed Archean to Mesoproterozoic components. Although the role of multiple crustal components is apparent from the wide range of ɛHft distribution, values of single intrusions cluster within relatively small ranges. The subchondritic data attest that no significant Pan-African juvenile magma was involved in the magmatogenesis. A subduction environment, although plausible, it is not inevitably disclosed by the new data. As we suggest magma underplating as a likely heating source for the Goas magmatism, the prolonged crustal residence time and the apparent lack of juvenile components suggest that the magma below the Pan-African active margin was unable to pass through the lithosphere, but managed to heat up sections of the crust sufficiently to

  20. Coupling geodynamic with thermodynamic modelling for reconstructions of magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Lisa; Kaus, Boris J. P.; White, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Coupling geodynamic with petrological models is fundamental for understanding magmatic systems from the melting source in the mantle to the point of magma crystallisation in the upper crust. Most geodynamic codes use very simplified petrological models consisting of a single, fixed, chemistry. Here, we develop a method to better track the petrological evolution of the source rock and corresponding volcanic and plutonic rocks by combining a geodynamic code with a thermodynamic model for magma generation and evolution. For the geodynamic modelling a finite element code (MVEP2) solves the conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations. The thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibria in magmatic systems is performed with pMELTS for mantle-like bulk compositions. The thermodynamic dependent properties calculated by pMELTS are density, melt fraction and the composition of the liquid and solid phase in the chemical system: SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3-Cr2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-P2O5-H2O. In order to take into account the chemical depletion of the source rock with increasing melt extraction events, calculation of phase diagrams is performed in two steps: 1) With an initial rock composition density, melt fraction as well as liquid and solid composition are computed over the full upper mantle P-T range. 2) Once the residual rock composition (equivalent to the solid composition after melt extraction) is significantly different from the initial rock composition and the melt fraction is lower than a critical value, the residual composition is used for next calculations with pMELTS. The implementation of several melt extraction events take the change in chemistry into account until the solidus is shifted to such high temperatures that the rock cannot be molten anymore under upper mantle conditions. An advantage of this approach is that we can track the change of melt chemistry with time, which can be compared with natural constraints. In the thermo-mechanical code the

  1. Detecting Aseismic Fault Slip and Magmatic Intrusion From Seismicity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, A. L.; McGuire, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Seismicity triggered by aseismic deformation, such as magmatic intrusions or afterslip, can be used to detect the occurrence of these otherwise difficult to observe processes. Recent studies suggest that aseismic deformation can trigger large amounts of seismicity in a variety of plate tectonic settings. We have developed a new technique that takes advantage of this triggered seismicity to estimate the time-history of aseismic stressing rate on a fault- zone by combining the rate and state dependent friction and the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models of seismicity-rate [ Dieterich, 1994; Ogata, 1988]. In the rate-state model, the integration of an observed seismicity rate results in an estimate of the stress rate acting in a given space-time window. However, the seismicity rate observed in any catalog comes from 3 primary sources: coseismically-triggered seismicity (aftershocks), tectonically-triggered seismicity (i.e., from long-term tectonic loading), and aseismically-triggered seismicity (e.g., from dike intrusion, aseismic slip transients, or fluid migration). In catalogs dominated by directly triggered aftershocks (i.e., ETAS branching ratios >~0.7), the coseismically-triggered seismicity rate will be much larger than the aseismically-triggered rate and will dominate the estimate of stressing-rate, obscuring the aseismic transient of interest if the rate-state method is applied directly. The challenge therefore lies in isolating the aseismically-triggered seismicity rate from the coseismically-triggered seismicity rate. The ETAS model [ Ogata, 1988] provides a natural way to separate the aseismic and coseismic seismicity rates, as the ETAS parameter μ essentially reflects the aseismically-triggered rate (as well as the background tectonically-triggered rate). To develop a method that can resolve the magnitude and time history of aseismic stress transients even in high branching ratio regions, we combine the rate-state and ETAS models into a

  2. Temporal and Spatial Fluctuations in Ancestral Northern Cascade Arc Magmatism from New LA-ICP-MS U-Pb Zircon Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, I. S.; Mullen, E.; Jean-Louis, P.; Tepper, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Baker and the adjacent Chilliwack batholith (MBC focus) in NW Washington preserve the longest magmatic record in the Cascade Arc, providing an excellent natural laboratory for examining the spatial, temporal and geochemical evolution of Cascade magmatism and links to tectonic processes. We present new U-Pb zircon LA-ICP-MS ages for 14 samples from MBC and neighboring regions of the north Cascades. The new results are up to 8 Myr different from previous K-Ar ages, illustrating the need for new age determinations in the Cascades. A maximum age of 34.74±0.24 Ma (2σ) (Post Creek stock) is consistent with 35-40 Ma ages for arc inception in the southern Cascades. The most voluminous MBC plutons cluster at 32-29 Ma, consistent with an early flare-up that also coincides with intrusion of the Index batholith farther south (2 samples at 33.26±0.19, 33.53±0.15 Ma). This flare-up is absent in the northernmost Cascades where the oldest pluton (Fall Creek stock) is 6.646±0.046 Ma, 4 Myr younger than previously cited. Earliest Cascade magmatism is progressively younger to the north of MBC, possibly tracing the northerly passage of the slab edge. MBC activity was continuous to 22.75±0.17 Ma (Whatcom Arm), marking the initiation of an 11 Myr hiatus. Magmatism resumed at 11.33±0.08 Ma (Indian Creek) and continued to the modern Mt. Baker cone, defining a pattern of southwesterly migration over ~55 km that may be attributable to slab rollback and arc rotation (e.g. Wells & McCaffrey 2013). Uniformity of the rate and direction of migration implies that rollback and rotation began at least 11 Myr ago. Post-hiatus magmas show distinct geochemical and petrologic characteristics including a major Pb isotopic shift. The 2.430±0.016 Ma Lake Ann stock contains 4.2 Ma zircon antecrysts, recording prolonged activity in that area. The 1.165±0.013 Ma Kulshan caldera ignimbrite contains ~200 Ma inherited zircons that may provide the first direct record of Wrangellian basement beneath

  3. Preface to special issue: Granite magmatism in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Pinho Guimarães, Ignez; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll

    2016-07-01

    Granites are important both to the geologic evolution and to the economy of Brazil. Deposits of precious and rare metals, such as Au, Sn and many others, are directly or indirectly associated with granites, especially in the geologically under-explored Amazon region. On the opposite eastern side of the country, expanding exploitation of natural granite as dimension stone makes Brazil currently the world's second largest exporter of granite blocks. Granites are a major constituent of the Brazilian Archean-Proterozoic cratonic domains (the Amazon and São Francisco cratons) and their surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts. The granites are thus fundamental markers of the major events of crustal generation and recycling that shaped the South American Platform. As a result, Brazilian granites have received great attention from the national and international community, and a number of influential meetings focused on the study of granites were held in the country in the last three decades. These meetings include the two International Symposia on Granites and Associated Mineralization (Salvador, January 21-31, 1987, and August 24-29, 1997), the Symposium on Rapakivi Granites and Related Rocks (Belém, August 2-5, 1995) and the Symposium on Magmatism, Crustal Evolution, and Metallogenesis of the Amazonian Craton (Belém, August 2006). Special issues dedicated to contributions presented at these meetings in the Journal of South American Earth Sciences (Sial et al., 1998), Lithos (Stephens et al., 1999), Canadian Mineralogist (Dall'Agnol and Ramo, 2006), Precambrian Research (Ramo et al., 2002) and Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências (Dall'Agnol and Bettencourt, 1997; Sial et al., 1999a) are still important references on the knowledge of Brazilian granites and granite petrology in general.

  4. Modelling Subduction Zone Magmatism Due to Hydraulic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, R.; Davies, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this project is to test the hypothesis that subduction zone magmatism involves hydraulic fractures propagating from the oceanic crust to the mantle wedge source region (Davies, 1999). We aim to test this hypothesis by developing a numerical model of the process, and then comparing model outputs with observations. The hypothesis proposes that the water interconnects in the slab following an earthquake. If sufficient pressure develops a hydrofracture occurs. The hydrofracture will expand in the direction of the least compressive stress and propagate in the direction of the most compressive stress, which is out into the wedge. Therefore we can calculate the hydrofracture path and end-point, given the start location on the slab and the propagation distance. We can therefore predict where water is added to the mantle wedge. To take this further we have developed a thermal model of a subduction zone. The model uses a finite difference, marker-in-cell method to solve the heat equation (Gerya, 2010). The velocity field was prescribed using the analytical expression of cornerflow (Batchelor, 1967). The markers contained within the fixed grid are used to track the different compositions and their properties. The subduction zone thermal model was benchmarked (Van Keken, 2008). We used the hydrous melting parameterization of Katz et.al., (2003) to calculate the degree of melting caused by the addition of water to the wedge. We investigate models where the hydrofractures, with properties constrained by estimated water fluxes, have random end points. The model predicts degree of melting, magma productivity, temperature of the melt and water content in the melt for different initial water fluxes. Future models will also include the buoyancy effect of the melt and residue. Batchelor, Cambridge UP, 1967. Davies, Nature, 398: 142-145, 1999. Gerya, Cambridge UP, 2010. Katz, Geochem. Geophys. Geosy, 4(9), 2003 Van Keken et.al. Phys. Earth. Planet. In., 171:187-197, 2008.

  5. Magmatic and fragmentation controls on ash surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, C.; Ayris, P. M.; Diplas, S.; Damby, D. E.; Hornby, A. J.; Delmelle, P.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical effects of silicate ash particles ejected by explosive volcanic eruptions on biotic and abiotic systems are fundamentally mediated by ash particle surfaces. Ash surface properties can be presumed to be functions of magmatic state and fragmentation processes, as well as in-plume and atmospheric alteration by volcanic and/or environmental gases and liquid aerosols. Recently, attention has been focussed on the capacity of alteration processes to shape ash surfaces, with the chemistry and mineralogy of the pre-existing ash surface presumed to be equivalent to those of the bulk particle, or even of the ash deposit. Here we present findings which highlight the influence of magma composition and fragmentation mechanisms on ash surfaces. We conducted rapid decompression experiments at varying temperature and pressure conditions on porous andesitic rocks to produce fragmented ash materials, untouched by secondary alteration. These materials were compared to samples produced by crushing of clasts from the same experiments. The bulk chemistry and surface mineralogy of ash particles from a selected size fraction (63-90 μm) was determined via XRF, SEM-BSE, and EPMA, while the surface chemistry (<10 nm) was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We identify similar disparities between whole-rock and surface chemistry as identified in previous ash studies, demonstrating ash surface chemistry to be a product of surface generation mechanisms, in addition to alteration. We observe dependences on both fragmentation pressure and temperature of ash surface chemistry. The mechanisms, pressure and temperature of magma fragmentation may thus influence ash surface chemistry and mineralogy, and subsequently, the post-eruptive alteration of ash particles and their reactivity within biotic and abiotic systems.

  6. Bimodal tholeiitic-dacitic magmatism and the Early Precambrian crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1974-01-01

    Interlayered plagioclase-quartz gneisses and amphibolites from 2.7 to more than 3.6 b.y. old form much of the basement underlying Precambrian greenstone belts of the world; they are especially well-developed and preserved in the Transvaal and Rhodesian cratons. We postulate that these basement rocks are largely a metamorphosed, volcanic, bimodal suite of tholeiite and high-silica low-potash dacite-compositionally similar to the 1.8-b.y.-old Twilight Gneiss - and partly intrusive equivalents injected into the lower parts of such volcanic piles. We speculate that magmatism in the Early Precambrian involved higher heat flow and more hydrous conditions than in the Phanerozoic. Specifically, we suggest that the early degassing of the Earth produced a basaltic crust and pyrolitic upper mantle that contained much amphibole, serpentine, and other hydrous minerals. Dehydration of the lower parts of a downgoing slab of such hydrous crust and upper mantle would release sufficient water to prohibit formation of andesitic liquid in the upper part of the slab. Instead, a dacitic liquid and a residuum of amphibole and other silica-poor phases would form, according to Green and Ringwood's experimental results. Higher temperatures farther down the slab would cause total melting of basalt and generation of the tholeiitic member of the suite. This type of magma generation and volcanism persisted until the early hydrous lithosphere was consumed. An implication of this hypothesis is that about half the present volume of the oceans formed before about 2.6 b.y. ago. ?? 1974.

  7. A Parent Magma for the Nakhla Martian Meteorite: Reconciliation of Estimates from 1-Bar Experiments, Magmatic Inclusions in Olivine, and Magmatic Inclusions in Augite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Goodrich, Cyrena Anne

    2001-01-01

    The composition of the parent magma for the Nakhla (martian) meteorite has been estimated from mineral-melt partitioning and from magmatic inclusions in olivine and in augite. These independent lines of evidence have converged on small range of likely compositions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Geochronology and isotopic-geochemical characteristics of magmatic complexes of gold-silver ore-magmatic structures in the Chukotka sector of the Russian Arctic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhno, V. G.; Grigoriev, N. V.; Kurashko, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The first results of SHRIMP dating of magmatic complexes and associated gold-silver deposits and ore occurrences (Kupol, Dvoinoe, Moroshka, and others) in the Chukotka sector of the Russian Arctic coast are discussed. The petrological and isotopic-geochronological data are used for reconstructing their formation conditions.

  9. Geology and petrology of the plutonic complexes in the Wadi Fizh area: Multiple magmatic events and segment structure in the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yoshiko; Miyashita, Sumio

    2003-09-01

    Multiple magmatic events are recorded in the gabbroic unit in the Fizh area of the northern Oman ophiolite. Gabbroic blocks intruded by sheeted dike complex and upper gabbros of the main crustal sequence show the oldest event. Gabbronorite sills in the gabbroic blocks are nearly coeval with the host gabbro. Wehrlitic intrusions (wehrlite I) mark the third event of magmatism. These three magmatic events occurred at the retreating (dying) ridge axis because all these rocks are intruded by dolerite dike swarm, which is generally regarded as a precursor of advancing ridge axis. The next stage of magmatism is a main phase of oceanic crust generation in this area. Wehrlite II and then gabbronorite dikes intrude the still hot main gabbro unit. All of these above rocks have similar signatures with respect to clinopyroxene compositions and covariations between plagioclase and mafic minerals, though slight differences are present in the compositional ranges and clinopyroxene compositions of each unit. After considerable cooling of the main gabbro unit, primitive basalt dikes intrude the main gabbro unit, which may correspond to the Lasail unit. Finally, the Fizh-South complex intrudes into considerably cooled crustal sequence, being below the brittle-plastic transition temperatures. The Fizh-South complex, which was regarded as a common wehrlitic intrusion, is significantly different from all of the above mentioned rocks, with respect to the covariation between plagioclase and associating mafic minerals, crystallization order, and clinopyroxene compositions. The clinopyroxenes are characterized by extremely low Ti and Na contents, comparable with those of the V2 unit (Alley volcanics), suggesting that the Fizh-South complex correlates with the plutonic facies of the V2 unit during arc stage. Layered gabbros in the Wadi Zabin area, about 10 km north of the Fizh area, may be a northern extension of the gabbro blocks of the Fizh area, because they are intruded by numerous

  10. Magmatic He-3 in Ferrar Dolerite: Implications for Cosmogenic He-3 Surface Exposure Dating in the Dry Valleys of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Landis, G. P.; Marchant, D. R.; Lewis, A. R.; Mills-Herring, L. M.; Margerison, H. R.

    2001-12-01

    Sills of Jurassic Ferrar Dolerite are common in the Transantarctic Mountains. Cosmogenic He-3 surface exposure dating of glacial deposits using Ferrar clinopyroxene has become an important tool in Antarctic paleoclimatology. Here we report preliminary evidence for magmatic helium in Ferrar clinopyroxene from the Mullins Valley rock glacier, Quartermain Mountains, East Antarctica (S. 77.88\\deg, E. 160.58\\deg). Magmatic helium has not previously been recognized in Ferrar clinopyroxene, and all He-3 released by sample fusion has been ascribed to cosmogenic production. However, our evidence indicates that a correction for non-cosmogenic He-3 is needed for at least some samples. The Mullins Valley rock glacier is fed by a small, cold-based alpine glacier. Rockfall onto the alpine glacier becomes concentrated by sublimation, creating a dolerite-rich debris cap. Glacial ice, which may contain ancient atmospheric records, is preserved beneath the debris. We sampled 13 surface dolerite boulders from the head to the terminus of the rock glacier. Magmatic helium was identified by crushing clinopyroxene grains under vacuum 3 samples, yielding gas from broken inclusions with He-3/He-4 ratios of 0.11 to 0.45 R/Ra. Fusion ratios for these samples are 0.24 to 1.77 R/Ra. The magmatic component was also quantified by replicate fusion analyses of aliquots from the same mineral separates. These yielded He-3 and He-4 concentrations that plot along linear mixing lines. Since cosmogenic He-3 is the same in these replicates, this behavior must be due to trapped contributions. Thus, He-3 concentrations seem controlled by both cosmogenic production and irregularly distributed gas-rich inclusions. Radiogenic He-4 is also present. Magmatic and radiogenic He creates large He-3 exposure age errors in some samples. For example, two samples near the head of the glacier had apparent ages of 280 ka and 400 ka. After correction, these exposure ages were reduced to about 9 ka and 20 ka. Corrected

  11. Using multiple sulfur isotopes to link biological isotope fractionation in a sedimentary protolith to a magmatic Ni-sulfide deposit: Voisey's Bay Ni deposit, Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebert, R. S.; Bekker, A.; Wing, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is generally accepted that crustal contamination is required for the formation of significant magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits. Either the addition of external S or SiO2 promote early sulfide saturation. The most direct indicator of S addition by this contaminant is S isotopes. However, the traditional use of δ34S values is inadequate in deposits where Archean sedimentary sulfides incorporated into these deposits might not have significantly different δ34S values from those of mantle S. Even in sediments that have variable δ34S values, δ34S signature can be reset to magmatic values by equilibrating large amounts of silicate magma with initial sulfide melt. However, sedimentary rocks contain isotope evidence of biological fractionation processes in the relationship between δ33S and δ34S values. We used multiple S isotope data to constrain the relationship between δ33S and δ34S values, identify biological S isotope fractionation in the metamorphosed sedimentary rocks of the Tasiuyak Gneiss, and compare this relationship to that in the Voisey's Bay magmatic Ni-deposit. The Voisey's Bay Ni-sulfide deposit, Labrador is hosted by a troctolitic conduit system. The Voisey's Bay intrusion is a part of the Nain plutonic suite and intruded at approximately 1.3 Ga along the boundary between the Proterozoic Tasiuyak Gneiss of the Churchill province and Archean gneisses of the Nain province. The general model suggests assimilation of a large amount of sulfidic Tasiuyak gneiss, leading to sulfur saturation prior to emplacement, even though the Tasiuyak gneiss does not have a high concentration of sulfur. High-temperature equilibrium relationships are not present in our measured δ33S and δ34S values from the Voisey's Bay deposit. Instead they indicate that a kinetic process is responsible for S isotope fractionations in the mineralization and troctolite, similar to that recorded by the Tasiuyak gneiss. The observed relationship between δ33S and δ34S values is

  12. Rapid emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province as a net sink for CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Morgan F.; Wright, James D.; Kent, Dennis V.; Olsen, Paul E.

    2012-03-01

    Recent evidence from the ~ 201.5 Ma Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) in the Newark rift basin demonstrates that this Large Igneous Province produced a transient doubling of atmospheric pCO2, followed by a falloff to pre-eruptive concentrations over ~ 300 kyr. This paper confirms the short-term findings from the Newark basin, and tests the million-year effects of the CAMP volcanism on Early Jurassic pCO2 from strata in the corollary Hartford basin of Eastern North America (ENA) also using the pedogenic carbonate paleobarometer. We find pCO2 levels for pre-CAMP background of 2000 ± 700 ppm (at S(z) = 3000 ± 1000 ppm), increasing to ~ 5000 ± 1700 ppm immediately above the first lava flow unit, consistent with observations from the Newark. The longer post-extrusive Portland Formation of the Hartford basin records a fourth pulse of pCO2 to ~ 4500 ± 1200 ppm, about 240 kyr after the last lava recorded in the ENA section. We interpret this fourth increase as due to a major episode of volcanism, and revise the main CAMP duration to 840 ± 60 kyr. The Portland also records a post-eruptive decrease in pCO2 reaching pre-eruptive background concentrations of ~ 2000 ppm in only ~ 300 kyr, and continuing to levels below pre-CAMP background over the subsequent 1.5 Myr following the final episode of eruptions. Geochemical modeling (using modified COPSE code) demonstrates that the rapidity of the pCO2 decreases, and fall to concentrations below background can be accounted for by a 1.5-fold amplification of the continental silicate weathering response due to the presence of the CAMP basalts themselves. These results demonstrate that a continental flood basalt capable of producing a short-term perturbation of the carbon system may actually have an overall net-cooling effect on global climates due to a long-term net-decrease in pCO2 to below pre-eruptive levels, as previous models have suggested followed the emplacement of the Deccan Traps.

  13. Geochemistry and isotopic composition of the Guerrero Terrane (western Mexico): implications for the tectono-magmatic evolution of southwestern North America during the Late Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, O. T.; Suastegui, M. G.

    2000-10-01

    The composite Guerrero Terrane of western Mexico records much of the magmatic evolution of southwestern North America during Late Mesozoic time. The Guerrero includes three distinctive subterranes characterized by unique stratigraphic records, structural evolutions, and geochemical and isotopic features that strongly suggest they evolved independently. The eastern Teloloapan Subterrane represents an evolved intra-oceanic island arc of Hauterivian to Cenomanian age, which includes a high-K calc-alkaline magmatic suite. The central Arcelia-Palmar Chico Subterrane represents a primitive island arc-marginal basin system of Albian to Cenomanian age, consisting of an oceanic suite and a tholeiitic arc suite. The western Zihuatanejo-Huetamo Subterrane comprises three components that represent an evolved island arc-marginal basin-subduction complex system of Late Jurassic (?) -Early Cretaceous age built on a previously deformed basement. The Zihuatanejo Sequence includes a thick high-K calc-alkaline magmatic suite. The Las Ollas Complex consists of tectonic slices containing exotic blocks of arc affinity affected by high-pressure/low-temperature metamorphism included in a sheared matrix. The Huetamo Sequence consists mainly of volcanic-arc derived sedimentary rocks, including large pebbles of tholeiitic, calc-alkaline, and shoshonitic lavas. These sequences are unconformably underlain by the Arteaga Complex, which represents the subvolcanic basement. On the basis of available geology, geochemistry, geochronology, and isotopic data, we suggest that Late Mesozoic volcanism along the western margin of southern North America developed in broadly contemporaneous but different intra-oceanic island arcs that constitute a complex fossil arc-trench system similar to the present-day western Pacific island arc system.

  14. Zircon and baddeleyite U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes from the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Joshua; Marzoli, Andrea; Bertrand, Herve; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are anomalously large volumes of dominantly mafic magma that erupted and intruded into the upper crust over short time scales. The origin of these volcanic provinces is very likely specific for each case, partly explained by plate tectonic processes or mantle plumes. Despite an ambivalent plate tectonic connection, there is a striking temporal correlation between the timing of LIPs and periods of mass extinction on Earth. However, establishing the relationship between these two is quite complicated since mass extinctions are typically recognised in the marine record, and LIPs are usually terrestrially emplaced. High precision geochronology of LIPs is essential to (i) establish the synchrony and infer the causal relationship with mass extinctions, and (ii) to understand how LIPs form. In this study, we apply high-precision zircon and baddeleyite U-Pb geochronology to rocks from the ~200 Ma Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), in an attempt to reconstruct the overall timing of the event, its spatial distribution in time, and determine its relationship with the end-Triassic mass extinction. We also present Hf isotope data from the separated zircon and baddeleyite to both elucidate the origin of the LIP and also to determine if the magmas all originate from the same source. Our data suggest that the majority of the CAMP magmas were emplaced over a 0.5 Ma period from ~201.5 Ma to ~201.0 Ma with a possible small secondary event occurring much later at ~199 Ma. Spatially, it appears that CAMP magmatism occurred roughly simultaneously over the entire province (i.e. ~8000 Km North to South). However, the Hf isotopic composition varies over this length with the highest values (~5.5 ɛHf) occurring in a small area to the south of the province in Brazil and Sierra Leone. Towards the north, the ɛHf values become negative, indicating the presence of an older or more enriched component in the magmas. Our geochronology also indicates that CAMP

  15. Variations in mid-ocean ridge magmatism and carbon emissions driven by glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Burley, J. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Crowley, J. W.; Park, S. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferguson, D.; Proistosescu, C.; Boulahanis, B.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial cycles transfer ˜5×10^19 kg of water between the oceans and ice sheets, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Forced with Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge magma/mantle dynamics predict temporal variations up to 10% in melt supply to the base of the crust. Moreover, a transport model for a perfectly incompatible element suggests that CO2 emissions from mid-ocean ridges could vary by a similar proportion, though with a longer time-lag.Bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The mechanism by which variations in the rate of melt supply are expressed in the bathymetry is not understood.The same pressure variations that modulate the melting rate could also modulate the depth of the onset of silicate melting. As ice sheets grow and sea level drops, this onset deepens, causing melting at the base of the silicate melting regime. Excess highly incompatible elements like CO2 enter the melt and begin their journey to the ridge axis. Tens of thousands of years later, this additional CO2 flux is emitted into the climate system. Because of its delay with respect to sea-level change, the predicted variation in CO2 emissions could represent a restoring force on climate (and sea-level) excursions. This mechanism has a response time determined by the time scale of melt transport; it potentially introduces a resonant frequency into the climate system.

  16. Impacts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province on the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle in Western Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobbe, T.; Suarez, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon isotope analysis of bulk organic and inorganic carbon preserved in the lacustrine deposits of the late Triassic to Jurassic Moenave Formation were analyzed to construct a carbon isotope chemostratigraphic profile of western Pangea. Negative carbon isotope excursions (NCIE) are characteristic of the Late Triassic and are attributed to the effects of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) on climate and the global C-cycle. The aerial extent of the CAMP basalts is the largest in Earth's history spanning four continents with an area of ~ 7 x 106 km2 and a volume of 3 to 11 x 106 km3. Carbon isotope and paleontological evidence has shown that the end Triassic extinction is near synchronous to the CAMP and likely spurred on the extinction event as well as an increase in global temperatures of 2 - 2.5°C. Global correlations of NCIEs between marine and terrestrial strata provide a connection between the CAMP basalts and the end-Triassic extinction. Preliminary data collected at Potter Canyon, Arizona reveal a 5.5 ‰ decrease in δ13Corganic and a 2.75‰ decrease in δ13Ccarbonate in the lower portion of the Whitmore Point Member. These NCIEs indicate the global carbon cycle perturbation caused by the CAMP is recorded in lacustrine sediments of the Whitmore Point Member in southern Utah and northern Arizona. Additional samples collected at high sampling frequencies at other locations in the Whitmore Point Member will corroborate the terrestrial impacts of the CAMP perturbation at these locations across the region. Correlation of NCIES associated with the CAMP and any identified microfossils of the Whitmore Point Member will also illustrate the global effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on the terrestrial environment and biota.

  17. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  18. Palinspastic restoration of NAVDat and implications for the origin of magmatism in southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, Nadine; Oskin, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Simultaneous palinspastic restoration of deformation and volcanism illuminates relationships between magmatism and tectonics in western North America. Using ArcGIS, we retrodeformed the NAVDat (North American Volcanic Database, navdat.geongrid.org) using the western North America reconstruction of McQuarrie and Wernicke (2005). From these data sets we quantitatively compare rates of magmatism and deformation and evaluate the age, composition, and migration of Cenozoic volcanism from 36 Ma to present. These relationships are shown in a series of palinspastic maps as well as animations that highlight migrating extension and volcanism with time. Western North America is grouped into eight different regions with distinct relationships between strain and volcanism to evaluate competing hypotheses regarding the relationship of extension to continental magmatism. A first-order observation from this study is that magmatism throughout the Basin and Range appears to be primarily driven by plate boundary effects, notably subducting and foundering slabs as well as slab windows. Exceptions include the Yellowstone hotspot system along the northern border of our study area and late-stage (<8 Ma) passive, extension-related asthenospheric upwelling along the eastern and western margins of the Basin and Range. The palinspastic reconstructions presented here highlight that the classic, high-angle, Basin and Range faulting that comprises most of the physiographic Basin and Range Province commenced during a magmatic lull. More broadly, with the exception of the Rio Grande rift we find that pulses of magmatism lag the onset of extension. These observations largely contradict the active rifting model where magmatism triggers Basin and Range extension.

  19. The Interplay Between Saline Fluid Flow and Dynamic Permeability in Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits document the interplay between saline fluid flow and rock permeability. Numerical simulations of multi-phase flow of variably miscible, compressible H20-NaCl fluids in concert with a dynamic permeability model can reproduce characteristics of porphyry copper and epithermal gold systems. This dynamic permeability model incorporates depth-dependent permeability profiles characteristic for tectonically active crust as well as pressure- and temperature-dependent relationships describing hydraulic fracturing and the transition from brittle to ductile rock behavior. In response to focused expulsion of magmatic fluids from a crystallizing upper crustal magma chamber, the hydrothermal system self-organizes into a hydrological divide, separating an inner part dominated by ascending magmatic fluids under near-lithostatic pressures from a surrounding outer part dominated by convection of colder meteoric fluids under near-hydrostatic pressures. This hydrological divide also provides a mechanism to transport magmatic salt through the crust, and prevents the hydrothermal system to become "clogged" by precipitation of solid halite due to depressurization of saline, high-temperature magmatic fluids. The same physical processes at similar permeability ranges, crustal depths and flow rates are relevant for a number of active systems, including geothermal resources and excess degassing at volcanos. The simulations further suggest that the described mechanism can separate the base of free convection in high-enthalpy geothermal systems from the magma chamber as a driving heat source by several kilometers in the vertical direction in tectonic settings with hydrous magmatism. This hydrology would be in contrast to settings with anhydrous magmatism, where the base of the geothermal systems may be closer to the magma chamber.

  20. Attenuation tomography in the western central Andes: A detailed insight into the structure of a magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Christian; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2001-06-01

    High-quality data from 1498 local earthquakes recorded by the PISCO '94 (Proyecto de Investigatión Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental, 1994) and ANCORP '96 (Andean Continental Research Project, 1996) temporary seismological networks allowed the detailed determination of the three-dimensional (3-D) attenuation structure (Qp-1) beneath the recent magmatic arc in the western central Andes (20° to 24°S). Assuming a frequency-independent Qp-1 in a frequency band between 1 and 30 Hz, whole path attenuation (t*) was estimated from the amplitude spectra of the P waves using spectral ratios and a spectral inversion technique. The damped least squares inversion (tomography) of the data reveals a complex attenuation structure. Crust and mantle of the forearc and subducting slab are generally characterized by low attenuation (Qp > 1000). Crust and mantle beneath the magmatic arc show elevated attenuation. The strongest anomaly of extremely low Qp is found in the crust between 22° and 23°S beneath the recent volcanic arc (Qp < 100). N-S variations can be observed: The western flank of the crustal attenuation anomaly follows the curved course of the volcanic front. North of 21°S the attenuation is less developed. In the northern part of the study area the low-Qp zone penetrates in the forearc mantle down to the subducting slab. In the south a deeper zone of high attenuation is resolved between 23° and 24°S directly above the subducting slab. Low Qp in the mantle correlates with earthquake clusters. The strong crustal attenuation is confined to the distribution of young ignimbrites and silicic volcanism and is interpreted as a thermally weakened zone with partial melts. The attenuation pattern in the upper mantle might reflect the variable extent of the asthenosphere and maps variations of subduction-related hydration processes in the mantle wedge from slab-derived fluids.

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In the calculations we have assumed that all apatites are magmatic. The presence of chlorite and altered plagioclase within the granite and quartz-monzodiorite suggests that alteration may play a role in leading to erroneous estimates of initial melt Cl and F for 2 reasons: (1) the apatites may in fact not be magmatic in origin, but are hydrothermal, and (2) the halogen signature of magmatic apatite may be changed due to subsolidus exchange with a hydrothermal fluid. We are currently endeavoring to develop criteria for determining whether apatite composition represents earlier or later stages of magmatic-hydrothermal development.

  2. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the magmatic evolution in Iran: Implications of the Phanerozoic continental growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H.; Chung, S.; Zarrinkoub, M. H.; Lee, H.; Pang, K.; Mohammadi, S. S.; Khatib, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Combined LA-ICPMS analyses of zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope compositions for magmatic rocks from major domains of Iran allow us to better understand the magmatic evolution regarding the development of the Tethys oceans in the regions. In addition to 79 igneous rocks from Iran, 12 others were also collected from Armenia for isotopic studies. Two major episodes of magmatism were identified in the late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian and the Late Triassic. While the former represents the depleted mantle-derived magma and has associated with the magmatic events that produced the peri-Gondwanan terranes and the Arabian-Nubian Shield, the latter shows the continental crust-type zircon Hf isotopic characteristic and is attributed to the subduction and closing of the Paleotethys ocean. The Neotethyan subduction-related magmatism started from the Jurassic period as granitoids that now exposed along the Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone (SSZ) and in the central part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA), and exhibit heterogeneous isotopic affinities of variable zircon ɛHf(T) values between +12 and -5. The igneous activities migrated inland in the southeastern segment of the UDMA from which the Late Cretaceous granitoids occurred in the Jiroft and Bazman areas with zircon ɛHf(T) values from +15 to +11 and from +5 to -9, respectively, implying the remarkable involvement of crustal material in the Bazman magma. Then, the most widespread magmatic activities which took place during the Eocene to Miocene in the UDMA, Armenia, the SSZ and the Alborz yielded mainly positive zircon ɛHf(T) values from +17 to -1. However, the Eocene intrusive rocks from the Central Iran, in the Saghand area have less radiogenic zircon Hf isotopes of ɛHf(T) values between +6 and -7. Magmatic zircons with juvenile signatures, ɛHf(T) values from +17 to 0, were also found during the Oligocene to Quaternary in the southern Sistan suture zone and the Makran region. Significantly, the positive ɛHf(T) values

  3. Breakup Style and Magmatic Underplating West of the Lofoten Islands, Norway, Based on OBS Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.; Mjelde, R.; Murai, Y.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of the Northeast Atlantic in the Early Eocene was magma-rich, forming the major part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). This is seen as extrusive and intrusive magmatism in the continental domain, and as a thicker than normal oceanic crust produced the first few million years after continental breakup. The maximum magma productivity and the duration of excess magmatism varies along the margins of Northwest Europe and East Greenland, to some extent as a function of the distance from the Iceland hotspot. The Vøring Plateau off mid-Norway is the northernmost of the margin segments in northwestern Europe with extensive magmatism. North of the plateau, magmatism dies off towards the Lofoten Margin, marking the northern boundary of the NAIP here. In 2003, as part of the Euromargins Program we collected an Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) profile from mainland Norway, across the Lofoten Islands, and out into the deep ocean. Forward velocity modeling using raytracing reveals a continental margin that shows transitional features between magma-rich and magma-poor rifting. On one hand, we detect an up to 2 km thick and 40-50 km wide magmatic underplate of the outer continent, on the other hand, continental thinning is greater and intrusive magmatism less than farther south. Continental breakup also appears to be somewhat delayed compared to breakup on the Vøring Plateau, consistent with increased extension. This indicates that magmatic diking, believed to quickly lead to continental breakup of volcanic margins and thus to reduce continental thinning, played a much lesser role here than at the plateau. Early post-breakup oceanic crust is up to 8 km thick, less than half of that observed farther south. The most likely interpretation of these observations, is that the source for the excess magmatism of the NAIP was not present at the Lofoten Margin during rifting, and that the excess magmatism actually observed was the result of lateral transport from the

  4. The magmatic budget of Atlantic type rifted margins: is it related to inheritance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manatschal, Gianreto; Tugend, Julia; Picazo, Suzanne; Müntener, Othmar

    2016-04-01

    In the past, Atlantic type rifted margins were either classified as volcanic or non-volcanic. An increasing number of high quality reflection and refraction seismic surveys and drill hole data show a divergent style of margin architecture and an evolution in which the quantity and distribution of syn-rift magmatism is variable, independently of the amount of extension. Overgeneralized classifications and models assuming simple relations between magmatic and extensional systems are thus inappropriate to describe the formation of rifted margins. More recent studies show that the magmatic evolution of rifted margins is complex and cannot be characterized based on the volume of observed magma alone. On the one hand, so-called "non-volcanic" margins are not necessarily amagmatic, as shown by the results of ODP drilling along the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins. On the other hand, magma-rich margins, such as the Norwegian, NW Australian or the Namibia rifted margins show evidence for hyper-extension prior to breakup. These observations suggest that the magmatic budget does not only depend on extension rates but also on the composition and temperature of the decompressing mantle. Moreover, the fact that the magmatic budget may change very abruptly along strike and across the margin is difficult to reconcile with the occurrence of plumes or other deep-seated large-scale mantle phenomena only. These overall observations result in questions on how magmatic and tectonic processes are interacting during rifting and lithospheric breakup and on how far inheritance may control the magmatic budget during rifting. In our presentation we will review results from the South and North Atlantic and the Alpine Tethys domain and will discuss the structural and magmatic evolution of so-called magma-rich and magma-poor rifted margins. In particular, we will try to define when, where and how much magma forms during rifting and lithospheric breakup. The key questions that we aim to address

  5. Magmatic versus phreatomagmatic fragmentation: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D. L.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    What are the fragmentation processes in volcanic eruptions? At meetings like this sessions ask "what can pyroclasts tell us?" and the answer is mostly "the properties of the magma at the point of solidification." The only place a pyroclast can preserve a fragmentation signature is at its surface, as the fracture or interface that made it a fragment. Commonly contrasted are "phreatomagmatic" and "magmatic" fragmentation in eruptions. Strictly, the latter means only fragmentation of magma without external water, but it often carries the connotation of disruption by bubbles of magmatic gas. Phreatomagmatic fragmentation implies a role for external water in fragmenting the magma, including vaporization and expansion of water as steam with rapid cooling/quenching of the magma. Magma is necessarily involved in phreatomagmatic fragmentation, and a common approach to assessing whether a pyroclast formed by magmatic or phreatomagmatic fragmentation is to make a stepwise assessment. This often uses particle vesicularity (high=magmatic), shape of particles (blocky=phreatomagmatic), degree of quenching (high=phreatomagmatic), or a glassy fluidal exterior film on particles (present=magmatic). It is widely known that no single one of these criteria is entirely diagnostic and other criteria are often considered, such as welding (=magmatic), particle aggregation (=phreatomagmatic), lithic-fragment abundance (high=phreatomagmatic), and proportion of fines (high=phreatomagmatic). Magmatic fragmentation varies, and even without water can yield anything from rhyolite pumice to obsidian to basaltic achneliths or carbonatitic globules. This makes direct argument for magmatic fragmentation difficult, and many papers have taken an alternative approach: they have "tested" for phreatomagmatism using the fingerprints listed above, and if the fingerprint is lacking a magmatic fragmentation process is considered to be "proven". In other words, absence of evidence for phreatomagmatic

  6. Effects of ice-cap unloading on shallow magmatic reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    One of the effects of global warming is the increase of volcanic activity. Glacial melting has been shown to cause visco-elastic relaxation of the upper mantle, which in turn promotes upwelling of magmas through the crust. To date, the effects of ice-cap melting on shallow (i.e., less than 10 km depth) plumbing systems of volcanoes are still not clear. We investigate the pressure changes due to glacial unloading around a magmatic reservoir by combining laboratory and numerical methods. As a case study we focus on Snæfellsjökull, a volcano in Western Iceland whose ice cap is currently melting 1.25 meters (thickness) per year. Our approach is as follows: we obtain representative rock samples from the field, preform tri-axial deformation tests at relevant pressure and temperature (PT) conditions and feed the results into a numerical model in which the stress fields before and after ice cap removal are compared. A suite of deformation experiments were conducted using a Paterson-type tri-axial deformation apparatus. All experiments were performed at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1, while varying the PT conditions. We applied confining pressures between 50 and 150 MPa and temperatures between 200 and 1000 ° C. Between 200 and 800 ° C we observe a localized deformation and a slight decrease of the Young's modulus from 41 to 38 GPa. Experiments at 900 and 1000 ° C exhibit macroscopically ductile behavior and a marked reduction of the Young's modulus down to 4 GPa at 1000 ° C. These results are used to construct a numerical finite-element model in which we approximate the volcanic edifice and basement by a 2D axisymmetric half-space. We first calculate the steady-state temperature field in the volcanic system and assign the laboratory-derived temperature-dependent Young's modulus to every element of the model. Then the pressure in the edifice is calculated for two scenarios: with and without ice cap. The comparison between the two scenarios allows us estimate the

  7. Volatiles and the tempo of flood basalt magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Manga, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Individual flood basalt lavas often exceed 103 km3 in volume, and many such lavas erupt during emplacement of flood basalt provinces. The large volume of individual flood basalt lavas implies correspondingly large magma reservoirs within or at the base of the crust. To erupt, some fraction of this magma must become buoyant and overpressure must be sufficient to encourage failure and dike propagation. The overpressure associated with a new injection of magma is inversely proportional to the total reservoir volume, and as a large magma body heats the surrounding rocks thermally activated creep will relax isotropic overpressure more rapidly. Here, we examine the viability of buoyancy overpressure as a trigger for continental flood basalt eruptions. We employ a new one-dimensional model that combines volatile exsolution, bubble growth and rise, assimilation, and permeable fluid escape from Moho-depth and crustal chambers. We investigate the temporal evolution of degassing and the eruptibility of magmas using the Siberian Traps flood basalts as a test case. We suggest that the volatile inventory set during mantle melting and redistributed via bubble motion controls ascent of magma into and through the crust, thereby regulating the tempo of flood basalt magmatism. Volatile-rich melts from low degrees of partial melting of the mantle are buoyant and erupt to the surface with little staging or crustal interaction. Melts with moderate volatile budgets accumulate in large, mostly molten magma chambers at the Moho or in the lower crust. These large magma bodies may remain buoyant and poised to erupt-triggered by volatile-rich recharge or external stresses-for ∼106 yr. If and when such chambers fail, enormous volumes of magma can ascend into the upper crust, staging at shallow levels and initiating substantial assimilation that contributes to pulses of large-volume flood basalt eruption. Our model further predicts that the Siberian Traps may have released 1019-1020 g of CO2

  8. What about temperature? Measuring permeability at magmatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Champallier, Rémi; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    The explosive potential of volcanoes is intimately linked to permeability, which is governed by the connectivity of the porous structure of the magma and surrounding edifice. As magma ascends, volatiles exsolve from the melt and expand, creating a gas phase within the conduit. In the absence of a permeable structure capable of dissipating these gases, the propulsive force of an explosive eruption arises from the gas expansion and the build up of subsurface overpressures. Thus, characterizing the permeability of volcanic rocks under in-situ conditions (high temperature and pressure) allows us to better understand the outgassing potential and explosivity of volcanic systems. Current studies of the permeabilities of volcanic rocks generally measure permeability at room temperature using gas permeameters or model permeability using analytic imaging. Our goal is to perform and assess permeability measurements made at high temperature and high pressure in the interest of approaching the permeability of the samples at magmatic conditions. We measure the permeability of andesitic samples expelled during the 2010 Mt. Merapi eruption. We employ and compare two protocols for measuring permeability at high temperature and under high pressure using argon gas in an internally heated Paterson apparatus with an isolated pore fluid system. We first use the pulse decay method to measure the permeability of our samples, then compare these values to permeability measurements performed under steady state flow. We consider the steady state flow method the more rigorous of the two protocols, as we are more capable of accounting for the temperature gradient within the entire pore fluid system. At temperatures in excess of 700°C and pressures of 100 MPa, permeability values plummet by several orders of magnitude. These values are significantly lower than those commonly reported for room temperature permeameter measurements. The reduction in permeability at high temperature is a

  9. Magmatic evolution of the Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezin, D.; Mann, C. P.; Hernández, W.; Stix, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Ilopango caldera (16 x 13 km) is an active, long-lived magmatic system, erupting voluminous amounts of pyroclastic material numerous times over the course of its evolution. The caldera is presently water filled and the most recent activity is a dome growth event in 1880. Established age constraints from extracaldera pyroclastic sequences, indicate caldera forming events occur ~ every 10,000 years over the last 40,000 years. The most recent pyroclastic eruption (TBJ) is constrained to A.D. 429 erupting 70 km3 DRE of pyroclastic material. We combine major element and trace element chemistry with 40Ar/39Ar age constraints of the intracaldera domes and intracaldera pyroclastic deposits to extent the caldera history. The intracaldera domes are andesitic to rhyolitic in composition (57 - 76 wt. % SiO2), some with basaltic enclaves (54 wt. % SiO2) and pyroclastic units observed inside the caldera (San Agustín Pumice Breccia) are dacitic to rhyolitic in composition (69 -75 wt. % SiO2). Formation of an intracaldera andesitic dome at 359±7.9 ka provides a minimum age of caldera formation and extends the caldera history back ~ 320 ka years. The variable composition of the intracaldera domes, the presence of mafic enclaves in the dome lavas, mafic clasts in the TB4 plinian fall, mafic banding in the TB3 and TB2, attest to the obvious involvement of a more mafic magma The highly evolved compositions of the pyroclastic units and the volume of erupted material, point towards a large evolving magma reservoir at depth. The mafic magma may replenish the subsurface reservoir and act as a catalyst for volcanic eruption. The presence of an intracaldera lake, the regularity with which the volcano erupts and the presence of a more mafic magma are the ingredients for a catastrophic disaster. The Ilopango caldera, located 10 km to the east of the capital city of San Salvador (~ 1.5 million people) poses a threat both locally and globally as demonstrated 1600 years ago as it

  10. Experimental investigation into the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.

    During the time that the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was in orbit around the innermost planet, new and exciting results regarding the planets structure, chemical makeup, and diverse surface were revealed, confirming that Mercury is a geochemical endmember among the terrestrial planets. Data from this mission, more specifically data from the X-Ray Spectrometer and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer onboard MESSENGER, has been used to provide insight into the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury. This dissertation consists of five chapters that, as a whole, have substantially increased our knowledge about Mercury through a high pressure and high temperature experimental investigation. First, we identified nine distinct geochemical regions that have characteristic major element compositions. We computed silicate and sulfide mineralogy of these regions and petrologically classified them according to IUGS specifications. The diversity of the rocks and minerals on Mercury was then compared to other planetary bodies revealing the wide range in diversity of the mercurian surface. Second, we conducted sink-float experiments on a melt composition similar to the composition of the largest volcanic field on the planet to provide insight into crust formation on Mercury. These results suggested a primary floatation crust composed of graphite is possible given a magma ocean event on Mercury. Third, we experimentally determined the phase assemblages associated with the largest volcanic field on the planet. From this data we were able to provide insight into eruption scenarios that produced the northern volcanic plains on Mercury. Fourth, we determined the sulfide concentration at sulfide saturation in mercurian-like melts by conducting sulfide solubility experiments on a synthetic rock composition matching the northern volcanic plains. These results indicated that the high amounts of sulfur on the surface of Mercury measured by

  11. Magmatic sulfides in the porphyritic chondrules of EH enstatite chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Laurette; Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy; Tissandier, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within 17 porphyritic chondrules of the Sahara 97096 EH3 enstatite chondrite have been studied by backscattered electron microscopy and electron microprobe in order to investigate the role of gas-melt interactions in the chondrule sulfide formation. Troilite (FeS) is systematically present and is the most abundant sulfide within the EH3 chondrite chondrules. It is found either poikilitically enclosed in low-Ca pyroxenes or scattered within the glassy mesostasis. Oldhamite (CaS) and niningerite [(Mg,Fe,Mn)S] are present in ≈60% of the chondrules studied. While oldhamite is preferentially present in the mesostasis, niningerite associated with silica is generally observed in contact with troilite and low-Ca pyroxene. The Sahara 97096 chondrule mesostases contain high abundances of alkali and volatile elements (average Na2O = 8.7 wt.%, K2O = 0.8 wt.%, Cl = 7100 ppm and S = 3700 ppm) as well as silica (average SiO2 = 62.8 wt.%). Our data suggest that most of the sulfides found in EH3 chondrite chondrules are magmatic minerals that formed after the dissolution of S from a volatile-rich gaseous environment into the molten chondrules. Troilite formation occurred via sulfur solubility within Fe-poor chondrule melts followed by sulfide saturation, which causes an immiscible iron sulfide liquid to separate from the silicate melt. The FeS saturation started at the same time as or prior to the crystallization of low-Ca pyroxene during the high temperature chondrule forming event(s). Protracted gas-melt interactions under high partial pressures of S and SiO led to the formation of niningerite-silica associations via destabilization of the previously formed FeS and low-Ca pyroxene. We also propose that formation of the oldhamite occurred via the sulfide saturation of Fe-poor chondrule melts at moderate S concentration due to the high degree of polymerization and the high Na-content of the chondrule melts, which allowed the activity of Ca

  12. Controls on Calcite Solubility in Metamorphic and Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Eguchi, J.; Galvez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Calcite is an important hydrothermal alteration product in a wide range of environments. The role of calcite in hydrothermal alteration depends on its solubility in geologic fluids, especially H2O. At ambient T and P, calcite solubility is low and it exhibits well-known declining, or "reverse", solubility with rising T. However, experimental and theoretical studies show that increasing P yields higher solubility and restricts the region of reverse solubility behavior to higher temperature. At 0.2 GPa the reverse solubility region lies at T>600°C; at 0.5 GPa, >800°C. Thus, whereas calcite possesses relatively low solubility in pure H2O in shallow hydrothermal systems (typically <10 ppm C), it is substantially more soluble at conditions of middle and lower crustal metamorphism and magmatism, reaching concentrations ≥1000 ppm. At the higher P of subduction zones, aragonite solubility in H2O is even greater. Thus, neglecting other solubility controls, calcite precipitation is favored as crustal fluids cool and/or decompress. However, the solubility of calcite in H2O also depends strongly on other solutes, pH, and fO2. Sources of alkalinity decrease calcite solubility. In contrast, sources of acidity such as CO2 and Cl increase solubility. Crustal fluids can be enriched in alkali halides such as NaCl. Calcite solubility increases with increasing salt content at a given P and T. From approximately seawater salinity to salt saturation, the fluid behaves as a dilute molten salt and calcite solubility increases as the square of the salt mole fraction regardless of the alkali (Li, Na, K, Cs) or halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) considered. Similar behavior is seen in mixed salt solutions. At lower salinities, solubility behavior is as expected in dilute electrolyte solutions. The transition from dilute electrolyte to molten salt is fundamental to the properties of crustal fluids. Reduction of carbonate species or CO2 in the fluid to CH4, which is common during serpentinization of

  13. Orogenic plateau magmatism of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Kheirkhah, M.; van Hunen, J.; Davidson, J. P.; Meliksetian, Kh.; Emami, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    Magmatism is a common feature of high plateaux created during continental collision, but the causes remain enigmatic. Here we study Pliocene-Quaternary volcanics from the active Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, to determine the chemistry of these rocks and their relations to faulting and deeper lithospheric structure. The great majority of the centres lie within the overriding Eurasian plate in Iran, eastern Turkey and Armenia , implying that mantle fertilised by pre-collision subduction processes plays a significant role in magma generation. The composition of the Pliocene-Quaternary centres is extremely variable, ranging from OIB-like alkali basalts, to intermediate types resembling mature continental arc lavas, to potassic and even ultrapotassic lavas. These centres are erupted across a mosaic of pre-Cenozoic suture zones and heterogeneous lithospheric blocks. The chemical diversity implies a range of partial melting conditions operating on lithospheric and perhaps sub-lithospheric sources. Published data show a thick (>200 km) lithospheric keel beneath the Arabia-Eurasia suture, thinning to near normal thicknesses (~120 km) across much of central and northern Iran. Thin mantle lithosphere under eastern Turkey (max. ~30 km) may relate to the region's juvenile, accretionary lithosphere. These variable thicknesses are constraints on the cause of the melting in each area, and the degree of variation suggests that no one mechanism applies across the plateau. Various melting models have been suggested. Break-off of the subducted Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab is supported by tomographic data, which may have permitted melting related to adiabatic ascent of hot asthenosphere under areas where the lithosphere is thin. This seems a less plausible mechanism where the lithosphere is at normal or greater than normal thickness. The same problem applies to postulated lower lithosphere delamination. Isolated pull-aparts may account for the location of some centres, but are not

  14. Age and nature of Triassic magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex, West Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Max; White, Lloyd T.

    2016-12-01

    We report field observations together with petrological, geochemical and geochronological data from granitoids of the Netoni Intrusive Complex of West Papua. Until now, our knowledge of the timing of granitic magmatism in this region has been limited to a wide range of ages (241-6.7 Ma) obtained from K-Ar measurements of hornblende, biotite and plagioclase, primarily from samples of river detritus. We collected in situ samples along several traverses into the intrusive complex to: (1) develop a better understanding of the lithologies within the intrusive complex; and (2) determine the timing of magmatism using U-Pb dating of zircon. We also dated zircons from two river sand samples to identify other potential pulses of magmatism that may have been missed due to a sampling bias. The zircons extracted from the river sands yield age spectra similar to those obtained from the in situ samples. The combined data demonstrate that magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex occurred between 248 Ma and 213 Ma. The petrological and geochemical data indicate that the granitoids were most likely emplaced in an ocean-continent (Andean style) subduction setting. This builds on previous work which suggests that a magmatic belt extended along eastern Gondwana (now New Guinea and eastern Australia) throughout much of the Paleozoic. The volcanic ejecta that were produced along this arc and the subsequent erosion of the mountain chain are a potential source of detritus for Triassic and younger sedimentary rocks in New Guinea, eastern Indonesia and north/northwestern Australia.

  15. Resolving Histories of Magmatic Volatiles in Fluids and Silicate Melts as a Function of Pressure, Temperature, and Melt Composition through Apatite Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, J. D.; Piccoli, P. M.; Goldoff, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    volatiles in magmatic fluids; and interpreting magmatic degassing based on concentrations and zonation patterns of halogens and hydroxyl in apatite. We have applied this relationship to eruptive units of Augustine volcano, Alaska, to interpret magma evolution and to highlight the behavior of volatiles in melt and fluid(s); Augustine melt inclusion data are limited largely to felsic compositions. For geologically reasonable ranges in temperature and using compositions of rhyodacitic to rhyolitic melt inclusions and coexisting apatite for these units, we derive apparent pressures of apatite crystallization (or of subsequent equilibration of apatite with melt and fluid) that are generally higher than apparent pressures of melt inclusion entrapment (many differ by a factor of two). Thus, inclusions of apatite, trapped in other phenocrysts, provide a record of melt and fluid compositions for magmas located deeper and formed potentially earlier during differentiation than that of felsic melt inclusions from the same rock samples. We will also apply this geochemical relationship to apatites from high-silica rhyolitic and other subduction-related volcanic systems to provide new constraints on the behavior of volatiles in eruptive magma and fluid(s) and compare these results to those determined from coexisting melt inclusions in such systems.

  16. Widespread and Compositionally Diverse Magmatism Characterizes Late Holocene Time at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    Medicine Lake volcano in the southern Cascades is a high priority target for monitoring by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program. Ongoing subsidence focused on the central caldera along with fumarolic activity and an active geothermal system, as well as intermittent long-period seismic events indicate that the volcano is likely to erupt again. Nine eruptions have taken place at this very large rear-arc volcano since 5200 years ago. Their vents were widely distributed, scattered over an area of about 300 square km across the 2000-square-km volcano. The eruptions are well dated and occurred in three episodes at about 5 ka, 3 ka, and 1 ka. A remarkably diverse array of magmas ranging from basalt through rhyolite is represented. The 5-ka episode produced two caldera-focused dacitic eruptions. At ~3 ka, a north flank tholeiitic basalt eruption was followed by eruption of a south flank andesite. The 1-ka final episode produced a variety of compositions including west- and north-flank calc-alkaline mafic flows interspersed with fissure rhyolites erupted tangential to the caldera. The youngest and most spectacular rhyolite, and the youngest eruption at the volcano, is the 950-yr-old Glass Mountain flow. Quenched mafic magmatic inclusions record evidence of intrusions that did not independently reach the surface. The inclusions are present in five andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic host lavas, and were erupted in each of the three episodes. The mafic lavas and inclusions include both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline types and record complicated petrogenetic histories. Experimental evidence suggests that magmas were stored at 3-6 km prior to eruption, and that both wet and dry parental magmas were involved in generating the more silicic magmas. All eruptions took place from NW- to NE-trending alignments of vents, reflecting the overall E-W extensional tectonic environment. The interaction of tectonism and volcanism is a dominant influence at this subduction-related volcano, located

  17. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  18. Tourmaline as a recorder of ore-forming processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Trumbull, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Tourmaline occurs in diverse types of hydrothermal mineral deposits and can be used to constrain the nature and evolution of ore-forming fl uids. Because of its broad range in composition and retention of chemical and isotopic signatures, tourmaline may be the only robust recorder of original mineralizing processes in some deposits. Microtextures and in situ analysis of compositional and isotopic variations in ore-related tourmaline provide valuable insights into hydrothermal systems in seafl oor, sedimentary, magmatic, and metamorphic environments. Deciphering the hydrothermal record in tourmaline also holds promise for aiding exploration programs in the search for new ore deposits.

  19. High-pressure thermal aureoles around two Neoproterozoic synorogenic magmatic epidote-bearing granitoids, Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caby, Renaud; Sial, Alcides N.; Ferreira, Valderez P.

    2009-02-01

    Unusual high-pressure inner thermal aureoles are described from the Minador and Angico Torto epidote-bearing tonalitic plutons that emplaced into greenschist-facies metasedimentary rocks of the Neoproterozoic Cachoeirinha-Salgueiro belt, northeastern Brazil. The foliated pelitic hornfelses display the mineral assemblage garnet, kyanite, staurolite, muscovite, biotite, plagioclase ± quartz. Rare fibrolite is only found very close to the contacts. Hornfelses display steep mineral lineations and steeply-dipping foliations concordant with magmatic contacts. Leucocratic veinlets containing quartz, oligoclase, garnet, kyanite, staurolite, rutile and ilmenite suggest that limited melting conditions were reached very close to magmatic contacts ( T ⩾ 650 °C, P around 8 kbar). These high-pressure hornfelses form a few meters thick, rigid envelopes around the two plutons. Contrary to known examples of kyanite-bearing hornfelses that recorded high-temperature decompression, the nearly isobaric cooling down to ca. 450 °C is constrained by 3.20-3.30 Si contents of retrogressive phengites from both inner hornfelses and ductilely-deformed tonalite at the pluton margins. Isograds and bathograds are, therefore, apparently telescoped due to HP/LT shearing, possibly caused by subsequent differential vertical movements affecting these two solidified plutons. The unusual depth of emplacement of these syn-kinematic calc-alkaline plutons is explained by a tentative geodynamic model involving a pre-620 Ma-subduction setting. Resumen Las aureolas internas que rodean dos plutones tonalíticos emplazados dentro de rocas cajas en facies esquistos verdes del Cinturón-plegado Cachoeirinha-Salgueiro al noreste de Brasil, contienen hornfelses pelíticos foliados con granate, kyanita, estaurolita, muscovita, biotita, plagioclasa ± cuarzo. Fibrolita es rara ó es encontrada solamente cerca de las zonas de contacto. Los hornfelses desarrollaron foliaciones concordantes con buzamiento fuerte

  20. Sea level forcing of mid-ocean ridge magmatism on Milankovitch timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, D.; Asimow, P.

    2008-12-01

    It is well-documented that Iceland experienced a pulse of elevated volcanism immediately following the last deglaciation (Maclennan et al., 2002). Modeling results suggest ice sheet retreat depressurized the mantle thus enhancing melt production and the supply of magma to the surface (Jull and McKenzie, 1996). Here we take a similar approach, but instead model the effect of glacial-interglacial changes in sea level on mantle melting at mid-ocean ridges. Loading rates reaching ±2 cm/year of water are comparable to the tectonic unloading rate of ~2 cm/year of mantle rock that drives magmatic activity at a slow-spreading ridge. Although the magnitude of sea level forcing is smaller than subglacial forcing, the sea level effect is globally distributed and could have significant consequences for ocean crust architecture and geothermal heat delivery to the deep ocean. We use a model of melt production based on analytical corner flow velocities coupled to the pMELTS model (Ghiorso et al. 2002; Asimow et al. 2004) of melting of the Workman and Hart (2006) depleted upper mantle source composition. For simplicity we assume that the hydrostatic pressure signal from sea-level variation is felt instantaneously by the entire melting regime, and that melts migrate from source to ridge axis at a constant rate. We neglect crustal magmatic and hydrothermal processes that might damp or delay the signal. We examined mid-ocean ridge systems with half-spreading rates from 30 mm/yr to 100 mm/yr and melt migration rates from 2.5 to 50 m/yr. For the case of 30 mm/yr half-spreading rate and 10 m/yr melt migration, we find that the rate of melt delivery to the crust varies ±30% relative to steady state conditions when the model is driven by a record of sea-level variability for the last 140 kyr. Notably, we simulate that melt delivery increased by ~30% beginning at 75 kyr BP, coincident with a rapid decrease in sea level of approximately 60 m. We also estimate a ~30% increase in melt

  1. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between C-H-O species in magmatic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    methane in the liquid is twice that recorded in the gas phase. Accordingly, condensed-phase isotope effects are inferred to govern the evolution of H/D isotopologues, induced by differences in the solubility of the isotopic molecules driven by excess energy/entropy developed during the mixing of non-polar species in the supercritical water structure. On the contrary, at such high temperatures/-pressures statistical thermodynamic models, based on the vibrational zero point energy distributions and high-temperature anharmonicity for isotopic molecules in ideal-gas reference state, predict minimal isotope exchange. Data, therefore, demonstrate that the solvation mechanism of H-D-bearing species in magmatic fluids can impose substantial D/H fractionation effects governing the δD composition of coexisting species even at lower-crust/upper-mantle temperature conditions. 1. Foustoukos D.I. and B.O. Mysen, (2012) D/H isotopic fractionation in the H2-H2O system at supercritical water conditions: Composition and hydrogen bonding effects, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 86, 88-102.

  2. Cross correlation of chemical profiles in minerals: insights into the architecture of magmatic reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Line; Caricchi, Luca; Gander, Martin; Wallace, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of chemical zoning in minerals offers the opportunity to reconstruct the pre-eruptive conditions and the temporal evolution of magmatic reservoirs. The chemical composition of minerals is a function of the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir from which they grow and therefore minerals record the evolution and variation of residual melt chemistry and intensive parameters within the magmatic system. A quantitative approach is required to determine if similar crystals actually shared a portion of their crystallisation history. These analyses are in many cases extremely time consuming and rather expensive. Therefore, it is not always possible to analyse a statically significant number of crystals, especially within their textural context in thin sections and that is the main reason to build automated methods. We are presenting a numerical cross-correlation method that compares the zonation pattern of minerals to identify if they share the totality or part of their growth history. We modified the method first developed by Wallace and Bergantz (2004) to compare profiles in minerals also from samples collected in different outcrops and that can be used for any dataset (i.e. geochemical proxies in stratigraphic sections). The main purpose of this method is to objectively compare chemical profiles in minerals (collected by electron microprobe, LA-ICP-MS or cathodoluminescence images) and quantify their degree of similarity. For this purpose, we use a well-known mathematical tool: the cross correlation which is a way of quantifying the difference between two given signals at a given position. Once our program was built, we performed tests using a set of synthetic profiles, profiles acquired along different transects of the same mineral and also on different minerals. Finally we applied our program to about 100 zircons from Kilgore Tuff, Heise Volcanic Field (USA) collected at different stratigraphic levels in two different outcrops. The correlation shows that

  3. Towards quantifying the arc-scale and global magmatic response to deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, S. F.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    and spatial sampling biases must be corrected. Spatial variation in sampling rates is particularly significant. In some highly active volcanic regions, such as Indonesia, as few as 1 in 20,000 VEI ≥2 eruptions have been identified during the 5-20 ka time period. Globally, >99% of all eruptions of VEI ≥2 have not been identified. Because of this, variations in eruption rate between glaciated and non-glaciated regions cannot be precisely quantified. We attempt to account for such uncertainties, and suggest that, at most, global eruption rates may have doubled after the last glaciation, from 13-7 ka. This suggests that, although volcanism may have been an important source of CO2 in the early Holocene, it cannot have been a dominant control on changes in atmospheric CO2 after the last glacial maximum. To improve our ability to constrain global-scale patterns in magmatic processes, there is a need for improved records of past volcanic activity, particularly from several low-latitude regions, where data are extremely sparse.

  4. Vertically extensive and unstable magmatic systems: A unified view of igneous processes.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Katharine V; Sparks, R Stephen J; Blundy, Jonathan D

    2017-03-24

    Volcanoes are an expression of their underlying magmatic systems. Over the past three decades, the classical focus on upper crustal magma chambers has expanded to consider magmatic processes throughout the crust. A transcrustal perspective must balance slow (plate tectonic) rates of melt generation and segregation in the lower crust with new evidence for rapid melt accumulation in the upper crust before many volcanic eruptions. Reconciling these observations is engendering active debate about the physical state, spatial distribution, and longevity of melt in the crust. Here we review evidence for transcrustal magmatic systems and highlight physical processes that might affect the growth and stability of melt-rich layers, focusing particularly on conditions that cause them to destabilize, ascend, and accumulate in voluminous but ephemeral shallow magma chambers.

  5. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    SciTech Connect

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  6. Magmatism on rift flanks: Insights from ambient noise phase velocity in Afar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Weemstra, Cornelis; Leroy, Sylvie; Boschi, Lapo; Keir, Derek; Ren, Yong; Molinari, Irene; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Stuart, Graham W.; Rolandone, Frédérique; Khanbari, Khaled; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J. M.; Doubre, Cécile; Ganad, Ismail Al; Goitom, Berhe; Ayele, Atalay

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of continents in magmatic settings, the extension of the rift valley is commonly assumed to initially occur by border faulting and progressively migrate in space and time toward the spreading axis. Magmatic processes near the rift flanks are commonly ignored. We present phase velocity maps of the crust and uppermost mantle of the conjugate margins of the southern Red Sea (Afar and Yemen) using ambient noise tomography to constrain crustal modification during breakup. Our images show that the low seismic velocities characterize not only the upper crust beneath the axial volcanic systems but also both upper and lower crust beneath the rift flanks where ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity occur at the surface. Magmatic modification of the crust beneath rift flanks likely occurs for a protracted period of time during the breakup process and may persist through to early seafloor spreading.

  7. Magmatic model for the Mount St. Helens blast of May 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Hayes, D.B.

    1982-09-10

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the hydrodynamic equations of motion, constrained by physical properties of juvenile ejecta in the Mount St. Helens blast deposit, were used to investigate magmatic conditions required to produce the initial devastating blast phase of the eruption of May 18, 1980. Evidence that the blast was magmatic includes equivalence in volume of juvenile blast ejecta to preeruption inflation of the cone, substantial vesicularity of this ejecta, and continued vesiculation of large juvenile clasts after eruption. Observed or inferred ejecta velocities of 100 to 250 m/s are shown to require 0.2 to 0.7 wt% water vapor preexisting in magma unloaded by a landslide 200 to 900 m thick. These conditions imply total magmatic water contents of 0.7 to 1.7 wt%, respectively. Such low required water content suggests that volcanic blasts may be regarded as a normal consequence of magma intrusion into an unstable edifice.

  8. Length Scales of Magmatic Segments at Intermediate and Fast Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Klein, E. M.; Smith, D. K.; Cannat, M.

    2014-12-01

    A synthesis of observations from fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges suggest that fine-scale tectonic segments, previously classified as 3rd order, correspond with principle magmatic segments along these ridges, each with their own magmatic plumbing system in the crust and shallow mantle. In this study, we use multi-beam sonar data available for fast and intermediate spreading ridges to determine the length distribution of these segments for comparison with the primary segmentation of the ridge axis found at slower spreading ridges. A study of intermediate, slow and ultraslow-spreading ridges using global satellite-derived bathymetry indicates a dominant segment length of 53 km [Briais and Rabinowicz, J. Geophys. Res. 2002]. However, satellite-derived bathymetry cannot be used to identify fine-scale tectonic segmentation of fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges due to the subdued low-relief expression of ridge-axis discontinuities along these spreading rates. This study focuses on the well-mapped regions of the East Pacific Rise between 13.35°S and 18°N, and the Galapagos Spreading Center between 85° and 95.38° W. We reexamine tectonic segmentation of the ridge axis previously identified in the literature and modify the locations of ridge-axis discontinuities defining segment ends in regions where modern multi-beam bathymetric data coverage has improved relative to that available in early studies. Discontinuities of first, second, and third order are used to define tectonic segment lengths. Initial results show a mean segment length of 42 km (standard deviation of 27 km) and a median of 33 km, with 85 segments studied, similar to the segment length distributions observed at slower spreading ridges. To further evaluate the hypothesis of principle magmatic segments, we also examine the relationship between fine-scale tectonic segmentation and properties of the crustal magmatic system imaged in prior seismic studies of

  9. The Role of Chaotic Dynamics in the Cooling of Magmatic Systems in Subduction Related Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrelli, M.; El Omari, K.; Le Guer, Y.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics occurring during the thermo-chemical evolution of igneous bodies is of crucial importance in both petrology and volcanology. This is particularly true in subduction related systems where large amount of magmas start, and sometime end, their differentiation histories at mid and lower crust levels. These magmas play a fundamental role in the evolution of both plutonic and volcanic systems but several key questions are still open about their thermal and chemical evolution: 1) what are the dynamics governing the development of these magmatic systems, 2) what are the timescales of cooling, crystallization and chemical differentiation; 4) how these systems contribute to the evolution of shallower magmatic systems? Recent works shed light on the mechanisms acting during the growing of new magmatic bodies and it is now accepted that large crustal igneous bodies result from the accretion and/or amalgamation of smaller ones. What is lacking now is how fluid dynamics of magma bodies can influence the evolution of these igneous systems. In this contribution we focus on the thermo-chemical evolution of a subduction related magmatic system at pressure conditions corresponding to mid-crustal levels (0.7 GPa, 20-25 km). In order to develop a robust model and address the Non-Newtonian behavior of crystal bearing magmas, we link the numerical formulation of the problem to experimental results and rheological modeling. We define quantitatively the thermo-chemical evolution of the system and address the timing required to reach the maximum packing fraction. We will shows that the development of chaotic dynamics significantly speed up the crystallization process decreasing the time needed to reach the maximum packing fraction. Our results have important implications for both the rheological history of the magmatic body and the refilling of shallower magmatic systems.

  10. Macrostructural and microstructural architecture of the Karakoram fault: Relationship between magmatism and strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Richard J.; Searle, Michael P.

    2007-06-01

    A key factor in interpreting the significance of large-scale strike-slip faults in models of continental deformation is an understanding of the temporal relationship between faulting and magmatism. Knowledge of when a strike-slip fault initiated is essential in order to determine its long-term slip rate and its significance in accommodating strain. We review key structural criteria that identify whether magmatism is prekinematic or synkinematic with faulting and apply these criteria to a major Tibet-bounding strike-slip fault. Along the Karakoram fault, in western Tibet, opinion is divided between (1) those advocating that magmatism and shearing were coeval, in which case the youngest U-Pb crystallization age provides a minimum age of shear, and (2) those advocating that magmatism preceded strike-slip shearing, in which case the youngest U-Pb crystallization age provides a maximum age of shear. Fault zone rocks within the central segment of the fault are variably deformed, displaying high- to low-temperature solid-state fabrics. Mylonites indicate subsolidus noncoaxial deformation at temperatures that have not exceeded greenschist-lower amphibolite facies. There is no evidence for submagmatic deformation, and there are no textural or structural indicators that suggest synkinematic magmatism. Consequently, magmatism preceded shearing suggesting that the U-Pb age of proximal leucogranites sets a maximum age for shear. Coupled with a limited offset (<150 km), these data confirm a low long-term slip rate for the Karakoram fault (3-10 mm/yr). Consequently, the fault is unlikely to have played a significant role in accommodating strain during the Indo-Asian collision, and thus its role in suggested extrusion models of deformation is limited.

  11. High-precision temporal constraints on intrusive magmatism of the Siberian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Seth; Bowring, Sam; Pavlov, Volodia E.; Veselovsky, Roman V.

    2014-05-01

    The broad temporal coincidence between large igneous province magmatism and some of the most severe biotic/environmental crises in Earth history has led many to infer a causal connection between the two. Notable examples include the end-Permian mass extinction and eruption/emplacement of the Siberian Traps large igneous province (LIP) and the end-Triassic mass extinction and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. In models proposing a causal connection between LIP magmatism and the environmental changes that lead to mass extinction, gases and particulates injected into the atmosphere are thought to cause abrupt changes in climate and ocean chemistry sufficient to drive mass extinction of marine and terrestrial biota. Magmatism has been proposed to cause voluminous volatile release via contact metamorphism of the sedimentary rocks. In the case of the Siberian Traps LIP, the compositions of sedimentary rocks (carbonates, evaporates, organic-rich shales) that host sills and dikes are ideal for greenhouse gas generation. When coupled with the enormous volume of Siberian LIP intrusive rocks, there is the potential for volatile generation on a scale necessary to drive environmental changes and mass extinction. This model must be tested by comparing the timing of intrusive magmatism with that of the mass extinction. Coupled high-precision geochronology and astrochronology have constrained the timing of biotic crisis and associated environmental perturbations from the deca-millennial to sub-millennial timescale, suggesting that the biotic crisis was abrupt, occurring over < 100 ka. Published geochronology on sills and dikes from the LIP are sparse and lack the necessary precision to resolve the relative timing of the two events outside of age uncertainty. We present new high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology on seventeen gabbroic sills from throughout the magmatic province. This includes samples from the mineralized and differentiated intrusions in the Noril'sk region

  12. Magmatic and crustal differentiation history of granitic rocks from Hf-O isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Foster, G L; Paterson, B A; Woodhead, J D; Hergt, J M; Gray, C M; Whitehouse, M J

    2007-02-16

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust.

  13. Elevation and igneous crater modification on Venus: Implications for magmatic volatile content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    Although most impact craters on Venus preserve nearly pristine crater rim and ejecta features, a small number of craters have been identified showing clear evidence of either igneous intrusion emplacement (floor-fracturing) beneath the crater floor or of volcanically embayed exterior ejecta deposits. Since the volcanically embayed craters consistently occur at higher elevations than the identified floor-fractured craters, this report proposes that igneous crater modification on Venus is elevation dependent. This report describes how regional variations in magmatic neutral buoyancy could produce such elevation dependent crater modification and considers the implications for typical magmatic volatile contents on Venus.

  14. New insights into the evolution of the magmatic system of a composite andesite volcano revealed by clasts from distal mass-flow deposits: Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tost, M.; Price, R. C.; Cronin, S. J.; Smith, I. E. M.

    2016-05-01

    Stratovolcanoes characteristically build large composite edifices over long periods with stacked lavas intercalated with pyroclastic deposits. In most cases, only the most recent volcanic products are exposed on the flanks of the volcano, and consequently the search for deposits recording an older eruptive and magmatic history is typically focussed far from the cone, within distal tephra deposits. Clasts within lahar and debris avalanche deposits may also provide unique insights into the earliest eruptive and magmatic history of long-lived volcanoes, especially when widespread fallout is absent. Careful sampling and subsequent petrological and geochemical analyses of lava and pumice clasts from six distal mass-flow deposit sequences (hyperconcentrated flow, debris flows and debris avalanche deposits) from Mt. Ruapehu (New Zealand), combined with detailed stratigraphic studies and radiometric age dating, give new perspectives on the pre-50 ka magmatic system of this complex volcano. A conglomerate emplaced between 340 and 310 ka contains evidence for the oldest episode of Mt. Ruapehu volcanism, and unusually for the composite cone, pumice clasts from this unit contain amphibole-bearing xenoliths. Chemical and petrological data for these oldest Ruapehu clasts indicate that a deep (˜40 km) crustal storage system had already developed under Mt. Ruapehu before ˜340 ka. From the very earliest stages, evolution was largely controlled by magma mixing, along with decoupled assimilation and fractional crystallization within numerous isolated small-scale magma batches stored throughout the crust. From around 340 to 160 ka, there was a progressive shift towards more primitive compositions, suggesting that during this period large-scale replenishment events involving mantle-derived basaltic magmas occurred within the mid- to upper crustal storage system. Subsequent magmas became progressively more evolved due to decoupled fractional crystallization and assimilation processes

  15. Magmatic storage conditions along the Mono Craters chain, Eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Befus, K.; Gardner, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    We employ a variety of petrologic tools to characterize the pre-eruptive storage conditions of individual units erupted from Mono Craters. The Mono Craters chain represents one of the systems within the Long Valley volcanic field in Eastern California, which has been a regional center for effusive to cataclysmic volcanism from 800 ka until recent times. The Long Valley system has been the focus of much research; however, there are little published petrologic data for the Mono Craters chain. Understanding the Mono Craters chain is critical because it was the center for the most recent eruptions in the region. Eruptions along the chain occurred from 20 ka to ~660 years ago, and it is the most likely focus for future volcanic activity in the Long Valley region. Thus, petrologic data from Mono Craters must provide excellent constraints on the development and nature of the existing magmatic system. The Mono Craters chain contains 27 high silica rhyolite domes and flows and 1 dacite dome that were erupted along a gently arcuate trend that extends for ~15 km south of Mono Lake. The high silica rhyolites can be subdivided based on phenocryst assemblages into the following groups: biotite-bearing rhyolite, orthopyroxene-bearing rhyolite, fayalite-bearing rhyolite, sparsely porphyritic rhyolite, and aphyric rhyolite. We collected samples from 14 of the domes and flows within the Mono Craters chain, obtaining samples from each of the groups except the orthopyroxene-bearing rhyolite. We examined the composition of the mineral phases using electron microprobe analyses. Biotite-bearing rhyolites contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase (Ab74-77), sanidine (Or66-68), Fe-rich hornblende, Ti-rich biotite, pyroxene, and magnetite with lamellae of ilmenite. Fayalite-bearing rhyolites contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase (Ab75-80), sanidine (Or61-69), fayalite (Fa92-93), Fe-rich hornblende, Ti-rich biotite, pyroxene, magnetite and ilmenite. Sparsely porphyritic rhyolites

  16. Late Cretaceous to Paleocene metamorphism and magmatism in the Funeral Mountains metamorphic core complex, Death Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattinson, C.G.; Colgan, J.P.; Metcalf, J.R.; Miller, E.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Amphibolite-facies Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks below the low-angle Ceno-zoic Boundary Canyon Detachment record deep crustal processes related to Meso-zoic crustal thickening and subsequent extension. A 91.5 ?? 1.4 Ma Th-Pb SHRIMP-RG (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry) monazite age from garnet-kyanite-staurolite schist constrains the age of prograde metamorphism in the lower plate. Between the Boundary Canyon Detachment and the structurally deeper, subparallel Monarch Spring fault, prograde metamorphic fabrics are overprinted by a pervasive greenschist-facies retrogression, high-strain subhorizontal mylonitic foliation, and a prominent WNW-ESE stretching lineation parallel to corrugations on the Boundary Canyon Detachment. Granitic pegmatite dikes are deformed, rotated into parallelism, and boudinaged within the mylonitic foliation. High-U zircons from one muscovite granite dike yield an 85.8 ?? 1.4 Ma age. Below the Monarch Spring fault, retrogression is minor, and amphibolite-facies mineral elongation lineations plunge gently north to northeast. Multiple generations of variably deformed dikes, sills, and leucosomal segregations indicate a more complex history of partial melting and intrusion compared to that above the Monarch Spring fault, but thermobarometry on garnet amphibolites above and below the Monarch Spring fault record similar peak conditions of 620-680 ??C and 7-9 kbar, indicating minor (<3-5 km) structural omission across the Monarch Spring fault. Discordant SHRIMP-RG U-Pb zircon ages and 75-88 Ma Th-Pb monazite ages from leucosomal segregations in paragneisses suggest that partial melting of Proterozoic sedimentary protoliths was a source for the structurally higher 86 Ma pegmatites. Two weakly deformed two-mica leucogranite dikes that cut the high-grademetamorphic fabrics below the Monarch Spring fault yield 62.3 ?? 2.6 and 61.7 ?? 4.7 Ma U-Pb zircon ages, and contain 1.5-1.7 Ga cores. The similarity of metamorphic

  17. Carboniferous magmatism in the Evora Massif (southwest Portugal, Ossa-Morena Zone): from typical arc calc-alkaline to adakitic-like magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Selma M.; Neiva, Ana M. R.; Ramos, Joao M. F.

    2014-05-01

    The Evora Massif is one of the subdivisions of western Ossa-Morena Zone. It is a dome-like structure mainly composed of Ediacaran, Cambrian and Ordovician country rocks, affected by medium- and high-grade metamorphism coeval with the emplacement of several mafic to felsic intrusive bodies. The last magmatic event recorded in this area (Carboniferous) consists of calc-alkaline volcanism and voluminous plutonism (mainly composed by tonalites, gabbros, diorites and late-orogenic granodiorites and granites) [1]. Detailed chemical and isotopic studies from Evora Massif plutons were performed in the last few years. Whole-rock chemical and isotopic data suggest that the Hospitais tonalite (HT), Alto de Sao Bento area (ASB) and Reguengos de Monsaraz pluton (RM) resulted from fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas followed by mixing with variable proportions of crustal melts [2-4]. U-Pb ID-TIMS data indicate an age of 337-335 for the RM [4]. The Pavia pluton is a multiphase granitic body constructed incrementally by the episodic emplacement of several batches of magma (at 328 Ma, ca. 324 Ma and 319-317 Ma) [5]. The main granitic phases range from tonalite to two-mica granite that contain rare surmicaceous and fine-grained enclaves, and granitic and amphibolitic xenoliths. On the other hand, they are cut by abundant rhyodacite porphyries, microgranites (s.l.) and pegmatite dikes, predominantly oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. Although each phase seems to represent a distinct batch of magma, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest a similar and fairly homogenous source for all the constituent phases. Initial 87Sr/86Sr varies between 0.70428 and 0.7058 and ɛ Ndt ranges from -3.4 to +0.4, pointing towards a mantle or juvenile crust origin. A higher variation is observed in whole-rock δ18O (5.6-9.6 o), consistent with assimilation of crust. The PP was interpreted as the result of assimilation-fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. Substantial differences between

  18. Geodetic observations of deep re-equilibration of magmatic systems accompanying the Hekla 2000 and Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; Sturkell, Erik; Ofeigsson, Benedikt; Arnadottir, Thora; Hreinsdottir, Sigrun; Hjaltadottir, Sigurlaug; Hooper, Andy; Lund, Bjorn; Schmidt, Peter; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Linde, Alan; Sacks, Selwyn

    2015-04-01

    after the eruption. For the Eyjafjallajokull 2010 eruption, we observe a wide-spread (>60 km from Eyjafjallajokull) deformation field with motion towards the volcano from an extensive network of episodic and continuous GPS stations. The distant continuous GPS stations clearly show that the time of deformation exceeds the eruptive period by several months, indicating that these stations are recording deep re-equilibration of the magmatic system under Eyjafjallajokull. Both volcanoes indicate a certain time-progression of deformation, where the deeper (>10 km) parts of the magmatic systems re-equilibrate in response to the shallower co-eruptive pressure decrease.

  19. Eocene to Quaternary mafic-intermediate volcanism in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico: The transition from Farallon plate subduction to intra-plate continental magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Tristán-González, Margarito; de Jesús Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo; López-Doncel, Rubén A.; Bellon, Hervé; Martínez-Esparza, Gilberto

    2014-04-01

    from maars and tuff cones, which are the youngest manifestations of mantle-derived intra-plate extensional events. Based upon this volcanic record, the last subduction manifestations of the extinct Farallon plate occurred at about 42 Ma, this was followed by a transition to intra-plate magmatism between 42 and 31 Ma, and an extensional, intra-plate tectonic setting from 31 Ma to almost Present.

  20. Hurst exponent used as a tool to differentiate between magmatic and fluid-induced processes as reflected in crystal geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domonik, A.; Słaby, E.; Śmigielski, M.

    2012-04-01

    element distributions in feldspar cores are almost homogeneous and only relatively small and irregular variations in trace element contents makes their growth morphology slightly patchy. Despite homogenization the fractal statistics reveal that trace elements were incorporated chaotically into the growing crystal. The anti-persistent chaotic behaviour of elements during magmatic growth of the feldspars progressively changes into persistent behaviour within domains, where re-crystallization reaction took place. Elements demonstrate variable dynamics of this exchange corresponding to increasing persistency. This dynamics is different for individual elements compared to analogical, observed for crystallization process proceeding from mixed magmas. Consequently, it appears that fractal statistics clearly discriminate between two different processes, with contrasted element behaviour during these processes. One process is magma crystallization and it is recorded in the core of the megacrysts; the second is recorded in the crystal rims and along cleavages and cracks, such that it can be related to a post-crystallization process linked to fluid percolation. Słaby, E., Martin, H., Hamada, M., Śmigielski, M., Domonik, A., Götze, J., Hoefs, J., Hałas, S., Simon, K., Devidal, J-L., Moyen, J-F., Jayananda, M. (2011) Evidence in Archaean alkali-feldspar megacrysts for high-temperature interaction with mantle fluids. Journal of Petrology (on line). doi:10.1093/petrology/egr056

  1. Crustal structure of Tolfa domes complex (northern Latium - Italy) inferred from receiver functions analysis: an interplay between tectonics and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttinelli, M.; Bianchi, I.; Anselmi, M.; Chiarabba, C.; de Rita, D.; Quattrocchi, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Tolfa-Cerite volcanic district developed along the Tyrrhenian passive margin of central Italy, as part of magmatic processes started during the middle Pliocene. In this area the uncertainties on the deep crustal structures and the definition of the intrusive bodies geometry are focal issues that still need to be addressed. After the onset of the spreading of the Tyrrhenian sea during the Late Miocene, the emplacement of the intrusive bodies of the Tolfa complex (TDC), in a general back-arc geodynamical regime, generally occurred in a low stretching rate, in correspondence of the junctions between major lithospheric discontinuities. Normal faults, located at the edge of Mio-Pliocene basins, were used as preferential pathways for the rising of magmatic masses from the mantle to the surface. We used teleseismic recordings at the TOLF and MAON broad band station of the INGV seismic network (located between the Argentario promontory and Tolfa-Ceriti dome complexes -TDC-) to image the principal seismic velocity discontinuities by receiver function analysis (RF's). Together with RF’s velocity models of the area computed using the teleseismic events recorded by a temporary network of eight stations deployed around the TDC, we achieve a general crustal model of this area. The geometry of the seismic network has been defined to focus on the crustal structure beneath the TDC, trying to define the main velocity changes attributable to the intrusive bodies, the calcareous basal complex, the deep metamorphic basement, the lower crust and the Moho. The analysis of these data show the Moho at a depth of 23 km in the TDC area and 20 km in the Argentario area. Crustal models also show an unexpected velocity decrease between 12 and 18 km, consistent with a slight dropdown of the Vp/Vs ratio, imputable to a regional mid-crustal shear zone inherited from the previous alpine orogenesis, re-activated in extensional tectonic by the early opening phases of the Tyrrhenian sea. Above

  2. Stochastic modelling of deep magmatic controls on porphyry copper deposit endowment.

    PubMed

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-03-15

    Porphyry deposits, our main source of copper and of significant amounts of Mo, Re and Au, form at convergent margins in association with intermediate-felsic magmas. Although it is accepted that copper is transported and precipitated by fluids released by these magmas, the magmatic processes leading to the formation of economic deposits remain elusive. Here we perform Monte Carlo petrological and geochemical modelling to quantitatively link crustal magmatic processes and the geochemical signatures of magmas (i.e., Sr/Y) to the formation of porphyry Cu deposits of different sizes. Our analysis shows that economic deposits (particularly the largest ones) may only form in association with magma accumulated in the lower-middle crust (P > ~0.5 GPa) during ≥2-3 Ma, and subsequently transferred to and degassed in the upper crust over periods of up to ~2.0 Ma. Magma accumulation and evolution at shallower depths (<~0.4 GPa) dramatically reduces the potential of magmatic systems to produce economic deposits. Our modelling also predicts the association of the largest porphyry deposits with a specific Sr/Y interval (~100 ± 50) of the associated magmatic rocks, which is virtually identical to the range measured in giant porphyry copper deposits.

  3. Observational Constraints on the Identification of Shallow Lunar Magmatism: Insights from Floor-Fractured Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jozwiak, L. M.; Head, J. W., III; Neumann, G. A.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Floor-fractured craters are a class of lunar crater hypothesized to form in response to the emplacement of a shallow magmatic intrusion beneath the crater floor. The emplacement of a shallow magmatic body should result in a positive Bouguer anomaly relative to unaltered complex craters, a signal which is observed for the average Bouguer anomaly interior to the crater walls. We observe the Bouguer anomaly of floor-fractured craters on an individual basis using the unfiltered Bouguer gravity solution from GRAIL and also a degree 100-600 band-filtered Bouguer gravity solution. The low-magnitude of anomalies arising from shallow magmatic intrusions makes identification using unfiltered Bouguer gravity solutions inconclusive. The observed anomalies in the degree 100-600 Bouguer gravity solution are spatially heterogeneous, although there is spatial correlation between volcanic surface morphologies and positive Bouguer anomalies. We interpret these observations to mean that the spatial heterogeneity observed in the Bouguer signal is the result of variable degrees of magmatic degassing within the intrusions.

  4. Petrographic-mineralogical investigation of magmatic rocks from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarasov, L. S.; Shevaleyevskiy, I. D.; Nazarov, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical features of fragments of magmatic rock of regolith from the Sea of Fertility are examined. The textures and mineral composition vary in relation to the type of rock. More than 50 X-ray spectral analyses of minerals (olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclases, and ores) were made; their chemical composition varies even within the limits of individual rock fragments.

  5. Stochastic modelling of deep magmatic controls on porphyry copper deposit endowment

    PubMed Central

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Porphyry deposits, our main source of copper and of significant amounts of Mo, Re and Au, form at convergent margins in association with intermediate-felsic magmas. Although it is accepted that copper is transported and precipitated by fluids released by these magmas, the magmatic processes leading to the formation of economic deposits remain elusive. Here we perform Monte Carlo petrological and geochemical modelling to quantitatively link crustal magmatic processes and the geochemical signatures of magmas (i.e., Sr/Y) to the formation of porphyry Cu deposits of different sizes. Our analysis shows that economic deposits (particularly the largest ones) may only form in association with magma accumulated in the lower-middle crust (P > ~0.5 GPa) during ≥2–3 Ma, and subsequently transferred to and degassed in the upper crust over periods of up to ~2.0 Ma. Magma accumulation and evolution at shallower depths (<~0.4 GPa) dramatically reduces the potential of magmatic systems to produce economic deposits. Our modelling also predicts the association of the largest porphyry deposits with a specific Sr/Y interval (~100 ± 50) of the associated magmatic rocks, which is virtually identical to the range measured in giant porphyry copper deposits. PMID:28295045

  6. Prolonged KREEP magmatism on the Moon indicated by the youngest dated lunar igneous rock.

    PubMed

    Borg, Lars E; Shearer, Charles K; Asmerom, Yemane; Papike, James J

    2004-11-11

    Primordial solidification of the Moon (or its uppermost layer) resulted in the formation of a variety of rock types that subsequently melted and mixed to produce the compositional diversity observed in the lunar sample suite. The initial rocks to crystallize from this Moon-wide molten layer (the magma ocean) contained olivine and pyroxene and were compositionally less evolved than the plagioclase-rich rocks that followed. The last stage of crystallization, representing the last few per cent of the magma ocean, produced materials that are strongly enriched in incompatible elements including potassium (K), the rare earth elements (REE) and phosphorus (P)--termed KREEP. The decay of radioactive elements in KREEP, such as uranium and thorium, is generally thought to provide the thermal energy necessary for more recent lunar magmatism. The ages of KREEP-rich samples are, however, confined to the earliest periods of lunar magmatism between 3.8 and 4.6 billion years (Gyr) ago, providing no physical evidence that KREEP is directly involved in more recent lunar magmatism. But here we present evidence that KREEP magmatism extended for an additional 1 Gyr, based on analyses of the youngest dated lunar sample.

  7. Model of the magmatic thermolysis of coal matter deep in the earth (short communication)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu.M. Korolev; S.G. Gagarin

    2008-06-15

    A model of contact thermolysis was constructed based on a combined set of equations for heat transfer from a magmatic intrusion to a coal bed and the kinetics of thermal coal conversion. This model was illustrated by the generation of petroleum hydrocarbons deep in the earth by the thermolysis of the sapropelic matter of boghead.

  8. High-precision geochronology confirms voluminous magmatism before, during, and after Earth's most severe extinction.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Seth D; Bowring, Samuel A

    2015-08-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe in the Phanerozoic, extinguishing more than 90% of marine and 75% of terrestrial species in a maximum of 61 ± 48 ky. Because of broad temporal coincidence between the biotic crisis and one of the most voluminous continental volcanic eruptions since the origin of animals, the Siberian Traps large igneous province (LIP), a causal connection has long been suggested. Magmatism is hypothesized to have caused rapid injection of massive amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, driving climate change and subsequent destabilization of the biosphere. Establishing a causal connection between magmatism and mass extinction is critically dependent on accurately and precisely knowing the relative timing of the two events and the flux of magma. New U/Pb dates on Siberian Traps LIP lava flows, sills, and explosively erupted rocks indicate that (i) about two-thirds of the total lava/pyroclastic volume was erupted over ~300 ky, before and concurrent with the end-Permian mass extinction; (ii) eruption of the balance of lavas continued for at least 500 ky after extinction cessation; and (iii) massive emplacement of sills into the shallow crust began concomitant with the mass extinction and continued for at least 500 ky into the early Triassic. This age model is consistent with Siberian Traps LIP magmatism as a trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction and suggests a role for magmatism in suppression of post-extinction biotic recovery.

  9. Late Precambrian OIB magmatism in the Kuznetsk Alatau, Siberia: Geochemical features of the Kulbyurstyug Formation volcanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskii, V. V.; Kotelnikov, A. D.; Krupchatnikov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    Basaltoids of the Vendian-Cambrian Kulbyurstyug volcanic complex in the eastern part of Kuznetsk Alatau have a high content of titanium (TiO2 3-4 wt %). They are relatively enriched with LILE and HFSE (Ba 360-900, Zr 160-726, Nb 66-101, ΣREE up to 225-329 ppm), and demonstrate a fractionated spectrum of REEs (La/Yb ˜ 13-17), high Nb/U (44-66), and low Th/Ta and Th/Nb. These features are comparable with derivatives of OIB (Ocean Island Basalts) magmatism. The rock geochemistry suggests the possible formation of an initial mafic melt in the garnet-bearing peridotite mantle with 2-4% degree of melting and the presence of a small amount of spinel. By the age and composition, the studied volcanics are correlated with the OIB magmatism products, occurring in the adjacent Gorny Altai and also considered to be derivatives of intraplate magmatism of Riphean-Early Cambrian age. This magmatism was caused by plume activity during formation of the Paleo-Asian Ocean.

  10. Quantitative textural investigation of trachyandesites of Damavand volcano (N Iran): Insights into the magmatic processes