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Sample records for 3omega damage growth

  1. 3(omega) Damage: Growth Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, M; Demos, S; Wu, Z-L; Wong, J; Penetrante, B; Hrubesh, L

    2001-02-22

    The design of high power UV laser systems is limited to a large extent by the laser-initiated damage performance of transmissive fused silica optical components. The 3{omega} (i.e., the third harmonic of the primary laser frequency) damage growth mitigation LDRD effort focused on understanding and reducing the rapid growth of laser-initiated surface damage on fused silica optics. Laser-initiated damage can be discussed in terms of two key issues: damage initiated at some type of precursor and rapid damage growth of the damage due to subsequent laser pulses. The objective of the LDRD effort has been the elucidation of laser-induced damage processes in order to quantify and potentially reduce the risk of damage to fused silica surfaces. The emphasis of the first two years of this effort was the characterization and reduction of damage initiation. In spite of significant reductions in the density of damage sites on polished surfaces, statistically some amount of damage initiation should always be expected. The early effort therefore emphasized the development of testing techniques that quantified the statistical nature of damage initiation on optical surfaces. This work led to the development of an optics lifetime modeling strategy that has been adopted by the NIF project to address damage-risk issues. During FY99 interest shifted to the damage growth issue which was the focus of the final year of this project. The impact of the remaining damage sites on laser performance can be minimized if the damage sites did not continue to grow following subsequent illumination. The objectives of the final year of the LDRD effort were to apply a suite of state-of-the-art characterization tools to elucidate the nature of the initiated damage sites, and to identify a method that effectively mitigates further damage growth. Our specific goal is to understand the cause for the rapid growth of damage sites so that we can develop and apply an effective means to mitigate it. The

  2. 3(omega) damage threshold evaluation of final optics components using Beamlet mule and off-line testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, M.F.; Maricle, S.; Mouser, R.; Schwartz, S.; Wegner, P.; Weiland, T.

    1998-07-27

    A statistics-based model is being developed to predict the laser-damage-limited lifetime of UV optical components on the NIF laser. In order to provide data for the model, laser damage experiments were performed on the Beamlet laser system at LLNL. An early prototype NIF focus lens was exposed to twenty 35 1 nm pulses at an average fluence of 5 J/cm{sup 2}, 3ns. Using a high resolution optic inspection system a total of 353 damage sites was detected within the 1160 cm{sup 2} beam aperture. Through inspections of the lens before, after and, in some cases, during the campaign, pulse to pulse damage growth rates were measured for damage initiating both on the surface and at bulk inclusions. Growth rates as high as 79 {micro}m/pulse (surface diameter) were observed for damage initiating at pre-existing scratches in the surface. For most damage sites on the optic, both surface and bulk, the damage growth rate was approximately l0{micro}m/pulse. The lens was also used in Beamlet for a subsequent 1053 {micro}m/526 {micro}m campaign. The 352 {micro}m-initiated damage continued to grow during that campaign although at generally lower growth rate.

  3. Low-Temperature Growth of DKDP for Improving Laser-Induced Damage resistance at 350nm

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R A; Carman, M L; Torres, R A; Whitman, P K

    2000-12-06

    A set of twenty-three 20-L crystallizer runs exploring the importance of several engineering variables found that growth temperature is the most important variable controlling damage resistance of DKDP over the conditions investigated. Boules grown between 45 C and room temperature have a 50% probability of 3{omega} bulk damage that is 1.5 to 2 times higher than boules grown between 65 and 45 C. This raises their damage resistance above the NIF tripler specification for 8 J/cm{sup 2} operation by a comfortable margin. Solution impurity levels do not correlate with damage resistance for iron less than 200 ppb and aluminum less than 2000 ppb. The possibility that low growth temperatures could increase damage resistance in NIF-scale boules was tested by growing a large boule in a 1000-L crystallizer with a supplemental growth solution tank. Four samples representing early and late pyramid and prism growth are very close to the specification as best it is understood at the present. Implications of low temperature growth for meeting absorbance, homogeneity, and other material specifications are discussed.

  4. Phenomenological approach to mechanical damage growth analysis.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola; Bosia, Federico; Gliozzi, Antonio S; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    The problem of characterizing damage evolution in a generic material is addressed with the aim of tracing it back to existing growth models in other fields of research. Based on energetic considerations, a system evolution equation is derived for a generic damage indicator describing a material system subjected to an increasing external stress. The latter is found to fit into the framework of a recently developed phenomenological universality (PUN) approach and, more specifically, the so-called U2 class. Analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations based on a fiber-bundle model and statistically assigned local strengths at the microscale. The fits with numerical data prove, with an excellent degree of reliability, that the typical evolution of the damage indicator belongs to the aforementioned PUN class. Applications of this result are briefly discussed and suggested. PMID:18999489

  5. Analysis of optics damage growth at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z. M.; Nostrand, M.; Whitman, P.; Bude, J.

    2015-11-01

    Optics damage growth modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica. We will show the results of single shot growth comparisons, damage site lifetime comparisons as well as growth metrics for each individual NIF beamline. These results help validate the consistency of the damage growth models and allow us to have confidence in our strategic planning in regards to projected optic usage.

  6. Monitoring damage growth in titanium matrix composites using acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Prosser, W. H.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the acoustic emission (AE) technique to locate and monitor damage growth in titanium matrix composites (TMC) was investigated. Damage growth was studied using several optical techniques including a long focal length, high magnification microscope system with image acquisition capabilities. Fracture surface examinations were conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AE technique was used to locate damage based on the arrival times of AE events between two sensors. Using model specimens exhibiting a dominant failure mechanism, correlations were established between the observed damage growth mechanisms and the AE results in terms of the events amplitude. These correlations were used to monitor the damage growth process in laminates exhibiting multiple modes of damage. Results revealed that the AE technique is a viable and effective tool to monitor damage growth in TMC.

  7. Neuronal growth cones respond to laser-induced axonal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that damage to neurons results in release of substances that inhibit axonal growth, release of chemical signals from damaged axons that attract axon growth cones has not been observed. In this study, a 532 nm 12 ns laser was focused to a diffraction-limited spot to produce site-specific damage to single goldfish axons in vitro. The axons underwent a localized decrease in thickness (‘thinning’) within seconds. Analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy indicated that there was no gross rupture of the cell membrane. Mitochondrial transport along the axonal cytoskeleton immediately stopped at the damage site, but recovered over several minutes. Within seconds of damage nearby growth cones extended filopodia towards the injury and were often observed to contact the damaged site. Turning of the growth cone towards the injured axon also was observed. Repair of the laser-induced damage was evidenced by recovery of the axon thickness as well as restoration of mitochondrial movement. We describe a new process of growth cone response to damaged axons. This has been possible through the interface of optics (laser subcellular surgery), fluorescence and electron microscopy, and a goldfish retinal ganglion cell culture model. PMID:21831892

  8. The stochastic nature of growth of laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. W.; Cross, David A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Norton, Mary A.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and operational tempo of ICF systems operating in the UV are typically limited by the growth of laser- induced damage on their final optics (primarily silica optics). In the early 2000 time frame, studies of laser damage growth with relevant large area beams revealed that for some laser conditions damage sites located on the exit surface of a fused silica optic grew following an exponential growth rule: D(n) = D0 exp (n α(φ)), where D is final site diameter, D0 is the initial diameter of the site, φ is the laser fluence, α(φ) is the growth coefficient, and n is the number of exposures. In general α is a linear function of φ, with a threshold of φTH. In recent years, it has been found that that growth behavior is actually considerably more complex. For example, it was found that α is not a constant for a given fluence but follows a probability distribution with a mean equal to α(φ). This is complicated by observations that these distributions are actually functions of the pulse shape, damage site size, and initial morphology of damage initiation. In addition, there is not a fixed fluence threshold for damage sites growth, which is better described by a probability of growth which depends on site size, morphology and laser fluence. Here will review these findings and discuss implications for the operation of large laser systems.

  9. Finite element prediction of fatigue damage growth in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Frikha, Sana; Toumi, Hechmi; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stresses applied to bones generate fatigue damage that affects the bone stiffness and its elastic modulus. This paper proposes a finite element model for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation and failure in cancellous bone at continuum scale. The model is based on continuum damage mechanics and incorporates crack closure effects in compression. The propagation of the cracks is completely simulated throughout the damaged area. In this case, the stiffness of the broken element is reduced by 98% to ensure no stress-carrying capacities of completely damaged elements. Once a crack is initiated, the propagation direction is simulated by the propagation of the broken elements of the mesh. The proposed model suggests that damage evolves over a real physical time variable (cycles). In order to reduce the computation time, the integration of the damage growth rate is based on the cycle blocks approach. In this approach, the real number of cycles is reduced (divided) into equivalent blocks of cycles. Damage accumulation is computed over the cycle blocks and then extrapolated over the corresponding real cycles. The results show a clear difference between local tensile and compressive stresses on damage accumulation. Incorporating stiffness reduction also produces a redistribution of the peak stresses in the damaged region, which results in a delay in damage fracture.

  10. Damage growth in composite laminates with interleaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, James G.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of placing interleaves between fiber reinforced plies in multilayered composite laminates is investigated. The geometry of the composite is idealized as two dimensional, isotropic, linearly elastic media made of a damaged layer bonded between two half planes and separated by thin interleaves of low extensional and shear moduli. The damage in the layer is taken in the form of a symmetric crack perpendicular to the interface and may extend up to the interface. The case of an H-shaped crack in the form of a broken layer with delamination along the interface is also analyzed. The interleaves are modeled as distributed shear and tension springs. Fourier integral transform techniques are used to develop solutions in terms of singular integral equations. An asymptotic analysis of the integral equations based on Muskhelishvili's techniques reveals logarithmically singular axial stresses in the half plane at the crack tips for the broken layer. For the H shaped crack, similar singularities are found to exist in the axial stresses at the interface crack tips in the layer and the half plane. The solution of the equations is found numerically for the stresses and displacements by using the Hadamard's concept of direct differentiation of Cauchy integrals as well as Gaussian integration techniques.

  11. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  12. Damage segregation at fissioning may increase growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Steven N.; Steinsaltz, David

    2007-01-01

    A fissioning organism may purge unrepairable damage by bequeathing it preferentially to one of its daughters. Using the mathematical formalism of superprocesses, we propose a flexible class of analytically tractable models that allow quite general effects of damage on death rates and splitting rates and similarly general damage segregation mechanisms. We show that, in a suitable regime, the effects of randomness in damage segregation at fissioning are indistinguishable from those of randomness in the mechanism of damage accumulation during the organism’s lifetime. Moreover, the optimal population growth is achieved for a particular finite, non-zero level of combined randomness from these two sources. In particular, when damage accumulates deterministically, optimal population growth is achieved by a moderately unequal division of damage between the daughters, while too little or too much division is sub-optimal. Connections are drawn both to recent experimental results on inheritance of damage in protozoans, and to theories of aging and resource division between siblings. PMID:17442356

  13. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Saeid; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Jalaie, Shohreh; Rahimi, Vida

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14). The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation) and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4), and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.01). No significant difference was observed in the P1 and P3 absolute latency period between the studied groups  (P>0.05).  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL) periods (P>0.05); while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  14. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  15. A damage mechanics approach to high temperature fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Z.; Takezono, S.; Tao, K.

    1995-12-31

    A nonlocal damage constitutive model is developed for elasto-visco-plastic materials and is used to analyze fatigue crack growth at high temperature. In this model, no kinematic hardening rule is needed to account for the subsequent yielding and strain hardening behavior of the materials. A calculation method for nonlocal damage is introduced. The fatigue crack growth tests and the cyclic strain controlled fatigue tests are carried out at 723 K (450 C) on pure titanium. By means of FEM, the stress distribution near the crack tip, and the relationships between the crack growth rate dl/dN and some mechanical parameters, such as the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and the range of viscoplastic strain {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup vp} at the crack tip, are investigated. The mesh size dependence of these mechanical parameters in finite element analysis is discussed. The numerical results are given and compared with the experimental ones.

  16. A methodology to predict damage initiation, damage growth and residual strength in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    In this research, a methodology to predict damage initiation, damage growth, fatigue life, and residual strength in titanium matrix composites (TMC) is outlined. Emphasis was placed on micromechanics-based engineering approaches. Damage initiation was predicted using a local effective strain approach. A finite element analysis verified the prevailing assumptions made in the formulation of this model. Damage growth, namely, fiber-bridged matrix crack growth, was evaluated using a fiber bridging (FB) model which accounts for thermal residual stresses. This model combines continuum fracture mechanics and micromechanics analyses yielding stress-intensity factor solutions for fiber-bridged matrix cracks. It is assumed in the FB model that fibers in the wake of the matrix crack are idealized as a closure pressure, and an unknown constant frictional shear stress is assumed to act along the debond length of the bridging fibers. This frictional shear stress was used as a curve fitting parameter to the available experimental data. Fatigue life and post-fatigue residual strength were predicted based on the axial stress in the first intact 0 degree fiber calculated using the FB model and a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

  17. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  18. Growth of laser initiated damage in fused silica at 1053 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Donohue, E E; Hollingsworth, W G; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Hackel, R P

    2004-11-10

    The effective lifetime of a laser optic is limited by both laser-induced damage and the subsequent growth of laser initiated damage sites. We have measured the growth rate of laser-induced damage on polished fused silica surfaces in 10 torr of air at 1053 nm at 10 ns. The data shows exponential growth in the lateral size of the damage site with shot number above a threshold fluence. The size of the initial damage influences the threshold for growth. We will compare the growth rates for input and output surface damage. Possible reasons for the observed growth behavior are discussed.

  19. Shrinkage and growth compensation in common sunflowers: refining estimates of damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Oldemeye, John L.; Swenson, Elizabeth L.

    1986-01-01

    Shrinkage and growth compensation of artificially damaged common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were studied in central North Dakota during 1981-1982 in an effort to increase accuracy of estimates of blackbird damage to sunflowers. In both years, as plants matured damaged areas on seedheads shrank at a greater rate than the sunflower heads themselves. This differential shrinkage resulted in an underestimation of the area damaged. Sunflower head and damaged-area shrinkage varied widely by time and degree of damage and by size of the seedhead damaged. Because variation in shrinkage by time of damage was so large, predicting when blackbird damage occurs may be the most important factor in estimating seed loss. Yield'occupied seed area was greater (P < 0.05) for damaged than undamaged heads and tended to increase as degree of damage inflicted increased, indicating growth compensation was occurring in response to lost seeds. Yields of undamaged seeds in seedheads damaged during early seed development were higher than those of heads damaged later. This suggested that there was a period of maximal response to damage when plants were best able to redirect growth to seeds remaining in the head. Sunflowers appear to be able to compensate for damage of ≤ 15% of the total hear area. Estimates of damage can be improved by applying empirical results of differential shrinkage and growth compensations.

  20. Growth of laser damage in fused silica: diameter to depth ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Adams, J J; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hollingsworth, W G; Jarboe, J A; Matthews, M; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L

    2007-10-29

    Growth of laser initiated damage plays a major role in determining optics lifetime in high power laser systems. Previous measurements have established that the lateral diameter grows exponentially. Knowledge of the growth of the site in the propagation direction is also important, especially so when considering techniques designed to mitigate damage growth, where it is required to reach all the subsurface damage. In this work, we present data on both the diameter and the depth of a growing exit surface damage sites in fused silica. Measured growth rates with both 351 nm illumination and with combined 351 nm and 1054 nm illumination are discussed.

  1. A 3 omega method to measure an arbitrary anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vivek; Hardin, Corey L; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Previous use of the 3 omega method has been limited to materials with thermal conductivity tensors that are either isotropic or have their principal axes aligned with the natural cartesian coordinate system defined by the heater line and sample surface. Here, we consider the more general case of an anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor with finite off-diagonal terms in this coordinate system. An exact closed form solution for surface temperature has been found for the case of an ideal 3 omega heater line of finite width and infinite length, and verified numerically. We find that the common slope method of data processing yields the determinant of the thermal conductivity tensor, which is invariant upon rotation about the heater line's axis. Following this analytic result, an experimental scheme is proposed to isolate the thermal conductivity tensor elements. Using two heater lines and a known volumetric heat capacity, the arbitrary 2-dimensional anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor can be measured with a low frequency sweep. Four heater lines would be required to extend this method to measure all 6 unknown tensor elements in 3 dimensions. Experiments with anisotropic layered mica are carried out to demonstrate the analytical results.

  2. A 3 omega method to measure an arbitrary anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vivek; Hardin, Corey L.; Garay, Javier E.; Dames, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Previous use of the 3 omega method has been limited to materials with thermal conductivity tensors that are either isotropic or have their principal axes aligned with the natural cartesian coordinate system defined by the heater line and sample surface. Here, we consider the more general case of an anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor with finite off-diagonal terms in this coordinate system. An exact closed form solution for surface temperature has been found for the case of an ideal 3 omega heater line of finite width and infinite length, and verified numerically. We find that the common slope method of data processing yields the determinant of the thermal conductivity tensor, which is invariant upon rotation about the heater line's axis. Following this analytic result, an experimental scheme is proposed to isolate the thermal conductivity tensor elements. Using two heater lines and a known volumetric heat capacity, the arbitrary 2-dimensional anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor can be measured with a low frequency sweep. Four heater lines would be required to extend this method to measure all 6 unknown tensor elements in 3 dimensions. Experiments with anisotropic layered mica are carried out to demonstrate the analytical results.

  3. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  4. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  5. [Effects of leaf damage and sediment type on compensatory growth of submerged macrophyte Vallisneria spiralis].

    PubMed

    Li, Kuan-yi; Li, Yan-min; Liu, Zheng-wen

    2008-11-01

    Through a 2 x 2 factorial outdoor experiment, the effects of leaf damage and sediment type on the compensatory growth of submerged macrophyte Vallisneria spiralis were examined. The results showed that leaf damage and sediment type had significant effects on the cumulative biomass, biomass allocation, and ramet number of V. spiralis. Compared with undamaged plant, the strongly damaged one had a decrease of cumulative biomass and ramet number and an increase of biomass allocation, but no evident difference was observed between weakly damaged and undamaged plants. The cumulative biomass of undamaged and strongly damaged plants was lower in infertile sediments (bank sediment) than in fertile sediments (lake sediment), but that of weakly damaged plant was almost the same in the two sediments. The biomass allocation and ramet number of V. spiralis were higher in bank sediment than in lake sediment. Leaf damage and sediment type also affected the relative growth rate (RGR) of V. spiralis. Leaf damage resulted in an increase of RGR, but the difference of RGR between weak damage and strong damage was not evident. The RGR of undamaged and strongly damaged plants was significantly higher in lake sediment than in bank sediment, but that of weakly damaged plant was almost the same in the two sediments. The mechanisms of the compensatory growth of V. spiralis were discussed. PMID:19238834

  6. Growth of Laser Initiated Damage in Fused Silica at 351 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Hrubesh, L W; Wu, Z; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Kozlowski, M R; Milam, D; Neeb, K P; Molander, W A; Rubenchik, A M; Sell, W D; Wegner, P

    2001-01-30

    The lifetime of optics in high-fluence UV laser applications is typically limited by the initiation of damage and its subsequent growth. We have measured the growth rate of laser-induced damage on fused silica surfaces in both air and vacuum. The data shows exponential growth in the lateral size of the damage site with shot number above a threshold fluence. The concurrent growth in depth follows a linear dependence with shot number. The size of the initial damage influences the threshold for growth; the morphology of the initial site depends strongly on the initiating fluence. We have found only a weak dependence on pulse length for growth rate. Most of the work has been on bare substrates but the presence of a sol-gel AR coating has no significant effect.

  7. Method of mitigation laser-damage growth on fused silica surface.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhou; Zhao, Yuan'an; Chen, Shunli; Sun, Wei; Shao, Jianda

    2013-10-10

    A reliable method, combining femtosecond (fs) laser mitigation and chemical (HF) etching, has been developed to mitigate laser-damage growth sites on a fused silica surface. A rectangular mitigation site was fabricated by an fs laser with a raster scan procedure; HF etching was then used to remove the redeposition material. The results show that the mitigation site exhibits good physical qualities with a smooth bottom and edge. The damage test results show that the growth threshold of the mitigation sites increases. Furthermore, the structural characteristic of samples was measured by a photoluminescence (PL) spectrometer, and the light intensification caused by damage and mitigation sites was numerically modeled by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). It revealed that the removal of damaged material and structure optimization contribute to the increase of the damage growth threshold of the mitigation site.

  8. Creep crack growth predictions in INCO 718 using a continuum damage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Wilson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Creep crack growth tests have been carried out in compact type specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). Theoretical creep crack growth predictions have been carried out by incorporating a unified viscoplastic constitutive model and a continuum damage model into the ARAQUS nonlinear finite element program. Material constants for both the viscoplastic model and the creep continuum damage model were determined from tests carried out on uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). A comparison of the theoretical creep crack growth rates obtained from the finite element predictions with the experimentally observed creep crack growth rates indicates that the viscoplastic/continuum damage model can be used to successfully predict creep crack growth in compact type specimens using material constants obtained from uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C).

  9. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  10. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage.

  11. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage. PMID:26940495

  12. Energy Change due to Off-Fault Damage Evolution associated with Dynamic Fault Tip Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically study off-fault damage evolution effects on dynamic earthquake rupture, especially from a standpoint of energy change in a whole system. The importance of off-fault inelastic energy loss due to damage on dynamic earthquake rupture has attracted interests of many researchers in terms of, for example, rupture velocity reduction and crack tip growth cessation. The damage effect is found to be important on dynamic earthquake slip behavior in terms of porosity increase also in a series of our previous studies, Suzuki and Yamashita (2007; 2008; 2009; 2010). The mathematical formulation of Murakami and Kamiya (1997) is assumed in the present study; the damage tensor D is used to describe damage state in a medium. Damage, which consists of microcracks in a medium, has direction (defined as normal to the crack surface) and the magnitude (crack size), so that a scalar damage variable is insufficient to describe the damage state. We first analytically derive the equation system including the damage tensor and describing energy change in a whole system due to any dynamic elastic and inelastic deformation processes such as macroscopic crack extension and damage evolution. The change in the summation of strain and kinetic energies and damage energy is found to be equal to the summation of energy flowing out of the medium through the boundary and energy turning to heat and irreversibly lost based on the analytical expression; the damage energy is associated with surface energy released by damage evolution. The damage energy is confirmed to be equal to the summation of the loss in strain energy due to change in the elastic moduli and irreversibly lost energy. A mode III crack embedded in a medium causing damage is then assumed to study the off-fault damage effects on dynamic earthquake rupture. Spontaneous crack tip growth with the Coulomb fracture criterion is assumed and in such a case the rupture velocity can be sufficiently smaller than the terminal velocity

  13. Growth of Laser Damage in SiO2 under Multiple Wavelength Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hollingsworth, W G; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L

    2005-10-28

    In laser systems using frequency conversion, multiple wavelengths will be present on optical components. We have investigated the growth of laser initiated damage in fused silica in the presence of multiple wavelengths. In particular, we measured growth at 351 nm in the presence of 1053 nm near the threshold of growth for 351 nm alone. The data shows that the sum fluence determines the onset of growth as well as the growth rate. The measured growth coefficient is consistent with all the energy being delivered at 351 nm. Additionally, we measured growth at 527 nm in the presence of 1053 nm near the threshold of growth at 527 nm alone. In this case, the sum fluence also determines the growth coefficient but the rate is consistent with all the energy being delivered at 1053 nm. We present the measurements and discuss possible reasons for the behavior.

  14. Laser-Induced Surface Damage of Optical Materials: Absorption Sources, Initiation, Growth, adn Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    2009-04-07

    Susceptibility to laser damage of optical-material surfaces originates from the nature of the surface as a transitional structure between optical-material bulk and its surroundings. As such, it requires technological processing to satisfy figure and roughness requirements and is also permanently subjected to environmental exposure. Consequently, enhanced absorption caused by mechanical structural damage or incorporation and sorption of microscale absorbing defects, even layers of organic materials, is always characteristic for optical-material surfaces. In this review physics of interaction of pulsed-laser radiation with surface imperfections for different types of optical materials (metals, semiconductors, dielectrics, etc.), mechanisms of damage initiation, damage morphology, and damage-site growth under repetitive pulse irradiation are discussed. Consideration is also given here to the surface treatments leading to the reduction of damage initiation sites, such as laser cleaning and conditioning, removal of the surface layers affected by the grinding/polishing process, and mitigation of the damage growth at already formed damage sites.

  15. Determination of laser damage initiation probability and growth on fused silica scratches

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Bude, J D; Steele, W A; Monticelli, M V; Suratwala, T I

    2010-10-26

    Current methods for the manufacture of optical components inevitably leaves a variety of sub-surface imperfections including scratches of varying lengths and widths on even the finest finishes. It has recently been determined that these finishing imperfections are responsible for the majority of laser-induced damage for fluences typically used in ICF class lasers. We have developed methods of engineering subscale parts with a distribution of scratches mimicking those found on full scale fused silica parts. This much higher density of scratches provides a platform to measure low damage initiation probabilities sufficient to describe damage on large scale optics. In this work, damage probability per unit scratch length was characterized as a function of initial scratch width and post fabrication processing including acid-based etch mitigation processes. The susceptibility of damage initiation density along scratches was found to be strongly affected by the post etching material removal and initial scratch width. We have developed an automated processing procedure to document the damage initiations per width and per length of theses scratches. We show here how these tools can be employed to provide predictions of the performance of full size optics in laser systems operating at 351 nm. In addition we use these tools to measure the growth rate of a damage site initiated along a scratch and compare this to the growth measured on an isolated damage site.

  16. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  17. Rheological Control of Interbedded Siliciclastic Strata on Damage Zone Evolution During Fault Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wightman, R. H.; Imber, J.; Healy, D.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Jones, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Fault damage zones can have a major impact on fluid flow through sub-surface reservoirs. The typical resolution of seismic reflection data is such that faults with throws <15m are not imaged, and those with throws >15 m are imaged as discrete planes, revealing none of the smaller scale architecture of the fault damage zones. Previous field studies show that damage zone width scales with fault throw, which suggests that a relationship exists between fault growth and increasing damage zone width. However, this hypothesis remains largely untested and the factors controlling damage zone evolution are poorly understood. This study develops kinematic models to describe the evolution of damage zones during fault growth. The predictions of these models are tested against quantitative geometric attributes of natural fault damage zones preserved in siliciclastic sand/shale sequences from the Carboniferous Northumberland Basin, NE England. These data, obtained from faults with throws spanning 0.1-20 m, were measured from detailed (cm-resolution) digital outcrop models captured using terrestrial laser scanning techniques. Study locations include areas of active open-cast coal mining that provide good 3D exposure of faults during progressive coal extraction. The damage zones comprise complex arrays of structural elements including: fault splays and oversteps; drag folds; rotated fault-bound blocks; sub-parallel fracture sets and ductile shear zones; cataclasite lenses; and intensely deformed scaly gouge. We propose two complimentary kinematic models to explain the structural relationships observed within these damage zones. The first model predicts the development of cataclasite lenses from fault-bounded blocks in contractional oversteps with increasing fault throw. In this scenario, the damage zone width remains approximately constant, defined by the initial fault separation. The second model describes the space incompatibility that develops between discrete fault planes in

  18. A Numerical and Experimental Study of Damage Growth in a Composite Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark; Ratcliffe, James; Czabaj, Michael; Wang, John; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2014-01-01

    The present study has three goals: (1) perform an experiment where a simple laminate damage process can be characterized in high detail; (2) evaluate the performance of existing commercially available laminate damage simulation tools by modeling the experiment; (3) observe and understand the underlying physics of damage in a composite honeycomb sandwich structure subjected to low-velocity impact. A quasi-static indentation experiment has been devised to provide detailed information about a simple mixed-mode damage growth process. The test specimens consist of an aluminum honeycomb core with a cross-ply laminate facesheet supported on a stiff uniform surface. When the sample is subjected to an indentation load, the honeycomb core provides support to the facesheet resulting in a gradual and stable damage growth process in the skin. This enables real time observation as a matrix crack forms, propagates through a ply, and then causes a delamination. Finite element analyses were conducted in ABAQUS/Explicit(TradeMark) 6.13 that used continuum and cohesive modeling techniques to simulate facesheet damage and a geometric and material nonlinear model to simulate core crushing. The high fidelity of the experimental data allows a detailed investigation and discussion of the accuracy of each numerical modeling approach.

  19. Real Time Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Three-Stringer Panel Using Passive Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Bly, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue testing of advanced composite structures is critical to validate both structural designs and damage prediction models. In-situ inspection methods are necessary to track damage onset and growth as a function of load cycles. Passive thermography is a large area, noncontact inspection technique that is used to detect composite damage onset and growth in real time as a function of fatigue cycles. The thermal images are acquired in synchronicity to the applied compressive load using a dual infrared camera acquisition system for full (front and back) coverage. Image processing algorithms are investigated to increase defect contrast areas. The thermal results are compared to non-immersion ultrasound inspections and acoustic emission data.

  20. Differences between wheat genotypes in damage from freezing temperatures during reproductive growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cereal crops in the reproductive stage of growth are considerably more susceptible to freezing temperatures than they are during their vegetative stage during the fall. While damage resulting from spring-freeze events has been documented, information on genotypic differences in tolerance to ...

  1. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS PLUS IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING OF DAMAGED LX-04 CHARGES

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. The LX-04 charges were damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermal damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for a long enough time for the beta to delta phase transition to occur and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while the thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. The pristine LX-04 Ignition and Growth model, modified only by igniting a larger amount of explosive during shock compression based on the damaged charge density, accurately calculated the increased shock sensitivity of the three damaged charges.

  2. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J; Adams, J; Carr, C; Demos, S; Feit, M; Mehta, N; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; Rubenchik, A; Spaeth, M

    2006-02-08

    The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

  3. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    component of the damage zone is the outer damage zone which has a larger and more variable thickness and a lower fracture frequency than the inner zone. The origin and evolution of the inner and outer damage zones are closely related to the history of the fault development as shown in a new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth. This model forms the basis for a better predictive tool for the attributes of damage zones associated with both large faults that have resolvable slip magnitude and smaller sub-seismic faults in the subsurface.

  4. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  5. Timing of cotyledon damage affects growth and flowering in mature plants.

    PubMed

    Hanley, M E; Fegan, E L

    2007-07-01

    Although the effects of herbivory on plant fitness are strongly linked to age, we understand little about how the timing of herbivory at the seedling stage affects growth and reproduction for plants that survive attack. In this study, we subjected six north-western European, dicotyledonous grassland species (Leontodon autumnalis, Leontodon hispidus, Plantago lanceolata, Plantago major, Trifolium pratense and Trifolium repens) to cotyledon removal at 7, 14 and 21 d old. We monitored subsequent growth and flowering (number of inflorescences recorded, and time taken for first flowers to open) over a 107 d period. Cotyledon removal reduced growth during establishment (35 d) for all species, and a further three exhibited reduced growth at maturity. Four species developed fewer inflorescences, or had delayed flowering after cotyledon removal. Although early damage (7 d old) had the greatest long-term effect on plant performance, responses varied according to the age at which the damage occurred and the species involved. Our results illustrate how growth and flowering into the mature phase is affected by cotyledon damage during different stages of seedling ontogeny, and we highlight the ways in which ontogenetic variation in seedling tolerance of tissue loss might impact upon plant fitness in mature plant communities. PMID:17547653

  6. Nutriomes and personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention, telomere integrity maintenance and cancer growth control.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage at the base sequence and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability, including telomere integrity and functionality and DNA repair. Using nutrient array systems with high-content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth, it is possible to define, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control. This knowledge can also be used to improve culture systems for cells used in therapeutics such as stem cells to ensure that they are not genetically aberrant when returned to the body. Furthermore, this information could be used to design dietary patterns that deliver the micronutrient combinations and concentrations required for preventing DNA damage by micronutrient deficiency or excess. Using this approach, new knowledge could be obtained to identify the dietary restrictions and/or supplementations required to control specific cancers, which is particularly important given that reliable validated advice is not yet available for those diagnosed with cancer.

  7. Nutriomes and personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention, telomere integrity maintenance and cancer growth control.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage at the base sequence and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability, including telomere integrity and functionality and DNA repair. Using nutrient array systems with high-content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth, it is possible to define, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control. This knowledge can also be used to improve culture systems for cells used in therapeutics such as stem cells to ensure that they are not genetically aberrant when returned to the body. Furthermore, this information could be used to design dietary patterns that deliver the micronutrient combinations and concentrations required for preventing DNA damage by micronutrient deficiency or excess. Using this approach, new knowledge could be obtained to identify the dietary restrictions and/or supplementations required to control specific cancers, which is particularly important given that reliable validated advice is not yet available for those diagnosed with cancer. PMID:24114494

  8. Helicopter rotor blade frequency evolution with damage growth and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Niranjan; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2005-05-01

    Structural damage in materials evolves over time due to growth of fatigue cracks in homogenous materials and a complicated process of matrix cracking, delamination, fiber breakage and fiber matrix debonding in composite materials. In this study, a finite element model of the helicopter rotor blade is used to analyze the effect of damage growth on the modal frequencies in a qualitative manner. Phenomenological models of material degradation for homogenous and composite materials are used. Results show that damage can be detected by monitoring changes in lower as well as higher mode flap (out-of-plane bending), lag (in-plane bending) and torsion rotating frequencies, especially for composite materials where the onset of the last stage of damage of fiber breakage is most critical. Curve fits are also proposed for mathematical modeling of the relationship between rotating frequencies and cycles. Finally, since operational data are noisy and also contaminated with outliers, denoising algorithms based on recursive median filters and radial basis function neural networks and wavelets are studied and compared with a moving average filter using simulated data for improved health-monitoring application. A novel recursive median filter is designed using integer programming through genetic algorithm and is found to have comparable performance to neural networks with much less complexity and is better than wavelet denoising for outlier removal. This filter is proposed as a tool for denoising time series of damage indicators.

  9. Propagule size and predispersal damage by insects affect establishment and early growth of mangrove seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Wayne P; Kennedy, Peter G; Mitchell, Betsy J

    2003-05-01

    Variation in rates of seedling recruitment, growth, and survival can strongly influence the rate and course of forest regeneration following disturbance. Using a combination of field sampling and shadehouse experiments, we investigated the influence of propagule size and predispersal insect damage on the establishment and early growth of the three common mangrove species on the Caribbean coast of Panama: Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle. In our field samples, all three species exhibited considerable intraspecific variation in mature propagule size, and suffered moderate to high levels of predispersal attack by larval insects. Rates of insect attack were largely independent of propagule size both within and among trees. Our experimental studies using undamaged mature propagules showed that, for all three species, seedlings established at high rates regardless of propagule size. However, propagule size did have a marked effect on early seedling growth: seedlings that developed from larger propagules grew more rapidly. Predispersal insect infestations that had destroyed or removed a substantial amount of tissue, particularly if that tissue was meristematic or conductive, reduced the establishment of propagules of all three species. The effect of sublethal tissue damage or loss on the subsequent growth of established seedlings varied among the three mangrove species. For Avicennia, the growth response was graded: for a propagule of a given size, the more tissue lost, the slower the growth of the seedling. For Laguncularia, the response to insect attack appeared to be all-or-none. If the boring insect penetrated the outer spongy seed coat and reached the developing embryo, it usually caused sufficient damage to prevent a seedling from developing. On the other hand, if the insect damaged but did not penetrate the seed coat, a completely healthy seedling developed and its growth rate was indistinguishable from a seedling developing from an

  10. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery.

  11. Mitigation of Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with a Galvanometer Scanned CO2 Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Hackel, R P

    2005-10-28

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), mitigation of laser surface damage growth on fused silica using single and multiple CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been consistently successful for damage sites whose lateral dimensions are less than 100 {micro}m, but has not been for larger sites. Cracks would often radiate outward from the damage when a CO{sub 2} pulse was applied to the larger sites. An investigation was conducted to mitigate large surface damage sites using galvanometer scanning of a tightly focused CO{sub 2} laser spot over an area encompassing the laser damage. It was thought that by initially scanning the CO{sub 2} spot outside the damage site, radiating crack propagation would be inhibited. Scan patterns were typically inward moving spirals starting at radii somewhat larger than that of the damage site. The duration of the mitigation spiral pattern was {approx}110 ms during which a total of {approx}1.3 J of energy was delivered to the sample. The CO{sub 2} laser spot had a 1/e{sup 2}-diameter of {approx}200 {micro}m. Thus, there was general heating of a large area around the damage site while rapid evaporation occurred locally at the laser spot position in the spiral. A 30 to 40 {micro}m deep crater was typically generated by this spiral with a diameter of {approx}600 {micro}m. The spiral would be repeated until there was no evidence of the original damage in microscope images. Using this technique, damage sites as large as 300 mm in size did not display new damage after mitigation when exposed to fluences exceeding 22 J/cm{sup 2} at 355 nm, 7.5 ns. It was found necessary to use a vacuum nozzle during the mitigation process to reduce the amount of re-deposited fused silica. In addition, curing spiral patterns at lower laser powers were used to presumably ''re-melt'' any re-deposited fused silica. A compact, shearing interferometer microscope was developed to permit in situ measurement of the depth of

  12. [Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF): a key factor in the onset and progression of kidney damage].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, E; Rodrigues Díez, R; Rodríguez Vita, J; Rayego Mateos, S; Rodrigues Díez, R R; Rodríguez García, E; Lavoz Barria, C; Mezzano, S; Egido, J; Ortiz, A; Ruiz-Ortega, M; Selgas, R

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is increased in several pathologies associated with fibrosis, including multiple renal diseases. CTGF is involved in biological processes such as cell cycle regulation, migration, adhesion and angiogenesis. Its expression is regulated by various factors involved in renal damage, such as transforming growth factor- , Angiotensin II, high concentrations of glucose and cellular stress. CTGF is involved in the initiation and progression of renal damage to be able to induce an inflammatory response and promote fibrosis, identified as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of kidney diseases. In this paper we review the main actions of CTGF in renal disease, the intracellular action mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for its blocking.

  13. Fatigue crack growth in damage tolerant Al-Li sheet alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanhill, R. J. H.

    1990-03-01

    The fatigue crack growth properties of two candidate damage tolerant Al-Li sheet alloys, 2091 and 8090 are compared with those of the conventional and widely used 2024 alloy. There were three load histories: constant amplitude, gust spectrum, and constant amplitude with occasional peak loads. The results are interpreted with the aid of fractographic observations and measurements of fracture surface roughness. The practical significance of the results is assessed, and recommendations are made for further evaluations.

  14. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  15. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  17. Glutathione-deficient Plasmodium berghei parasites exhibit growth delay and nuclear DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Padín-Irizarry, Vivian; Colón-Lorenzo, Emilee E; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Castro, María Del R; González-Méndez, Ricardo; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium parasites are exposed to endogenous and exogenous oxidative stress during their complex life cycle. To minimize oxidative damage, the parasites use glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) as primary antioxidants. We previously showed that disruption of the Plasmodium berghei gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (pbggcs-ko) or the glutathione reductase (pbgr-ko) genes resulted in a significant reduction of GSH in intraerythrocytic stages, and a defect in growth in the pbggcs-ko parasites. In this report, time course experiments of parasite intraerythrocytic development and morphological studies showed a growth delay during the ring to schizont progression. Morphological analysis shows a significant reduction in size (diameter) of trophozoites and schizonts with increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles in the pbggcs-ko parasites in comparison to the wild type (WT). Furthermore, the pbggcs-ko mutants exhibited an impaired response to oxidative stress and increased levels of nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage. Reduced GSH levels did not result in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage or protein carbonylations in neither pbggcs-ko nor pbgr-ko parasites. In addition, the pbggcs-ko mutant parasites showed an increase in mRNA expression of genes involved in oxidative stress detoxification and DNA synthesis, suggesting a potential compensatory mechanism to allow for parasite proliferation. These results reveal that low GSH levels affect parasite development through the impairment of oxidative stress reduction systems and damage to the nDNA. Our studies provide new insights into the role of the GSH antioxidant system in the intraerythrocytic development of Plasmodium parasites, with potential translation into novel pharmacological interventions. PMID:26952808

  18. Development of a Process Model for CO(2) Laser Mitigation of Damage Growth in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C; Rotter, M D

    2003-11-01

    A numerical model of CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of damage growth in fused silica has been constructed that accounts for laser energy absorption, heat conduction, radiation transport, evaporation of fused silica and thermally induced stresses. This model will be used to understand scaling issues and effects of pulse and beam shapes on material removal, temperatures reached and stresses generated. Initial calculations show good agreement of simulated and measured material removal. The model has also been applied to LG-770 glass as a prototype red blocker material.

  19. Akt1-mediated fast/glycolytic skeletal muscle growth attenuates renal damage in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanatani, Shinsuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Araki, Satoshi; Rokutanda, Taku; Kimura, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-01

    Muscle wasting is frequently observed in patients with kidney disease, and low muscle strength is associated with poor outcomes in these patients. However, little is known about the effects of skeletal muscle growth per se on kidney diseases. In this study, we utilized a skeletal muscle-specific, inducible Akt1 transgenic (Akt1 TG) mouse model that promotes the growth of functional skeletal muscle independent of exercise to investigate the effects of muscle growth on kidney diseases. Seven days after Akt1 activation in skeletal muscle, renal injury was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in Akt1 TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. The expression of atrogin-1, an atrophy-inducing gene in skeletal muscle, was upregulated 7 days after UUO in WT mice but not in Akt1 TG mice. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, apoptosis, and increased expression of inflammatory, fibrosis-related, and adhesion molecule genes were significantly diminished in Akt1 TG mice compared with WT mice. An increase in the activating phosphorylation of eNOS in the kidney accompanied the attenuation of renal damage by myogenic Akt1 activation. Treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME abolished the protective effect of skeletal muscle Akt activation on obstructive kidney disease. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated muscle growth reduces renal damage in a model of obstructive kidney disease. This improvement appears to be mediated by an increase in eNOS signaling in the kidney. Our data support the concept that loss of muscle mass during kidney disease can contribute to renal failure, and maintaining muscle mass may improve clinical outcome. PMID:25012168

  20. The role of growth factors on hepatic damage in rats with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Turk, Ozgur; Badak, Bartu; Ates, Ersin; Dundar, Emine; Sutken, Emine

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the affect and the role of growth factors on liver damage. 110 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 11 groups: a sham group, a control group, HGF, EGF, IGF, TGF groups of irreversible jaundiced rats and a control group and HGF, EGF, IGF, and TGF groups of reversible jaundiced rats (n = 10). In the irreversible jaundiced groups, the common bile duct was explorated, double ligated, and cut. 150 μg/kg/day HGF, 5 μg/kg/day EGF, 5 μg/kg/day IGF, and 5 μg/kg/day TGF β-1 were injected intraperitoneally after the seventh post-operative day. In the reversible jaundiced group, the common bile duct was ligated and the ligation was resolved on the seventh post-operative day. For 5 days, growth factors were injected at the same dose. Ductal proliferation scores significantly decreased after growth factor administration in the EGF-A and TGF-A groups. Furthermore, ductal proliferation was decreased in the TGF-B group. As a result of this study, HGF was effective in the irreversible jaundiced groups and ineffective in the reversible jaundice groups. EGF was effective in the reversible jaundiced groups and ineffective in the irreversible jaundiced groups. In both the irreversible jaundiced and reversible jaundiced groups, IGF was ineffective, although TGF β-1 was effective. We believe that these results arise from the positive effects of effective doses of growth factor on liver damage. PMID:27540507

  1. Akt1-mediated fast/glycolytic skeletal muscle growth attenuates renal damage in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanatani, Shinsuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Araki, Satoshi; Rokutanda, Taku; Kimura, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-01

    Muscle wasting is frequently observed in patients with kidney disease, and low muscle strength is associated with poor outcomes in these patients. However, little is known about the effects of skeletal muscle growth per se on kidney diseases. In this study, we utilized a skeletal muscle-specific, inducible Akt1 transgenic (Akt1 TG) mouse model that promotes the growth of functional skeletal muscle independent of exercise to investigate the effects of muscle growth on kidney diseases. Seven days after Akt1 activation in skeletal muscle, renal injury was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in Akt1 TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. The expression of atrogin-1, an atrophy-inducing gene in skeletal muscle, was upregulated 7 days after UUO in WT mice but not in Akt1 TG mice. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, apoptosis, and increased expression of inflammatory, fibrosis-related, and adhesion molecule genes were significantly diminished in Akt1 TG mice compared with WT mice. An increase in the activating phosphorylation of eNOS in the kidney accompanied the attenuation of renal damage by myogenic Akt1 activation. Treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME abolished the protective effect of skeletal muscle Akt activation on obstructive kidney disease. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated muscle growth reduces renal damage in a model of obstructive kidney disease. This improvement appears to be mediated by an increase in eNOS signaling in the kidney. Our data support the concept that loss of muscle mass during kidney disease can contribute to renal failure, and maintaining muscle mass may improve clinical outcome.

  2. Observations of fatigue crack initiation and damage growth in notched titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose was to characterize damage initiation and growth in notched titanium matrix composites at room temperature. Double edge notched or center open hole SCS-6/Ti-15-3 specimens containing 0 deg plies or containing both 0 and 90 deg plies were fatigued. The specimens were tested in the as-fabricated (ASF) and in heat-treated conditions. A local strain criterion using unnotched specimen fatigue data was successful in predicting fatigue damage initiation. The initiation stress level was accurately predicted for both a double edge notched unidirectional specimen and a cross-plied center hole specimen. The fatigue produced long multiple cracks growing from the notches. These fatigue cracks were only in the matrix material and did not break the fibers in their path. The combination of matrix cracking and fiber/matrix debonding appears to greatly reduce the stress concentration around the notches. The laminates that were heat treated showed a different crack growth pattern. In the ASF specimens, matrix cracks had a more tortuous path and showed considerable more crack branching. For the same specimen geometry and cyclic stress, the (0/90/0) laminate with a hole had far superior fatigue resistance than the matrix only specimen with a hole.

  3. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Grigoriadou, Christina; Pytel, Dariusz; Zhang, Fang; Ye, Jiangbin; Koumenis, Constantinos; Cavener, Douglas; Diehl, J. Alan

    2010-01-01

    In order to proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential anti-neoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase PERK have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have utilized animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate PERK contribution in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is utilized during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis and thereby facilitates tumor growth. PMID:20453876

  4. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, E; Grigoriadou, C; Pytel, D; Zhang, F; Ye, J; Koumenis, C; Cavener, D; Diehl, J A

    2010-07-01

    To proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential antineoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase, RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have used animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate the contribution of PERK in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle because of the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is used during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis, thereby facilitating tumor growth.

  5. Effect of damage rate on the kinetics of void nucleation and growth by phase field modeling for materials under irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuejian; Zhao, Jiejiang; Huang, Hao; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2016-11-01

    The void formation and growth in materials under irradiations is studied by a modified Cahn-Hilliard equation coupled with the explicit nucleation algorithm. Through the numerical simulations, the stages of incubation, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the irradiation induced voids are clearly observed with a faster kinetics for stronger damage rate. There seems to exist a critical damage rate g˙vc at which the kinetics speeds up significantly. For smaller damage rates, very few voids can be nucleated. But the nucleated voids can grow rather large with its average radius growing as Rv ∝t1/d. For stronger irradiations, much more voids could be nucleated, but they cannot grow very large before coarsening. The growth follows a much faster kinetics as Rv ∝t2/d. The critical damage rate g˙vc should be determined by the competition of the rate of diffusion and the rate of vacancy production due to irradiations.

  6. Damage growth in Si during self-ion irradiation: A study of ion effects over an extended energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, O.W.; El-Ghor, M.K.; White, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Damage nucleation/growth in single-crystal Si during ion irradiation is discussed. For MeV ions, the rate of growth as well as the damage morphology are shown to vary widely along the track of the ion. This is attributed to a change in the dominant, defect-related reactions as the ion penetrates the crystal. The nature of these reactions were elucidated by studying the interaction of MeV ions with different types of defects. The defects were introduced into the Si crystal prior to high-energy irradiation by self-ion implantation at a medium energy (100 keV). Varied damage morphologies were produced by implanting different ion fluences. Electron microscopy and ion-channeling measurements, in conjunction with annealing studies, were used to characterize the damage. Subtle changes in the predamage morphology are shown to result in markedly different responses to the high-energy irradiation, ranging from complete annealing of the damage to rapid growth. These divergent responses occur over a narrow range of dose (2--3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ cm/sup /minus/2/) of the medium-energy ions; this range also marks a transition in the growth behavior of the damage during the predamage implantation. A model is proposed which accounts for these observations and provides insight into ion-induced growth of amorphous layers in Si and the role of the amorphous/crystalline interface in this process. 15 refs, 9 figs.

  7. Laser damage initiation and growth of antireflection coated S-FAP crystal surfaces prepared by pitch lap and magnetorheological finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bibeau, C; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2005-10-31

    Antireflection (AR) coatings typically damage at the interface between the substrate and coating. Therefore the substrate finishing technology can have an impact on the laser resistance of the coating. For this study, AR coatings were deposited on Yb:S-FAP [Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F] crystals that received a final polish by both conventional pitch lap finishing as well as magnetorheological finishing (MRF). SEM images of the damage morphology reveals laser damage originates at scratches and at substrate coating interfacial absorbing defects. Previous damage stability tests on multilayer mirror coatings and bare surfaces revealed damage growth can occur at fluences below the initiation fluence. The results from this study suggest the opposite trend for AR coatings. Investigation of unstable HR and uncoated surface damage morphologies reveals significant radial cracking that is not apparent with AR damage due to AR delamination from the coated surface with few apparent cracks at the damage boundary. Damage stability tests show that coated Yb:S-FAP crystals can operate at 1057 nm at fluences around 20 J/cm{sup 2} at 10 ns; almost twice the initiation damage threshold.

  8. Growth control switch by a DNA-damage-inducible toxin-antitoxin system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Martins, Daniel; Redder, Peter; Frandi, Antonio; Mignolet, Johann; Chapalay, Julien Bortoli; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are thought to respond to various stresses, often inducing growth-arrested (persistent) sub-populations of cells whose housekeeping functions are inhibited. Many such TASs induce this effect through the translation-dependent RNA cleavage (RNase) activity of their toxins, which are held in check by their cognate antitoxins in the absence of stress. However, it is not always clear whether specific mRNA targets of orthologous RNase toxins are responsible for their phenotypic effect, which has made it difficult to accurately place the multitude of TASs within cellular and adaptive regulatory networks. Here, we show that the TAS HigBA of Caulobacter crescentus can promote and inhibit bacterial growth dependent on the dosage of HigB, a toxin regulated by the DNA damage (SOS) repressor LexA in addition to its antitoxin HigA, and the target selectivity of HigB's mRNA cleavage activity. HigB reduced the expression of an efflux pump that is toxic to a polarity control mutant, cripples the growth of cells lacking LexA, and targets the cell cycle circuitry. Thus, TASs can have outcome switching activity in bacterial adaptive (stress) and systemic (cell cycle) networks. PMID:27572440

  9. Neuron Growth on Carbon Nanotube Thread Bio-Scaffolds for Repair of Central Nervous System Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, David; Pixley, Sarah; Schulz, Mark; Shanov, Vessilin

    2012-02-01

    Approximately 11,000 new spinal cord injuries occur each year. Repairing such central nervous system (CNS) damage has proven to be very difficult. We report on in vitro experiments using carbon nanotube (CNT) threads as a bio-scaffold for promoting CNS repair via directed neuron regrowth along the CNT material. Mouse brain neurospheres, containing neuronal stem cells, neurons and support glia, were observed to attach to and grow along laminin-coated CNT threads in vitro. However, due to their limited mobility, only neurospheres close to the threads attach. To increase cellular attachment to the threads, we exploit the fact that these cells can exhibit enhanced, directed migration along an externally applied electric field. Recent in vitro cell growth was carried out in chambers containing several parallel CNT threads with electrical connections extending out of the incubator so that a voltage applied across adjacent threads established an appropriate electric field. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry and dc and ac IV measurements were used to monitor cell growth and attachment as a function of applied electric field and time. Cell migration and attachment were also investigated using time lapse photography in a separate growth chamber mounted on the stage of an optical microscope.

  10. Fatigue crack growth spectrum simplification: Facilitation of on-board damage prognosis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Matthew Adam

    2009-12-01

    Better lifetime predictions of systems subjected to fatigue loading are needed in support of the optimization of the costs of life-cycle engineering. In particular, the climate is especially encouraging for the development of safer aircraft. One issue is that aircraft experience complex fatigue loading and current methods for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation rely on intensive computational tools that are not currently carried onboard during flight. These tools rely on complex models that are made more difficult by the complicated load spectra themselves. This presents an overhead burden as offline analysis must be performed at an offsite facility. This architecture is thus unable to provide online, timely information for on-board use. The direct objective of this research was to facilitate the real-time fatigue damage assessments of on-board systems with a particular emphasis on aging aircraft. To achieve the objective, the goal of this research was to simplify flight spectra. Variable-amplitude spectra, in which the load changes on a cycle-by-cycle basis, cannot readily be supported by an onboard system because the models required to predict fatigue crack growth during variable-amplitude loading are too complicated. They are too complicated because variable-amplitude fatigue crack growth analysis must be performed on a cycle-by-cycle basis as no closed-form solution exists. This makes these calculations too time-consuming and requires impractical, heavy onboard systems or offsite facilities. The hypothesis is to replace a variable-amplitude spectrum with an equivalent constant-amplitude spectrum. The advantage is a dramatic reduction in the complexity of the problem so that damage predictions can be made onboard by simple, fast calculations in real-time without the need to add additional weight to the aircraft. The intent is to reduce the computational burden and facilitate on-board projection of damage evolution and prediction for the accurate

  11. Methods for Mitigating Growth of Laser-Initiated Surface Damage on Fused Silcia Optics at 351nm

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L W; Norton, M A; Molander, W A; Donohue, E E; Maricle, S M; Penetrante, B M; Brusasco, R M; Grundler, W; Butler, J A; Carr, J W; Hill, R M; Summers, L J; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A; Key, M H; Wegner, P J; Burnham, A K; Hackel, L A; Kozlowski, M R

    2001-12-12

    We report a summary of the surface damage, growth mitigation effort at 351nm for polished fused silica optics. The objective was to experimentally validate selected methods that could be applied to pre-initiated or retrieved-from-service optics, to stop further damage growth. A specific goal was to obtain sufficient data and information on successful methods for fused silica optics to select a single approach for processing large aperture, fused-silica optics used in high-peak-power laser applications. This paper includes the test results and the evaluation thereof, for several mitigation methods for fused silica surfaces. The mitigation methods tested in this study are wet chemical etching, cold plasma etching, CW-CO{sub 2} laser processing, and micro-flame torch processing. We found that CW-CO{sub 2} laser processing produces the most significant and consistent results to halt laser-induced surface damage growth on fused silica. We recorded successful mitigation of the growth of laser-induced surface damage sites as large as 0.5mm diameter, for 1000 shots at 351nm and fluences in the range of 8 to 13J/cm{sup 2}, {approx}11ns pulse length. We obtained sufficient data for elimination of damage growth using CO{sub 2} laser processing on sub-aperture representative optics, to proceed with application to large aperture ({approx}40 x 40cm{sup 2}) fused silica.

  12. Nutrient withdrawal rescues growth factor-deprived cells from mTOR-dependent damage

    PubMed Central

    Panieri, Emiliano; Toietta, Gabriele; Mele, Marina; Labate, Valentina; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Fusco, Salvatore; Tesori, Valentina; Antonini, Annalisa; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Spirito, Marco De; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2010-01-01

    Deregulated nutrient signaling plays pivotal roles in body ageing and in diabetic complications; biochemical cascades linking energy dysmetabolism to cell damage and loss are still incompletely clarified, and novel molecular paradigms and pharmacological targets critically needed. We provide evidence that in the retrovirus-packaging cell line HEK293-T Phoenix, massive cell death in serum-free medium is remarkably prevented or attenuated by either glucose or aminoacid withdrawal, and by the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-glucose. A similar protection was also elicited by interference with mitochondrial function, clearly suggesting involvement of energy metabolism in increased cell survival. Oxidative stress did not account for nutrient toxicity on serum-starved cells. Instead, nutrient restriction was associated with reduced activity of the mTOR/S6 Kinase cascade. Moreover, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of the mTOR pathway modulated in an opposite fashion signaling to S6K/S6 and cell viability in nutrient-repleted medium. Additionally, stimulation of the AMP-activated Protein Kinase concomitantly inhibited mTOR signaling and cell death, while neither event was affected by overexpression of the NAD+ dependent deacetylase Sirt-1, another cellular sensor of nutrient scarcity. Finally, blockade of the mTOR cascade reduced hyperglycemic damage also in a more pathophysiologically relevant model, i.e. in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to hyperglycemia. Taken together these findings point to a key role of the mTOR/S6K cascade in cell damage by excess nutrients and scarcity of growth-factors, a condition shared by diabetes and other ageing-related pathologies. PMID:20739737

  13. Nutrient withdrawal rescues growth factor-deprived cells from mTOR-dependent damage.

    PubMed

    Panieri, Emiliano; Toietta, Gabriele; Mele, Marina; Labate, Valentina; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Fusco, Salvatore; Tesori, Valentina; Antonini, Annalisa; Maulucci, Giuseppe; De Spirito, Marco; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2010-08-01

    Deregulated nutrient signaling plays pivotal roles in body ageing and in diabetic complications; biochemical cascades linking energy dysmetabolism to cell damage and loss are still incompletely clarified, and novel molecular paradigms and pharmacological targets critically needed. We provide evidence that in the retrovirus-packaging cell line HEK293-T Phoenix, massive cell death in serum-free medium is remarkably prevented or attenuated by either glucose or aminoacid withdrawal, and by the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-glucose. A similar protection was also elicited by interference with mitochondrial function, clearly suggesting involvement of energy metabolism in increased cell survival. Oxidative stress did not account for nutrient toxicity on serum-starved cells. Instead, nutrient restriction was associated with reduced activity of the mTOR/S6 Kinase cascade. Moreover, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of the mTOR pathway modulated in an opposite fashion signaling to S6K/S6 and cell viability in nutrient-repleted medium. Additionally, stimulation of the AMP-activated Protein Kinase concomitantly inhibited mTOR signaling and cell death, while neither event was affected by overexpression of the NAD+ dependent deacetylase Sirt-1, another cellular sensor of nutrient scarcity. Finally, blockade of the mTOR cascade reduced hyperglycemic damage also in a more pathophysiologically relevant model, i.e. in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to hyperglycemia. Taken together these findings point to a key role of the mTOR/S6K cascade in cell damage by excess nutrients and scarcity of growth-factors, a condition shared by diabetes and other ageing-related pathologies. PMID:20739737

  14. Growth factor independence-1 antagonizes a p53-induced DNA damage response pathway in lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Cyrus; Phelan, James D.; Vassen, Lothar; Schütte, Judith; Chen, Riyan; Horman, Shane R.; Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Krongold, Joseph; Zhu, Jinfang; Paul, William E.; Dührsen, Ulrich; Göttgens, Bertie; Grimes, H. Leighton; Möröy, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) fail current treatments highlighting the need for better therapies. Since oncogenic signaling activates a p53-dependent DNA-damage response and apoptosis, leukemic cells must devise appropriate countermeasures. We show here that growth factor independence 1 (Gfi1) can serve such a function, since Gfi1 ablation exacerbates p53 responses, and lowers the threshold for p53-induced cell death. Specifically, Gfi1 restricts p53 activity and expression of pro-apoptotic p53 targets such as Bax, Noxa (Pmaip1) and Puma (Bbc3). Subsequently, Gfi1 ablation cures mice from leukemia and limits the expansion of primary human T-ALL xenografts in mice. This suggests that targeting Gfi1 could improve the prognosis of patients with T-ALL or other lymphoid leukemias. PMID:23410974

  15. Growth hormone reverses excitotoxic damage induced by kainic acid in the green iguana neuroretina.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Mora, Janeth; Carranza, Martha; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    It is known that growth hormone (GH) is expressed in extrapituitary tissues, including the nervous system and ocular tissues, where it is involved in autocrine/paracrine actions related to cell survival and anti-apoptosis in several vertebrates. Little is known, however, in reptiles, so we analyzed the expression and distribution of GH in the eye of green iguana and its potential neuroprotective role in retinas that were damaged by the intraocular administration of kainic acid (KA). It was found, by Western blotting, that GH-immunoreactivity (GH-IR) was expressed as two isoforms (15 and 26kDa, under reducing conditions) in cornea, vitreous, retina, crystalline, iris and sclera, in varying proportions. Also, two bands for the growth hormone receptor (GHR)-IR were observed (70 and 44kDa, respectively) in the same tissues. By immunofluorescence, GH-IR was found in neurons present in several layers of the neuroretina (inner nuclear [INL], outer nuclear [ONL] and ganglion cell [GCL] layers) as determined by its co-existence with NeuN, but not in glial cells. In addition, GH and GHR co-expression was found in the same cells, suggesting paracrine/autocrine interactions. KA administration induced retinal excitotoxic damage, as determined by a significant reduction of the cell density and an increase in the appearance of apoptotic cells in the INL and GCL. In response to KA injury, both endogenous GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) expression were increased by 70±1.8% and 33.3±16%, respectively. The addition of exogenous GH significantly prevented the retinal damage produced by the loss of cytoarchitecture and cell density in the GCL (from 4.9±0.79 in the control, to 1.45±0.2 with KA, to 6.35±0.49cell/mm(2) with KA+GH) and in the INL (19.12±1.6, 10.05±1.9, 21.0±0.8cell/mm(2), respectively) generated by the long-term effect of 1mM KA intraocular administration. The co-incubation with a specific anti-GH antibody, however, blocked the protective effect of GH

  16. Imaging System to Measure Kinetics of Material Cluster Ejection During Exit-Surface Damage Initiation and Growth in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R N; Negres, R A; Demos, S G

    2009-10-29

    Laser-induced damage on the surface of optical components typically is manifested by the formation of microscopic craters that can ultimately degrade the optics performance characteristics. It is believed that the damage process is the result of the material exposure to high temperatures and pressures within a volume on the order of several cubic microns located just below the surface. The response of the material following initial localized energy deposition by the laser pulse, including the timeline of events and the individual processes involved during this timeline, is still largely unknown. In this work we introduce a time-resolved microscope system designed to enable a detailed investigation of the sequence of dynamic events involved during surface damage. To best capture individual aspects of the damage timeline, this system is employed in multiple imaging configurations (such as multi-view image acquisition at a single time point and multi-image acquisition at different time points of the same event) and offers sensitivity to phenomena at very early delay times. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated with preliminary results from the study of exit-surface damage in fused silica. The time-resolved images provide information on the material response immediately following laser energy deposition, the processes later involved during crater formation or growth, the material ejecta kinetics, and overall material motion and transformation. Such results offer insight into the mechanisms governing damage initiation and growth in the optical components of ICF class laser systems.

  17. Effects of diphenyl diselenide on growth, oxidative damage, and antioxidant response in silver catfish.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Charlene; Marins, Aline; Murussi, Camila; Pretto, Alexandra; Leitemperger, Jossiele; Loro, Vania Lucia

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2] at different concentrations (1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg/kg) on growth, oxidative damage and antioxidant parameters in silver catfish after 30 and 60 days. Fish fed with 5.0 mg/kg of (PhSe)2 experienced a significant decrease in weight, length, and condition factor after 30 days and these parameters increased after 60 days. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and protein carbonyl (PC) decreased in the liver of silver catfish supplemented with (PhSe)2 after 30 days at all concentrations, while after 60 days these parameters decreased in liver, gills, brain, and muscle. Supplementation with (PhSe)2 induced a decrease in catalase (CAT) activity from liver only after 60 days of feeding. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased at 5.0 mg/kg after 30 and 60 days and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was enhanced at 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg after 30 and 60 days. Silver catfish supplemented for 30 days showed a significant increase in liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) at 3.0 mg/kg, while after 60 days GST activity increased in liver at 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg/kg and in gills at 3.0 and 5.0 mg/kg of (PhSe)2. After 30 days, non-protein thiols (NPSH) did not change, while after 60 days NPSH increased in liver, gills, brain, and muscle. In addition, ascorbic acid (AA) levels after 30 days increased in liver at three concentrations and in gills and muscle at 1.5 mg/kg, while after 60 days, AA increased at all concentrations in all and tissues tested. Thus, diet supplemented with (PhSe)2 for 60 days could be more effective for silver catfish. Although the concentration of 5.0 mg/kg showed decreased growth parameters, concentrations of 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg, in general, decreased oxidative damage and increased antioxidant defenses. PMID:26520260

  18. Fracture and crack growth in orthotropic laminates. Part 2: Experimental determination of internal damage growth in unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The fracture behavior of unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates is investigated in order to verify the results of mathematical models. These models predict the stresses and displacements of fibers and the amount of damage growth in a center-notched lamina as a function of the applied remote stress and the matrix and fiber material properties. The damage may take the form of longitudinal yielding and splitting in the matrix as well as stable transverse damage consisting of broken fibers and matrix yielding ahead of the notch. A brittle lacquer coating is used to detect the yielding in the matrix while X-ray techniques are used to detemine the number of broken fibers in the laminate. The notched strengths and the amounts of damage found in the experimental specimens agree well with those predicted by the mathematical model.

  19. Differential effects of type and quantity of leaf damage on growth, reproduction and defence of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.).

    PubMed

    Blue, E; Kay, J; Younginger, B S; Ballhorn, D J

    2015-05-01

    Folivores are major plant antagonists in most terrestrial ecosystems. However, the quantitative effects of leaf area loss on multiple interacting plant traits are still little understood. We sought to contribute to filling this lack of understanding by applying different types of leaf area removal (complete leaflets versus leaflet parts) and degrees of leaf damage (0, 33 and 66%) to lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) plants. We quantified various growth and fitness parameters including above- and belowground biomass as well as the production of reproductive structures (fruits, seeds). In addition, we measured plant cyanogenic potential (HCNp; direct chemical defence) and production of extrafloral nectar (EFN; indirect defence). Leaf damage reduced above- and belowground biomass production in general, but neither variation in quantity nor type of damage resulted in different biomass. Similarly, the number of fruits and seeds was significantly reduced in all damaged plants without significant differences between treatment groups. Seed mass, however, was affected by both type and quantity of leaf damage. Leaf area loss had no impact on HCNp, whereas production of EFN decreased with increasing damage. While EFN production was quantitatively affected by leaf area removal, the type of damage had no effect. Our study provides a thorough analysis of the quantitative and qualitative effects of defoliation on multiple productivity-related and defensive plant traits and shows strong differences in plant response depending on trait. Quantifying such plant responses is vital to our understanding of the impact of herbivory on plant fitness and productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems.

  20. Growth, optical, thermal and laser damage threshold studies of 4-aminopyridinium 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadesan, A.; Peramaiyan, G.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Arjunan, S.

    2015-05-01

    Organic nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals of 4-aminopyridinium 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol (4AP4NP) were grown by the slow evaporation solution growth technique. The unit cell parameters and space group of 4AP4NP crystal were found out by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. From the UV-vis-NIR spectral studies, the lower cut-off wavelength of the grown crystal was found to be 474 nm. The laser damage threshold study shows that 4AP4NP crystal withstands the laser radiation up to 3.67 GW cm-2. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses revealed that 4AP4ANP is thermally stable up to 175 °C. The specific heat capacity of 4AP4NP was measured to be 3.9135 J g-1 K-1 at 33 °C. Kurtz and Perry powder study reveals that 4AP4NP is a phase-matchable NLO material. The four independent tensor coefficients of dielectric permittivity were found to be ε11=25.09, ε22=25.84, ε33=26.69 and ε13=0.8 from the dielectric measurement.

  1. Thallus morphology and optical characteristics affect growth and DNA damage by UV radiation in juvenile Arctic Laminaria sporophytes.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Wiencke, Christian; Hanelt, Dieter

    2006-02-01

    Growth of young sporophytes of the brown algae Laminaria digitata, L. saccharina and L. solidungula from Spitsbergen were measured in the laboratory after being exposed for 21 days to either photosynthetically active radiation (PAR = P) or to full light spectrum (PAR + UV-A + UV-B = PAB) using of cutoff glass filters. The plants were grown at 8+/-2 degrees C and 16 h light : 8 h dark cycles with 6 h additional ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in the middle of the light period. Growth was measured every 10 min using growth chambers with online video measuring technique. Tissue morphology and absorption spectra were measured in untreated young sporophytes while chlorophyll (Chl) a content and DNA damage were measured in treated thalli at the end of the experiment. In all species, growth rates were significantly higher in sporophytes exposed to P alone compared to sporophytes exposed to PAB. Tissue DNA damage is dependent on thallus thickness and absorption spectra characteristics of pigments and UV-absorbing compounds. In sporophytes exposed to UVR, energy demands for repair of DNA damage and synthesis of UV-absorbing compounds for protection effectively diverts photosynthate at the expense of growth. Photosynthetic pigment was not significantly different between treatments suggesting a capacity for acclimation to moderate UVR fluence. The general growth pattern in sporophytes exposed to P alone showed an increasing growth rate from the onset of light (0500-0900 hours) to a peak at the middle of the light phase (0900-1500 hours), a decline towards the end of the light phase (1500-2100 hours) and a minimum "low" growth in the dark (2100-0500 hours) relative to growth during the entire light phase. Under PAB, different growth patterns were observed such as growth compensation at night in L. digitata, delayed growth recovery in L. saccharina and minimal but continuous growth in L. solidungula. Growth as an integrative parameter of all physiological processes showed

  2. Mitigation of Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica NIF Optics with a Galvanometer Scanned Carbon Dioxide Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, I L; Draggoo, V; Guss, G M; Hackel, R P; Norton, M A

    2006-04-06

    Economic operation of the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory depends on controlling growth of laser damage in the large, high cost optics exposed to UV light at 351 nm. Mitigation of the growth of damage sites on fused silica surfaces greater than several hundred microns in diameter has been previously reported by us using galvanometer scanning of a tightly focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot over an area encompassing the laser damage. Further investigation revealed that fused silica vapor re-deposited on the surface as ''debris'' led to laser damage at unexpectedly low fluences when exposed to multiple laser shots at 351 nm. Additionally, laser power and spatial mode fluctuations in the mitigation laser led to poor repeatability of the process. We also found that the shape of the mitigation pit could produce downstream intensification that could damage other NIF optics. Modifications were made to both the laser system and the mitigation process in order to address these issues. Debris was completely eliminated by these changes, but repeatability and downstream intensification issues still persist.

  3. A two-scale time-dependent damage model based on non-planar growth of micro-cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Dascalu, Cristian

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the theoretical developments and the numerical applications of a time-dependent damage law. This law is deduced from considerations at the micro-scale where non-planar growth of micro-cracks, following a subcritical propagation criterion, is assumed. The orientation of the crack growth is governed by the maximum energy release rate at the crack tips and the introduction of an equivalent straight crack. The passage from micro-scale to macro-scale is done through an asymptotic homogenization approach. The model is built in two steps. First, the effective coefficients are calculated at the micro-scale in finite periodical cells, with respect to the micro-cracks length and their orientation. Then, a subcritical damage law is developed in order to establish the evolution of damage. This damage law is obtained as a differential equation depending on the microscopic stress intensity factors, which are a priori calculated for different crack lengths and orientations. The developed model enables to reproduce not only the classical short-term stress-strain response of materials (in tension and compression) but also the long-term behavior encountering relaxation and creep effects. Numerical simulations show the ability of the developed model to reproduce this time-dependent damage response of materials.

  4. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS. PMID:24482192

  5. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  6. Time-resolved imaging of processes associated with exit-surface damage growth in fused silica following exposure to nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Negres, Raluca A

    2013-02-25

    We study the dynamics of energy deposition and subsequent material response associated with exit surface damage growth in fused silica using a time resolved microscope system. This system enables acquisition of two transient images per damage event with temporal resolution of 180 ps and spatial resolution on the order of 1 µm. The experimental results address important issues in laser damage growth that include: a) the specific structural features within a damage site where plasma formation initiates; b) the subsequent growth of the plasma regions; c) the formation and expansion of radial and circumferential cracks; d) the kinetics and duration of material ejection; e) the characteristics of the generated shockwave.

  7. A Werner syndrome protein homolog affects C. elegans development, growth rate, life span and sensitivity to DNA damage by acting at a DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Jin; Yook, Jong-Sung; Han, Sung Min; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2004-06-01

    A Werner syndrome protein homolog in C. elegans (WRN-1) was immunolocalized to the nuclei of germ cells, embryonic cells, and many other cells of larval and adult worms. When wrn-1 expression was inhibited by RNA interference (RNAi), a slight reduction in C. elegans life span was observed, with accompanying signs of premature aging, such as earlier accumulation of lipofuscin and tissue deterioration in the head. In addition, various developmental defects, including small, dumpy, ruptured, transparent body, growth arrest and bag of worms, were induced by RNAi. The frequency of these defects was accentuated by gamma-irradiation, implying that they were derived from spontaneous or induced DNA damage. wrn-1(RNAi) worms showed accelerated larval growth irrespective of gamma-irradiation, and pre-meiotic germ cells had an abnormal checkpoint response to DNA replication blockage. These observations suggest that WRN-1 acts as a checkpoint protein for DNA damage and replication blockage. This idea is also supported by an accelerated S phase in wrn-1(RNAi) embryonic cells. wrn-1(RNAi) phenotypes similar to those of Werner syndrome, such as premature aging and short stature, suggest wrn-1-deficient C. elegans as a useful model organism for Werner syndrome. PMID:15115755

  8. DNA Damage Responses in Prokaryotes: Regulating Gene Expression, Modulating Growth Patterns, and Manipulating Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the area of bacterial DNA damage responses are reviewed here. The SOS pathway is still the major paradigm of bacterial DNA damage response, and recent studies have clarified the mechanisms of SOS induction and key physiological roles of SOS including a very major role in genetic exchange and variation. When considering diverse bacteria, it is clear that SOS is not a uniform pathway with one purpose, but rather a platform that has evolved for differing functions in different bacteria. Relating in part to the SOS response, the field has uncovered multiple apparent cell-cycle checkpoints that assist cell survival after DNA damage and remarkable pathways that induce programmed cell death in bacteria. Bacterial DNA damage responses are also much broader than SOS, and several important examples of LexA-independent regulation will be reviewed. Finally, some recent advances that relate to the replication and repair of damaged DNA will be summarized. PMID:24097899

  9. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  10. Morphology And Microstructure in Fused Silica Induced By High Fluence Ultraviolet 3omega (355 Nm) Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Ferriera, J.L.; Lindsey, E.F.; Haupt, D.L.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Kinney, J.H.

    2007-08-08

    The morphology and microstructure induced in high quality fused silica by UV (355 nm) laser pulses at high fluence (10-45 J/cm{sup 2}) have been investigated using a suite of microscopic and spectroscopic tools. The laser beam has a near-Gaussian profile with a 1/e{sup 2} diameter of 0.98 mm at the sample plane and a pulse length FWHM (full width at half maximum) of 7.5 ns. The damage craters consist of a molten core region (thermal explosion), surrounded by a near concentric region of fractured material. The latter arises from propagation of lateral cracks induced by the laser-generated shock waves, which also compact the crater wall, {approx} 10 {micro}m thick and {approx} 20% higher in density. The size of the damage crater varies with laser fluence, number of pulses, and laser irradiation history. In the compaction layer, there is no detectable change in the Si/O stoichiometry to within {+-} 1.6% and no crystalline nano-particles of Si were observed. Micro- (1-10 {micro}m) and nano- (20-200 nm) cracks are found, however. A lower valence Si{sup 3+} species on the top 2-3 nm of the compaction layer is evident from the Si 2p XPS. The results are used to construct a physical model of the damage crater and to gain critical insight into laser damage process.

  11. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth arid/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a Function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test material&

  12. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress- rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the rest materials.

  13. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case 1 loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case 1 loading history, and alumina for the Case 3 loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test materials.

  14. Population Growth and Damage Caused by Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Hemiptera, Aphididae) on Different Cultivars and Phenological Stages of Wheat.

    PubMed

    Savaris, M; Lampert, S; Salvadori, J R; Lau, D; Pereira, P R V S; Smaniotto, M A

    2013-10-01

    Among the aphids associated with wheat and other winter cereals, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) is currently the predominant species in the wheat growing region of southern Brazil. The damage caused by this aphid occurs by direct feeding and/or by the transmission of pathogenic viruses, such as the Barley/Cereal yellow dwarf virus. In order to estimate the direct damage caused by R. padi on wheat, we evaluated the population growth of this aphid during the tillering and elongation stages and its effects on grain yield components. The experiment was conducted in a screenhouse with three wheat cultivars (BRS Guabiju, BRS Timbaúva, and Embrapa 16). The effect of a period of 16 days, starting from an infestation of 40 aviruliferous aphids/plant, was evaluated and compared to non-infested plants. In both stages, the population growth of R. padi was lower on the BRS Timbaúva. Although infestation caused a reduction in the grain yield of the three cultivars, this effect was lower for BRS Timbaúva. The cultivar Embrapa 16 supported higher infestations and was more tolerant to damage than the BRS Guabiju. PMID:27023210

  15. Systemic DNA Damage Accumulation Under in Vivo Tumor Growth can be Inhibited by the Antioxidant Tempol

    PubMed Central

    Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ferguson, Nicholas F.; Kryston, Thomas B.; Parekh, Palak; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Mitchell, James B.; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Recently we found that mice bearing subcutaneous non-metastatic tumors exhibited elevated levels of two types of complex DNA damage, i.e., double-strand breaks and oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions in various tissues throughout the body, both adjacent to and distant from the tumor site. This DNA damage was dependent on CCL2, a cytokine involved in the recruitment and activation of macrophages, suggesting that this systemic DNA damage was mediated via tumor-induced chronic inflammatory responses involving cytokines, activation of macrophages, and consequent free radical production. If free radicals are involved, then a diet containing an antioxidant may decrease the distant DNA damage. Results Here we repeated our standard protocol in cohorts of two syngeneic tumor-bearing C57BL/6NCr mice that were on a Tempol-supplemented diet. We show that double-strand break and oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesion levels were considerably decreased, about 2-3 fold, in the majority of tissues studied from the tumor-bearing mice fed the antioxidant Tempol compared to the control tumor-bearing mice. Similar results were also observed in nude mice suggesting that the Tempol effects are independent of functioning adaptive immunity. Conclusions This is the first in vivo study demonstrating the effect of a dietary antioxidant on abscopal DNA damage in tissues distant from a localized source of genotoxic stress. These findings may be important for understanding the mechanisms of genomic instability and carcinogenesis caused by chronic stress-induced systemic DNA damage and for developing preventative strategies. PMID:25069035

  16. Chinese hamster V79 cells harbor potentially lethal damage which is neither fixed nor repaired for long times after attaining maximal survival under growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, N.M.S.; Nori, D.; Mayer, P.J.; Lange, C.S.

    1995-03-01

    The kinetics of the repair and fixation of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in log-phase Chinese hamster V79 cells. The postirradiation (10 Gy) survival of cells treated with hypertonic saline increased when these cells were incubated further in conditioned medium but not in growth medium, indicating that damage which is neither fixed by hypertonic saline nor amenable to repair in growth medium is nonetheless repaired in conditioned medium. Recovery of X-irradiated cells incubated in growth medium or in conditioned medium was maximal by about 70 min and was two times higher in conditioned medium than in growth medium. Cells incubated in growth medium for 70-120 min postirradiation continued to repair damage when subsequently shifted to conditioned medium only. Thus PLD is not fixed by the time the recovery plateau has been attained in growth medium, and this unfixed PLD can still be repaired when cells are shifted to conditioned medium. To study the kinetics of fixation of PLD (without hypertonic saline), the survival of cells incubated in growth medium for up to 9 h postirradiation was compared with that for cells incubated in conditioned medium. These results show that the damage was neither fixed nor misrepaired in growth medium but rather remained unrepaired for up to 2 h, and that damage fixation in growth medium does not begin until after 2 h and is completed by 6 h postirradiation. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Additive and non-additive effects of simulated leaf and inflorescence damage on survival, growth and reproduction of the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Adriana; Ågren, Jon

    2012-08-01

    Herbivores may damage both leaves and reproductive structures, and although such combined damage may affect plant fitness non-additively, this has received little attention. We conducted a 2-year field experiment with a factorial design to examine the effects of simulated leaf (0, 12.5, 25, or 50% of leaf area removed) and inflorescence damage (0 vs. 50% of inflorescences removed) on survival, growth and reproduction in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. Leaf and inflorescence damage negatively and independently reduced flower, fruit and seed production in the year of damage; leaf damage also reduced rosette size by the end of the first season and flower production in the second year. Leaf damage alone reduced the proportion of flowers forming a fruit and fruit production per plant the second year, but when combined with inflorescence damage no such effect was observed (significant leaf × inflorescence damage interaction). Damage to leaves (sources) caused a greater reduction in future reproduction than did simultaneous damage to leaves and inflorescences (sinks). This demonstrates that a full understanding of the effects of herbivore damage on plant fitness requires that consequences of damage to vegetative and reproductive structures are evaluated over more than 1 year and that non-additive effects are considered.

  18. Additive and non-additive effects of simulated leaf and inflorescence damage on survival, growth and reproduction of the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Adriana; Ågren, Jon

    2012-08-01

    Herbivores may damage both leaves and reproductive structures, and although such combined damage may affect plant fitness non-additively, this has received little attention. We conducted a 2-year field experiment with a factorial design to examine the effects of simulated leaf (0, 12.5, 25, or 50% of leaf area removed) and inflorescence damage (0 vs. 50% of inflorescences removed) on survival, growth and reproduction in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. Leaf and inflorescence damage negatively and independently reduced flower, fruit and seed production in the year of damage; leaf damage also reduced rosette size by the end of the first season and flower production in the second year. Leaf damage alone reduced the proportion of flowers forming a fruit and fruit production per plant the second year, but when combined with inflorescence damage no such effect was observed (significant leaf × inflorescence damage interaction). Damage to leaves (sources) caused a greater reduction in future reproduction than did simultaneous damage to leaves and inflorescences (sinks). This demonstrates that a full understanding of the effects of herbivore damage on plant fitness requires that consequences of damage to vegetative and reproductive structures are evaluated over more than 1 year and that non-additive effects are considered. PMID:22349755

  19. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  20. Evolutionary Consequence of a Trade-Off between Growth and Maintenance along with Ribosomal Damages

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Bei-Wen; Honda, Tomoya; Tsuru, Saburo; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms in nature are constantly subjected to a limited availability of resources and experience repeated starvation and nutrition. Therefore, microbial life may evolve for both growth fitness and sustainability. By contrast, experimental evolution, as a powerful approach to investigate microbial evolutionary strategies, often targets the increased growth fitness in controlled, steady-state conditions. Here, we address evolutionary changes balanced between growth and maintenance while taking nutritional fluctuations into account. We performed a 290-day-long evolution experiment with a histidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain that encountered repeated histidine-rich and histidine-starved conditions. The cells that experienced seven rounds of starvation and re-feed grew more sustainably under prolonged starvation but dramatically lost growth fitness under rich conditions. The improved sustainability arose from the evolved capability to use a trace amount of histidine for cell propagation. The reduced growth rate was attributed to mutations genetically disturbing the translation machinery, that is, the ribosome, ultimately slowing protein translation. This study provides the experimental demonstration of slow growth accompanied by an enhanced affinity to resources as an evolutionary adaptation to oscillated environments and verifies that it is possible to evolve for reduced growth fitness. Growth economics favored for population increase under extreme resource limitations is most likely a common survival strategy adopted by natural microbes. PMID:26292224

  1. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  2. Surface Damage Growth Mitigation on KDP/DKDP Optics Using Single-Crystal Diamond Micro-Machining

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L; Adams, J; Feit, M; Sell, W; Stanley, J; Miller, E; Thompson, S; Whitman, P; Hackel, R

    2003-11-12

    A process whereby laser-initiated surface damage on KDP/DKDP optics is removed by spot micro-machining using a high-speed drill and a single-crystal diamond bit, is shown to mitigate damage growth for subsequent laser shots. Our tests show that machined dimples on both surfaces of an AR coated doubler (KDP) crystal are stable, for 526nm, {approx} 3.2ns pulses at {approx} 12J/cm{sup 2} fluences. Other tests also confirmed that the machined dimples on both surfaces of an AR coated tripler (DKDP) crystal are stable, for 351nm, {approx} 3ns pulses at {approx} 8J/cm{sup 2}. We have demonstrated successful mitigation of laser-initiated surface damage sites as large as 0.14mm diameter on DKDP, for up to 1000 shots at 351nm, 13J/cm{sup 2}, {approx} 11ns pulse length, and up to 10 shots at 351nm, 8J/cm{sup 2}, 3ns. Details of the method are presented, including estimates for the heat generated during micro-machining and a plan to implement this method to treat pre-initiated or retrieved-from-service, large-scale optics for use in high-peak-power laser applications.

  3. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  4. Pretreatment with transforming growth factor beta-3 protects small intestinal stem cells against radiation damage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Potten, C. S.; Booth, D.; Haley, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, with its rapid cell replacement, is sensitive to cytotoxic damage and can be a site of dose-limiting toxicity in cancer therapy. Here, we have investigated the use of one growth modulator to manipulate the cell cycle status of gastrointestinal stem cells before cytotoxic exposure to minimize damage to this normal tissue. Transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGF-beta3), a known inhibitor of cell cycle progression through G1, was used to alter intestinal crypt stem cell sensitivity before 12-16 Gy of gamma irradiation, which was used as a model cytotoxic agent. Using a crypt microcolony assay as a measure of functional competence of gastrointestinal stem cells, it was shown that the administration of TGF-beta3 over a 24-h period before irradiation increased the number of surviving crypts by four- to six-fold. To test whether changes in crypt survival are reflected in the well-being of the animal, survival time analyses were performed. After 14.5 Gy of radiation, only 35% of the animals survived within a period of about 12 days, while prior treatment with TGF-beta3 provided significant protection against this early gastrointestinal animal death, with 95% of the treated animals surviving for greater than 30 days. PMID:9166937

  5. Dermatomycoses and inflammation: The adaptive balance between growth, damage, and survival.

    PubMed

    Hube, B; Hay, R; Brasch, J; Veraldi, S; Schaller, M

    2015-03-01

    Dermatomycosis is characterized by both superficial and subcutaneous infections of keratinous tissues and mucous membranes caused by a variety of fungal agents, the two most common classes being dermatophytes and yeasts. Overall, the stepwise process of host infection is similar among the main dermatomycotic species; however, the species-specific ability to elicit a host reaction upon infection is distinct. Yeasts such as Candida albicans elicit a relatively low level of host tissue damage and inflammation during pathogenic infection, while dermatophytes may induce a higher level of tissue damage and inflammatory reaction. Both pathogens can, however, manipulate the host's immune response, ensuring survival and prolonging chronic infection. One common element of most dermatomycotic infections is the disease burden caused by inflammation and associated signs and symptoms, such as erythema, burning and pruritus. There is a strong clinical rationale for the addition of a topical corticosteroid agent to an effective antimycotic therapy, especially in patients who present with inflammatory dermatomycoses (e.g., tinea inguinalis). In this review, we aim to compare the pathogenesis of common dermatomycotic species, including Candida yeasts (Candida albicans), dermatophytes (Trichophyton, Epidermophyton or Microsporum species), and other pathogenic yeasts (Malassezia), with a special focus on unique species-specific aspects of the respective infection processes, the interaction between essential aspects of pathogenic infection, the different roles of the host inflammatory response, and the clinical consequences of the infection-related tissue damage and inflammation. We hope that a broader understanding of the various mechanisms of dermatomycoses may contribute to more effective management of affected patients. PMID:25662199

  6. A growth analysis of waterlogging damage in mung bean (Phaseolus aureus)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Vanhoy, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Mung beans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) were grown for 2 weeks in gravel-vermiculite soilless mix in a growth chamber and subjected to a 1-week waterlogging period followed by a 1-week recovery period. Sequential harvests were made to determine the time course of effects of waterlogging and subsequent recovery on growth parameters by techniques of growth analysis. Root dry matter was the first to be affected, along with an increase in leaf dry matter and specific leaf weight. After a 1-week waterlogging period, specific leaf weight had more than doubled in the stressed plants. Leaf area declined in relation to the control plants as did the ratio of root dry matter to shoot dry matter. During the recovery period there was an increase in the dry matter allocation to the roots relative to the shoot. Specific leaf weight fell to control levels although the rate of leaf area elaboration did not increase during this time, suggesting a redistribution of stored assimilates from the leaves. Net assimilation rate increased during the waterlogging period, probably due to a restriction in root metabolism and reduced translocation out of the leaf rather than to an increase in photosynthesis. Net assimilation rate of waterlogged plants was severely reduced compared with control plants during the recovery period. Both relative growth rate and leaf area duration declined during the waterlogging period and declined further subsequent to the waterlogging treatment. The results illustrate the interrelationships between root and shoot carbon budgets in mung bean during response to the stress of waterlogging.

  7. A growth analysis of waterlogging damage in mung bean (Phaseolus aureus).

    PubMed

    Musgrave, M E; Vanhoy, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mung beans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) were grown for 2 weeks in gravel-vermiculite soilless mix in a growth chamber and subjected to a 1-week waterlogging period followed by a 1-week recovery period. Sequential harvests were made to determine the time course of effects of waterlogging and subsequent recovery on growth parameters by techniques of growth analysis. Root dry matter was the first to be affected, along with an increase in leaf dry matter and specific leaf weight. After a 1-week waterlogging period, specific leaf weight had more than doubled in the stressed plants. Leaf area declined in relation to the control plants as did the ratio of root dry matter to shoot dry matter. During the recovery period there was an increase in the dry matter allocation to the roots relative to the shoot. Specific leaf weight fell to control levels although the rate of leaf area elaboration did not increase during this time, suggesting a redistribution of stored assimilates from the leaves. Net assimilation rate increased during the waterlogging period, probably due to a restriction in root metabolism and reduced translocation out of the leaf rather than to an increase in photosynthesis. Net assimilation rate of waterlogged plants was severely reduced compared with control plants during the recovery period. Both relative growth rate and leaf area duration declined during the waterlogging period and declined further subsequent to the waterlogging treatment. The results illustrate the interrelationships between root and shoot carbon budgets in mung bean during response to the stress of waterlogging.

  8. Pulse length dependence of laser conditioning and bulk damage in KD2PO4

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J J; Weiland, T L; Stanley, J R; Sell, W D; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L; Hackel, R P

    2004-11-10

    An experimental technique has been developed to measure the damage density {rho}({phi}) variation with fluence from scatter maps of bulk damage sites in plates of KD{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (DKDP) crystals combined with calibrated images of the damaging beam's spatial profile. Unconditioned bulk damage in tripler-cut DKDP crystals has been studied using 351 nm (3 {omega}) light at pulse lengths of 0.055, 0.091, 0.30, 0.86, 2.6, and 10 ns. It is found that there is less scatter due to damage at fixed fluence for longer pulse lengths. The results also show that for all the pulse lengths the scatter due to damage is a strong function of the damaging fluence. It is determined that the pulse length scaling for bulk damage scatter in unconditioned DKDP material varies as {tau}{sup 0.24 {+-} 0.05} over two orders of magnitude of pulse lengths. The effectiveness of 3 {omega} laser conditioning at pulse lengths of 0.055, 0.096, 0.30, 0.86, 3.5, and 23 ns is analyzed in term of damage density {rho}({phi}) at 3 {omega}, 2.6 ns. The 860 ps conditioning to a peak irradiance of 7 GW/cm{sup 2} had the best performance under 3 {omega}, 2.6 ns testing. It is shown that the optimal conditioning pulse length appears to lies in the range from 0.3 to 1 ns with a low sensitivity of 0.5 J/cm{sup 2}/ns to the exact pulse length.

  9. Agonistic approach of omega-3, omega-6 and its metabolites with BDNF: An in-silico study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yadla Phani; Srinivas, G Sri Shanmukha; E, Yadu Mitravinda; Malla, Lalitha; Rao, Allam Appa

    2013-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of neurotrophic family of growth factors, mainly found in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of brain. Studies have shown that there is a link between BDNF and cognitive dysfunction, as well as there is a relationship between the PUFAs intake and their effect on BDNF production. Intake of PUFAs, mainly omega-3 and omega-6 has show increase in production of BDNF in brain. In our study we performed docking studies on PUFAs and their metabolites with BDNF using MVD (Molegro Virtual Docker), this has shown that the metabolites of the PUFAs mainly LXA_4, NPD1, HDHA have shown more binding affinity towards BDNF. These metabolites of PUFAs are responsible for modulation of BDNF activity. PMID:24307768

  10. Oligogalacturonides: plant damage-associated molecular patterns and regulators of growth and development.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Simone; Savatin, Daniel V; Sicilia, Francesca; Gramegna, Giovanna; Cervone, Felice; Lorenzo, Giulia De

    2013-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are oligomers of alpha-1,4-linked galacturonosyl residues released from plant cell walls upon partial degradation of homogalacturonan. OGs are able to elicit defense responses, including accumulation of reactive oxygen species and pathogenesis-related proteins, and protect plants against pathogen infections. Recent studies demonstrated that OGs are perceived by wall-associated kinases and share signaling components with microbe-associated molecular patterns. For this reason OGs are now considered true damage-associated molecular patterns that activate the plant innate immunity and may also be involved in the activation of responses to mechanical wounding. Furthermore, OGs appear to modulate developmental processes, likely through their ability to antagonize auxin responses. Here we review our current knowledge on the role and mode of action of this class of oligosaccharides in plant defense and development.

  11. Transforming growth factor alpha treatment alters intracellular calcium levels in hair cells and protects them from ototoxic damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staecker, H; Dazert, S; Malgrange, B; Lefebvre, P P; Ryan, A F; Van de Water, T R

    1997-07-01

    To determine if transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) pretreatment protects hair cells from aminoglycoside induced injury by modifying their intracellular calcium concentration, we assayed hair cell calcium levels in organ of Corti explants both before and after aminoglycoside (i.e. neomycin, 10(-3) M) exposure either with or without growth factor pretreatment. After TGF alpha (500 ng/ml) treatment, the intracellular calcium level of hair cells showed a five-fold increase as compared to the levels observed in the hair cells of control cultures. After ototoxin exposure, calcium levels in hair cells of control explants showed an increase relative to their baseline levels, while in the presence of growth factors pretreatment, hair cells showed a relative reduction in calcium levels. Pretreatment of organ of Corti explants afforded significant protection of hair cell stereocilia bundle morphology from ototoxic damage when compared to explants exposed to ototoxin alone. This study correlates a rise in hair cell calcium levels with the otoprotection of hair cells by TGF alpha in organ of Corti explants. PMID:9263032

  12. Growth, structural, optical, thermal and laser damage threshold studies of an organic single crystal: 1,3,5 - triphenylbenzene (TPB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, R. Subramaniyan; Babu, G. Anandha; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-05-01

    Good quality single crystals of pure hydrocarbon 1,3,5-Triphenylbenzene (TPB) have been successfully grown using toluene as a solvent using controlled slow cooling solution growth technique. TPB crystallizes in orthorhombic structure with the space group Pna21. The structural perfection of the grown crystal has been analysed by high resolution X-ray diffraction measurements. The range and percentage of the optical transmission are ascertained by recording the UV-vis spectrum. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used to study its thermal properties. Powder second harmonic generation studies were carried out to explore its NLO properties. Laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm.

  13. Growth and Potential Damage of Human Bone-Derived Cells Cultured on Fresh and Aged C60/Ti Films

    PubMed Central

    Kopova, Ivana; Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Thin films of binary C60/Ti composites, with various concentrations of Ti ranging from ~ 25% to ~ 70%, were deposited on microscopic glass coverslips and were tested for their potential use in bone tissue engineering as substrates for the adhesion and growth of bone cells. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of Ti atoms (i.e., widely used biocompatible material for the construction of stomatological and orthopedic implants) with atoms of fullerene C60, which can act as very efficient radical scavengers. However, fullerenes and their derivatives are able to generate harmful reactive oxygen species and to have cytotoxic effects. In order to stabilize C60 molecules and to prevent their possible cytotoxic effects, deposition in the compact form of Ti/C60 composites (with various Ti concentrations) was chosen. The reactivity of C60/Ti composites may change in time due to the physicochemical changes of molecules in an air atmosphere. In this study, we therefore tested the dependence between the age of C60/Ti films (from one week to one year) and the adhesion, morphology, proliferation, viability, metabolic activity and potential DNA damage to human osteosarcoma cells (lines MG-63 and U-2 OS). After 7 days of cultivation, we did not observe any negative influence of fresh or aged C60/Ti layers on cell behavior, including the DNA damage response. The presence of Ti atoms resulted in improved properties of the C60 layers, which became more suitable for cell cultivation. PMID:25875338

  14. Interactions of ErbB4 and Kap1 Connect the Growth Factor and DNA Damage Response Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Hebert, Maureen; Ramabhadran, Rajani; Stern, David F.

    2014-01-01

    ErbB4 is unusual among receptor tyrosine kinases because some isoforms can be efficiently cleaved at the plasma membrane to release a soluble intracellular domain. The cleavage product has high kinase activity and homes to the nucleus. A screen for proteins that associate with the ErbB4 intracellular domain identified candidate interactors including ITCH, WWP2, Nucleolin, and Krab-associated protein 1 (Kap1). Kap1 binds to multiple isoforms of ErbB4 but does not require ErbB4 kinase activity for binding, nor is it an ErbB4 substrate. Kap1 reduces ERBB4 transcription and either directly or indirectly modulates the expression of genes that are themselves regulated by ErbB4. Upregulation of ErbB4 and suppression of MDM2 jointly enhance and accelerate the accumulation of p21CIP1 in response to DNA damage. Overall, these findings further substantiate the role of ErbB4 in conjoint regulation of growth factor signaling and DNA damage responses. PMID:20858735

  15. Unveiling laser diode "fossil" and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser "fossil" buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser "fossil" is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates. PMID:26740303

  16. Unveiling laser diode "fossil" and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-07

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser "fossil" buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser "fossil" is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates.

  17. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA Damage Responsive Murine Endogenous Retrovirus of GLN Family Involved in Cell Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Qi, Xinming; Gong, Likun; Xing, Guozhen; Chen, Min; Miao, Lingling; Yao, Jun; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Furihata, Chie; Luan, Yang; Ren, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512), whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs), but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs). Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV). However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions. PMID:22514700

  18. The pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β2 in glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    In patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the optic nerve head (ONH) shows characteristic cupping correlated with visual field defects. The progressive optic neuropathy is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The critical risk factor for axonal damage at the ONH is an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The increase in IOP correlates with axonal loss in the ONH, which might be due to an impaired axoplasmatic flow leading to the loss of RGCs. Damage to the optic nerve is thought to occur in the lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the ONH, which is composed of characteristic sieve-like connective tissue cribriform plates through which RGC axons exit the eye. The cupping of the optic disc, and the compression and excavation of LC are characteristic signs of glaucomatous ONH remodelling. In ONH of POAG patients a disorganized distribution and deposition of elastic fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the optic nerve fibers is found. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 could be one of the pathogenic factors responsible for the structural alterations in POAG patients as the TGF-β2 levels in the ONH of glaucomatous eyes are elevated as well as in the aqueous homour. TGF-β2 leads to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules mediated by connective tissue growth factor and to an impaired ECM degradation in cultured ONH astrocytes. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 effectively antagonizes the effects of TGF-β2 on matrix deposition. The BMP antagonist gremlin blocks this inhibition, allowing TGF-β2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Overall, the ECM in the ONH is kept in balance in the OHN by factors that augment or block the activity of TGF-β2.

  19. Essential oil of Artemisia scoparia inhibits plant growth by generating reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Kaur, Shalinder; Mittal, Sunil; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the chemical composition and phytotoxicity of the essential oil extracted from leaves of Artemisia scoparia Waldst. et Kit. (red stem wormwood, Asteraceae). GC/GC-MS analyses revealed 33 chemical constituents representing 99.83% of the oil. The oil, in general, was rich in monoterpenes that constitute 71.6%, with beta-myrcene (29.27%) as the major constituent followed by (+)-limonene (13.3%), (Z)-beta-ocimene (13.37%), and gamma-terpinene (9.51%). The oil and beta-myrcene were evaluated in a dose-response bioassay under laboratory conditions for phytotoxicity against three weeds-Avena fatua, Cyperus rotundus, and Phalaris minor. A significant reduction in germination, seedling growth, and dry matter accumulation was observed in the test weeds. At the lowest treatment of 0.07 mg/ml Artemisia oil, germination was reduced by 39%, 19%, and 10.6% in C. rotundus, P. minor, and A. fatua, respectively. However, the inhibitory effect of beta-myrcene was less. In general, a dose-dependent effect was observed and the growth declined with increasing concentration. Among the three weeds, the inhibitory effect was greatest on C. rotundus, so it was selected for further studies. We explored the explanation for observed growth inhibition in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS: lipid peroxidation, membrane integrity, and amounts of conjugated dienes and hydrogen peroxide)-induced oxidative stress. Exposure of C. rotundus to Artemisia oil or beta-myrcene enhanced solute leakage, indicating membrane disintegration. There were increased levels of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide, indicating lipid peroxidation and induction of oxidative stress. We conclude that Artemisia oil inhibits plant root growth through generation of ROS-induced oxidative damage.

  20. Nucleation and growth of damage in polycrystalline aluminum under dynamic tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, M. L.; Yao, Y.; Ran, X. X.; Ye, W.; Bie, B. X.; Fan, D.; Li, P.

    2015-03-15

    Plate-impact experiments were conducted to study the features and mechanisms of void nucleation and growth in the polycrystalline of pure aluminum under dynamic loading. Soft-recovered samples have been analyzed by metallographic microscopy, electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and synchrotron radiation x-ray tomography technology. It was found that most of the void nucleation in grains neared the boundaries of “weak-orientation” grains and grew toward the grain boundaries with fractured small grains around the boundaries. This was mainly caused by the accumulation and interaction of slip systems in the “weak-orientation” grains. In addition, the micro voids were nearly octahedron because the octahedral slip systems were formed by 8 slip planes in the polycrystalline of pure aluminum. The EBSD results are consistent with the three-dimensional structure observed by synchrotron radiation x-ray.

  1. Growth performance and oxidative damage in kidney induced by oral administration of Cr(III) in chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhan; Liu, Cun; Cheng, Jia; Fan, Wentao; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of adding chromic chloride (CrCl3) in the drinking water of chickens. Hyland brown male chickens were randomly divided into four groups. Three groups orally received 1/2 LD50, 1/4 LD50, and 1/8 LD50 CrCl3mgkg(-1) body weight daily for 42d. The fourth group was treated with water. The chickens were sacrificed at 14, 28, and 42d post-treatment. The renal injury was examined through histological analysis, and kidney mass was determined. The effects on growth performance were assessed by measuring the weight of the body, chest muscles, and leg muscles. Oxidative damage was evaluated by determining the antioxidant defense levels in kidney homogenates. The body weight and the weight of tissues gained time-dependently, but significantly decreased compared with those in the control group (P<0.05) at the same exposure time. Administering Cr(3+) significantly increased the levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and hydrogen peroxide in the kidney compared with those in the control groups. Whereas, administering Cr(3+) reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and total an-tioxidant capacity compared with those in the control group (P<0.05) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In conclusion, oral administration of CrCl3 decreases the growth performance of chickens, leads to the pathological lesions and affects nephritic antioxidant capacity in the kidney dose- and time-dependently.

  2. Relationship of chromosomal damage induced by caffeine to growth temperature and ATP level in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández, P; Mingo, R; González-Fernández, A; López-Sáez, J F

    1986-10-01

    Caffeine is known to induce chromosomal aberrations in proliferating cells when they are incubated during G2 and mitotic prophase. In the present paper, this caffeine effect has been analyzed in Allium cepa root meristems growing at different culture temperatures under steady-state kinetics. Caffeine (1-10 mM) induces chromosomal aberrations in a dose-dependent manner, and the treatment efficiency correlates linearly with the square of caffeine concentration. The efficiency of caffeine incubations, within the range 5-25 degrees C during equivalent cycle time periods has also been studied. It has been found that the lower the culture temperature, the higher the level of chromosomal aberrations. Moreover, at different temperatures, the level of chromosomal aberrations is a simple function of caffeine concentration and the ATP level. Therefore, the efficiency of caffeine treatment appears to be determined by some interaction between caffeine concentration and cellular ATP level. Our present results demonstrate that the influence of growth temperature on the chromosome-breaking effect of caffeine can be, at least partially, explained by the ATP levels during the incubation periods. In short, under different kinetics of plant cell proliferation, the ATP level, and/or something correlating with it, could explain the efficiency of caffeine in inducing chromosomal aberrations: the lower the ATP level, the higher the caffeine efficiency.

  3. Cell Growth of Wall-Free L-Form Bacteria Is Limited by Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Mercier, Romain; Wu, Ling Juan; Domínguez-Cuevas, Patricia; Oshima, Taku; Errington, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Summary The peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall is a defining feature of the bacterial lineage and an important target for antibiotics, such as β-lactams and glycopeptides. Nevertheless, many bacteria are capable of switching into a cell-wall-deficient state, called the “L-form” [1–3]. These variants have been classically identified as antibiotic-resistant forms in association with a wide range of infectious diseases [4]. L-forms become completely independent of the normally essential FtsZ cell division machinery [3, 5]. Instead, L-form proliferation is driven by a simple biophysical process based on an increased ratio of surface area to cell volume synthesis [6, 7]. We recently showed that only two genetic changes are needed for the L-form transition in Bacillus subtilis [7]. Class 1 mutations work to generate excess membrane synthesis [7]. Until now, the function of the class 2 mutations was unclear. We now show that these mutations work by counteracting an increase in the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the electron transport pathway, which occurs in wall-deficient cells. Consistent with this, addition of a ROS scavenger or anaerobic culture conditions also worked to promote L-form growth without the class 2 mutations in both Gram-positive B. subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that physiological compensation for the metabolic imbalance that occurs when cell wall synthesis is blocked is crucial for L-form proliferation in a wide range of bacteria and also provide new insights into the mode of action of antibiotics that target the bacterial cell wall. PMID:26051891

  4. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  5. Gamma rays induce DNA damage and oxidative stress associated with impaired growth and reproduction in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Bo-Young; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Yong Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear radioisotope accidents are potentially ecologically devastating due to their impact on marine organisms. To examine the effects of exposure of a marine organism to radioisotopes, we irradiated the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus with several doses of gamma radiation and analyzed the effects on mortality, fecundity, and molting by assessing antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns. No mortality was observed at 96h, even in response to exposure to a high dose (800Gy) of radiation, but mortality rate was significantly increased 120h (5 days) after exposure to 600 or 800Gy gamma ray radiation. We observed a dose-dependent reduction in fecundity of ovigerous females; even the group irradiated with 50Gy showed a significant reduction in fecundity, suggesting that gamma rays are likely to have a population level effect. In addition, we observed growth retardation, particularly at the nauplius stage, in individuals after gamma irradiation. In fact, nauplii irradiated with more than 200Gy, though able to molt to copepodite stage 1, did not develop into adults. Upon gamma radiation, T. japonicus showed a dose-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, the activities of several antioxidant enzymes, and expression of double-stranded DNA break damage genes (e.g. DNA-PK, Ku70, Ku80). At a low level (sub-lethal dose) of gamma irradiation, we found dose-dependent upregulation of p53, implying cellular damage in T. japonicus in response to sub-lethal doses of gamma irradiation, suggesting that T. japonicus is not susceptible to sub-lethal doses of gamma irradiation. Additionally, antioxidant genes, phase II enzyme (e.g. GSTs), and cellular chaperone genes (e.g. Hsps) that are involved in cellular defense mechanisms also showed the same expression patterns for sublethal doses of gamma irradiation (50-200Gy). These findings indicate that sublethal doses of gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage and increase

  6. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible, beta (GADD45b)-mediated DNA demethylation in major psychosis.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Sharma, Rajiv P; Chase, Kayla A; Matrisciano, Francesco; Dong, Erbo; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant neocortical DNA methylation has been suggested to be a pathophysiological contributor to psychotic disorders. Recently, a growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible, beta (GADD45b) protein-coordinated DNA demethylation pathway, utilizing cytidine deaminases and thymidine glycosylases, has been identified in the brain. We measured expression of several members of this pathway in parietal cortical samples from the Stanley Foundation Neuropathology Consortium (SFNC) cohort. We find an increase in GADD45b mRNA and protein in patients with psychosis. In immunohistochemistry experiments using samples from the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, we report an increased number of GADD45b-stained cells in prefrontal cortical layers II, III, and V in psychotic patients. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor IX (BDNF IXabcd) was selected as a readout gene to determine the effects of GADD45b expression and promoter binding. We find that there is less GADD45b binding to the BDNF IXabcd promoter in psychotic subjects. Further, there is reduced BDNF IXabcd mRNA expression, and an increase in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at its promoter. On the basis of these results, we conclude that GADD45b may be increased in psychosis compensatory to its inability to access gene promoter regions.

  7. Dynamic monitoring of platelet deposition on severely damaged vessel wall in flowing blood. Effects of different stenoses on thrombus growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, R.; Badimon, J.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Badimon, L. )

    1990-03-01

    The formation of an arterial thrombus is a dynamic process that depends upon the characteristics of blood flow, the triggering substrate, and the blood components. We have developed and characterized a sensitive and specific computer-assisted nuclear scintigraphic method to study the dynamics of platelet deposition on severely damaged vessels both in vitro and in vivo in nonstenotic and stenotic flow conditions. Heparinized pig blood with Indium-111-labeled platelets was perfused for 50 minutes. Method variability in both static and flowing conditions was evaluated by Indium-111-labeled transferrin and Indium-111-labeled platelets. Positive scintigrams were obtained mainly in the presence of severe high grade stenoses on a thrombogenic substrate. Since the method is highly sensitive, computer-assisted axial dependence analysis was performed on the scintigraphic images to locate the thrombotic accumulation with respect to the area of the stenosis and to monitor the dynamic changes in platelet accumulation over time. Both in vitro and in vivo the highest level of platelet deposition occurred at the apex of the 80% stenosis, where embolization could be usually detected after 30 minutes of perfusion. This study is the first to assess the dynamics of thrombus growth in nonparallel flow streamlines such as are encountered in stenotic vessels. This method provides a new experimental tool with which to study factors affecting thrombus formation and stability.

  8. Copper-induced root growth inhibition of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. involves disturbances in cell division and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rong; Wang, Congyue; Chen, Da; Björn, Lars O; Li, Shaoshan

    2015-05-01

    Copper (Cu) is considered to be an indispensable microelement for plants. Excessive Cu, however, is toxic and disturbs several processes in the plant. The present study addressed the effects of ionic Cu (2.0 µM and 8.0 µM) on mitosis, the microtubule cytoskeleton, and DNA in root tip cells of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. to better understand Cu toxicity on plant root systems. The results indicated that Cu accumulated in roots and that root growth was inhibited dramatically in Cu treatment groups. Chromosomal aberrations (for example, C-mitosis, chromosome bridges, chromosome stickiness, and micronucleus) were observed, and the mitotic index decreased during Cu treatments at different concentrations. Microtubules were one of the target sites of Cu toxicity in root tip meristematic cells, and Cu exposure substantially impaired microtubule arrangements. The content of α-tubulin decreased following 36 h of exposure to 2.0 µM or 8.0 µM of Cu in comparison with the control group. Copper increased DNA damage and suppressed cell cycle progression. The above toxic effects became more serious with increasing Cu concentration and prolonged exposure time.

  9. Copper-induced root growth inhibition of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. involves disturbances in cell division and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rong; Wang, Congyue; Chen, Da; Björn, Lars O; Li, Shaoshan

    2015-05-01

    Copper (Cu) is considered to be an indispensable microelement for plants. Excessive Cu, however, is toxic and disturbs several processes in the plant. The present study addressed the effects of ionic Cu (2.0 µM and 8.0 µM) on mitosis, the microtubule cytoskeleton, and DNA in root tip cells of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. to better understand Cu toxicity on plant root systems. The results indicated that Cu accumulated in roots and that root growth was inhibited dramatically in Cu treatment groups. Chromosomal aberrations (for example, C-mitosis, chromosome bridges, chromosome stickiness, and micronucleus) were observed, and the mitotic index decreased during Cu treatments at different concentrations. Microtubules were one of the target sites of Cu toxicity in root tip meristematic cells, and Cu exposure substantially impaired microtubule arrangements. The content of α-tubulin decreased following 36 h of exposure to 2.0 µM or 8.0 µM of Cu in comparison with the control group. Copper increased DNA damage and suppressed cell cycle progression. The above toxic effects became more serious with increasing Cu concentration and prolonged exposure time. PMID:25639377

  10. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of manganese and plant growth by alleviating the ultrastructural damages in Juncus effusus L.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, U; Xu, L; Ali, Shafaqat; Jilani, Ghulam; Gong, H J; Shen, W Q; Zhou, W J

    2009-10-30

    Chelate-assisted phytoextraction by high biomass producing plant species enhances the removal of heavy metals from polluted environments. In this regard, Juncus effusus a wetland plant has great potential. This study evaluated the effects of elevated levels of manganese (Mn) on the vegetative growth, Mn uptake and antioxidant enzymes in J. effusus. We also studied the role of citric acid and EDTA on improving metal accumulation, plant growth and Mn toxicity stress alleviation. Three-week-old plantlets of J. effusus were subjected to various treatments in the hydroponics as: Mn (50, 100 and 500 microM) alone, Mn (500 microM) + citric acid (5 mM), and Mn (500 microM) + EDTA (5 mM). After 2 weeks of treatment, higher Mn concentrations significantly reduced the plant biomass and height. Both citric acid and EDTA restored the plant height as it was reduced at the highest Mn level. Only the citric acid (but not EDTA) was able to recover the plant biomass weight, which was also obvious from the microscopic visualization of mesophyll cells. There was a concentration dependent increase in Mn uptake in J. effusus plants, and relatively more deposition in roots compared to aerial parts. Although both EDTA and citric acid caused significant increase in Mn accumulation; however, the Mn translocation was enhanced markedly by EDTA. Elevated levels of Mn augmented the oxidative stress, which was evident from changes in the activities of antioxidative enzymes in plant shoots. Raised levels of lipid peroxidation and variable changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were recorded under Mn stress. Electron microscopic images revealed several modifications in the plants at cellular and sub-cellular level due to the oxidative damage induced by Mn. Changes in cell shape and size, chloroplast swelling, increased number of plastoglobuli and disruption of thylakoid were noticed. However, these plants showed a high degree of tolerance against Mn toxicity stress, and it removed

  11. Combined Advanced Finishing and UV-Laser Conditioning for Producing UV-Damage-Resistant Fused Silica Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Penetrante, B; Golini, D; Slomba, A; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Nichols, M; Peterson, J

    2001-11-01

    Laser induced damage initiation on fused silica optics can limit the lifetime of the components when used in high power UV laser environments. Foe example in inertial confinement fusion research applications, the optics can be exposed to temporal laser pulses of about 3-nsec with average fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} and peak fluences between 12 and 15 J/cm{sup 2}. During the past year, we have focused on optimizing the damage performance at a wavelength of 355-nm (3{omega}), 3-nsec pulse length, for optics in this category by examining a variety of finishing technologies with a challenge to improve the laser damage initiation density by at least two orders of magnitude. In this paper, we describe recent advances in improving the 3{omega} damage initiation performance of laboratory-scale zirconium oxide and cerium oxide conventionally finished fused silica optics via application of processes incorporating magnetorheological finishing (MRF), wet chemical etching, and UV laser conditioning. Details of the advanced finishing procedures are described and comparisons are made between the procedures based upon large area 3{omega} damage performance, polishing layer contamination, and optical subsurface damage.

  12. Damage potential of grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) on early growth stages of small-grains and canola under subarctic conditions.

    PubMed

    Begna, Sultan H; Fielding, Dennis J

    2003-08-01

    We characterized the type and extent of grasshopper injury to above- and below-ground plant parts for four crops [barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and canola (Brassica campestris L.)] commonly grown, or with potential to grow, in central Alaska. Cages were placed on 48 pots containing plants in second to third leaf stages and stocked with 0, 2, 4, and 6 first-instar Melanoplus sanguinipes F. pot(-1). Plants were harvested 22 d after planting. Stem growth of barley and oats was not affected except at the highest grasshopper treatment. In canola, stem biomass was reduced at the medium and high grasshopper treatments, when most of the leaves had been consumed. The highest grasshopper treatment reduced leaf area in barley and oats by approximately 55%, and caused a significant reduction in dry weight of leaves, stems, and roots (41-72%). Wheat and canola plants were smaller than barley and oats across all treatments and, at the highest grasshopper density, above-ground portions of wheat and canola were completely destroyed. Length and surface area of roots of barley and oats were reduced by 20-28% again at the highest grasshopper density, whereas the reduction for wheat and canola ranged from 50 to 90%. There was little or no difference among all grasshopper densities for C-N ratio in leaf and stem tissues of all crops. The results suggest that wheat and canola are more susceptible than barley and oats and that densities > or = 2 pot(-1) (approximately > or = 50 m(-2)) of even very small grasshoppers could cause significant damage in small-grain and oilseed crop production.

  13. DNA Damage Response Proteins and Oxygen Modulate Prostaglandin E2 Growth Factor Release in Response to Low and High LET Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher P.; Tinganelli, Walter; Sharma, Neelam; Nie, Jingyi; Sicard, Cory; Natale, Francesco; King, Maurice; Keysar, Steven B.; Jimeno, Antonio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira; Durante, Marco; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2015-01-01

    Common cancer therapies employ chemicals or radiation that damage DNA. Cancer and normal cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex networks of DNA damage sensor, signal transducer, and effector proteins that arrest cell cycle progression, and repair damaged DNA. If damage is severe enough, the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers programed cell death by apoptosis or other pathways. Caspase 3 is a protease that is activated upon damage and triggers apoptosis, and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent growth factor that can enhance growth of surviving cancer cells leading to accelerated tumor repopulation. Thus, dying tumor cells can promote growth of surviving tumor cells, a pathway aptly named Phoenix Rising. In the present study, we surveyed Phoenix Rising responses in a variety of normal and established cancer cell lines, and in cancer cell lines freshly derived from patients. We demonstrate that IR induces a Phoenix Rising response in many, but not all cell lines, and that PGE2 production generally correlates with enhanced growth of cells that survive irradiation, and of unirradiated cells co-cultured with irradiated cells. We show that PGE2 production is stimulated by low and high LET ionizing radiation, and can be enhanced or suppressed by inhibitors of key DDR proteins. PGE2 is produced downstream of caspase 3 and the cyclooxygenases COX1 and COX2, and we show that the pan COX1–2 inhibitor indomethacin blocks IR-induced PGE2 production in the presence or absence of DDR inhibitors. COX1–2 require oxygen for catalytic activity, and we further show that PGE2 production is markedly suppressed in cells cultured under low (1%) oxygen concentration. Thus, Phoenix Rising is most likely to cause repopulation of tumors with relatively high oxygen, but not in hypoxic tumors. This survey lays a foundation for future studies to further define tumor responses to radiation and inhibitors of the DDR and Phoenix Rising to enhance the efficacy of

  14. Comparing the use of 4.6 um lasers versus 10.6 um lasers for mitigating damage site growth on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2010-10-21

    The advantage of using mid-infrared (IR) 4.6 {micro}m lasers, versus far-infrared 10.6 {micro}m lasers, for mitigating damage growth on fused silica is investigated. In contrast to fused silica's high absorption at 10.6 {micro}m, silica absorption at 4.6 {micro}m is two orders of magnitude less. The much reduced absorption at 4.6 {micro}m enables deep heat penetration into fused silica when it is heated using the mid-IR laser, which in turn leads to more effective mitigation of damage sites with deep cracks. The advantage of using mid-IR versus far-IR laser for damage growth mitigation under non-evaporative condition is quantified by defining a figure of merit (FOM) that relates the crack healing depth to laser power required. Based on our FOM, we show that for damage cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation using a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation using a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser.

  15. Eriophyoid mite damage in Vitis vinifera (grapevine) in Australia: Calepitrimerus vitis and Colomerus vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae) as the common cause of the widespread 'Restricted Spring Growth' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Martina B; Horne, Paul A; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2005-01-01

    Leaf and shoot distortions and retarded shoot growth in Vitis vinifera L. prevalent in Australian vineyards in early spring, were investigated in replicated field experiments over 3 yrs. Leaf distortion and retarded shoot growth were identified as damage due to feeding of extremely high populations of over-wintered deutogynes of Calepitrimerus vitis (Nalepa) (grape rust mite). This damage was hitherto known in Australia as 'Restricted Spring Growth' (RSG), a syndrome comprising several growth abnormality symptoms, none with a clearly identified cause or a successful treatment. A successful treatment against C. vitis was used to selectively eliminate RSG, while C. vitis numbers were recorded using a validated trapping technique; intercepting deutogynes migrating from winter shelters in the wooden vine structure, to emerging green tissues. Severe leaf distortion was associated with > 400 C. vitis deutogynes per spur, while > 1000 per spur had the added effect of severely retarding shoot growth. A 43.0-47.2% shoot length reduction was recorded for Cabernet Sauvignon, 27.1-32.8% for Sauvignon Blanc, when 4-6 leaves were separated. Symptoms were most prominent up to 8-9 separated leaves, however 24.7-30.4% shoot length reduction was still evident at flowering, and 12.8% circa fruit set. C. vitis effect on vine fruitfulness, and yield parameters at fruit set, were also studied. Once successfully treated to prevent C. vitis damage, poor bud burst remained evident in some vineyards. Surveys of unburst buds from such vineyards revealed presence of Colomerus vitis (Pagenstecher) (grape bud mite). When Col. vitis numbers in unburst buds reached 100-500 per bud, apical meristems of primary, and commonly also secondary buds were dead, preventing bud burst. The remaining living scale tissue was distinctly scarred. Bud and associated shoot damage were documented. Retarded shoot growth and leaf distortion, previously attributed to RSG, are misdiagnosed C. vitis spring feeding

  16. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Fujita, Mayumi; Asada, Masahiro; Meineke, Viktor; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  17. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Shinji; Tam, Justina; Roth, Jack A; Sokolov, Konstantin; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP) produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint by inhibiting BRCA1, Chk1, and phospho-Cdc2/CDK1 protein expression. In vivo therapy studies showed 225-NP treatment reduced EGFR phosphorylation, increased γH2AX foci, and induced tumor cell apoptosis, resulting in suppression of tumor growth. Conclusion The 225-NP treatment induces DNA damage and abrogates G2/M phase of the cell cycle, leading to cellular apoptosis and suppression of lung tumor growth

  18. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Peter; Anderson, Jennifer

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  19. p53-Dependent and p53-independent induction of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 by deoxyribonucleic acid damage and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Adda; Coleman, Carrie M; Burns, Timothy F; Himelstein, Bruce P; Koch, Cameron J; Cohen, Pinchas; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2005-06-01

    IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3, the principal carrier of IGFs in the circulation, contributes to both endocrine and autocrine/paracrine growth control; it can be induced by GH, cytokines, retinoic acid, and tumor suppressors. Induction of IGFBP-3 by the tumor suppressor p53 has been shown in various models that directly manipulate p53 activity. However, the physiologic settings under which this induction occurs have not been established. DNA damage and hypoxia are two important physiologic activators of p53. We have demonstrated for the first time that IGFBP-3 is an in vivo target of p53 in response to ionizing radiation. This effect was tissue specific. Furthermore, we demonstrated that genotoxic drugs could increase IGFBP-3 protein levels and secretion in tumor cell lines in a p53-independent manner. Finally, we have established that IGFBP-3 induction under hypoxic conditions is independent of p53 in tumor cell lines derived form multiple tissue types. Thus, IGFBP-3 is induced by physiologic conditions that also induce p53, although p53 is not always required. Because IGFBP-3 can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, its induction by DNA damage and hypoxia suggest IGFBP-3 plays a role in the physiologic protection against aberrant cell growth.

  20. Fault core and damage zone fracture attributes vary along strike owing to interaction of fracture growth, quartz accumulation, and differing sandstone composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, S. E.; Eichhubl, P.; Hargrove, P.; Ellis, M. A.; Hooker, J. N.

    2014-11-01

    Small, meter-to decimeter-displacement oblique-slip faults cut latest Precambrian lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite and Cambrian quartz arenite sandstones in NW Scotland. Despite common slip and thermal histories during faulting, the two sandstone units have different fault-core and damage-zone attributes, including fracture length and aperture distributions, and location of quartz deposits. Fault cores are narrow (less than 1 m), low-porosity cataclasite in lithic arkose/feldspathic litharenites. Damage zone-parallel opening-mode fractures are long (meters or more) with narrow ranges of lengths and apertures, are mostly isolated, have sparse quartz cement, and are open. In contrast, quartz arenites, despite abundant quartz cement, have fault cores that contain porous breccia and dense, striated slip zones. Damage-zone fractures have lengths ranging from meters to centimeters or less, but with distributions skewed to short fractures, and have power-law aperture distributions. Owing to extensive quartz cement, they tend to be sealed. These attributes reflect inhibited authigenic quartz accumulation on feldspar and lithic grains, which are unfavorable precipitation substrates, and favored accumulation on detrital quartz. In quartz breccia, macropores >0.04 mm wide persist where surrounded by slow-growing euhedral quartz. Differences in quartz occurrence and size distributions are compatible with the hypothesis that cement deposits modify the probability of fracture reactivation. Existing fractures readily reactivate in focused growth where quartz accumulation is low and porosity high. Only some existing, partly cemented fractures reactivate and some deformation is manifest in new fracture formation in partitioned growth where quartz accumulation is high. Consequences include along-strike differences in permeability and locus of fluid flow between cores and damage zones and fault strength.

  1. The Arabidopsis Class III Peroxidase AtPRX71 Negatively Regulates Growth under Physiological Conditions and in Response to Cell Wall Damage1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Sara; Ranocha, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the cell wall has a major impact on plant growth and development, and alteration of cell wall structural components is often detrimental to biomass production. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these negative effects are largely unknown. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with altered pectin composition because of either the expression of the Aspergillus niger polygalacturonase II (AnPGII; 35S:AnPGII plants) or a mutation in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene that encodes a putative pectin methyltransferase (qua2-1 plants), display severe growth defects. Here, we show that expression of Arabidopsis PEROXIDASE71 (AtPRX71), encoding a class III peroxidase, strongly increases in 35S:AnPGII and qua2-1 plants as well as in response to treatments with the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben, which also impairs cell wall integrity. Analysis of atprx71 loss-of-function mutants and plants overexpressing AtPRX71 indicates that this gene negatively influences Arabidopsis growth at different stages of development, likely limiting cell expansion. The atprx71-1 mutation partially suppresses the dwarf phenotype of qua2-1, suggesting that AtPRX71 contributes to the growth defects observed in plants undergoing cell wall damage. Furthermore, AtPRX71 seems to promote the production of reactive oxygen species in qua2-1 plants as well as plants treated with isoxaben. We propose that AtPRX71 contributes to strengthen cell walls, therefore restricting cell expansion, during normal growth and in response to cell wall damage. PMID:26468518

  2. The Arabidopsis Class III Peroxidase AtPRX71 Negatively Regulates Growth under Physiological Conditions and in Response to Cell Wall Damage.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Sara; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Dunand, Christophe; Ranocha, Philippe; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Cervone, Felice; Ferrari, Simone

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the cell wall has a major impact on plant growth and development, and alteration of cell wall structural components is often detrimental to biomass production. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these negative effects are largely unknown. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with altered pectin composition because of either the expression of the Aspergillus niger polygalacturonase II (AnPGII; 35S:AnPGII plants) or a mutation in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene that encodes a putative pectin methyltransferase (qua2-1 plants), display severe growth defects. Here, we show that expression of Arabidopsis PEROXIDASE71 (AtPRX71), encoding a class III peroxidase, strongly increases in 35S:AnPGII and qua2-1 plants as well as in response to treatments with the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben, which also impairs cell wall integrity. Analysis of atprx71 loss-of-function mutants and plants overexpressing AtPRX71 indicates that this gene negatively influences Arabidopsis growth at different stages of development, likely limiting cell expansion. The atprx71-1 mutation partially suppresses the dwarf phenotype of qua2-1, suggesting that AtPRX71 contributes to the growth defects observed in plants undergoing cell wall damage. Furthermore, AtPRX71 seems to promote the production of reactive oxygen species in qua2-1 plants as well as plants treated with isoxaben. We propose that AtPRX71 contributes to strengthen cell walls, therefore restricting cell expansion, during normal growth and in response to cell wall damage.

  3. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protect against DNA Damage but Are Dispensable for the Growth of the Pathogen in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rupangi Verma; Reddy, P. Vineel; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    In host cells, Mycobacterium tuberculosis encounters an array of reactive molecules capable of damaging its genome. Non-bulky DNA lesions are the most common damages produced on the exposure of the pathogen to reactive species and base excision repair (BER) pathway is involved in the repair of such damage. During BER, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease enzymes repair the abasic sites that are generated after spontaneous DNA base loss or by the action of DNA glycosylases, which if left unrepaired lead to inhibition of replication and transcription. However, the role of AP endonucleases in imparting protection against DNA damage and in the growth and pathogenesis of M.tuberculosis has not yet been elucidated. To demonstrate the biological significance of these enzymes in M.tuberculosis, it would be desirable to disrupt the relevant genes and evaluate the resulting mutants for their ability to grow in the host and cause disease. In this study, we have generated M.tuberculosis mutants of the base excision repair (BER) system, disrupted in either one (MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA) or both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA). We demonstrate that these genes are crucial for bacteria to withstand alkylation and oxidative stress in vitro. In addition, the mutant disrupted in both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA) exhibited a significant reduction in its ability to survive inside human macrophages. However, infection of guinea pigs with either MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA or MtbΔendΔxthA resulted in the similar bacillary load and pathological damage in the organs as observed in the case of infection with wild-type M.tuberculosis. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:24800740

  4. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-RasG12V-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:25971796

  5. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-05-13

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  6. Wavelength and pulselength dependence of laser conditioning and bulk damage in doubler-cut KH2PO4

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J J; Bruere, J R; Bolourchi, M; Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hahn, D E; Jarboe, J A; Lane, L A; Luthi, R L; McElroy, J N; Rubenchik, A M; Stanley, J R; Sell, W D; Vickers, J L; Weiland, T L; Willard, D A

    2005-10-28

    An experimental technique has been utilized to measure the variation of bulk damage scatter with damaging fluence in plates of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) crystals. Bulk damage in unconditioned and laser-conditioned doubler-cut KDP crystals has been studied using 527 nm (2{omega}) light at pulselengths of 0.3-10 ns. It is found that there is less scatter due to damage at fixed fluence for longer pulselengths. In particular, there is {approx}4X increase in fluence for equivalent scatter for damage at 2{omega}, 10 ns as compared to 0.30 ns in unconditioned KDP. The results for the unconditioned and conditioned KDP show that for all the pulselengths the scatter due to the bulk damage is a strong function of the damaging fluence ({phi}{sup -5}). It is determined that the 2{omega} fluence pulselength-scaling for equivalent bulk damage scatter in unconditioned KDP varies as {tau}{sup 0.30{+-}0.11} and in 3{omega}, 3ns ramp-conditioned KDP varies as {tau}{sup 0.27{+-}0.14}. The effectiveness of 2{omega} and 3{omega} laser conditioning at pulselengths in the range of 0.30-23 ns for damage induced 2{omega}, 3 ns is analyzed in terms of scatter. For the protocols tested (i.e. peak conditioning irradiance, etc.), the 3{omega}, 300 ps conditioning to a peak fluence of 3 J/cm{sup 2} had the best performance under 2{omega}, 3 ns testing. The general trend in the performance of the conditioning protocols was shorter wavelength and shorter pulselength appear to produce better conditioning for testing at 2{omega}, 3 ns.

  7. Ochratoxin A at low concentrations inhibits in vitro growth of canine umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells through oxidative chromatin and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rutigliano, Lucia; Valentini, Luisa; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Pizzi, Flavia; Zanghì, Antonina; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Minervini, Fiorenza

    2015-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) exposure during pregnancy in laboratory animals induces delayed/abnormal embryo development. Foetal adnexa-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could help evaluate the developmental risk of exposure to chemicals in advanced gestational age. We tested the effects of OTA at concentrations ranging from 2.5×10(-4) to 25nM on growth parameters of canine umbilical cord matrix (UCM)-derived MSCs. The hypothesis that oxidative chromatin and DNA damage could underlie OTA-mediated cell toxicity was also investigated. After in vitro exposure, OTA significantly decreased cell density and increased doubling time in a passage- and concentration-dependent manner and no exposed cells survived beyond passage 5. Significantly higher rates of cells showed condensed and fragmented chromatin and oxidized DNA, as assessed by OxyDNA assay. These findings showed that in vitro exposure to OTA, at picomolar levels, perturbs UCM-MSC growth parameters through oxidative chromatin and DNA damage, suggesting possible consequences on canine foetal development.

  8. Initiation and growth of multiple-site damage in the riveted lap joint of a curved stiffened fuselage panel: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abubaker Ali

    As part of the structural integrity research of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program, a comprehensive study on multiple-site damage (MSD) initiation and growth in a pristine lap-joint fuselage panel has been conducted. The curved stiffened fuselage panel was tested at the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. A strain survey test was conducted to verify proper load application. The panel was then subjected to a fatigue test with constant-amplitude cyclic loading. The applied loading spectrum included underload marker cycles so that crack growth history could be reconstructed from post-test fractographic examinations. Crack formation and growth were monitored via nondestructive and high-magnification visual inspections. Strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey tests indicated that the inner surface of the skin along the upper rivet row of the lap joint experienced high tensile stresses due to local bending. During the fatigue loading, cracks were detected by eddy-current inspections at multiple rivet holes along the upper rivet row. Through-thickness cracks were detected visually after about 80% of the fatigue life. Once MSD cracks from two adjacent rivet holes linked up, there was a quick deterioration in the structural integrity of the lap joint. The linkup resulted in a 2.87" (72.9-mm) lead fatigue crack that rapidly propagated across 12 rivet holes and crossed over into the next skin bay, at which stage the fatigue test was terminated. A post-fatigue residual strength test was then conducted by loading the panel quasi-statically up to final failure. The panel failed catastrophically when the crack extended instantaneously across three additional bays. Post-test fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces in the lap joint of the fuselage panel were conducted to characterize subsurface crack initiation and

  9. Amelioration of high salinity stress damage by plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes that contain ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaila; Charles, Trevor C; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    Plant growth and productivity is negatively affected by soil salinity. However, it is predicted that plant growth-promoting bacterial (PGPB) endophytes that contain 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (E.C. 4.1.99.4) can facilitate plant growth and development in the presence of a number of different stresses. In present study, the ability of ACC deaminase containing PGPB endophytes Pseudomonas fluorescens YsS6, Pseudomonas migulae 8R6, and their ACC deaminase deficient mutants to promote tomato plant growth in the absence of salt and under two different levels of salt stress (165 mM and 185 mM) was assessed. It was evidence that wild-type bacterial endophytes (P. fluorescens YsS6 and P. migulae 8R6) promoted tomato plant growth significantly even in the absence of stress (salinity). Plants pretreated with wild-type ACC deaminase containing endophytic strains were healthier and grew to a much larger size under high salinity stress compared to plants pretreated with the ACC deaminase deficient mutants or no bacterial treatment (control). The plants pretreated with ACC deaminase containing bacterial endophytes exhibit higher fresh and dry biomass, higher chlorophyll contents, and a greater number of flowers and buds than the other treatments. Since the only difference between wild-type and mutant bacterial endophytes was ACC deaminase activity, it is concluded that this enzyme is directly responsible for the different behavior of tomato plants in response to salt stress. The use of PGPB endophytes with ACC deaminase activity has the potential to facilitate plant growth on land that is not normally suitable for the majority of crops due to their high salt contents.

  10. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  11. Growth and Potential Damage of Human Bone-Derived Cells on Fresh and Aged Fullerene C60 Films

    PubMed Central

    Kopova, Ivana; Bacakova, Lucie; Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Fullerenes are nanoparticles composed of carbon atoms arranged in a spherical hollow cage-like structure. Numerous studies have evaluated the therapeutic potential of fullerene derivates against oxidative stress-associated conditions, including the prevention or treatment of arthritis. On the other hand, fullerenes are not only able to quench, but also to generate harmful reactive oxygen species. The reactivity of fullerenes may change in time due to the oxidation and polymerization of fullerenes in an air atmosphere. In this study, we therefore tested the dependence between the age of fullerene films (from one week to one year) and the proliferation, viability and metabolic activity of human osteosarcoma cells (lines MG-63 and U-2 OS). We also monitored potential membrane and DNA damage and morphological changes of the cells. After seven days of cultivation, we did not observe any cytotoxic morphological changes, such as enlarged cells or cytosolic vacuole formation. Furthermore, there was no increased level of DNA damage. The increasing age of the fullerene films did not cause enhancement of cytotoxicity. On the contrary, it resulted in an improvement in the properties of these materials, which are more suitable for cell cultivation. Therefore, fullerene films could be considered as a promising material with potential use as a bioactive coating of cell carriers for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23624607

  12. Cellulosimicrobium funkei-like enhances the growth of Phaseolus vulgaris by modulating oxidative damage under Chromium(VI) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Chinnannan; Oves, Mohammad; Thangabalu, R; Sharma, Ranandkumar; Santhosh, S B; Indra Arulselvi, P

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of agriculture land by heavy metals is a worldwide risk that has sped up noticeably since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Hence, there arise the demands of heavy metal tolerant plant growth promoting bacterial strains for specific metal contaminated agricultural sites restoration. In this study, 36 bacterial isolates were screened out from the rhizospheric soil of Phaseolus vulgaris. Among these, two bacterial strains AR6 and AR8 were selected based on their higher Cr(VI) tolerance (1200 and 1100 μg/mL, respectively) and the maximum production of plant growth promoting substances. In the molecular characterization study, both the bacterial strains showed 99% homology with Cellulosimicrobium funkei KM032184. In greenhouse experiments, the exposure of Cr(VI) to P.vulgaris inhibited the growth and photosynthetic pigments and increased the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant expressions. However, rhizosphere bacterial inoculations alleviated the negative effect of Cr(VI) and enhanced the seed germination rate (89.54%), shoot (74.50%),root length (60%), total biomass (52.53%), chlorophyll a (15.91%), chlorophyll b (17.97%), total chlorophyll (16.58%) and carotenoid content (3.59%). Moreover, bacterial inoculations stabilized and modulated the antioxidant system of P. vulgaris by reducing the accumulation of Cr in plant tissues. The present finding shows the Cr(VI) tolerance and plant growth promoting properties of the rhizosphere bacterial strains which might make them eligible as biofertilizer of metal-contaminated soils. PMID:27668092

  13. Cellulosimicrobium funkei-like enhances the growth of Phaseolus vulgaris by modulating oxidative damage under Chromium(VI) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Chinnannan; Oves, Mohammad; Thangabalu, R; Sharma, Ranandkumar; Santhosh, S B; Indra Arulselvi, P

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of agriculture land by heavy metals is a worldwide risk that has sped up noticeably since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Hence, there arise the demands of heavy metal tolerant plant growth promoting bacterial strains for specific metal contaminated agricultural sites restoration. In this study, 36 bacterial isolates were screened out from the rhizospheric soil of Phaseolus vulgaris. Among these, two bacterial strains AR6 and AR8 were selected based on their higher Cr(VI) tolerance (1200 and 1100 μg/mL, respectively) and the maximum production of plant growth promoting substances. In the molecular characterization study, both the bacterial strains showed 99% homology with Cellulosimicrobium funkei KM032184. In greenhouse experiments, the exposure of Cr(VI) to P.vulgaris inhibited the growth and photosynthetic pigments and increased the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant expressions. However, rhizosphere bacterial inoculations alleviated the negative effect of Cr(VI) and enhanced the seed germination rate (89.54%), shoot (74.50%),root length (60%), total biomass (52.53%), chlorophyll a (15.91%), chlorophyll b (17.97%), total chlorophyll (16.58%) and carotenoid content (3.59%). Moreover, bacterial inoculations stabilized and modulated the antioxidant system of P. vulgaris by reducing the accumulation of Cr in plant tissues. The present finding shows the Cr(VI) tolerance and plant growth promoting properties of the rhizosphere bacterial strains which might make them eligible as biofertilizer of metal-contaminated soils.

  14. Phytotoxicity assessment on corn stover biochar, derived from fast pyrolysis, based on seed germination, early growth, and potential plant cell damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Shen, Fei; Guo, Haiyan; Wang, Zhanghong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Lilin; Zhang, Yanzong; Zeng, Yongmei; Deng, Shihuai

    2015-06-01

    The potential phytotoxicity of water extractable toxicants in a typical corn stover biochar, the product of fast pyrolysis, was investigated using an aqueous biochar extract on a soil-less bioassay with tomato plants. The biochar dosage of 0.0-16.0 g beaker(-1) resulted in an inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship between biochar doasage and seed germination/seedling growth. This indicated that tomato growth was slightly stimulated by low dosages of biochar and inhibited with higher dosages of biochar. Additionally, antioxidant enzyme activities in the roots and leaves were enhanced at lower dosages, but rapidly decreased with higher dosages of biochar. With the increased dosages of biochar, the malondialdehyde content in the roots and leaves increased, in addition with the observed morphology of necrotic root cells, suggesting that serious damage to tomato seedlings occurred. EC50 of root length inhibition occurred with biochar dosages of 9.2 g beaker(-1) (3.5th day) and 16.7 g beaker(-1) (11th day) (equivalent to 82.8 and 150.3 t ha(-1), respectively), which implied that toxicity to the early growth of tomato can potentially be alleviated as the plant grows.

  15. Phytotoxicity assessment on corn stover biochar, derived from fast pyrolysis, based on seed germination, early growth, and potential plant cell damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Shen, Fei; Guo, Haiyan; Wang, Zhanghong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Lilin; Zhang, Yanzong; Zeng, Yongmei; Deng, Shihuai

    2015-06-01

    The potential phytotoxicity of water extractable toxicants in a typical corn stover biochar, the product of fast pyrolysis, was investigated using an aqueous biochar extract on a soil-less bioassay with tomato plants. The biochar dosage of 0.0-16.0 g beaker(-1) resulted in an inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship between biochar doasage and seed germination/seedling growth. This indicated that tomato growth was slightly stimulated by low dosages of biochar and inhibited with higher dosages of biochar. Additionally, antioxidant enzyme activities in the roots and leaves were enhanced at lower dosages, but rapidly decreased with higher dosages of biochar. With the increased dosages of biochar, the malondialdehyde content in the roots and leaves increased, in addition with the observed morphology of necrotic root cells, suggesting that serious damage to tomato seedlings occurred. EC50 of root length inhibition occurred with biochar dosages of 9.2 g beaker(-1) (3.5th day) and 16.7 g beaker(-1) (11th day) (equivalent to 82.8 and 150.3 t ha(-1), respectively), which implied that toxicity to the early growth of tomato can potentially be alleviated as the plant grows. PMID:25628114

  16. Venlafaxine treatment after endothelin-1-induced cortical stroke modulates growth factor expression and reduces tissue damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Rodrigo; Contreras, Valentina; Pissani, Claudia; Stack, Katherine; Vargas, Macarena; Owen, Gareth I; Lazo, Oscar M; Bronfman, Francisca C

    2016-08-01

    Neuromodulators, such as antidepressants, may contribute to neuroprotection by modulating growth factor expression to exert anti-inflammatory effects and to support neuronal plasticity after stroke. Our objective was to study whether early treatment with venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, modulates growth factor expression and positively contributes to reducing the volume of infarcted brain tissue resulting in increased functional recovery. We studied the expression of BDNF, FGF2 and TGF-β1 by examining their mRNA and protein levels and cellular distribution using quantitative confocal microscopy at 5 days after venlafaxine treatment in control and infarcted brains. Venlafaxine treatment did not change the expression of these growth factors in sham rats. In infarcted rats, BDNF mRNA and protein levels were reduced, while the mRNA and protein levels of FGF2 and TGF-β1 were increased. Venlafaxine treatment potentiated all of the changes that were induced by cortical stroke alone. In particular, increased levels of FGF2 and TGF-β1 were observed in astrocytes at 5 days after stroke induction, and these increases were correlated with decreased astrogliosis (measured by GFAP) and increased synaptophysin immunostaining at twenty-one days after stroke in venlafaxine-treated rats. Finally, we show that venlafaxine reduced infarct volume after stroke resulting in increased functional recovery, which was measured using ladder rung motor tests, at 21 days after stroke. Our results indicate that the early oral administration of venlafaxine positively contributes to neuroprotection during the acute and late events that follow stroke. PMID:26965219

  17. Combined exercise and insulin-like growth factor-1 supplementation induces neurogenesis in old rats, but do not attenuate age-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Koltai, Erika; Zhao, Zhongfu; Lacza, Zsombor; Cselenyak, Attila; Vacz, Gabriella; Nyakas, Csaba; Boldogh, Istvan; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Radak, Zsolt

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the effects of 2 weeks of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) supplementation (5 μg/kg per day) and 6 weeks of exercise training (60% of the maximal oxygen consumption [VO₂ max]) on neurogenesis, DNA damage/repair, and sirtuin content in the hippocampus of young (3 months old) and old (26 months old) rats. Exercise improved the spatial memory of the old group, but IGF-1 supplementation eliminated this effect. An age-associated decrease in neurogenesis was attenuated by exercise and IGF-1 treatment. Aging increased the levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and the protein Ku70, indicating the role of DNA damage in age-related neuropathology. Acetylation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) was detected in vivo, and this decreased with aging. However, in young animals, exercise and IGF-1 treatment increased acetylated (ac) OGG1 levels. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and SIRT3, as DNA damage-associated lysine deacetylases, were measured, and SIRT1 decreased with aging, resulting in a large increase in acetylated lysine residues in the hippocampus. On the other hand, SIRT3 increased with aging. Exercise-induced neurogenesis might not be a causative factor of increased spatial memory, because IGF-1 plus exercise can induce neurogenesis in the hippocampus of older rats. Data revealed that the age-associated increase in 8-oxoG levels is due to decreased acetylation of OGG1. Age-associated decreases in SIRT1 and the associated increase in lysine acetylation, in the hippocampus, could have significant impact on function and thus, could suggest a therapeutic target.

  18. Loss of Lon1 in Arabidopsis Changes the Mitochondrial Proteome Leading to Altered Metabolite Profiles and Growth Retardation without an Accumulation of Oxidative Damage1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Solheim, Cory; Li, Lei; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Millar, A. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Lon1 is an ATP-dependent protease and chaperone located in the mitochondrial matrix in plants. Knockout in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to a significant growth rate deficit in both roots and shoots and lowered activity of specific mitochondrial enzymes associated with respiratory metabolism. Analysis of the mitochondrial proteomes of two lon1 mutant alleles (lon1-1 and lon1-2) with different severities of phenotypes shows a common accumulation of several stress marker chaperones and lowered abundance of Complexes I, IV, and V of OXPHOS. Certain enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle are modified or accumulated, and TCA cycle bypasses were repressed rather than induced. While whole tissue respiratory rates were unaltered in roots and shoots, TCA cycle intermediate organic acids were depleted in leaf extracts in the day in lon1-1 and in both lon mutants at night. No significant evidence of broad steady-state oxidative damage to isolated mitochondrial samples could be found, but peptides from several specific proteins were more oxidized and selected functions were more debilitated in lon1-1. Collectively, the evidence suggests that loss of Lon1 significantly modifies respiratory function and plant performance by small but broad alterations in the mitochondrial proteome gained by subtly changing steady-state protein assembly, stability, and damage of a range of components that debilitate an anaplerotic role for mitochondria in cellular carbon metabolism. PMID:22968828

  19. Unveiling laser diode “fossil” and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser “fossil” buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser “fossil” is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates.

  20. Unveiling laser diode “fossil” and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser “fossil” buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser “fossil” is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates. PMID:26740303

  1. Reduction of RIE induced damage of GaInAsP/InP DQW lasers fabricated by 2-step growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumwongrot, D.; Kurokawa, M.; Okumura, T.; Nishimoto, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Nishiyama, N.; Arai, S.

    2008-02-01

    In order to realize low damage fine structuring processes for the low-dimensional quantum structures, we investigated a process for reducing the degradations of optical properties, which was induced during a reactive-ion-etching (RIE) process with CH 4/H II gas mixture in the quantum-well (QW) structures. Quantitative studies of optical degradation were carried out by photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) measurements. We introduced a thicker upper optical confinement layer (OCL) to protect the QWs from the RIE-plasma. In practical, for the PL measurement, twotypes of strain-compensated single-quantum-well (SC-SQW) structures were prepared for 40-nm-thick- and 80-nmthick- upper OCL wafers and covered by 20-nm-thick SiO II. After the samples were exposed to CH 4/H II-RIE for 5- minutes, a relatively stronger suppression of integral PL intensity as well as a spectral broadening was observed in the sample with 40-nm-thick OCL, while those did not change in the sample with 80-nm-thick OCL. For the EL measurements, using two types of SC-DQW structures, samples were exposed to CH 4/H II-RIE plasma for 5-minute and then re-grown for other layers to form high-mesa stripe laser structures (W s=1.5μm). As a result, the spontaneous emission efficiency of the lasers with 80-nm-thick OCL was almost 2 times higher than that of the lasers with 40-nmthick OCL. In addition, a lower threshold current as well as a higher differential quantum efficiency was obtained for the lasers with 80-nm-thick OCL , while that in lasers with 40-nm-thick OCL indicated poor efficiency and a slightly higher threshold.

  2. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of chromium, plant growth, and photosynthesis by alleviating the oxidative damages in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Afshan, Sehar; Ali, Shafaqat; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Abbas, Farhat; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) toxicity is widespread in crops grown on Cr-contaminated soils and has become a serious environmental issue which requires affordable strategies for the remediation of such soils. This study was performed to assess the performance of citric acid (CA) through growing Brassica napus in the phytoextraction of Cr from contaminated soil. Different Cr (0, 100, and 500 μM) and citric acid (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mM) treatments were applied alone and in combinations to 4-week-old seedlings of B. napus plants in soil under wire house condition. Plants were harvested after 12 weeks of sowing, and the data was recorded regarding growth characteristics, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolytic leakage (EL), antioxidant enzymes, and Cr uptake and accumulation. The results showed that the plant growth, biomass, chlorophyll contents, and carotenoid as well as soluble protein concentrations significantly decreased under Cr stress alone while these adverse effects were alleviated by application of CA. Cr concentration in roots, stem, and leaves of CA-supplied plant was significantly reduced while total uptake of Cr increased in all plant parts with CA application. Furthermore, in comparison with Cr treatments alone, CA supply reduced the MDA and EL values in both shoots and roots. Moreover, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in shoots and roots markedly increased by 100 μM Cr exposure, while decreased at 500 μM Cr stress. CA application enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the same Cr treatment alone. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cr uptake and can minimize Cr stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cr through hyper-accumulating plants such as B. napus. PMID:25850739

  3. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of chromium, plant growth, and photosynthesis by alleviating the oxidative damages in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Afshan, Sehar; Ali, Shafaqat; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Abbas, Farhat; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) toxicity is widespread in crops grown on Cr-contaminated soils and has become a serious environmental issue which requires affordable strategies for the remediation of such soils. This study was performed to assess the performance of citric acid (CA) through growing Brassica napus in the phytoextraction of Cr from contaminated soil. Different Cr (0, 100, and 500 μM) and citric acid (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mM) treatments were applied alone and in combinations to 4-week-old seedlings of B. napus plants in soil under wire house condition. Plants were harvested after 12 weeks of sowing, and the data was recorded regarding growth characteristics, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolytic leakage (EL), antioxidant enzymes, and Cr uptake and accumulation. The results showed that the plant growth, biomass, chlorophyll contents, and carotenoid as well as soluble protein concentrations significantly decreased under Cr stress alone while these adverse effects were alleviated by application of CA. Cr concentration in roots, stem, and leaves of CA-supplied plant was significantly reduced while total uptake of Cr increased in all plant parts with CA application. Furthermore, in comparison with Cr treatments alone, CA supply reduced the MDA and EL values in both shoots and roots. Moreover, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in shoots and roots markedly increased by 100 μM Cr exposure, while decreased at 500 μM Cr stress. CA application enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the same Cr treatment alone. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cr uptake and can minimize Cr stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cr through hyper-accumulating plants such as B. napus.

  4. Early post-larval development of the endoparasitic platyhelminth Mesocestoides corti: trypsin provokes reversible tegumental damage leading to serum-induced cell proliferation and growth.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, I; Galindo, M; Bizarro, C V; Ferreira, H B; Zaha, A; Galanti, N

    2005-11-01

    Mesocestoides corti is a suitable in vitro model for studying the development of human endoparasitic platyhelminthes. Treatment with trypsin, supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS), induces M. corti development from larvae (tetrathyridia) to segmented adult worm; however, the role of this protease and of FBS in post-larval development induction remains unknown. To characterize the participation of trypsin enzymatic activity and of FBS in the induction of tetrathyridia growth and development, both stimuli were added to the larvae either together or sequentially. Additionally, specific inhibition of trypsin activity was also monitored. Finally, the effect of the enzyme on the parasite tegument as well as the proliferative activity and location of proliferating cells after induction of tetrathyridia development were also studied. We conclude that trypsin-induced tetrathyridia development to adult worm is FBS-dependent and that the effect of serum factors is dependent upon a previous trypsin-induced reversible damage to the larva tegument. In dividing and non-dividing tetrathyridia, proliferative activity of cells is mainly located within the apical massif in the anterior region and nerve cords of larvae, respectively. In tetrathyridia stimulated to develop to adult worms, an intense proliferative activity is evident along the nerve cords. Our results suggest that in natural infections the tetrathyridia tegument is temporally made permeable to growth factors by proteolytic enzyme activity in the intestine juice of the definitive host, thus leading to development to adult worms. PMID:15887242

  5. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat.

  6. The Prevention of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy by Non-Mitogenic Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor Is Probably Mediated by the Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Linbo; Chen, Shali; Feng, Biao; Lu, Xuemian; Bai, Yang; Liang, Guang; Tan, Yi; Shao, Minglong; Skibba, Melissa; Jin, Litai; Li, Xiaokun; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Cai, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence showed the beneficial effect of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) on heart diseases. The present study investigated whether non-mitogenic aFGF (nm-aFGF) can prevent diabetic cardiomyopathy and the underlying mechanisms, if any. Methodology/Principal Findings Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by multiple intraperitoneal injections of low-dose streptozotocin. Hyperglycemic and age-matched control mice were treated with or without nm-aFGF at 10 µg/kg daily for 1 and 6 months. Blood pressure and cardiac function were assessed. Cardiac H9c2 cell, human microvascular endothelial cells, and rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to high glucose (25 mM) for mimicking an in vitro diabetic condition for mechanistic studies. Oxidative stress, DNA damage, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were assessed by real-time qPCR, immunofluorescent staining, Western blotting, and pathological examination. Nm-aFGF significantly prevented diabetes-induced hypertension and cardiac dysfunction at 6 months. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that nm-aFGF showed the similar preventive effect as the native aFGF on high glucose-induced oxidative stress (increase generation of reactive oxygen species) and damage (cellular DNA oxidation), cell hypertrophy, and fibrotic response (increased mRNA expression of fibronectin) in three kinds of cells. These in vitro findings were recaptured by examining the heart of the diabetic mice with and without nm-aFGF. Conclusions These results suggest that nm-aFGF can prevent diabetic cardiomyopathy, probably through attenuation of cardiac oxidative stress, hypertrophy, and fibrosis. PMID:24349248

  7. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat. PMID:26285082

  8. Long-term effects of liming on health and growth of a Masson pine stand damaged by soil acidification in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yanhui; Liu, Yuan; Guo, Hao; Li, Tao; Li, Zhen-Hua; Shi, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in Chongqing, southwest China, have increasingly declined. Soil acidification was believed to be an important cause. Liming is widely used as a measure to alleviate soil acidification and its damage to trees, but little is known about long-term effects of liming on the health and growth of declining Masson pine forests. Soil chemical properties, health condition (defoliation and discoloration), and growth were evaluated following application of limestone powder (0 (unlimed control), 1, 2, 3, and 4 t ha(-1)) in an acidified and declining Masson pine stand at Tieshanping (TSP) of Chongqing. Eight years after liming, in the 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm mineral soil layers, soil pH values, exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents, and Ca/Al molar ratios increased, but exchangeable aluminum (Al) levels decreased, and as a result, length densities of living fine roots of Masson pine increased, with increasing dose. Mean crown defoliation of Masson pines (dominant, codominant and subdominant pines, according to Kraft classes 1-3) decreased with increasing dose, and it linearly decreased with length densities of living fine roots. However, Masson pines (Kraft classes 1-3) in all treatments showed no symptoms of discoloration. Mean current-year twig length, twig dry weight, needle number per twig, needle length per twig, and needle dry weight per twig increased with increasing dose. Over 8 years, mean height increment of Masson pines (Kraft classes 1-3) increased from 5.5 m in the control to 5.8, 6.9, 8.3, and 9.5 m in the 1, 2, 3, and 4 t ha(-1) lime treatments, and their mean DBH (diameter at breast height) increment increased from 3.1 to 3.2, 3.8, 4.9, and 6.2 cm, respectively. The values of all aboveground growth parameters linearly increased with length densities of living fine roots. Our results show that liming improved tree health and growth, and these effects increased with increasing dose.

  9. Long-term effects of liming on health and growth of a Masson pine stand damaged by soil acidification in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yanhui; Liu, Yuan; Guo, Hao; Li, Tao; Li, Zhen-Hua; Shi, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in Chongqing, southwest China, have increasingly declined. Soil acidification was believed to be an important cause. Liming is widely used as a measure to alleviate soil acidification and its damage to trees, but little is known about long-term effects of liming on the health and growth of declining Masson pine forests. Soil chemical properties, health condition (defoliation and discoloration), and growth were evaluated following application of limestone powder (0 (unlimed control), 1, 2, 3, and 4 t ha(-1)) in an acidified and declining Masson pine stand at Tieshanping (TSP) of Chongqing. Eight years after liming, in the 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm mineral soil layers, soil pH values, exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents, and Ca/Al molar ratios increased, but exchangeable aluminum (Al) levels decreased, and as a result, length densities of living fine roots of Masson pine increased, with increasing dose. Mean crown defoliation of Masson pines (dominant, codominant and subdominant pines, according to Kraft classes 1-3) decreased with increasing dose, and it linearly decreased with length densities of living fine roots. However, Masson pines (Kraft classes 1-3) in all treatments showed no symptoms of discoloration. Mean current-year twig length, twig dry weight, needle number per twig, needle length per twig, and needle dry weight per twig increased with increasing dose. Over 8 years, mean height increment of Masson pines (Kraft classes 1-3) increased from 5.5 m in the control to 5.8, 6.9, 8.3, and 9.5 m in the 1, 2, 3, and 4 t ha(-1) lime treatments, and their mean DBH (diameter at breast height) increment increased from 3.1 to 3.2, 3.8, 4.9, and 6.2 cm, respectively. The values of all aboveground growth parameters linearly increased with length densities of living fine roots. Our results show that liming improved tree health and growth, and these effects increased with increasing dose. PMID:24728089

  10. Long-Term Effects of Liming on Health and Growth of a Masson Pine Stand Damaged by Soil Acidification in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yanhui; Liu, Yuan; Guo, Hao; Li, Tao; Li, Zhen-Hua; Shi, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in Chongqing, southwest China, have increasingly declined. Soil acidification was believed to be an important cause. Liming is widely used as a measure to alleviate soil acidification and its damage to trees, but little is known about long-term effects of liming on the health and growth of declining Masson pine forests. Soil chemical properties, health condition (defoliation and discoloration), and growth were evaluated following application of limestone powder (0 (unlimed control), 1, 2, 3, and 4 t ha−1) in an acidified and declining Masson pine stand at Tieshanping (TSP) of Chongqing. Eight years after liming, in the 0–20 cm and 20–40 cm mineral soil layers, soil pH values, exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents, and Ca/Al molar ratios increased, but exchangeable aluminum (Al) levels decreased, and as a result, length densities of living fine roots of Masson pine increased, with increasing dose. Mean crown defoliation of Masson pines (dominant, codominant and subdominant pines, according to Kraft classes 1–3) decreased with increasing dose, and it linearly decreased with length densities of living fine roots. However, Masson pines (Kraft classes 1–3) in all treatments showed no symptoms of discoloration. Mean current-year twig length, twig dry weight, needle number per twig, needle length per twig, and needle dry weight per twig increased with increasing dose. Over 8 years, mean height increment of Masson pines (Kraft classes 1–3) increased from 5.5 m in the control to 5.8, 6.9, 8.3, and 9.5 m in the 1, 2, 3, and 4 t ha−1 lime treatments, and their mean DBH (diameter at breast height) increment increased from 3.1 to 3.2, 3.8, 4.9, and 6.2 cm, respectively. The values of all aboveground growth parameters linearly increased with length densities of living fine roots. Our results show that liming improved tree health and growth, and these effects increased with increasing dose. PMID:24728089

  11. Apoptosis of human lung cancer cells by curcumin mediated through up-regulation of "growth arrest and DNA damage inducible genes 45 and 153".

    PubMed

    Saha, Achinto; Kuzuhara, Takashi; Echigo, Noriko; Fujii, Atsuko; Suganuma, Masami; Fujiki, Hirota

    2010-01-01

    The expression of "growth arrest and DNA damage inducible genes 45 and 153" is related to apoptotic induction of cells. GADD45 is an effector gene of the tumor suppressor p53, and GADD153 is associated with cellular function of cancer prevention. Curcumin, isolated from the plant Curcuma longa (LINN), has been investigated as a promising cancer preventive in food because curcumin, a phenolic and coloring compound, is widely ingested in the Indian subcontinent. However, the exact mechanisms of action of curcumin have not yet been clearly elucidated. Based on our successful results with green tea catechins as cancer preventive, we studied the relationship between the expression of GADD45 and 153 and apoptotic induction in human lung cancer cell line PC-9. In our study curcumin increased the expression of GADD45 and 153 in a p53-independent manner. Curcumin also inhibited the growth of PC-9 cells and induced G(1)/S arrest of the cell-cycle followed by strong induction of apoptosis. Treatment with GADD45 and 153 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) inhibited the apoptotic induction in PC-9 cells by curcumin. Moreover, curcumin induced the expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor genes p21 and p27, while it inhibited the expression of numerous genes, including Bcl-2, cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. All the results with PC-9 cells suggest that the up-regulation of GADD45 and 153 by curcumin is a prime mechanism in the anticancer activity of curcumin. PMID:20686221

  12. Interactive effects of herbicide and enhanced UV-B on growth, oxidative damage and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in two Azolla species.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sheo Mohan; Kumar, Sushil; Parihar, Parul; Singh, Rachana

    2016-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the impact of alone and combined exposures of herbicide pretilachlor (5, 10 and 20μgml(-1)) and enhanced UV-B radiation (UV-B1; ambient +2.2kJm(-2) day(-1) and UV-B2; ambient +4.4kJm(-2) day(-1)) on growth, oxidative stress and the ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in two agronomically important Azolla spp. viz., Azolla microphylla and Azolla pinnata. Decreased relative growth rate (RGR) in both the species under tested stress could be linked to enhanced oxidative stress, thus higher H2O2 accumulation was observed, that in turn might have caused severe damage to lipids and proteins, thereby decreasing membrane stability. The effects were exacerbated when spp. were exposed to combined treatments of enhanced UV-B and pretilachlor. Detoxification of H2O2 is regulated by enzymes/metabolites of AsA-GSH cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity that were found to be stimulated. While, dehydroascorabte reductase (DHAR) activity, and the amount of metabolites: ascorbate (AsA), glutathione (GSH) and ratios of reduced/oxidized AsA (AsA/DHA) and GSH (GSH/GSSG), showed significant reduction with increasing doses of both the stressors, either applied alone or in combination. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), an enzyme involved in scavenging of xenobiotics, was found to be stimulated under the tested stress. This study suggests that decline in DHAR activity and in AsA/DHA ratio might have led to enhanced H2O2 accumulation, thus decreased RGR was noticed under tested stress in both the species and the effect was more pronounced in A. pinnata. Owing to better performance of AsA-GSH cycle in A. microphylla, this study substantiates the view that A. microphylla is more tolerant than A. pinnata. PMID:27497078

  13. A novel role for epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase and its downstream endoplasmic reticulum stress in cardiac damage and microvascular dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Galán, Maria; Kassan, Modar; Choi, Soo-Kyoung; Partyka, Megan; Trebak, Mohamed; Henrion, Daniel; Matrougui, Khalid

    2012-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFRtk) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are important factors in cardiovascular complications. Understanding whether enhanced EGFRtk activity and ER stress induction are involved in cardiac damage, and microvascular dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus is an important question that has remained unanswered. Cardiac fibrosis and microvascular function were determined in C57BL/6J mice injected with streptozotocin only or in combination with EGFRtk inhibitor (AG1478), ER stress inhibitor (Tudca), or insulin for 2 weeks. In diabetic mice, we observed an increase in EGFRtk phosphorylation and ER stress marker expression (CHOP, ATF4, ATF6, and phosphorylated-eIF2α) in heart and mesenteric resistance arteries, which were reduced with AG1478, Tudca, and insulin. Cardiac fibrosis, enhanced collagen type I, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 were decreased with AG1478, Tudca, and insulin treatments. The impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and -independent relaxation responses were also restored after treatments. The inhibition of NO synthesis reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in control and treated streptozotocin mice, whereas the inhibition of NADPH oxidase improved endothelium-dependent relaxation only in streptozotocin mice. Moreover, in mesenteric resistance arteries, the mRNA levels of Nox2 and Nox4 and the NADPH oxidase activity were augmented in streptozotocin mice and reduced with treatments. This study unveiled novel roles for enhanced EGFRtk phosphorylation and its downstream ER stress in cardiac fibrosis and microvascular endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  14. The ascidian natural product eusynstyelamide B is a novel topoisomerase II poison that induces DNA damage and growth arrest in prostate and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liberio, Michelle S; Sadowski, Martin C; Davis, Rohan A; Rockstroh, Anja; Vasireddy, Raj; Lehman, Melanie L; Nelson, Colleen C

    2015-12-22

    As part of an anti-cancer natural product drug discovery program, we recently identified eusynstyelamide B (EB), which displayed cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 5 μM) and induced apoptosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of EB in cancer cell lines of the prostate (LNCaP) and breast (MDA-MB-231). EB inhibited cell growth (IC50 = 5 μM) and induced a G2 cell cycle arrest, as shown by a significant increase in the G2/M cell population in the absence of elevated levels of the mitotic marker phospho-histone H3. In contrast to MDA-MB-231 cells, EB did not induce cell death in LNCaP cells when treated for up to 10 days. Transcript profiling and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suggested that EB activated DNA damage pathways in LNCaP cells. Consistent with this, CHK2 phosphorylation was increased, p21CIP1/WAF1 was up-regulated and CDC2 expression strongly reduced by EB. Importantly, EB caused DNA double-strand breaks, yet did not directly interact with DNA. Analysis of topoisomerase II-mediated decatenation discovered that EB is a novel topoisomerase II poison.

  15. The window of opportunity for treatment of focal cerebral ischemic damage with noninvasive intranasal insulin-like growth factor-I in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Feng; Fawcett, John R; Hanson, Leah R; Frey, William H

    2004-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has been shown to protect against stroke in rats. This method of delivery is not practical in human beings, as it requires an operation with risk of infection and other complications. Intranasal (i.n.) delivery offers a noninvasive method of bypassing the blood-brain barrier to deliver IGF-I to the brain. This study delineates the window of opportunity for treatment of focal cerebral ischemic damage using i.n. IGF-I after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Rats were allowed to survive 7 days after 2 hours of MCAO. Infarct volume, apoptosis after 7 days, and neurologic deficit scores from the postural reflex and adhesive tape tests assessing motor-sensory and somatosensory functions, respectively, at 1 to 7 days were used to evaluate the efficacy of i.n. IGF-I (150 microg) administered at different times after MCAO. I.n. IGF-I significantly reduced infarct volume by 54%; and 39%; versus control when administered at 2 or 4 hours, respectively, after the onset of MCAO (P < .05) and improved motor-sensory and somatosensory functions (P < .05) when administered 2 hours after the onset of MCAO. In addition, treatment with i.n. IGF-I at 2, 4, or 6 hours after MCAO decreased apoptotic cell counts by more than 90%; in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the occlusion. I.n. IGF-I is a promising treatment for stroke with a therapeutic window of opportunity for up to 6 hours after the onset of ischemia. This noninvasive method provides a simpler, safer, and potentially more cost-effective method of delivery than other methods currently in use.

  16. Method for producing damage resistant optics

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Burnham, Alan K.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Wegner, Paul J.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Feit, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a system that mitigates the growth of surface damage in an optic. Damage to the optic is minimally initiated. In an embodiment of the invention, damage sites in the optic are initiated, located, and then treated to stop the growth of the damage sites. The step of initiating damage sites in the optic includes a scan of the optic using a laser to initiate defects. The exact positions of the initiated sites are identified. A mitigation process is performed that locally or globally removes the cause of subsequent growth of the damaged sites.

  17. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  18. Attenuation of the DNA Damage Response by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Inhibitors Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Shisuo; Bouquet, Sophie; Lo, Chen-Hao; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Bolourchi, Shiva; Parry, Renate; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibition increases the response to radiation therapy in human and mouse non–small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: TGF-β–mediated growth response and pathway activation were examined in human NSCLC NCI-H1299, NCI-H292, and A549 cell lines and murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells. Cells were treated in vitro with LY364947, a small-molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β type 1 receptor kinase, or with the pan-isoform TGF-β neutralizing monoclonal antibody 1D11 before radiation exposure. The DNA damage response was assessed by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or Trp53 protein phosphorylation, γH2AX foci formation, or comet assay in irradiated cells. Radiation sensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay. Mice bearing syngeneic subcutaneous LLC tumors were treated with 5 fractions of 6 Gy and/or neutralizing or control antibody. Results: The NCI-H1299, A549, and LLC NSCLC cell lines pretreated with LY364947 before radiation exposure exhibited compromised DNA damage response, indicated by decreased ATM and p53 phosphorylation, reduced γH2AX foci, and increased radiosensitivity. The NCI-H292 cells were unresponsive. Transforming growth factor-β signaling inhibition in irradiated LLC cells resulted in unresolved DNA damage. Subcutaneous LLC tumors in mice treated with TGF-β neutralizing antibody exhibited fewer γH2AX foci after irradiation and significantly greater tumor growth delay in combination with fractionated radiation. Conclusions: Inhibition of TGF-β before radiation attenuated DNA damage recognition and increased radiosensitivity in most NSCLC cells in vitro and promoted radiation-induced tumor control in vivo. These data support the rationale for concurrent TGF-β inhibition and RT to provide therapeutic benefit in NSCLC.

  19. Regulated in Development and DNA Damage 1 Is Necessary for Hyperglycemia-induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in the Retina of Diabetic Rodents*

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Michael D.; Kimball, Scot R.; Fort, Patrice E.; Jefferson, Leonard S.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered a major role player in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, yet the mechanisms regulating its expression are not fully understood. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that diabetes-induced VEGF expression in the retina was dependent on the repressor of mRNA translation 4E-BP1. Interaction of 4E-BP1 with the cap-binding protein eIF4E regulates protein expression by controlling the selection of mRNAs for translation. The process is regulated by the master kinase mTOR in complex 1 (mTORC1), which phosphorylates 4E-BP1, thus promoting its disassociation from eIF4E. In the present study, we investigated the role of the Akt/mTORC1 repressor REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage) in diabetes-induced VEGF expression. REDD1 expression was induced by hyperglycemia in the retina of diabetic rodents and by hyperglycemic conditions in Müller cells concomitant with increased VEGF expression. In Müller cells, hyperglycemic conditions attenuated global rates of protein synthesis and cap-dependent mRNA translation concomitant with up-regulated cap-independent VEGF mRNA translation, as assessed by a bicistronic luciferase reporter assay. Hyperglycemic conditions also attenuated mTORC1 signaling and enhanced 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E. Furthermore, ectopic expression of REDD1 in Müller cells was sufficient to promote both increased 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E and VEGF expression. Whereas the retina of wild-type mice exhibited increased expression of VEGF and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) 4 weeks after streptozotocin administration, the retina of REDD1 knock-out mice failed to do so. Overall, the results demonstrate that REDD1 contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes in the retina by mediating the pathogenic effects of hyperglycemia. PMID:25548280

  20. Investigation of Combined Action of Food Supplement's and Ionizing Radiation on the Cytogenetic Damage Induction and Ehrlich Ascite Carcinoma Growth on Mice in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Dyukina, Alsu; Rozanova, Olga; Balakin, Vladimir; Peleshko, Vladimir; Romanchenko, Sergey; Smirnova, Helena; Aptikaeva, Gella; Shemyakov, Alexander

    . The relation of the amount of the food supplement to the quantity of standard food was selected experimentally. In order to determine the level of radiosensitivity all groups of mice were subjected to X-radiation with the dose of 1,5 Gy and for induction of RAR the animals were irradiated according to the standard scheme (10 cGy+1,5 Gy). The influence of food supplement on the growth of solid tumor was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. The percent of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) with micronucleus (MN) in marrow served as definition criteria of cytogenetic level of damage. The results of the study indicate that: 1) Due to influence of high-LET radiation with the dose of 11,6 Gy, mice who had dietary supplement demonstrated reduction of PCE with MN to the level of natural background radiation comparing with mice who had only standard food; 2) Diet containing soybeam, buckwheat or greens unlike cod-liver oil reduces the sensitivity of mice to X-radiation with the dose of 1,5 Gy and causes significant slowdown in growth of Ehrlich carcinoma; 3) The combined effect of high-LET radiation and the food supplements (except for cod-liver oil) reduces the sensitivity of mice to irradiation with the dose of 1,5 Gy, which demonstrate ability of RAR induction unlike the mice only irradiated with high-LET radiation and causes the slowdown in growth speed of Ehrlich carcinoma in contrast to the mice only irradiated with high-LET with the dose of 11,6 Gy; 4) The combined effect of high-LET radiation and the food supplements (except for cod-liver oil) does not influence the quantity of RAR according to the standard scheme (10 cGy+1,5 Gy).

  1. Activation of adenosine A2A receptors by polydeoxyribonucleotide increases vascular endothelial growth factor and protects against testicular damage induced by experimental varicocele in rats.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Arena, Salvatore; Bonvissuto, Giulio; Bitto, Alessandra; Polito, Francesca; Irrera, Natasha; Arena, Francesco; Fragalà, Eugenia; Romeo, Carmelo; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Fazzari, Carmine; Marini, Herbert; Implatini, Alessandra; Grimaldi, Silvia; Cantone, Noemi; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2011-03-15

    In rat experimental varicocele, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production, thereby enhancing testicular function. This may point to a new therapeutic approach in human varicocele.

  2. Aqueous extracts of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata are protective against H₂O₂-induced DNA damage, growth inhibition, and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Lee, Jin-Ching; Yi, Szu-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2012-06-13

    Potential antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract of the edible red seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) against oxidative DNA damage were evaluated. The AEGT revealed several antioxidant molecules, including phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid. In a cell-free assay, the extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity that significantly reduced H₂O₂-induced plasmid DNA breaks in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001). The AEGT also suppressed H₂O₂-induced oxidative DNA damage in H1299 cells by reducing the percentage of damaged DNA in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001) as measured by a modified alkaline comet-nuclear extract (comet-NE) assay. The MTT assay results showed that AEGT confers significant protection against H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity and that AEGT itself is not cytotoxic (P < 0.001). Moreover, H₂O₂-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest was significantly released when cells were co-treated with different concentrations of AEGT (P < 0.001). Taken together, these findings suggest that edible red algae Gracilaria water extract can prevent H₂O₂-induced oxidative DNA damage and its related cellular responses.

  3. Mechanism of metformin action in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells involves oxidative stress generation, DNA damage, and transforming growth factor β1 induction.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Poliana Camila; da Silva, Thamara Nishida Xavier; Panis, Carolina; Neves, Amanda Fouto; Machado, Kaliana Larissa; Borges, Fernando Henrique; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Bernardes, Sara Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Júlio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Luiz, Rodrigo Cabral; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço

    2016-04-01

    The participation of oxidative stress in the mechanism of metformin action in breast cancer remains unclear. We investigated the effects of clinical (6 and 30 μM) and experimental concentrations of metformin (1000 and 5000 μM) in MCF-7 and in MDA-MB-231 cells, verifying cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and intracellular pathways related to cell growth and survival after 24 h of drug exposure. Clinical concentrations of metformin decreased metabolic activity of MCF-7 cells in the MTT assay, which showed increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, although cell death and impairment in the proliferative capacity were observed only at higher concentrations. The reduction in metabolic activity and proliferation in MDA-MB-231 cells was present only at experimental concentrations after 24 h of drug exposition. Oxidative stress and DNA damage were induced in this cell line at experimental concentrations. The drug decreased cytoplasmic extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and AKT and increased nuclear p53 and cytoplasmic transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in both cell lines. These findings suggest that metformin reduces cell survival by increasing reactive oxygen species, which induce DNA damage and apoptosis. A relationship between the increase in TGF-β1 and p53 levels and the decrease in ERK1/2 and AKT was also observed. These findings suggest the mechanism of action of metformin in both breast cancer cell lineages, whereas cell line specific undergoes redox changes in the cells in which proliferation and survival signaling are modified. Taken together, these results highlight the potential clinical utility of metformin as an adjuvant during the treatment of luminal and triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:26561471

  4. Results of Pulse-Scaling Experiments on Rapid-Growth DKDP Triplers Using the Optical Sciences Laser at 351 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M; Burnham, A K; Milam, D; Sell, W; Feit, M; Rubenchik, A

    2000-12-11

    Results are reported from recently performed bulk-damage, pulse-scaling experiments on DKDP tripler samples taken from NIF-size, rapid-growth boule BD7. The tests were performed on LLNL's Optical Sciences Laser. A matrix of samples was exposed to single shots at 351 mn (3 {omega}) with average fluences from 4 to 8 J/cm{sup 2} for pulse durations of 1, 3 and 10 ns. The damage sites were scatter-mapped after testing to determine the damage evolution as a function of local beam fluence. The average bulk damage microcavity (pinpoint) density varied nearly linearly with fluence with peak values of approximately 16,000 pp/mm{sup 3} at 1 ns, 10,000 pp/mm{sup 3} at 3 ns and 400 pp/mm{sup 3} at 10 ns for fluences in the 8-10 J/cm{sup 2} range. The average size of a pinpoint was 10(+14,-9) {micro}m at 1 ns, 37 {+-} 20 {micro}m at 3 ns and {approx} 110 {micro}m at 10 ns, although all pulse durations produced pinpoints with a wide distribution of sizes. Analysis of the pinpoint density data yielded pulse-scaling behavior of t{sup 0.35}. Significant planar cracking around the pinpoint as was observed for the 10 ns case but not for the 1 and 3 ns pulses. Crack formation around pinpoints has also been observed frequently for Zeus ADT tests at {approx}8 ns. The high pinpoint densities also lead to significant eruption of near-surface bulk damage. Measurements of the damage site area for surface and bulk gave ratios (A{sub surf}/A{sub bulk}) of 2:1 at 1 ns, 7:1 at 3 ns and 110:1 at 10 ns. Maximum aperture averaged transmission losses on the order 15 percent have been measured by photometry for the worst damage at 1 and 3 ns for beam fluences in the 8-10 J/cm{sup 2} range. Analysis of this data yielded a pulse-scaling behavior of t{sup 0.25} for the obscured area. It was also determined that the crystals used in this test would survive unconditioned exposure to 4 J/cm{sup 2} shots on the NIF laser and still meet the obscuration requirement of 0.1%.

  5. Comparison between S/1 and R/1 tests and damage density vs. fluence (rho(phi)) results for unconditioned and sub-nanosecond laser-conditioned KD2PO4 crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J J; Jarboe, J; Feit, M; Hackel, R

    2007-10-31

    We present S/1 and R/1 test results on unconditioned and 355 nm (3{omega}), 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP. We find up to {approx}2.5X improvement in fluence in the S/1 performance after 3{omega}, 500 ps conditioning to 5 J/cm{sup 2}. For the first time, we observe a shift to higher fluences in the R/1 results for DKDP at 3{omega}, 7 ns due to 500 ps laser conditioning. The S/1 results are compared to {rho}({phi}) results previously measured on the same DKDP crystal [1]. A consistent behavior in fluence was found between the S/1 and {rho}({phi}) results for unconditioned and 500 ps conditioned DKDP. We were successful at using Poisson statistics to derive a connection between the S/1 and {rho}({phi}) results that could be tested with our data sets by trying to predict the shape of the {rho}({phi}) curve. The value for the power dependence on fluence of {rho}({phi}) derived from the S/1 data was {approx}11 {+-} 50%. The results presented and discussed here imply a strong correlation between the damage probability (S/1) test and {rho}({phi}). We find a consistent description of the two test types in terms of a power law {rho}({phi}) and that this basic shape held for all cases, i.e. the shape was invariant between unconditioned and conditioned results.

  6. PA-1, a novel synthesized pyrrolizidine alkaloid, inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by damaging the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Tan, Sheng-nan; Cui, Jian; Guo, Na; Wang, Wei; Zu, Yuan-gang; Jin, Shuang; Xu, Xian-xiu; Liu, Qun; Fu, Yu-jie

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, antimicrobial activity and mode of a novel synthesized pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA-1) were investigated. PA-1 exhibited predominantly strong antibacterial activity toward six bacteria tested with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.0039 to 0.025 mg ml(-1). The time-kill assay indicated that PA-1 killed Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus completely at 2MIC (minimum bactericidal concentration) within 8 h. Besides, PA-1-induced death rates of most sensitive strains (E. coli, 97.80% and S. aureus, 96.24%) were analyzed by flow cytometry. A combination of approaches was used to verify the membrane damage of E. coli and S. aureus. Results showed that release of 260 nm absorbing materials quickly increased after PA-1 treatment. PA-1 also rapidly promoted the uptake of crystal violet from 24.52 to 97.12% for E. coli and from 19.68 to 97.63% for S. aureus when the concentrations were changed from MIC to 4MIC. Furthermore, the cellular membrane damages were testified by the significant increase of fluorescence intensity and decrease of membrane potential. Finally, lecithin and phosphate groups were applied to search the possibly targets on the cytoplasmic membrane. Results showed that PA-1 acted on cytoplasmic membrane phospholipids and phosphate groups of S. aureus but not of E. coli. In conclusion, the novel synthesized PA-1 exerted its antibacterial activity by acting on membrane phospholipids and phosphate groups and then damaging the structures of cellular membrane, which finally led to cell death.

  7. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  8. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  9. Control of Cell Proliferation, Organ Growth, and DNA Damage Response Operate Independently of Dephosphorylation of the Arabidopsis Cdk1 Homolog CDKA;1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dissmeyer, Nico; Weimer, Annika K.; Pusch, Stefan; De Schutter, Kristof; Kamei, Claire Lessa Alvim; Nowack, Moritz K.; Novak, Bela; Duan, Gui-Lan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; De Veylder, Lieven; Schnittger, Arp

    2009-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is universally controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). A key regulatory event in metazoans and fission yeast is CDK activation by the removal of inhibitory phosphate groups in the ATP binding pocket catalyzed by Cdc25 phosphatases. In contrast with other multicellular organisms, we show here that in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, cell cycle control does not depend on sudden changes in the phosphorylation pattern of the PSTAIRE-containing Cdk1 homolog CDKA;1. Consistently, we found that neither mutants in a previously identified CDC25 candidate gene nor plants in which it is overexpressed display cell cycle defects. Inhibitory phosphorylation of CDKs is also the key event in metazoans to arrest cell cycle progression upon DNA damage. However, we show here that the DNA damage checkpoint in Arabidopsis can also operate independently of the phosphorylation of CDKA;1. These observations reveal a surprising degree of divergence in the circuitry of highly conserved core cell cycle regulators in multicellular organisms. Based on biomathematical simulations, we propose a plant-specific model of how progression through the cell cycle could be wired in Arabidopsis. PMID:19948791

  10. Comparing the effects of excess copper in the leaves of Brassica juncea (L. Czern) and Brassica napus (L.) seedlings: Growth inhibition, oxidative stress and photosynthetic damage.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Gábor; Kumar, Devanand; Lehotai, Nóra; Pető, Andrea; Molnár, Árpád; Rácz, Éva; Ördög, Attila; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Laskay, Gábor

    2015-06-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to compare the effects of excess copper (Cu) on growth and photosynthesis in young Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We compared the effects of excess Cu on the two Brassica species at different physiological levels from antioxidant levels to photosynthetic activity. Nine-day-old plants were treated with Cu (10, 25 and 50 μM CuSO4) for 7 and 14 days. Both species took up Cu from the external solution to a similar degree but showed slight root-to-shoot translocation. Furthermore, after seven days of treatment, excess Cu significantly decreased other microelement content, such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn), especially in the shoots of B. napus. As a consequence, the leaves of young Brassica napus plants showed decreased concentrations of photosynthetic pigments and more intense growth inhibition; however, accumulation of highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) were not detected. After 14 days of Cu exposure the reduction of Fe and Mn contents and shoot growth proved to be comparable in the two species. Moreover, a significant Cu-induced hROS accumulation was observed in both Brassica species. The diminution in pigment contents and photosynthetic efficiency were more pronounced in B. napus during prolonged Cu exposure. Based on all the parameters, B. juncea appears to be more resistant to excess Cu than B. napus, rendering it a species with higher potential for phytoremediation.

  11. Comparing the effects of excess copper in the leaves of Brassica juncea (L. Czern) and Brassica napus (L.) seedlings: Growth inhibition, oxidative stress and photosynthetic damage.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Gábor; Kumar, Devanand; Lehotai, Nóra; Pető, Andrea; Molnár, Árpád; Rácz, Éva; Ördög, Attila; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Laskay, Gábor

    2015-06-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to compare the effects of excess copper (Cu) on growth and photosynthesis in young Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We compared the effects of excess Cu on the two Brassica species at different physiological levels from antioxidant levels to photosynthetic activity. Nine-day-old plants were treated with Cu (10, 25 and 50 μM CuSO4) for 7 and 14 days. Both species took up Cu from the external solution to a similar degree but showed slight root-to-shoot translocation. Furthermore, after seven days of treatment, excess Cu significantly decreased other microelement content, such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn), especially in the shoots of B. napus. As a consequence, the leaves of young Brassica napus plants showed decreased concentrations of photosynthetic pigments and more intense growth inhibition; however, accumulation of highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) were not detected. After 14 days of Cu exposure the reduction of Fe and Mn contents and shoot growth proved to be comparable in the two species. Moreover, a significant Cu-induced hROS accumulation was observed in both Brassica species. The diminution in pigment contents and photosynthetic efficiency were more pronounced in B. napus during prolonged Cu exposure. Based on all the parameters, B. juncea appears to be more resistant to excess Cu than B. napus, rendering it a species with higher potential for phytoremediation. PMID:26081276

  12. Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

    1992-10-01

    Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

  13. Effects of benzo[a]pyrene on growth, the antioxidant system, and DNA damage in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) in 2 different soil types under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochen; Xu, Li; Song, Jing; Jiao, Jiaguo; Liu, Manqiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare the toxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and to screen for rapid and sensitive biomarkers that can be used to assess the environmental risks of BaP in earthworms in different natural soil types. The authors exposed Eisenia fetida to 2 types of soil (red soil and fluvo-aquic soil) spiked with different concentrations (0 mg kg(-1), 1 mg kg(-1), 10 mg kg(-1), 100 mg kg(-1), and 500 mg kg(-1)) of BaP for 7 d or 14 d. Benzo[a]pyrene-induced weight variation altered the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase [SOD]; catalase [CAT]; and guaiacol peroxidase [POD]) and changed the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, using the comet assay, the authors determined the DNA damage in earthworms. The results revealed that the comet assay was suitable for evaluating the genotoxicity of BaP in the soil, even at the lowest examined concentration. The MDA content was the least sensitive indicator of BaP toxicity. A 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine whether the soil type, exposure concentration, and duration affected the BaP toxicity. The antioxidant enzyme activities and the MDA content were shown to be significantly correlated with the exposure concentration. The percentage of weight variation (p < 0.001), CAT activity (p < 0.05), and SOD activity (p < 0.01) were significantly affected by the soil type, and the POD activity (p < 0.01), CAT activity (p < 0.001), and SOD activity (p < 0.001) were significantly affected by the exposure duration. Therefore, measuring DNA damage in earthworms is a simple and efficient means of assessing BaP genotoxicity in a terrestrial environment, and the effects of the soil type and exposure time on the other parameters that were investigated in E. fetida, which were used as responsive biomarkers, should be considered.

  14. Effect of Low Temperature on Fatigue Crack Formation and Microstructure-Scale Growth from Corrosion Damage in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2013-05-01

    The strong effect of cold temperature on the fatigue resistance of 7075-T651 is established. As temperature decreases from 296 K to 183 K (23 °C to -90 °C), the formation life for cracking about pit and EXCO corrosion perimeters increases, microstructure scale crack growth rates decrease in the range from 20 to 500 μm beyond the corrosion topography, and long crack growth rates similarly decline. Fatigue crack surface features correlate with reduced hydrogen embrittlement with decreasing temperature fed by localized H produced during precorrosion for pit and EXCO-proximate cracks, as well as by crack tip H produced by water vapor reaction during stressing for all crack sizes. The importance of the former H source increases with decreasing temperature for cracks sized below 200 μm. Decreasing temperature to 223 K (-50 °C) eliminates the contribution of environmental H through interaction of reduced water vapor pressure in equilibrium with ice and reduced H diffusion. The Knudsen flow model and exposure parameter, P_{{{{H}}2 {{O}}}}/f , enables improved modeling of temperature dependent crack propagation, but does not fully describe low temperature fatigue behavior due to possible rate limitation by H diffusion. Further decreases in MSC da/dN to 183 K (-90 °C) are related to reduced mobility of the corrosion-precharged H which may associate with vacancies from dissolution. Crack formation, and growth rates correlate with either elastic stress intensity range or cyclic crack tip opening displacement, and are available to predict corrosion effects on airframe fatigue for the important low temperature regime.

  15. Suppression of Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation in Chloroplasts Prevents Leaf Damage but Not Growth Arrest in Salt-Stressed Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lodeyro, Anabella F.; Giró, Mariana; Poli, Hugo O.; Bettucci, Gabriel; Cortadi, Adriana; Ferri, Alejandro M.; Carrillo, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Crop yield reduction due to salinity is a growing agronomical concern in many regions. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells accompanies many abiotic stresses including salinity, acting as toxic and signaling molecules during plant stress responses. While ROS are generated in various cellular compartments, chloroplasts represent a main source in the light, and plastid ROS synthesis and/or elimination have been manipulated to improve stress tolerance. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a plastid-targeted cyanobacterial flavodoxin, a flavoprotein that prevents ROS accumulation specifically in chloroplasts, displayed increased tolerance to many environmental stresses, including drought, excess irradiation, extreme temperatures and iron starvation. Surprisingly, flavodoxin expression failed to protect transgenic plants against NaCl toxicity. However, when high salt was directly applied to leaf discs, flavodoxin did increase tolerance, as reflected by preservation of chlorophylls, carotenoids and photosynthetic activities. Flavodoxin decreased salt-dependent ROS accumulation in leaf tissue from discs and whole plants, but this decline did not improve tolerance at the whole plant level. NaCl accumulation in roots, as well as increased osmotic pressure and salt-induced root damage, were not prevented by flavodoxin expression. The results indicate that ROS formed in chloroplasts have a marginal effect on plant responses during salt stress, and that sensitive targets are present in roots which are not protected by flavodoxin. PMID:27441560

  16. Investigations on the growth, optical, thermal, dielectric, and laser damage threshold properties of crystal violet dye-doped potassium acid phthalate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. Babu; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-03-01

    Influence of crystal violet dye with different concentration on potassium acid phthalate single crystal grown by conventional method has been studied. No change has been observed in the structure, whereas changes have been observed in the external morphology of the crystal when the dyes are incorporated in the crystal lattice. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses show the onset decomposition temperatures to be at 302, 285, 284, and 285 °C for pure, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mol% crystal violet-doped potassium acid phthalate crystals, respectively. The dielectric measurement was carried out on the grown crystals as a function of frequency at various temperatures. In addition, strong luminescent emission bands at 638, 648, and 640 nm were observed in which the relative intensity was found to be reversed as a result of doping concentration. The laser damage threshold value significantly increased for dye-doped crystal in comparison with pure crystal which may make it suitable for the solid-state dye laser applications.

  17. Crystal growth, perfection, linear and nonlinear optical, photoconductivity, dielectric, thermal and laser damage threshold properties of 4-methylimidazolium picrate: an interesting organic crystal for photonic and optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, K.; Arun, A.; Mani, A.; Praveen Kumar, P.

    2016-10-01

    The 4-methylimidazolium picrate has been synthesized and characterized successfully. Single and powder x-ray diffraction studies were conducted which confirmed the crystal structure, and the value of the strain was calculated. The crystal perfection was determined by a HRXR diffractometer. The transmission spectrum exhibited a better transmittance of the crystal in the entire visible region with a lower cut-off wavelength of 209 nm. The linear absorption value was calculated by the optical limiting method. A birefringence study was also carried out. Second and third order nonlinear optical properties of the crystal were found by second harmonic generation and the z-scan technique. The crystals were also characterized by dielectric measurement and a photoconductivity analyzer to determine the dielectric property and the optical conductivity of the crystal. The laser damage threshold activity of the grown crystal was studied by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam. Thermal studies established that the compound did not undergo a phase transition and was stable up to 240 °C.

  18. Suppression of Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation in Chloroplasts Prevents Leaf Damage but Not Growth Arrest in Salt-Stressed Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Lodeyro, Anabella F; Giró, Mariana; Poli, Hugo O; Bettucci, Gabriel; Cortadi, Adriana; Ferri, Alejandro M; Carrillo, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Crop yield reduction due to salinity is a growing agronomical concern in many regions. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells accompanies many abiotic stresses including salinity, acting as toxic and signaling molecules during plant stress responses. While ROS are generated in various cellular compartments, chloroplasts represent a main source in the light, and plastid ROS synthesis and/or elimination have been manipulated to improve stress tolerance. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a plastid-targeted cyanobacterial flavodoxin, a flavoprotein that prevents ROS accumulation specifically in chloroplasts, displayed increased tolerance to many environmental stresses, including drought, excess irradiation, extreme temperatures and iron starvation. Surprisingly, flavodoxin expression failed to protect transgenic plants against NaCl toxicity. However, when high salt was directly applied to leaf discs, flavodoxin did increase tolerance, as reflected by preservation of chlorophylls, carotenoids and photosynthetic activities. Flavodoxin decreased salt-dependent ROS accumulation in leaf tissue from discs and whole plants, but this decline did not improve tolerance at the whole plant level. NaCl accumulation in roots, as well as increased osmotic pressure and salt-induced root damage, were not prevented by flavodoxin expression. The results indicate that ROS formed in chloroplasts have a marginal effect on plant responses during salt stress, and that sensitive targets are present in roots which are not protected by flavodoxin. PMID:27441560

  19. Alleviation of lead toxicity by 5-aminolevulinic acid is related to elevated growth, photosynthesis, and suppressed ultrastructural damages in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Ali, Basharat; Qin, Yebo; Malik, Zaffar; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Shafaqat; Zhou, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a widely spread pollutant and leads to diverse morphological and structural changes in the plants. In this study, alleviating role of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was investigated with or without foliar application of ALA (25 mg L(-1)) in hydroponic environment under different Pb levels (0, 100, and 400 µM). Outcomes stated that plant morphology and photosynthetic attributes were reduced under the application of Pb alone. However, ALA application significantly increased the plant growth and photosynthetic parameters under Pb toxicity. Moreover, ALA also lowered the Pb concentration in shoots and roots under Pb toxicity. The microscopic studies depicted that exogenously applied ALA ameliorated the Pb stress and significantly improved the cell ultrastructures. After application of ALA under Pb stress, mesophyll cell had well-developed nucleus and chloroplast having a number of starch granules. Moreover, micrographs illustrated that root tip cell contained well-developed nucleus, a number of mitochondria, and golgi bodies. These results proposed that under 15-day Pb-induced stress, ALA improved the plant growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic parameters, and ultrastructural modifications in leaf mesophyll and root tip cells of the B. napus plants.

  20. Alleviation of Lead Toxicity by 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Is Related to Elevated Growth, Photosynthesis, and Suppressed Ultrastructural Damages in Oilseed Rape

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Qin, Yebo; Gill, Rafaqat A.; Ali, Shafaqat

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a widely spread pollutant and leads to diverse morphological and structural changes in the plants. In this study, alleviating role of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was investigated with or without foliar application of ALA (25 mg L−1) in hydroponic environment under different Pb levels (0, 100, and 400 µM). Outcomes stated that plant morphology and photosynthetic attributes were reduced under the application of Pb alone. However, ALA application significantly increased the plant growth and photosynthetic parameters under Pb toxicity. Moreover, ALA also lowered the Pb concentration in shoots and roots under Pb toxicity. The microscopic studies depicted that exogenously applied ALA ameliorated the Pb stress and significantly improved the cell ultrastructures. After application of ALA under Pb stress, mesophyll cell had well-developed nucleus and chloroplast having a number of starch granules. Moreover, micrographs illustrated that root tip cell contained well-developed nucleus, a number of mitochondria, and golgi bodies. These results proposed that under 15-day Pb-induced stress, ALA improved the plant growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic parameters, and ultrastructural modifications in leaf mesophyll and root tip cells of the B. napus plants. PMID:24683549

  1. Protective effect of gelatin polypeptides from Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) against UV irradiation-induced damages by inhibiting inflammation and improving transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation results in skin damage, collagen reduction in the dermis, and consequently, premature skin aging (photoaging). The goal of this study was to examine the effect of gelatin hydrolysate (CH) from pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) skin on UV irradiation-induced inflammation and collagen reduction of photoaging mouse skin. The effect of CH on the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes was investigated. The expressions of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), proinflammatory cytokines, type I and type III procollagen, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), type II receptor of TGF-β1 (TGF-βRII), and Smad7 were determined using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and ELISA. The results showed that oral administration of CH suppressed UV irradiation-induced damages to skin by inhibiting the depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity, and by suppressing the expression of NF-κB as well as NF-κB-mediated proinflammatory cytokines expression. Furthermore, CH inhibited type I procollagen synthesis reduction by up-regulating TβRII level and down-regulating Smad7 level, which demonstrates that CH is involved in matrix collagen synthesis by activating the TGF-β/Smad pathway in the photoaging skin. Based on these results, we conclude that CH protected skin from UV irradiation-induced photodamages, and CH may be a potentially effective agent for the prevention of photoaging. PMID:27491029

  2. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... defect, shall be considered as damage: (a) Growth cracks when more than 2 branches are affected by growth cracks which are over one-half inch in length, or when more than 6 branches have growth cracks; (b... branches of the stalk, whichever is less, has more than 3 distinct hair-like lines more than 3 inches...

  3. 7 CFR 51.586 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Growth cracks when more than 4 branches are affected by growth cracks which are over one-half inch in length, or when more than 8 branches have growth cracks; (b) Horizontal cracks when more than 5 branches have horizontal cracks which...

  4. 7 CFR 51.586 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Growth cracks when more than 4 branches are affected by growth cracks which are over one-half inch in length, or when more than 8 branches have growth cracks; (b) Horizontal cracks when more than 5 branches have horizontal cracks which...

  5. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... defect, shall be considered as damage: (a) Growth cracks when more than 2 branches are affected by growth cracks which are over one-half inch in length, or when more than 6 branches have growth cracks; (b... branches of the stalk, whichever is less, has more than 3 distinct hair-like lines more than 3 inches...

  6. Damaged Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Prolongs Postharvest Storage of Fresh-Cut Pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) by Alleviation of Oxidative Damage and Inhibition of Fungal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuai-Ping; Wu, Jun; Li, Yan-Hong; Zheng, Ji-Lian; Han, Yi; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has proved to be a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants and animals. Here, we investigated the role of H2S in the decay of fresh-cut pears (Pyrus pyrifolia). H2S gas released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) prolonged the shelf life of fresh-cut pear slices in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, H2S maintained higher levels of reducing sugar and soluble protein in pear slices. H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide radicals (•O2−) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Further investigation showed that H2S fumigation up-regulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD), while it down-regulated those of lipoxygenase (LOX), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Furthermore, H2S fumigation effectively inhibited the growth of two fungal pathogens of pear, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum, suggesting that H2S can be developed as an effective fungicide for postharvest storage. The present study implies that H2S is involved in prolonging postharvest storage of pears by acting as an antioxidant and fungicide. PMID:24454881

  8. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko; Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru; Akashi, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  9. Projecting global tropical cyclone economic damages with validation of tropical cyclone economic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseri, Y.; Iwasaki, A.; Miyazaki, C.; Kanae, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) sometimes cause serious damages to human society and thus possible changes of TC properties in the future have been concerned. In fact, the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) mentions likely increasing in intensity and rain rate of TCs. In addition, future change of socioeconomic condition (e.g. population growth) might worsen TC impacts in the future. Thereby, in this study, we developed regression models to estimate economic damages by TCs (hereafter TC damage model), and employed those models to project TC economic damages under several future climate and socioeconomic scenarios. We developed the TC damage models for each of 4 regions; western North Pacific, North American, North Indian, and Southern Hemisphere. The inputs for TC damage model are tropical cyclone central pressure, populations in the area exposed by tropical cyclone wind, and GDP (Gross Domestic Product) per capita. The TC damage models we firstly developed tended to overestimate very low damages and also underestimate very high damages. Thereby we modified structure of TC damage models to improve model performance, and then executed extensive validation of the model. The modified model presented better performance in estimating very low and high TC damages. After the modification and validation of the model, we determined the structure of TC damage models and projected TC economic damages. The result indicated increase in TC economic damage in global scale, while TC economic damage against world GDP would decrease in the future, which result is consistent with previous study.

  10. 7 CFR 51.3157 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... marketing quality of the fruit. The following specific defects shall be considered as damage: (a) Growth... exceeds three-sixteenths inch in diameter; (c) Scab or bacterial spot when cracked, or when the...

  11. 7 CFR 51.3157 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be considered as damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed; (2) When more than one in number; (3... indentation; or, (4) When an indentation exceeds three-sixteenths inch in diameter; (c) Scab or bacterial...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1222 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Bacterial spot, when any cracks are... inch in diameter; (d) Growth cracks, when unhealed, or more than 1/2 inch in length; (e) Hail...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1222 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Bacterial spot, when any cracks are... inch in diameter; (d) Growth cracks, when unhealed, or more than 1/2 inch in length; (e) Hail...

  14. 7 CFR 51.3157 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be considered as damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed; (2) When more than one in number; (3... indentation; or, (4) When an indentation exceeds three-sixteenths inch in diameter; (c) Scab or bacterial...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1222 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Bacterial spot, when any cracks are... inch in diameter; (d) Growth cracks, when unhealed, or more than 1/2 inch in length; (e) Hail...

  16. 7 CFR 51.3157 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... marketing quality of the fruit. The following specific defects shall be considered as damage: (a) Growth... exceeds three-sixteenths inch in diameter; (c) Scab or bacterial spot when cracked, or when the...

  17. 7 CFR 51.3157 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... marketing quality of the fruit. The following specific defects shall be considered as damage: (a) Growth... exceeds three-sixteenths inch in diameter; (c) Scab or bacterial spot when cracked, or when the...

  18. The relationship between observed fatigue damage and life estimation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurath, Peter; Socie, Darrell F.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the surface of laboratory specimens subjected to axial and torsional fatigue loadings has resulted in the identification of three damage fatigue phenomena: crack nucleation, shear crack growth, and tensile crack growth. Material, microstructure, state of stress/strain, and loading amplitude all influence which of the three types of fatigue damage occurs during a dominant fatigue life fraction. Fatigue damage maps are employed to summarize the experimental observations. Appropriate bulk stress/strain damage parameters are suggested to model fatigue damage for the dominant fatigue life fraction. Extension of the damage map concept to more complex loadings is presented.

  19. Wiring Damage Analyses for STS OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Walter, III

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the Shuttle Program s belief that Space Transportation System (STS) wiring damage occurrences are random, that is, a constant occurrence rate. Using Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA)-derived data for STS Space Shuttle OV-103, wiring damage was observed to increase over the vehicle s life. Causal factors could include wiring physical deterioration, maintenance and inspection induced damage, and inspection process changes resulting in more damage events being reported. Induced damage effects cannot be resolved with existent data. Growth analysis (using Crow-AMSAA, or CA) resolved maintenance/inspection effects (e.g., heightened awareness) on all wire damages and indicated an overall increase since Challenger Return-to-Flight (RTF). An increasing failure or occurrence rate per flight cycle was seen for each wire damage mode; these (individual) rates were not affected by inspection process effects, within statistical error.

  20. A continuum damage model of fatigue-induced damage in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented which predicts the stress-strain behavior of continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites in the presence of microstructural damage. The model is based on the concept of continuum damage mechanics and uses internal state variables to characterize the various damage modes. The associated internal state variable growth laws are mathematical models of the loading history induced development of microstructural damage. The model is demonstrated by using it to predict the response of damaged AS-4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate panels.

  1. 7 CFR 51.3159 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed and more than one-eighth inch in length or depth; (2) When... discoloration over more than one-fourth of the fruit surface; (c) Scab or bacterial spot when the aggregate area...) Nectarines affected by decay; (k) Unhealed broken skins except those associated with growth cracks; and,...

  2. 7 CFR 51.3159 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed and more than one-eighth inch in length or depth; (2) When... discoloration over more than one-fourth of the fruit surface; (c) Scab or bacterial spot when the aggregate area...) Nectarines affected by decay; (k) Unhealed broken skins except those associated with growth cracks; and,...

  3. 7 CFR 51.3159 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed and more than one-eighth inch in length or depth; (2) When... discoloration over more than one-fourth of the fruit surface; (c) Scab or bacterial spot when the aggregate area...) Nectarines affected by decay; (k) Unhealed broken skins except those associated with growth cracks; and,...

  4. 7 CFR 51.3159 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... defects shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed and more than one... bacterial spot when the aggregate area exceeds that of a circle one-half inch in diameter on a fruit 2... except those associated with growth cracks; and, (l) Wormy fruit or worm holes. Metric Conversion Table...

  5. 7 CFR 51.3159 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... defects shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Growth cracks: (1) When not healed and more than one... bacterial spot when the aggregate area exceeds that of a circle one-half inch in diameter on a fruit 2... except those associated with growth cracks; and, (l) Wormy fruit or worm holes. Metric Conversion Table...

  6. Surface contamination initiated laser damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Faux, D.R.

    1997-01-24

    We are engaged in a comprehensive effort to understand and model the initiation and growth of laser damage initiated by surface contaminants. This includes, for example, the initial absorption by the contaminant, heating and plasma generation, pressure and thermal loading of the transparent substrate, and subsequent shockwave propagation, ``splashing`` of molten material and possible spallation, optical propagation and scattering, and treatment of material fracture. The integration use of large radiation hydrodynamics codes, optical propagation codes and material strength codes enables a comprehensive view of the damage process The following picture of surface contaminant initiated laser damage is emerging from our simulations. On the entrance optical surface, small particles can ablate nearly completely. In this case, only relatively weak shockwaves are launched into the substrate, but some particulate material may be left on the surface to act as a diffraction mask and cause further absorption. Diffraction by wavelength scale scattering centers can lead to significant intensity modulation. Larger particles will not be completely vaporized. The shockwave generated in this case 1642is larger and can lead to spallation of contaminant material which then may be deposited in the substrate. A gaseous atmosphere can lead to radiation trapping with concomitant increases in temperature and pressure near the surface. In addition, supersonic ionization waves in air may be generated which greatly extend the plasma plume spatially and temporally. Contaminants on the exit optical surface behave differently. They tend to heat and pop off completely in which case significant damage may not occur. Since plasma formed at the interface of the optic and absorbing particle is confined, much stronger pressures are generated in this case. Imaging of contaminants resulting in ``writing`` a diffraction pattern on the exit surface due to contamination on the entrance surface has been

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMAGED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Dehaven, M; McClelland, M; Chidester, S; Maienschein, J L

    2006-06-23

    Thermal damage experiments were conducted on LX-04, LX-10, and LX-17 at high temperatures. Both pristine and damaged samples were characterized for their material properties. A pycnometer was used to determine sample true density and porosity. Gas permeability was measured in a newly procured system (diffusion permeameter). Burn rate was measured in the LLNL strand burner. Weight losses upon thermal exposure were insignificant. Damaged pressed parts expanded, resulting in a reduction of bulk density by up to 10%. Both gas permeabilities and burn rates of the damaged samples increased by several orders of magnitude due to higher porosity and lower density. Moduli of the damaged materials decreased significantly, an indication that the materials became weaker mechanically. Damaged materials were more sensitive to shock initiation at high temperatures. No significant sensitization was observed when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature.

  8. Integrated Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Sheet Metal Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerlings, R. H. J.; Mediavilla, J.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2007-05-01

    A framework for finite element simulations of ductile damage development and ductile fracture during metal forming is presented. The damage evolution is described by a phenomenological continuum damage model. Crack growth and fracture are treated as the ultimate consequences of the damage process. Computationally, the initiation and growth of cracks is traced by an adaptive remeshing strategy, thereby allowing for opening crack faces. The application of the method to the fabrication of food-can lids demonstrates its capabilities, but also some of its limitations.

  9. Laser Damage Inspection Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J T; Brase, J M; Bliss, E S; Carrano, C J; Kegelmeyer, L M; Miller, M G; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A

    2001-02-26

    Large, high-power laser systems are often designed as reimaging multipass cavities to maximize the extraction of energy from the amplifiers. These multipass cavities often have vacuum spatial filters that suppress the growth of beam instability via B-integral effects. These spatial filters also relay images of laser damage, often nearly superimposing these images in common planes. Also, the fluence damage threshold limits the minimum size of the optics. When used as vacuum barriers in the spatial filters, these large optics present a safety hazard from the risk of implosion if the laser damage were sufficiently large. The objective of the project was to develop algorithms and methods for optical detection and characterization of laser-induced damage of optics. The system should detect small defects (about 5% of the critical size), track their growth over multiple laser shots, and characterize the defects accurately so that the optic can be replaced (at 25% of the critical size) and, hence, minimize the risk of implosion. The depth of field must be short enough to isolate the damaged vacuum barrier from other damaged optics in the beamline, and the system should also be capable of inspecting other optics in the beamline, since damage on one optic can subsequently damage subsequent optics. Laser induced damage starts as a small (<<1mm) crater and grows as material is removed on subsequent laser shots. The highly fractured rough surface of the crater scatters light from the illuminating inspection beam. This scattered light is imaged by the inspection system. Other types of defects may occur as well including inclusions in the bulk glass, tooling marks, and surface contamination. This report will discuss the detection and characterization of crater-like surface defects although the general techniques may prove useful for other types of defects. The work described here covers the development of an image processing approach and specific algorithms for defect detection

  10. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  11. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  12. 7 CFR 51.1911 - Damaged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... right angles to a line running from the stem to the blossom end. (c) Catfaces. These are irregular, dark... on a 21/2 inch tomato. (d) Growth cracks. These are ruptures or cracks radiating from the stem scar, or concentric to the stem scar. They damage the tomato when not well healed, or when more than...

  13. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  14. Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

    2009-11-11

    There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

  15. Impact damage characterization of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkmaz, Yesim

    2002-04-01

    Impact damage in structural composites depends on their material properties, component geometry and a variety of impact parameters and experimental determination of their detailed characteristics requires prohibitively large test matrices. The effects of some of these parameters can be understood through simulation models that complement experimental results. In this dissertation a series of finite element models are developed using MSC/NASTRAN for calculating contact laws and progressive damage (e.g., matrix cracking, delamination and fiber break) in graphite/epoxy laminates subject to low and intermediate velocity impact. The validity of the computational models is supported by theoretical calculations involving idealized cases. The effects of laminate geometry as well as the impact parameters on the nature and degree of damage are studied. The global force-time and displacement-time responses of the laminate during impact are also studied. The results of this research can be used for damage growth prediction in composite structural components subject to impact loads.

  16. Age to survive: DNA damage and aging.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Björn; Garinis, George A; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2008-02-01

    Aging represents the progressive functional decline and increased mortality risk common to nearly all metazoans. Recent findings experimentally link DNA damage and organismal aging: longevity-regulating genetic pathways respond to the accumulation of DNA damage and other stress conditions and conversely influence the rate of damage accumulation and its impact for cancer and aging. This novel insight has emerged from studies on human progeroid diseases and mouse models that have deficient DNA repair pathways. Here we discuss a unified concept of an evolutionarily conserved 'survival' response that shifts the organism's resources from growth to maintenance as an adaptation to stresses, such as starvation and DNA damage. This shift protects the organism from cancer and promotes healthy aging. PMID:18192065

  17. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  18. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, Kin Fung

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  19. Control of growth during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gongping; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration is a process by which organisms replace damaged or amputated organs to restore normal body parts. Regeneration of many tissues or organs requires proliferation of stem cells or stem cell-like blastema cells. This regenerative growth is often initiated by cell death pathways induced by damage. The executors of regenerative growth are a group of growth-promoting signaling pathways, including JAK/STAT, EGFR, Hippo/YAP, and Wnt/β-catenin. These pathways are also essential to developmental growth, but in regeneration, they are activated in distinct ways and often at higher strengths, under the regulation by certain stress-responsive signaling pathways, including JNK signaling. Growth suppressors are important in termination of regeneration to prevent unlimited growth and also contribute to the loss of regenerative capacity in nonregenerative organs. Here, we review cellular and molecular growth regulation mechanisms induced by organ damage in several models with different regenerative capacities. PMID:24512707

  20. A two-scale damage model with material length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dascalu, Cristian

    2009-09-01

    The Note presents the formulation of a class of two-scale damage models involving a micro-structural length. A homogenization method based on asymptotic developments is employed to deduce the macroscopic damage equations. The damage model completely results from energy-based micro-crack propagation laws, without supplementary phenomenological assumptions. We show that the resulting two-scale model has the property of capturing micro-structural lengths. When damage evolves, the micro-structural length is given by the ratio of the surface density of energy dissipated during the micro-crack growth and the macroscopic damage energy release rate per unit volume of the material. The use of fracture criteria based on resistance curves or power laws for sub-critical growth of micro-cracks leads to quasi-brittle and, respectively, time-dependent damage models. To cite this article: C. Dascalu, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  1. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  2. War Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During and after the Persian Gulf war, hundreds of "oil lakes" were created in Kuwait by oil released from damaged wells. The lakes are a hazard to the Kuwait atmosphere, soil and ground water and must be carefully monitored. Boston University Center for Remote Sensing, assisted by other organizations, has accurately mapped the lakes using Landsat and Spot imagery. The war damage included the formation of over 300 oil lakes, oil pollution and sand dune movement. Total damage area is over 5,400 square kilometers - 30 percent of Kuwait's total surface area.

  3. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  4. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  5. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  6. Composite heat damage assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A.; Philpot, H.E.; Powell, G.L.

    1993-12-31

    The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

  7. LSD and Genetic Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  8. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  9. The Growth Illusion: How Economic Growth Has Enriched the Few, Impoverished the Many, and Endangered the Planet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Richard

    The premise of this book is that economic growth has made life considerably worse for people in Britain since 1955 and that, even if growth were beneficial at one stage in human history, it is now damaging. The book presents evidence of social and environmental damage caused by growth and several reasons for a persistence of growth in the face of…

  10. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  11. Progressive Fracture and Damage Tolerance of Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Structural performance (integrity, durability and damage tolerance) of fiber reinforced composite pressure vessels, designed for pressured shelters for planetary exploration, is investigated via computational simulation. An integrated computer code is utilized for the simulation of damage initiation, growth, and propagation under pressure. Aramid fibers are considered in a rubbery polymer matrix for the composite system. Effects of fiber orientation and fabrication defect/accidental damages are investigated with regard to the safety and durability of the shelter. Results show the viability of fiber reinforced pressure vessels as damage tolerant shelters for planetary colonization.

  12. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  13. Impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bidinger, G. M.; Lou, M. C.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental investigation was made to study the impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts made of both brittle epoxy and toughened epoxy based composite materials. Damage parameters such as barely visible surface damage and internal damage represented by the ultrasonic C-scan, and residual compressive strengths were evaluated against impact energy for two impactor sizes. From both a damage resistance (internal damage vs. impact energy) and a damage tolerance (residual compressive strength vs. internal damage) point of view, the toughened IM7/977-2 struts exhibited better performance than the brittle epoxy based T50/934 struts. This is attributed to the toughening mechanism in 977-2 which impedes delamination initiation from impact, and delamination growth and subsequent buckling under a compression loading. At barely visible damage thresholds, regardless of the impactor sizes, a maximum strength reduction of 45-55 percent was observed for the T50/934 struts, and approximately 10 percent for IM7/977-2 struts. This is of great interest for developing a damage tolerance design approach and risk assessment methodology in which the design allowable would be defined by the residual strength at the threshold of barely visible damage.

  14. Impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bidinger, G. M.; Lou, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to study the impact damage tolerance of thin wall composite struts made of both brittle epoxy and toughened epoxy based composite materials. Damage parameters such as barely visible surface damage and internal damage represented by the ultrasonic C-scan, and residual compressive strengths were evaluated against impact energy for two impactor sizes. From both a damage resistance (internal damage vs. impact energy) and a damage tolerance (residual compressive strength vs. internal damage) point of view, the toughened IM7/977-2 struts exhibited better performance than the brittle epoxy based T50/934 struts. This is attributed to the toughening mechanism in 977-2 which impedes delamination initiation from impact, and delamination growth and subsequent buckling under a compression loading. At barely visible damage thresholds, regardless of the impactor sizes, a maximum strength reduction of 45-55 percent was observed for the T50/934 struts, and approximately 10 percent for IM7/977-2 struts. This is of great interest for developing a damage tolerance design approach and risk assessment methodology in which the design allowable would be defined by the residual strength at the threshold of barely visible damage.

  15. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade Jr., J. S.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties. PMID:27173442

  16. Crumpling Damaged Graphene.

    PubMed

    Giordanelli, I; Mendoza, M; Andrade, J S; Gomes, M A F; Herrmann, H J

    2016-05-13

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties.

  17. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  18. Crumpling Damaged Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanelli, I.; Mendoza, M.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Gomes, M. A. F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    Through molecular mechanics we find that non-covalent interactions modify the fractality of crumpled damaged graphene. Pristine graphene membranes are damaged by adding random vacancies and carbon-hydrogen bonds. Crumpled membranes exhibit a fractal dimension of 2.71 ± 0.02 when all interactions between carbon atoms are considered, and 2.30 ± 0.05 when non-covalent interactions are suppressed. The transition between these two values, obtained by switching on/off the non-covalent interactions of equilibrium configurations, is shown to be reversible and independent on thermalisation. In order to explain this transition, we propose a theoretical model that is compatible with our numerical findings. Finally, we also compare damaged graphene membranes with other crumpled structures, as for instance polymerised membranes and paper sheets, that share similar scaling properties.

  19. Growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve

    2013-09-01

    Pituitary GH is obligatory for normal growth in mammals, but the importance of pituitary GH in avian growth is less certain. In birds, pituitary GH is biologically active and has growth promoting actions in the tibia-test bioassay. Its importance in normal growth is indicated by the growth suppression following the surgical removal of the pituitary gland or after the immunoneutralization of endogenous pituitary GH. The partial restoration of growth in some studies with GH-treated hypophysectomized birds also suggests GH dependency in avian growth, as does the dwarfism that occurs in some strains with GHR dysfunctions. Circulating GH concentrations are also correlated with body weight gain, being high in young, rapidly growing birds and low in slower growing older birds. Nevertheless, despite these observations, there is an extensive literature that concludes pituitary GH is not important in avian growth. This is based on numerous studies with hypophysectomized and intact birds that show only slight, transitory or absent growth responses to exogenous GH-treatment. Moreover, while circulating GH levels correlate with weight gain in young birds, this may merely reflect changes in the control of pituitary GH secretion during aging, as numerous studies involving experimental alterations in growth rate fail to show positive correlations between plasma GH concentrations and the alterations in growth rate. Furthermore, growth is known to occur in the absence of pituitary GH, as most embryonic development occurs prior to the ontogenetic appearance of pituitary somatotrophs and the appearance of GH in embryonic circulation. Early embryonic growth is also independent of the endocrine actions of pituitary GH, since removal of the presumptive pituitary gland does not impair early growth. Embryonic growth does, however, occur in the presence of extrapituitary GH, which is produced by most tissues and has autocrine or paracrine roles that locally promote growth and development

  20. Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Carol L.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time spectral analysis of vibrations being developed for use in monitoring conditions of critical bearings in rotating machinery. Underlying concept simple and fairly well established: appearance and growth of vibrations at frequencies associated with rotations of various parts of bearing system indicate wear, damage, and imperfections of manufacture. Frequencies include fundamental and harmonics of frequency of rotation of ball cage, frequency of passage of balls, and frequency of rotation of shaft.

  1. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  2. Coping with brain damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waring, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two neurological disorders, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain damage as from an accident, are considered. The discussion covers the incidence of disabilities, their characteristics, and what is now being done to deal with them, particularly in reference to areas in which the capabilities of the engineer can be effectively applied.

  3. Loss and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  4. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  5. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  6. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process. PMID:26855751

  7. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process.

  8. The combined effect of glass buffer strips and stitching on the damage tolerance of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that through-the-thickness stitching provides major improvements in the damage tolerance of composite laminates loaded in compression. However, the brittle nature of polymer matrix composites makes them susceptible to damage propagation, requiring special material applications and designs to limit damage growth. Glass buffer strips, embedded within laminates, have shown the potential for improving the damage tolerance of unstitched composite laminates loaded in tension. The glass buffer strips, less stiff than the surrounding carbon fibers, arrest crack growth in composites under tensile loads. The present study investigates the damage tolerance characteristics of laminates that contain both stitching and glass buffer strips.

  9. Factors derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, grown in different growth media, enhance cell death in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated supernatants (SNs) from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) grown in commonly used growth media for their capacity to affect the viability of Caco-2 colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. EcN was grown in Luria-Bertani (LB), tryptone soya (TSB), Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS), and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Human Caco-2 colon cancer cells were treated with DMEM (control), growth media alone (LB, TSB, MRS, and M17) or EcN SNs derived from these 4 media, in the presence and absence of 5-FU. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell monolayer permeability were determined. EcN SN in LB medium reduced Caco-2 cell viability significantly, to 51% at 48 h. The combination of this EcN SN and 5-FU further reduced cell viability to 37% at 48 h, compared to 5-FU control. MRS broth and EcN SN in MRS, together with 5-FU, generated significantly lower levels of ROS compared to 5-FU control. However, all 5-FU treatments significantly disrupted the Caco-2 cell barrier compared to control; with no significant differences observed among any of the 5-FU treatments. EcN SNs (LB+) was most effective at decreasing the viability of Caco-2 cells. This could indicate a potential role for this EcN SN in chemoprevention for colon cancer. PMID:25625670

  10. Factors derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, grown in different growth media, enhance cell death in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated supernatants (SNs) from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) grown in commonly used growth media for their capacity to affect the viability of Caco-2 colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. EcN was grown in Luria-Bertani (LB), tryptone soya (TSB), Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS), and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Human Caco-2 colon cancer cells were treated with DMEM (control), growth media alone (LB, TSB, MRS, and M17) or EcN SNs derived from these 4 media, in the presence and absence of 5-FU. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell monolayer permeability were determined. EcN SN in LB medium reduced Caco-2 cell viability significantly, to 51% at 48 h. The combination of this EcN SN and 5-FU further reduced cell viability to 37% at 48 h, compared to 5-FU control. MRS broth and EcN SN in MRS, together with 5-FU, generated significantly lower levels of ROS compared to 5-FU control. However, all 5-FU treatments significantly disrupted the Caco-2 cell barrier compared to control; with no significant differences observed among any of the 5-FU treatments. EcN SNs (LB+) was most effective at decreasing the viability of Caco-2 cells. This could indicate a potential role for this EcN SN in chemoprevention for colon cancer.

  11. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  12. Tornado damage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, T.A.; Ellingwood, B.

    1982-09-01

    Several proposed models were evaluated for predicting tornado wind speed probabilities at nuclear plant sites as part of a program to develop statistical data on tornadoes needed for probability-based load combination analysis. A unified model was developed which synthesized the desired aspects of tornado occurrence and damage potential. The sensitivity of wind speed probability estimates to various tornado modeling assumptions are examined, and the probability distributions of tornado wind speed that are needed for load combination studies are presented.

  13. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  14. Predicting bulk damage in NIF triple harmonic generators

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J; Runkel, M; Williams, W

    1998-09-18

    Recently reported experiments have investigated the statistics of laser damage in KDP and KD*P. Automated damage tests have allowed cumulative failure and damage probability distributions to be constructed. Large area tests have investigated the feasibility of on-line laser conditioning and damage evolution for tripler harmonic generation (THG) crystals on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These tests have shown that there is a nonzero probability of damage at NIF redline fluence (14.3 J/cm2, 351 nm, 3 ns) and that the damage pinpoint density evolves exponentially with fluence. In this paper, the results of these tests are used in conjunction with model spatial profiles of the NIP beam to predict the level of damage created in the THG crystal. A probabilistic calculation based on the overlap of the beam fluence and damage probabiity distribution shows that the overall damage probability is less than 3% for well-conditioned, high quality KDP/KD*P crystals of conventional or rapid growth. The number density of generated pinpoints has been calculated by mapping the damage evolution curves onto the NlF model profile. This shows that the number of damage pinpoints generated in high fluence portions of the NIF beam will be low for well-conditioned THG crystals. In contrast, unconditioned triplers of the same material will exhibit an increase in pinpoint density of greater than 20x. To test the validity of these calculations a 37 cm, conventionally grown KD*P tripler from the Beamlet laser was scatter mapped for bulk damage. The tripler had been exposed to NE-like fluences during its operational lifetime on Beamlet and exhibited very low levels of bulk pinpoint damage, essentially supporting the predictions based on tests and modeling.

  15. Earthquake damage to schools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    These unusual slides show earthquake damage to school and university buildings around the world. They graphically illustrate the potential danger to our schools, and to the welfare of our children, that results from major earthquakes. The slides range from Algeria, where a collapsed school roof is held up only by students' desks; to Anchorage, Alaska, where an elementary school structure has split in half; to California and other areas, where school buildings have sustained damage to walls, roofs, and chimneys. Interestingly, all the United States earthquakes depicted in this set of slides occurred either on a holiday or before or after school hours, except the 1935 tremor in Helena, Montana, which occurred at 11:35 am. It undoubtedly would have caused casualties had the schools not been closed days earlier by Helena city officials because of a damaging foreshock. Students in Algeria, the People's Republic of China, Armenia, and other stricken countries were not so fortunate. This set of slides represents 17 destructive earthquakes that occurred in 9 countries, and covers more than a century--from 1886 to 1988. Two of the tremors, both of which occurred in the United States, were magnitude 8+ on the Richter Scale, and four were magnitude 7-7.9. The events represented by the slides (see table below) claimed more than a quarter of a million lives.

  16. Synthesis, growth, structural and HOMO and LUMO, MEP analysis of a new stilbazolium derivative crystal: A enhanced third-order NLO properties with a high laser-induced damage threshold for NLO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, K.; Kalainathan, S.; Hamada, F.; Yamada, M.; Aravindan, P. G.

    2015-08-01

    A new organic third-order nonlinear optical crystal from stilbazolium family 2-[2-(4-methoxy-phenyl) vinyl]-1-methyl-pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (4MSTB) has been synthesized and grown by slow evaporation method for the first time. The grown crystal structure was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and it is revealed that the grown crystal crystallized in a triclinic crystal system with centrosymmetric space group P 1 bar . The HOMO and LUMO energies were calculated for the grown crystal explains charge transfer takes place within the molecule and confirms the suitability of the title crystal for NLO applications. The presence of various vibration modes of expected functional groups was identified by FT-IR analysis. The transmittance ability of the grown crystal was also analyzed by using UV-Vis-NIR spectral studies and shows that the crystal has no absorption of light in the entire Vis-NIR region. The thermal stability of the title crystal has been investigated by TGA/DTA studies and revealed that the material was thermally stable up to the melting point, 193 °C. The hardness number, Meyer index, yield strength, and elastic stiffness constant has been estimated for the grown 4MSTB crystal using Vickers microhardness tester. Photoluminescence excitation studies showed green emission radiation occurred at 517 nm. The dielectric properties of the grown crystal have been analyzed as a function of temperature over a wide range of frequency (50 Hz-5 MHz) by using LCR meter. The result of ac electrical conductivity of 4MSTB was found to be 5.25 × 10-5 (Ω m)-1. The laser damage threshold (LDT) energy for the grown crystal has been measured by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser as a source in single-shot mode (1064 nm, 10 Hz, 420 mJ). The result of LDT indicates that grown title crystal has excellent resistance to laser radiation than those of known some inorganic NLO materials. The chemical etching studies were carried out to assess the perfection of

  17. Predicting The Compression Strength Of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James; Jackson, Wade; Schaff, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a technique for predicting the residual compression strength of sandwich panels containing impact damage in one facesheet. The technique was tailored to predict the strength of specimens that exhibit a failure mode involving the formation of kink bands at locations of peak strain in the region of impact damage. Under continued compression loading, the kink bands propagate in a stable manner perpendicular to the applied load. When a critical kink-band length is reached, growth becomes unstable corresponding to panel failure. The analysis follows in two sections. The first section calculates the far-field stress required for stable kink-band growth and the second calculates that required for unstable growth. The residual strength prediction is made when the stress for stable growth becomes equal to that for unstable kink-band growth. Initial comparisons between analysis and experiment show good agreement.

  18. Analysis of matrix damage in unidirectional composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mukunda, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The fracture behavior of composites in the presence of a flaw needs to be studied in order to exploit their vast structural potential. Thus analytical models were developed using shear lag concepts to determine the displacement and stress field in a fiber-reinforced unidirectional composite with various damage configurations. The effect of friction on the initiation and growth of longitudinal matrix damage is studied for center-noticed specimens. A consistent shear lag constitutive relationship is employed to take into account the load carrying capacity of the matrix. The results show that the introduction of friction within the matrix split in the form of a closed crack retards the split growth. Further, this model is employed to study the splitting mechanism in edge-noticed unidirectional composite specimens. The model predictions are shown to agree with the experimental results. Finally, a comparison is made between the classical shear lag model and a consistent shear lag model for different damage configurations. This comparison shows that the classical shear lag model predicts acceptable results if the ratio of Young's modulus of the fiber to the Young's modulus of the matrix is large. However, for composites in which fiber and matrix are comparable, the consistent shear lag formulations yields better results, especially in predicting some of the matrix-dominant failure modes.

  19. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  20. Damage and strength of composite materials: Trends, predictions, and challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1994-01-01

    Research on damage mechanisms and ultimate strength of composite materials relevant to scaling issues will be addressed in this viewgraph presentation. The use of fracture mechanics and Weibull statistics to predict scaling effects for the onset of isolated damage mechanisms will be highlighted. The ability of simple fracture mechanics models to predict trends that are useful in parametric or preliminary designs studies will be reviewed. The limitations of these simple models for complex loading conditions will also be noted. The difficulty in developing generic criteria for the growth of these mechanisms needed in progressive damage models to predict strength will be addressed. A specific example for a problem where failure is a direct consequence of progressive delamination will be explored. A damage threshold/fail-safety concept for addressing composite damage tolerance will be discussed.

  1. A Novel Approach to Rotorcraft Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Damage-tolerance methodology is positioned to replace safe-life methodologies for designing rotorcraft structures. The argument for implementing a damage-tolerance method comes from the fundamental fact that rotorcraft structures typically fail by fatigue cracking. Therefore, if technology permits prediction of fatigue-crack growth in structures, a damage-tolerance method should deliver the most accurate prediction of component life. Implementing damage-tolerance (DT) into high-cycle-fatigue (HCF) components will require a shift from traditional DT methods that rely on detecting an initial flaw with nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods. The rapid accumulation of cycles in a HCF component will result in a design based on a traditional DT method that is either impractical because of frequent inspections, or because the design will be too heavy to operate efficiently. Furthermore, once a HCF component develops a detectable propagating crack, the remaining fatigue life is short, sometimes less than one flight hour, which does not leave sufficient time for inspection. Therefore, designing a HCF component will require basing the life analysis on an initial flaw that is undetectable with current NDI technology.

  2. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  3. Modeling KDP Bulk Damage Curves for Prediction of Large-Area Damage Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M.; Sharp, R.

    1999-12-16

    Over the past two years extensive experimentation has been carded out to determine the nature of bulk damage in KDP. Automated damage testing with small beams has made it possible to rapidly investigate damage statistics and its connection to growth parameter Variation. Over this time we have built up an encyclopedia of many damage curves but only relatively few samples have been tested with large beams. The scarcity of data makes it difficult to estimate how future crystals will perform on the NIF, and the campaign nature of large beam testing is not suitable for efficient testing of many samples with rapid turn-around, it is therefore desirable to have analytical tools in place that could make reliable predictions of large-beam performance based on small-beam damage probability measurements. To that end, we discuss the application of exponential and power law damage evolution within the framework of Poisson statistics in this memo. We describe the results of fitting these models to various damage probability curves on KDP including the heavily investigated KDP214 samples. We find that both models are capable of fitting the damage probability S-curves quite well but there are multiple parameter sets for each model that produce comparable {chi}{sup 2} values. In addition, the fit parameters from the exponential model do not agree well with the measured evolution from large-beam OSL experiments where pinpoint density was shown to evolve according to n(F)=n{sub 0}exp(bF). The largest discrepancy is in determination of the b values. For the O'Connell formalism the power law case developed here, we find that the best-fit powers have approximately the same magnitude as the Weibull exponent of Feit's formalism, but it is difficult to extract information about the defect concentration using the O'Connell approach. In addition, we found that the power law case provides slightly better {chi}{sup 2} values in roughly half of the cases. We discuss these results in terms of

  4. Laser damage performance of large-aperture fused silica optical components at 351 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wanqing; Han, Wei; Wang, Fang; Xiang, Yong; Li, Fuquan; Feng, Bin; Jing, Feng; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2008-12-01

    High power laser facility for ICF will routinely operate at high fluence level. The damage on the large-area FOA optics is a key lifetime limiter. The optics should be checked after each laser shot for damage initiation and growth. On-line monitoring equipments are installed for this purpose. Damage pictures of a fused silica component are successfully taken and the luminance of the pictures could reflect the deterioration of the operational environment. Damage initiation and growth behaviors at 351nm high-fluence laser were observed. Damage density and damage growth are exponential with the shot number and some conclusions could be drawn. These results bring forward demands for future monitoring equipments and more experiments to establish a lifetime model.

  5. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other ... of it may be very short. Treatment with growth hormone can stimulate growth. People can also have too ...

  6. Progressive damage state evolution and quantification in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Subir; Banerjee, Sourav

    2016-04-01

    Precursor damage state quantification can be helpful for safety and operation of aircraft and defense equipment's. Damage develops in the composite material in the form of matrix cracking, fiber breakages and deboning, etc. However, detection and quantification of the damage modes at their very early stage is not possible unless modifications of the existing indispensable techniques are conceived, particularly for the quantification of multiscale damages at their early stage. Here, we present a novel nonlocal mechanics based damage detection technique for precursor damage state quantification. Micro-continuum physics is used by modifying the Christoffel equation. American society of testing and materials (ASTM) standard woven carbon fiber (CFRP) specimens were tested under Tension-Tension fatigue loading at the interval of 25,000 cycles until 500,000 cycles. Scanning Acoustic Microcopy (SAM) and Optical Microscopy (OM) were used to examine the damage development at the same interval. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) velocity profile on a representative volume element (RVE) of the specimen were calculated at the regular interval of 50,000 cycles. Nonlocal parameters were calculated form the micromorphic wave dispersion curve at a particular frequency of 50 MHz. We used a previously formulated parameter called "Damage entropy" which is a measure of the damage growth in the material calculated with the loading cycle. Damage entropy (DE) was calculated at every pixel on the RVE and the mean of DE was plotted at the loading interval of 25,000 cycle. Growth of DE with fatigue loading cycles was observed. Optical Imaging also performed at the interval of 25,000 cycles to investigate the development of damage inside the materials. We also calculated the mean value of the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) velocity and plotted with fatigue cycle which is correlated further with Damage Entropy (DE). Statistical analysis of the Surface Acoustic Wave profile (SAW) obtained at different

  7. Forecasting Frost Damage: Follow the Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Frost damage takes place when the pressure exerted against pore walls exceeds the cohesive strength of water-infiltrated rock and causes cracks to extend. Elegant theoretical treatments supported by meticulous field and laboratory observations have combined to unravel the basic mechanical and thermodynamic controls in idealized systems. Frost damage is most vigorous when conditions are cold enough that the net pressure exerted against the pore walls can cause crack extension, yet warm enough to enable the flow that supplies further ice growth in the newly opened space. This insight is applied here to develop practical geomorphic process laws for the effects of frost damage at the larger scales that are relevant for describing the evolution of landscapes. To this end, a direct connection is made between the intensity of frost damage and the porosity increase that results from gradients in water flux under conditions that are cold enough for ice-rock interactions to propagate cracks. This implies that the annual temperature variation at the ground surface can be combined with considerations of heat and mass transport to derive rigorous forecasts of the potential for frost damage that are tied to the increases in water mass that accompany solidification in porous rock. As an example, the image shows the depth-integrated porosity change λ promoted by crack growth at temperatures colder than -ΔTc over an annual cycle for different choices of mean annual temperature MAT and surface amplitude A (assuming a thermal diffusivity of 1 mm2/s and a power-law relationship between permeability and undercooling with exponent α=4, such that a base value of 10-14m2 is reached at a reference undercooling of 0.1 ºC). The abrupt onset in cracking once MAT decreases below a threshold is produced by the requirement that undercooling surpass ΔTc in order to generate sufficient pressures to propagate cracks. The eventual reduction and gradual tail in λ at colder MAT is produced by

  8. Damage scenarios and an onboard support system for damaged ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Lee, Dongkon; Kang, Hee Jin; Kim, Soo-Young; Shin, Sung-Chul

    2014-06-01

    Although a safety assessment of damaged ships, which considers environmental conditions such as waves and wind, is important in both the design and operation phases of ships, in Korea, rules or guidelines to conduct such assessments are not yet developed. However, NATO and European maritime societies have developed guidelines for a safety assessment. Therefore, it is required to develop rules or guidelines for safety assessments such as the Naval Ship Code (NSC) of NATO. Before the safety assessment of a damaged ship can be performed, the available damage scenarios must be developed and the safety assessment criteria must be established. In this paper, the parameters related to damage by accidents are identified and categorized when developing damage scenarios. The need for damage safety assessment criteria is discussed, and an example is presented. In addition, a concept and specifications for the DB-based supporting system, which is used in the operation phases, are proposed.

  9. Reduction in fiber damage thresholds due to static fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Damage mechanisms may occur during the transmission of Q-switched, Nd/YAG laser pulses through fused silica fibers. Fiber end-face characteristics, laser characteristics, and aspects of the laser-to-fiber injection typically determine dominant damage mechanisms. However, an additional damage process has been observed at internal sites where fibers were experiencing significant local stresses due to fixturing or bends in the fiber path. A transmission reduction prior to damage was typically not measurable at these sites. Damage would not always occur during initial testing, but sometimes occurred later in time at laser levels that previously had been transmitted without damage. In these cases the time at stress appeared to be more important than the number of transmitted shots prior to damage. A possible relation between internal damage thresholds at stressed sites and the total time under stress is suggested by the fact that silica fibers experience static fatigue processes. These processes involve the slow growth of local defects under tensile stress at rates that depend upon environmental conditions. Defects reaching sufficient size and having appropriate location could be sites for reduced laser-induced damage thresholds. The present work looks into the possibility that static fatigue processes can affect damage thresholds. The experiments used a laser injection and fiber routing configuration that produced significantly elevated fluences within fiber core regions under tensile stress. In order to establish initial strength and fatigue properties for these fibers, a number of samples were used to generate time-to-failure data at various stress levels. Other fiber samples were subjected to conditions that greatly accelerated fatigue processes. Internal damage thresholds were then measured in these fibers and compared to thresholds measured in fresh fibers. Conclusive comparisons were frustrated by sample-to-sample and lot-to-lot variations in fiber defects.

  10. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  11. Mechanism of frost damage to concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhua

    We studied several topics that are important to explain the mechanisms of frost damage to concrete, including the volume change of concrete during freezing, the role of air voids in protecting concrete from frost damage, the pore structure of concrete, and the nucleation and propagation of ice in concrete. By combining calorimetric measurements with dilatometry, we were able to calculate the contributions of thermal expansion, pore pressure, and crystallization pressure of ice to the strain observed in a mortar during freezing/thawing cycles. Air-entrained mortars contract upon freezing due to the cryo-suction effect, while non-air-entrained mortars expand primarily due to hydraulic pressure. Based on the theory originally proposed by Powers and Helmuth, we show that the poromechanical calculations account quantitatively for the contraction of samples with air entrainment, which is shown to quantitatively account for a reduction of salt scaling damage based on the glue-spall theory. The method of thermoporometry (TPM) that we used to study the pore structure of concrete is also discussed. In a study of ice propagation inside concrete, we re-examined experiments by Helmuth [Proc. 4th Int. Cong. Chem. Cement, NBS Monog. 43, Vol. II (National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C., 1962) pp. 855--869] from which he concluded that ice grows in the pores of cement paste under heat-flow control, and that the internal temperature rises to the melting point given by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Using experimental and computational methods, we find that his conclusions are correct, but the growth rates he reports are misleading. Our experiment reveals the true growth rate, which is about three times smaller than found by Helmuth. The dendritic morphology explains how fast constant growth rates can occur when the interior temperature of the sample is very near the melting point: the temperature at the tip of the dendrite is a few degrees below the melting point, but the liquid

  12. Laser damage resistance of optical coatings in the sub-ps regime: limitations and improvement of damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, L.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the topic of short-pulse laser damage in optical coatings in order to understand the intrinsic limitations depending on the application, and the possibility of laser damage resistance improvement. Firstly we describe the physical process of a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse interaction with an optical coating and how this interaction can lead to a damage of the film. Then we present the main facts about laser damage resistance of coatings that are relevant for applications and related to the previously described processes: the dependence of the Laser-Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) of coating materials with bandgap, the decrease of LIDT with the pulse number, the wavelength and pulse duration dependence, etc... We also discuss on the question of the role of macroscopic defects on damage initiation in this regime and damage growth under multiple irradiation. Eventually different strategies to improve the laser damage resistance will be discussed: engineering of the electric field distribution in the stack, fabrication of mixture materials with enhanced LIDT, mitigation of defects.

  13. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  14. Identification and Elimination of Fluorescent Surface-Damage Precursors on DKDP Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M; Thompson, S; Siekhaus, W; Fluss, M; Hahn, D; Whitman, P; Burnham, A

    2002-11-15

    Fluorescing surface defects that led to damage upon 351-nm laser exposure below 7 J/cm{sup 2} (3-11s) in DKDP optics were reported in these proceedings by this group a year ago. Subsequent laser damage experiments have correlated the density of these damage precursors to single-point diamond finishing conditions. Every diamond-finishing schedule contains brittle-mode cutting and ductile-mode cutting in a taper-down sequence. Finishing experiments have traced the occurrence of these defects to insufficient ductile-mode removal of subsurface damage incurred during prior brittle-mode cutting. Additionally, a correlation between defect fluorescence, laser-induced damage, and defect morphology has been established. Laser-induced damage tests also suggest a correlation between growth method and damage probability. Current experiments indicate that damage-prone defects can be minimized with the proper choice of diamond finishing conditions.

  15. Prediction of tissue thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Subic, Aleksandar; Jazar, Reza; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2016-04-29

    This paper presents a method to characterize tissue thermal damage by taking into account the thermal-mechanical effect of soft tissues for thermal ablation. This method integrates the bio-heating conduction and non-rigid motion dynamics to describe thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and further extends the traditional tissue damage model to characterize thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively predict tissue thermal damage and it also provides reliable guidelines for control of the thermal ablation procedure. PMID:27163325

  16. Prediction of tissue thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Subic, Aleksandar; Jazar, Reza; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2016-04-29

    This paper presents a method to characterize tissue thermal damage by taking into account the thermal-mechanical effect of soft tissues for thermal ablation. This method integrates the bio-heating conduction and non-rigid motion dynamics to describe thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and further extends the traditional tissue damage model to characterize thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively predict tissue thermal damage and it also provides reliable guidelines for control of the thermal ablation procedure.

  17. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  18. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  19. Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non- isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

  20. Road Damage Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of water-saturated sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and slit, which moved from right to left towards the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed lateral spreading, is a principal cause of liquefaction-related earthquake damage caused by the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: S.D. Ellen, U.S. Geological Survey

  1. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  2. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  3. Damage Surrounding Dynamically Propagating Shear Cracks in Granodiorite (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D. R.; Faulkner, R. G.; Cembrano, J. M.; Jensen, E.

    2009-12-01

    Quantifying the microfracture damage surrounding faults and fractures is important for predicting the fluid flow properties of rock masses. Damage surrounding faults has been attributed to fault growth, geometric irregularities, and earthquake rupture. Up to now, earthquake rupture can only be inferred when pseudotachylyte is present, indicating shear heating leading to melt production. We describe shear fractures that have developed a relatively isotropic granodioritic protolith within the Atacama fault system in northern Chile. These fractures have an alteration zone produced as a result of intense microfracture damage surrounding the fractures. These alteration zones taper out towards the fracture tips. The alteration zone also shows asymmetry either side of the fracture that can be used to infer the propagation direction of the fracture. We interpret these observations as being due to a waning fracture tip stress field of a dynamically propagating shear crack. In contrast, simple fracture mechanics models indicate a quasi-statically propagating fracture would be expected to produce an expanding zone of damage at the crack tip as displacement accumulates. Another explanation for the reduction in alteration zone width might be extension of the fracture tips by sub-critical crack growth. The width of alteration zone has a positive correlation with the shear displacement and a zero intercept. The slope of this correlation is steeper than for microfracture damage zone widths measured on larger displacement faults in the same region. We suggest that this indicates a different mode of formation; that of damage surrounding a dynamically propagating shear fracture. At higher displacements, additional processes such as those mentioned earlier contribute to the width of the microfracture damage zone, and the rate of growth with displacement is not so pronounced.

  4. Endothelial damage and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2009-11-01

    This issue of Autoimmunity reviews the mechanisms that lead to vascular damage in systemic autoimmune diseases. In addition, this issue explores recent advances in the understanding of how abnormalities in angiogenesis present in autoimmune diseases may lead to tissue damage and/or to premature vascular disease.

  5. Mouth Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Growths can ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis NOTE: This ...

  6. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F.; Fang, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  7. Damaging oral habits.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results.

  8. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-17

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  9. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  10. Computations on frost damage to Scots pine under climatic warming in boreal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kellomaeki, S.; Haenninen, H.; Kolstroem, M.

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the risk of frost damage to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in northern regions under climatic warming, a submodel for such damage to trees was included in a forest ecosystem model of the gap type. An annual growth multiplier describing the effects of frost was calculated with the help of simulated daily frost hardiness and daily minimum temperature. The annual growth multiplier was used in the main ecosystem model when simulating the development of a tree stand using a time step of one year. Simulations of the growth and development of Scots pine stands in southern Finland (61{degrees} N) under an elevating temperature indicated that climatic warming could increase the risk of frost damage due to premature onset of growth during warm spells in the late winter and early spring. Risk of frost damage implies uncertainty in yield expectations from boreal forest ecosystems in the event of climatic warming. 38 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Equivalent damage: A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflen, J. R.; Cook, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts in equivalent damage were evaluated to determine their applicability to the life prediction of hot path components of aircraft gas turbine engines. Equivalent damage was defined as being those effects which influence the crack initiation life-time beyond the damage that is measured in uniaxial, fully-reversed sinusoidal and isothermal experiments at low homologous temperatures. Three areas of equivalent damage were examined: mean stress, cumulative damage, and multiaxiality. For each area, a literature survey was conducted to aid in selecting the most appropriate theories. Where possible, data correlations were also used in the evaluation process. A set of criteria was developed for ranking the theories in each equivalent damage regime. These criteria considered aspects of engine utilization as well as the theoretical basis and correlative ability of each theory. In addition, consideration was given to the complex nature of the loading cycle at fatigue critical locations of hot path components; this loading includes non-proportional multiaxial stressing, combined temperature and strain fluctuations, and general creep-fatigue interactions. Through applications of selected equivalent damage theories to some suitable data sets it was found that there is insufficient data to allow specific recommendations of preferred theories for general applications. A series of experiments and areas of further investigations were identified.

  12. Drug-induced corneal damage.

    PubMed

    2014-04-01

    Corneal damage can have a variety of causes, including infections, chemical splashes, environmental factors (radiation, trauma, contact lenses, etc.), and systemic diseases (genetic, autoimmune, inflammatory, metabolic, etc.). A wide range of drugs can also damage the cornea. The severity of drug-induced corneal changes can range from simple asymptomatic deposits to irreversible, sight-threatening damage. Several factors can influence the onset of corneal lesions. Some factors, such as the dose, are treatment-related, while others such as contact lenses, are patient-related. A variety of mechanisms may be involved, including corneal dryness, changes in the corneal epithelium, impaired wound healing and deposits. Many drugs can damage the cornea through direct contact, after intraocular injection or instillation, including VEGF inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, local anaesthetics, glaucoma drugs, fluoroquinolones, and preservatives. Some systemically administered drugs can also damage the cornea, notably cancer drugs, amiodarone and isotretinoin. Vulnerable patients should be informed of this risk if they are prescribed a drug with the potential to damage the cornea so that they can identify problems in a timely manner. It may be necessary to discontinue the suspect drug when signs and symptoms of corneal damage occur.

  13. Estimating bird damage from damage incidence in wine grape vineyards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeHaven, R.W.; Hothem, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Bird damage was measured during 1977 and 1978 at 32 wine grape vineyards in the San Joaquin Valley and North Coastal Region of California. Both the percentage bird loss (PBL) and the percentage of bunches damaged (BDI = bird damage incidence) were determined during 55 total-damage assessments, and the resulting data pairs were used to develop a regression of PBL on BDI. The final prediction equation was loge (PBL + 1) = 0.0385 BDI, for which the SE = 9.6297 10-4, and it accounted for 97% of the observed variation. We conclude that by using that equation, reasonably accurate predictions of PBL can be obtained from relatively quick and inexpensive estimates of BDI. Guidelines for the use of the prediction method and the accuracy of some PBL predictions are discussed.

  14. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... which could cause catastrophic failure of the airplane; and (iii) An analysis, supported by test.... Inspection thresholds for the following types of structure must be established based on crack growth analyses... locations and modes of damage due to fatigue, corrosion, or accidental damage. Repeated load and...

  15. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  16. Impact damage in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1988-01-01

    Damage tolerance requirements have become an important consideration in the design and fabrication of composite structural components for modern aircraft. The ability of a component to contain a flaw of a given size without serious loss of its structural integrity is of prime concern. Composite laminates are particularly susceptible to damage caused by transverse impact loading. The ongoing program described is aimed at developing experimental and analytical methods that can be used to assess damage tolerance capabilities in composite structures subjected to impulsive loading. Some significant results of this work and the methodology used to obtain them are outlined.

  17. An experimental study of damage accumulation in cemented hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    McCormack, B A O; Prendergast, P J; Gallagher, D G

    1996-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a methodology to characterize the pattern of crack initiation and damage accumulation in intramedullary fixated cemented prostheses. DESIGN: An experimental physical model of intramedullary fixation was developed which both represents the implant structure and permits monitoring of fatigue crack growth. BACKGROUND: Many joint replacement prostheses are fixed into the medullary cavity of bones using a poly(methylmethacrylate) 'bone cement', which forms a mantle around the prosthesis and locks it to the bone. The endurance of the replacement is, to a great extent, determined by the mechanical durability of the cement and the implant interfaces under cyclic stresses generated by dynamic loading. The cement mantle is subjected to complex multiaxial stresses which vary in particular distribution depending on the prosthesis design. METHODS: Damage accumulation is reported in terms of the number of cracks, the location of cracks, and the rate of crack growth. RESULTS: The results clearly show the nature of damage accumulation in the cement mantle, and that many of the cracks which propagate within the cement mantle are related to cement porosity. CONCLUSION: This study gives experimental evidence to support the hypothesis of a damage accumulation failure scenario in cemented hip reconstructions. RELEVANCE: Cementing is the most popular technique for the fixation of joint replacement prosthesis. However, the sequence of events leading to the failure of cemented fixation is not fully understood. In this paper it is shown that damage accumulation can be directly monitored in an experimental model of cemented intramedullary fixation.

  18. Damage formation during 1.0 MeV Si self-implantation at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.B.; Mitchell, I.V.

    1999-04-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and ion flux on lattice damage in silicon induced by 1.0 MeV Si ion implantation has been investigated using Rutherford backscattering channeling (RBSC) and Raman spectroscopy. Over the temperature range of 77--323K, the temperature dependence of near-surface damage is found to be different from that of end-of-range damage. This may suggest that different mechanisms for damage growth are dominant along the ion path. The flux effect on damage accumulation varies with substrate temperatures. Around liquid nitrogen temperature (77K), the near-surface damage decreases with increasing flux, contrary to the case around room temperature (300K). In the temperature range of {approximately}120--250K, damage is almost independent of implant flux. Possible causes of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  19. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  20. Clinical light damage to the eye

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four sections: The Nature of Light and of Light Damage to Biological Tissues; Light Damage to the Eye; Protecting the Eye from Light Damage; and Overview of Light Damage to the Eye. Some of the paper titles are: Ultraviolet-Absorbing Intraocular Lens Implants; Phototoxic Changes in the Retina; Light Damage to the Lens; and Radiation, Light, and Sight.

  1. Effects of Accelerated Aging on Fiber Damage Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1999-02-15

    Laser-induced damage mechanisms that can occur during high-intensity fiber transmission have been under study for a number of years. Our particular interest in laser initiation of explosives has led us to examine damage processes associated with the transmission of Q-switched, Nd:YAG pulses at 1.06 {micro}m through step-index, multimode, fused silica fiber. Laser breakdown at the fiber entrance face is often the first process to limit fiber transmission but catastrophic damage can also occur at either fiber end face, within the initial entry segment of the fiber, and at other internal sites along the fiber path. Past studies have examined how these various damage mechanisms depend upon fiber end-face preparation, fiber fixturing and routing, laser characteristics, and laser-to-fiber injection optics. In some applications of interest, however, a fiber transmission system may spend years in storage before it is used. Consequently, an important additional issue for these applications is whether or not there are aging processes that can result in lower damage thresholds over time. Fiber end-face contamination would certainly lower breakdown and damage thresholds at these surfaces, but careful design of hermetic seals in connectors and other end-face fixtures can minimize this possibility. A more subtle possibility would be a process for the slow growth of internal defects that could lead to lower thresholds for internal damage. In the current study, two approaches to stimulating the growth of internal defects were used in an attempt to produce observable changes in internal damage thresholds. In the first approach test fibers were subjected to a very high tensile stress for a time sufficient for some fraction to fail from static fatigue. In the second approach, test fibers were subjected to a combination of high tensile stress and large, cyclic temperature variations. Both of these approaches were rather arbitrary due to the lack of an established growth mechanism for

  2. Loss and damage post Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2016-08-01

    The Paris Agreement gave the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage a permanent and potentially prominent place in climate negotiations, but beyond that its impact remains wide open for interpretation.

  3. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  4. BDS thin film damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2008-10-24

    A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

  5. Radiolytic Damage to Genetic Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, John F.

    1981-01-01

    Describes some basic findings in the radiation chemistry of genetic material derived from studies of model systems. Uses these findings to extrapolate the consequences of radiation damage to DNA within cells. (CS)

  6. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Program (FATIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    FATIG computes fatigue damage/fatigue life using the stress rms (root mean square) value, the total number of cycles, and S-N curve parameters. The damage is computed by the following methods: (a) traditional method using Miner s rule with stress cycles determined from a Rayleigh distribution up to 3*sigma; and (b) classical fatigue damage formula involving the Gamma function, which is derived from the integral version of Miner's rule. The integration is carried out over all stress amplitudes. This software solves the problem of probabilistic fatigue damage using the integral form of the Palmgren-Miner rule. The software computes fatigue life using an approach involving all stress amplitudes, up to N*sigma, as specified by the user. It can be used in the design of structural components subjected to random dynamic loading, or by any stress analyst with minimal training for fatigue life estimates of structural components.

  7. Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

  8. Damage progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    A computational simulation tool is used to evaluate the various stages of damage progression in composite materials during Iosipescu sheat testing. Unidirectional composite specimens with either the major or minor material axis in the load direction are considered. Damage progression characteristics are described for each specimen using two types of boundary conditions. A procedure is outlined regarding the use of computational simulation in composites testing. Iosipescu shear testing using the V-notched beam specimen is a convenient method to measure both shear strength and shear stiffness simultaneously. The evaluation of composite test response can be made more productive and informative via computational simulation of progressive damage and fracture. Computational simulation performs a complete evaluation of laminated composite fracture via assessment of ply and subply level damage/fracture processes.

  9. Damaging effects of visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. P.; Baker, B. N.

    1982-02-01

    The right eyes of anesthetized, ten week old albino rats are exposed to constant photon fluxes at 6 wavelengths for 6 hours. The left eye of each animal is patched during the exposure and is used as control. Histologic examination of retinal sections disclosed a region in the superior retina which is more damaged than are other areas. Attempting to ascertain an action spectrum by measuring outer nuclear layer (ONL) lost in this sensitive region fails. However, it is shown that when ONL thickness is integrated over the entire retinal sections, a rhodopsin action-spectrum emerges. It is concluded that retinal light damage in the albina rat under these conditions is rhodopsin mediated; and assessment of the extent of damage is best made by some method which integrates over the entire retinal section. The latter methodology is not routinely incorporated into studies of retinal light-damage but probably should be.

  10. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  11. Climate change: Unattributed hurricane damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallegatte, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    In the United States, hurricanes have been causing more and more economic damage. A reanalysis of the disaster database using a statistical method that accounts for improvements in resilience opens the possibility that climate change has played a role.

  12. Non-local damage rheology and size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, V.

    2011-12-01

    We study scaling relations controlling the onset of transiently-accelerating fracturing and transition to dynamic rupture propagation in a non-local damage rheology model. The size effect is caused principally by growth of a fracture process zone, involving stress redistribution and energy release associated with a large fracture. This implies that rupture nucleation and transition to dynamic propagation are inherently scale-dependent processes. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and local damage mechanics are formulated in terms of dimensionless strain components and thus do not allow introducing any space scaling, except linear relations between fracture length and displacements. Generalization of Weibull theory provides scaling relations between stress and crack length at the onset of failure. A powerful extension of the LEFM formulation is the displacement-weakening model which postulates that yielding is complete when the crack wall displacement exceeds some critical value or slip-weakening distance Dc at which a transition to kinetic friction is complete. Scaling relations controlling the transition to dynamic rupture propagation in slip-weakening formulation are widely accepted in earthquake physics. Strong micro-crack interaction in a process zone may be accounted for by adopting either integral or gradient type non-local damage models. We formulate a gradient-type model with free energy depending on the scalar damage parameter and its spatial derivative. The damage-gradient term leads to structural stresses in the constitutive stress-strain relations and a damage diffusion term in the kinetic equation for damage evolution. The damage diffusion eliminates the singular localization predicted by local models. The finite width of the localization zone provides a fundamental length scale that allows numerical simulations with the model to achieve the continuum limit. A diffusive term in the damage evolution gives rise to additional damage diffusive time

  13. Replicating Damaged DNA in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail. PMID:24296172

  14. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  15. Heat transfer in damaged material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, J.

    2013-10-01

    Fully coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of civil engineering problems is studied. The mechanical analysis is based on damage mechanics which is useful for modeling of behaviour of quasi-brittle materials, especially in tension. The damage is assumed to be isotropic. The heat transfer is assumed in the form of heat conduction governed by the Fourier law and heat radiation governed by the Stefan-Boltzmann law. Fully coupled thermo-mechanical problem is formulated.

  16. Nav Channels in Damaged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Morris, C E; Joos, B

    2016-01-01

    Sick excitable cells (ie, Nav channel-expressing cells injured by trauma, ischemia, inflammatory, and other conditions) typically exhibit "acquired sodium channelopathies" which, we argue, reflect bleb-damaged membranes rendering their Nav channels "leaky." The situation is excitotoxic because untreated Nav leak exacerbates bleb damage. Fast Nav inactivation (a voltage-independent process) is so tightly coupled, kinetically speaking, to the inherently voltage-dependent process of fast activation that when bleb damage accelerates and thus left-shifts macroscopic fast activation, fast inactivation accelerates to the same extent. The coupled g(V) and availability(V) processes and their window conductance regions consequently left-shift by the same number of millivolts. These damage-induced hyperpolarizing shifts, whose magnitude increases with damage intensity, are called coupled left shift (CLS). Based on past work and modeling, we discuss how to test for Nav-CLS, emphasizing the virtue of sawtooth ramp clamp. We explain that it is the inherent mechanosensitivity of Nav activation that underlies Nav-CLS. Using modeling of excitability, we show the known process of Nav-CLS is sufficient to predict a wide variety of "sick excitable cell" phenomena, from hyperexcitability through to depolarizing block. When living cells are mimicked by inclusion of pumps, mild Nav-CLS produces a wide array of burst phenomena and subthreshold oscillations. Dynamical analysis of mild damage scenarios shows how these phenomena reflect changes in spike thresholds as the pumps try to counteract the leaky Nav channels. Smart Nav inhibitors designed for sick excitable cells would target bleb-damaged membrane, buying time for cell-mediated removal or repair of Nav-bearing membrane that has become bleb-damaged (ie, detached from the cytoskeleton). PMID:27586295

  17. ARTICLES: High-power laser radiation damage to transparent insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Kulikov, V. I.; Pedanov, V. V.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the kinetics of the post-breakdown phenomena accompanying the focusing of high-power laser radiation inside transparent insulators (using the example of single-crystal potassium alum). Measurements were made of the rate of growth of the damage region and of the propagation velocity of the elastic wave, its amplitude and wavelength. The dimensions of the breakdown region were compared with those of the damage zone in the insulator. An analysis was made of the laser radiation energy distribution in the observed phenomenon.

  18. Structural Durability of Damaged Metallic Panel Repaired with Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability/damage tolerance characteristics of an aluminum tension specimen possessing a short crack and repaired by applying a fiber composite surface patch is investigated via computational simulation. The composite patch is made of graphite/epoxy plies with various layups. An integrated computer code that accounts for all possible failure modes is utilized for the simulation of combined fiber-composite/aluminum structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the structural degradation stages due to tensile loading and illustrate the use of computational simulation for the investigation of a composite patch repaired cracked metallic panel.

  19. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which represent three of the most common neurodegenerative pathologies in humans. PMID:26255941

  20. Damage Assessment Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapico, J. L.; González, M. P.; Worden, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method of damage assessment based on neural networks (NNs) is presented and applied to the Steelquake structure. The method is intended to assess the overall damage at each floor in composite frames caused by seismic loading. A neural network is used to calibrate the initial undamaged structure, and another to predict the damage. The natural frequencies of the structure are used as inputs of the NNs. The data used to train the NNs were obtained through a finite element (FE) model. Many previous approaches have exhibited a relatively poor capacity of generalisation. In order to overcome this problem, a FE model more suitable to the definition of damage is tried herein. Further work in this paper is concerned with the validation of the method. For this end, the damage levels of the structure were obtained through the trained NNs from the available experimental modal data. Then, the stiffness matrices of the structure predicted by the method were compared with those identified from pseudo-dynamic tests. Results are excellent. The new FE model definition allows the NNs to have a much better generalisation. The obtained values of the terms of the stiffness matrix of the undamaged structure are almost exact when comparing with the experimental ones, while the absolute differences are lower than 8.6% for the damaged structure.

  1. Mechanism of DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin

    2015-08-26

    DNA damage may compromise genome integrity and lead to cell death. Cells have evolved a variety of processes to respond to DNA damage including damage repair and tolerance mechanisms, as well as damage checkpoints. The DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathway promotes the bypass of single-stranded DNA lesions encountered by DNA polymerases during DNA replication. This prevents the stalling of DNA replication. Two mechanistically distinct DDT branches have been characterized. One is translesion synthesis (TLS) in which a replicative DNA polymerase is temporarily replaced by a specialized TLS polymerase that has the ability to replicate across DNA lesions. TLS is mechanistically simple and straightforward, but it is intrinsically error-prone. The other is the error-free template switching (TS) mechanism in which the stalled nascent strand switches from the damaged template to the undamaged newly synthesized sister strand for extension past the lesion. Error-free TS is a complex but preferable process for bypassing DNA lesions. However, our current understanding of this pathway is sketchy. An increasing number of factors are being found to participate or regulate this important mechanism, which is the focus of this editorial. PMID:26322163

  2. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  3. Improved Method for Laser Damage Testing Coated Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, M R; Folta, J A; Stolz, C J; Taylor, J R; Wolfe, J E; Griffin, A J; Thomas, M D

    2005-10-25

    The damage test procedure for qualifying a coating run of anti-reflection coated optics consists of scanning a pulsed 1064 nm laser over a 1 cm x 1 cm area on a test sample to illuminate approximately 2400 sites. Scans are repeated at 3 J/cm{sup 2} increments until the fluence specification for the optic is reached. In the past, initiation of 1 or more damage sites was classified as a failed coating run, requiring the production optics in the corresponding coating lot be reworked and recoated. Recent laser damage growth tests of 300 repetitive pulses performed on numerous damage sites revealed that all were stable up to 20 J/cm{sup 2}. Therefore the acceptance criteria has been modified to allow a moderate number of damage sites, as long as they are smaller than the allowed dig size and are stable (do not grow). Consequently many coating runs that previously would have been rejected are now accepted, resulting in higher yield, lower cost, and improved delivery schedule. The new test also provides assurance that initiated damage sites are stable during long term operation.

  4. New Treatment Strategies for Alcohol-Induced Heart Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Solà, Joaquim; Planavila Porta, Ana

    2016-01-01

    High-dose alcohol misuse induces multiple noxious cardiac effects, including myocyte hypertrophy and necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, decreased ventricular contraction and ventricle enlargement. These effects produce diastolic and systolic ventricular dysfunction leading to congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and an increased death rate. There are multiple, dose-dependent, synchronic and synergistic mechanisms of alcohol-induced cardiac damage. Ethanol alters membrane permeability and composition, interferes with receptors and intracellular transients, induces oxidative, metabolic and energy damage, decreases protein synthesis, excitation-contraction coupling and increases cell apoptosis. In addition, ethanol decreases myocyte protective and repair mechanisms and their regeneration. Although there are diverse different strategies to directly target alcohol-induced heart damage, they are partially effective, and can only be used as support medication in a multidisciplinary approach. Alcohol abstinence is the preferred goal, but control drinking is useful in alcohol-addicted subjects not able to abstain. Correction of nutrition, ionic and vitamin deficiencies and control of alcohol-related systemic organ damage are compulsory. Recently, several growth factors (myostatin, IGF-1, leptin, ghrelin, miRNA, and ROCK inhibitors) and new cardiomyokines such as FGF21 have been described to regulate cardiac plasticity and decrease cardiac damage, improving cardiac repair mechanisms, and they are promising agents in this field. New potential therapeutic targets aim to control oxidative damage, myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and persistent apoptosis In addition, stem-cell therapy may improve myocyte regeneration. However, these strategies are not yet approved for clinical use. PMID:27690014

  5. 7 CFR 51.3748 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3748 Damage. Damage means any... considered as damage: (1) Sunburn which causes the rind to become brownish in color, hard, tough, or...

  6. Boulder damage symposium annual thin film laser damage competition

    DOE PAGES

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-11-28

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed betweenmore » different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. The resulting series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity were used in each of the competitions so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. Laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.« less

  7. Boulder damage symposium annual thin film laser damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-11-28

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed between different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. The resulting series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity were used in each of the competitions so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. Laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.

  8. Boulder Damage Symposium annual thin-film laser damage competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Christopher J.

    2012-12-01

    Optical instruments and laser systems are often fluence-limited by multilayer thin films deposited on the optical surfaces. When comparing publications within the laser damage literature, there can be confusing and conflicting laser damage results. This is due to differences in testing protocols between research groups studying very different applications. In this series of competitions, samples from multiple vendors are compared under identical testing parameters and a single testing service. Unlike a typical study where a hypothesis is tested within a well-controlled experiment with isolated variables, this competition isolates the laser damage testing variables so that trends can be observed between different deposition processes, coating materials, cleaning techniques, and multiple coating suppliers. This series of damage competitions has also been designed to observe general trends of damage morphologies and mechanisms over a wide range of coating types (high reflector and antireflector), wavelengths (193 to 1064 nm), and pulse lengths (180 fs to 13 ns). For each of the competitions, a double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the deposition process, coating materials, layer count and spectral results are presented. In summary, laser resistance was strongly affected by substrate cleaning, coating deposition method, and coating material selection whereas layer count and spectral properties had minimal impact.

  9. Laser damage performance of fused silica optical componets measured on the beamlet laser at 35nm

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, M R; Maricle, S; Mouser, R; Parham, T; Schwartz, S; Wegner, P; Weiland, T

    1998-12-22

    A statistics-based model is being developed to predict the laser-damage-limited lifetime of UV optical components on the NIF laser. In order to provide data for the model, laser damage experiments were performed on the Beamlet laser system at LLNL (aperture: 34 cm x 34 cm). Three prototype NIF focus lenses were exposed to 351 nm pulses (1.5 ns or 3 ns) during four experimental campaigns, each consisting of 23 to 38 pulses at NIF relevant fluences. Each lens was sol-gel AR coated and all laser exposures were performed in a vacuum environment. Through inspections of the lens before, during and after the campaigns, pulse-to-pulse damage growth rates were measured for damage initiating both on the surfaces and at bulk inclusions. Radial growth rates measured for rear surface damage was typically 10x higher than that measured in the bulk or at the front surface. No significant correlation of growth rate to precursor type was indicated. For 5 J/cm², 3 ns pulses the typical radial growth rate was nominally 20 µm/pulse. Average growth rates measured on three lenses made by two manufacturers were in good agreement. While the growth rate clearly increased with fluence, the data obtained was insufficient to quantify the dependence. The growth rates reported here were 20x-50x higher than values predicted from off-line studies of bare surfaces in air.

  10. Neural networks for damage identification

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Klenke, S.E.

    1997-11-01

    Efforts to optimize the design of mechanical systems for preestablished use environments and to extend the durations of use cycles establish a need for in-service health monitoring. Numerous studies have proposed measures of structural response for the identification of structural damage, but few have suggested systematic techniques to guide the decision as to whether or not damage has occurred based on real data. Such techniques are necessary because in field applications the environments in which systems operate and the measurements that characterize system behavior are random. This paper investigates the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to identify damage in mechanical systems. Two probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) are developed and used to judge whether or not damage has occurred in a specific mechanical system, based on experimental measurements. The first PNN is a classical type that casts Bayesian decision analysis into an ANN framework; it uses exemplars measured from the undamaged and damaged system to establish whether system response measurements of unknown origin come from the former class (undamaged) or the latter class (damaged). The second PNN establishes the character of the undamaged system in terms of a kernel density estimator of measures of system response; when presented with system response measures of unknown origin, it makes a probabilistic judgment whether or not the data come from the undamaged population. The physical system used to carry out the experiments is an aerospace system component, and the environment used to excite the system is a stationary random vibration. The results of damage identification experiments are presented along with conclusions rating the effectiveness of the approaches.

  11. Sperm DNA damage and its relation with leukocyte DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Babazadeh, Zahra; Razavi, Shahnaz; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Shahidi, Maryam; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-01-01

    DNA fragmentation in human sperm has been related to endogenous and exogenous factors. Exogenous factors can also affect leukocyte DNA integrity. This study evaluated the relation between sperm DNA damage and leukocyte DNA integrity, as a predictor of exogenous factors. DNA damage in the sperm and leukocytes of 41 individuals undergoing ICSI were measured by Comet assay. In addition, sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) was carried out on semen samples. A positive correlation was observed between the DNA integrity of sperm with leukocytes. When patients were divided into low and high DNA exposure groups, sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly different between the two groups. Cleavage rate and embryo quality showed significant correlation with leukocyte DNA integrity. The results showed that leukocyte DNA integrity could be used to identify individuals at high risk in order to reduce the extent of DNA damage in patients before ICSI in order to improve the subsequent outcome of this procedure.

  12. Continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials and its application to multilayer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellmann, Roman; Ricoeur, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a micromechanical continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials is presented. As a constitutive law it is implemented into a finite element (FE) code. The model is based on micromechanical considerations of domain switching and its interaction with microcrack growth and coalescence. A FE analysis of a multilayer actuator is performed, showing the initiation of damage zones at the electrode tips during the poling process. Further, the influence of mechanical pre-stressing on damage evolution and actuating properties is investigated. The results provided in this work give useful information on the damage of advanced piezoelectric devices and their optimization.

  13. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  14. Eyelid Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microscope). The growth is usually removed surgically. Did You Know... A growth on the eyelid that ... respond to initial treatments. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  15. Evaluating damage potential of cryogenic concrete using acoustic emission sensors and permeability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Parsaei, Boback; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the damage potential of concrete of different mix designs subjected to cryogenic temperatures, using acoustic emission (AE) and permeability testing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies that might be employed to produce concrete that resists damage when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Such concrete would be suitable for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and could replace currently used 9% Ni steel, thereby leading to huge cost savings. In the experiments described, concrete cubes, 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm, were cast using four different mix designs. The four mixes employed siliceous river sand as fine aggregate. Moreover, limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate were individually used as coarse aggregates in the mixes. The concrete samples were then cooled from room temperature (20°C) to cryogenic temperature (-165°C) in a temperature chamber. AE sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during the cryogenic freezing process. The damage potential was evaluated in terms of the growth of damage as determined from AE, as a function of temperature and concrete mixture design. The damage potential observed was validated with water permeability testing. Initial results demonstrate the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the aggregates on damage growth. Concrete damage (cracking) resistance generally decreased with increasing coarse aggregate CTE, and was in the order, limestone ≥ trap rock << lightweight aggregate ≥ sandstone. Work is in progress to fully understand thermal dilation and damage growth in concrete due to differential CTE of its components.

  16. The compensatory responses of an understory herb to experimental damage are habitat-dependent.

    PubMed

    Bruna, Emilio M; Ribeiro, Maria Beatriz Nogueira

    2005-12-01

    Canopy gap formation strongly influences the diversity and dynamics of both tropical and temperate forests. It is often viewed as inherently beneficial for understory plants, primarily because growth and flowering are enhanced when light is no longer a limiting resource. It can also be detrimental, however, because plants can be damaged by falling crowns or branches. To elucidate the responses of the Amazonian understory herb Heliconia acuminata to damage sustained during gap formation, we transplanted both experimentally damaged and control plants to canopy gaps and the forest understory. We then measured their patterns of growth and biomass allocation 10 mo later. Despite losing approximately 50% of their leaf area, all damaged plants survived the duration of our experiment. Furthermore, damaged plants transplanted to gaps had relative growth rates that far exceeded those of undamaged plants in both gaps and the forest understory. There were also significant interactions between damage and destination habitat type on root to shoot ratios and leaf-area ratios. Our results suggest the ability of herbaceous plants to recover from damage, as well as patterns of post-damage biomass allocation, may be habitat-dependent in ways that have previously remained unexplored.

  17. Unlimited Damage Accumulation in Metallic Materials Under Cascade-Damage Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barashev, Aleksandr; Golubov, Stanislav I

    2008-09-01

    Most experiments on neutron or heavy-ion cascade-produced irradiation of pure metals and metallic alloys demonstrate unlimited void growth as well as development of the dislocation structure. In contrast, the theory of radiation damage predicts saturation of void swelling at sufficiently high irradiation doses and, accordingly, termination of accumulation of interstitial-type defects. It is shown in the present paper that, under conditions of steady production of one-dimensionally (1-D) mobile clusters of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in displacement cascades, any one of the following three conditions can result in indefinite damage accumulation. First, if the fraction of SIAs generated in the clustered form is smaller than some finite value of the order of the dislocation bias factor. Second, if solute, impurity or transmuted atoms form atmospheres around voids and repel the SIA clusters. Third, if spatial correlations between voids and other defects, such as second-phase precipitates and dislocations, exist that provide shadowing of voids from the SIA clusters. The driving force for the development of such correlations is the same as for void lattice formation and is argued to be always present under cascade-damage conditions. It is emphasised that the mean-free path of 1-D migrating SIA clusters is typically at least an order of magnitude longer than the average distance between microstructural defects; hence spatial correlations on the same scale should be taken into consideration. A way of developing a predictive theory is discussed. An interpretation

  18. STS-118 Radiator Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, Dana M.; Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Herrin, J.; Lyons, F.

    2008-01-01

    During the August 2007 STS-118 mission to the International Space Station, a micro-meteoroid or orbital debris (MMOD) particle impacted and completely penetrated one of shuttle Endeavour s radiator panels and the underlying thermal control system (TCS) blanket, leaving deposits on (but no damage to) the payload bay door. While it is not unusual for shuttle orbiters to be impacted by small MMOD particles, the damage from this impact is larger than any previously seen on the shuttle radiator panels. A close-up photograph of the radiator impact entry hole is shown in Figure 1, and the location of the impact on Endeavour s left-side aft-most radiator panel is shown in Figure 2. The aft radiator panel is 0.5-inches thick and consists of 0.011 inch thick aluminum facesheets on the front and back of an aluminum honeycomb core. The front facesheet is additionally covered by a 0.005 inch thick layer of silver-Teflon thermal tape. The entry hole in the silver-Teflon tape measured 8.1 mm by 6.4 mm (0.32 inches by 0.25 inches). The entry hole in the outer facesheet measured 7.4 mm by 5.3 mm (0.29 inches by 0.21 inches) (0.23 inches). The impactor also perforated an existing 0.012 inch doubler that had been bonded over the facesheet to repair previous impact damage (an example that lightning can strike the same place twice, even for MMOD impact). The peeled-back edge around the entry hole, or lip , is a characteristic of many hypervelocity impacts. High velocity impact with the front facesheet fragmented the impacting particle and caused it to spread out into a debris cloud. The debris cloud caused considerable damage to the internal honeycomb core with 23 honeycomb cells over a region of 28 mm by 26 mm (1.1 inches by 1.0 inches) having either been completely destroyed or partially damaged. Figure 3 is a view of the exit hole in the rear facesheet, and partially shows the extent of the honeycomb core damage and clearly shows the jagged petaled exit hole through the backside

  19. Radiation damage in nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1992-03-01

    Any nuclear material experiences radiation damage in the course of its technological application. The damage sources cover a wide range: fission, fast neutrons, α-particles and recoil atoms of the α-decay, β- and γ-radiation. In addition, extensive parametric studies using controlled ion implantation have been performed covering wide ranges of doses, ion energies, implantation and recovery-temperatures and using different ion beams. The present paper concentrates on ceramic nuclear materials for fission reactors (i.e. the nuclear fuels UO 2 and UN), but damage effects in materials for solidification of nuclear waste (ceramics and glasses) arc also discussed. Since the author has contributed extensive reviews to this field at previous REI conferences, emphasis is placed on new insights gained in recent work. A good knowledge on the various aspects (type, extent, recovery temperatures, etc.) of radiation damage has been elaborated. Many physical properties are affected. The importance of radiation effects and of radiation damage for the technological application of nuclear materials is discussed.

  20. Delayed growth

    MedlinePlus

    Growth - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Weight gain - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; ... A child should have regular, well-baby check-ups with a health care provider. These checkups are usually scheduled ...

  1. Final optics damage inspection (FODI) for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Conder, A; Alger, T; Azevedo, S; Chang, J; Glenn, S; Kegelmeyer, L; Liebman, J; Spaeth, M; Whitman, P

    2007-10-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will routinely fire high energy shots (approaching 10 kJ per beamline) through the final optics, located on the target chamber. After a high fluence shot, exceeding 4J/cm2 at 351 nm wavelength, the final optics will be inspected for laser-induced damage. The FODI (Final Optics Damage Inspection) system has been developed for this purpose, with requirements to detect laser-induced damage initiation and to track and size it's the growth to the point at which the optic is removed and the site mitigated. The FODI system is the 'corner stone' of the NIF optic recycle strategy. We will describe the FODI system and discuss the challenges to make optics inspection a routine part of NIF operations.

  2. A procedure for utilization of a damage-dependent constitutive model for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Allen, David H.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the procedure for utilizing a damage constitutive model to predict progressive damage growth in laminated composites. In this model, the effects of the internal damage are represented by strain-like second order tensorial damage variables and enter the analysis through damage dependent ply level and laminate level constitutive equations. The growth of matrix cracks due to fatigue loading is predicted by an experimentally based damage evolutionary relationship. This model is incorporated into a computer code called FLAMSTR. This code is capable of predicting the constitutive response and matrix crack damage accumulation in fatigue loaded laminated composites. The structure and usage of FLAMSTR are presented along with sample input and output files to assist the code user. As an example problem, an analysis of crossply laminates subjected to two stage fatigue loading was conducted and the resulting damage accumulation and stress redistribution were examined to determine the effect of variations in fatigue load amplitude applied during the first stage of the load history. It was found that the model predicts a significant loading history effect on damage evolution.

  3. Cotyledon damage affects seed number through final plant size in the annual grassland species Medicago lupulina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiting; Zhao, Chuan; Lamb, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The effects of cotyledon damage on seedling growth and survival are relatively well established, but little is known about the effects on aspects of plant fitness such as seed number and size. Here the direct and indirect mechanisms linking cotyledon damage and plant fitness in the annual species Medicago lupulina are examined. Methods Growth and reproductive traits, including mature plant size, time to first flowering, flower number, seed number and individual seed mass were monitored in M. lupulina plants when zero, one or two cotyledons were removed at 7 d old. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to examine the mechanisms linking cotyledon damage to seed number and seed mass. Key Results Cotyledon damage reduced seed number but not individual seed mass. The primary mechanism was a reduction in plant biomass with cotyledon damage that in turn reduced seed number primarily through a reduction in flower numbers. Although cotyledon damage delayed flower initiation, it had little effect on seed number. Individual seed mass was not affected by cotyledon removal, but there was a trade-off between seed number and seed mass. Conclusions It is shown how a network of indirect mechanisms link damage to cotyledons and fitness in M. lupulina. Cotyledon damage had strong direct effects on both plant size and flowering phenology, but an analysis of the causal relationships among plant traits and fitness components showed that a reduction in plant size associated with cotyledon damage was an important mechanism influencing fitness. PMID:21196450

  4. Measurement of small intestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Many animal models have been devised for investigating the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions and for screening drugs for the treatment of intestinal ulcers in humans. Recently, particular attention has been focused on NSAID-induced intestinal lesions as a result of the development of the capsule endoscope and double-balloon endoscope. Ischemic enteritis, one of the most dramatic abdominal emergencies, is known to cause severe damage to the small intestine by a significant decrease of arterial blood flow in the small intestine. In this unit, two animal models for small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs or intestinal ischemia are described. Also included are methods for lesion induction and evaluation of the damage as well as the measurement of pathogenic functional and biochemical changes.

  5. Elastic properties, strength and damage tolerance of pultruded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Mrinal Chandra

    Pultruded composites are candidate materials for civil engineering infrastructural applications due their higher corrosion resistance and lower life cycle cost. Efficient use of materials like structural members requires thorough understanding of the mechanism that affects their response. The present investigation addresses the modeling and characterization of E-glass fiber/polyester resin matrix pultruded composites in the form of sheets of various thicknesses. The elastic constants were measured using static, vibration and ultrasonic methods. Two types of piezoelectric crystals were used in ultrasonic measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using a single specimen, in the form of a circular disk, was shown in measuring all the elastic constants using ultrasonic technique. The effects of stress gradient on tensile strength were investigated. A large number of specimens, parallel and transverse to the pultrusion direction, were tested in tension, 3-point flexure, and 4-point flexure. A 2-parameter Weibull model was applied to predict the tensile strength from the flexure tests. The measured and Weibull-predicted ratios did not show consistent agreement. Microstructural observations suggested that the flaw distribution in the material was not uniform, which appears to be a basic requirement for the Weibull distribution. Compressive properties were measured using a short-block compression test specimen of 44.4-mm long and 25.4-mm wide. Specimens were tested at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° orientations. The compression test specimen was modeled using 4-noded isoparametric layered plate and shell elements. The predicted elastic properties for the roving layer and the continuous strand mat layer was used for the finite element study. The damage resistance and damage tolerance were investigated experimentally. Using a quasi-static indentation loading, damage was induced at various incrementally increased force levels to investigate the damage growth process. Damage

  6. The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vervaeck, A.

    2011-08-01

    The global CATDAT damaging earthquakes and secondary effects (tsunami, fire, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture) database was developed to validate, remove discrepancies, and expand greatly upon existing global databases; and to better understand the trends in vulnerability, exposure, and possible future impacts of such historic earthquakes. Lack of consistency and errors in other earthquake loss databases frequently cited and used in analyses was a major shortcoming in the view of the authors which needed to be improved upon. Over 17 000 sources of information have been utilised, primarily in the last few years, to present data from over 12 200 damaging earthquakes historically, with over 7000 earthquakes since 1900 examined and validated before insertion into the database. Each validated earthquake includes seismological information, building damage, ranges of social losses to account for varying sources (deaths, injuries, homeless, and affected), and economic losses (direct, indirect, aid, and insured). Globally, a slightly increasing trend in economic damage due to earthquakes is not consistent with the greatly increasing exposure. The 1923 Great Kanto (214 billion USD damage; 2011 HNDECI-adjusted dollars) compared to the 2011 Tohoku (>300 billion USD at time of writing), 2008 Sichuan and 1995 Kobe earthquakes show the increasing concern for economic loss in urban areas as the trend should be expected to increase. Many economic and social loss values not reported in existing databases have been collected. Historical GDP (Gross Domestic Product), exchange rate, wage information, population, HDI (Human Development Index), and insurance information have been collected globally to form comparisons. This catalogue is the largest known cross-checked global historic damaging earthquake database and should have far-reaching consequences for earthquake loss estimation, socio-economic analysis, and the global reinsurance field.

  7. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  8. Overview of recent KDP damage experiments and implications for NIF tripler performance

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen, L.; De Yoreo, J.; Jennings, R.; Milam, D.; Runkel, M.; Sell, W.; Williams, W.; Zaitseva, N.

    1998-07-14

    Considerable attention has been paid over the years to the problem of growing high purity KDP and KD*P to meet damage threshold requirements of ICF lasers at LLNL. The maximum fluence requirement for KD*P triplers on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is 14.3 J/cm2 at 351 nm in a 3 ns pulse. Currently KD*P (conventional or rapid grown) cannot meet this requirement without laser (pre)conditioning. In this overview, recent experiments to understand laser conditioning and damage phenomena in KDP and KD*P will be discussed. These experiments have lead to a fundamental revision of damage test methods and test result interpretation. In particular, the concept of a damage threshold has given way to measuring performance by damage distributions using millimeter sixed beams. Automated R/l (conditioned) damage tests have shown that the best rapidly grown KDP crystals exhibit the same damage distributions at the best conventionally grown KD*P. Continuous filtration of the growth solution and post growth thermal sealing are shown to increase the damage performance as well. In addition, centimeter size beams from multijoule lasers have been used to study stepwise laser conditioning in KDP. These tests have shown that an increase in the damage threshold of ~1.5X is attainable with 8-12 shots of increasing fluence. The experiments show that the damage density (pinpoints/mm3) evolves exponentially and once formed, the micron sized bulk pinpoints remain stable against increases in local fluence. The information obtained from damage distributions and conditioning studies has been used with model NIF spatial profiles to determine the probability of damage and the local pinpoint density generated in a tripler. Calculations based on test data have shown that .for well conditioned, high quality rapid growth KDP or conventional growth KD*P the damage probability is less than 3%. Furthermore, the fluence profiles expected on NIF lead to only small numbers of

  9. 7 CFR 51.613 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.613 Section 51.613 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.613 Serious damage. Serious damage means any injury... any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Crater rot, when moist, or when...

  10. 7 CFR 51.613 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.613 Section 51.613 Agriculture... damage. Serious damage means any injury or defect which seriously affects the appearance, or edible or... exceeds the maximum allowed for any one defect, shall be considered as serious damage: (a) Crater...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1583 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage. 51.1583 Section 51.1583 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1583 Damage. Damage... defective area. Loss of outer skin (epidermis) shall not be considered as damage when the potatoes...

  12. 7 CFR 51.3067 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.3067 Section 51.3067 Agriculture... Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3067 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect which... serious damage: (a) Anthracnose when any spot exceeds the area of a circle one-fourth inch in diameter,...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2960 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage. 51.2960 Section 51.2960 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2960 Damage. Damage means any specific defect... considered as damage: (a) Broken shells when the area from which a portion of the shell is missing is...

  14. Experimental Verification of a Progressive Damage Model for IM7/5260 Laminates Subjected to Tension-Tension Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    The durability and damage tolerance of laminated composites are critical design considerations for airframe composite structures. Therefore, the ability to model damage initiation and growth and predict the life of laminated composites is necessary to achieve structurally efficient and economical designs. The purpose of this research is to experimentally verify the application of a continuum damage model to predict progressive damage development in a toughened material system. Damage due to monotonic and tension-tension fatigue was documented for IM7/5260 graphite/bismaleimide laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables to predict stiffness loss in unnotched laminates. A damage dependent finite element code predicted the stiffness loss for notched laminates with good agreement to experimental data. It was concluded that the continuum damage model can adequately predict matrix damage progression in notched and unnotched laminates as a function of loading history and laminate stacking sequence.

  15. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  16. Laser damage dependence on the size and concentration of precursor defects in KDP crystals: view through differently sized filter pores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueliang; Zhao, Yuanan; Xie, Xiaoyi; Hu, Guohang; Yang, Liujiang; Xu, Ziyuan; Shao, Jianda

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the laser-induced damage performance at 1064 nm of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals grown using filters of different pore sizes. The aim is to explore a novel method for understanding laser-matter interactions with regard to physical parameters affecting the ability of damage precursors to initiate damage. By reducing the pore size of filters in continuous filtration growth, we can improve laser damage resistance. Furthermore, we develop a model based on a Gaussian distribution of precursor thresholds and heat transfer to obtain a size distribution of the precursor defects. Smaller size and/or lower concentration of precursor defects could lead to better damage resistance. PMID:27192280

  17. Strength and failure of a damaged material

    DOE PAGES

    Cerreta, Ellen K.; Gray III, George T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Potocki, Mark L.; Vachhani, Shraddha; Martinez, Daniel T.; Lovato, Manual L.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-07

    Under complex, dynamic loading conditions, damage can occur within a material. Should this damage not lead to catastrophic failure, the material can continue to sustain further loading. But, little is understood about how to represent the mechanical response of a material that has experienced dynamic loading leading to incipient damage. We examine this effect in copper. Copper is shock loaded to impart an incipient state of damage to the material. Thereafter compression and tensile specimens were sectioned from the dynamically damaged specimen to quantify the subsequent properties of the material in the region of intense incipient damage and in regionsmore » far from the damage. Finally, we observed that enhanced yield stresses result from the damaged material even over material, which has simply been shock loaded and not damaged. These results are rationalized in terms of stored plastic work due to the damage process.« less

  18. Strength and failure of a damaged material

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K.; Gray III, George T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Potocki, Mark L.; Vachhani, Shraddha; Martinez, Daniel T.; Lovato, Manual L.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-07

    Under complex, dynamic loading conditions, damage can occur within a material. Should this damage not lead to catastrophic failure, the material can continue to sustain further loading. But, little is understood about how to represent the mechanical response of a material that has experienced dynamic loading leading to incipient damage. We examine this effect in copper. Copper is shock loaded to impart an incipient state of damage to the material. Thereafter compression and tensile specimens were sectioned from the dynamically damaged specimen to quantify the subsequent properties of the material in the region of intense incipient damage and in regions far from the damage. Finally, we observed that enhanced yield stresses result from the damaged material even over material, which has simply been shock loaded and not damaged. These results are rationalized in terms of stored plastic work due to the damage process.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Genome Damage, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Naomi; Gutierrez, Karina; Michalak, Marek; Bordignon, Vilceu; Agellon, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to many diseases, including cancer. A large body of work has focused on the activation of the ER stress response in cancer cells to facilitate their survival and tumor growth; however, there are some studies suggesting that the ER stress response can also mitigate cancer progression. Despite these contradictions, it is clear that the ER stress response is closely associated with cancer biology. The ER stress response classically encompasses activation of three separate pathways, which are collectively categorized the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR has been extensively studied in various cancers and appears to confer a selective advantage to tumor cells to facilitate their enhanced growth and resistance to anti-cancer agents. It has also been shown that ER stress induces chromatin changes, which can also facilitate cell survival. Chromatin remodeling has been linked with many cancers through repression of tumor suppressor and apoptosis genes. Interplay between the classic UPR and genome damage repair mechanisms may have important implications in the transformation process of normal cells into cancer cells. PMID:25692096

  20. Growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Golde, D.W.; Herschman, H.R.; Lusis, A.J.; Groopman, J.E.

    1980-05-01

    Humoral regulation of somatic and hematopoietic cell growth has been intensely investigated during the past decade. Growth hormone is unique because it regulates the size of the person within the constraints of the genetic program. The somatomedins and insulin growth factors are low molecular weight polypeptides believed to mediate some functions of growth hormone. Epithelial growth factor and nerve growth factor are well-characterized polypeptides that influence the growth and differentiation of epithelial and neural tissues and interact with specific cell surface receptors. The hematopoietins are a family of polypeptide hormones that specifically regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells giving rise to erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, megakaryocytes, and B and T lymphocytes. Platelet-derived growth factor modulates the proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro and may have a role in the development of atherosclerosis and myelofibrosis. New knowledge on the biochemistry and physiology of growth factors will probably have a substantial impact on our understanding of human diseases involving abnormal cell growth.

  1. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  2. Compensation for oil pollution damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matugina, E. G.; Glyzina, T. S.; Kolbysheva, Yu V.; Klyuchnikov, A. S.; Vusovich, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The commitment of national industries to traditional energy sources, as well as constantly growing energy demand combined with adverse environmental impact of petroleum production and transportation urge to establish and maintain an appropriate legal and administrative framework for oil pollution damage compensation. The article considers management strategies for petroleum companies that embrace not only production benefits but also environmental issues.

  3. Human activity and damaging landslides and floods on Madeira Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.

    2011-11-01

    Over the last few decades, the island of Madeira has become an important offshore tourism and business center, with rapid economic and demographic development that has caused changes to the landscape due to human activity. In Madeira's recent history, there has been an increase over time in the frequency of occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events. As a result, the costs of restoration work due to damage caused by landslide and flood events have become a larger and larger component of Madeira's annual budget. Landslides and floods in Madeira deserve particular attention because they represent the most serious hazard to human life, to property, and to the natural environment and its important heritage value. The work reported on in this paper involved the analysis of historical data regarding damaging landslide and flood events on Madeira (in particular from 1941 to 1991) together with data on geological characteristics, topographic features, and climate, and from field observations. This analysis showed that the main factor triggering the occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events is rainfall, but that the increase in the number of damaging events recorded on Madeira Island, especially in recent times, seems to be related mostly to human activity, specifically to economic development and population growth, rather than to natural factors.

  4. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  5. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1990-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  6. Advances in understanding damage by salt crystallization.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Scherer, George W

    2010-06-15

    The single most important cause of the deterioration of monuments in the Mediterranean basin, and elsewhere around the world, is the crystallization of salt within the pores of the stone. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in elucidating the fundamental mechanisms responsible for salt damage. As a result, new methods of treatment are being proposed that offer the possibility of attacking the cause of the problem, rather than simply treating the symptoms. In this Account, we review the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization, then examine how a range of technological innovations have been applied experimentally to further the current understanding of in-pore crystallization. We close with a discussion of how computer modeling now provides particularly valuable insight, including quantitative estimates of both the interaction forces between the mineral and the crystal and the stresses induced in the material. Analyzing the kinetics and thermodynamics of crystal growth within the pores of a stone requires sensitive tools used in combination. For example, calorimetry quantifies the amount of salt that precipitates in the pores of a stone during cooling, and dilatometric measurements on a companion sample reveal the stress exerted by the salt. Synchrotron X-rays can penetrate the stone and identify the metastable phases that often appear in the first stages of crystallization. Atomic force microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy permit study of the nanometric liquid film that typically lies between salt and stone; this film controls the magnitude of the pressure exerted and the kinetics of relaxation of the stress. These experimental advances provide validation for increasingly advanced simulations, using continuum models of reactive transport on a macroscopic scale and molecular dynamics on the atomic scale. Because of the fundamental understanding of the damage mechanisms that is beginning to emerge, it is possible to devise

  7. Damage and fracture mechanics of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Saleh Ramadan

    The design of structural systems in the aerospace industry has been characterized by a continuing search for strong, yet lightweight, materials to achieve maximum payload capability for minimum weight. In recent years, this search has led to a wide use of fiber reinforced composites, such as carbon, glass and kevelar based composites. Comparison of these new materials with the traditional ones (metals) according to the basic properties, such as density, elastic modulus and also long-time and short-time strength, shows their superiority over traditional materials, when weight is a major design factor, like in the aerospace industry. Most composite materials of interest to aerospace applications have been adequately characterized under static loading conditions. Related work to study their fracture behaviour has been limited. Since most failure mechanisms involve crack growth and/or delamination, design of such components requires knowledge and understanding of their fracture properties. This thesis includes an experimental and analytical investigation of fracture characteristics of composite materials. The post-peak response of notched specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic loading is established to evaluate the fracture energy associated with progressive matrix damage and subsequent crack growth. A total of 75 uniaxial tension specimens were tested. The experimental work consisted of first testing several un-notched specimens with different thickness (number of layers) to determine the initial and secondary elastic modulus as well as the tensile strength. The investigation studied the effect of the various fracture parameters, including thickness, fiber orientation, and crack width ratio (a/w) on the behaviour of crack propagation, peak load, and post-peak response. The specimens used in this research were prepared using the vacuum bagging technique, with a chosen number of fiber glass cloth layers and fiber orientation. The experimental results provided

  8. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  9. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D. A.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto subduction about 4Ga, evident in geochemical analysis from ancient cratons, to global tectonics by 3-2.7Ga, suggests that plates and plate boundaries spread globally over a 1Gyr period. We hypothesize that when sufficient lithospheric damage, which promotes shear-localization and long-lived weak zones, combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of plate boundaries and eventually fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We demonstrate this process with an idealized model of pressure-driven flow (wherein a low pressure zone is equivalent to downwelling suction or slab pull) in a lithosphere that self-weakens according to a mylonitic-type polycrystalline grain-damage mechanism (Bercovici and Ricard, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. v.202-203, pp27-55, 2012). In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, four successive orthogonal rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damage zones that are inherited to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even as flow is only driven by subduction. For Venus' hotter surface conditions, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which is compatible with observations. After plates are developed, continued changes in driving forces combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor and micro plates.

  10. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  11. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  12. A New Damage Constitutive Model for Thermal Deformation of AA6111 Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenyu; Wang, Baoyu; Bian, Jianhua; Tang, Xuefeng; Yang, Lei; Huo, Yuanming

    2015-06-01

    Hot tensile tests were conducted using a Gleeble 1500, at the temperature range of 623 K to 823 K (350 °C to 550 °C) and strain rate range of 0.1 to 10 s-1. Flow stress is significantly affected by temperature and strain rate. As strain increases; the flow stress first rapidly increases, subsequently maintains a steady state, and finally drops sharply because of damage evolution. The features and mechanism of the damage were studied utilizing a scanning electron microscope. Micro-void nucleation, growth, and coalescence result in the failure of the hot-formed specimen. A damage equation based on continuum damage mechanics and damage mechanism in hot metal forming was proposed. A unified viscoplastic damage model coupled with strain, strain rate, temperature, dislocation, hardening, damage, damage rate, and so on was developed and calibrated for AA6111 using Genetic Algorism Tool in three steps. This model can be used to describe viscoplastic flow behavior and damage evolution at various temperatures and strain rates. The model was implemented into the finite element (FE) model in ABAQUS platform via the variable user material subroutine. Thus, the FE model could be employed to study the damage distribution and the effects of blank holder force (BHF) and forming velocity on hot cylindrical deep drawing. It is revealed that lower BHF and higher velocity are beneficial for drawability. A good agreement between simulated and experimental results has been achieved.

  13. Improving 351-nm Damage Performance of Large-Aperture Fused Silica and DKDP Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Hackel, L; Wegner, P; Parham, T; Hrubesh, L; Penetrante, B; Whitman, P; Demos, S; Menapace, J; Runkel, M; Fluss, M; Feit, M; Key, M; Biesiada, T

    2002-01-07

    A program to identify and eliminate the causes of UV laser-induced damage and growth in fused silica and DKDP has developed methods to extend optics lifetimes for large-aperture, high-peak-power, UV lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Issues included polish-related surface damage initiation and growth on fused silica and DKDP, bulk inclusions in fused silica, pinpoint bulk damage in DKDP, and UV-induced surface degradation in fused silica and DKDP in a vacuum. Approaches included an understanding of the mechanism of the damage, incremental improvements to existing fabrication technology, and feasibility studies of non-traditional fabrication technologies. Status and success of these various approaches are reviewed. Improvements were made in reducing surface damage initiation and eliminating growth for fused silica by improved polishing and post-processing steps, and improved analytical techniques are providing insights into mechanisms of DKDP damage. The NIF final optics hardware has been designed to enable easy retrieval, surface-damage mitigation, and recycling of optics.

  14. Direct observation of morphological evolution of a catalyst during carbon nanotube forest growth: new insights into growth and growth termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seojeong; Lee, Jaegeun; Kim, Hwan-Chul; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Maruyama, Benji; Stach, Eric A.; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests.In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05547d

  15. Direct growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on conducting ZnO films and its field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Yo-Sep; Bae, Eun Ju; Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2006-09-11

    Despite the necessity of direct growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on conducting films for versatility of designing device architectures for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, most of SWNT growths have been carried out on insulating films or supporting materials such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Here, the authors report that conducting ZnO films can be used as both an underlying layer for the SWNT growth and an electrode for device operation. ZnO films with a resistivity in the order of 10{sup -3} {omega} cm were deposited by atomic layer deposition. SWNTs were directly grown on the ZnO film by water plasma chemical vapor deposition. The authors demonstrate field emission properties from the SWNT/ZnO cathode, of which the turn-on electric field for a current density of 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} and the field enhancement factor are 1.8 V/{mu}m and 3200, respectively.

  16. Extrapituitary growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    While growth hormone (GH) is obligatory for postnatal growth, it is not required for a number of growth-without-GH syndromes, such as early embryonic or fetal growth. Instead, these syndromes are thought to be dependent upon local growth factors, rather than pituitary GH. The GH gene is, however, also expressed in many extrapituitary tissues, particularly during early development and extrapituitary GH may be one of the local growth factors responsible for embryonic or fetal growth. Moreover, as the expression of the GH receptor (GHR) gene mirrors that of GH in extrapituitary tissues the actions of GH in early development are likely to be mediated by local autocrine or paracrine mechanisms, especially as extrapituitary GH expression occurs prior to the ontogeny of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of pituitary somatotrophs or the appearance of GH in the circulation. The extrapituitary expression of GH in embryos has also been shown to be of functional relevance in a number of species, since the immunoneutralization of endogenous GH or the blockade of GH production is accompanied by growth impairment or cellular apoptosis. The extrapituitary expression of the GH gene also persists in some central and peripheral tissues postnatally, which may reflect its continued functional importance and physiological or pathophysiological significance. The expression and functional relevance of extrapituitary GH, particularly during embryonic growth, is the focus of this brief review.

  17. Cumulative life damage in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Ibler, Kristina; Jemec, Gregor B.E.

    2011-01-01

    Cumulative life damage is an old concept of considerable face validity, which has attracted more scientific interest in the fields of sociology and psychology than in medicine over the years. The research examines the interconnectivity of the many factors which shape the development of individuals or institutions over time. By focussing on time, context and process, life course research highlights the different effects seemingly similar events may have at different points in time and in different contexts. PMID:25386260

  18. Plasma model for charging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.; Lukaszek, W.; Current, M.I.; Tripsas, N.H.

    1994-07-01

    The mechanism responsible for charging damage is treated as beam/plasma driven differences in local floating potentials on the process surface. A cold plasma flood is shown to limit these potential differences. Beam/plasma J-V characteristics obtained with CHARM2 in a high current implanter are fit with the theory. With flood OFF, the fit corresponds to plasma buildup over the target surface.

  19. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  20. Moisture damage in asphalt concrete. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Information is provided on physical and chemical explanations for moisture damage in asphalt concrete, along with a discussion of current practices and test methods for determining or reducing the susceptibility of various asphalt concrete components and mixtures to such damage. Moisture damage in asphalt concrete is a nationwide problem which often necessitates premature replacement of highway pavement surfaces. The report of the Transportation Research Board describes the underlying physical and chemical phenomena responsible for such damage. Current test methods used to determine the susceptibility of asphalt concretes, or their constituents, to moisture damage are described and evaluated. Additionally, current practices for minimizing the potential for moisture damage are examined.

  1. Electron Irradiation Damage in Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayensu, Akwasi; Ocran, John

    2002-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy for observing highly beam sensitive materials had been used to study the microstructure of deformed quartz crystals. At 100 kV accelerating voltage and electron flux of 3 x 10^8 e/cm2/s, beam spots damage appeared within five minutes of exposure to the electron beam. The rate of damage was found to depend on the crystal type; in particular, on the OH content and initial defect density, since these factors controlled the plasticity of quartz. The electron irradiation damage was manifested as black spots, prismatic dislocation loops, defect clusters, hairpin shaped images of dislocations and long segements of dislocation loops. The observed microstructure indicate that during electron beam irradiation, the primary defects in quartz attained sufficiently high mobilities permitting large-scale recombination and clustering leading to rapid creation of secondary defects from the clustering processes. The number of electrons that are lost by the recombination process is determined by the density of the recombination centres and the probability that an electron will interact with the centre.

  2. Composite blade damaging under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menouillard, T.; Réthoré, J.; Bung, H.; Suffis, A.

    2006-08-01

    Composites materials are now being used in primary aircraft structures, and other domains because of numerous advantages. A part of a continuous in-flight operating costs, gas turbine engine manufacturers are always looking for ways to decrease engine weight. This is the case of compressor blades which have to satisfy, for example, the standard bird strike or debris in order to measure the crashworthiness. Bird strike impacts are actually among the most challenging loads that composite blades must accommodate. Thus for the further development of composite structures, it becomes important to have available predictive tools for simulating the response of composite structures under crash or impact loads, which will allow to evaluate damage state in the structure in function of time. A composites damage model, without mesh dependency, is presented, and allows to obtain agreement with impact experiment. Examples of finite element simulations for the impact response of blade based on this materials model are developped. These numerical results correspond to a bird strike on an equivalent composites blade, and insists on damage evolution in structure.

  3. Economic measurement of environment damages

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.

    1980-05-01

    The densities, energy consumption, and economic development of the increasing population exacerbate environmental degradation. Air and water pollution is a major environmental problem affecting life and health, outdoor recreation, household soiling, vegetation, materials, and production. The literature review indicated that numerous studies have assessed the physical and monetary damage to populations at risk from excessive concentrations of major air and water pollutants-sulfur dioxide, total suspended particulate matter, oxidants, and carbon monoxide in air; and nutrients, oil, pesticides, and toxic metals and others in water. The measurement of the damages was one of the most controversial issues in pollution abatement. The methods that have been used to estimate the societal value of pollution abatement are: (1) chain of effects, (2) market approaches, and (3) surveys. National gross damages of air pollution of $20.2 billion and of water pollution of $11.1 billion for 1973 are substantial. These best estimates, updated for the economic and demographic conditions, could provide acceptable control totals for estimating and predicting benefits and costs of abating air and water pollution emissions. The major issues to be resolved are: (1) lack of available noneconomic data, (2) theoretical and empirical difficulties of placing a value on human life and health and on benefits such as aesthetics, and (3) lack of available demographic and economic data.

  4. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  5. Fatigue damage-fracture mechanics interaction in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Y N; Fyhrie, D P

    2002-03-01

    Fatigue loading causes accumulation of damage that may lead to the initiation of a macrocrack and result in a catastrophic failure of bone. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of fatigue damage on crack growth parameters in bovine cortical bone. Nineteen rectangular beam specimens (4 x 4 x 48 mm) were machined from bovine tibiae. The long axis of the beams was aligned with the long axis of bones. Using a four-point bending fatigue setup, ten specimens were fatigue-damaged to different levels as indicated by stiffness loss. A through-thickness notch was machined at the center of each damaged and undamaged beam. The notched specimens were then monotonically loaded beyond failure using a three-point bending protocol. Critical stress intensity factor, K(I), and work to critical load, W(Q), were significantly lower in the damaged group than in the undamaged group (p < 0.03). When the undamaged specimens were assigned a percent stiffness loss of zero and pooled with the damaged group, significant negative correlations of percent stiffness loss with K(I) (R = 0.58, p < 0.01), W(Q) (R = 0.54, p < 0.02), maximum load, P(max) (R = 0.59, p < 0.008), deflection at maximum load, Delta(max) (R = 0.48, p < 0.04), structural stiffness, S(max) (R = 0.53, p < 0.02), W(max) (R = 0.55, p < 0.02), and load at 1.4 mm deflection (a value beyond failure but without complete fracture), P(1.4) (R = 0.47, p < 0.05), were found. Post hoc analysis revealed that the average load-deflection curve from the damaged group was transformable into that from the undamaged group through a special shift on the load-deflection plane. Fatigue damage reduces bone stiffness and resistance to crack initiation, maximum load-carrying capacity, and deflection before and after failure in cortical bone. The data suggest there is a single rule that governs the overall effect of fatigue damage on the fracture behavior of cortical bone. PMID:11882466

  6. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  7. Helping women to good health: breast cancer, omega-3/omega-6 lipids, and related lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia

    2014-03-27

    In addition to genetic predisposition and sex hormone exposure, physical activity and a healthy diet play important roles in breast cancer (BC). Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) associated with decreased omega-6 (n-6), resulting in a higher n-3/n-6 ratio compared with the western diet, are inversely associated with BC risk, as shown by Yang et al. in their meta-analysis in BMC Cancer. High consumption of polyphenols and organic foods increase the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in turn may decrease BC risk. Intake of high fiber foods and foods with low glycemic index decreases insulin resistance and diabetes risk, and in turn may decrease BC risk. The modernized Mediterranean diet is an effective strategy for combining these recommendations, and this dietary pattern reduces overall cancer risk and specifically BC risk. High-risk women should also eliminate environmental endocrine disruptors, including those from foods. Drugs that decrease the n-3/n-6 ratio or that are suspected of increasing BC or diabetes risk should be used with great caution by high-risk women and women wishing to decrease their BC risk.Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/14/105/abstract.

  8. Polycations Globally Enhance Binding of 14-3-3 omega to Target Proteins in Spinach Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of 14-3-3' to phosphorylated NR (pNR) is stimulated by cations such as Mg2+ or spermine, and decreased by 5'-AMP. In order to determine whether binding to other cellular proteins is affected similarly, Far-Western overlays of extracts prepared from light- or dark-treated spinach (Spinac...

  9. Luminance measurement to evaluate the damage of notched FRP plates in static load

    SciTech Connect

    Hyakutake, H.; Yamamoto, T.

    1995-11-01

    The validity of the damage criterion for notched FRP plates based on the concept of severity near the notch root is subjected to further experimental scrutiny. An experimental program is presented which examines the effect of notch geometry on the damage near the notch root of FRP plates. This is accomplished by obtaining experimental data on the notched specimens of a glass cloth/epoxy laminate for a wide range of notch geometries in tension and bending. The process of initiation and growth of damage near the notch root was measured by means of the luminance measurement technique with a CCD camera. The experiment shows that the growth of damage zone near the notch root was governed predominantly by both the notch-root radius and the maximum elastic stress at the notch root, while it was independent of notch depth and type of loading. On the basis of the concept of severity, the experimental results can be clearly elucidated.

  10. Damage Progression in Buckle-Resistant Notched Composite Plates Loaded in Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Davila, Carlos G.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2001-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical evaluation of damage progression in three stitched composite plates containing an angled central notch and subjected to compression loading are presented. Parametric studies were conducted systematically to identify the relative effects of the material strength parameters on damage initiation and growth. Comparisons with experiments were conducted to determine the appropriate in situ values of strengths for progressive failure analysis. These parametric studies indicated that the in situ value of the fiber buckling strength is the most important parameter in the prediction of damage initiation and growth in these notched composite plates. Analyses of the damage progression in the notched, compression-loaded plates were conducted using in situ material strengths. Comparisons of results obtained from these analyses with experimental results for displacements and axial strains show good agreement.

  11. BACH2: a Marker of DNA Damage and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Uittenboogaard, L.M.; Payan-Gomez, C.; Pothof, J.; van IJcken, W.; Mastroberardino, PG; van der Pluijm; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Tresini, M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage and aging share expression changes involving alterations in many aspects of metabolism, suppression of growth and upregulation of defence and genome maintenance systems. “Omics” technologies have permitted large-scale parallel measurements covering global cellular constituents and aided the identification of specific response pathways that change during aging and after DNA damage. We have set out to identify genes with highly conserved response patterns through meta-analysis of mRNA expression datasets collected during natural aging and accelerated aging caused by a Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) defect in a diverse set of organs and tissues in mice, and from in-vitro UV-induced DNA damage in a variety of murine cells. The identified set of genes that show similar expression patterns in response to organ aging (accelerated and normal), and endogenously and exogenously induced DNA damage, consists of genes involved in anti-oxidant systems and includes the transcription factor Bach2 as one of the most consistent markers. BACH2 was originally identified as a partner of the small Maf proteins and antagonist of the NRF2 anti-oxidant defence pathway and has been implicated in B-cell differentiation and immune system homeostasis. Although BACH2 has never before been associated with UV-induced damage or aging, it shows a strong downregulation in both conditions. We have characterized the dynamics of Bach2 expression in response to DNA damage and show that it is a highly sensitive responder to transcription-blocking DNA lesions. Gene expression profiling using Affymetrix microarray analysis after siRNA-mediated silencing of Bach2 identified cell cycle and transcription regulation as the most significantly altered processes consistent with a function as transcription factor affecting proliferation. PMID:24075570

  12. Muscle damage and muscle remodeling: no pain, no gain?

    PubMed

    Flann, Kyle L; LaStayo, Paul C; McClain, Donald A; Hazel, Mark; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2011-02-15

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic tissue that responds adaptively to both the nature and intensity of muscle use. This phenotypic plasticity ensures that muscle structure is linked to patterns of muscle use throughout the lifetime of an animal. The cascade of events that result in muscle restructuring - for example, in response to resistance exercise training - is often thought to be initiated by muscle damage. We designed this study to test the hypothesis that symptomatic (i.e. detectable) damage is a necessary precursor for muscle remodeling. Subjects were divided into two experimental populations: pre-trained (PT) and naive (NA). Demonstrable muscle damage was avoided in the PT group by a three-week gradual 'ramp-up' protocol. By contrast, the NA group was subjected to an initial damaging bout of exercise. Both groups participated in an eight-week high-force eccentric-cycle ergometry program (20 min, three times per week) designed to equate the total work done during training between the groups. The NA group experienced signs of damage, absent in the PT group, as indicated by greater than five times higher levels of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and self-reporting of initial perceived soreness and exertion, yet muscle size and strength gains were not different for the two groups. RT-PCR analysis revealed similar increases in levels of the growth factor IGF-1Ea mRNA in both groups. Likewise, the significant (P<0.01) increases in mean cross-sectional area (and total muscle volume) were equal in both groups. Finally, strength increases were identical for both groups (PT=25% and NA=26% improvement). The results of this study suggest that muscle rebuilding - for example, hypertrophy - can be initiated independent of any discernible damage to the muscle.

  13. Fractographic analysis of fatigue damage in 7000 aluminium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cvijović, Z; Vratnica, M; Gerić, K

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to correlate the fatigue damage in 7000 aluminium alloys with different impurity contents to the microstructural features and to explain their interdependence through fractographic observations. The Paris constants of these alloys in the form of hot-forged plates subjected to the overaged T73 temper are evaluated and differences in the fatigue crack growth rate described by striation spacing measurements. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that the type and morphological parameters of coarse intermetallic particles play a critical role in fatigue crack growth behaviour. The elemental distribution determined by means of energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the fractured particles accelerating the crack advances are larger particles of Fe-rich phases. The fatigue crack growth rate increases considerably with increasing amounts of these particles. The smaller eta, S and Mg(2)Si particles contribute beneficially to fatigue life.

  14. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  15. Electrodeposition Repair of Damaged Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, M.; Rietdyk, J.

    1983-01-01

    Damaged material replace by electrodeposited copper. Channel restoration consists of alternately machinging damaged material and reconstructing material by electrodeposition. Solid wax processed into coolant channels to provide plating surfaces that match original channel surfaces.

  16. 7 CFR 51.2763 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Shelled Virginia Type Peanuts Definitions § 51.2763 Damage. Damage means that the peanut... cuts, web or frass; (d) Freezing injury causing hard, translucent or discolored flesh; and, (e)...

  17. 7 CFR 51.908 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.908 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect or any combination of defects which... berries which are split, crushed, wet, affected by decay or waterberry, or affected by heat or...

  18. Recent Advances in Composite Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifsnider, Ken; Case, Scott; Iyengar, Nirmal

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art and recent developments in the field of composite material damage mechanics are reviewed, with emphasis on damage accumulation. The kinetics of damage accumulation are considered with emphasis on the general accumulation of discrete local damage events such as single or multiple fiber fractures or microcrack formation. The issues addressed include: how to define strength in the presence of widely distributed damage, and how to combine mechanical representations in order to predict the damage tolerance and life of engineering components. It is shown that a damage mechanics approach can be related to the thermodynamics of the damage accumulation processes in composite laminates subjected to mechanical loading and environmental conditions over long periods of time.

  19. 7 CFR 51.2293 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2293 Serious damage. Serious damage... severely shriveled, or a greater area is affected by lesser degrees of shriveling producing an...

  20. 7 CFR 51.777 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Florida Grapefruit Definitions § 51.777 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... the edible or marketing quality of the fruit....

  1. 7 CFR 51.1826 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Florida Tangerines Definitions § 51.1826 Damage. Damage means any specific defect... edible or marketing quality of the fruit....

  2. 7 CFR 51.773 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Florida Grapefruit Definitions § 51.773 Damage. Damage means any specific defect... marketing quality of the fruit....

  3. 7 CFR 51.1871 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1871 Damage. Damage means any specific defect described in... marketing quality of the tomato....

  4. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.573 Damage. Damage, unless otherwise specifically defined in this... the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in the container. Any one of the...

  5. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.573 Damage. Damage, unless... the edible or shipping quality of the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in...

  6. 7 CFR 51.586 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.586 Serious damage. Serious damage, unless otherwise specifically... shipping quality of the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in the container. Any one...

  7. 7 CFR 51.573 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.573 Damage. Damage, unless... the edible or shipping quality of the celery stalk or the general appearance of the stalks in...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3017 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Damage. The effect of mold, must, rot, black rot, or other fungous or bacterial diseases which attack tobacco in its cured state. Tobacco having the odor of mold, must, or rot is considered damaged. (See...

  12. Damage localization of marine risers using time series of vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yang, Hezhen; Liu, Fushun

    2014-10-01

    Based on dynamic response signals a damage detection algorithm is developed for marine risers. Damage detection methods based on numerous modal properties have encountered issues in the researches in offshore oil community. For example, significant increase in structure mass due to marine plant/animal growth and changes in modal properties by equipment noise are not the result of damage for riser structures. In an attempt to eliminate the need to determine modal parameters, a data-based method is developed. The implementation of the method requires that vibration data are first standardized to remove the influence of different loading conditions and the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model is used to fit vibration response signals. In addition, a damage feature factor is introduced based on the autoregressive (AR) parameters. After that, the Euclidean distance between ARMA models is subtracted as a damage indicator for damage detection and localization and a top tensioned riser simulation model with different damage scenarios is analyzed using the proposed method with dynamic acceleration responses of a marine riser as sensor data. Finally, the influence of measured noise is analyzed. According to the damage localization results, the proposed method provides accurate damage locations of risers and is robust to overcome noise effect.

  13. EVALUATION OF BALLISTIC DAMAGE IN AN ENCAPSULATED CERAMIC PANEL VIA X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Green, W. H.; Carter, R. H.

    2009-03-03

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is an important non-destructive evaluation technique for revealing the spatial distribution of ballistically-induced damage in ceramics. The level of detection and resolution of damage depends on the size of the sample and the parameters of the XCT approach (e.g., focal spot size, magnification, etc.). Previous and ongoing work in this area includes assessment of ballistically induced damage in both individual ceramic targets and ceramic armor panels. Ballistic damage in an encapsulated ceramic armor panel with a metal backing has been scanned and extensively evaluated using XCT 2-D and 3-D analysis. The purpose of using XCT evaluation in this study was to better characterize and understand all of the detectable damage. This information can be used to correlate damage features and types with the physical processes of damage initiation and growth. XCT scans and analyses of damage in the panel will be shown and discussed. This will include virtual 3-D solid visualizations and some quantitative analysis of damage features.

  14. Effect of impurities and stress on the damage distributions of rapidly grown KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M.; Tan, M.; De Yoreo, J.; Zaitseva, N.

    1997-12-20

    Development of high damage threshold, 50 cm, rapidly grown KF*P frequency triplers for operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the 14 J/cm2, 351 nm, 3 ns regime requires a thorough understanding of how the crystal growth parameters and technologies affect laser induced damage. Of particular importance is determining the effect of ionic impurities (e.g. Cr3+, Fe3+, Al3+) which may be introduced in widely varying concentrations via starting salts. In addition, organic particulates can contaminate the solution as leachants from growth platforms or via mechanical ablation. Mechanical stresses in the crystals may also play a strong role in the laser-induced damage distribution (LIDD), particularly in the cases of large boules where hydrodynamic forces in the growth tank may be quite high. WE have developed a dedicated, automated damage test system with diagnostic capabilities specifically designed for measured time resolved bulk damage onset and evolution. The data obtained make it possible to construct characteristic damage threshold distributions for each sample. Test results obtained for a variety of KDP samples grown from high purity starting salts and individually doped with Lucite and Teflon, iron, chromium, and aluminium show that the LIDD drops with increasing contamination content. The results also show that solution filtration leads to increased damage performance for undoped crystals but is not solely responsibility for producing the high LIDDs required by the NIF. The highest LIDD measured on a rapidly grown sample indicate that it is possible to produce high damage threshold material using ultrahigh purity, recrystallized starting salts, continuous filtration and a platform designed to minimize internal stress during growth.

  15. Sphingolipids in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Jane Catalina; Obeid, Lina

    2015-05-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. PMID:25434743

  16. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  17. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  18. An evaluation of corn earworm damage and thresholds in soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Brian Patrick

    Interactions between corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and soybean, Glycine max L. (Merrill), were investigated in the Mid-South to evaluate thresholds and damage levels. Field studies were conducted in both indeterminate and determinate modern cultivars to evaluate damage, critical injury levels, and soybean response to simulated corn earworm injury. Field studies were also conducted to evaluate the response of indeterminate cultivars to infestations of corn earworm. Field studies were also conducted to investigate the relationship between pyrethroid insecticide application and corn earworm oviposition in soybean. Results of field studies involving simulated corn earworm damage indicated the need for a dynamic threshold that becomes more conservative as soybean phenology progressed through the reproductive growth stages. This suggested that soybean was more tolerant to fruit loss during the earlier reproductive stages and was able to compensate for fruit loss better during this time than at later growth stages. Results of field studies involving infestations of corn earworm indicated that current thresholds are likely too liberal. This resulted in economic injury level tables being constructed based upon a range of crop values and control costs, however, a general action threshold was also recommended for indeterminate soybean in the Mid-South. Field study results investigating the relationship of pyrethroid application and corn earworm oviposition indicated that even in the presence of an insecticide, corn earworm prefers to oviposit in the upper portion of the canopy, as well as on the leaves as opposed to all other plant parts, consistent with all previous literature.

  19. Employment Discrimination Litigation: The Availability of Damages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plax, Karen A.

    1976-01-01

    The focus of this comment is on the availability of damages under both Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and section 1981 with an analysis of the decisional law and theoretical rationales used by federal courts in allowing or disallowing damage awards. Consideration is given to compensatory versus punitive damages as well as those for…

  20. 7 CFR 51.609 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage. 51.609 Section 51.609 Agriculture Regulations..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.609 Damage. Damage means any injury or defect which materially affects the appearance, or edible or shipping...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2933 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2933 Serious damage. Serious Damage means any specific... or shipping quality of the apricot. The dimensions given for these defects are based on an apricot... larger or smaller apricots. The following specific defects shall be considered as serious damage:...

  2. 7 CFR 51.2933 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2933 Serious damage. Serious Damage means any specific... or shipping quality of the apricot. The dimensions given for these defects are based on an apricot... larger or smaller apricots. The following specific defects shall be considered as serious damage:...

  3. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  4. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  5. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  6. 32 CFR 750.33 - Damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Damages. 750.33 Section 750.33 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL CLAIMS REGULATIONS Federal Tort Claims Act § 750.33 Damages. (a) Generally. The measure of damages is determined by the law of the...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1911 - Damaged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1911 Damaged. Damaged means any defect which... the fruit. Such scars damage the tomato when they are rough or deep, or when channels extend into...

  8. Damage Caused by the Rogue Trustee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-nine community college presidents and chancellors in 16 states report on the damage caused by rogue trustees. While the damage to presidents, other trustees, and faculty and staff is alarming, the damage these trustees cause the college suggests that the rogue trustee may be the single most destructive force ever to plague an educational…

  9. 7 CFR 51.2966 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.2966 Section 51.2966 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2966 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... discoloration covering a smaller area if the appearance is equally objectionable; (b) Perforated shells when...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1583 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage. 51.1583 Section 51.1583 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1583 Damage. Damage means any injury or defect which... of the total weight of the potato including peel covering defective area. Loss of outer...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2966 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.2966 Section 51.2966 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2966 Serious damage. Serious damage means any... discoloration covering a smaller area if the appearance is equally objectionable; (b) Perforated shells when...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2293 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.2293 Section 51.2293 Agriculture... § 51.2293 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect, other than color, which seriously affects... more than one-fourth of the kernel is severely shriveled, or a greater area is affected by...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1913 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.1913 Section 51.1913 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1913 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect... diameter on a tomato 21/2 inches in diameter, or lighter colored, shallow scars covering a greater...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1913 - Serious damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Serious damage. 51.1913 Section 51.1913 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Definitions § 51.1913 Serious damage. Serious damage means any defect... diameter on a tomato 21/2 inches in diameter, or lighter colored, shallow scars covering a greater...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1413 - Damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... defects shall be considered as damage: (a) Adhering hull material or dark stains affecting an aggregate of... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1413 Damage. Damage means any specific defect described in this section; or an equally objectionable variation of any one of these defects, or any...

  16. Damaging effects of visible light. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress in studies of photodynamic damage of visual photoreceptors is presented. It was found the retina is not homogeneous in its susceptibility to light damage. Steady state rhodopsin levels have been evaluated in albino rats and in pigmented rats at several light intensities. Studies have continued of the effects of peroxidative photodynamic damage on the properties of rod outer segments. (ACR)

  17. Recent Advances in Durability and Damage Tolerance Methodology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) issues are critical to the development of lighter, safer and more efficient aerospace vehicles. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. Both D&DT methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of damage that may occur during the vehicle s service lifetime. The result of unanticipated D&DT response is often manifested in the form of catastrophic and potentially fatal accidents. As such, durability and damage tolerance requirements must be rigorously addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA spacecraft systems. This paper presents an overview of the recent and planned future research in durability and damage tolerance analytical and experimental methods for both metallic and composite aerospace structures at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  18. Modeling and Characterization of Damage Processes in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Saether, E.; Smith, S. W.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Yamakov, V. I.; Gupta, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a broad effort that is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of crack growth and using that understanding as a basis for designing materials and enabling predictions of fracture in materials and structures that have small characteristic dimensions. This area of research, herein referred to as Damage Science, emphasizes the length scale regimes of the nanoscale and the microscale for which analysis and characterization tools are being developed to predict the formation, propagation, and interaction of fundamental damage mechanisms. Examination of nanoscale processes requires atomistic and discrete dislocation plasticity simulations, while microscale processes can be examined using strain gradient plasticity, crystal plasticity and microstructure modeling methods. Concurrent and sequential multiscale modeling methods are being developed to analytically bridge between these length scales. Experimental methods for characterization and quantification of near-crack tip damage are also being developed. This paper focuses on several new methodologies in these areas and their application to understanding damage processes in polycrystalline metals. On-going and potential applications are also discussed.

  19. Homogenization of intergranular fracture towards a transient gradient damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Poh, L. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the intergranular fracture of polycrystalline materials, where a detailed model at the meso-scale is translated onto the macro-level through a proposed homogenization theory. The bottom-up strategy involves the introduction of an additional macro-kinematic field to characterize the average displacement jump within the unit cell. Together with the standard macro-strain field, the underlying processes are propagated onto the macro-scale by imposing the equivalence of power and energy at the two scales. The set of macro-governing equations and constitutive relations are next extracted naturally as per standard thermodynamics procedure. The resulting homogenized microforce balance recovers the so-called 'implicit' gradient expression with a transient nonlocal interaction. The homogenized gradient damage model is shown to fully regularize the softening behavior, i.e. the structural response is made mesh-independent, with the damage strain correctly localizing into a macroscopic crack, hence resolving the spurious damage growth observed in many conventional gradient damage models. Furthermore, the predictive capability of the homogenized model is demonstrated by benchmarking its solutions against reference meso-solutions, where a good match is obtained with minimal calibrations, for two different grain sizes.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA damage and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Emma P K; Bennett, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondria are often regarded as the cellular powerhouses through their ability to generate ATP, the universal fuel for metabolic processes. However, in recent years mitochondria have been recognised as critical regulators of cell death, inflammation, metabolism, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction directly promotes cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress and alters metabolism. These are key processes in atherosclerosis and there is now evidence that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and promotes atherosclerosis directly. In this review we discuss the recent evidence for and mechanisms linking mtDNA defects and atherosclerosis and suggest areas of mitochondrial biology that are potential therapeutic targets.

  1. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Snyder, Sarah J. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Parks, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems may provide for a structure having a plurality of interconnected panels, wherein each panel has a plurality of detection layers separated from one another by one or more non-detection layers. The plurality of detection layers may form a grid of conductive traces. Additionally, a monitor may be coupled to each grid of conductive traces, wherein the monitor is configured to detect damage to the plurality of interconnected panels in response to an electrical property change with respect to one or more of the conductive traces. In one example, the structure is part of an inflatable space platform such as a spacecraft or habitat.

  2. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  3. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  4. Fertilization increases the risk of loblolly pine to ice storm damage.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, D.P.; Coleman, M.D.; Coyle D.R.

    2005-08-01

    Winter storms resulting in substantial ice accumulation occur with periodic frequency in the southeastern United States and they have potential to severely damage softwood plantations. Loblolly pine is one of the most important crop tree species in this region and a combined understanding of initial damage and subsequent growth and recovery may allow for more productive utilization of these stands following severe ice storms. In January 2004 a severe ice storm deposited approximately 2 cm of ice on an intensively managed four-year old loblolly pine plantation in South Carolina . The existing treatments within this plantation presented an opportunity to examine the effects of irrigation and fertilization on ice damage and recovery.

  5. A metallography and x-ray tomography study of spall damage in ultrapure Al

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, M. L.; Bie, B. X.; Zhao, F. P.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.; Hu, C. M.; Ran, X. X.; Xiao, X. H.; Yang, W. G.; Li, P.

    2014-07-15

    We characterize spall damage in shock-recovered ultrapure Al with metallography and x-ray tomography. The measured damage profiles in ultrapure Al induced by planar impact at different shock strengths, can be described with a Gaussian function, and showed dependence on shock strengths. Optical metallography is reasonably accurate for damage profile measurements, and agrees within 10–25% with x-ray tomography. Full tomography analysis showed that void size distributions followed a power law with an exponent of γ = 1.5 ± 2.0, which is likely due to void nucleation and growth, and the exponent is considerably smaller than the predictions from percolation models.

  6. Modeling and characterization of recompressed damaged materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Cazamias, J U; Kalantar, D H; LeBlanc, M M; Springer, H K

    2004-02-11

    Experiments have been performed to explore conditions under which spall damage is recompressed with the ultimate goal of developing a predictive model. Spall is introduced through traditional gas gun techniques or with laser ablation. Recompression techniques producing a uniaxial stress state, such as a Hopkinson bar, do not create sufficient confinement to close the porosity. Higher stress triaxialities achieved through a gas gun or laser recompression can close the spall. Characterization of the recompressed samples by optical metallography and electron microscopy reveal a narrow, highly deformed process zone. At the higher pressures achieved in the gas gun, little evidence of spall remains other than differentially etched features in the optical micrographs. With the very high strain rates achieved with laser techniques there is jetting from voids and other signs of turbulent metal flow. Simulations of spall and recompression on micromechanical models containing a single void suggest that it might be possible to represent the recompression using models similar to those employed for void growth. Calculations using multiple, randomly distributed voids are needed to determine if such models will yield the proper behavior for more realistic microstructures.

  7. A numerical model for predicting crack path and modes of damage in unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G.; Tan, T. M.; Lau, A. C. W.; Awerbuch, J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-based numerical technique has been developed to simulate damage growth in unidirectional composites. This technique incorporates elastic-plastic analysis, micromechanics analysis, failure criteria, and a node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm to create crack surfaces. Any combination of fiber and matrix properties can be used. One of the salient features of this technique is that damage growth can be simulated without pre-specifying a crack path. In addition, multiple damage mechanisms in the forms of matrix cracking, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix debonding and plastic deformation are capable of occurring simultaneously. The prevailing failure mechanism and the damage (crack) growth direction are dictated by the instantaneous near-tip stress and strain fields. Once the failure mechanism and crack direction are determined, the crack is advanced via the node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm. Simulations of the damage growth process in center-slit boron/aluminum and silicon carbide/titanium unidirectional specimens were performed. The simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental observations.

  8. Excitotoxic damage to white matter

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Carlos; Alberdi, Elena; Domercq, María; Sánchez-Gómez, María-Victoria; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate kills neurons by excitotoxicity, which is caused by sustained activation of glutamate receptors. In recent years, it has been shown that glutamate can also be toxic to white matter oligodendrocytes and to myelin by this mechanism. In particular, glutamate receptor-mediated injury to these cells can be triggered by activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid, kainate and N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor types. Thus, these receptor classes, and the intermediaries of the signal cascades they activate, are potential targets for drug development to treat white matter damage in acute and chronic diseases. In addition, alterations of glutamate homeostasis in white matter can determine glutamate injury to oligodendrocytes and myelin. Astrocytes are responsible for most glutamate uptake in synaptic and non-synaptic areas and consequently are the major regulators of glutamate homeostasis. Activated microglia in turn may secrete cytokines and generate radical oxygen species, which impair glutamate uptake and reduce the expression of glutamate transporters. Finally, oligodendrocytes also contribute to glutamate homeostasis. This review aims at summarizing the current knowledge about the mechanisms leading to oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination as a consequence of alterations in glutamate signalling, and their clinical relevance to disease. In addition, we show evidence that oligodendrocytes can also be killed by ATP acting at P2X receptors. A thorough understanding of how oligodendrocytes and myelin are damaged by excitotoxicity will generate knowledge that can lead to improved therapeutic strategies to protect white matter. PMID:17504270

  9. Malnutrition, liver damage, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Grasso, P

    1981-01-01

    There is no clear indication that malnutrition, per se, is a principal cause of cancer in man, but the prevalence of liver cancer in areas where malnutrition exists supports this hypothesis. Liver damage and liver cancer have been induced in laboratory rats by diets consisting of peanut meal and proteins deficient in some essential amino acids. However, liver damage, but not cancer, was produced when the diets contained no peanut meal but consisted of a mixture of amino acids deficient in methionine and cysteine, so that it is possible that aflatoxin, a contaminant of peanut meal, may have been responsible for the malignancies seen in the earlier experiments. Liver cancer developes in a high proportion of mice allowed to feed ad libitum or given a diet containing a high proportion of fat (groundnut oil) or protein (casein). Dietary restriction reduced the incidences of this cancer. This findings lends some support to current thinking that diet may be a factor in the development of cancer in man.

  10. [Liver damage caused by drugs].

    PubMed

    Strohmeyer, G; Weik, C

    1999-05-01

    The liver has a central role in the metabolism of many drugs, since this organ is the main site of biotransformation of endo- and xenobiotics. Water-soluble drugs have a small volume of distribution and can be eliminated unchanged in the urine. By contrast, lipid-soluble drugs have a larger volume of distribution and require conversion to water-soluble metabolites for their elimination in urine or bile. The liver with its specific receptors, transporters and enzymes is responsible for the uptake, transformation and excretion of the lipophilic drugs. While most of the drugs are transformed into stable metabolites, other drugs form reactive, potentially toxic, metabolites producing liver cell damage. Liver injury caused by drugs may mimic almost any kind of liver disease. Clinical findings are gastrointestinal symptoms with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, cholestatic liver injury with jaundice and pruritus of severe inflammatory and cirrhotic liver damage with signs of liver failure, encephalopathy and cerebral edema. The morphological changes vary from hepatitis, cholestasis, fatty liver, granulomatous hepatitis, peri-/portal inflammation, to fibrosis with cirrhotic alterations and vascular lesions and tumors. The most commonly used drugs causing severe liver injury are discussed in detail. These are anabolics, oral contraceptives, antituberculous and antifungal agents, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ring substituted amphetamins ("designer drugs"), antiarrhythmics and antibiotics.

  11. Air pollution and brain damage.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Azzarelli, Biagio; Acuna, Hilda; Garcia, Raquel; Gambling, Todd M; Osnaya, Norma; Monroy, Sylvia; DEL Tizapantzi, Maria Rosario; Carson, Johnny L; Villarreal-Calderon, Anna; Rewcastle, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures of air pollutants produces inflammation in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Because the nasal cavity is a common portal of entry, respiratory and olfactory epithelia are vulnerable targets for toxicological damage. This study has evaluated, by light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the olfactory and respiratory nasal mucosae, olfactory bulb, and cortical and subcortical structures from 32 healthy mongrel canine residents in Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), a highly polluted urban region. Findings were compared to those in 8 dogs from Tlaxcala, a less polluted, control city. In SWMMC dogs, expression of nuclear neuronal NF-kappaB and iNOS in cortical endothelial cells occurred at ages 2 and 4 weeks; subsequent damage included alterations of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), degenerating cortical neurons, apoptotic glial white matter cells, deposition of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-positive lipid droplets in smooth muscle cells and pericytes, nonneuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Persistent pulmonary inflammation and deteriorating olfactory and respiratory barriers may play a role in the neuropathology observed in the brains of these highly exposed canines. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's may begin early in life with air pollutants playing a crucial role.

  12. Neuronal damage in brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Orhan; Ullrich, Oliver; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke

    2007-02-01

    In contrast to traditional textbook paradigms, recent studies indicate neuronal damage in classic neuroinflammatory diseases of the brain, such as multiple sclerosis or meningitis. In these cases, immune cells invade the central nervous system compartments, accompanied by a massive breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and typical changes of the cerebrospinal fluid. On the other hand, inflammation within the central nervous system is a common phenomenon even in classic noninflammatory brain diseases that are characterized by degeneration or trauma of neuronal structures, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, or stroke. In these cases, inflammation is a frequent occurrence but displays different, more subtle, patterns compared with, for example, multiple sclerosis. Concepts for directly protecting neurons and axons in neuroinflammatory diseases may improve the outcome of the patients. In parallel, epidemiological and animal experimental evidences, as well as first clinical trials indicate the benefit of immunomodulatory therapies for classic noninflammatory brain diseases. We review the evidence for inflammatory neuronal damage and its clinical impact in the context of these diseases. PMID:17296833

  13. Theoretical model of impact damage in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a mechanistically consistent model of impact damage based on elastic failures due to tensile and shear overloading. An elastic axisymmetric finite element model is used to determine the dynamic stresses generated by a single particle impact. Local failures in a finite element are assumed to occur when the primary/secondary principal stresses or the maximum shear stress reach critical tensile or shear stresses, respectively. The succession of failed elements thus models macrocrack growth. Sliding motions of cracks, which closed during unloading, are resisted by friction and the unrecovered deformation represents the 'plastic deformation' reported in the literature. The predicted ring cracks on the contact surface, as well as the cone cracks, median cracks, radial cracks, lateral cracks, and damage-induced porous zones in the interior of hot-pressed silicon nitride plates, matched those observed experimentally. The finite element model also predicted the uplifting of the free surface surrounding the impact site.

  14. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  15. Tyrosine 370 phosphorylation of ATM positively regulates DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jen; Lan, Li; Peng, Guang; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Cheng, Chien-Chia; Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lavin, Martin; Ang, K Kian; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates DNA damage response by controling irradiation-induced foci formation, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis. However, how upstream signaling regulates ATM is not completely understood. Here, we show that upon irradiation stimulation, ATM associates with and is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Tyr370 (Y370) at the site of DNA double-strand breaks. Depletion of endogenous EGFR impairs ATM-mediated foci formation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. Moreover, pretreatment with an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, blocks EGFR and ATM association, hinders CHK2 activation and subsequent foci formation, and increases radiosensitivity. Thus, we reveal a critical mechanism by which EGFR directly regulates ATM activation in DNA damage response, and our results suggest that the status of ATM Y370 phosphorylation has the potential to serve as a biomarker to stratify patients for either radiotherapy alone or in combination with EGFR inhibition. PMID:25601159

  16. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    DOE PAGES

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in thismore » impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.« less

  17. X-ray induced damage observations in ZERODUR mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K.; Furenlid, L.

    1997-07-01

    Catastrophic damage has been observed in some ZERODUR mirrors used as first mirrors in two beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Despite the high reflectivity of the coatings used on these mirrors, a significant flux of high energy photons penetrates below the coating and is absorbed in the substrate. Although model calculations indicate that the local temperature does not increase significantly, the authors suspect that over long time periods the absorbed flux produces structural changes in the material, leading to a build-up of surface stress, gross figure changes, and growth of fractures. These changes are probably related to the nature of the two-phase glass-ceramic composition of the ZERODUR material. Metal mirrors and single-phase materials do not exhibit such catastrophic damage under similar exposure conditions.

  18. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  19. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in this impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.

  20. Thermal fatigue damage of Cu-Cr-Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arya; Mitra, R.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Rotti, C.; Ray, K. K.

    2013-11-01

    The primary aim of this investigation is to examine thermal fatigue damage (TFD) in Cu-Cr-Zr alloys used in High Heat Flux components of Tokamak and its subsystems. Thermal fatigue experiments have been carried out between 290 °C and 30 °C, which is analogous to the condition of service application on two Cu-Cr-Zr alloys having different aging treatments. The extents of TFD have been examined by standard measurements of electrical conductivity, lattice strain, residual stress and dynamic elastic modulus, supplemented by characterizations of microstructure and determination of hardness and tensile properties. The results lead to infer that the relative amounts of damage are different in the two alloys which are further dependent on their aging conditions; the reasons for the observed difference have been explained. The operative mechanisms of TFD are revealed to be as formation and subsequent coalescence of microvoids, and/or initiation and growth of microcracks.

  1. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  2. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  3. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  4. Characteristics and mechanisms of acrylate polymer damage to maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qin; Liao, Zongwen; He, Zhenli

    2016-07-01

    Superabsorbent acrylate polymers (SAPs) have been widely used to maintain soil moisture in agricultural management, but they may cause damage to plants, and the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, seed germination, soil pot culture, hydroponic experiments, and SAPs degradation were conducted to investigate damage characteristics and mechanisms associated with SAPs application. The Results showed that SAPs inhibited maize growth and altered root morphology (irregular and loose arrangement of cells and breakage of cortex parenchyma), and the inhibitory effects were enhanced at higher SAPs rates. After 1h SAP hydrogels treatment, root malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) content were significantly decreased. Hydroponics experiment indicated that root and shoot growth was inhibited at 2.5mgL(-1) acrylic acid (AA), and the inhibition was enhanced with increasing AA rates. This effect was exacerbated by the presence of Na(+) at a high concentration in the hydrogels. Release and degradation of AA were enhanced at higher soil moisture levels. A complete degradation of AA occurred between 15 and 20 days after incubation (DAI), but it took longer for Na(+) concentration to decrease to a safe level. These results indicate that high concentration of both AA and Na(+) present in the SAPs inhibits plant growth. The finding of this study may provide a guideline for appropriate application of SAPs in agriculture. PMID:27057990

  5. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K.; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Roks, Anton J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  6. A continuum theory of grain size evolution and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y.; Bercovici, D.

    2009-01-01

    Lithospheric shear localization, as occurs in the formation of tectonic plate boundaries, is often associated with diminished grain size (e.g., mylonites). Grain size reduction is typically attributed to dynamic recrystallization; however, theoretical models of shear localization arising from this hypothesis are problematic because (1) they require the simultaneous action of two creep mechanisms (diffusion and dislocation creep) that occur in different deformation regimes (i.e., in grain size stress space) and (2) the grain growth ("healing") laws employed by these models are derived from normal grain growth or coarsening theory, which are valid in the absence of deformation, although the shear localization setting itself requires deformation. Here we present a new first principles grained-continuum theory, which accounts for both coarsening and damage-induced grain size reduction in a monomineralic assemblage undergoing irrecoverable deformation. Damage per se is the generic process for generation of microcracks, defects, dislocations (including recrystallization), subgrains, nuclei, and cataclastic breakdown of grains. The theory contains coupled macroscopic continuum mechanical and grain-scale statistical components. The continuum level of the theory considers standard mass, momentum, and energy conservation, as well as entropy production, on a statistically averaged grained continuum. The grain-scale element of the theory describes both the evolution of the grain size distribution and mechanisms for both continuous grain growth and discontinuous grain fracture and coalescence. The continuous and discontinuous processes of grain size variation are prescribed by nonequilibrium thermodynamics (in particular, the treatment of entropy production provides the phenomenological laws for grain growth and reduction); grain size evolution thus incorporates the free energy differences between grains, including both grain boundary surface energy (which controls coarsening

  7. Grain-damage hysteresis and plate tectonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2016-04-01

    Shear localization in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The theoretical model for grain-damage and pinning in two-phase polycrystalline rocks provides a frame-work for understanding lithospheric shear weakening and plate-generation, and is consistent with laboratory and field observations of mylonites. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, and damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between crystalline phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary positive self-weakening feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. However, the suppression of interface damage at low interface curvature (wherein inter-grain mixing is inefficient and other energy sinks of deformational work are potentially more facile) causes a hysteresis effect, in which three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress coexist: (1) a stable, large-grain, weakly-deforming state, (2) a stable, small-grain, rapidly-deforming state analogous to ultramylonites, and (3) an unstable, intermediate grain-size state perhaps comparable to protomylonites. A comparison of the model to field data suggests that shear-localized zones of small-grain mylonites and ultra-mylonites exist at a lower stress than the co-existing large-grain porphyroclasts, rather than, as predicted by paleopiezometers or paleowattmeters, at a much higher stress; this interpretation of field data thus allows localization to relieve instead of accumulate stress. The model also predicts that a lithosphere that

  8. Risk and Damage As A Main Factors of Groundwater Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Julia V.

    It's well known that groundwater is widely used for potable water supply in compar- ison with surface water. However significant urbanization, intensive growth of indus- try, quite limited investments for reconstractision of existed manufactures and also imperfect environmental protective legislation, all these are the cause of ecosystem degradation. Because of these the problem of both preventing of change in groundwa- ter chemical composition and forecasting of negative processes caused by economical activity is the main at present. According to data of Ministry of Economy, the increas- ing of total production in all spheres of industry till 2004 is forecasted. All these lead to increasing of anthropogenic load on ecosystems. So, the problem of environmental risk assessment including groundwater is actual. The methodology of risk assessment includes natural groundwater protection and the damage cost. The first is based on the time calculation of contaminated water in- filtration through the soil and vadoze zone till groundwater level, i.e. assessment of groundwater vulnerability. The second (damage cost) is based on the cost value of measures aimed to the elimination of contamination aftereffects. Damage can be direct and indirect. The first appears as a result of direct destroying of buildings, agricultural areas, natural landscapes, people and animals death or sickness. and amount of direct damage is determined by expendures, necessary for reduction of objects. The second, indirect, damage is determined by product losses or other negative affects connected with supply lines, deterioration of ecological conditions. It is necessary to mark that risk assessment is very important for planning of hy- drotechnical, engineering and civil construction (e.g., construction and location of different buildings depending from hydrogeological and geological conditions; or- ganization of well-fields and etc.), because all these factors correctly estimated can eleminate or

  9. Laser-induced damage initiated on the surface of particle contamination fused silica at 1064nm

    SciTech Connect

    Michlitsch, K.J.

    1998-06-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to quantify the effects of contamination particles on the damage threshold of laser-illuminated fused silica optics and set cleanliness requirements for optics on the beam line of the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Circular contamination particles were sputter-deposited onto fused silica windows which were then illuminated repetitively using a 1064nm laser. A variety of contaminants were tested including metals, oxides, and organics. Tests were conducted with particles on the input and output surfaces of the window, and the morphological features of the damage were very reproducible. A plasma often ignited at the contamination particle; its intensity was dependent upon the mass of the contaminant. Input surface damage was characteristically more severe than output surface damage. The size of the damaged area scaled with the size of the particle. On a few occasions, catastrophic damage (cracking or ablation of the substrate) initiated on the output surface due to contamination particles on either the input or output surface. From damage growth plots, predictions can be made about the severity of damage expected from contamination particles of known size and material.

  10. p53 activates G₁ checkpoint following DNA damage by doxorubicin during transient mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-03-10

    Recovery from DNA damage is critical for cell survival. The serious damage is not able to be repaired during checkpoint and finally induces cell death to prevent abnormal cell growth. In this study, we demonstrated that 8N-DNA contents are accumulated via re-replication during prolonged recovery period containing serious DNA damage in mitotic cells. During the incubation for recovery, a mitotic delay and initiation of an abnormal interphase without cytokinesis were detected. Whereas a failure of cytokinesis occurred in cells with no relation with p53/p21, re-replication is an anomalous phenomenon in the mitotic DNA damage response in p53/p21 negative cells. Cells with wild-type p53 are accumulated just prior to the initiation of DNA replication through a G₁ checkpoint after mitotic DNA damage, even though p53 does not interrupt pre-RC assembly. Finally, these cells undergo cell death by apoptosis. These data suggest that p53 activates G₁ checkpoint in response to mitotic DNA damage. Without p53, cells with mitotic DNA damage undergo re-replication leading to accumulation of damage.

  11. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  12. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Engang; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Wang, Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Caro, Jose A.

    2012-07-30

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  13. Wireless Damage Location Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A wireless damage location sensing system uses a geometric-patterned wireless sensor that resonates in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field to generate a harmonic response that will experience a change when the sensor experiences a change in its geometric pattern. The sensing system also includes a magnetic field response recorder for wirelessly transmitting the time-varying magnetic field and for wirelessly detecting the harmonic response. The sensing system compares the actual harmonic response to a plurality of predetermined harmonic responses. Each predetermined harmonic response is associated with a severing of the sensor at a corresponding known location thereof so that a match between the actual harmonic response and one of the predetermined harmonic responses defines the known location of the severing that is associated therewith.

  14. Misonidazole and potentially lethal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Korbelik, M.; Palcic, B.; Skov, K.; Skarsgard, L.

    1982-03-01

    The existence of potentially lethal damage (PLD) is demonstrated in exponentially growing CHO cells exposed to misonidazole in hypoxia. The method of hypertonic post-treatment of cells was used in these studies. Misonidazole-induced PLD differs in many characteristics from radiation-induced PLD.The repair kinetics of misonidazole-induced PLD are much slower than for the repair of radiation-induced PLD (hours vs. minutes). No significant repair of misonidazole-induced PLD took place at 25/sup 0/C. Other differences are discussed. Hypertonic post-treatment of irradiated cells which had been pre-incubated with misonidazole to non-toxic levels, gave survival data consistent with the interpretation that no radiation PLD can be induced in such cells.

  15. Rotor damage detection by using piezoelectric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Tao, Y.; Mao, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Rotor is a core component of rotary machinery. Once the rotor has the damage, it may lead to a major accident. Thus the quantitative rotor damage detection method based on piezoelectric impedance is studied in this paper. With the governing equation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) in a cylindrical coordinate, the displacement along the radius direction is derived. The charge of PZT is calculated by the electric displacement. Then, by the use of the obtained displacement and charge, an analytic piezoelectric impedance model of the rotor is built. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used to set up the damage detection model. The Electro-Mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is deduced with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection method is proposed. This method can directly calculate the change of bending stiffness of the structural elements, it follows that the rotor damage can be effectively detected. Finally, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation. The result shows that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  16. Locating structural damage using operational deflection shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Perngjin F.; Jin, Si

    2000-06-01

    Presented here is a newly developed Boundary Effect Detection (BED) method for pinpointing locations of small damage to structures using Operational Deflection Shapes (ODSs) measured by a scanning laser vibrometer. The BED method requires no model or historical data for locating structural damage. It works by decomposing a measured ODS into central solutions and boundary-layer solutions by using a sliding-window least- squares curve-fitting technique. For high-order ODSs without damage, boundary-layer solutions are non-zero only at structural boundaries. For a damaged structure, because damage introduces new boundaries, its boundary-layer solutions are non-zero at damage locations as well as its original boundaries. At a damage location, the boundary-layer solution of slope changes sign, and the boundary-layer solution of displacement peaks up or dimples down. The theoretical background is shown in detail. Experiments are performed on several different structures with different damages, including surface slots, edge slots, surface holes, internal holes, and fatigue cracks. Experimental results show that this damage detection method is more sensitive and reliable for locating small damage than other dynamics-based methods using curvatures or strain energies.

  17. Gear Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to verify, when using an oil debris sensor, that accumulated mass predicts gear pitting damage and to identify a method to set threshold limits for damaged gears. Oil debris data was collected from 8 experiments with no damage and 8 with pitting damage in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Oil debris feature analysis was performed on this data. Video images of damage progression were also collected from 6 of the experiments with pitting damage. During each test, data from an oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. The data measured from the oil debris sensor during experiments with damage and with no damage was used to identify membership functions to build a simple fuzzy logic model. Using fuzzy logic techniques and the oil debris data, threshold limits were defined that discriminate between stages of pitting wear. Results indicate accumulated mass combined with fuzzy logic analysis techniques is a good predictor of pitting damage on spur gears.

  18. Economic Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, James B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual introduction for teachers explains economic growth and how it is measured. Four instructional units follow, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit which offers young students an opportunity to interview puppet workers, set up a classroom corner store, and learn the importance of capital resources for increasing productivity…

  19. A preliminary damage tolerance methodology for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The certification experience for the primary, safety-of-flight composite structure applications on the F-16 is discussed. The rationale for the selection of delamination as the major issue for damage tolerance is discussed, as well as the modeling approach selected. The development of the necessary coupon-level data base is briefly summarized. The major emphasis is on the description of a full-scale fatigue test where delamination growth was obtained to demonstrate the validity of the selected approach. A summary is used to review the generic features of the methodology.

  20. Inspecting for widespread fatigue damage: Is partial debonding the key?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, John

    1994-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results indicate that cracks can initiate, grow, and coalesce more rapidly in fuselage lap joints that have experienced partial or complete debonding. Computational analysis in this paper shows that stress concentrations and stress intensity factors at the rivet holes are far less severe when the bond is intact. Debonding hastens the initiation of widespread fatigue cracks and significantly increases crack growth rate. Thus, debonded regions serve as "breeding grounds" for widespread fatigue damage. Therefore, the effectiveness of lap joint inspection programs may be enhanced if detailed inspections are focused on areas in which debonding has been detected.