Science.gov

Sample records for 3rd order sequences

  1. Palaeocommunity dynamics across the Lower to Middle Miocene 3rd order sequence boundary of the Central Paratethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuschin, Martin; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    The 3rd order sequence boundary from the Lower to the Middle Miocene of the Paratethys is characterized by a well-known major change of the molluscan fauna. This change was mainly studied based on regional species lists, which suggest a transition from low-diversity Karpatian (Upper Burdigalian) to highly diverse Badenian (Langhian and Lower Serravallian) assemblages. Here, we present quantitative data from 4 Karpatian and 6 Badenian localities to capture the anatomy of this faunal transition by comparing species-abundance patterns of local assemblages. 223 bulk samples, comprising more than 65,000 shells, were taken from shell beds; all molluscs > 1mm were studied quantitatively and sorted into 496 species. Independent sources (e.g., palaeogeographic position of localities and environmental data from foraminifera) suggest a water depth ranging from the intertidal to several tens of meters for the studied assemblages. Ordination methods indicate that benthic assemblages in the study area developed along the same depth-related environmental gradient across the 3rd order sequence boundary. Due to strong facies shifts at the boundary, the Karpatian faunas are mostly preserved in nearshore settings, but the Badenian faunas range from intertidal to shelf depth. Statistical analyses indicate that differences between the total of Karpatian and the total of Badenian assemblages are smaller than any differences among individual localities. The striking differences among the studied localities are most likely due to heterogeneous environments present on the Lower and Middle Miocene shelf of the Central Paratethys. Clearly, the immigration of several thermophilic molluscan families and superfamilies (e.g., Strombidae, Tonnoidea, Isognomonidae, and Carditidae) reflects climatic changes at the onset of the Langhian transgression. Our quantitative approach, however, favours the strong facies shift at the Lower / Middle Miocene boundary as the main reason for the pretended faunal

  2. Bifurcation of limit cycles in 3rd-order Z2 Hamiltonian planar vector fields with 3rd-order perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pei; Han, Maoan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we show that a Z2-equivariant 3rd-order Hamiltonian planar vector fields with 3rd-order symmetric perturbations can have at least 10 limit cycles. The method combines the general perturbation to the vector field and the perturbation to the Hamiltonian function. The Melnikov function is evaluated near the center of vector field, as well as near homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits.

  3. Simulation of robustness of a new e-beam column with the 3 rd-order imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, K.; Fuse, T.; Kinoshita, H.; Parker, N. William

    2008-03-01

    We are now investigating a new concept column with the 3 rd-order imaging technique, in order to obtain fine resolution and high current density beams for electron beam direct writing (EBDW) suitable for below 32nm technology nodes. From the first experimental verification, it is found that the 3 rd-order imaging has a benefit of increasing the beam current compared with conventional Gaussian beam without any beam blurring. However, in order to realize such a column which can work stably in the sub 32nm technology node generations, it is important to clarify how robust the 3 rd-order imaging is against the mechanical tolerances in column manufacturing. This paper describes the tolerance analysis for errors of column manufacturing by simulation. The column has an electron gun with small virtual source and two (Gun and Main) lenses. A patterned beam defining aperture, which enables the 3 rd-order imaging, is set between the 1 st and the 2 nd lenses. The influences of errors such as concentricity, offset and tilt between optical parts on the beam shape, beam current density distribution, and beam edge acuity on a wafer is analyzed for this column. According to these results, the 3 rd-order imaging appears to have sufficiently large allowance compared to the error budget for column manufacturing required in the sub 32nm technology node patterning.

  4. Analysis and design of a 3rd order velocity-controlled closed-loop for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan-ming; Yang, Hai-gang; Yin, Tao; Jiao, Ji-wei

    2013-09-18

    The time-average method currently available is limited to analyzing the specific performance of the automatic gain control-proportional and integral (AGC-PI) based velocity-controlled closed-loop in a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) vibratory gyroscope, since it is hard to solve nonlinear functions in the time domain when the control loop reaches to 3rd order. In this paper, we propose a linearization design approach to overcome this limitation by establishing a 3rd order linear model of the control loop and transferring the analysis to the frequency domain. Order reduction is applied on the built linear model's transfer function by constructing a zero-pole doublet, and therefore mathematical expression of each control loop's performance specification is obtained. Then an optimization methodology is summarized, which reveals that a robust, stable and swift control loop can be achieved by carefully selecting the system parameters following a priority order. Closed-loop drive circuits are designed and implemented using 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, and experiments carried out on a gyroscope prototype verify the optimization methodology that an optimized stability of the control loop can be achieved by constructing the zero-pole doublet, and disturbance rejection capability (D.R.C) of the control loop can be improved by increasing the integral term.

  5. Assembling in Sequence: A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 3rd-4th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hueston, Jean

    This teacher's guide for grades 3 and 4 contains simulated work experiences for students using the isolated skill concept - assembling in sequence. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Three pre-skill activities are suggested,…

  6. High-Order Residual-Distribution Hyperbolic Advection-Diffusion Schemes: 3rd-, 4th-, and 6th-Order

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza R.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, spatially high-order Residual-Distribution (RD) schemes using the first-order hyperbolic system method are proposed for general time-dependent advection-diffusion problems. The corresponding second-order time-dependent hyperbolic advection- diffusion scheme was first introduced in [NASA/TM-2014-218175, 2014], where rapid convergences over each physical time step, with typically less than five Newton iterations, were shown. In that method, the time-dependent hyperbolic advection-diffusion system (linear and nonlinear) was discretized by the second-order upwind RD scheme in a unified manner, and the system of implicit-residual-equations was solved efficiently by Newton's method over every physical time step. In this paper, two techniques for the source term discretization are proposed; 1) reformulation of the source terms with their divergence forms, and 2) correction to the trapezoidal rule for the source term discretization. Third-, fourth, and sixth-order RD schemes are then proposed with the above techniques that, relative to the second-order RD scheme, only cost the evaluation of either the first derivative or both the first and the second derivatives of the source terms. A special fourth-order RD scheme is also proposed that is even less computationally expensive than the third-order RD schemes. The second-order Jacobian formulation was used for all the proposed high-order schemes. The numerical results are then presented for both steady and time-dependent linear and nonlinear advection-diffusion problems. It is shown that these newly developed high-order RD schemes are remarkably efficient and capable of producing the solutions and the gradients to the same order of accuracy of the proposed RD schemes with rapid convergence over each physical time step, typically less than ten Newton iterations.

  7. A Low Distortion 3rd-Order Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for a Worldwide Digital TV-Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Koji; Matsukawa, Kazuo; Mitani, Yosuke; Takayama, Masao; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Sakiyama, Shiro; Dosho, Shiro

    This paper presents a low distortion 3rd-order continuous-time delta-sigma modulator for a worldwide digital TV-receiver whose peak SNDR is 69.8dB and SNR is 70.2dB under 1V power supply. To enhance SNDR performance, the mechanisms to occur harmonic distortions at feedback current-steering DAC and flash ADC have been analyzed. A low power tuning system using RC-relaxation oscillator has been developed in order to achieve high yield against PVT variations. A 3rd-order modulator with modified single opamp resonator contributes to cost reduction by realizing a very compact circuit. Reduction schemes of the distortions enabled the modulator to achieve FOM of 0.18pJ/conv-step.

  8. Frequency locking and monitoring based on Bi-directional terahertz radiation of a 3rd-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser

    DOE PAGES

    van Marrewijk, N.; Mirzaei, B.; Hayton, D.; ...

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we have performed frequency locking of a dual, forward reverse emitting third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 3.5 THz. By using both directions of THz emission in combination with two gas cells and two power detectors, we can for the first time perform frequency stabilization, while monitor the frequency locking quality independently. We also characterize how the use of a less sensitive pyroelectric detector can influence the quality of frequency locking, illustrating experimentally that the sensitivity of the detectors is crucial. Using both directions of terahertz (THz) radiation has a particular advantage for the applicationmore » of a QCL as a local oscillator, where radiation from one side can be used for frequency/phase stabilization, leaving the other side to be fully utilized as a local oscillator to pump a mixer.« less

  9. 5000 groove/mm multilayer-coated blazed grating with 33percent efficiency in the 3rd order in the EUV wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Anderson, Erik; Cambie, Rossana; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard; Ahn, Minseung; Chang, Chih-Hao; Heilmann, Ralf; Schattenburg, Mark

    2009-07-07

    We report on recent progress in developing diffraction gratings which can potentially provide extremely high spectral resolution of 105-106 in the EUV and soft x-ray photon energy ranges. Such a grating was fabricated by deposition of a multilayer on a substrate which consists ofa 6-degree blazed grating with a high groove density. The fabrication of the substrate gratings was based on scanning interference lithography and anisotropic wet etch of silicon single crystals. The optimized fabrication process provided precise control of the grating periodicity, and the grating groove profile, together with very short anti-blazed facets, and near atomically smooth surface blazed facets. The blazed grating coated with 20 Mo/Si bilayers demonstrated a diffraction efficiency in the third order as high as 33percent at an incidence angle of 11? and wavelength of 14.18 nm.

  10. 2nd & 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraph presentation on the "2nd & 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems" project. The objective behind this project is to design, develop and test advanced avionics, power systems, power control and distribution components and subsystems for insertion into a highly reliable and low-cost system for a Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The project is divided into two sections: 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems and 2nd Generation Vehicle Subsystems. The following topics are discussed under the first section, 3rd Generation Vehicle Subsystems: supporting the NASA RLV program; high-performance guidance & control adaptation for future RLVs; Evolvable Hardware (EHW) for 3rd generation avionics description; Scaleable, Fault-tolerant Intelligent Network or X(trans)ducers (SFINIX); advance electric actuation devices and subsystem technology; hybrid power sources and regeneration technology for electric actuators; and intelligent internal thermal control. Topics discussed in the 2nd Generation Vehicle Subsystems program include: design, development and test of a robust, low-maintenance avionics with no active cooling requirements and autonomous rendezvous and docking systems; design and development of a low maintenance, high reliability, intelligent power systems (fuel cells and battery); and design of a low cost, low maintenance high horsepower actuation systems (actuators).

  11. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program is to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool will be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishment achieved during the second year (2008) of the program is summarized. The activities of this year include final selection of multicomponent thermodynamics and mobility databases, precipitate surface energy determination from nucleation experiment, multiscale comparison of predicted versus measured intragrain precipitation microstructure in quench samples showing good agreement, isothermal coarsening experiment and interaction of grain boundary and intergrain precipitates, primary microstructure of subsolvus treatment, and finally the software implementation plan for the third year of the project. In the following year, the calibrated models and simulation tools will be validated against an independently developed experimental data set, with actual disc heat treatment process conditions. Furthermore, software integration and implementation will be developed to provide material engineers valuable information in order to optimize the processing of the 3rd generation gas turbine disc alloys.

  12. 3rd Pavia international symposium on advanced kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Porta, Camillo; Bracarda, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Kidney cancers' natural history has radically changed in the past few years, due to the development of novel targeted agents. Despite these improvements, several unanswered questions still remain on the table, regarding the best first-line treatment, the ideal sequence of treatments, the management of specific subgroups of patients (e.g., elderly patients or those with comorbidities) and the relevance of prognostic factors, among many others. To foster discussions among clinicians and investigators working in this field, and to exchange different viewpoints concerning the newest advances in kidney cancer pathogenesis and treatment, the 3rd Pavia International Symposium on Advanced Kidney cancer was held in Pavia (Italy) between 30 June and 1 July 2011. The aim of this report is to summarize the most significant advances in the different disciplines applied to advanced kidney cancer, which were presented and discussed during the meeting, and how these advances will be changing the perspective of patients with this disease.

  13. Presenting the 3rd edition of WRB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The third edition of the international soil classification system "World Reference Base for Soil Resources" (WRB) will be presented during der 20th World Congress of Soil Science, Jeju, Korea, June 9-12. The second edition was published in 2006 and the first in 1998, which, in turn, was based on the Legends of the FAO Soil Map of the World. Now, after eight years of experience with the second edition, time was due for a revision. The major changes are: 1. The second edition had two different qualifier sequences for naming soils (IUSS Working Group WRB, 2006, update 2007) and for creating map legends (Guidelines for creating small-scale map legends using the WRB; IUSS Working Group WRB, 2010). The third edition has one sequence for both. The qualifiers for every Reference Soil Group are subdivided into a small number of main qualifiers that are ranked and a larger number of additional qualifiers that are not ranked and given in an alphabetical order. The name of a pedon must comprise all applying qualifiers. The name of a map unit comprises a specified small number of main qualifiers, depending on scale, whereas all other qualifiers are optional. 2. For some soils, problems have been reported. Albeluvisols are difficult to detect in the field and cover only small surfaces. They have been replaced by Retisols, which have a broader definition that is easier to identify in the field. 3. The use of some diagnostics was difficult. Examples are: The argic horizon had too low limit values, so we had much more soils with argic horizons than justified. The definitions of the cambic horizon and the gleyic and stagnic properties were not precise enough. Organic material, mollic and umbric horizons had an unnecessary complicated definition. 4. Some changes in the key to the Reference Soil Groups seemed to be justified. Fluvisols were moved further down, Durisols and Gypsisols switched their position, also Arenosols and Cambisols. The soils with an argic horizon were brought

  14. The Ups and Downs of 3rd Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Kelsey Augst; Akos, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The transition from 2nd to 3rd grade has received little notice in education research--yet the authors' experience in elementary school counseling convinced them that most students undergo a seismic shift during this period. Third grade is not only the first year students will encounter standardized end-of-grade tests, but also a year in which…

  15. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (CIMMEC2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    From October 14th to 16th 2014, The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality, and Technology (Inmetro) and the Brazilian Society of Metrology (SBM) organized the 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (3rd CIMMEC). The 3rd CIMMEC was held in the city of Gramado, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Anticipating the interest and enthusiasm of the technical-scientific community, the Organizing Institutions invite people and organizations to participate in this important congress, reiterating the commitment to organize an event according to highest international standards. This event has been conceived to integrate people and organizations from Brazil and abroad in the discussion of advanced themes in metrology. Manufacturers and dealers of measuring equipment and standards, as well as of auxiliary accessories and bibliographic material, had the chance to promote their products and services in stands at the Fair, which has taken place alongside the Congress. The 3rd CIMMEC consisted of five Keynote Speeches and 116 regular papers. Among the regular papers, the 25 most outstanding ones, comprising a high quality content on Mechanical Metrology, were selected to be published in this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series to the scientific community to promote further research in Mechanical Metrology and related areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by CIMMEC 2014.

  16. PreK-3rd: How Superintendents Lead Change. PreK-3rd Policy Action Brief. No. Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marietta, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    Leading change to create an integrated PreK-3rd education and connect early learning programs with the K-12 system is not easy. Superintendents require courage to take the first step, persistence and political skills to encourage organizational and community engagement, and a relentless focus on results to measure progress and build momentum. As a…

  17. Using Photographs to Probe Students' Understanding of Physical Concepts: The Case of Newton's 3rd Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshach, Haim

    2010-08-01

    The starting point of the present research is the following question: since we live in an age that makes increasing use of visual representations of all sorts, is not the visual representation a learner constructs a window into his/her understanding of what is or is not being learned? Following this direction of inquiry, the present preliminary study introduces and evaluates a novel technique for pinpointing learners’ misconceptions, namely, one that has learners create and interpret their own photographs (CIP). 27 high-school students and 26 pre-service teacher trainees were asked to assume the role of textbook designers and create a display—photograph plus attached verbal explanation—which, in their opinion, best depicted Newton’s 3rd law. Subsequent analysis of the participants’ photographs yielded the following six misconception categories: 3rd law not depicted; 3rd law depicts a sequence of events; tendency to introduce irrelevant entities in explanations; the word ‘reaction’ used colloquially; tendency to restrict the application of the third law to dynamic situations; and informal explanations in which the word “force” is absent. The findings indicate that, indeed, the CIP method can be effectively employed to elicit, detect, and investigate learners’ misconceptions. The CIP method joins the growing efforts to utilize the yet relatively untapped potential of visual tools for science education purposes.

  18. The 3rd Annual Controlled Structures Technology Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of presentations at the Controlled Structures Technology (CST) MIT Space Engineering Research Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include optical interferometer testbed; active impedence matching of complex structural systems; application of CST to adaptive optics; middeck 0-G dynamics Experiment (MODE); inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems; the middeck active control experiment (MACE); robust control for uncertain structures; cost averaging techniques for robust structural control; and intelligent structures technology.

  19. Nice observatory measurements of double stars (3rd series)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorel, J.-C.

    2000-12-01

    We present recent measurements of visual double stars made at the Nice Observatory (3rd series). We also report the discovery of a new double star: JCT 4. Moreover we give a more precise position of the double star DOO 35. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  20. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 66, 3rd Quarter 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    core combat systems are interactive with one another, creating a synergistic outcome and capability rather than providing an additive- segmented tool ...J o i n t F o r c e Q u a r t e r l y issue 66, 3rd Quarter 2012 Achieving Force Resilience Offensive Cyber Joint System Assessments Report...cross-pollination” of students on a large scale. At a joint-minded level, we need to rethink our Service personnel systems , which could enhance the

  1. Ordered hierarchy versus scale invariance in sequence stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    Sequence stratigraphy has been applied in a wide range of scales of time and space, from decimeter-thick layers formed within hours to kilometer-thick basin fills formed during hundreds of millions of years. The traditional approach to practice sequence stratigraphy in this wide range of scales is to subdivide the sediment piles into an ordered hierarchy of sequence cycles of different duration and different architecture. An alternative are scale-invariant models with fractal characteristics. Published data confirm two predictions of the ordered-hierarchy model: sequences of very short duration (<1 × 103 years) are parasequences bounded by flooding surfaces, very long sequences (>200 × 106 years) are symmetrical transgressive-regressive cycles. However, the sequence record in the range of 1 × 104-200 × 106 years, the principal domain of sequence stratigraphy, shows a rather irregular succession of sequences with variable symmetry and bounded by flooding surfaces or exposure surfaces. For these time scales, scale-invariant models are a good first approximation, particularly because the evidence for scale-invariance and randomness in the stratigraphic record is strong: Frequency spectra of sea-level change as well as rates of sedimentation and rates of accommodation change plotted against length of observation span show basic trends indistinguishable from random walk. These trends, combined with scale-invariant sequence models may be the most efficient tools for across-the-board predictions on sequences and for locating islands of order in the sequence record.

  2. Precipitation Model Validation in 3rd Generation Aeroturbine Disc Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. B.; Jou, H.-J.; Jung, J.; Sebastian, J. T.; Misra, A.; Locci, I.; Hull, D.

    2008-01-01

    In support of application of the DARPA-AIM methodology to the accelerated hybrid thermal process optimization of 3rd generation aeroturbine disc alloys with quantified uncertainty, equilibrium and diffusion couple experiments have identified available fundamental thermodynamic and mobility databases of sufficient accuracy. Using coherent interfacial energies quantified by Single-Sensor DTA nucleation undercooling measurements, PrecipiCalc(TM) simulations of nonisothermal precipitation in both supersolvus and subsolvus treated samples show good agreement with measured gamma particle sizes and compositions. Observed longterm isothermal coarsening behavior defines requirements for further refinement of elastic misfit energy and treatment of the parallel evolution of incoherent precipitation at grain boundaries.

  3. Designing a 3rd generation, authenticatable attribute measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, Jonathan; Karpius, Peter; Santi, Peter; Smith, Morag; Vo, Duc; Williams, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Attribute measurement systems (AMS) are designed to measure potentially sensitive items containing Special Nuclear Materials to determine if the items possess attributes which fall within an agreed-upon range. Such systems could be used in a treaty to inspect and verify the identity of items in storage without revealing any sensitive information associated with the item. An AMS needs to satisfy two constraints: the host party needs to be sure that none of their sensitive information is released, while the inspecting party wants to have confidence that the limited amount of information they see accurately reflects the properties of the item being measured. The former involves 'certifying' the system and the latter 'authenticating' it. Previous work into designing and building AMS systems have focused more on the questions of certifiability than on the questions of authentication - although a few approaches have been investigated. The next step is to build a 3rd generation AMS which (1) makes the appropriate measurements, (2) can be certified, and (3) can be authenticated (the three generations). This paper will discuss the ideas, options, and process of producing a design for a 3rd generation AMS.

  4. 3rd International Conference on X-ray Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potrakhov, N. N.; Gryaznov, A. Yu; Lisenkov, A. A.; Kostrin, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    In this preface a brief history, modern aspects and future tendencies in development of the X-ray technique as seen from the 3rd International Conference on X-ray Technique that was held on 24–25 November 2016 in Saint Petersburg, Russia are described On 24–25 November 2016 in Saint Petersburg on the basis of Saint Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” n. a. V. I. Ulyanov (Lenin) was held the 3rd International Conference on X-ray Technique. The tradition to hold a similar conference in our country was laid in Soviet times. The last of them, the All-Union Conference on the Prospects of X-ray Tubes and Equipment was organized and held more than a quarter century ago – on 21–23 November 1999, at the initiative and under the leadership of the chief engineer of the Leningrad association of electronic industry “Svetlana” Borovsky Alexander Ivanovich and the chief of special design bureau of X-ray devices of “Svetlana” Shchukin Gennady Anatolievich. The most active part in the organization and work of the conference played members of the department of X-ray and electron beam instruments of Leningrad Electrotechnical Institute “LETI” (the former name of Saint Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI”), represented by head of the department professor Ivanov Stanislav Alekseevich.

  5. Anchoring and ordering NGS contig assemblies by population sequencing (POPSEQ)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation, whole genome shotgun (WGS) assemblies of complex genomes are highly enabling, but fail to link nearby sequence contigs with each other or provide a linear order of contigs along individual chromosomes. Here, we introduce a strategy based on sequencing progeny of a segregating popul...

  6. 3rd grade English language learners making sense of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Enrique; Otero, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Despite the extensive body of research that supports scientific inquiry and argumentation as cornerstones of physics learning, these strategies continue to be virtually absent in most classrooms, especially those that involve students who are learning English as a second language. This study presents results from an investigation of 3rd grade students' discourse about how length and tension affect the sound produced by a string. These students came from a variety of language backgrounds, and all were learning English as a second language. Our results demonstrate varying levels, and uses, of experiential, imaginative, and mechanistic reasoning strategies. Using specific examples from students' discourse, we will demonstrate some of the productive aspects of working within multiple language frameworks for making sense of physics. Conjectures will be made about how to utilize physics as a context for English Language Learners to further conceptual understanding, while developing their competence in the English language.

  7. Results from the UK 3rd generation programme: Albion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, R. K.; Axcell, C.; Knowles, P.; Hoade, K. P.; Wilson, M.; Dennis, P. N. J.; Backhouse, P.; Gordon, N. T.

    2008-10-01

    Following the development of 1st Generation systems in the 1970s, thermal imaging has been in service with the UK armed forces for over 25 years and has proven itself to be a battle winning technology. More recently the wider accessibility to similar technologies within opposing forces has reduced the military advantage provided by these 1st Generation systems and a clear requirement has been identified by the UK MOD for thermal imaging sensors providing increased detection, recognition and identification (DRI) ranges together with a simplified logistical deployment burden and reduced through-life costs. In late 2005, the UK MOD initiated a programme known as "Albion" to develop high performance 3rd Generation single waveband infrared detectors to meet this requirement. At the same time, under a separate programme supporting higher risk technology, a dual waveband infrared detector was also developed. The development phase of the Albion programme has now been completed and prototype detectors are now available and have been integrated into demonstration thermal imaging cameras. The Albion programme has now progressed into the second phase, incorporating both single and dual waveband devices, focussing on low rate initial production (LRIP) and qualification of the devices for military applications. All of the detectors have been fabricated using cadmium mercury telluride material (CMT), grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on low cost, gallium arsenide (GaAs) substrates and bump bonded to the silicon read out circuit (ROIC). This paper discusses the design features of the 3rd Generation detectors developed in the UK together with the results obtained from the prototype devices both in the laboratory and when integrated into field deployable thermal imaging cameras.

  8. A two-pulse technique for extracting 3rd harmonic from ultrasound contrast agent echo signal.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-hee; Kim, Sang-min; Song, Tai-kyong

    2008-01-01

    Multi-pulse techniques like CPS (contrast pulse sequence) and TPS (triplet pulse sequence) are the most popular methods for separating the 3rd harmonic signals from received signal. Those two methods, however, transmit a pulse at least three times along each scanline with different phase and amplitude, which results in the frame rate reduction. In this paper, we propose a technique using two pulses whose phase difference is 90 degrees and a simple digital filter. The second harmonic signal is eliminated by summing two received signals as their phase difference becomes 180 degrees and then the fundamental signals are eliminated by using a digital filter. Computer simulations are performed for different values of signal bandwidths and filter specifications. The results show the maximum error is -35.5 dB compared to TPS.

  9. Microdrilling of PCB substrate using DPSS 3rd harmonic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. G.; Chang, Won Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ku; Jeong, Sungho; Shin, Bo Sung; Whang, Kyung Hyun

    2003-02-01

    Micromachining using the DPSS 3rd Harmonic Laser (355nm) has outstanding advantages as a UV source in comparison with Excimer lasers in various aspects such as maintenance cost, maskless machining, high repetition rate and so on. It also has the greater absorptivity of many materials in contrast to other IR sources. In this paper, the process for micro-drilling of through and blind hope in Cu/PI/Cu substrate with the UV DPSSL and a scanning device is investigated by both experimental and numerical methods. It is known that there is a large gap between the ablation threshold of copper and that of PI. We use the multi path for through hole with high energy density and we use Archimedes spiral path for blind hole with different energy densities to ablate different material. Furthermore, Matlab simulations considering the energy threshold of material is performed to anticipate the ablation shape according to the duplication of pulse, and FEM thermal analysis is used to predict the ablation depth of copper. This study would be widely applicable to various laser micromachining applications including through and blind hole micro-drilling of PCB, and micromachining of semiconductor components, medical parts and printer nozzles amongst others.

  10. 80. GENERAL VIEW TO NORTH ON 3RD AVENUE EL AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. GENERAL VIEW TO NORTH ON 3RD AVENUE EL AT GUN HILL STATION. 7TH AVENUE EL EXPRESS IS VISIBLE ABOVE THE 3RD AVENUE EL WHICH JOINED ONTO THE SAME STRUCTURE AT GUN HILL ROAD. NOTE: GUN HILL ROAD IS THE NORTH TERMINUS OF THE 3RD AVENUE ELEVATED. TRAINS DID NOT CARRY PASSENGERS BEYOND THIS POINT, ALTHOUGH THE 3RD AVENUE TRACK DID EXTEND FURTHER NORTH FOR SWITCHING PURPOSES AND INTO THE YARDS. - Interborough Rapid Transit Company, Third Avenue Elevated Line, Borough of the Bronx, New York County, NY

  11. Nullomers and High Order Nullomers in Genomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Vergni, Davide; Santoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    A nullomer is an oligomer that does not occur as a subsequence in a given DNA sequence, i.e. it is an absent word of that sequence. The importance of nullomers in several applications, from drug discovery to forensic practice, is now debated in the literature. Here, we investigated the nature of nullomers, whether their absence in genomes has just a statistical explanation or it is a peculiar feature of genomic sequences. We introduced an extension of the notion of nullomer, namely high order nullomers, which are nullomers whose mutated sequences are still nullomers. We studied different aspects of them: comparison with nullomers of random sequences, CpG distribution and mean helical rise. In agreement with previous results we found that the number of nullomers in the human genome is much larger than expected by chance. Nevertheless antithetical results were found when considering a random DNA sequence preserving dinucleotide frequencies. The analysis of CpG frequencies in nullomers and high order nullomers revealed, as expected, a high CpG content but it also highlighted a strong dependence of CpG frequencies on the dinucleotide position, suggesting that nullomers have their own peculiar structure and are not simply sequences whose CpG frequency is biased. Furthermore, phylogenetic trees were built on eleven species based on both the similarities between the dinucleotide frequencies and the number of nullomers two species share, showing that nullomers are fairly conserved among close species. Finally the study of mean helical rise of nullomers sequences revealed significantly high mean rise values, reinforcing the hypothesis that those sequences have some peculiar structural features. The obtained results show that nullomers are the consequence of the peculiar structure of DNA (also including biased CpG frequency and CpGs islands), so that the hypermutability model, also taking into account CpG islands, seems to be not sufficient to explain nullomer phenomenon

  12. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics (TROIA'11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2012-03-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'11 was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 22-25 August 2011. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. Its aim was to bring together the experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 60 participants from 12 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: Chiral Perturbation Theory QCD Sum Rules Effective Field Theory Exotic Hadrons Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD Experimental Results and Future Perspectives Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and the afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks and poster presentations. The speakers of the invited talks were: D Melikhov, M Nielsen, M Oka, E Oset, S Scherer, T T Takahashi and R Wanke. The conference venue was a resort hotel near Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient town of Troia and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Kadir Utku Can, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 13 February 2012 The Editors Güray Erkol Ayşe Küçükarslan Altuğ Özpineci Conference photograph

  13. PREFACE: 3rd International Meeting on Silicene (IMS-3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Abdelkader; Enriquez, Hanna; Lemaire, Jean Louis; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2014-03-01

    . Historical summary Every two years, the STARM (science, technologie avanc\\'ee et recherche pour la Mediterran\\'ee, http://www.starm.emcmre.org/) society is organizing an international conference entitled Euro-Mediterranean Conference on Materials and Renewable Energies (EMCMRE, http://www.emcmre.org/) in countries across the Mediterranean Sea. It is in this framework that an international meeting dedicated to silicene is organized simultaneously since 2010: 1st International Meeting of Silicene (IMS-1), Safi, Morocco, 2010 2nd International Meeting of Silicene (IMS-2), Marrakech, Morocco, 2011 3rd International Meeting of Silicene (IMS-3), Istres-Marseille, France, 2013 Conference pictures are available in the PDF

  14. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. L.; Dolganova, I. N.; Gevorgyan, N.; Guzman, A.; Papoyan, A.; Sarkisyan, H.; Yurchenko, S.

    2016-01-01

    The SPIE.FOCUS Armenia: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications'' (OPTICS-2015) http://rau.am/optics2015/ was held in Yerevan, Armenia, in the period October 1 - 5, 2015. The symposium was organized by the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), the Armenian SPIE student chapter with collaboration of the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-PYRKAL, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the SPIE & OSA student chapters of BMSTU, the Armenian OSA student chapter, and the SPIE student chapters of Lund University and Wroclaw University of Technology. The symposium OPTICS-2015 was dedicated to the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies. OPTICS-2015 was devoted to modern topics and optical technologies such as: optical properties of nanostructures, silicon photonics, quantum optics, singular optics & its applications, laser spectroscopy, strong field optics, biomedical optics, nonlinear & ultrafast optics, photonics & fiber optics, and mathematical methods in optics. OPTICS-2015 was attended by 100 scientists and students representing 17 countries: Armenia, China, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Germany, India, Iran, Italy, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Ukraine, and USA. Such a broad international community confirmed the important mission of science to be a uniting force between different countries, religions, and nations. We hope that OPTICS-2015 inspired and motivated students and young scientists to work in optics and in science in general. The present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes proceedings of the symposium covering various aspects of modern problems in optics. We are grateful to all people who were involved in the organization process. We gratefully acknowledge support from

  15. Potential for Significant Reductions in Dropout Rates: Analysis of an Entire 3rd Grade State Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cratty, Dorothyjean

    2012-01-01

    Nineteen percent of 1997-98 North Carolina 3rd graders were observed to drop out of high school. A series of logits predict probabilities of dropping out on determinants such as math and reading test scores, absenteeism, suspension, and retention, at the following grade levels: 3rd, 5th, 8th, and 9th. The same cohort and variables are used to…

  16. 75 FR 55313 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Conversion of the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (3rd ACR) to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... conversion, the 3rd ACR will provide the Army with a force structure that has the flexibility to respond... Infantry BCTs and Heavy Armor BCTs augmented with the protection and versatility of an additional SBCT. The... socioeconomic impacts that would be associated with the stationing of the different types of Army BCTs...

  17. 15. OFFSHORE VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EASTNORTHEAST, 3RD TEE, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. OFFSHORE VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST-NORTHEAST, 3RD TEE, SHOWING RESTROOMS IN FOREGROUND WITH PUMPHOUSE AND TACKLE BOX BEHIND - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  18. 19. OFFSHORE VIEW OF 3RD TEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. OFFSHORE VIEW OF 3RD TEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING SOUTHEAST SIDE OF TACKLE BOX IN FOREGROUND - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. 19. MILL NO. 1, 3rd FLOOR, CEILING TRACKING WITH AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. MILL NO. 1, 3rd FLOOR, CEILING TRACKING WITH AIR CLEANER (BLEW DUST/LINT DOWNWARD WHILE TRAVELING ON TRACK OVER MILL MACHINERY). - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  20. Survey of K-3rd-Grade Teachers' Knowledge of Ear Infections and Willingness to Participate in Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Carole E.; Caudle, Abby T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ear infections are prevalent in kindergarten through 3rd-grade (K-3rd) children and can affect their performance at school. Chewing gum, when administered by parents and teachers, can help prevent ear infections in children. This pilot study surveyed K-3rd-grade teachers in the Santa Barbara School Districts to assess their knowledge…

  1. Sequencing in SLA: Phonological Memory, Chunking, and Points of Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Nick C.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that much of language acquisition is sequence learning and that the resultant long-term knowledge base of language sequences serves as the database for grammar acquisition. The article also proposes mechanisms to analyze sequence information that result in knowledge of underlying grammar. (184 references) (Author/CK)

  2. [Infant Mortality in Argentina: reducibility criteria, 3rd review].

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Juliana Zoe; Duhau, Mariana; Abeyá Gilardon, Enrique; Ferrario, Claudia; Speranza, Ana; Asciutto, Carolina; Marconi, Élida; Guevel, Carlos; Fernández, María de las Mercedes; Martínez, María Laura; Santoro, Adrián; Loiacono, Karina; Lomuto, Celia

    2015-08-01

    The infant mortality rate is an indicator of quality of life, development, and quality and accessibility of health care. Improvements in science, technology and better access to health care have contributed to a major decrease in the infant mortality rate in Argentina. Since the 1980s, infant deaths have been classified based on the opportunities for reducibility yielded by scientific knowledge and available technologies, in order to obtain a basis for the monitoring and implementation of health policies. The last review of this classification was in 2011. In 2012, a total of 5,541 neonatal deaths (less than 28 days of life) were registered and, under this new classification, over 61% were reducible mainly by the improvement of perinatal health care and adequate and timely treatment of the at-risk newborn. In 2012, a total of 2,686 post-neonatal deaths (from 28 days of life to a year) were registered and, under this new classification, over 66.8% were reducible by improving prevention strategies and providing adequate and timely treatment. This new analysis demonstrates the need to improve the opportunity, accessibility and quality of perinatal care starting at pregnancy, guaranteeing quality care at delivery and reinforcing prevention and timely treatment of common diseases in childhood over the first year of life.

  3. Low efficiency gratings for 3rd harmonic diagnostics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Perry, M.D.; Shore, B.W.; Thomas, I.M.

    1995-08-09

    The baseline design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) calls for sampling gratings to provide third-harmonic energy diagnostics in the highly constrained area of the target chamber. These 40 {times} 4O cm transmission gratings are to diffract at (order +1) nominally 0.3% of the incident 351 run light at a small angle on to a focusing mirror and into a calorimeter. The design calls for a plane grating of 500 lines/mm, and approximately 30 run deep, etched into a fused silica focusing lens and subsequently overcoated with a solgel anti reflective coating. Gratings of similar aperture and feature size have been produced for other applications by ion etching processes, but, in an effort to reduce substantially the cost of such optics, we are studying the feasibility of making these gratings by wet chemical etching techniques. Experimentation with high-quality fused silica substrates on 5 and 15 cm. scale has led to a wet etching process which can meet the design goals and which offers no significant scaleup barriers to full sized optics. The grating is produced by holographic exposure and a series of processing steps using only a photoresist mask and a final hydrofluoric acid etch. Gratings on 15 cm diameter test substrates exhibit absolute diffraction efficiencies from 0.2--0.4% with a standard deviation of about 15% of the mean over the full aperture. The efficiency variation is due to variation in linewidth caused by spatial nonuniformities in exposure energy. Uniformity improvements can be realized by using a smaller, more uniform portion of the exposure beam and exposing for longer times. The laser damage threshold for these gratings has been measured at LLNL and found to be identical to that of the fused silica substrate.

  4. 3rd hand smoking; heterogeneous oxidation of nicotine and secondary aerosol formation in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren; Dubowski, Yael

    2010-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is well known as a significant source of primary indoor air pollutants. However, only recently has it been recognized that the impact of Tobacco smoking may continue even after the cigarette has been extinguished (i.e., third hand smoke) due to the effect of indoor surfaces. These surfaces may affect the fate of tobacco smoke in the form of secondary reactions and pollutants, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry with Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR) in tandem with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizing (SMPS) system was used to monitor the ozonation of cellulose sorbed nicotine and resulting SOA formation. SOA formation began at onset of ozone introduction ([O3] = 60 ± 5 ppb) with a size distribution of dp ≤ 25 nm, and was determined to be a result of heterogeneous reaction (opposed to homogeneous). SOA yield from reacted surface nicotine was on the order of 10 %. Simultaneous to SOA monitoring, FTIR-ATR spectra showed surface changes in the nicotine film as the reaction progressed, revealing a pseudo first-order surface reaction rate of 0.0026 ± 0.0008 min-1. Identified surface oxidation products included: cotinine, myosmine, methylnicotinamide and nicotyrine. Surface reaction rate was found to be partially inhibited at high relative humidity. Given the toxicity of some of the identified products (e.g., cotinine has shown potential mutagenicity and teratogenicity) and that small particles may contribute to adverse health effects, the present study indicates that exposure to 3rd hand smoke ozonation products may pose additional health risks.

  5. PREFACE: 3rd International Youth Conference "Interdisciplinary Problems of Nanotechnology, Biomedicine and Nanotoxicology" (Nanobiotech 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsnes, Magne, Prof; Gusev, Alexander, Dr; Godymchuk, Anna, Dr; Bogdan, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The 3rd International Youth Conference "Interdisciplinary Problems of Nanotechnology, Biomedicine and Nanotoxicology" (Nanobiotech2015) was held on 21-22 May 2015 in Tambov, Russia, and was jointly organized by Tambov Derzhavin State University (Russia), the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Norway), the National University of Science and Technology MISiS (Russia), Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russia) and Tomsk State University. The conference gathered experienced and young researchers, post-docs and students, working in the fieldof nanotechnologies, nanomedicine, nano(eco)toxicology and risk assessment of nanomaterials, in order to facilitate the aggregation and sharing of interests and results for better collaboration and visibility of activity. The goal of Nanobiotech2015 was to bring researchers and practitioners together to share the latest knowledge on nanotechnology-specific risks to occupational and environmental health and assessing how to reduce these potential risks. The main objective of the conference is to identify, systematize and solve current scientific problems inthe sphere of nanobiotechnologies, nanomedicine and nanotoxicology, in order to join forces todetermine prospective areas and compose working groups of interested co-workers for carrying out interdisciplinary research projects. The topics of Nanobiotech2015 were: (1) Nanotechnologies in pharmaceutics and medicine; (2) Sources and mechanisms of nanoparticle release into the environment; (3) Ecological and biological effects of nanoparticles; (4) (Eco)toxicology of nanomaterials; (5) Methods for detection of nanoparticles in the environment and in biological objects; and (6) Physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles in the environment. We want to thank the Organizing Committee, the universities and sponsors supporting the conference,and everyone who contributed to the organization of this meeting, for their contribution towards the conference and for their contributions to these

  6. Poly(2-oxazoline) based micelles with high capacity for 3rd generation taxoids: preparation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhijian; Schulz, Anita; Wan, Xiaomeng; Seitz, Joshua; Bludau, Herdis; Alakhova, Daria Y; Darr, David B; Perou, Charles M; Jordan, Rainer; Ojima, Iwao; Kabanov, Alexander V; Luxenhofer, Robert

    2015-06-28

    The clinically and commercially successful taxanes, paclitaxel and docetaxel suffer from two major drawbacks, namely their very low aqueous solubility and the risk of developing resistance. Here, we present a method that overcomes both drawbacks in a very simple manner. We formulated 3rd generation taxoids, able to avoid common drug resistance mechanisms with doubly amphiphilic poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx), a safe and highly efficient polymer for the formulation of extremely hydrophobic drugs. We found excellent solubilization of different 3rd generation taxoids irrespective of the drug's chemical structures with essentially quantitative drug loading and final drug to polymer ratios around unity. The small, highly loaded micelles with a hydrodynamic diameter of less than 100nm are excellently suited for parenteral administration. Moreover, a selected formulation with the taxoid SB-T-1214 is about one to two orders of magnitude more active in vitro than paclitaxel in the multidrug resistant breast cancer cell line LCC6-MDR. In contrast, in wild-type LCC6, no difference was observed. Using a q4d×4 dosing regimen, we also found that POx/SB-T-1214 significantly inhibits the growth of LCC6-MDR orthotropic tumors, outperforming commercial paclitaxel drug Taxol and Cremophor EL formulated SB-T-1214.

  7. On the Extreme Order Statistics for a Stationary Sequence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    DTIC TAB U!, anounced 0 "+’. ~juztfjatin------ Technical Report No. 198 By. ~~Distribtion/_____. * July 1987 Aviltbility Cods 7 Avai A-/ o - St...Random Measures. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, London- New York: Academic Press . Le-dbetter, M. R. (1974). On extreme values in stationary sequences. Z

  8. Plane stress yield function described by 3rd-degree spline curve and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamaishi, Toshiro; Tsutamori, Hideo; Iizuka, Eiji; Sato, Kentaro; Ogihara, Yuki; Matsui, Yohei

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a plane stress yield function which is described by 3rd-degree spline curve is proposed. This yield function can predict a material anisotropy with flexibility and consider evolution of anisotropy in terms of both r values and stresses. As an application, hole expanding simulation results are shown to discuss accuracy of the proposed yield function.

  9. Starting Young: Massachusetts Birth-3rd Grade Policies That Support Children's Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Shayna; Bornfreund, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Massachusetts is one of a handful of states that is often recognized as a leader in public education, and for good reason. The Commonwealth consistently outperforms most states on national reading and math tests and often leads the pack in education innovations. "Starting Young: Massachusetts Birth-3rd Grade Policies that Support Children's…

  10. Prediction of High School Dropout or Graduation from 3rd Grade Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Dee Norman; Bleach, Gail

    Measures of background characteristics, school performance, and tested achievement were analyzed for four race-by-sex samples of 3rd graders who were known to have later become high school dropouts or graduates. Results showed that as early as five to eight years before leaving school, dropouts differed significantly from graduates in age, tested…

  11. Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachian Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Melani W.; Hovland, Jana; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; McLeod, Sara; Duffrin, Christopher; Phillips, Sharon; Rivera, David; Saum, Diana; Johanson, George; Graham, Annette; Lee, Tammy; Bosse, Michael; Berryman, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. In 2007 to 2008, a foods curriculum developed by professionals in nutrition and education was implemented in 10 3rd-grade classrooms in Appalachian Ohio; teachers in these…

  12. The Effect of Book Blogging on the Motivation of 3rd-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Kristen N.; Legutko, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    A Web 2.0 technology was implemented during reading instruction in one 3rd-grade classroom in suburban southeastern Pennsylvania. Trained preservice teachers provided feedback to students via the World Wide Web to enhance their performance and social connections. Motivation scores were measured before and after the intervention was implemented. A…

  13. Education Reform Starts Early: Lessons from New Jersey's PreK-3rd Reform Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Sara

    2009-01-01

    This report seeks to describe how New Jersey became a national leader in early education and PreK-3rd, identify its successes and challenges, draw lessons from its experience for policymakers in other states and nationally, and provide recommendations for New Jersey policymakers to translate progress to date into sustained, large scale learning…

  14. 75 FR 34450 - Filing Dates for the Indiana Special Election in the 3rd Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Indiana Special Election in the 3rd Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Indiana has scheduled a...

  15. Evaluation of the "Respect Not Risk" Firearm Safety Lesson for 3rd-Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liller, Karen D.; Perrin, Karen; Nearns, Jodi; Pesce, Karen; Crane, Nancy B.; Gonzalez, Robin R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MORE HEALTH "Respect Not Risk" Firearm Safety Lesson for 3rd-graders in Pinellas County, Florida. Six schools representative of various socioeconomic levels were selected as the test sites. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected. A total of 433 matched pretests/posttests were used…

  16. 16. 3RD FLOOR, J.M. LEHMANN CO. FIVEROLL TOILET SOAP MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 3RD FLOOR, J.M. LEHMANN CO. FIVE-ROLL TOILET SOAP MILL INSTALLED 1950, TO WEST; BUCKET CONVEYOR AT RIGHT MOVED WASTE FROM 2ND FLOOR SOAP PRESSES TO 5TH FLOOR RE-MANUFACTURE - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  17. Sequencing human ribs into anatomical order by quantitative multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Henneberg, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Little research has focussed on methods to anatomically sequence ribs. Correct anatomical sequencing of ribs assists in determining the location and distribution of regional trauma, age estimation, number of puncture wounds, number of individuals, and personal identification. The aim of the current study is to develop a method for placing fragmented and incomplete rib sets into correct anatomical position. Ribs 2-10 were used from eleven cadavers of an Australian population. Seven variables were measured from anatomical locations on the rib. General descriptive statistics were calculated for each variable along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ANOVA with Bonferroni statistics. Considerable overlap was observed between ribs for univariate methods. Bivariate and multivariate methods were then applied. Results of the ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni statistics show that ratios of various dimensions of a single rib could be used to sequence it within adjacent ribs. Using multiple regression formulae, the most accurate estimation of the anatomical rib number occurs when the entire rib is found in isolation. This however, is not always possible. Even when only the head and neck of the rib are preserved, a modified multivariate regression formula assigned 91.95% of ribs into correct anatomical position or as an adjacent rib. Using multivariate methods it is possible to sequence a single human rib with a high level of accuracy and they are superior to univariate methods. Left and right ribs were found to be highly symmetrical. Some rib dimensions were greater in males than in females, but overall the level of sexual dimorphism was low.

  18. Megabase sequencing of human genome by ordered-shotgun-sequencing (OSS) strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ellson Y.

    1997-05-01

    So far we have used OSS strategy to sequence over 2 megabases DNA in large-insert clones from regions of human X chromosomes with different characteristic levels of GC content. The method starts by randomly fragmenting a BAC, YAC or PAC to 8-12 kb pieces and subcloning those into lambda phage. Insert-ends of these clones are sequenced and overlapped to create a partial map. Complete sequencing is then done on a minimal tiling path of selected subclones, recursively focusing on those at the edges of contigs to facilitate mergers of clones across the entire target. To reduce manual labor, PCR processes have been adapted to prepare sequencing templates throughout the entire operation. The streamlined process can thus lend itself to further automation. The OSS approach is suitable for large- scale genomic sequencing, providing considerable flexibility in the choice of subclones or regions for more or less intensive sequencing. For example, subclones containing contaminating host cell DNA or cloning vector can be recognized and ignored with minimal sequencing effort; regions overlapping a neighboring clone already sequenced need not be redone; and segments containing tandem repeats or long repetitive sequences can be spotted early on and targeted for additional attention.

  19. Exposure, drowning, and missed beats'': Shelf-edge sequence stratigraphy, Middle Ordovician non-cycle carbonates, east Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauff, D.M.; Walker, K.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Stratigraphic sequences in a Middle Ordovician platform interior carbonate succession can be correlated to the shelf-edge. Surfaces of subaerial exposure are correlated among seven stratigraphic sections, 4 at on-shelf positions and 3 at or near the shelf-edge. This analysis of carbonate facies geometry is based on outcrop observation, analysis of thin-sections, and consideration of water-depth curves. In platform successions, most sequences are bounded by exposure surfaces, but in more continuously subtidal areas, period of shallowing and drowning are discerned in bathymetric curves based on multiple lines of evidence. Cephalopod-rich limestone beds that overlie subtidal limestones and contain black, iron-manganese oxide rich sediment and pavements provide additional evidence for drowning followed by condensed sedimentation. These non-cyclic carbonates have 4th order sequences that are grouped into 3rd order sequences based on the occurrence of pronounced and less pronounced exposure surfaces. For example, 7 pronounced surfaces of subaerial exposure define six 3rd order sequences at on-shelf positions at Thorn Hill, TN. Within the lower four 3rd order sequences, 19 less pronounced surfaces occur with a total of 23 surfaces recognized in about 400 m. These less pronounced surfaces define 4th order sequences that are correlative across the shelf. Within these 3rd and 4th order sequences, 5th order packages occur. Fifth order sequences are not correlative across the shelf or from the shelf to the shelf-edge and many are probably the result of lateral environmental migration. Stratigraphic sequences define shallowing-upward packages and are used to construct Fischer plots, substituting sequences for cycles. The modified Fischer plots show that some sequences are missing. Sequences are missed in 3 ways: Sea-level stays below the shelf edge even though sea level is oscillating; Tectonic uplift exposes the shelf until subsidence allows submergence; and During drowning.

  20. From sequences to polynomials and back, via operator orderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amdeberhan, Tewodros; De Angelis, Valerio; Dixit, Atul; Moll, Victor H.; Vignat, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Bender and Dunne ["Polynomials and operator orderings," J. Math. Phys. 29, 1727-1731 (1988)] showed that linear combinations of words qkpnqn-k, where p and q are subject to the relation qp - pq = ı, may be expressed as a polynomial in the symbol z = 1/2(qp+pq). Relations between such polynomials and linear combinations of the transformed coefficients are explored. In particular, examples yielding orthogonal polynomials are provided.

  1. Foundational Skills to Support Reading for Understanding in Kindergarten through 3rd Grade. Educator's Practice Guide. NCEE 2016-4008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foorman, Barbara; Beyler, Nicholas; Borradaile, Kelley; Coyne, Michael; Denton, Carolyn A.; Dimino, Joseph; Furgeson, Joshua; Hayes, Lynda; Henke, Juliette; Justice, Laura; Keating, Betsy; Lewis, Warnick; Sattar, Samina; Streke, Andrei; Wagner, Richard; Wissel, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this practice guide is to offer educators specific, evidence-based recommendations for teaching foundational reading skills to students in kindergarten through 3rd grade. This guide is a companion to the existing practice guide, "Improving Reading Comprehension in Kindergarten Through 3rd Grade", and as a set, these guides…

  2. The generalized order-k Fibonacci-Pell sequence by matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Emrah

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the usual and generalized order-k Fibonacci and Pell recurrences, then we define a new recurrence, which we call generalized order-k F-P sequence. Also we present a systematic investigation of the generalized order-k F-P sequence. We give the generalized Binet formula, some identities and an explicit formula for sums of the generalized order-k F-P sequence by matrix methods. Further, we give the generating function and combinatorial representations of these numbers. Also we present an algorithm for computing the sums of the generalized order-k Pell numbers, as well as the Pell numbers themselves.

  3. Conference report: the 3rd Global CRO Council for Bioanalysis at the International Reid Bioanalytical Forum.

    PubMed

    Breda, Massimo; Garofolo, Fabio; Caturla, Maria Cruz; Couerbe, Philippe; Maltas, John; White, Peter; Struwe, Petra; Sangster, Timothy; Riches, Suzanne; Hillier, Jim; Garofolo, Wei; Zimmerman, Thomas; Pawula, Maria; Collins, Eileen; Schoutsen, Dick; Wieling, Jaap; Green, Rachel; Houghton, Richard; Jeanbaptiste, Bernard; Claassen, Quinton; Harter, Tammy; Seymour, Mark

    2011-12-01

    The 3rd Global CRO Council Closed Forum was held on the 3rd and 4th July 2011 in Guildford, United Kingdom, in conjunction with the 19th International Reid Bioanalytical Forum. In attendance were 21 senior-level representatives from 19 CROs on behalf of nine European countries and, for many of the attendees, this occasion was the first time that they had participated in a GCC meeting. Therefore, this closed forum was an opportunity to increase awareness of the aim of the GCC and how it works, share information about bioanalytical regulations and audit findings from different agencies, their policies and procedures and also to discuss some topics of interest and aim to develop ideas and provide recommendations for bioanalytical practices at future GCC meetings in Europe.

  4. 3rd Workshop on Semantic Ambient Media Experience (SAME) - In Conjunction with AmI-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugmayr, Artur; Stockleben, Bjoern; Kaario, Juha; Pogorelc, Bogdan; Risse, Thomas

    The SAME workshop takes place for the 3rd time in 2010, and it's theme in this year was creating the business value-creation, vision, media theories and technology for ambient media. SAME differs from other workshops due to its interactive and creative touch and going beyond simple powerpoint presentations. Several results will be published by AMEA - the AMbient Media Association (www.ambientmediaassociation.org.

  5. Insights from the 3rd World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, D.; Goodlet, B.; Weaver, J.; Spanos, G.

    2016-05-01

    The 3rd World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) was a forum for presenting the "state-of-the-art" in the ICME discipline, as well as for charting a path for future community efforts. The event concluded with in an interactive panel-led discussion that addressed such topics as integrating efforts between experimental and computational scientists, uncertainty quantification, and identifying the greatest challenges for future workforce preparation. This article is a summary of this discussion and the thoughts presented.

  6. 13. Photocopy of 1920 drawing titled: BUILDING 78, 3RD FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of 1920 drawing titled: BUILDING 78, 3RD FLOOR BALCONY AND FIRE ESCAPES, including plans for skylight and North Elevation. HABS photograph is an 8x10' contact print made from a high contrast negative of an enlargement made from microfiche. Original is in the collection of Department of Public Works, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Administration Building, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  7. Not All Order Memory Is Equal: Test Demands Reveal Dissociations in Memory for Sequence Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonker, Tanya R.; MacLeod, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Remembering the order of a sequence of events is a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Indeed, a number of formal models represent temporal context as part of the memory system, and memory for order has been researched extensively. Yet, the nature of the code(s) underlying sequence memory is still relatively unknown. Across 4 experiments that…

  8. On the Higher Power Sums of Reciprocal Higher-Order Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Let {un} be a higher-order linear recursive sequence. In this paper, we use the properties of error estimation and the analytic method to study the reciprocal sums of higher power of higher-order sequences. Then we establish several new and interesting identities relating to the infinite and finite sums. PMID:24741351

  9. The Goodrich 3rd generation DB-110 system: successful flight test on the F-16 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Davis; Iyengar, Mrinal; Maver, Larry; Dyer, Gavin; Francis, John

    2007-04-01

    The 3rd Generation Goodrich DB-110 system provides users with a three (3) field-of-view high performance Airborne Reconnaissance capability that incorporates a dual-band day and nighttime imaging sensor, a real time recording and a real time data transmission capability to support long range, medium range, and short range standoff and over-flight mission scenarios, all within a single pod. Goodrich developed their 3rd Generation Airborne Reconnaissance Pod for operation on a range of aircraft types including F-16, F-15, F-18, Euro-fighter and older aircraft such as the F-4, F-111, Mirage and Tornado. This system upgrades the existing, operationally proven, 2nd generation DB-110 design with enhancements in sensor resolution, flight envelope and other performance improvements. Goodrich recently flight tested their 3rd Generation Reconnaissance System on a Block 52 F-16 aircraft with first flight success and excellent results. This paper presents key highlights of the system and presents imaging results from flight test.

  10. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Taiichi; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2014-12-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3) was held at KGU Kannai Media Center, Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama, Japan, from May 26 to 30, 2014. Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan, about 25 km southeast of Tokyo. The first workshop of the series was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008 and the second one was in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. The purpose of SOTANCP3 was to discuss the present status and future perspectives of the nuclear cluster physics. The following nine topics were selected in order to cover most of the scientific programme and highlight an area where new ideas have emerged over recent years: (1) Cluster structures and many-body correlations in stable and unstable nuclei (2) Clustering aspects of nuclear reactions and resonances (3) Alpha condensates and analogy with condensed matter approaches (4) Role of tensor force in cluster physics and ab initio approaches (5) Clustering in hypernuclei (6) Nuclear fission, superheavy nuclei, and cluster decay (7) Cluster physics and nuclear astrophysics (8) Clustering in nuclear matter and neutron stars (9) Clustering in hadron and atomic physics There were 122 participants, including 53 from 17 foreign countries. In addition to invited talks, we had many talks selected from contributed papers. There were plenary, parallel, and poster sessions. Poster contributions were also presented as four-minute talks in parallel sessions. This proceedings contains the papers presented in invited and selected talks together with those presented in poster sessions. We would like to express our gratitude to the members of the International Advisory Committee and those of the Organizing Committee for their efforts which made this workshop successful. In particular we would like to present our great thanks to Drs. Y. Funaki, W. Horiuchi, N. Itagaki, M. Kimura, T. Myo, and T. Yoshida. We would like also to thank the following organizations for their sponsors: RCNP

  11. Superimposed multiple orders of sequences predict reservoir migration and thickness in stratigraphy trapped Haynesville carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhart, D.; Hwang, D. )

    1991-08-01

    The Upper Jurassic Haynesville Formation is part of the Louark group located on the east flank of the East Texas salt basin. Haynesville gas production is from ooid grainstones which formed on a gently dipping carbonate ramp. Hydrocarbon was sourced from the underlying Smackover Formation basinal deposits and trapped stratigraphically by multiple ooid shoal pinch-outs. Therefore, an essential tool in prospecting for Haynesville gas is an understanding of Haynesville stratigraphy. Toward that end, the authors placed the formation into a sequence stratigraphic framework. Haynesville stratal-stacking patterns and lithology distribution result from the superimposition of three orders of cyclicity. Evidence of second order, third order, and fourth order sequences are found within the Haynesville data. The entire Haynesville Formation lies within a second-order transgressive systems tract, which is expresses in facies as an overall deepening event. The superimposition of second-order extreme retrograde deposition during periods of in-phase second- and third- order transgression. The results were large shifts in deposition centers and additional reservoir thickness due to increased accommodation. Fourth -order sequences exerted the greatest control an ooid reservoir distribution due to shoal progradation. By superimposing the observed multiple orders of sequences into the Haynesville geologic model, the top of Haynesville becomes both a sequence boundary in the third order and a maximum flooding surface in the second order. Together, fourth-order flooding surface in the second order. Together, fourth-order and third order sequences indicate the direction of reservoir migration as well as areas of maximum reservoir thickness.

  12. High-Order Residual-Distribution Hyperbolic Advection-Diffusion Schemes: 3rd-, 4th-, and 6th-Order

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    January 2013. 20N. R. Merski. Reduction and analysis of phosphor thermography data with the IHEAT software package. In 36th AIAA Aerospace Sciences...and n. R. Merski. X- 33 Experimental Aeroheating at Mach 6 Using Phosphor Thermography . J. Spacecraft and Rockets, 38:635–645, 2001. 22M. Ricchiuto, R

  13. Preface to Special Topic: Invited Papers of the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to visualize the real-time dynamics of atomic, magnetic, and electronic structure is widely recognized in many fields as a key element underpinning many important processes in chemistry, materials science, and biology. The need for an improved understanding of such processes becomes acute as energy conversion processes on fast time scales become increasingly relevant to problems in science and technology. This special issue, containing invited papers from participants at the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics held June 10–12, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland, discusses several recent developments in this area. PMID:27191008

  14. Overview of the 3rd isirv-Antiviral Group Conference – advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Aeron C; Hui, David S; Hay, Alan; Hayden, Frederick G

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the main points which emerged from the presentations and discussions at the 3rd isirv-Antiviral Group Conference - advances in clinical management. The conference covered emerging and potentially pandemic influenza viruses and discussed novel/pre-licensure therapeutics and currently approved antivirals and vaccines for the control of influenza. Current data on approved and novel treatments for non-influenza respiratory viruses such as MERS-CoV, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinoviruses and the challenges of treating immunocompromised patients with respiratory infections was highlighted. PMID:25399715

  15. [Modern surgical treatment of breast cancer. 3rd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue into the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 3rd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations.

  16. Preface to Special Topic: Invited Papers of the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S L

    2016-03-01

    The ability to visualize the real-time dynamics of atomic, magnetic, and electronic structure is widely recognized in many fields as a key element underpinning many important processes in chemistry, materials science, and biology. The need for an improved understanding of such processes becomes acute as energy conversion processes on fast time scales become increasingly relevant to problems in science and technology. This special issue, containing invited papers from participants at the 3rd International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics held June 10-12, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland, discusses several recent developments in this area.

  17. Mapping by sequencing the Pneumocystis genome using the ordering DNA sequences V3 tool.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zheng; Lance, Britton; Vargas, Claudia; Arpinar, Budak; Bhandarkar, Suchendra; Kraemer, Eileen; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Wagner, Jeff R; Weise, Michael J; Wunderlich, John K; Stringer, James; Smulian, George; Cushion, Melanie T; Arnold, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A bioinformatics tool called ODS3 has been created for mapping by sequencing. The tool allows the creation of integrated genomic maps from genetic, physical mapping, and sequencing data and permits an integrated genome map to be stored, retrieved, viewed, and queried in a stand-alone capacity, in a client/server relationship with the Fungal Genome Database (FGDB), and as a web-browsing tool for the FGDB. In that ODS3 is programmed in Java, the tool promotes platform independence and supports export of integrated genome-mapping data in the extensible markup language (XML) for data interchange with other genome information systems. The tool ODS3 is used to create an initial integrated genome map of the AIDS-related fungal pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii. Contig dynamics would indicate that this physical map is approximately 50% complete with approximately 200 contigs. A total of 10 putative multigene families were found. Two of these putative families were previously characterized in P. carinii, namely the major surface glycoproteins (MSGs) and HSP70 proteins; three of these putative families (not previously characterized in P. carinii) were found to be similar to families encoding the HSP60 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the heat-shock psi protein in S. pombe, and the RNA synthetase family (i.e., MES1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Physical mapping data are consistent with the 16S, 5.8S, and 26S rDNA genes being single copy in P. carinii. No other fungus outside this genus is known to have the rDNA genes in single copy. PMID:12702676

  18. A global drought climatology for the 3rd edition of the World Atlas of Desertification (WAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoni, Jonathan; Carrao, Hugo; Naumann, Gustavo; Antofie, Tiberiu; Barbosa, Paulo; Vogt, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    A new version of the World Atlas of Desertification (WAD) is being compiled in the framework of cooperation between the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). This initiative aims at mapping the global land degradation and desertification, as well as introducing the reader with complex interactions of geo-physical, socio-economic, and political aspects that affect the environmental sustainability. Recurrent extreme events resulting from climate change, such as more severe droughts, combined with non-adapted land use practices can affect the resilience of ecosystems tipping them into a less productive state. Thus, to describe the effects of climatological hazards on land degradation and desertification processes, we computed a World drought climatology that will be part of the 3rd edition of the WAD and will replace and update to 2010 the results presented in the 2nd edition in 1997. This paper presents the methodology used to compute three parameters included in the WAD drought climatology, i.e. drought frequency, intensity and duration, and discusses their spatio-temporal patterns both at global and continental scales. Because drought is mainly driven and triggered by a rainfall deficit, we chose the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) as the drought indicator to estimate our climatological parameters. The SPI is a statistical precipitation-based drought indicator widely used in drought-related studies. We calculated the SPI on three different accumulation periods: 3 months (SPI-3), 6 months (SPI-6), and 12 months (SPI-12), in order to take into account meteorological, agricultural, and hydrological drought-related features. Each quantity has been calculated on a monthly basis using the baseline period between January 1951 and December 2010. As data input, we used the Full Data Reanalysis Version 6.0 (0.5˚x0.5˚) of gridded monthly precipitation provided by the Global Precipitation

  19. Extreme and Local 3rd Harmonic Response of Niobium (Nb) Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oripov, Bakhrom; Tai, Tamin; Anlage, Steven

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are being widely used in new generation particle accelerators. These SRF cavities are based on bulk Nb. Based on the needs of the SRF community to identify defects on Nb surfaces, a novel near-field magnetic microwave microscope was successfully built using a magnetic writer from a conventional magnetic recording hard-disk drive1. This magnetic writer can create an RF magnetic field, localized and strong enough to drive Nb into the vortex state. This probe enables us to locate defects through scanning and mapping of the local electrodynamic response in the multi-GHz frequency range. Recent measurements have shown that 3rd harmonic nonlinear response is far more sensitive to variations in input power and temperature then linear response, thus we mainly study the 3rd harmonic response. Moreover, the superconductor is usually the only source for nonlinear response in our setup, thus there is less chance of having noise or background signal. Understanding the mechanism responsible for this non-linear response is important for improving the performance of SRF cavities. Besides Nb we also study various other superconductors such as MgB2 and the cuprate Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) for potential applications in SRF cavities. This work is funded by US Department of Energy through Grant # DE-SC0012036T and CNAM.

  20. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015): overall activities and outcome highlights.

    PubMed

    Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Assidi, Mourad; Dallol, Ashraf; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Al-Hamzi, Emad; Shay, Jerry W; Scherer, Stephen W; Agarwal, Ashok; Budowle, Bruce; Gari, Mamdooh; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-10-17

    The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3(rd) IGMC) was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1(st) IGMC, 2011) followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2(nd) IGMC, 2013). The 3(rd) IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  1. Editorial: 3rd Special Issue on behavior change, health, and health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    This Special Issue of Preventive Medicine (PM) is the 3rd that we have organized on behavior change, health, and health disparities. This is a topic of critical importance to improving U.S. population health. There is broad scientific consensus that personal behaviors such as cigarette smoking, other substance abuse, and physical inactivity/obesity are among the most important modifiable causes of chronic disease and its adverse impacts on population health. Hence, effectively promoting health-related behavior change needs to be a key component of health care research and policy. There is also broad recognition that while these problems extend throughout the population, they disproportionately impact economically disadvantaged populations and other vulnerable populations and represent a major contributor to health disparities. Thus, behavior change represents an essential step in curtailing health disparities, which receives special attention in this 3rd Special Issue. We also devote considerable space to the longstanding challenges of reducing cigarette smoking and use of other tobacco and nicotine delivery products in vulnerable populations, obesity, and for the first time food insecurity. Across each of these topics we include contributions from highly accomplished policymakers and scientists to acquaint readers with recent accomplishments as well as remaining knowledge gaps and challenges. PMID:27693562

  2. 3rd Circuit hints it may reconsider McNemar reasoning.

    PubMed

    1997-10-17

    The [name removed] v. The Disney Store ruling is under criticism and the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals may reconsider its 1996 decision to not allow employees who receive disability benefits to sue under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). A panel of 3rd Circuit judges, working on [name removed] v. American Sterilizer Co., asserts that the [name removed] decision should not be used to assume that an individual's ADA claims are barred because of prior representations of disability. [Name removed] is suing American Sterilizer under the retaliation provisions of the ADA. Other courts are criticizing the [name removed] decision, including the District of Columbia Court in [name removed] v. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. The [name removed] court assets that a statement made in the context of a disability application does not preclude an ADA claim brought by a worker for illegal discrimination because the ADA and the Social Security Act differ in their statutory intent. AIDS advocates state that the [name removed] decision places a plaintiff in the position of having to choose between asserting a legal right or maintaining an income. Alan Epstein, who represented [name removed], is pleased by the criticism but explains that [name removed], who died this summer, will not be vindicated.

  3. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference of Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamat, Riazalman; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mohd. Zuki Nik Mohamed, Nik; Che Ghani, Saiful Anwar; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan

    2015-12-01

    The 3rd ICMER2015 is the continuity of the NCMER2010. The year 2010 represents a significant milestone in the history for Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP) Malaysia with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (1st and 2nd NCMER) at UMP on May 26-27 and Dec 3-4 2010. The Faculty then changed the name from National Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (NCMER) to International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER) in 2011 and this year, 2015 is our 3rd ICMER. These proceedings contain the selected scientific manuscripts submitted to the conference. It is with great pleasure to welcome you to the "International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER2015)" that is held at Zenith Hotel, Kuantan, Malaysia. The call for papers attracted submissions of over two hundred abstracts from twelve different countries including Japan, Iran, China, Kuwait, Indonesia, Norway, Philippines, Morocco, Germany, UAE and more. The scientific papers published in these proceedings have been revised and approved by the technical committee of the 3rd ICMER2015. All of the papers exhibit clear, concise, and precise expositions that appeal to a broad international readership interested in mechanical engineering, combustion, metallurgy, materials science as well as in manufacturing and biomechanics. The reports present original ideas or results of general significance supported by clear reasoning and compelling evidence, and employ methods, theories and practices relevant to the research. The authors clearly state the questions and the significance of their research to theory and practice, describe how the research contributes to new knowledge, and provide tables and figures that meaningfully add to the narrative. In this edition of ICMER representatives attending are from academia, industry, governmental and private sectors. The plenary and invited speakers will present, discuss, promote and

  4. Defining a new vision for the retinoblastoma gene: report from the 3rd International Rb Meeting.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Seth M; Sage, Julien

    2013-11-21

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) pathway is mutated in most, if not all human tumors. In the G0/G1 phase, Rb and its family members p107 and p130 inhibit the E2F family of transcription factors. In response to mitogenic signals, Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) phosphorylate Rb family members, which results in the disruption of complexes between Rb and E2F family members and in the transcription of genes essential for S phase progression. Beyond this role in early cell cycle decisions, Rb family members regulate DNA replication and mitosis, chromatin structure, metabolism, cellular differentiation, and cell death. While the RB pathway has been extensively studied in the past three decades, new investigations continue to provide novel insights into basic mechanisms of cancer development and, beyond cancer, help better understand fundamental cellular processes, from plants to mammals. This meeting report summarizes research presented at the recently held 3rd International Rb Meeting.

  5. Passive solar progress: a simplified guide to the 3rd national passive solar conference

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.; Howell, Y.; Richards, D.

    1980-10-01

    Some of the concepts and practices that have come to be known as passive solar heating and cooling are introduced, and a current picture of the field is presented. Much of the material presented is derived from papers given at the 3rd National Passive Solar Conference held in San Jose, California in January 1979 and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Extracts and data from these papers have been integrated in the text with explanatory and descriptive material. In this way, it is attempted to present technical information in an introductory context. Topics include design considerations, passive and hybrid systems and applications, sizing methods and performance prediction, and implementation issues. A glossary is included. (WHK)

  6. [Methodology for an appreciative, dynamic and collaborative process: 3rd Canary Islands (Spain) Health Plan].

    PubMed

    O'Shanahan Juan, José Joaquín; Hernández Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Del Otero Sanz, Laura; Henríquez Suárez, José Andrés; Mahtani Chugani, Vinita

    The need for new approaches to strategic planning by incorporating the perspectives of professionals and inhabitants has led to a new model for the 3rd Canary Islands (Spain) Health Plan (IIIPSC). A dual-phase participatory process using qualitative techniques is proposed: 1) local phase: a quantitative and qualitative study based on training and a research-action-participation initiative; and 2) insular phase: health conferences with face-to-face discussion of results in each health area (island) and proposals for action. The process prioritises problems and establishes a specific action plan for each island through initiatives that are considered to be viable, grouped by themes and weighted according to the potential impact on priority problems. This process of interaction may help to guide planning model changes and health policy decision-making, and was included in the IIIPSC Project for its parliamentary procedure.

  7. John D. Rockefeller 3rd, statesman and founder of the Population Council.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, J

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a profile of John D. Rockefeller 3rd, statesman and founder of the Population Council. It is noted that Rockefeller took a broad view of population control as a means to address poverty and economic development rather than as an end in itself. In 1952 he initiated the convocation of the Conference on Population Problems held in Williamsburg, Virginia. The discussion focused on food supply, industrial development, depletion of natural resources, and political instability resulting from unchecked population growth. In 1967, Rockefeller initiated, lobbied for, and finally achieved a World Leaders' Statement signed by 30 heads of state including US President Lyndon Johnson. The document drew attention to population growth as a world problem and engendered political support for family planning as a solution. After 3 years the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future was established, and Rockefeller was made its chairman. Several issues were debated, including more safer fertility control and the legalization of abortion.

  8. Food: The Chemistry of Its Components, 3rd Edition (by T. P. Coultate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carandang, Rachelle; Ziegler, Greg

    1998-02-01

    Food: The Chemistry of Its Components, 3rd edition, by T. P. Coultate, is an excellent textbook in food chemistry for undergraduates. It is a concise version of the very detailed Food Chemistry by Fennema and similar to, but with advantages over, Mechanism and Theory in Food Chemistry by Wong and Principles of Food Chemistry by Deman. The book assumes knowledge of biochemistry and basic principles in organic chemistry, but presents very practical examples that allow the student to see the obvious link between theory and practice. The examples are described almost as if the author is performing a demonstration in a classvery vivid to the imagination. This is important because students are expected in the future to perform and put into practice their knowledge of food chemistry.

  9. Retrospective Dosimetry of Vver 440 Reactor Pressure Vessel at the 3RD Unit of Dukovany Npp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.; Sus, F.; Klupak, V.; Rataj, J.; Hogel, J.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) residual lifetime of the Czech VVER-440 is currently monitored under Surveillance Specimens Programs (SSP) focused on reactor pressure vessel materials. Neutron fluence in the samples and its distribution in the RPV are determined by a combination of calculation results and the experimental data coming from the reactor dosimetry measurements both in the specimen containers and in the reactor cavity. The direct experimental assessment of the neutron flux density incident onto RPV and neutron fluence for the entire period of nuclear power plant unit operation can be based on the evaluation of the samples taken from the inner RPV cladding. The Retrospective Dosimetry was also used at Dukovany NPP at its 3rd unit after the 18th cycle. The paper describes methodology, experimental setup for sample extraction, measurement of activities, and the determination of the neutron flux and fluence averaged over the samples.

  10. IP-MSA: Independent order of progressive multiple sequence alignments using different substitution matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boraik, Aziz Nasser; Abdullah, Rosni; Venkat, Ibrahim

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential process for many biological sequence analyses. There are many algorithms developed to solve MSA, but an efficient computation method with very high accuracy is still a challenge. Progressive alignment is the most widely used approach to compute the final MSA. In this paper, we present a simple and effective progressive approach. Based on the independent order of sequences progressive alignment which proposed in QOMA, this method has been modified to align the whole sequences to maximize the score of MSA. Moreover, in order to further improve the accuracy of the method, we estimate the similarity of any pair of input sequences by using their percent identity, and based on this measure, we choose different substitution matrices during the progressive alignment. In addition, we have included horizontal information to alignment by adjusting the weights of amino acid residues based on their neighboring residues. The experimental results have been tested on popular benchmark of global protein sequences BAliBASE 3.0 and local protein sequences IRMBASE 2.0. The results of the proposed approach outperform the original method in QOMA in terms of sum-of-pair score and column score by up to 14% and 7% respectively.

  11. Protein ordered sequences are formed by random joining of amino acids in protein 0(th)-order structure, followed by evolutionary process.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Only random processes should occur on the primitive Earth. In contrast, many ordered sequences are synthesized according to genetic information on the present Earth. In this communication, I have proposed an idea that protein 0(th)-order structures or specific amino acid compositions would mediate the transfer from random process to formation of ordered sequences, after formation of double-stranded genes.

  12. Integrated and sequence-ordered BAC- and YAC-based physical maps for the rat genome.

    PubMed

    Krzywinski, Martin; Wallis, John; Gösele, Claudia; Bosdet, Ian; Chiu, Readman; Graves, Tina; Hummel, Oliver; Layman, Dan; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Zhu, Baoli; Albracht, Derek; Asano, Jennifer; Barber, Sarah; Brown-John, Mabel; Chan, Susanna; Chand, Steve; Cloutier, Alison; Davito, Jonathon; Fjell, Chris; Gaige, Tony; Ganten, Detlev; Girn, Noreen; Guggenheimer, Kurtis; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kreitler, Thomas; Leach, Stephen; Lee, Darlene; Lehrach, Hans; Mayo, Michael; Mead, Kelly; Olson, Teika; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Shin, Heesun; Tänzer, Simone; Thompson, Jason; Tsai, Miranda; Walker, Jason; Yang, George; Sekhon, Mandeep; Hillier, LaDeana; Zimdahl, Heike; Marziali, Andre; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhao, Shaying; Siddiqui, Asim; de Jong, Pieter J; Warren, Wes; Mardis, Elaine; McPherson, John D; Wilson, Richard; Hübner, Norbert; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline

    2004-04-01

    As part of the effort to sequence the genome of Rattus norvegicus, we constructed a physical map comprised of fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the CHORI-230 BAC library. These BAC clones provide approximately 13-fold redundant coverage of the genome and have been assembled into 376 fingerprint contigs. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) map was also constructed and aligned with the BAC map via fingerprinted BAC and P1 artificial chromosome clones (PACs) sharing interspersed repetitive sequence markers with the YAC-based physical map. We have annotated 95% of the fingerprint map clones in contigs with coordinates on the version 3.1 rat genome sequence assembly, using BAC-end sequences and in silico mapping methods. These coordinates have allowed anchoring 358 of the 376 fingerprint map contigs onto the sequence assembly. Of these, 324 contigs are anchored to rat genome sequences localized to chromosomes, and 34 contigs are anchored to unlocalized portions of the rat sequence assembly. The remaining 18 contigs, containing 54 clones, still require placement. The fingerprint map is a high-resolution integrative data resource that provides genome-ordered associations among BAC, YAC, and PAC clones and the assembled sequence of the rat genome.

  13. Not all order memory is equal: Test demands reveal dissociations in memory for sequence information.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Tanya R; MacLeod, Colin M

    2017-02-01

    Remembering the order of a sequence of events is a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Indeed, a number of formal models represent temporal context as part of the memory system, and memory for order has been researched extensively. Yet, the nature of the code(s) underlying sequence memory is still relatively unknown. Across 4 experiments that manipulated encoding task, we found evidence for 3 dissociable facets of order memory. Experiment 1 introduced a test requiring a judgment of which of 2 alternatives had immediately followed a word during encoding. This measure revealed better retention of interitem associations following relational encoding (silent reading) than relatively item-specific encoding (judging referent size), a pattern consistent with that observed in previous research using order reconstruction tests. In sharp contrast, Experiment 2 demonstrated the reverse pattern: Memory for the studied order of 2 sequentially presented items was actually better following item-specific encoding than following relational encoding. Experiment 3 reproduced this dissociation in a single experiment using both tests. Experiment 4 extended these findings by further dissociating the roles of relational encoding and item strength in the 2 tests. Taken together, these results indicate that memory for event sequence is influenced by (a) interitem associations, (b) the emphasized directionality of an association, and (c) an item's strength independent of other items. Memory for order is more complicated than has been portrayed in theories of memory and its nuances should be carefully considered when designing tests and models of temporal and relational memory. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Comparison of the large scale structure of the ISM in the 2nd and 3rd Galactic Quadrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, V.; Kiss, Cs.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we are questing the large scale structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) using IRAS/ISSA 60 and 100 mum maps in the 3rd Galactic Quadrant (GQ). Here we identified 41 loop-like intensity enhancements and analysed their far-infrared (FIR) properties. We found major differences in the distribution and characteristics of these features when comparing the results of the 2nd and the 3rd GQs. This discrepancy can be satisfactorily explained by basic differences of the structure of the ISM in these two Galactic Quadrants.

  15. [Level of smoking of 3rd and 4th grade students studying health and related factors: follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Göktalay, Tuğba; Cengiz Özyurt, Beyhan; Sakar Coşkun, Ayşin; Celik, Pinar

    2011-01-01

    The levels of smoking of 1st and 2nd year students at Faculty of Medicine and Manisa School of Health at Celal Bayar University were investigated in 2006-2007. This study is carried out in order to see if there is a change in the same students' level of smoking while they are in 3rd and 4th year. In addition, the study aimed to examine the factors affecting the level of use and attitudes towards the law effectuated in July 19, 2009. This is a follow-up study with 80.42% return rate. A 26-item structured questionnaire was administered. The participants filled out the questionnaires under supervision of the researchers in their classrooms. The University Institutional Review Board approved the study. The total of participants (263) of the follow-up study included 189 female and 74 male. The rate of experimenting with smoking was 49% with the mean age of 15.7 (SD= 4.01 years). The mean age of experimenting with smoking was the earliest on male students studying at faculty of medicine. The level of smoking was found to be the most on females, studying at faculty of medicine and staying at the dormitory, with smoking parents (p< 0.05). The most important reason to begin smoking was curiosity (55.2%) while bad breath and yellowing of teeth were the reasons to quit (91.7%). 83.3% of the students thought that the law will be effective on quit smoking. The level of both experimenting and use of smoking has been increased over time. It is suggested that medical students' awareness about the danger of smoking should be raised at earlier grades. In addition, lectures should be offered to students at School of Health and they should be encouraged to unite in order to fight with smoking.

  16. The Power of PreK-3rd: How a Small Foundation Helped Push Washington State to the Forefront of the PreK-3rd Movement. FCD Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The New School Foundation was not born from a commission, legislative mandate, research project, think tank, or even the mind of a leading education scholar. One of Washington state's pioneering PreK-3rd initiatives began as the brainchild of a wealthy Seattle businessman, Stuart Sloan, 20 years ago. The New School Foundation and its ideas were…

  17. Two-Stage orders sequencing system for mixed-model assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemczak, M.; Skolud, B.; Krenczyk, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the paper, the authors focus on the NP-hard problem of orders sequencing, formulated similarly to Car Sequencing Problem (CSP). The object of the research is the assembly line in an automotive industry company, on which few different models of products, each in a certain number of versions, are assembled on the shared resources, set in a line. Such production type is usually determined as a mixed-model production, and arose from the necessity of manufacturing customized products on the basis of very specific orders from single clients. The producers are nowadays obliged to provide each client the possibility to determine a huge amount of the features of the product they are willing to buy, as the competition in the automotive market is large. Due to the previously mentioned nature of the problem (NP-hard), in the given time period only satisfactory solutions are sought, as the optimal solution method has not yet been found. Most of the researchers that implemented inaccurate methods (e.g. evolutionary algorithms) to solving sequencing problems dropped the research after testing phase, as they were not able to obtain reproducible results, and met problems while determining the quality of the received solutions. Therefore a new approach to solving the problem, presented in this paper as a sequencing system is being developed. The sequencing system consists of a set of determined rules, implemented into computer environment. The system itself works in two stages. First of them is connected with the determination of a place in the storage buffer to which certain production orders should be sent. In the second stage of functioning, precise sets of sequences are determined and evaluated for certain parts of the storage buffer under certain criteria.

  18. Geysers Characteristics before and after Landslide of June 3-rd, 2007 (Geysers Valley, Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droznin, V. A.; Kiryukhin, A. V.; Muraviev, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1990 cycling characteristics of five geysers (Maly, Bolshoy, Shel, Velican, Troynoy) were contentiously monitoring using automatic telemetric system (V A Drosnin, http://www.ch0103.emsd.iks.ru/ ). The most powerful geyser Velikan erupted steam clouds at 300 m height. 1:20 UTC June 3-rd, 2007 lower basin of the Geysers Valley was in a few minutes buried under 10 mln m3 of mud, debris, and blocks of rocks. Some indications were found, that landslide triggered by steam eruption in the upstream area of Vodopadny creek. As a result of this three famous geysers (Pervenets, Sakharny,Troynoy) located at lower elevations were sealed under 10-30 m thick caprock as well as Vodopadny hot creek, a rock dumb trap Geysernaya river and lifted water into 20 m deep lake, which flooded three famous geysers (Conus, Bolshoy and Maly) terminating their cycling activity. Nevertheless Bolshoy and Maly activity continues in a form of discharge of water circulated in the former geysers channels and a clear plume at a lake surface above exits observed. Shortly after landslide continuous monitoring of the cycling characteristics of the upper basin geysers, including Velikan and lake level, accomplished by temperature loggers - restarted. There are some indications time periods of the geysers cycling decrease.

  19. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Webb, Jeff; Ding, Jun

    2015-05-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2015) was held at the Sheraton Kuta, Bali, Indonesia, from 28 - 29 March 2015. The MOIME 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. MOIME 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that relate to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program, as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 99 papers and after rigorous review, 24 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There were four parallel sessions and two invited speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of MOIME 2015. The Editors of the MOIME 2015 Proceedings Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Jeff Webb, Ph.D Prof. Jun DING, Ph.D

  20. Visual, Critical, and Scientific Thinking Dispositions in a 3rd Grade Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, Stacy

    Many American students leave school without the required 21st century critical thinking skills. This qualitative case study, based on the theoretical concepts of Facione, Arheim, and Vygotsky, explored the development of thinking dispositions through the arts in science on the development of scientific thinking skills when used as a conceptual thinking routine in a rural 3rd grade classroom. Research questions examined the disposition to think critically through the arts in science and focused on the perceptions and experiences of 25 students with the Visual Thinking Strategy (VTS) process. Data were collected from classroom observations (n = 10), student interviews (n = 25), teacher interviews ( n = 1), a focus group discussion (n = 3), and artifacts of student work (n = 25); these data included perceptions of VTS, school culture, and classroom characteristics. An inductive analysis of qualitative data resulted in several emergent themes regarding disposition development and students generating questions while increasing affective motivation. The most prevalent dispositions were open-mindedness, the truth-seeking disposition, the analytical disposition, and the systematicity disposition. The findings about the teachers indicated that VTS questions in science supported "gradual release of responsibility", the internalization of process skills and vocabulary, and argumentation. This case study offers descriptive research that links visual arts inquiry and the development of critical thinking dispositions in science at the elementary level. A science curriculum could be developed, that emphasizes the development of thinking dispositions through the arts in science, which in turn, could impact the professional development of teachers and learning outcomes for students.

  1. The 3rd international intercomparison on EPR tooth dosimetry: Part 1, general analysis.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Debuyst, R; Fattibene, P; Meghzifene, A; Onori, S; Bayankin, S N; Blackwell, B; Brik, A; Bugay, A; Chumak, V; Ciesielski, B; Hoshi, M; Imata, H; Ivannikov, A; Ivanov, D; Junczewska, M; Miyazawa, C; Pass, B; Penkowski, M; Pivovarov, S; Romanyukha, A; Romanyukha, L; Schauer, D; Scherbina, O; Schultka, K; Shames, A; Sholom, S; Skinner, A; Skvortsov, V; Stepanenko, V; Tielewuhan, E; Toyoda, S; Trompier, F

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the 3rd International Intercomparison on Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Tooth Dosimetry was the evaluation of laboratories performing tooth enamel dosimetry below 300 mGy. Participants had to reconstruct the absorbed dose in tooth enamel from 11 molars, which were cut into two halves. One half of each tooth was irradiated in a 60Co beam to doses in the ranges of 30-100 mGy (5 samples), 100-300 mGy (5 samples), and 300-900 mGy (1 sample). Fourteen international laboratories participated in this intercomparison programme. A first analysis of the results and an overview of the essential features of methods applied in different laboratories are presented. The relative standard deviation of results of all methods was better than 27% for applied doses in the range of 79-704 mGy. In the analysis of the unirradiated tooth halves 8% of the samples were identified as outliers with additional absorbed dose above background dose.

  2. SESAME-A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2010-02-01

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO and modeled on CERN, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is an international research center in construction in Jordan. It will enable world class research by scientists from the region, reversing the brain drain. It will also build bridges between diverse societies, contributing to a culture of peace through international cooperation in science. The centerpiece is a synchrotron light source originating from BESSY I, a gift by Germany. The upgraded machine, a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation Light Source (133m circumference, 26nm-rad emittance and 12 places for insertion devices), will provide light from infra-red to hard X-rays, offering excellent opportunities to train local scientists and attract those working abroad to return. The SESAME Council meets twice each year and presently has nine Members (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Turkey). Members have responsibility for the project and provide the annual operations budget (1.5M US dollars in 2009, expected to rise to about 5M when operation starts in 2012-13). Jordan provided the site, building, and infrastructure. A staff of 20 is installing the 0.8 GeV BESSY I injection system. The facility will have the capacity to serve 30 or more experiments operating simultaneously. See www.sesame.org.jo )

  3. The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics: Global Perspectives, Common Concerns, Worldwide Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastavker, Yevgeniya V.

    2009-03-01

    The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP), held in Seoul, Korea, in October 2008, brought together 300 participants from 57 countries, including a diverse 22-member U.S. Delegation, for a 3-day summit of stimulating discussions, thought-provoking presentations, inspirational posters, and networking. Held under the auspices of the Working Group on Women in Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), this meeting built on the successes of the 1^st (Paris, 2002) and 2^nd (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) Conferences and further clarified the importance of diversifying the field of physics worldwide. Although considerable progress has been made since 2002, it was clear that the global scientific workforce is still under-utilizing a large percentage of the available female talent pool. If human society is to benefit to its fullest from various contributions that the field of physics can offer in addressing global issues of economic crisis, energy, environment, water, health, poverty, and hunger, women of all races and nationalities need to become fully included and engaged in the national and international physical community. To address these and many other issues, the ICWIP unanimously approved a five-part resolution to IUPAP recommending actions to promote the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in physics and related fields.

  4. SESAME, A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, D.; Hasnain, S.S.; Sayers, Z.; Schopper, H.; Winick, H.; Al-Dmour, E.

    2004-05-12

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be a major international research centre in the Middle East and Mediterranean region. On 6th of January 2003, the official foundation of SESAME took place. The facility is located in Allan, Jordan, 30 km North-West of Amman. As of August 2003 the Founding Members are Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine, Turkey and United Arabic Emirates, representing a population of over 300 million. SESAME will be a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 24.6 nm.rad, circumference {approx}125m). About 40% of the circumference is available for insertion devices (average length 2.75m) in 13 straight sections. Beam lines are up to 36m. The site and a building are provided by Jordan. Construction started in August 2003. The scientific program will start with up to 6 beam lines: MAD Protein Crystallography, SAXS and WAXS for polymers and proteins, Powder Diffraction for material science, UV/VUV/SXR Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Photoabsorption Spectroscopy, IR Spectroscopy, and EXAFS.

  5. When should orthostatic blood pressure changes be evaluated in elderly: 1st, 3rd or 5th minute?

    PubMed

    Soysal, Pinar; Aydin, Ali Ekrem; Koc Okudur, Saadet; Isik, Ahmet Turan

    2016-01-01

    Detection of orthostatic hypotension (OH) is very important in geriatric practice, since OH is associated with mortality, ischemic stroke, falls, cognitive failure and depression. It was aimed to determine the most appropriate time for measuring blood pressure in transition from supine to upright position in order to diagnose OH in elderly. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) including Head up Tilt Table (HUT) test was performed in 407 geriatric patients. Orthostatic changes were assessed separately for the 1st, 3rd and 5th minutes (HUT1, HUT3 and HUT5, respectively) taking the data in supine position as the basis. The mean age, recurrent falls, presence of dementia and Parkinson's disease, number of drugs, alpha-blocker and anti-dementia drug use, and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the patients with versus without OH; whereas, albumin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were significantly lower (p<0.05). However, different from HUT3 and HUT5, Charlson Comorbidity Index and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were higher, the use of antidiabetics, antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, opioid and levodopa were more common (p<0.05). Statistical significance of the number of drugs and fasting blood glucose level was prominent in HUT1 as compared to HUT3 (p<0.01, p<0.05). Comparison of the patients that had OH only in HUT1, HUT3or HUT5 revealed no difference in terms of CGA parameters. These results suggests that orthostatic blood pressure changes determined at the 1st minute might be more important for geriatric practice. Moreover, 1st minute measurement might be more convenient in the elderly as it requires shorter time in practice.

  6. Test Review: C. Keith Conners "Conners 3rd Edition" Toronto, Ontario, Canada--Multi-Health Systems, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Grace S.; Thomas, Hillary M.

    2010-01-01

    "Conners 3rd Edition" is the most updated version of a series of measures for assessing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and common comorbid problems/disorders in children and adolescents ranging from 6 to 18 years of age. Related problems that the test helps assess include executive dysfunction, learning problems, aggression, and…

  7. 3rd Annual PIALA Conference Saipan--Collecting, Preserving & Sharing Information in Micronesia. Conference Proceedings. October 13-15, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Margaret, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This PIALA 1993 Proceedings contains many of the papers presented at the 3rd annual conference of the Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives. This publication is the first time papers from this Micronesian regional library and archives conference have ever been published. The conference addressed various topics of interest to…

  8. The Lived Experiences of 3rd Generation and beyond U.S.-Born Mexican Heritage College Students: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychosocial and identity challenges of 3rd generation and beyond U.S.-born (3GAB-USB) Mexican heritage college students. Alvarez (1973) has written about the psychosocial impact "hybridity" can have on a U.S.- born (USB) Mexican individual who incorporates two distinct cultures (American and…

  9. Exemplary Institute. Proceedings of the Annual Conference (3rd, Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 22-24, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Scholarship Fund, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    This proceedings contains presentations and workshop summaries from the 3rd Annual Exemplary Institute for educators of Native American students. Presentations include: "Quality in Learning: Romancing the Journey" (quality management at Mount Edgecumbe High School, Alaska) (Todd Bergman); "Creating a School-wide Literacy Climate" (Sig Boloz); "How…

  10. Predicting 3rd Grade and 10th Grade FCAT Success for 2007-08. Research Brief. Volume 0702

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Rubiera, Vilma

    2008-01-01

    For the past few years the Florida School Code has set the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) performance requirements for promotion of 3rd graders and graduation for 10 graders. Grade 3 students who do not score at level 2 or higher on the FCAT SSS Reading must be retained unless exempted for special circumstances. Grade 10 students…

  11. Predicting 3rd Grade and 10th Grade FCAT Success for 2006-07. Research Brief. Volume 0601

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Rubiera, Vilma

    2006-01-01

    For the past few years the Florida School Code has set the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) performance requirements for promotion of 3rd graders and graduation for 10th graders. Grade 3 students who do not score at level 2 or higher on the FCAT SSS Reading must be retained unless exempted for special circumstances. Grade 10 students…

  12. Iowa Acceleration Scale Manual: A Guide for Whole-Grade Acceleration K-8. (3rd Edition, Manual)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assouline, Susan G.; Colangelo, Nicholas; Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann; Forstadt, Leslie; Lipscomb, Jonathon

    2009-01-01

    Feedback from years of nationwide use has resulted in a 3rd Edition of this unique, systematic, and objective guide to considering and implementing academic acceleration. Developed and tested by the Belin-Blank Center at the University of Iowa, the IAS ensures that acceleration decisions are systematic, thoughtful, well reasoned, and defensible.…

  13. Constancy and Variability: Dialogic Literacy Events as Sites for Improvisation in Two 3rd-Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Michelle E.; Santori, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This multisite study investigates dialogic literacy events that revolved around narrative and informational texts in two 3rd-grade classrooms. The authors offer a metaphor of musical improvisation to contemplate dialogic literacy events as part of the repertoire of teaching and learning experiences. In literacy learning, where there is much…

  14. A Program Evaluation of ClassScape Used in 3rd Grade Classes in a Rural County in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Misha Neely

    2012-01-01

    The research study will examine the impact of using the ClassScape program and targeted interventions on 3rd grade reading levels of performance. The conceptual and theoretical framework for the study suggests the need to connect formative, benchmark, and summative assessments in North Carolina. Furthermore, the review of the literature will…

  15. Meeting report on the 3rd International Congress on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) focuses on the earliest stages of human development, and provides a novel paradigm to complement other strategies for lifelong prevention of common chronic health conditions. The 3rd International Congress on DOHaD, held in 2005, retained the most ...

  16. Visual Arts Teaching in Kindergarten through 3rd-Grade Classrooms in the UAE: Teacher Profiles, Perceptions, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buldu, Mehmet; Shaban, Mohamed S.

    2010-01-01

    This study portrayed a picture of kindergarten through 3rd-grade teachers who teach visual arts, their perceptions of the value of visual arts, their visual arts teaching practices, visual arts experiences provided to young learners in school, and major factors and/or influences that affect their teaching of visual arts. The sample for this study…

  17. 3 rd generation 1280 x 720 FPA development status at Raytheon Vision Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. F.; Radford, W. A.; Patten, E. A.; Graham, R. W.; McEwan, T. F.; Vodicka, J. G.; Bornfreund, R. E.; Goetz, P. M.; Venzor, G. M.; Johnson, S. M.; Jensen, J. E.; Nosho, B. Z.; Roth, J. A.

    2006-05-01

    Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) has developed and demonstrated the first-ever 1280 x 720 pixel dual-band MW/LWIR focal plane arrays (FPA) to support 3rd-Generation tactical IR systems under the U.S. Army's Dual-Band FPA Manufacturing (DBFM) program. The MW/LWIR detector arrays are fabricated from MBE-grown HgCdTe triple-layer heterojunction (TLHJ) wafers. The RVS dual-band FPA architecture provides highly simultaneous temporal detection in the MWIR and LWIR bands using time-division multiplexed integration (TDMI) incorporated into the readout integrated circuit (ROIC). The TDMI ROIC incorporates a high degree of integration and output flexibility, and supports both dual-band and single-band full-frame operating modes, as well as high-speed LWIR "window" operation at 480 Hz frame rate. The ROIC is hybridized to a two-color detector array using a single indium interconnect per pixel, which makes it highly producible for 20 μm unit cells and exploits mature fabrication processes currently used to produce single-color FPAs. High-quality 1280 x 720 MW/LWIR FPAs have been fabricated and excellent dual-band imagery produced at 60 Hz frame rate. The 1280 x 720 detector arrays for these FPAs have LWIR cutoff wavelengths >=10.5 μm at 78K. These FPAs have demonstrated high-sensitivity at 78K with MW NETD values < 20 mK and LW NETD values <30 mK with f/3.5 apertures. Pixel operability greater than 99.9% has been achieved in the MW band and greater than 98% in the LW band.

  18. Essential surgery: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    PubMed

    Mock, Charles N; Donkor, Peter; Gawande, Atul; Jamison, Dean T; Kruk, Margaret E; Debas, Haile T

    2015-05-30

    The World Bank will publish the nine volumes of Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition, in 2015-16. Volume 1--Essential Surgery--identifies 44 surgical procedures as essential on the basis that they address substantial needs, are cost effective, and are feasible to implement. This report summarises and critically assesses the volume's five key findings. First, provision of essential surgical procedures would avert about 1·5 million deaths a year, or 6-7% of all avertable deaths in low-income and middle-income countries. Second, essential surgical procedures rank among the most cost effective of all health interventions. The surgical platform of the first-level hospital delivers 28 of the 44 essential procedures, making investment in this platform also highly cost effective. Third, measures to expand access to surgery, such as task sharing, have been shown to be safe and effective while countries make long-term investments in building surgical and anaesthesia workforces. Because emergency procedures constitute 23 of the 28 procedures provided at first-level hospitals, expansion of access requires that such facilities be widely geographically diffused. Fourth, substantial disparities remain in the safety of surgical care, driven by high perioperative mortality rates including anaesthesia-related deaths in low-income and middle-income countries. Feasible measures, such as WHO's Surgical Safety Checklist, have led to improvements in safety and quality. Fifth, the large burden of surgical disorders, cost-effectiveness of essential surgery, and strong public demand for surgical services suggest that universal coverage of essential surgery should be financed early on the path to universal health coverage. We point to estimates that full coverage of the component of universal coverage of essential surgery applicable to first-level hospitals would require just over US$3 billion annually of additional spending and yield a benefit-cost ratio of more than 10:1. It would

  19. A collaborative study to establish the 3rd International Standard for tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Sands, Dawn; Whitton, Colin M; Merton, R Elizabeth; Longstaff, Colin

    2002-08-01

    An international collaborative study was organised to replace the 2nd International Standard (IS) for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The 2nd IS for tPA (86/670) was used to calibrate the replacement Standard, which was selected from two candidate materials included in the collaborative study. Participants were provided with five sets of four samples (A, B, C, D) and asked to use sample A (2nd IS, 86/670, 850 IU/ml) to determine the activity of B (86/624, approximately 850 IU/ml), C and D (coded duplicates of the same material, 98/714 approximately 11,000 IU/ml). A total of 14 laboratories returned results from Europe, USA, Japan and Australia, providing data from 60 independent assays. Four laboratories used a reference method based on a published monograph from the European Pharmacopoeia for Alteplase for Injection, 1998, and the remaining 10 used their own method. Fibrin was used as promoter of tPA activity by 12 out of the 14 laboratories, the remaining two used kits where fibrinogen fragments were the promoter. Data from this collaborative study and the previous study to establish the 2nd IS for tPA show that tPA from melanoma cells and recombinant tPA from CHO cells are both suitable materials as International Standards. It was agreed that sample C, D, recombinant tPA, 98/714, be established as the 3rd International Standard for tPA with a potency of 10,000 IU per ampoule, calculated as the mean value from laboratories using fibrin as a promoter of tPA activity. The standard was established by WHO in November 2000.

  20. Catalysis in the 3rd Dimension: How Organic Molecules May be Formed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Catalysis is often little more than a word to phenomenologically describe the fact that a reaction follows a pat1 that leads to products of an unexpected kind or of unexpected yield. Low activation energy barriers for intermediates are recognized as the most likely cause why a system deviates from the thermodynamic pull towards minimizing its free energy and ends up in a metastable state. Seldom is the mechanism known. This i: particularly true for heterogeneous catalysis under hydrothermal conditions with minerals as catalysts. It is commonly assumed that catalytic action takes place across solid-fluid interfaces and that, on the atomic level, interfaces are just 2-dimensional contacts. This makes it difficult to understand, for instance, the assembly of long-chain carboxylic (fatty) acids. 3y studying single crystals that grew from a melt in the presence of H2O and CO2, we can show: (1) that numerals take up the fluid components into solid solution, (2) that some-thing happens converting them to -educedH and C, (3) that C atoms segregate into dislocations and tie C-C bonds. The products are medium-to-long chain Cn protomolecules, with some C-H attached, pre-assembled in the dislocations. Upon solvent extraction, these proto-molecules turn into carboxylic and dicarboxylic acids. This observation suggests that, in a very elementary step, catalysis under hydrothermal conditions leading to fatty acids involves the pre-assembly of Cn entities in the interface that is not 2-D but extends into the 3rd dimension, with dislocations as synthesis sites.

  1. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg and Evolution Analysis within the Malvales Order

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhan, Di-Feng; Jia, Xian; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp) genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A. sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A. sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A. sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A. sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A. sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A. sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional medicinal

  2. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg and Evolution Analysis within the Malvales Order.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhan, Di-Feng; Jia, Xian; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp) genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A. sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A. sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A. sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A. sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A. sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A. sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional medicinal

  3. Implicit Sequence Learning in Dyslexia: A Within-Sequence Comparison of First- and Higher-Order Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Wenchong; Kelly, Steve W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines implicit sequence learning in adult dyslexics with a focus on comparing sequence transitions with different statistical complexities. Learning of a 12-item deterministic sequence was assessed in 12 dyslexic and 12 non-dyslexic university students. Both groups showed equivalent standard reaction time increments when the…

  4. Application of population sequencing (POPSEQ) for ordering and inputting genotyping-by-sequencing markers in hexaploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies in conjunction with new bioinformatics tools enabled fine-tuning of sequence-based high resolution mapping strategies for complex genomes. Although genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) provides a large number of markers, its application for assoc...

  5. New Materials Directions for the Realization of Ultra-High Performance 3rd Order Non-Linear Optical Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-13

    polymers that exhibited unprecedented values of chiral nonlinearity. Multiscale modeling played a vital role in design of all these structures and...opportunity here to manipulate the sign of n2 at selected wavelengths. 3 Figure 2. Newly synthesized chiral polymers . From left to right: Poly3...synthesized a series of chiral alternating polymers , based on a fluorene- quinoxaline motif with chiral ester side chains (Fig. 2) with much higher

  6. Building monument materials during the 3rd-4rd millennium (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moita, Patricia; Pedro, Jorge; Boaventura, Rui; Mataloto, Rui; Maximo, Jaime; Almeida, Luís; Nogueira, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Dolmens are the most conspicuous remains of the populations of the 4th and first half of 3rd millennia BCE. These tombs are impressive not only for their monumentality, but also because of the socioeconomic investment they represent for those Neolithic communities, namely from the Central-South of Portugal, who built them. Although dolmens have been studied for their funerary content and typologies, an interdisciplinary approach toward the geological characterization and sourcing of stones used in these constructions has not received enough attention from researchers. With MEGAGEO project a multidisciplinary group of geologist and archaeologists intends to assess the relationship between the distribution of dolmens in Central-South Portugal, their source materials, and the geological landscape. GIS will map the information gathered and will be used to analyse these relationships. The selection of the areas, with distinctive geologies (limestone vs granite), will allow to verify if human patterns of behaviour regarding the selection of megaliths are similar or different regionally. Geologically the first target area (Freixo, Alentejo) is dominated by a small intrusion of gabbro mingled/mixed within a granodioritic intrusion both related with variscan orogeny. Granodiorite exhibit several enclaves of igneous and metamorphic nature attesting the interaction between both igneous rocks as well with enclosing gneisses. Despite Alentejo region have a reduced number of outcrops the granodiorite provides rounded to tabular metric blocks. The gabbro is very coarse grained, sometimes with a cumulate texture, and their fracturing and weathering provide very fresh tabular blocks. The five studied dolmens (Quinta do Freixo #1 to #5) are implanted in a large granodioritic intrusion, around the gabbroic rocks, within an area of approximately 9km2. The medium grained granodiorite is ubiquity in all the dolmens slabs and occasionally it can be observed features of mixing and

  7. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-19

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference {approx}133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member

  8. SESAME — A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å°lkü, Dinçer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference ˜133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member countries

  9. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U˝Lkü, Dinçer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference ~133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member countries

  10. ic-cmtp3: 3rd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-04-01

    Competitiveness is one of the most important factors in our lives and it plays a key role in the efficiency both of organizations and societies. The more scientifically advanced and prepared organizations develop more competitive materials with better physical, chemical, and biological properties, and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technological processes. The aims of the 3rd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes (ic-cmtp3), and the 1st International Symposium on Innovative Carbons and Carbon Based Materials (is-icbm1) and the 1st International Symposium on Innovative Construction Materials (is-icm1) organized alongside are the following: —Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of material, biological, environmental and technological sciences; —Exchange information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implementations; —Promote communication and collaboration between the scientists, researchers and engineers of different nations, countries and continents. Among the major fields of interest are advanced and innovative materials with competitive characteristics, including mechanical, physical, chemical, biological, medical and thermal, properties and extreme dynamic strength. Their crystalline, nano - and micro-structures, phase transformations as well as details of their technological processes, tests and measurements are also in the focus of the ic-cmtp3 conference and the is-scbm1 and is-icm1 symposia. Multidisciplinary applications of material science and the technological problems encountered in sectors like ceramics, glasses, thin films, aerospace, automotive and marine industries, electronics, energy, construction materials, medicine, biosciences and environmental sciences are of particular interest. In accordance with the program of the ic-cmtp3 conference and is-icbm1 and is-icm1 symposia we have received more

  11. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayurskii, Dmitrii; Abe, Sumiyoshi; Alexandre Wang, Q.

    2012-11-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS2012) was held between 25-30 August at Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation. This workshop was jointly organized by Kazan Federal University and Institut Supérieur des Matériaux et Mécaniques Avancées (ISMANS), France. The series of SPMCS workshops was created in 2008 with the aim to be an interdisciplinary incubator for the worldwide exchange of innovative ideas and information about the latest results. The first workshop was held at ISMANS, Le Mans (France) in 2008, and the third at Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China) in 2010. At SPMCS2012, we wished to bring together a broad community of researchers from the different branches of the rapidly developing complexity science to discuss the fundamental theoretical challenges (geometry/topology, number theory, statistical physics, dynamical systems, etc) as well as experimental and applied aspects of many practical problems (condensed matter, disordered systems, financial markets, chemistry, biology, geoscience, etc). The program of SPMCS2012 was prepared based on three categories: (i) physical and mathematical studies (quantum mechanics, generalized nonequilibrium thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamics, condensed matter physics, nanoscience); (ii) natural complex systems (physical, geophysical, chemical and biological); (iii) social, economical, political agent systems and man-made complex systems. The conference attracted 64 participants from 10 countries. There were 10 invited lectures, 12 invited talks and 28 regular oral talks in the morning and afternoon sessions. The book of Abstracts is available from the conference website (http://www.ksu.ru/conf/spmcs2012/?id=3). A round table was also held, the topic of which was 'Recent and Anticipated Future Progress in Science of Complexity', discussing a variety of questions and opinions important for the understanding of the concept of

  12. The Effect of Interference on Temporal Order Memory for Random and Fixed Sequences in Nondemented Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolentino, Jerlyn C.; Pirogovsky, Eva; Luu, Trinh; Toner, Chelsea K.; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments tested the effect of temporal interference on order memory for fixed and random sequences in young adults and nondemented older adults. The results demonstrate that temporal order memory for fixed and random sequences is impaired in nondemented older adults, particularly when temporal interference is high. However, temporal order…

  13. Differential contribution of specific working memory components to mathematics achievement in 2nd and 3rd graders.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M L; Salimpoor, V N; Wu, S S; Geary, D C; Menon, V

    2010-04-01

    The contribution of the three core components of working memory (WM) to the development of mathematical skills in young children is poorly understood. The relation between specific WM components and Numerical Operations, which emphasize computation and fact retrieval, and Mathematical Reasoning, which emphasizes verbal problem solving abilities in 48 2nd and 50 3rd graders was assessed using standardized WM and mathematical achievement measures. For 2nd graders, the central executive and phonological components predicted Mathematical Reasoning skills; whereas the visuo-spatial component predicted both Mathematical Reasoning and Numerical Operations skills in 3rd graders. This pattern suggests that the central executive and phonological loop facilitate performance during early stages of mathematical learning whereas visuo-spatial representations play an increasingly important role during later stages. We propose that these changes reflect a shift from prefrontal to parietal cortical functions during mathematical skill acquisition. Implications for learning and individual differences are discussed.

  14. Plant chromatin warms up in Madrid: meeting summary of the 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin 2013, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, José A; Gaudin, Valérie; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin (EWPC) was held on August 2013 in Madrid, Spain. A number of different topics on plant chromatin were presented during the meeting, including new factors mediating Polycomb Group protein function in plants, chromatin-mediated reprogramming in plant developmental transitions, the role of histone variants, and newly identified chromatin remodeling factors. The function of interactions between chromatin and transcription factors in the modulation of gene expression, the role of chromatin dynamics in the control of nuclear processes and the influence of environmental factors on chromatin organization were also reported. In this report, we highlight some of the new insights emerging in this growing area of research, presented at the 3rd EWPC.

  15. Proceedings of the 3rd IDA-CIISS Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities of Common Security and the Business of Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities of Common Security and the Business of Defense Stephen J. Balut, IDA Project Leader Larry D. Welch, IDA David L...3693 Proceedings of the 3rd IDA-CIISS Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities of Common Security and the Business of Defense Stephen J. Balut, IDA...Welch on “ Challenges and Opportunities of Common Security for the United States and China.” Also included are presentations by Senior Colonel Jiang

  16. Does 3rd Age + 3rd World = 3rd Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tout, Ken

    1992-01-01

    Demographic changes, migration, and industrialization are having drastic effects on older adults in developing nations. Local programs such as Pro Vida in Colombia, supported by Help Age International, rely on the support of volunteers to improve the quality of life for elderly people. (SK)

  17. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2015-06-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015), was held at The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali on 31 January - 1 February 2015. The ScieTech 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. ScieTech 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics. As we already know that science and technology have brought tremendous benefits for human civilization. People are becoming healthier, wealthier, better educated, more peaceful, increasingly connected, and living longer. Of course, science and technology provide many answers to global challenges, but we will face more complex problems in the next decade due to increasing world population, limitation of energy, and climate change. Therefore, researchers should be more active in conducting research that enables collaboration between one and the others. Interdisciplinary cooperation is absolutely necessary in order to create a smart system for solving the global problems. We need a global and general long-term view of the future with long-range goals for solving complex problems in next decade. Therefore the conference was held to be a forum for researchers from different disciplines to start collaborating and conducting research that provides a solution to the global issues. The theme of ScieTech 2015 was ''The interdisciplinary Application between Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics to enhance the Quality of Life''. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting conference program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 197 papers and after rigorous review, 59 papers were accepted. The participants came from 19

  18. Knowledge and institutional requirements to promote land degradation neutrality in drylands - An analysis of the outcomes of the 3rd UNCCD scientific conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar-Schuster, Mariam; Safriel, Uriel; Abraham, Elena; de Vente, Joris; Essahli, Wafa; Escadafal, Richard; Stringer, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    Achieving land degradation neutrality (LDN) through sustainable land management (SLM) targets the maintenance or restoration of the productivity of land, and therefore has to include decision-makers, knowledge generators and knowledge holders at the different relevant geographic scales. In order to enhance the implementation of the Convention, the Conference of the Parties (COP) of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification therefore decided that each future session of its Committee on Science and Technology (CST) would be organized in a predominantly scientific and technical conference-style format. This contribution will outline the major outcomes of UNCCD's 3rd scientific conference that will be held in Cancún, Mexico, from 9 to 12 March 2015, on addressing desertification, land degradation and drought issues (DLDD) for poverty reduction and sustainable development. The conference follows an exceptional new round table conference format that will allow the various stakeholders to discuss scientific as well as the contribution of traditional knowledge and practices in combating land degradation. This format should provide two-way communication and enable deeper insight into the availability and contribution of all forms of knowledge for achieving LDN through the assessment of: • the vulnerability of lands to DLDD and climate change and the adaptive capacities of socio-ecosystems; • best examples of adapted, knowledge-based practices and technologies; • monitoring and assessment methods to evaluate the effectiveness of adaptation practices and technologies. The outcomes of UNCCD's 3rd scientific conference will serve as a basis for discussing: • contributions of science to diagnose the status of land; • research gaps that need to be addressed to achieve LDN for poverty reduction; • additional institutional requirements to optimally bridge knowledge generation, knowledge maintenance and knowledge implementation at the science

  19. PREFACE: 3rd Workshop on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductors (TMCSIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califano, Marco; Migliorato, Max; Probert, Matt

    2012-05-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 3rd International Conference on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductor materials and nanostructures. The conference was held at the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK on 18-20 January 2012. The previous conferences in this series took place in 2010 at St William's College, York and in 2008 at the University of Manchester, UK. The development of high-speed computer architectures is finally allowing the routine use of accurate methods for calculating the structural, thermodynamic, vibrational, optical and electronic properties of semiconductors and their hetero- and nano-structures. The scope of this conference embraces modelling, theory and the use of sophisticated computational tools in semiconductor science and technology, where there is substantial potential for time-saving in R&D. Theoretical approaches represented in this meeting included: Density Functional Theory, Tight Binding, Semiempirical Pseudopotential Methods, Effective Mass Models, Empirical Potential Methods and Multiscale Approaches. Topics included, but were not limited to: Optical and Transport Properties of Quantum Nanostructures including Colloids and Nanotubes, Plasmonics, Magnetic Semiconductors, Graphene, Lasers, Photonic Structures, Photovoltaic and Electronic Devices. This workshop ran for three days, with the objective of bringing together UK and international leading experts in the theoretical modelling of Group IV, III-V and II-VI semiconductors, as well as students, postdocs and early-career researchers. The first day focused on providing an introduction and overview of this vast field, aimed particularly at students, with several lectures given by recognised experts in various theoretical approaches. The following two days showcased some of the best theoretical research carried out in the UK in this field, with several

  20. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on Materials Analysis and Processing in Magnetic Fields (MAP3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, Yoshio; Hirota, Noriyuki; Horii, Shigeru; Ando, Tsutomu

    2009-07-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on Materials Analysis and Processing in Materials Fields (MAP3) was held on 14-16 May 2008 at the University of Tokyo, Japan. The first was held in March 2004 at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, USA. Two years later the second took place in Grenoble, France. MAP3 was held at The University of Tokyo International Symposium, and jointly with MANA Workshop on Materials Processing by External Stimulation, and JSPS CORE Program of Construction of the World Center on Electromagnetic Processing of Materials. At the end of MAP3 it was decided that the next MAP4 will be held in Atlanta, USA in 2010. Processing in magnetic fields is a rapidly expanding research area with a wide range of promising applications in materials science. MAP3 focused on the magnetic field interactions involved in the study and processing of materials in all disciplines ranging from physics to chemistry and biology: Magnetic field effects on chemical, physical, and biological phenomena Magnetic field effects on electrochemical phenomena Magnetic field effects on thermodynamic phenomena Magnetic field effects on hydrodynamic phenomena Magnetic field effects on crystal growth Magnetic processing of materials Diamagnetic levitation Magneto-Archimedes effect Spin chemistry Application of magnetic fields to analytical chemistry Magnetic orientation Control of structure by magnetic fields Magnetic separation and purification Magnetic field-induced phase transitions Materials properties in high magnetic fields Development of NMR and MRI Medical application of magnetic fields Novel magnetic phenomena Physical property measurement by Magnetic fields High magnetic field generation> MAP3 consisted of 84 presentations including 16 invited talks. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceeding of MAP3 with 34 papers that provide a scientific record of the topics covered by the conference with the special topics (13 papers) in

  1. Simulations of ordering and sequence reconstruction of random DNA clones hybridized with a small number of oligomeric probes

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, I.; Drmanac, R.

    1992-12-01

    The sequencing by hybridization (SBH) method has been developed for assaying millions of 0.5- to 2-kb-tong clones. This opens up an efficient way for defining the order of short clones and creating a physical map at 100-bp resolution. Moreover, complete sequences can be obtained using a modest number (about 3000) of probes if hybridization and gel sequence data from overlapped or similar sequences are used. In light of these possibilities, various heuristic algorithms have been developed and tested in simulation experiments. This approach can influence the interpretation of the intuitively obvious term, ``known sequence.``

  2. Third-order Middle Miocene-Early Pliocene depositional sequences in the prograding delta complex of the Pannonian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vakarcs, G.; Vail, P.R.; Tari, G.; Pogácsás, Gy.; Mattick, R.E.; Szabo, A.

    1994-01-01

    Few studies exist in the geologic literature that show the distribution of seismic facies and depositional sequences within a lacustrine basin. The Pannonian Basin of Central Europe offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the influence of the eustatic signal on lacustrine deposition. Seismic stratigraphie and sedimentological studies indicate that the Middle Miocene-Early Pliocene infill of the transtensional Pannonian Basin was formed by large delta systems. Systematic sequence stratigraphie analysis of 6000 km of reflection seismic data and more than 100 hydrocarbon exploration wells in Hungary allowed the identification of twelve third-order sequence boundaries in the late Neogene sedimentary fill. This number of depositional sequences corresponds to that of the published global eustatic curve for this time period. Furthermore, based on magnetostratigraphic and radiometric data, the ages of these depositional sequences can be tentatively correlated with the global eustatic curve. The Pannonian Basin became isolated from the world sea at the Sarmatian/Pannonian (11.5 Ma) boundary and formed a large lake. The stratal patterns and sedimentary facies of individual systems tracts within the lacustrine sequences display the same characteristics as marine depositional sequences. The relatively low rate of thermal subsidence and the high rate of sediment supply resulted in a good sequence resolution. Within the third-order sequences higher-order sequences can be recognized with an average duration of about 0.1-0.5 Ma. ?? 1994.

  3. Higher order asymptotics for negative binomial regression inferences from RNA-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Di, Yanming; Emerson, Sarah C; Schafer, Daniel W; Kimbrel, Jeffrey A; Chang, Jeff H

    2013-03-26

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is the current method of choice for characterizing transcriptomes and quantifying gene expression changes. This next generation sequencing-based method provides unprecedented depth and resolution. The negative binomial (NB) probability distribution has been shown to be a useful model for frequencies of mapped RNA-Seq reads and consequently provides a basis for statistical analysis of gene expression. Negative binomial exact tests are available for two-group comparisons but do not extend to negative binomial regression analysis, which is important for examining gene expression as a function of explanatory variables and for adjusted group comparisons accounting for other factors. We address the adequacy of available large-sample tests for the small sample sizes typically available from RNA-Seq studies and consider a higher-order asymptotic (HOA) adjustment to likelihood ratio tests. We demonstrate that 1) the HOA-adjusted likelihood ratio test is practically indistinguishable from the exact test in situations where the exact test is available, 2) the type I error of the HOA test matches the nominal specification in regression settings we examined via simulation, and 3) the power of the likelihood ratio test does not appear to be affected by the HOA adjustment. This work helps clarify the accuracy of the unadjusted likelihood ratio test and the degree of improvement available with the HOA adjustment. Furthermore, the HOA test may be preferable even when the exact test is available because it does not require ad hoc library size adjustments.

  4. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2013 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 22 May 2013, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational

  5. Assessment of human exposure to 3rd generation cephalosporin resistant E. coli (CREC) through consumption of broiler meat in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, P; Persoons, D; Uyttendaele, M; Butaye, P; De Zutter, L; Dierick, K; Herman, L; Imberechts, H; Van Huffel, X; Dewulf, J

    2012-09-17

    Acquired resistance of Escherichia coli to 3rd generation cephalosporin antimicrobials is a relevant issue in intensive broiler farming. In Belgium, about 35% of the E. coli strains isolated from live broilers are resistant to 3rd generation cephalosporins while over 60% of the broilers are found to be carrier of these 3rd generation cephalosporin resistant E. coli (CREC) after selective isolation. A model aimed at estimating the exposure of the consumer to CREC by consumption of broiler meat was elaborated. This model consists of different modules that simulate the farm to fork chain starting from primary production, over slaughter, processing and distribution to storage, preparation and consumption of broiler meat. Input data were obtained from the Belgian Food Safety agencies' annual monitoring plan and results from dedicated research programs or surveys. The outcome of the model using the available baseline data estimates that the probability of exposure to 1000 colony forming units (cfu) of CREC or more during consumption of a meal containing chicken meat is ca. 1.5%, the majority of exposure being caused by cross contamination in the kitchen. The proportion of CREC (within the total number of E. coli) at primary production and the overall contamination of broiler carcasses or broiler parts with E. coli are dominant factors in the consumer exposure to CREC. The risk of this exposure for human health cannot be estimated at this stage given a lack of understanding of the factors influencing the transfer of cephalosporin antimicrobial resistance genes from these E. coli to the human intestinal bacteria and data on the further consequences of the presence of CREC on human health.

  6. 3rd Quarter Transportation Report FY2015: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Louis B.

    2015-07-01

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 3rd quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments.

  7. A 3rd Generation Advanced High-Strength Steel (AHSS) Produced by Dual Stabilization Heat Treatment (DSHT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hao; Michal, Gary M.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2013-10-01

    A 3rd generation advanced high-strength steel containing, in wt pct, 0.3 C, 4.0 Mn, 1.5 Al, 2.1 Si, and 0.5 Cr has been produced using a dual stabilization heat treatment—a five stage thermal processing schedule compatible with continuous galvanized steel production. In excess of 30 vol pct retained austenite containing at least 0.80 wt pct C was achieved with this alloy, which had tensile strengths up to 1650 MPa and tensile elongations around 20 pct.

  8. Tunnelling of the 3rd kind: A test of the effective non-locality of quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Simon A.; Gies, Holger; Jaeckel, Joerg; Wallace, Chris J.

    2013-03-01

    Integrating out virtual quantum fluctuations in an originally local quantum field theory results in an effective theory which is non-local. In this letter we argue that tunnelling of the 3rd kind —where particles traverse a barrier by splitting into a pair of virtual particles which recombine only after a finite distance— provides a direct test of this non-locality. We sketch a quantum-optical setup to test this effect, and investigate observable effects in a simple toy model.

  9. Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Conference on Aerospace Computational Control, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Douglas E. (Editor); Man, Guy K. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the conference proceedings contain papers and discussions in the following topical areas: Parallel processing; Emerging integrated capabilities; Low order controllers; Real time simulation; Multibody component representation; User environment; and Distributed parameter techniques.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 3rd Quarter FY2014

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-09-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other non-reportable issues identified at INL from July 2013 through June 2014.

  11. Some new spaces of lacunary f-statistical A-convergent sequences of order α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Ekrem; Borgohain, Stuti

    2015-09-01

    We study the concept of density for sets of natural numbers in some spaces of lacunary A-convergent sequences. Also we investigate the relation between the ordinary convergence and module statistical convergence for every unbounded modulus function. Morever we also study some results on the spaces of lacunary f-statistically A-convergent sequences with respect to some Musielak-Orlicz function.

  12. Utilization of deletion bins to anchor and order sequences along the wheat 7B chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has a large, complex and highly repetitive genome which is challenging to assemble into high quality pseudo-chromosomes. As part of the international effort to sequence the hexaploid bread wheat genome by the international wheat genome sequencing consortium (IWGSC)...

  13. Defense Attache Saigon: RVNAF Quarterly Assessment, 3rd Quarter FY74.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    AG 7 78071 11 Classif ed by DAO/Sj lon 1 Exempt from General/Declassi- , 1, T ficati n Schedule Executive Order 11652, Exemp ion Cate- gory...Reserve 1-5Air Defense .* 1-6 Enemy Threat and Intentions.... " by Region 1-7[Intentions 1-21 CHAPTER 2 - FRIENDLY SITUATIO. Milit t Region 1 2-1 3...8217 Military Region 2 2-2 i~ t Military Region 3 2-6 5 Military Region 4 ,, 2-7 6. Summary/Conclusions 2-10 CHAPTR 3 RVNAF INTELLI-_G E :’’E CAPABILITY’’. 1

  14. The origin of anomalous 3rd neighbor exchange in 2D triangular magnets (NiGa2S4 and others)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Igor

    2008-03-01

    2D magnetic materials with triangular lattices have been attracting much interest. Among them one finds the parent compound of an exotic superconductor, NaxCoO2.yH2O, A-type antiferromagnets like NaNiO2, in-plane antiferromagnetism (LiCrO2), spin-liquid type materials (NiGa2S4), charge-order (AgNiO2). The main structural motif in all of them is the AB2 plane, where A is a transition metal and B is oxygen or sulfur. Experiments and calculations inevitably find anomalously strong 3rd neighbor exchange coupling in all these triangular planes, despite different band fillings and different magnetic ground states. I will explain why this happens, why this effect is so universal, and why it can be understood entirely on a one-electron level. I will use as an example NiGa2S4, with a reference to NaxCoO2 as well.

  15. Use of 2nd and 3rd Level Correlation Analysis for Studying Degradation in Polycrystalline Thin-Film Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S.; del Cueto, J. A.; Demtsu, S. H.; Bansal, S.

    2011-03-01

    The correlation of stress-induced changes in the performance of laboratory-made CdTe solar cells with various 2nd and 3rd level metrics is discussed. The overall behavior of aggregated data showing how cell efficiency changes as a function of open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current density (Jsc), and fill factor (FF) is explained using a two-diode, PSpice model in which degradation is simulated by systematically changing model parameters. FF shows the highest correlation with performance during stress, and is subsequently shown to be most affected by shunt resistance, recombination and in some cases voltage-dependent collection. Large decreases in Jsc as well as increasing rates of Voc degradation are related to voltage-dependent collection effects and catastrophic shunting respectively. Large decreases in Voc in the absence of catastrophic shunting are attributed to increased recombination. The relevance of capacitance-derived data correlated with both Voc and FF is discussed.

  16. THE 3rd SCHIZOPHRENIA INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SOCIETY CONFERENCE, 14-18 APRIL 2012, FLORENCE, ITALY: SUMMARIES OF ORAL SESSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Abbs, Brandon; Achalia, Rashmin M; Adelufosi, Adegoke O; Aktener, Ahmet Yiğit; Beveridge, Natalie J; Bhakta, Savita G; Blackman, Rachael K; Bora, Emre; Byun, MS; Cabanis, Maurice; Carrion, Ricardo; Castellani, Christina A; Chow, Tze Jen; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Gomes, Felipe V; Haut, Kristen; Hori, Hiroaki; Kantrowitz, Joshua T; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Lee, Frankie HF; Lin, Ashleigh; Palaniyappan, Lena; Quan, Meina; Rubio, Maria D; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Sahoo, Saddichha; Strauss, Gregory P; Szczepankiewicz, Aleksandra; Thompson, Andrew D; Trotta, Antonella; Tully, Laura M; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Velthorst, Eva; Young, Jared W; O’Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2013-01-01

    The 3rd Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference was held in Florence, Italy, April 14-18, 2012.and this year had as its emphasis, “The Globalization of Research”. Student travel awardees served as rapporteurs for each oral session and focused their summaries on the most significant findings that emerged and the discussions that followed. The following report is a composite of these summaries. We hope that it will provide an overview for those who were present, but could not participate in all sessions, and those who did not have the opportunity to attend, but who would be interested in an update on current investigations ongoing in the field of schizophrenia research. PMID:22910407

  17. 3rd Tech DeltaSphere-3000 Laser 3D Scene Digitizer infrared laser scanner hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-02-01

    A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for the 3rd Tech model DeltaSphere-3000{reg_sign} Laser 3D Scene Digitizer, infrared laser scanner model based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers. The portable scanner system is used in the Robotic Manufacturing Science and Engineering Laboratory (RMSEL). This scanning system had been proposed to be a demonstrator for a new application. The manufacture lists the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) as less than 2 meters. It was necessary that SNL validate this NOHD prior to its use as a demonstrator involving the general public. A formal laser hazard analysis is presented for the typical mode of operation for the current configuration as well as a possible modified mode and alternative configuration.

  18. Impact of order of movement on nerve strain and longitudinal excursion: a biomechanical study with implications for neurodynamic test sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nee, Robert J; Yang, Chich-Haung; Liang, Chung-Chao; Tseng, Guo-Fang; Coppieters, Michel W

    2010-08-01

    It is assumed that strain in a nerve segment at the end of a neurodynamic test will be greatest if the joint nearest that nerve segment is moved first in the neurodynamic test sequence. To test this assumption, the main movements of the median nerve biased neurodynamic test were applied in three different sequences to seven fresh-frozen human cadavers. Strain and longitudinal excursion were measured in the median nerve at the distal forearm. Strain and relative position of the nerve at the end of a test did not differ between sequences. The nerve was subjected to higher levels of strain for a longer duration during the sequence where wrist extension occurred first. The pattern of excursion was different for each sequence. The results highlight that order of movement does not affect strain or relative position of the nerve at the end of a test when joints are moved through comparable ranges of motion. When used clinically, different neurodynamic sequences may still change the mechanical load applied to a nerve segment. Changes in load may occur because certain sequences apply increased levels of strain to the nerve for a longer time period, or because sequences differ in ranges of joint motions.

  19. Tachyon search speeds up retrieval of similar sequences by several orders of magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Joshua; Kuchibhatla, Durga; Sirota, Fernanda L.; Sherman, Westley A.; Gattermayer, Tobias; Kwoh, Chia Yee; Eisenhaber, Frank; Schneider, Georg; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The usage of current sequence search tools becomes increasingly slower as databases of protein sequences continue to grow exponentially. Tachyon, a new algorithm that identifies closely related protein sequences ~200 times faster than standard BLAST, circumvents this limitation with a reduced database and oligopeptide matching heuristic. Availability and implementation: The tool is publicly accessible as a webserver at http://tachyon.bii.a-star.edu.sg and can also be accessed programmatically through SOAP. Contact: sebastianms@bii.a-star.edu.sg Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at the Bioinformatics online. PMID:22531216

  20. [Key events from the 3rd Francophone Congress on Digestive and Hepatobiliary Surgery].

    PubMed

    François, Eric; Adam, René; Boudjema, Karim

    2008-05-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer in Europe and the third cause of cancer death in the United States. Every year in France, 36000 new cases are diagnosed, 50% of them with visceral metastases. Among these metastasis patients, 70% exhibit liver metastasis exclusively at time of diagnosis. In most patients, liver metastases are non resecables with chemotherapy offering poor long term survival. Surgery is the only curative treatment. Among patients with liver metastases, 10 to 20% are resecable with 40% of them surviving at 5 years. The aim of chemotherapy intensification schedules is to allow resection in 15 to 30% of initially non resecable metastatic patients and consequently offering some long term survivals. Regarding colon cancer liver metastases therapeutic strategy, confrontation between oncologists and surgeons is essential in order to give the opportunity to a significant number of metastatic patients to acces to cure.

  1. Early acute antibody-mediated rejection of a negative flow crossmatch 3rd kidney transplant with exclusive disparity at HLA-DP.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M; Baum, Caitlin E; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-08-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA.

  2. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a 3rd Generation Addressable CMOS Piezoresistive Stress Sensing Test Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.

    1999-04-13

    Piezoresistive stress sensing chips have been used extensively for measurement of assembly related die surface stresses. Although many experiments can be performed with resistive structures which are directly bonded, for extensive stress mapping it is necessary to have a large number of sensor cells which can be addressed using CMOS logic circuitry. Our previous test chip, the ATC04, has 100 cells, each approximately 0.012 in. on a side, on a chip with a side dimension of 0.45 in. When a cell resistor is addressed, it is connected to a four terminal measurement bus through CMOS transmission gates. In theory, the gate resistances do not affect the measurement. In practice, there may be subtle effects which appear when very high accuracy is required. At high temperatures, gate leakage can increase to a point at which the resistor measurement becomes inaccurate. For ATC04 this occurred at or above 50 C. Here, we report on the first measurements obtained with a new prototype test chip, the ATC06. This prototype was fabricated in a 0.5 micron feature size silicided CMOS process using the MOSIS prototyping facility. The cell size was approximately 0.004 in. on a side. In order to achieve piezoresistive behavior for the implanted resistors it was necessary to employ a non-standard silicide ''blocking'' process. The stress sensitivity of both implanted and polysilicon blocked resistors is discussed. Using a new design strategy for the CMOS logic, it was possible to achieve a design in which only 5 signals had to be routed to a cell for addressing vs. 9 for ATC04. With our new design, the resistor under test is more effectively electrically isolated from other resistors on the chip, thereby improving high temperature performance. We present data showing operation up to 140 C.

  3. Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; Lewis, Louise A

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplast sequence data are widely used to infer phylogenies of plants and algae. With the increasing availability of complete chloroplast genome sequences, the opportunity arises to resolve ancient divergences that were heretofore problematic. On the flip side, properly analyzing large multi-gene data sets can be a major challenge, as these data may be riddled with systematic biases and conflicting signals. Our study contributes new data from nine complete and four fragmentary chloroplast genome sequences across the green algal order Sphaeropleales. Our phylogenetic analyses of a 56-gene data set show that analyzing these data on a nucleotide level yields a well-supported phylogeny - yet one that is quite different from a corresponding amino acid analysis. We offer some possible explanations for this conflict through a range of analyses of modified data sets. In addition, we characterize the newly sequenced genomes in terms of their structure and content, thereby further contributing to the knowledge of chloroplast genome evolution.

  4. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium on Laser Ultrasonics and Advanced Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    Based on the use of laser as a coherent and intense light source, the photo-acoustics originated from the discovery made by Alexander Graham Bell was extended to laser-ultrasonics (LU), and it has been applied to wide area of ultrasonics, optics, material characterization and nondestructive inspection. In 1996, a research group for LU was started in the Japanese Society for Nondestructive Inspection (JSNDI), and researches on LU and related topics such as noncontact measurements and elastic wave theories were discussed. Similar activities were pursued also in North America and in Europe. The international symposium on LU was started in Montreal, Canada in 2008 by Jean Pierre Monchalin in order to offer a forum for involved with basic researches and industrial applications of LU. In the second symposium in Bordeaux, France nearly 120 papers were presented. It is our honor to have organized the third symposium, LU2013 on 25-28 June in Yokohama, Japan. The articles published here provide a sample of achievements presented there. In LU2013, we focused on the laser generation and/or detection of acoustic waves, application to nondestructive testing, ultrafast-optoacoustics and innovative instruments. Research achievements in biomedical applications, advanced sensing including noncontact, micro/nanoscale or nonlinear measurements, as well as theory and simulation of ultrasound were also included, considering the interdisciplinary nature of this field. We enjoyed very excellent and informative 3 plenary talks, 11 invited talks, 81 oral and 41 poster presentations with 168 attendees. According to requests, we organized a post deadline poster session to give an opportunity to present recent achievements after the deadline. Contributions of the participants, the scientific and organizing committees are highly appreciated. The conference tour was a dinner cruise to the Tokyo bay, and we hope this experience will remain as a pleasant memory in attendees. As decided in the

  5. Third-order many-body perturbation theory calculations for the beryllium and magnesium isoelectronic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, H. C.; Johnson, W. R.; Blundell, S. A.; Safronova, M. S.

    2006-08-15

    Third-order relativistic many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) is applied to obtain energies of ions with two valence electrons in the no virtual-pair approximation (NVPA). A total of 302 third-order Goldstone diagrams are organized into 12 one-body and 23 two-body terms. Only third-order two-body terms and diagrams are presented in this paper, owing to the fact that the one-body terms are identical to the previously studied third-order terms in monovalent ions. Dominant classes of diagrams are identified. The model potential is the Dirac-Hartree-Fock potential V{sup N-2}, and B-spline basis functions in a cavity of finite radius are employed in the numerical calculations. The Breit interaction is taken into account through the second order of perturbation theory, and the lowest-order Lamb shift is also evaluated. Sample calculations are performed for berylliumlike ions with Z=4-7, and for the magnesiumlike ion P IV. The third-order excitation energies are in excellent agreement with measurement with an accuracy at 0.2% level for the cases considered. Comparisons are made with second-order MBPT results, and with other calculations. The third-order energy correction is shown to be significant, improving the previous second-order calculations by an order of magnitude.

  6. Cognitive performance of young and elderly subjects on the free word recall memory test: effect of presentation order on recall order.

    PubMed

    Santos-Galduróz, R F; Oliveira, F G; Galduróz, J C F; Bueno, O F A

    2009-10-01

    The influence of aging on memory has been extensively studied, but the importance of short-term memory and recall sequence has not. The objective of the current study was to examine the recall order of words presented on lists and to determine if age affects recall sequence. Physically and psychologically healthy male subjects were divided into two groups according to age, i.e., 23 young subjects (20 to 30 years) and 50 elderly subjects (60 to 70 years) submitted to the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the free word recall test. The order of word presentation significantly affected the 3rd and 4th words recalled (P < 0.01; F = 14.6). In addition, there was interaction between the presentation order and the type of list presented (P < 0.05; F = 9.7). Also, both groups recalled the last words presented from each list (words 13-15) significantly more times 3rd and 4th than words presented in all remaining positions (P < 0.01). The order of word presentation also significantly affected the 5th and 6th words recalled (P = 0.05; F = 7.5) and there was a significant interaction between the order of presentation and the type of list presented (P < 0.01; F = 20.8). The more developed the cognitive functions, resulting mainly from formal education, the greater the cognitive reserve, helping to minimize the effects of aging on the long-term memory (episodic declarative).

  7. Identifying Odd/Even-Order Binary Kernel Slices for a Nonlinear System Using Inverse Repeat m-Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jin-yan; Yan, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The study of various living complex systems by system identification method is important, and the identification of the problem is even more challenging when dealing with a dynamic nonlinear system of discrete time. A well-established model based on kernel functions for input of the maximum length sequence (m-sequence) can be used to estimate nonlinear binary kernel slices using cross-correlation method. In this study, we examine the relevant mathematical properties of kernel slices, particularly their shift-and-product property and overlap distortion problem caused by the irregular shifting of the estimated kernel slices in the cross-correlation function between the input m-sequence and the system output. We then derive the properties of the inverse repeat (IR) m-sequence and propose a method of using IR m-sequence as an input to separately estimate odd- and even-order kernel slices to reduce the chance of kernel-slice overlapping. An instance of third-order Wiener nonlinear model is simulated to justify the proposed method. PMID:25873988

  8. Identifying odd/even-order binary kernel slices for a nonlinear system using inverse repeat m-sequences.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin-Yan; Yan, Gang; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The study of various living complex systems by system identification method is important, and the identification of the problem is even more challenging when dealing with a dynamic nonlinear system of discrete time. A well-established model based on kernel functions for input of the maximum length sequence (m-sequence) can be used to estimate nonlinear binary kernel slices using cross-correlation method. In this study, we examine the relevant mathematical properties of kernel slices, particularly their shift-and-product property and overlap distortion problem caused by the irregular shifting of the estimated kernel slices in the cross-correlation function between the input m-sequence and the system output. We then derive the properties of the inverse repeat (IR) m-sequence and propose a method of using IR m-sequence as an input to separately estimate odd- and even-order kernel slices to reduce the chance of kernel-slice overlapping. An instance of third-order Wiener nonlinear model is simulated to justify the proposed method.

  9. Does order matter? Investigating the effect of sequence on glance duration during on-road driving

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Shannon C.; Reimer, Bryan; Mehler, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Previous literature has shown that vehicle crash risks increases as drivers’ off-road glance duration increases. Many factors influence drivers’ glance duration such as individual differences, driving environment, or task characteristics. Theories and past studies suggest that glance duration increases as the task progresses, but the exact relationship between glance sequence and glance durations is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of glance sequence on glance duration among drivers completing a visual-manual radio tuning task and an auditory-vocal based multi-modal navigation entry task. Eighty participants drove a vehicle on urban highways while completing radio tuning and navigation entry tasks. Forty participants drove under an experimental protocol that required three button presses followed by rotation of a tuning knob to complete the radio tuning task while the other forty participants completed the task with one less button press. Multiple statistical analyses were conducted to measure the effect of glance sequence on glance duration. Results showed that across both tasks and a variety of statistical tests, glance sequence had inconsistent effects on glance duration—the effects varied according to the number of glances, task type, and data set that was being evaluated. Results suggest that other aspects of the task as well as interface design effect glance duration and should be considered in the context of examining driver attention or lack thereof. All in all, interface design and task characteristics have a more influential impact on glance duration than glance sequence, suggesting that classical design considerations impacting driver attention, such as the size and location of buttons, remain fundamental in designing in-vehicle interfaces. PMID:28158301

  10. Does order matter? Investigating the effect of sequence on glance duration during on-road driving.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonbum; Roberts, Shannon C; Reimer, Bryan; Mehler, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Previous literature has shown that vehicle crash risks increases as drivers' off-road glance duration increases. Many factors influence drivers' glance duration such as individual differences, driving environment, or task characteristics. Theories and past studies suggest that glance duration increases as the task progresses, but the exact relationship between glance sequence and glance durations is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of glance sequence on glance duration among drivers completing a visual-manual radio tuning task and an auditory-vocal based multi-modal navigation entry task. Eighty participants drove a vehicle on urban highways while completing radio tuning and navigation entry tasks. Forty participants drove under an experimental protocol that required three button presses followed by rotation of a tuning knob to complete the radio tuning task while the other forty participants completed the task with one less button press. Multiple statistical analyses were conducted to measure the effect of glance sequence on glance duration. Results showed that across both tasks and a variety of statistical tests, glance sequence had inconsistent effects on glance duration-the effects varied according to the number of glances, task type, and data set that was being evaluated. Results suggest that other aspects of the task as well as interface design effect glance duration and should be considered in the context of examining driver attention or lack thereof. All in all, interface design and task characteristics have a more influential impact on glance duration than glance sequence, suggesting that classical design considerations impacting driver attention, such as the size and location of buttons, remain fundamental in designing in-vehicle interfaces.

  11. Mitochondrial genome sequence and gene order of Sipunculus nudus give additional support for an inclusion of Sipuncula into Annelida

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Adina; Meyer, Achim; Bleidorn, Christoph; Lieb, Bernhard; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomes are a valuable source of data for analysing phylogenetic relationships. Besides sequence information, mitochondrial gene order may add phylogenetically useful information, too. Sipuncula are unsegmented marine worms, traditionally placed in their own phylum. Recent molecular and morphological findings suggest a close affinity to the segmented Annelida. Results The first complete mitochondrial genome of a member of Sipuncula, Sipunculus nudus, is presented. All 37 genes characteristic for metazoan mtDNA were detected and are encoded on the same strand. The mitochondrial gene order (protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes) resembles that of annelids, but shows several derivations so far found only in Sipuncula. Sequence based phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes results in significant bootstrap support for Annelida sensu lato, combining Annelida together with Sipuncula, Echiura, Pogonophora and Myzostomida. Conclusion The mitochondrial sequence data support a close relationship of Annelida and Sipuncula. Also the most parsimonious explanation of changes in gene order favours a derivation from the annelid gene order. These results complement findings from recent phylogenetic analyses of nuclear encoded genes as well as a report of a segmental neural patterning in Sipuncula. PMID:19149868

  12. First- or second-order transition in the melting of repeat sequence DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    Both theoretical analysis and observation of the continuity of the melted fraction of base pairs indicate that the melting transition in DNA is second order. Analysis of the salt dependence of the transition by polyelectrolyte limiting laws, however, has first-order dynamics imbedded in the analysis. This paper proposes that the observation taken to be a latent heat of melting in the limiting law analysis could instead be a specific heat anomaly associated with a second-order transition. The limiting laws can be reconstructed based on a second-order transition with a specific heat anomaly. The T2M dependence of this excess heat is also consistent with its being a specific heat anomaly of a system displaying classical critical behavior. Classical critical behavior indicates that theoretical mean field approaches such as MSPA should be particularly appropriate to helix melting studies. PMID:8130338

  13. Development of partially-coherent wavefront propagation simulation methods for 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Berman, Lonny; Chu, Yong S.; Fluerasu, Andrei; Hulbert, Steve; Idir, Mourad; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Shapiro, David; Shen, Qun; Baltser, Jana

    2011-09-01

    Partially-coherent wavefront propagation calculations have proven to be feasible and very beneficial in the design of beamlines for 3rd and 4th generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources. These types of calculations use the framework of classical electrodynamics for the description, on the same accuracy level, of the emission by relativistic electrons moving in magnetic fields of accelerators, and the propagation of the emitted radiation wavefronts through beamline optical elements. This enables accurate prediction of performance characteristics for beamlines exploiting high SR brightness and/or high spectral flux. Detailed analysis of radiation degree of coherence, offered by the partially-coherent wavefront propagation method, is of paramount importance for modern storage-ring based SR sources, which, thanks to extremely small sub-nanometer-level electron beam emittances, produce substantial portions of coherent flux in X-ray spectral range. We describe the general approach to partially-coherent SR wavefront propagation simulations and present examples of such simulations performed using "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) code for the parameters of hard X-ray undulator based beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These examples illustrate general characteristics of partially-coherent undulator radiation beams in low-emittance SR sources, and demonstrate advantages of applying high-accuracy physical-optics simulations to the optimization and performance prediction of X-ray optical beamlines in these new sources.

  14. 3rd Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Louis

    2014-09-20

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 3rd quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014 in Tables 4 and 5. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report do not include minor volumes of non-radioactive materials that were approved for disposal. Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to differing rounding conventions.

  15. The 3rd Canadian Symposium on Hepatitis C Virus: Expanding care in the interferon-free era

    PubMed Central

    MacParland, Sonya A; Bilodeau, Marc; Grebely, Jason; Bruneau, Julie; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina; Sagan, Selena M; Choucha, Norma; Balfour, Louise; Bialystok, Frank; Krajden, Mel; Raven, Jennifer; Roberts, Eve; Russell, Rodney; Houghton, Michael; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Feld, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) currently infects approximately 250,000 individuals in Canada and causes more years of life lost than any other infectious disease in the country. In August 2011, new therapies were approved by Health Canada that have achieved higher response rates among those treated, but are poorly tolerated. By 2014/2015, short-course, well-tolerated treatments with cure rates >95% will be available. However, treatment uptake is poor due to structural, financial, geographical, cultural and social barriers. As such, ‘Barriers to access to HCV care in Canada’ is a crucial topic that must be addressed to decrease HCV disease burden and potentially eliminate HCV in Canada. Understanding how to better care for HCV-infected individuals requires integration across multiple disciplines including researchers, clinical services and policy makers to address the major populations affected by HCV including people who inject drugs, baby boomers, immigrants and Aboriginal and/or First Nations people. In 2012, the National CIHR Research Training Program in Hepatitis C organized the 1st Canadian Symposium on Hepatitis C Virus (CSHCV) in Montreal, Quebec. The 2nd CSHCV was held in 2013 in Victoria, British Columbia. Both symposia were highly successful, attracting leading international faculty with excellent attendance leading to dialogue and knowledge translation among attendees of diverse backgrounds. The current article summarizes the 3rd CSHCV, held February 2014, in Toronto, Ontario. PMID:25314353

  16. From bottom to top: Identification to precision measurement of 3rd-generation quarks with the atlas detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapp, Kevin

    The 3rd-generation quarks, bottom ( b) and top (t), are recent additions to the Standard Model of particle physics, and precise characterization of their properties have important implications to searching for new physics phenomena. This thesis presents two analyses which use 4.6 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to measure their properties. The first is an analysis which measures our ability to identify jets originating from b quarks with machine-learning algorithms applied to simulated and real data, so the result in simulation can be corrected to match that in data. This measurement has implications for our ability to identify processes with b quarks in their final state; t quarks decay to a b quark and a weak vector boson W more than 99% of the time. The second analysis presented measures properties of the t → Wb decay channel associated with phenomena not predicted by the Standard Model, through a set of effective couplings which preserve Lorentz covariance. The kinematic information of the final-state particles is used to construct an event-specific coordinate system, and probability density is estimated as a function of solid angle in these coordinates. A parameterization of the effective couplings is extracted via a novel unfolding method, finding their values consistent with the Standard Model expectation, contributing the first measurement of the correlation between the parameters, and improving on previous limits.

  17. Altered differential hemocyte count in 3rd instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster as a response to chronic exposure of Acephate

    PubMed Central

    Rajak, Prem; Dutta, Moumita

    2015-01-01

    Acephate, an organophosphate (OP) pesticide, was used to investigate the effects of its chronic exposure on hemocyte abundance in a non-target dipteran insect Drosophila melanogaster. For this purpose, six graded concentrations ranging from 1 to 6 μg/ml were selected, which are below the reported residual values (up to 14 μg/ml) of the chemical. 1st instar larvae were fed with these concentrations up to the 3rd instar stage and accordingly hemolymph smears from these larvae were prepared for differential hemocyte count. Three types of cells are found in Drosophila hemolymph, namely, plasmatocytes, lamellocytes and crystal cells. Plasmatocyte count was found to decrease with successive increase in treatment concentrations. Crystal cells showed an increasing trend in their number. Though the number of lamellocytes was very low, a bimodal response was noticed. Lamellocyte number was found to increase with the initial three concentrations, followed by a dose dependent reduction in their number. As hemocytes are directly linked to the immune system of fruit flies, fluctuations in normal titer of these cells may affect insect immunity. Hemocytes share homologies in their origin and mode of action with the immune cells of higher organisms including man. Thus the present findings suggest that immune cells of humans and other organisms may be affected adversely under chronic exposure to Acephate. PMID:27486365

  18. Organizational Support for the 3rd Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, July 30 – August 8, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Jose L.

    2012-07-01

    This grant provided partial funds for American graduate students to attend the 3rd Graduate Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, which was held from July 30 to August 8, 2012 at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. The Graduate Summer Institute is a topical series of instructional workshops held bi-annually on the emerging field of complex plasmas that is jointly organized through a collaboration between American and German-European Union plasmas researchers. This specialized program brings together many of the world's leading researchers in the specialized area of complex plasmas, who freely provide instructional lectures and tutorials on the most recent research and discoveries done in this branch of plasma science. The partial funds provided by this grant helped support the travel and accommodation expenses of the participating American students and tutorial instructors. Partial funds further supported the travel and accommodation of three renown American plasma researchers that provided educational tutorials to the thirty-eight participating students from the United States, Europe, and Asia. The organized program afforded a unique opportunity for the participating American graduate students to learn about and engage more deeply in an area of plasma science that is not studied in any of the graduate educational curriculums provided by universities in the United States of America. The educational experience offered by this program provided the necessary knowledge needed by future American plasma researchers to keep the national plasma research effort on the cutting-edge and keep the national plasma community as a global leader.

  19. Statistical learning of an auditory sequence and reorganization of acquired knowledge: A time course of word segmentation and ordering.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Tatsuya; Yatomi, Yutaka; Yumoto, Masato

    2017-01-27

    Previous neural studies have supported the hypothesis that statistical learning mechanisms are used broadly across different domains such as language and music. However, these studies have only investigated a single aspect of statistical learning at a time, such as recognizing word boundaries or learning word order patterns. In this study, we neutrally investigated how the two levels of statistical learning for recognizing word boundaries and word ordering could be reflected in neuromagnetic responses and how acquired statistical knowledge is reorganised when the syntactic rules are revised. Neuromagnetic responses to the Japanese-vowel sequence (a, e, i, o, and u), presented every .45s, were recorded from 14 right-handed Japanese participants. The vowel order was constrained by a Markov stochastic model such that five nonsense words (aue, eao, iea, oiu, and uoi) were chained with an either-or rule: the probability of the forthcoming word was statistically defined (80% for one word; 20% for the other word) by the most recent two words. All of the word transition probabilities (80% and 20%) were switched in the middle of the sequence. In the first and second quarters of the sequence, the neuromagnetic responses to the words that appeared with higher transitional probability were significantly reduced compared with those that appeared with a lower transitional probability. After switching the word transition probabilities, the response reduction was replicated in the last quarter of the sequence. The responses to the final vowels in the words were significantly reduced compared with those to the initial vowels in the last quarter of the sequence. The results suggest that both within-word and between-word statistical learning are reflected in neural responses. The present study supports the hypothesis that listeners learn larger structures such as phrases first, and they subsequently extract smaller structures, such as words, from the learned phrases. The present

  20. Generation of Some First-Order Autoregressive Markovian Sequences of Positive Random Variables with Given Marginal Distributions,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    LAWRANCE , P A LEWIS UNCLASSIFIED NWS55-81-003 NLm ’hEEEIIIIEEE mhhhhEEh EEEEEEEllEEEll 46 NPS55-81-003 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California D C...GENERATION OF SOME FIRST-ORDER AUTOREGRESSIVE MARKOVIAN SEQUENCES OF POSITIVE RANDOM VARIABLES WITH GIVEN MARGINAL DISTRIBUTIONS by A. J. Lawrance P. A... Lawrance University of Birmingham Birmingham, England P. A. W. Lewis, Professor Department of Operations Research Reviewed by: Released by: K. T

  1. The Relationship between Perceived and Ideal Body Size and Body Mass Index in 3rd-Grade Low Socioeconomic Hispanic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Allison; Lange, Mary Anne; Young-Cureton, Virginia; Canham, Daryl

    2005-01-01

    Very little is known about body satisfaction among minority children. This study examined the relationship between perceived and actual body size and Body Mass Index among 43 low-socioeconomic Hispanic 3rd-graders. Researchers measured participants' Body Mass Index; students self-reported Perceived Ideal Self Image and Perceived Actual Self Image…

  2. Midwest Child-Parent Center (CPC) PreK-3rd Grade School Reform Model: Impacts on Child and Family Outcomes over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylor, Erika; Spiker, Donna; Wei, Xin; Lease, Erin; Reynolds, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This presentation reports on the goals and preliminary outcomes of the Child-Parent Centers (CPC) Expansion Project, which is a PreK to 3rd grade school reform model aimed at improving the short- and long-term outcomes of participating children and families. The model provides continuous education and family support services to schools serving a…

  3. "Elderly Deafblindness." Proceedings of the European Conference of Deafblind International's Acquired Deafblindness Network (3rd, Marcelli di Numana, Italy, October 2-7, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deafblind International, London (England).

    This text includes all of the plenary presentations from the 3rd European Conference of Deafblind International's Acquired Deafblindness Network. This international conference was the first to focus specifically on older people with dual sensory impairment. Presentations addressed the awareness of the needs of older people with deafblind or dual…

  4. PREFACE: Special section featuring selected papers from the 3rd International Workshop on Numerical Modelling of High Temperature Superconductors Special section featuring selected papers from the 3rd International Workshop on Numerical Modelling of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Xavier; Sánchez, Àlvar; López-López, Josep

    2012-10-01

    The development of superconducting applications and superconducting engineering requires the support of consistent tools which can provide models for obtaining a good understanding of the behaviour of the systems and predict novel features. These models aim to compute the behaviour of the superconducting systems, design superconducting devices and systems, and understand and test the behavior of the superconducting parts. 50 years ago, in 1962, Charles Bean provided the superconducting community with a model efficient enough to allow the computation of the response of a superconductor to external magnetic fields and currents flowing through in an understandable way: the so called critical-state model. Since then, in addition to the pioneering critical-state approach, other tools have been devised for designing operative superconducting systems, allowing integration of the superconducting design in nearly standard electromagnetic computer-aided design systems by modelling the superconducting parts with consideration of time-dependent processes. In April 2012, Barcelona hosted the 3rd International Workshop on Numerical Modelling of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS), the third in a series of workshops started in Lausanne in 2010 and followed by Cambridge in 2011. The workshop reflected the state-of-the-art and the new initiatives of HTS modelling, considering mathematical, physical and technological aspects within a wide and interdisciplinary scope. Superconductor Science and Technology is now publishing a selection of papers from the workshop which have been selected for their high quality. The selection comprises seven papers covering mathematical, physical and technological topics which contribute to an improvement in the development of procedures, understanding of phenomena and development of applications. We hope that they provide a perspective on the relevance and growth that the modelling of HTS superconductors has achieved in the past 25 years.

  5. The Effect of Animacy on Children's Noun Order in Verb-Final Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lempert, Henrietta

    1988-01-01

    Examines effect of training 70 preschool children with animate agent + animate patient sentences (AAV) or animate agent + inanimate patient sentences (IAV). Children were tested with noun-noun-verb (NNV) order sentence to assess whether AAV or IAV produced better comprehension. AAV and IAV showed comparable results at age three, IAV resulted in…

  6. Effect of Element Composition on Streaming and the Ordering of Repeating Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Kathleen A.; Handel, Stephen

    1977-01-01

    The relatedness of four elements (tone, white noise, click, and a buzz) making up a recycled pattern was varied to determine the effects of streaming (sounds that break into separate channels) on the ease of correctly ordering the elements. Results suggest the organization of elements into streams by similarity supplants the organization by…

  7. LaGomiCs-Lagomorph Genomics Consortium: An International Collaborative Effort for Sequencing the Genomes of an Entire Mammalian Order.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, Luca; Di Palma, Federica; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Andrew T; Thulin, Carl-Gustaf; Alves, Paulo C

    2016-07-01

    The order Lagomorpha comprises about 90 living species, divided in 2 families: the pikas (Family Ochotonidae), and the rabbits, hares, and jackrabbits (Family Leporidae). Lagomorphs are important economically and scientifically as major human food resources, valued game species, pests of agricultural significance, model laboratory animals, and key elements in food webs. A quarter of the lagomorph species are listed as threatened. They are native to all continents except Antarctica, and occur up to 5000 m above sea level, from the equator to the Arctic, spanning a wide range of environmental conditions. The order has notable taxonomic problems presenting significant difficulties for defining a species due to broad phenotypic variation, overlap of morphological characteristics, and relatively recent speciation events. At present, only the genomes of 2 species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and American pika (Ochotona princeps) have been sequenced and assembled. Starting from a paucity of genome information, the main scientific aim of the Lagomorph Genomics Consortium (LaGomiCs), born from a cooperative initiative of the European COST Action "A Collaborative European Network on Rabbit Genome Biology-RGB-Net" and the World Lagomorph Society (WLS), is to provide an international framework for the sequencing of the genome of all extant and selected extinct lagomorphs. Sequencing the genomes of an entire order will provide a large amount of information to address biological problems not only related to lagomorphs but also to all mammals. We present current and planned sequencing programs and outline the final objective of LaGomiCs possible through broad international collaboration.

  8. Differences in risk factors for 2nd and 3rd degree hypospadias in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    in 't Woud, Sander Groen; van Rooij, Iris A.L.M.; van Gelder, Marleen M.H.J.; Olney, Richard S.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Roeleveld, Nel; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypospadias is a frequent birth defect with three phenotypic subtypes. With data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a large, multi-state, population-based, case-control study, we compared risk factors for second and third degree hypospadias. Methods A wide variety of data on maternal and pregnancy-related risk factors for isolated second and third degree hypospadias was collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews to identify potential etiological differences between the two phenotypes. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios including a random effect by study center. Results In total, 1547 second degree cases, 389 third degree cases, and 5183 male controls were included in our study. Third degree cases were more likely to have a non-Hispanic black or Asian/Pacific Islander mother, be delivered preterm, have a low birth weight, be small for gestational age, and be conceived with fertility treatments than second degree cases and controls. Associations with both second and third degree hypospadias were observed for maternal age, family history, parity, plurality, and hypertension during pregnancy. Risk estimates were generally higher for third degree hypospadias except for family history. Conclusions Most risk factors were associated with both or neither phenotype. Therefore, it is likely that the underlying mechanism is at least partly similar for both phenotypes. However, some associations were different between 2nd and 3rd degree hypospadias, and went in opposite directions for second and third degree hypospadias for Asian/Pacific Islander mothers. Effect estimates for subtypes of hypospadias may be over- or underestimated in studies without stratification by phenotype. PMID:25181604

  9. Arousal transitions in sleep, wakefulness, and anesthesia are characterized by an orderly sequence of cortical events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Yanagawa, Toru; Leopold, David A; Chang, Catie; Ishida, Hiroaki; Fujii, Naotaka; Duyn, Jeff H

    2015-08-01

    Many aspects of brain function are influenced by modulatory processes, including arousal. The most abrupt changes in arousal occur at the wake-sleep transition and at the induction of anesthetic conditions. They are accompanied by major electrophysiological changes, including an emergence of low-frequency (sleep-like) activity and a loss of mid-frequency (wake-like) activity that has been linked to feedback processes of the brain. Nevertheless, the causal relationship between these two types of electrophysiological changes, as well as the cortical mechanisms underlying changes in arousal and consciousness, remain poorly understood. To address this, we studied spontaneous electro-cortical activity during arousal changes in macaques. During sleep and at loss of consciousness induced by propofol anesthesia, we identified a prototypical sequence of cortical events in which the loss of mid-frequency activity preceded, by seconds, the increases in low-frequency activity. Furthermore, in visual areas, an influence of mid-frequency change onto high-frequency activity was observed across visual hierarchy. These results are consistent with the notion that drops in arousal and consciousness are facilitated by a release of feedback cortical inhibition.

  10. Arousal Transitions in Sleep, Wakefulness, and Anesthesia are Characterized by an Orderly Sequence of Cortical Events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Yanagawa, Toru; Leopold, David A.; Chang, Catie; Ishida, Hiroaki; Fujii, Naotaka; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of brain function are influenced by modulatory processes, including arousal. The most abrupt changes in arousal occur at the wake-sleep transition and at the induction of anesthetic conditions. They are accompanied by major electrophysiological changes, including an emergence of low-frequency (sleep-like) activity and a loss of mid-frequency (wake-like) activity that has been linked to feedback processes of the brain. Nevertheless, the causal relationship between these two types of electrophysiological changes, as well as the cortical mechanisms underlying changes in arousal and consciousness, remain poorly understood. To address this, we studied spontaneous electro-cortical activity during arousal changes in macaques. During sleep and at loss of consciousness induced by propofol anesthesia, we identified a prototypical sequence of cortical events in which the loss of mid-frequency activity preceded, by seconds, the increases in low-frequency activity. Furthermore, in visual areas, an influence of mid-frequency change onto high-frequency activity was observed across visual hierarchy. These results are consistent with the notion that drops in arousal and consciousness are facilitated by a release of feedback cortical inhibition. PMID:25865143

  11. Order Matters: Sequencing Scale-Realistic Versus Simplified Models to Improve Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Schneps, Matthew H.; Sonnert, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Teachers choosing between different models to facilitate students' understanding of an abstract system must decide whether to adopt a model that is simplified and striking or one that is realistic and complex. Only recently have instructional technologies enabled teachers and learners to change presentations swiftly and to provide for learning based on multiple models, thus giving rise to questions about the order of presentation. Using disjoint individual growth modeling to examine the learning of astronomical concepts using a simulation of the solar system on tablets for 152 high school students (age 15), the authors detect both a model effect and an order effect in the use of the Orrery, a simplified model that exaggerates the scale relationships, and the True-to-scale, a proportional model that more accurately represents the realistic scale relationships. Specifically, earlier exposure to the simplified model resulted in diminution of the conceptual gain from the subsequent realistic model, but the realistic model did not impede learning from the following simplified model.

  12. GORpipe: a query tool for working with sequence data based on a Genomic Ordered Relational (GOR) architecture

    PubMed Central

    Guðbjartsson, Hákon; Georgsson, Guðmundur Fr.; Guðjónsson, Sigurjón A.; Valdimarsson, Ragnar þór; Sigurðsson, Jóhann H.; Stefánsson, Sigmar K.; Másson, Gísli; Magnússon, Gísli; Pálmason, Vilmundur; Stefánsson, Kári

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Our aim was to create a general-purpose relational data format and analysis tools to provide an efficient and coherent framework for working with large volumes of DNA sequence data. Results: For this purpose we developed the GORpipe software system. It is based on a genomic ordered architecture and uses a declarative query language that combines features from SQL and shell pipe syntax in a novel manner. The system can for instance be used to annotate sequence variants, find genomic spatial overlap between various types of genomic features, filter and aggregate them in various ways. Availability and Implementation: The GORpipe software is freely available for non-commercial academic usage and can be downloaded from www.nextcode.com/gorpipe. Contact: hakon@wuxinextcode.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27339714

  13. Current practice of epidemiology in Africa: highlights of the 3rd conference of the African epidemiological association and 1st conference of the Cameroon society of epidemiology, Yaoundé, Cameroon, 2014.

    PubMed

    Nkwescheu, Armand Seraphin; Fokam, Joseph; Tchendjou, Patrice; Nji, Akindeh; Ngouakam, Hermann; Andre, Bita Fouda; Joelle, Sobngwi; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Akinroye, Kingsley; Mbacham, Wilfred; Colizzi, Vittorio; Leke, Rose; Victora, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    As the study of disease occurrence and health indicators in human populations, Epidemiology is a dynamic field that evolves with time and geographical context. In order to update African health workers on current epidemiological practices and to draw awareness of early career epidemiologists on concepts and opportunities in the field, the 3(rd) African Epidemiology Association and the 1st Cameroon Society of Epidemiology Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice of Epidemiology in Africa: Stakes, Challenges and Perspectives», the conference attracted close to five hundred guest and participants from all continents. The two main programs were the pre-conference course for capacity building of African Early Career epidemiologists, and the conference itself, providing a forum for scientific exchanges on recent epidemiological concepts, encouraging the use of epidemiological methods in studying large disease burden and neglected tropical diseases; and highlighting existing opportunities.

  14. Application of genotyping-by-sequencing on semiconductor sequencing platforms: A comparison of genetic and reference-based marker ordering in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid development of next generation sequencing platforms has enabled the use of sequencing for routine genotyping across a range of genetics studies and breeding applications. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a low-cost, reduced representation sequencing method, is becoming a common approach fo...

  15. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Science 2015 (AeroEarth 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2016-02-01

    The 3rd International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospaces and Earth Sciences 2015 (AeroEarth 2015), was held at The DoubleTree Hilton, Jakarta, Indonesia during 26 - 27 September 2015. The 1st AeoroEarth was held succefully in Jakarta in 2013. The success continued to The 2nd AeroEarth 2014 that was held in Kuta Bali, Indonesia. The publications were published by EES IOP in http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/19/1 and http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/23/1 respectively. The AeroEarth 2015 conference aims to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. Through research and development, Earth's scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. The theme of AeroEarth 2015 is ''Earth and Aerospace Sciences : Challenges and Opportunities'' Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 78 papers and after rigorous review, 18 papers were accepted. The participants

  16. Effect on Physical Activity of a Randomized Afterschool Intervention for Inner City Children in 3rd to 5th Grade

    PubMed Central

    Crouter, Scott E.; de Ferranti, Sarah D.; Whiteley, Jessica; Steltz, Sarah K.; Osganian, Stavroula K.; Feldman, Henry A.; Hayman, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Less than 45% of U.S. children meet the 60 min.d-1 physical activity (PA) guideline. Structured after-school PA programing is one approach to help increase activity levels. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and short-term impact of a supervised after-school PA and nutrition education program on activity levels. Methods Forty-two 3rd-5th graders from an inner-city school in Boston, MA were randomly assigned to a 10-wk after-school program of either: 1) weekly nutrition education, or 2) weekly nutrition education plus supervised PA 3 d.wk-1 at a community-based center. At baseline and follow-up, PA was measured using accelerometry and fitness (VO2max) was estimated using the PACER 15-m shuttle run. Additional measures obtained were non-fasting finger stick total cholesterol (TC) and glucose levels, waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (%BF), and blood pressure (BP). Values are presented as mean±SE, unless noted otherwise. Results Thirty-six participants completed the study (mean±SD; age 9.7±0.9 years). Participants attended >80% of the sessions. After adjusting for accelerometer wear time and other design factors, light and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) increased in the nutrition+PA group (+21.5±14.5 and +8.6±8.0 min.d-1, respectively) and decreased in the nutrition only group (-35.2±16.3 and -16.0±9.0 min.d-1, respectively); mean difference between groups of 56.8±21.7 min.d-1 (light PA, p = 0.01) and 24.5±12.0 min.d-1 (MVPA, p = 0.04). Time spent in sedentary behaviors declined in the nutrition+PA group (-14.8±20.7 min.d-1) and increased in the nutrition only group (+55.4±23.2 min.d-1); mean difference between groups of -70.2±30.9 min.d-1 (p = 0.02). Neither group showed changes in TC, BP, WC, %BF, BMI percentile, or fitness (p>0.05). Conclusions The supervised afterschool community-based nutrition and PA program was well accepted and had high attendance. The changes in light PA and MVPA has potential

  17. In vitro cultivation of Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from 3rd-stage larvae to egg-laying adults.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, L; Valero, A; Gálvez, L; Benítez, R; Adroher, F J

    2002-11-01

    This is the first demonstration of the in vitro development of the 3rd-stage larvae (L3) of Hysterothylacium aduncum to the adult. This was achieved in a semi-defined medium that is easy to prepare and to reproduce. The L3, collected from the peritoneal cavity of horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), were individually inoculated into RPMI-1640 medium +20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (IFBS). It has been demonstrated that the optimum temperature for development is around 13 degrees C and is stimulated by the presence of 5% CO2 in the growth atmosphere, increasing the percentage moulting to the 4th larval stage (L4) by 1.9-fold (from 44 to 82%) and the average survival of the nematodes by 1.6 times (from 60 to 96 days). When the larvae were grown at different pHs, optimum development occurred at pH 4.0. Under these conditions, all the larvae moulted to the L4 and more than two-thirds transformed to the adult stage--in which 25-30% of the females laid eggs--and reached an average survival of over 4 months. When this medium was supplemented with 1% (w/v) of commercial pepsin, all the larvae reached the adult stage, at least 45% of the females oviposited, laying around 12-fold more eggs per female than in the medium without pepsin. The mean size of the eggs (non-fertilized) obtained was 56.8 x 47.6 microm. The mean length of the adult males obtained was between 3.2 and 5.2 cm and the females were between 3.0 and 6.5 cm. The adult specimens were morphologically identified as Hysterothylacium aducum aduncum. This culture medium (RPMI-1640+20% (v/v) IFBS+1 commercial pepsin, at pH 4.0, 13 degrees C and 5% CO2 in air) could facilitate the identification of at least some of the larvae of the genus Hysterothylacium--and perhaps other anisakids--for which the specific identification and the biological study of these parasites is often difficult.

  18. Partial order optimum likelihood (POOL): maximum likelihood prediction of protein active site residues using 3D Structure and sequence properties.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenxu; Wei, Ying; Murga, Leonel F; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Williams, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    A new monotonicity-constrained maximum likelihood approach, called Partial Order Optimum Likelihood (POOL), is presented and applied to the problem of functional site prediction in protein 3D structures, an important current challenge in genomics. The input consists of electrostatic and geometric properties derived from the 3D structure of the query protein alone. Sequence-based conservation information, where available, may also be incorporated. Electrostatics features from THEMATICS are combined with multidimensional isotonic regression to form maximum likelihood estimates of probabilities that specific residues belong to an active site. This allows likelihood ranking of all ionizable residues in a given protein based on THEMATICS features. The corresponding ROC curves and statistical significance tests demonstrate that this method outperforms prior THEMATICS-based methods, which in turn have been shown previously to outperform other 3D-structure-based methods for identifying active site residues. Then it is shown that the addition of one simple geometric property, the size rank of the cleft in which a given residue is contained, yields improved performance. Extension of the method to include predictions of non-ionizable residues is achieved through the introduction of environment variables. This extension results in even better performance than THEMATICS alone and constitutes to date the best functional site predictor based on 3D structure only, achieving nearly the same level of performance as methods that use both 3D structure and sequence alignment data. Finally, the method also easily incorporates such sequence alignment data, and when this information is included, the resulting method is shown to outperform the best current methods using any combination of sequence alignments and 3D structures. Included is an analysis demonstrating that when THEMATICS features, cleft size rank, and alignment-based conservation scores are used individually or in combination

  19. The temperature field and heat transfer in the porthole of the Space Shuttle - Outer surface under the 3rd kind nonlinear boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Heping; Yu, Qizheng; Zhang, Jizhou

    In this paper, the transient combined heat transfer in the silicon glass porthole of Space Shuttle is studied by control volume method, ray tracing method and spectral band model. The temperature field in the silicon glass and heat flux entering the space cabin are given under the 3rd kind nonlinear boundary condition. The computational results show, if the radiation in the silicon glass is omitted, the errors for temperature fields are not too evident, but for heat flux are quite large.

  20. The application of the reduced order model Kalman filter to motion estimation of degraded image sequences. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Elizabeth C.

    1989-01-01

    Motion estimation is a field of great interest because of its many applications in areas such as robotics and image coding. The optic flow method is one such scheme which, although fairly accurate, is prone to error in the presence of noise. This thesis describes the use of the reduced order model Kalman filter (ROMKF) in reducing errors in displacement estimation due to degradation of the sequence. The implementation of filtering and motion estimation algorithms on the SUN workstation is also discussed. Results from preliminary testing were used to determine the degrees of freedom available for the ROMKF in the SUN software. The tests indicated that increasing the state to the left leads to slight improvement over the minimum state case. Therefore, the software uses the minimum model, with the option of adding states to the left only. The ROMKF was then used in conjunction with a hierarchical pel recursive motion estimation algorithm. Applying the ROMKF to the degraded displacements themselves generally yielded slight improvements in cases with noise degradation and noise plus blur. Filtering the images of the degraded sequence prior to motion estimation was less effective in these cases. Both methods performed badly in the case of blur alone, resulting in increased displacement errors. This is thought to be due in part to filter artifacts. Some improvements were obtained by varying the filter parameters when filtering the displacements directly. This result suggests that further study in varying filter parameters may lead to better results. The results of this thesis indicate that the ROMKF can play a part in reducing motion estimation errors from degraded sequences. However, more work needs to be done before the use of the ROMKF can be a practical solution.

  1. eMatchSite: Sequence Order-Independent Structure Alignments of Ligand Binding Pockets in Protein Models

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4–9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite. PMID

  2. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient θ = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR.

  3. High resolution three-dimensional (256 to the 3rd) spatio-temporal measurements of the conserved scalar field in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Werner J. A.; Buch, Kenneth A.

    Results from highly resolved three-dimensional spatio-temporal measurements of the conserved scalar field zeta(x,t) in a turbulent shear flow. Each of these experiments consists of 256 to the 3rd individual point measurements of the local instantaneous conserved scalar value in the flow. The spatial and temporal resolution of these measurements reach beyond the local Kolmogorov scale and resolve the local strain-limited molecular diffusion scale in the flow. The results clearly show molecular mixing occurring in thin strained laminar diffusion layers in a turbulent flow.

  4. Efficacy studies of Vectobac 12as and Teknar HP-D larvicides against 3rd-instar Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus and Culex quinquefasciatus in small plot field studies.

    PubMed

    Floore, T G; Petersen, J L; Shaffer, K R

    2004-12-01

    Efficacy studies were conducted with VectoBac 12AS and Teknar HP-D larvicides against 3rd-instar Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus and Culex quinquefasciatus in small field test plots. The products were obtained off the shelf from distributors and had different lot numbers. They were evaluated over a 2-year period in spring 2002 and 2003. Application rates were 0.29, 0.58, and 1.10 liter/ha and evaluations were made 24 and 48 h after treatment. Both products performed well in these studies, with VectoBac 12AS being more effective at the 0.29 liter/ha rate.

  5. Depositional sequence stratigraphy and architecture of the cretaceous ferron sandstone: Implications for coal and coalbed methane resources - A field excursion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, J.R.; Van Den, Bergh; Barker, C.E.; Tabet, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    This Field Excursion will visit outcrops of the fluvial-deltaic Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, known as the Last Chance delta or Upper Ferron Sandstone. This field guide and the field stops will outline the architecture and depositional sequence stratigraphy of the Upper Ferron Sandstone clastic wedge and explore the stratigraphic positions and compositions of major coal zones. The implications of the architecture and stratigraphy of the Ferron fluvial-deltaic complex for coal and coalbed methane resources will be discussed. Early works suggested that the southwesterly derived deltaic deposits of the the upper Ferron Sandstone clastic wedge were a Type-2 third-order depositional sequence, informally called the Ferron Sequence. These works suggested that the Ferron Sequence is separated by a type-2 sequence boundary from the underlying 3rd-order Hyatti Sequence, which has its sediment source from the northwest. Within the 3rd-order depositional sequence, the deltaic events of the Ferron clastic wedge, recognized as parasequence sets, appear to be stacked into progradational, aggradational, and retrogradational patterns reflecting a generally decreasing sediment supply during an overall slow sea-level rise. The architecture of both near-marine facies and non-marine fluvial facies exhibit well defined trends in response to this decrease in available sediment. Recent studies have concluded that, unless coincident with a depositional sequence boundary, regionally extensive coal zones occur at the tops of the parasequence sets within the Ferron clastic wedge. These coal zones consist of coal seams and their laterally equivalent fissile carbonaceous shales, mudstones, and siltstones, paleosols, and flood plain mudstones. Although the compositions of coal zones vary along depositional dip, the presence of these laterally extensive stratigraphic horizons, above parasequence sets, provides a means of correlating and defining the tops

  6. How to Prepare Long Multi-Block Heteropolymer Chains with AN Ordered Sequence and Controllable Block Lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi; Xie, Zuowei

    2003-03-01

    It had been a long dream in polymer science to synthesize long multi-block heteropolymers with an ordered chain sequence and controllable block lengths. Using ionic or living free radical polymerization, one can prepare copolymers with few blocks, such as diblock and triblock copolymers. The most plausible result with a reasonable yield in this direction was penta-block copolymer. In another way, one could attach each end of polymer blocks with a reactive functional group and then join them together to form a long multi-block heteropolymer chain. However, the functional ends are normally wrapped and hidden inside the coiled polymer blocks in solution, which dramatically reduces their reactivity, so that longer polymer chains cannot be formed in such a way. Recently, combining polymer physics and synthetic chemistry, we have invented a novel self-assembly assisted polypolymerization (SAAP) method to connect 10-100 polymer blocks together to form long multi-block heteropolymer chains with an ordered sequence and controllable narrowly distributed block lengths. The schematic principle is as follows. To demonstrate the principle of SAAP, we used a typical triblock copolymer, poly(methyl methacry-late)-b-polystyrene-b-poly(methylmethacrylate), PMNA-PS-PMMA, prepared by anionic polymeri-zation. The detail of synthesizing the triblock copolymer is not what we try to address here and can be found elsewhere. The number average molar masses of the PMMA and PS blocks used were 7.00 x 102 g/mol and 1.68 x 104 g/mol, respectively. The polydispersity index (Mw/Mn) is 1.25. The ionic ends of the two PMMA blocks were terminated with an excess amount of oxalyl chloride (ClOC-COCl), which led to functional groups (-OC-COCl) at the two ends. The triblock copolymer was soluble in a solvent mixture of methyl acetate and acetonitrile (10.0:1.0, v/v) when the solution temperature was higher than 45 oC. As the temperature decreases, they could self-assemble into a core-shell micelle

  7. Structural Uses for Ductile Ordered Alloys. Report of the Committee on Application Potential for Ductile Ordered Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-31

    Ordered Alloys: Structural Applications and Physical Metallurgy, Proceedings of the 3rd Bolton Landing Conference, Lake George , N.Y., September 1969...ordering reactions. In Order-Disorder Transformations in Alloys, p. 494, Ed. by H. Warlimont. New York: Springer-Verlag. Williams, A. R., J. Kubler

  8. Predicting Performance on 3rd Grade TCAP Scores Utilizing Two, Primary Grade-Level Reading Assessments, the DRA and DIBELS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donna

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify students at risk of failing the Tennessee high-stakes achievement test known as the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP), early literacy skills are monitored using reading assessments. Common reading assessments are based upon varying theories of reading development and do not reflect the necessary reading…

  9. Data in support of crystal structures of highly-ordered long-period stacking-ordered phases with 18R, 14H and 10H-type stacking sequences in the Mg-Zn-Y system.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kyosuke; Nagai, Kaito; Matsumoto, Akihide; Inui, Haruyuki

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structures of highly-ordered Mg-Zn-Y long-period stacking-ordered (LPSO) phases with the 18R, 14H and 10H-type stacking sequences have been investigated by atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and transmission electron microscopy (Kishida et al., 2015) [1]. This data article provides supporting materials for the crystal structure analysis based on the crystallographic theory of the order-disorder (OD) structure and the crystallographic information obtained through the structural optimization for various simple polytypes of the highly-ordered Mg-Zn-Y LPSO phases with the 18R, 14H and 10H-type stacking sequences by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  10. Use of cycle stacking patterns to define third-order depositional sequences: Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation, southern Great basin

    SciTech Connect

    Montanez, I.P.; Droser, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation (CA, NV) is characterized by superimposed scales of cyclicity. Small-scale cycles (0.5 to 10m) occur as shallowing-upward peritidal and subtidal cycles that repeat at high frequencies (10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5}). Systematic changes in stacking patterns of meter-scale cycles define several large-scale (50-250 m) third-order depositional sequences in the Bonanza King Formation. Third-order depositional sequences can be traced within ranges and correlated regionally across the platform. Peritidal cycles in the Bonanza King Formation are both subtidal- and tidal flat-dominated. Tidal flat-dominated cycles consist of muddy bases grading upward into thrombolites or columnar stromatolites all capped by planar stromatolites. Subtidal cycles in the Bonanza King Formation consist of grainstone bases that commonly fine upward and contain stacked hardgrounds. These are overlain by digitate-algal bioherms with grainstone channel fills and/or bioturbated ribbon carbonates with grainstone lenses. Transgressive depositional facies of third-order depositional sequences consist primarily of stacks of subtidal-dominated pertidial cycles and subtidal cycles, whereas regressive depositional facies are dominated by stacks of tidal flat-dominated peritidal cycles and regoliths developed over laminite cycle caps. The use of high frequency cycles in the Bonanza King Formation to delineate regionally developed third-order depositional sequences thus provides a link between cycle stratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy.

  11. International Conference on Superlattices, Microstructures and Microdevices (3rd) Held in Chicago, Illinois on August 17-20, 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-20

    Nurmikko, of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, R. W. Erwin , Brown University; L. A. Kolodziejski, J. J. Rhyne, National Bureau of Standards R. L. Gunshor...this higher-order Schroedinger equation. The enforcement of current continuity leads to analytic connection rules for the overlap Hamiltonian matrix...Urbana, IL 61801 R.W. Erwin and J.J. Rhyne Institute for Materials Science and Engineering National Bureau of Standards Gaithersburg, MD 20899 As an

  12. Influence to 16-QAM of CATV using the third-order pumped distributed Raman amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Gao, Ying; Huang, Shaoling; Cao, Jing

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the practical applicabality of the 3rd-order distributed Raman amplifier (DRA) in Cable Antenna Television (CATV) system, the structure of the 3rd-order DRA is put forward firstly, and the effect of higher order simulated Raman scattering is investigated. Moreover a simulated 3rdorder DRA-CATV system over 120 km fiber is set up to study its performance of 16-QAM as the main digital signal. In order to compare the performances, a simulated 1st-order DRA-CATV system is also set up. Simulation results indicate that the bit error rate (BER) of 16-QAM in the 3rd-order DRACATV system is lower than that in the 1st-order DRA-CATV system. The theory results are beneficial to apply a higher-order Raman pumping (HOP) DRA for the future experiment.

  13. Sequence analysis of a few species of termites (Order: Isoptera) on the basis of partial characterization of COII gene.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Ranbir Chander; Kumari, Mamtesh; Sharma, Vijay Lakshmi; Sodhi, Monika; Mukesh, Manishi; Shouche, Yogesh

    2009-11-01

    The present study was aimed to get the nucleotide sequences of a part of COII mitochondrial gene amplified from individuals of five species of Termites (Isoptera: Termitidae: Macrotermitinae). Four of them belonged to the genus Odontotermes (O. obesus, O. horni, O. bhagwatii and Odontotermes sp.) and one to Microtermes (M. obesi). Partial COII gene fragments were amplified by using specific primers. The sequences so obtained were characterized to calculate the frequencies of each nucleotide bases and a high A + T content was observed. The interspecific pairwise sequence divergence in Odontotermes species ranged from 6.5% to 17.1% across COII fragment. M. obesi sequence diversity ranged from 2.5 with Odontotermes sp. to 19.0% with O. bhagwatii. Phylogenetic trees drawn on the basis of distance neighbour-joining method revealed three main clades clustering all the individuals according to their genera and families.

  14. Research at the CEA in the field of safety in 2nd and 3rd generation light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billot, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    The research programs at the CEA in the field of safety in nuclear reactors are carried out in a framework of international partnerships. Their purpose is to develop studies on: The methods allowing for the determination of earthquake hazards and their consequences; The behaviour of fuel in an accident situation; The comprehension of deflagration and detonation phenomena of hydrogen and the search for effective prevention methods involving an explosion risk; The cooling of corium in order to stop its progression in and outside the vessel thereby reducing the risk of perforating the basemat; The behaviour of the different fission product families according to their volatility for the UO2 and MOX fuels.

  15. A tailed PCR procedure for cost-effective, two-order multiplex sequencing of candidate genes in polyploid plants.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mahmood; Bekele, Wubishet A; Schondelmaier, Joerg; Snowdon, Rod J

    2012-08-01

    Complex polyploid crop genomes can be recalcitrant towards conventional DNA sequencing approaches for allele mining in candidate genes for valuable traits. In the past, this has greatly complicated the transfer of knowledge on promising candidate genes from model plants to even closely related polyploid crops. Next-generation sequencing offers diverse solutions to overcome such difficulties. Here, we present a method for multiplexed 454 sequencing in gene-specific PCR amplicons that can simultaneously address multiple homologues of given target genes. We devised a simple two-step PCR procedure employing a set of barcoded M13/T7 universal fusion primers that enable a cost-effective and efficient amplification of large numbers of target gene amplicons. Sequencing-ready amplicons are generated that can be simultaneously sequenced in pools comprising multiple amplicons from multiple genotypes. High-depth sequencing allows resolution of the resulting sequence reads into contigs representing multiple homologous loci, with only insignificant off-target capture of paralogues or PCR artefacts. In a case study, the procedure was tested in the complex polyploid genome of Brassica napus for a set of nine genes identified in Arabidopsis as candidates for regulation of seed development and oil content. Up to six copies of these genes were expected in B. napus. SNP discovery was performed by pooled multiplex sequencing of 30 amplicons in 20 diverse B. napus accessions with interesting trait variation for oil content, providing a basis for comparative mapping to relevant quantitative trait loci and for subsequent marker-assisted breeding.

  16. Adaptive and Effortful Control and Academic Self-efficacy Beliefs on Achievement: A Longitudinal Study of 1st through 3rd Graders

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Jeffrey; McTigue, Erin; Barrois, Lisa; Hughes, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The linkages between self-regulatory processes and achievement were examined across three years in 733 children beginning at 1st grade (M = 6.57 years, SD = .39 at 1st grade) who were identified as lower achieving in literacy. Accounting for consistencies in measures (from one year prior) and for influences of child’s age, gender, IQ, ethnicity and economic adversity on achievement, results indicate that adaptive/effortful control at 1st grade contributed to both academic self-efficacy beliefs at 2nd grade, and reading (but not math) achievement at 3rd grade. Although academic self-efficacy did not partially mediate the linkage between adaptive/effortful control and achievement, academic self-efficacy beliefs were positively correlated with reading and math. Results support the notion that early efforts to promote children’s self-regulatory skills would enhance future academic self-beliefs and achievement, particularly in literacy. PMID:19169387

  17. X-ray holographic microscopy with zone plates applied to biological samples in the water window using 3rd harmonic radiation from the free-electron laser FLASH.

    PubMed

    Gorniak, T; Heine, R; Mancuso, A P; Staier, F; Christophis, C; Pettitt, M E; Sakdinawat, A; Treusch, R; Guerassimova, N; Feldhaus, J; Gutt, C; Grübel, G; Eisebitt, S; Beyer, A; Gölzhäuser, A; Weckert, E; Grunze, M; Vartanyants, I A; Rosenhahn, A

    2011-06-06

    The imaging of hydrated biological samples - especially in the energy window of 284-540 eV, where water does not obscure the signal of soft organic matter and biologically relevant elements - is of tremendous interest for life sciences. Free-electron lasers can provide highly intense and coherent pulses, which allow single pulse imaging to overcome resolution limits set by radiation damage. One current challenge is to match both the desired energy and the intensity of the light source. We present the first images of dehydrated biological material acquired with 3rd harmonic radiation from FLASH by digital in-line zone plate holography as one step towards the vision of imaging hydrated biological material with photons in the water window. We also demonstrate the first application of ultrathin molecular sheets as suitable substrates for future free-electron laser experiments with biological samples in the form of a rat fibroblast cell and marine biofouling bacteria Cobetia marina.

  18. Variations in the geomagnetic field strength in the 5th 3rd centuries BC in the eastern Mediterranean (according to narrowly dated ceramics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Burakov, K. S.; Il'Ina, T. A.

    2008-06-01

    The magnetization of ceramics from the eastern Mediterranean dated within a short period (mostly shorter than ±20 years) has been studied, which made it possible to specify the geomagnetic field variations on the time interval 5th 3rd centuries BC. The 11-year time series of the geomagnetic field strength values has been constructed. The field strength changes have been considered, which indicated that the centennial variation with a characteristic time of ˜130 years (according to the obtained data) is observed on this time interval as well as during the last two millennia. The ceramic material from the Mayskaya Gora archeological site (Taman), the preparation succession of which was established based on the shape of pottery but the problem of absolute dating was not solved, has been dated.

  19. Limbic system development underlies the emergence of classical fear conditioning during the 3rd and 4th weeks of life in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Alex L.; Erickson, Kristen J.; Shiers, Stephanie I.; Burman, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Classical fear conditioning creates an association between an aversive stimulus and a neutral stimulus. Although the requisite neural circuitry is well understood in mature organisms, the development of these circuits is less well studied. The current experiments examine the ontogeny of fear conditioning and relate it to neuronal activation assessed through immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the amygdala, hippocampus, perirhinal cortex, and hypothalamus of periweanling rats. Rat pups were fear conditioned, or not, during the 3rd or 4th weeks of life. Neuronal activation was assessed by quantifying expression of FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (FOS) using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in Experiment 1. Fos and early growth response gene-1 (EGR1) expression was assessed using qRT-PCR in Experiment 2. Behavioral data confirm that both auditory and contextual fear continue to emerge between PD 17 and 24. The IEG expression data are highly consistent with these behavioral results. IHC results demonstrate significantly more FOS protein expression in the basal amygdala of fear conditioned PD 23 subjects compared to control subjects, but no significant difference at PD 17. qRT-PCR results suggest specific activation of the amygdala only in older subjects during auditory fear expression. A similar effect of age and conditioning status was also observed in the perirhinal cortex during both contextual and auditory fear expression. Overall, the development of fear conditioning occurring between the 3rd and 4th weeks of life appears to be at least partly attributable to changes in activation of the amygdala and perirhinal cortex during fear conditioning or expression. PMID:26820587

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia Strain G2, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia and Able To Nodulate Actinorhizal Plants of the Order Rhamnales

    PubMed Central

    Nouioui, Imen; Gtari, Maher; Göker, Markus; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Tisa, Louis S.; Fernandez, Maria P.; Normand, Philippe; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Varghese, Neha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2016-01-01

    Frankia sp. strain G2 was originally isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia and is characterized by its ability to nodulate actinorhizal plants of the Rhamnales order, but not its original host. It represents one of the largest Frankia genomes so far sequenced (9.5 Mbp). PMID:27231368

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia Strain G2, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia and Able To Nodulate Actinorhizal Plants of the Order Rhamnales.

    PubMed

    Nouioui, Imen; Gtari, Maher; Göker, Markus; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Tisa, Louis S; Fernandez, Maria P; Normand, Philippe; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Varghese, Neha; Reddy, T B K; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-26

    Frankia sp. strain G2 was originally isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia and is characterized by its ability to nodulate actinorhizal plants of the Rhamnales order, but not its original host. It represents one of the largest Frankia genomes so far sequenced (9.5 Mbp).

  2. Method and software for using m-sequences to characterize parallel components of higher-order visual tracking behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Jacob W.; Keles, Mehmet F.; Mongeau, Jean-Michel; Lu, Patrick M.; Frye, Mark A.; Shoemaker, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    A moving visual figure may contain first-order signals defined by variation in mean luminance, as well as second-order signals defined by constant mean luminance and variation in luminance envelope, or higher-order signals that cannot be estimated by taking higher moments of the luminance distribution. Separating these properties of a moving figure to experimentally probe the visual subsystems that encode them is technically challenging and has resulted in debated mechanisms of visual object detection by flies. Our prior work took a white noise systems identification approach using a commercially available electronic display system to characterize the spatial variation in the temporal dynamics of two distinct subsystems for first- and higher-order components of visual figure tracking. The method relied on the use of single pixel displacements of two visual stimuli according to two binary maximum length shift register sequences (m-sequences) and cross-correlation of each m-sequence with time-varying flight steering measurements. The resultant spatio-temporal action fields represent temporal impulse responses parameterized by the azimuthal location of the visual figure, one STAF for first-order and another for higher-order components of compound stimuli. Here we review m-sequence and reverse correlation procedures, then describe our application in detail, provide Matlab code, validate the STAFs, and demonstrate the utility and robustness of STAFs by predicting the results of other published experimental procedures. This method has demonstrated how two relatively modest innovations on classical white noise analysis—the inclusion of space as a way to organize response kernels and the use of linear decoupling to measure the response to two channels of visual information simultaneously—could substantially improve our basic understanding of visual processing in the fly. PMID:25400550

  3. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, Blake T.; Deodato, Chloe R.; Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ryken, Scott A.; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K.; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J.; Barlow, Steven B.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Richardson, Paul M.

    2015-09-23

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two “red” RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. In conclusion, the Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes.

  4. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae)

    DOE PAGES

    Hovde, Blake T.; Deodato, Chloe R.; Hunsperger, Heather M.; ...

    2015-09-23

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. Themore » nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two “red” RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. In conclusion, the Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes.« less

  5. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae).

    PubMed

    Hovde, Blake T; Deodato, Chloe R; Hunsperger, Heather M; Ryken, Scott A; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J; Barlow, Steven B; Starkenburg, Shawn R; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼ 40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two "red" RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. The Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes.

  6. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Hovde, Blake T.; Deodato, Chloe R.; Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ryken, Scott A.; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K.; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J.; Barlow, Steven B.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two “red” RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. The Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes. PMID:26397803

  7. A Kinesthetic Learning Approach to Earth Science for 3rd and 4th Grade Students on the Pajarito Plateau, Los Alamos, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wershow, H. N.; Green, M.; Stocker, A.; Staires, D.

    2010-12-01

    Current efforts towards Earth Science literacy in New Mexico are guided by the New Mexico Science Benchmarks [1]. We are geoscience professionals in Los Alamos, NM who believe there is an important role for non-traditional educators utilizing innovative teaching methods. We propose to further Earth Science literacy for local 3rd and 4th grade students using a kinesthetic learning approach, with the goal of fostering an interactive relationship between the students and their geologic environment. We will be working in partnership with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), which teaches the natural heritage of the Pajarito Plateau to 3rd and 4th grade students from the surrounding area, as well as the Family YMCA’s Adventure Programs Director. The Pajarito Plateau provides a remarkable geologic classroom because minimal structural features complicate the stratigraphy and dramatic volcanic and erosional processes are plainly on display and easily accessible. Our methodology consists of two approaches. First, we will build an interpretive display of the local geology at PEEC that will highlight prominent rock formations and geologic processes seen on a daily basis. It will include a simplified stratigraphic section with field specimens and a map linked to each specimen’s location to encourage further exploration. Second, we will develop and implement a kinesthetic curriculum for an exploratory field class. Active engagement with geologic phenomena will take place in many forms, such as a scavenger hunt for precipitated crystals in the vesicles of basalt flows and a search for progressively smaller rhyodacite clasts scattered along an actively eroding canyon. We believe students will be more receptive to origin explanations when they possess a piece of the story. Students will be provided with field books to make drawings of geologic features. This will encourage independent assessment of phenomena and introduce the skill of scientific observation. We

  8. The Safety of Artemisinin Derivatives for the Treatment of Malaria in the 2nd or 3rd Trimester of Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Anna Maria; Sevene, Esperanca; Dellicour, Stephanie; Weiss, Noel S.; Emerson, Scott; Steketee, Richard; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Stergachis, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Given the high morbidity for mother and fetus associated with malaria in pregnancy, safe and efficacious drugs are needed for treatment. Artemisinin derivatives are the most effective antimalarials, but are associated with teratogenic and embryotoxic effects in animal models when used in early pregnancy. However, several organ systems are still under development later in pregnancy. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women treated with artemisinins monotherapy or as artemisinin-based combination therapy during the 2nd or 3rd trimesters relative to pregnant women who received non-artemisinin antimalarials or none at all. Pooled odds ratio (POR) were calculated using Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model with a 0.5 continuity correction for zero events. Eligible studies were identified through Medline, Embase, and the Malaria in Pregnancy Consortium Library. Twenty studies (11 cohort studies and 9 randomized controlled trials) contributed to the analysis, with 3,707 women receiving an artemisinin, 1,951 a non-artemisinin antimalarial, and 13,714 no antimalarial. The PORs (95% confidence interval (CI)) for stillbirth, fetal loss, and congenital anomalies when comparing artemisinin versus quinine were 0.49 (95% CI 0.24–0.97, I2 = 0%, 3 studies); 0.58 (95% CI 0.31–1.16, I2 = 0%, 6 studies); and 1.00 (95% CI 0.27–3.75, I2 = 0%, 3 studies), respectively. The PORs comparing artemisinin users to pregnant women who received no antimalarial were 1.13 (95% CI 0.77–1.66, I2 = 86.7%, 3 studies); 1.10 (95% CI 0.79–1.54, I2 = 0%, 4 studies); and 0.79 (95% CI 0.37–1.67, I2 = 0%, 3 studies) for miscarriage, stillbirth and congenital anomalies respectively. Treatment with artemisinin in 2nd and 3rd trimester was not associated with increased risks of congenital malformations or miscarriage and may be was associated with a reduced risk of stillbirths compared to quinine. This study updates the reviews

  9. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  10. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Lower Cretaceous in Aer Sag, Erlian Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; De Batist, Marc; Wu, Chonglong

    2014-05-01

    The concepts of sequence stratigraphy, initially developed for the study of marine depositional systems, are increasingly also being applied to sequences deposited in lacustrine basins, particularly in the context of petroleum exploration. However, lacustrine basins differ from marine basins. They are typically smaller, exhibit a strong diversification in sedimentary facies, generally contain thinner sequences and are characterized by multiple sedimentary source regions. These characteristics should be taken into account when analyzing sequence stratigraphy in lacustrine basins. Aer Sag is a balanced-fill sag in Erlian basin, North China. During the Early Cretaceous tectonic subsidence is the main controlling factor for sequence development. Based on the unconformities observed at the top of different inversion-induced depositional cycles, the 2nd-order sequence of the Lower Cretaceous can be sub-divided into six 3rd-order sequences of which the lower four, which bear most of the hydrocarbon reservoirs, are the focus of this study. Generally, a complete 3rd-order sequence can be partitioned into four systems tracts: i.e. lowstand systems tract (LST), transgressive systems tract (TST), highstand systems tract (HST) and forced regression systems tract (FRST). In LSTs, tectonic activity is weak and there is a slow subsidence rate. Thus, the rate of creation of accommodation space is so slow that coarsening-upward prograding sedimentary units develop. In TSTs, tectonic activity becomes stronger and the rate of creation of accommodation space outpaces the rate of sediment supply. TSTs are characterized by fining-upward retrograding sedimentary units and by onlaps on seismic profiles that are caused by the expansion of the lake. In HSTs, tectonic activity slows down again and the rate of creation of accommodation space becomes lower than the rate of sediment supply, which causes the lake to shrink and the development of coarsening-upward prograding sedimentary units. In

  11. Veterinary Microbiology, 3rd Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary Microbiology, Third Edition is organized into four sections and begins with an updated and expanded introductory section on infectious disease pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. The second section covers bacterial and fungal pathogens, and the third section describes viral d...

  12. Co-conservation of rRNA tetraloop sequences and helix length suggests involvement of the tetraloops in higher-order interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Siefert, J. L.; Fox, G. E.; Murgola, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Terminal loops containing four nucleotides (tetraloops) are common in structural RNAs, and they frequently conform to one of three sequence motifs, GNRA, UNCG, or CUUG. Here we compare available sequences and secondary structures for rRNAs from bacteria, and we show that helices capped by phylogenetically conserved GNRA loops display a strong tendency to be of conserved length. The simplest interpretation of this correlation is that the conserved GNRA loops are involved in higher-order interactions, intramolecular or intermolecular, resulting in a selective pressure for maintaining the lengths of these helices. A small number of conserved UNCG loops were also found to be associated with conserved length helices, consistent with the possibility that this type of tetraloop also takes part in higher-order interactions.

  13. Comparative genome analysis and phylogenetic relationship of order Liliales insight from the complete plastid genome sequences of two Lilies (Lilium longiflorum and Alstroemeria aurea).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Monocots are one of the most diverse, successful and economically important clades of angiosperms. We attempt to analyse the complete plastid genome sequences of two lilies and their lengths were 152,793bp in Lilium longiflorum (Liliaceae) and 155,510bp in Alstroemeria aurea (Alstroemeriaceae). Phylogenetic analyses were performed for 28 taxa including major lineages of monocots using the sequences of 79 plastid genes for clarifying the phylogenetic relationship of the order Liliales. The sister relationship of Liliales and Asparagales-commelinids was improved with high resolution. Comparative analyses of inter-familial and inter-specific sequence variation were also carried out among three families of Liliaceae, Smilacaceae, and Alstroemeriaceae, and between two Lilium species of L. longflorum and L. superbum. Gene content and order were conserved in the order Liliales except infA loss in Smilax and Alstroemeria. IR boundaries were similar in IRa, however, IRb showed different extension patterns as JLB of Smilax and JSB in Alstroemeria. Ka/Ks ratio was high in matK among the pair-wise comparison of three families and the most variable genes were psaJ, ycf1, rpl32, rpl22, matK, and ccsA among the three families and rps15, rpoA, matK, and ndhF between Lilium.

  14. Comparative Genome Analysis and Phylogenetic Relationship of Order Liliales Insight from the Complete Plastid Genome Sequences of Two Lilies (Lilium longiflorum and Alstroemeria aurea)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Monocots are one of the most diverse, successful and economically important clades of angiosperms. We attempt to analyse the complete plastid genome sequences of two lilies and their lengths were 152,793bp in Liliumlongiflorum (Liliaceae) and 155,510bp in Alstroemeriaaurea (Alstroemeriaceae). Phylogenetic analyses were performed for 28 taxa including major lineages of monocots using the sequences of 79 plastid genes for clarifying the phylogenetic relationship of the order Liliales. The sister relationship of Liliales and Asparagales-commelinids was improved with high resolution. Comparative analyses of inter-familial and inter-specific sequence variation were also carried out among three families of Liliaceae, Smilacaceae, and Alstroemeriaceae, and between two Lilium species of L. longflorum and L. superbum. Gene content and order were conserved in the order Liliales except infA loss in Smilax and Alstroemeria. IR boundaries were similar in IRa, however, IRb showed different extension patterns as JLB of Smilax and JSB in Alstroemeria. Ka/Ks ratio was high in matK among the pair-wise comparison of three families and the most variable genes were psaJ, ycf1, rpl32, rpl22, matK, and ccsA among the three families and rps15, rpoA, matK, and ndhF between Lilium. PMID:23950788

  15. Stable isotope and trace element studies on gladiators and contemporary Romans from Ephesus (Turkey, 2nd and 3rd Ct. AD)--mplications for differences in diet.

    PubMed

    Lösch, Sandra; Moghaddam, Negahnaz; Grossschmidt, Karl; Risser, Daniele U; Kanz, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The gladiator cemetery discovered in Ephesus (Turkey) in 1993 dates to the 2nd and 3rd century AD. The aim of this study is to reconstruct diverse diet, social stratification, and migration of the inhabitants of Roman Ephesus and the distinct group of gladiators. Stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulphur isotope analysis were applied, and inorganic bone elements (strontium, calcium) were determined. In total, 53 individuals, including 22 gladiators, were analysed. All individuals consumed C3 plants like wheat and barley as staple food. A few individuals show indication of consumption of C4 plants. The δ13C values of one female from the gladiator cemetery and one gladiator differ from all other individuals. Their δ34S values indicate that they probably migrated from another geographical region or consumed different foods. The δ15N values are relatively low in comparison to other sites from Roman times. A probable cause for the depletion of 15N in Ephesus could be the frequent consumption of legumes. The Sr/Ca-ratios of the gladiators were significantly higher than the values of the contemporary Roman inhabitants. Since the Sr/Ca-ratio reflects the main Ca-supplier in the diet, the elevated values of the gladiators might suggest a frequent use of a plant ash beverage, as mentioned in ancient texts.

  16. Stable Isotope and Trace Element Studies on Gladiators and Contemporary Romans from Ephesus (Turkey, 2nd and 3rd Ct. AD) - Implications for Differences in Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lösch, Sandra; Moghaddam, Negahnaz; Grossschmidt, Karl; Risser, Daniele U.; Kanz, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The gladiator cemetery discovered in Ephesus (Turkey) in 1993 dates to the 2nd and 3rd century AD. The aim of this study is to reconstruct diverse diet, social stratification, and migration of the inhabitants of Roman Ephesus and the distinct group of gladiators. Stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulphur isotope analysis were applied, and inorganic bone elements (strontium, calcium) were determined. In total, 53 individuals, including 22 gladiators, were analysed. All individuals consumed C3 plants like wheat and barley as staple food. A few individuals show indication of consumption of C4 plants. The δ13C values of one female from the gladiator cemetery and one gladiator differ from all other individuals. Their δ34S values indicate that they probably migrated from another geographical region or consumed different foods. The δ15N values are relatively low in comparison to other sites from Roman times. A probable cause for the depletion of 15N in Ephesus could be the frequent consumption of legumes. The Sr/Ca-ratios of the gladiators were significantly higher than the values of the contemporary Roman inhabitants. Since the Sr/Ca-ratio reflects the main Ca-supplier in the diet, the elevated values of the gladiators might suggest a frequent use of a plant ash beverage, as mentioned in ancient texts. PMID:25333366

  17. The perceptions of professional soccer players on the risk of injury from competition and training on natural grass and 3rd generation artificial turf

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe professional soccer players’ perceptions towards injuries, physical recovery and the effect of surface related factors on injury resulting from soccer participation on 3rd generation artificial turf (FT) compared to natural grass (NG). Methods Information was collected through a questionnaire that was completed by 99 professional soccer players from 6 teams competing in Major League Soccer (MLS) during the 2011 season. Results The majority (93% and 95%) of the players reported that playing surface type and quality influenced the risk of sustaining an injury. Players believed that playing and training on FT increased the risk of sustaining a non-contact injury as opposed to a contact injury. The players identified three surface related risk factors on FT, which they related to injuries and greater recovery times: 1) Greater surface stiffness 2) Greater surface friction 3) Larger metabolic cost to playing on artificial grounds. Overall, 94% of the players chose FT as the surface most likely to increase the risk of sustaining an injury. Conclusions Players believe that the risk of injury differs according to surface type, and that FT is associated with an increased risk of non-contact injury. Future studies should be designed prospectively to systematically track the perceptions of groups of professional players training and competing on FT and NG. PMID:24581229

  18. Trends in the nature of provision in ophthalmology services and resources and barriers to education in ophthalmic nursing: 3rd National UK survey.

    PubMed

    Czuber-Dochan, Wladyslawa J; Waterman, Christine G; Waterman, Heather A

    2006-04-01

    Over the last decade in the United Kingdom (UK), the roles of nurses have become increasingly specialised to support a more efficient and effective health service. In ophthalmology, the changes are most visible in the growing number of patients being treated as day case and the greater nursing contribution to patient outcomes. To support this change there is a continuing need for educational institutions to create opportunities to meet the training needs of nurses working in both specialised areas and at the advance level of practice. This article reports on a 3rd national survey the aims of which were to investigate trends in the nature and provision of ophthalmic services and the resources and barriers to education in ophthalmic nursing. The results demonstrate that over the three surveys there has been a significant increase of pre-operative assessment units and a significant decrease of designated ophthalmic wards. Between the second and third survey, the results indicate fewer difficulties with funding but there has been an increase of respondents stating a lack of training institutions offering ophthalmic courses. The survey shows that at a time when nurses need to acquire ophthalmic nursing skills and knowledge there appear to be fewer opportunities for them to access ophthalmic courses.

  19. Evidence of human-induced morphodynamic changes along the Campania coastal areas (southern Italy) since the 3rd-4th cent. AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Ermolli, Elda; Romano, Paola; Liuzza, Viviana; Amato, Vincenzo; Ruello, Maria Rosaria; Di Donato, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    Campania has always offered suitable climatic and physiographic conditions for human settlements since prehistoric times. In particular, many Graeco-Roman towns developed along its coasts starting from the 7th-6th cent. BC. In the last decade, geoarchaelogical surveys have been carried out in the archaeological excavations of Neapolis, Paestum and Elea-Velia allowing the main steps of the landscape evolution around these towns to be defined in detail. The greek town of Neapolis rose in the late 6th cent. BC [1] on a terrace overlooking a low-relief rocky coast surrounded by volcanic hills. Port activities developed in a protected bay facing the town from the 4th-2nd cent. BC up to the 4th cent. AD, as testified by the discovery of structures and shipwrecks [2, 3, 4]. Starting from the 3rd cent. AD a spit bar formed at the bay entrance causing the progressive establishment of a lagoon which was gradually filled up by alluvial inputs and completely closed in the 5th cent. AD. During the same period, episodes of increased alluvial inputs were also recorded further west along the coast, where a narrow sandy beach formed at the cliff toe. The greek town of Poseidonia, renamed Paestum by the Romans, was founded in the 540 BC on a travertine terrace facing the sandy littoral of a prograding coastal plain [5]. In front of the main town door, a coastal lagoon developed thanks to the growth of a dune ridge and was probably used for harbor activities [5]. After this period the shoreline shifted seawards, another dune ridge formed and the back-ridge depression was filled with fluvial-marshy deposits, slowly drying up. Phases of travertine deposition, which characterized the SE sector of the plain all along the Holocene, were recorded in the northern and southern quarters of the town in historical times and were connected to the abandonment of the town in the early Medieval times. The greek colony of Elea-Velia was located on top of a siliciclastic promontory where the ruins of

  20. Sunphotometric Measurement of Columnar H2O and Aerosol Optical Depth During the 3rd Water Vapor IOP in Fall 2000 at the SGP ARM Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B; Eilers, J. A.; McIntosh, D. M.; Longo, K.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Braun, J.; Rocken, C.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We conducted ground-based measurements with the Ames Airborne Tracking 6-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-6) during the 3rd Water Vapor IOP (WVIOP3), September 18 - October 8, 2000 at the SGP ARM site. For this deployment our primary result was columnar water vapor (CWV) obtained from continuous solar transmittance measurements in the 0.94-micron band. In addition, we simultaneously measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 380, 450, 525, 864 and 1020 nm. During the IOP, preliminary results of CWV and AOD were displayed in real-time. The result files were made available to other investigators by noon of the next day. During WVIOP3 those data were shown on the daily intercomparison plots on the IOP web-site. Our preliminary results for CWV fell within the spread of values obtained from other techniques. After conclusion of WVIOP3, AATS-6 was shipped directly to Mauna Loa, Hawaii for post-mission calibration. The updated calibration, a cloud screening technique for AOD, along with other mostly cosmetic changes were applied to the WVIOP3 data set and released as version 0.1. The resulting changes in CWV are small, the changes in AOD and Angstrom parameter are more noticeable. Data version 0.1 was successfully submitted to the ARM External Data Center. In the poster we will show data examples for both CWV and AOD. We will also compare our CWV results with those obtained from a GPS (Global Positioning System) slant path method.

  1. Insights into the preferential order of strand exchange in the Cre/loxP recombinase system: impact of the DNA spacer flanking sequence and flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi-Ghanem, Josephine; Samsonov, Sergey A.; Pisabarro, M. Teresa

    2015-03-01

    The Cre/loxP system is widely used as a genetic tool to manipulate DNA. Cre recombinase catalyzes site-specific recombination between 34 bp loxP sites. Each loxP site is recognized by two Cre molecules assuming a cleaving (CreC) and non-cleaving (CreNC) activity. Despite the symmetry in the sequences of the arms of loxP, available biochemical data show strong evidence that the recombination reaction is asymmetric with a preferred strand exchange order. The asymmetry comes from the spacer separating the two sets of palindromic arms of the loxP sequence. However, it remains to be understood how this preferential order is established. We apply computational structure-based methods and perform a thorough detailed analysis of available structural and biochemical information on the Cre/loxP system in order to investigate such asymmetry in the recombination, and we propose a rationale to explain the determinants favoring the strand exchange order. We show that the structural properties of the DNA flanking sequence of the spacer guide the recombination, and we establish the role of residues R118, R121 and K122 from CreC, which contact the spacer region and by clamping the DNA inhibit the cleavage on the second arm of loxP. Our studies give an atomistic insight on the synapsis state of the recombination process in the Cre/loxP system and highlight the importance of the flexibility and other intrinsic properties of the flanking regions of the DNA spacer to establish a preferential strand exchange order.

  2. Does 3rd age plus 3rd world equal 3rd class?

    PubMed

    Tout, K

    1992-04-01

    The patterns of care of the aged population are being influenced by demographic changes, migration, and industrialization in developing countries. There is no longer a secure place for the elders in the community as chiefs, sages, or useful members of the household. In very large mega-cities the aged living in an extended family are more prone to psychological problems than in a lone living situation. There are many variations in the degree of abandonment or loss of dignity, which are described in examples from Vilcabamba, Potosi, Lima, and Belize. For example in Belize, there are no cities to migrate to so people leave to seek their fortunes in the US or the UK. Solutions are possible within the community. The experiences of HelpAge International are reported for Pro Vida, Colombia; India; and Sri Lanka. In Colombia efforts were made to acquire a bakery so that the elderly could be employed in bread baking, donating loaves to institutions, and selling half the loaves on the street. Other projects involved improving living conditions for lone old people in shanty towns and training social workers. The institutional aim was to concentrate on a locale. Attention was given to providing instruction in classrooms to enlighten youth about the needs of the elderly. HelpAge in India concentrated on eye problems of the elderly in remote areas through awareness and fundraising campaigns. HelpAge Sri Lanka has set up seminars and training programs which have been models for similar programs in Thailand. Shared experience with the problems of aged beggars suggests that funding must come from nongovernmental agencies. The cultivation and sale of herbs by the elderly was promoted in Vilcabamba; in Jamaica a memory bank was established for preserving cultural traditions. Abandoned industries have been revived. The needs of the organizers, who are primarily volunteers, are organization skills. Governments can supplement meager funds by enhancing traditional life, by removing obstacles to foreign aid, and by avoiding spending on prestige projects and questionable projects imported from Western countries. Reinforcement of families and of local community groups is needed.

  3. Metabolic engineering of E.coli for the production of a precursor to artemisinin, an anti-malarial drug [Chapter 25 in Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Christopher; Keasling, Jay

    2011-07-18

    This document is Chapter 25 in the Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition. Topics covered include: Incorporation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Biosynthetic Pathway into E. coli; Amorpha-4,11-Diene Pathway Optimization; "-Omics" Analyses for Increased Amorpha-4,11-Diene Production; Biosynthetic Oxidation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene.

  4. Third order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods for time dependent convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng; Huang, Hongying; Yan, Jue

    2015-12-21

    We develop 3rd order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods [8], [9], [19] and [21] for convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular mesh. We carefully calculate the normal derivative numerical flux across element edges and prove that, with proper choice of parameter pair (β01) in the numerical flux formula, the quadratic polynomial solution satisfies strict maximum principle. The polynomial solution is bounded within the given range and third order accuracy is maintained. There is no geometric restriction on the meshes and obtuse triangles are allowed in the partition. As a result, a sequence of numerical examples are carried out to demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the maximum-principle-satisfying limiter.

  5. Third order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods for time dependent convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zheng; Huang, Hongying; Yan, Jue

    2015-12-21

    We develop 3rd order maximum-principle-satisfying direct discontinuous Galerkin methods [8], [9], [19] and [21] for convection diffusion equations on unstructured triangular mesh. We carefully calculate the normal derivative numerical flux across element edges and prove that, with proper choice of parameter pair (β0,β1) in the numerical flux formula, the quadratic polynomial solution satisfies strict maximum principle. The polynomial solution is bounded within the given range and third order accuracy is maintained. There is no geometric restriction on the meshes and obtuse triangles are allowed in the partition. As a result, a sequence of numerical examples are carried out to demonstratemore » the accuracy and capability of the maximum-principle-satisfying limiter.« less

  6. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  7. A novel amperometric alcohol biosensor developed in a 3rd generation bioelectrode platform using peroxidase coupled ferrocene activated alcohol oxidase as biorecognition system.

    PubMed

    Chinnadayyala, Somasekhar R; Kakoti, Ankana; Santhosh, Mallesh; Goswami, Pranab

    2014-05-15

    Alcohol oxidase (AOx) with a two-fold increase in efficiency (Kcat/Km) was achieved by physical entrapment of the activator ferrocene in the protein matrix through a simple microwave based partial unfolding technique and was used to develop a 3rd generation biosensor for improved detection of alcohol in liquid samples. The ferrocene molecules were stably entrapped in the AOx protein matrix in a molar ratio of ~3:1 through electrostatic interaction with the Trp residues involved in the functional activity of the enzyme as demonstrated by advanced analytical techniques. The sensor was fabricated by immobilizing ferrocene entrapped alcohol oxidase (FcAOx) and sol-gel chitosan film coated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon electrode through layer-by-layer technique. The bioelectrode reactions involved the formation of H2O2 by FcAOx biocatalysis of substrate alcohol followed by HRP-catalyzed reduction of the liberated H2O2 through MWCNT supported direct electron transfer mechanism. The amperometric biosensor exhibited a linear response to alcohol in the range of 5.0 × 10(-6) to 30 × 10(-4)mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), and a sensitivity of 150 µA mM(-1) cm(-2). The biosensor response was steady for 28 successive measurements completed in a period of 5h and retained ~90% of the original response even after four weeks when stored at 4 °C. The biosensor was successfully applied for the determination of alcohol in commercial samples and its performance was validated by comparing with the data obtained by GC analyses of the samples.

  8. Non-destructive measurement of demineralization and remineralization in the occlusal pits and fissures of extracted 3rd molars with PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulsung; Hsu, Dennis J.; Le, Michael H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image the remineralization of early artificial caries lesion on smooth enamel surfaces of human and bovine teeth. However, most new dental decay is found in the pits and fissures of the occlusal surfaces of posterior dentition and it is in these high risk areas where the performance of new caries imaging devices need to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that PS-OCT can be used to measure the subsequent remineralization of artificial lesions produced in the pits and fissures of extracted 3rd molars. A PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of occlusal surfaces exposed to a demineralizing solution at pH-4.5 followed by a fluoride containing remineralizing solution at pH-7.0 containing 2-ppm fluoride. The integrated reflectivity was calculated to a depth of 200-µm in the entire lesion area using an automated image processing algorithm. Although a well-defined surface zone was clearly resolved in only a few of the samples that underwent remineralization, the PS-OCT measurements indicated a significant (p<0.05) reduction in the integrated reflectivity between the severity of the lesions that were exposed to the remineralization solution and those that were not. The lesion depth and mineral loss were also measured with polarized light microscopy and transverse microradiography after sectioning the teeth. These results show that PS-OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the remineralization potential of anti-caries agents in the important pits and fissures of the occlusal surface.

  9. Stellar Occultations by Large TNOs on 2012: The February 3rd by (208996) 2003 AZ84, and the February 17th by (50000) Quaoar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga Ribas, Felipe; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Lecacheux, J.; Colas, F.; Vachier, F.; Tanga, P.; Sposetti, S.; Brosch, N.; Kaspi, S.; Manulis, I.; Baug, T.; Chandrasekhar, T.; Ganesh, S.; Jain, J.; Mohan, V.; Sharma, A.; Garcia-Lozano, R.; Klotz, A.; Frappa, E.; Jehin, E.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Behrend, R.; Roques, F.; Widemann, T.; Morales, N.; Thirouin, A.; Mahasena, P.; Benkhaldoun, Z.; Daassou, A.; Rinner, C.; Ofek, E. O.

    2012-10-01

    On February 2012, two stellar occultation's by large Trans-neptunian Objects (TNO's) were observed by our group. On the 3rd, an event by (208996) 2003 AZ84 was recorded from Mont Abu Observatory and IUCAA Girawali Observatory in India and from Weizmann Observatory in Israel. On the 17th, a stellar occultation by (50000) Quaoar was observed from south France and Switzerland. Both occultations are the second observed by our group for each object, and will be used to improve the results obtained on the previous events. The occultation by 2003 AZ84 is the first multi-chord event recorded for this object. From the single chord event on January 8th 2011, Braga-Ribas et al. 2011 obtained a lower limit of 573 +/- 21 km. From the 2012 occultation the longest chord has a size of 662 +/- 50 km. The other chords will permit to determine the size and shape of the TNO, and derive other physical parameters, such as the geometric albedo. The Quaoar occultation was observed from south of France (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, TAROT telescope and Valensole) and from Gnosca, Switzerland. Unfortunately, all three sites in France are almost at the same Quaoar's latitude, so in practice, we have two chords that can be used to fit Quaoar's limb. The resulting fit will be compared with the results obtained by Braga-Ribas et al. 2011. Braga-Ribas F., Sicardy B., et al. 2011, EPSC-DPS2011, 1060.Ribas F., Sicardy B., et al. 2011, EPSC-DPS2011, 1060.

  10. Molecular signatures (conserved indels) in protein sequences that are specific for the order Pasteurellales and distinguish two of its main clades.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-01-01

    The members of the order Pasteurellales are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the rRNA trees and no convincing biochemical or molecular markers are known that distinguish them from all other bacteria. The genome sequences for 20 Pasteurellaceae species/strains are now publicly available. We report here detailed analyses of protein sequences from these genomes to identify conserved signature indels (CSIs) that are specific for either all Pasteurellales or its major clades. We describe more than 23 CSIs in widely distributed genes/proteins that are uniquely shared by all sequenced Pasteurellaceae species/strains but are not found in any other bacteria. Twenty-one additional CSIs are also specific for the Pasteurellales except in some of these cases homologues were not detected in a few species or the CSI was also present in an isolated non-Pasteurellaceae species. The sequenced Pasteurellaceae species formed two distinct clades in a phylogenetic tree based upon concatenated sequences for 10 conserved proteins. The first of these clades consisting of Aggregatibacter, Pasteurella, Actinobacillus succinogenes, Mannheimia succiniciproducens, Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus somnus was also independently supported by 13 uniquely shared CSIs that are not present in other Pasteurellaceae species or other bacteria. Another clade consisting of the remaining Pasteurellaceae species (viz. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Actinobacillus minor, Haemophilus ducryi, Mannheimia haemolytica and Haemophilus parasuis) was also strongly and independently supported by nine CSIs that are uniquely present in these bacteria. The order Pasteurellales is presently made up of a single family, Pasteurellaceae, that encompasses all of its genera. In this context, our identification of two distinct clades within the Pasteurellales, which are supported by both phylogenetic analyses and by multiple highly specific molecular markers, strongly argues for and

  11. CENP-B box and pJalpha sequence distribution in human alpha satellite higher-order repeats (HOR).

    PubMed

    Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Vladimir; Basar, Ivan; Gluncić, Matko; Pavin, Nenad; Pilas, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Using our Key String Algorithm (KSA) to analyze Build 35.1 assembly we determined consensus alpha satellite higher-order repeats (HOR) and consensus distributions of CENP-B box and pJalpha motif in human chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 17, 19, and X. We determined new suprachromosomal family (SF) assignments: SF5 for 13mer (2211 bp), SF5 for 13mer (2214 bp), SF2 for 11mer (1869 bp), SF1 for 18mer (3058 bp), SF3 for 12mer (2047 bp), SF3 for 14mer (2379 bp), and SF5 for 17mer (2896 bp) in chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 10, 11, 17, and 19, respectively. In chromosome 5 we identified SF5 13mer without any CENP-B box and pJalpha motif, highly homologous (96%) to 13mer in chromosome 19. Additionally, in chromosome 19 we identified new SF5 17mer with one CENP-B box and pJalpha motif, aligned to 13mer by deleting four monomers. In chromosome 11 we identified SF3 12mer, homologous to 12mer in chromosome X. In chromosome 10 we identified new SF1 18mer with eight CENP-B boxes in every other monomer (except one). In chromosome 4 we identified new SF5 13mer with CENP-B box in three consecutive monomers. We found four exceptions to the rule that CENP-B box belongs to type B and pJalpha motif to type A monomers.

  12. A pedagogical example of second-order arithmetic sequences applied to the construction of computer passwords by upper elementary grade students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Porter E.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is (1) to present how general education elementary school age students constructed computer passwords using digital root sums and second-order arithmetic sequences, (2) argue that computer password construction can be used as an engaging introduction to generate interest in elementary school students to study mathematics related to computer science, and (3) share additional mathematical ideas accessible to elementary school students that can be used to create computer passwords. This paper serves to fill a current gap in the literature regarding the integration of mathematical content accessible to upper elementary school students and aspects of computer science in general, and computer password construction in particular. In addition, the protocols presented here can serve as a hook to generate further interest in mathematics and computer science. Students learned to create a random-looking computer password by using biometric measurements of their shoe size, height, and age in months and to create a second-order arithmetic sequence, then converted the resulting numbers into characters that become their computer passwords. This password protocol can be used to introduce students to good computer password habits that can serve a foundation for a life-long awareness of data security. A refinement of the password protocol is also presented.

  13. ICOM2012: 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (Belgrade, Serbia, 2-6 September 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Antić, Željka; Viana, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    The 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (ICOM2012) was held in Belgrade (Serbia) from 2 to 6 September 2012 (figure 1). The conference was organized by the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade (Serbia) and the Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (France), and supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia and Optical Society of America. ICOM2012 was a follow-up to the two previous, successful ICOM conferences held in Herceg Novi in 2006 and 2009. The conference aimed at providing a forum for scientists in optical materials to debate on: • Luminescent materials and nanomaterials • Hybrid optical materials (organic/inorganic) • Characterization techniques of optical materials • Luminescence mechanisms and energy transfers • Theory and modeling of optical processes • Ultrafast-laser processing of materials • Optical sensors • Medical imaging • Advanced optical materials in photovoltaics and biophotonics • Photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy and phenomena The conference stressed the value of a fundamental scientific understanding of optical materials. A particular accent was put on wide band-gap materials in crystalline, glass and nanocrystalline forms. The applications mainly involved lasers, scintillators and phosphors. Rare earth and transition metal ions introduced as dopants in various hosts were considered, and their impact on the optical properties were detailed in several presentations. This volume contains selected contributions of speakers and participants of the ICOM2012 conference. The conference provided a unique opportunity for about 200 scientists from 32 countries to discuss recent progress in the field of optical materials. During the three and half days, 21 invited talks and 52 contributed lectures were given, with a special event in memory of our dear colleague Professor Dr Tsoltan

  14. "Are You Human Beings?"Order and Knowledge Construction through Questioning in Primary Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margutti, Piera

    2006-01-01

    This article examines how question-answer sequences are constructed in primary school instructional activities. The interaction between teacher and students in two 3rd-year groups is analyzed using a conversation-analytic approach. Four questioning patterns--"yes-no, alternative, wh-questions", and a "non-interrogative format" very frequently used…

  15. Rosse, 3rd Earl of [William Parsons, Lord Rosse, Lord Oxmantown] (1800-67) and Rosse, 4th Earl of [Laurence Parsons, Lord Rosse, Lord Oxmantown] (1840-1908)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Irish astronomer and landowner, the 3rd Lord Rosse was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and Oxford as a mathematician. He became interested in astronomy and made at the family castle in Birr a 36 in reflector with the same design as William Herschel's (see HERSCEL FAMILY). Mapped the Moon, and observed nebulae with the intent to resolve them into stars. He developed the technology at Birr Cast...

  16. The Complete Mitochondrial DNA Sequence of the Bichir (Polypterus Ornatipinnis), a Basal Ray-Finned Fish: Ancient Establishment of the Consensus Vertebrate Gene Order

    PubMed Central

    Noack, K.; Zardoya, R.; Meyer, A.

    1996-01-01

    The evolutionary position of bichirs is disputed, and they have been variously aligned with ray-finned fish (Actinopterygii) or lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii), which also include tetrapods. Alternatively, they have been placed into their own group, the Brachiopterygii. The phylogenetic position of bichirs as possibly the most primitive living bony fish (Osteichthyes) made knowledge about their mitochondrial genome of considerable evolutionary interest. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence (16,624 bp) of the mitochondrial genome of a bichir, Polypterus ornatipinnis. Its genome contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, two rRNAs and one major noncoding region. The genome's structure and organization show that this is the most basal vertebrate that conforms to the consensus vertebrate mtDNA gene order. Bichir mitochondrial protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes have greater sequence similarity to ray-finned fish than to either lamprey or lungfish. Phylogenetic analyses suggest the bichir's placement as the most basal living member of the ray-finned fish and rule out its classification as a lobe-finned fish. Hence, its lobe-fins are probably not a shared-derived trait with those of lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii). PMID:8913758

  17. Stages of Geoinformation Evolution Related to the Territories Described in the Bible - from the 3Rd Millennium B.C. to Modern Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsenbarth, Adam

    2012-09-01

    The paper presents consecutive stages of the evolution of geoinformation related to the territories of the events described in the Bible. Two geoinformation sources are presented: the Bible and non-Bible sources. In the Bible there is much, often some highly detailed information regarding terrain topography. The oldest non-Bible sources are incorporated in the ancient documents, which were discovered in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Some of them are related to the 3rd millen- nium B.C. The further stages are related to the onomasticons and itineraries written by travellers and pilgrims to the Holy Land. The most famous onomasticons include: onomasticons prepared by bishop Eusebius from Caesarea and those pre- pared by St. Jerome. One of the oldest maps of Palestine's territory is the so-called mosaic map of Madaba dated to 565. In the 15th century several Bible maps were edited. The most rapid evolution occurred in the 16th and 17* centuries, when the world famous cartographers such as Mercator and Ortelius edited several maps of Palestine's territory. Cartographers from several European countries edited more than 6,000 maps presenting the Biblical territories and Biblical events. Modem maps, based on detailed topographical surveys, were edited m the second half of the 19* and 20th centuries. W artykule przedstawiono kolejne etapy rozwoju geoinformacji dotyczącej terenówr biblijnych. Omówiono dwa źródła informacji, a mianowicie geoinformacje biblijne i pozabiblijne. W tekstach biblijnych można znaleźć wiele, często bardzo detalicznych informacji topograficznych. Najstarsze źródła pozabiblijne, to starożytne dokumenty odnalezione na terenach Egiptu i Mezopotamii. Niektóre z nich pochodzą z trzeciego milenium przed Chr. Kolejnym etapem geoinformacji były onomastikony oraz dzienniki podróży pisane przez podróżników i pielgrzymów do Ziemi Świętej. Do najbardziej znanych należy onomastikon sporządzony przez biskupa Euzebiusza z Cezarei oraz

  18. Joint conference of iMEC 2015 (2nd International Manufacturing Engineering Conference & APCOMS 2015 (3rd Asia-Pacific Conference on Manufacturing Systems)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The iMEC 2015 is the second International Manufacturing Engineering Conference organized by the Faculty of Manufacturing, Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP), held from 12-14th November 2015 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, with a theme "Materials, Manufacturing and Systems for Tomorrow". For the first time, iMEC is organized together with 3rd Asia- Pacific Conference on Manufacturing System (APCOMS 2015) which owned by Fakulti Teknologi Industri, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Indonesia. This is an extended collaboration between UMP and ITB to intensify knowledge sharing and experiences between higher learning institutions. This conference (iMEC & APCOMS 2015) is a platform for knowledge exchange and the growth of ideas, particularly in manufacturing engineering. The conference aims to bring researchers, academics, scientists, students, engineers and practitioners from around the world together to present their latest findings, ideas, developments and applications related to manufacturing engineering and other related research areas. With rapid advancements in manufacturing engineering, iMEC is an appropriate medium for the associated community to keep pace with the changes. In 2015, the conference theme is “Materials, Manufacturing and Systems for Tomorrow” which reflects the acceleration of knowledge and technology in global manufacturing. The papers in these proceedings are examples of the work presented at the conference. They represent the tip of the iceberg, as the conference attracted over 200 abstracts from Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, United Kingdom, Australia, India, Bangladesh, South Africa, Turkey and Morocco and 151 full papers were accepted in these proceedings. The conference was run in four parallel sessions with 160 presenters sharing their latest finding in the areas of manufacturing process, systems, advanced materials and automation. The first keynote presentation was given by Prof. B. S. Murthy (IIT, Madras) on "Nanomaterials with Exceptional

  19. Birth order effect on childhood food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Takashi; Mukaida, Kumiko; Morimoto, Takeshi; Sakuma, Mio; Yasumi, Takahiro; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio

    2012-05-01

    Higher birth order is associated with a smaller risk of allergy (birth order effect). The purpose of this study was to compare the significance of the birth order effect on the prevalence of specific allergic diseases [bronchial asthma (BA), atopic dermatitis (AD), allergic rhinitis (AR), allergic conjunctivitis (AC), and food allergy (FA)] among schoolchildren. A questionnaire survey dealing with the prevalence of allergic diseases was administered to the parents of 14,669 schoolchildren aged 7-15 yr. Based on the data, the prevalence of each allergic disease was compared according to birth order (1st, 2nd, and 3rd or later). Multiple regression analysis was performed to test the significance of the differences. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of BA or AD according to birth order. The prevalence of AR, AC, and FA decreased significantly as birth order increased. The prevalence of FA among those with 1st, 2nd, and 3rd or later birth order was 4.0%, 3.4%, and 2.6%, respectively (p = 0.01). With respect to symptoms in infancy, the prevalence of wheeze increased significantly and that of FA and eczema in infancy decreased significantly as birth order increased. The present data show a significant birth order effect on FA. The effect was also observed for the prevalence of FA and eczema in infancy. These data support the concept of early, non-allergen-specific programming of IgE-mediated immunity.

  20. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    Coastal development in Black Sea has increased in recent years. Therefore, careful monitoring of the storms and verification of numerical tools with reliable data has become important. Previous studies by Kirezci and Ozyurt (2015) investigated extreme events in Black Sea using different wind datasets (NCEP's CFSR and ECMWF's operational datasets) and different numerical tools (SWAN and Wavewatch III). These studies showed that significant effect to results is caused by the deep water source-sink terms (wave growth by wind, deep water dissipation of wave energy (whitecapping) and deep water non-linear wave-wave interactions). According to Timmermans(2015), uncertainty about wind forcing and the process of nonlinear wave-wave interactions are found to be dominant in numerical wave modelling. Therefore, in this study deep water source and sink term solution approaches of 3rd generation numerical tool (SWAN model) are tested, validated and compared using the selected extreme storms in Black Sea. 45 different storms and storm like events observed in Black Sea between years 1994-1999 are selected to use in the models. The storm selection depends on the instrumental wave data (significant wave heights, mean wave period and mean wave direction) obtained in NATO-TU Waves project by the deep water buoy measurements at Hopa, Sinop, Gelendzhik, and wind data (mean and peak wind speeds, storm durations) of the regarding events. 2 different wave growth by wind with the corresponding deep water dissipation terms and 3 different wave -wave interaction terms of SWAN model are used in this study. Wave growth by wind consist of two parts, linear growth which is explained by Cavaleri and Malanotte-Rizzoli(1981),and dominant exponential growth. There are two methods in SWAN model for exponential growth of wave, first one by Snyder et al. (1981), rescaled in terms of friction velocity by Komen et. al (1984) which is derived using driving wind speed at 10m elevation with related drag

  1. The 4th International Symposium for Arctic Science and the 3rd International Conference for Arctic Research Planning, the science symposium of Arctic Science Summit Week 2015 (ISAR-4/ICARPIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, Peter; Kodama, Yuji; Yamanouchi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The 4th International Symposium for Arctic Research (ISAR-4) with the theme of "Rapid change of the Arctic climate system and its global influence" was held as the science symposium of the Arctic Science Summit Week 2015, together with the 3rd International Conference for Arctic Research Planning (ICARPIII) with the theme of "Integrating Arctic Research: a Roadmap for the Future," in Toyama, Japan, from April 27 to April 30, 2015. There were 340 oral and 177 poster presentations, totalling 511 presentations. Among them, 38 papers were submitted to this special issue and 30 were accepted. 16 sessions in which those accepted papers were presented are described.

  2. Type 1 Diabetes and NKT Cells: A Report on the 3rd International Workshop on NKT Cells and CD1-Mediated Antigen Presentation, September 2004, Heron Island, QLD, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Julie M.; Jordan, Margaret A.; Baxter, Alan G.

    2004-01-01

    NKT cells play a major role in regulating the vigor and character of a broad range of immune responses. Defects in NKT cell numbers and function have been associated with type 1 diabetes, especially in the NOD mouse model. The 3rd International Workshop on NKT Cells and CD1-Mediated Antigen Presentation provided an opportunity for researchers in the field of NKT cell biology to discuss their latest results, many of which have direct relevance to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:17491677

  3. The ENCCA-WP7/EuroSarc/EEC/PROVABES/EURAMOS 3rd European Bone Sarcoma Networking Meeting/Joint Workshop of EU Bone Sarcoma Translational Research Networks; Vienna, Austria, September 24-25, 2015. Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Kager, Leo; Whelan, Jeremy; Dirksen, Uta; Hassan, Bass; Anninga, Jakob; Bennister, Lindsey; Bovée, Judith V M G; Brennan, Bernadette; Broto, Javier M; Brugières, Laurence; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Copland, Christopher; Dutour, Aurélie; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrari, Stefano; Fiocco, Marta; Fleuren, Emmy; Gaspar, Nathalie; Gelderblom, Hans; Gerrand, Craig; Gerß, Joachim; Gonzato, Ornella; van der Graaf, Winette; Hecker-Nolting, Stefanie; Herrero-Martín, David; Klco-Brosius, Stephanie; Kovar, Heinrich; Ladenstein, Ruth; Lancia, Carlo; LeDeley, Marie-Cecile; McCabe, Martin G; Metzler, Markus; Myklebost, Ola; Nathrath, Michaela; Picci, Piero; Potratz, Jenny; Redini, Françoise; Richter, Günther H S; Reinke, Denise; Rutkowski, Piotr; Scotlandi, Katia; Strauss, Sandra; Thomas, David; Tirado, Oscar M; Tirode, Franck; Vassal, Gilles; Bielack, Stefan S

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the 3rd Joint ENCCA-WP7, EuroSarc, EEC, PROVABES, and EURAMOS European Bone Sarcoma Network Meeting, which was held at the Children's Cancer Research Institute in Vienna, Austria on September 24-25, 2015. The joint bone sarcoma network meetings bring together European bone sarcoma researchers to present and discuss current knowledge on bone sarcoma biology, genetics, immunology, as well as results from preclinical investigations and clinical trials, to generate novel hypotheses for collaborative biological and clinical investigations. The ultimate goal is to further improve therapy and outcome in patients with bone sarcomas.

  4. Factors affecting the duration of nestling period and fledging order in Tengmalm's owl (Aegolius funereus): effect of wing length and hatching sequence.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Marek; Bartoš, Luděk; Korpimäki, Erkki; Zárybnická, Markéta

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, the nestling period is an important part of the breeding phase because the juveniles may spend quite a long time in the nest, with associated high energy costs for the parents. The length of the nestling period can be variable and its duration may be influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors; however, studies of this have mostly been undertaken on passerine birds. We studied individual duration of nestling period of 98 Tengmalm's owl chicks (Aegolius funereus) at 27 nests during five breeding seasons using a camera and chip system and radio-telemetry. We found the nestlings stayed in the nest box for 27 - 38 days from hatching (mean ± SD, 32.4 ± 2.2 days). The individual duration of nestling period was negatively related to wing length, but no formally significant effect was found for body weight, sex, prey availability and/or weather conditions. The fledging sequence of individual nestlings was primarily related to hatching order; no relationship with wing length and/or other factors was found in this case. We suggest the length of wing is the most important measure of body condition and individual quality in Tengmalm's owl young determining the duration of the nestling period. Other differences from passerines (e.g., the lack of effect of weather or prey availability on nestling period) are considered likely to be due to different life-history traits, in particular different food habits and nesting sites and greater risk of nest predation among passerines.

  5. Beyond Course Availability: An Investigation into Order and Concurrency Effects of Undergraduate Programming Courses on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbaczewski, Andrew; Urbaczewski, Lise

    The objective of this study was to find the answers to two primary research questions: "Do students learn programming languages better when they are offered in a particular order, such as 4th generation languages before 3rd generation languages?"; and "Do students learn programming languages better when they are taken in separate semesters as…

  6. Summary of International Exhibition and Congress (3rd): BIOTECHNICA 󈨛 Hannover Held in Hannover (Germany, F.R.) on 22-24 September 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-21

    nucleic acids which occur in DNA and seem to play an e Improved theoretical analysis of the important role in determining gene reg’- fntra- and...developed two retroviral vectors, based on the murine new peptide-based animal vaccines which myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV), are currertly...Structure tides are part of a precursor molecule elucidation is performed by gas-phase composed of 126 amino acids. From a pre- amino acid sequence analysis

  7. A new third-order sequence stratigraphic framework applied to the Triassic of the Paraná Basin, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, based on structural, stratigraphic and paleontological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, B. L. D.; Melo, T. M.; Schultz, C. L.; Philipp, R. P.; Kloss, H. P.; Goldberg, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Santacruzodon assemblage zone was originally defined as a vertebrate fossil assemblage composed basically of non-mammalian cynodonts found in Santa Cruz do Sul and Venâncio Aires municipalities in Southern Brazil. This assemblage zone was positioned at the top of the Sequence I, in the Triassic Santa Maria Supersequence, Paraná Basin. However, the Santacruzodon assemblage zone does not occur across the entire area of the Santa Maria Supersequence. Based on new paleontological, structural and sedimentological data, we propose the existence of a new third-order sequence (Santa Cruz Sequence) between Sequences I and II in the Santa Maria Supersequence. Satellite image analysis was used to identify regional, NW- and NE-oriented lineaments that limit the occurrence zone. Outcrop data allowed the identification of a regional, angular unconformity that bounds the new sequence. The faunal content allowed the correlation of the new Santa Cruz Sequence with Madagascar's Isalo II fauna, corresponding to the Ladinian (Middle Triassic). New names were suggested for the sequences in the Santa Maria Supersequence, since the Santa Cruz Sequence was deposited between the former Sequences I and II. This unit was deposited or preserved exclusively on the hanging wall of normal faults, being absent from the adjacent structural blocks.

  8. Factors Affecting the Duration of Nestling Period and Fledging Order in Tengmalm’s Owl (Aegolius funereus): Effect of Wing Length and Hatching Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kouba, Marek; Bartoš, Luděk; Korpimäki, Erkki; Zárybnická, Markéta

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, the nestling period is an important part of the breeding phase because the juveniles may spend quite a long time in the nest, with associated high energy costs for the parents. The length of the nestling period can be variable and its duration may be influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors; however, studies of this have mostly been undertaken on passerine birds. We studied individual duration of nestling period of 98 Tengmalm’s owl chicks (Aegolius funereus) at 27 nests during five breeding seasons using a camera and chip system and radio-telemetry. We found the nestlings stayed in the nest box for 27 – 38 days from hatching (mean ± SD, 32.4 ± 2.2 days). The individual duration of nestling period was negatively related to wing length, but no formally significant effect was found for body weight, sex, prey availability and/or weather conditions. The fledging sequence of individual nestlings was primarily related to hatching order; no relationship with wing length and/or other factors was found in this case. We suggest the length of wing is the most important measure of body condition and individual quality in Tengmalm’s owl young determining the duration of the nestling period. Other differences from passerines (e.g., the lack of effect of weather or prey availability on nestling period) are considered likely to be due to different life-history traits, in particular different food habits and nesting sites and greater risk of nest predation among passerines. PMID:25793880

  9. Source potential and sequence stratigraphic characterization of microbial evaporitic mudrocks: Upper Permian Zechstein Group, Northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammes, Ursula; Mutti, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Microbial evaporitic carbonate mudrocks are important source rocks throughout much of the earth history. Some of the largest hydrocarbon provinces are potentially sourced by evaporite source rocks such as the Cretaceous and Jurassic in the Middle East, the Tertiary in Spain, the Permian in northern Germany, the Devonian in Canada, and the Pennsylvanian in the USA. Carbonate mudrocks deposited under mesosaline conditions are often over-looked and dismissed as potential source rocks. However, preservation and accumulation of organic matter in salinity-layered intraplatform epeiric depressions and restricted basin centers are significant. These mudrocks may not only constitute the source but also exhibit reservoir qualities. Slope and basin laminated mudrocks were investigated for their source and reservoir potential using sequence stratigraphic and geochemical techniques to investigate the exploration potential of the northern German Upper Permian Zechstein Formation. The lower Zechstein cycles Z1 and Z2 are characterized by calcareous to argillaceous, laminated, organic-rich mudstones with TOC (total organic carbon) contents ranging mostly <1% in the Z2 and >6% in the Z1 cycle. Maturities range from 0.9 to >3% Ro depending on depth of burial for these two cycles. While the Z1 mudrocks deposited above the Rotliegend clastic section are more argillaceous and clay-rich grading upward from calcareous mudstones to intraclast, coated grain, thrombolitic wacke- and packstones into coated-grain grainstones, the Z2 mudrocks are dominated by calcareous to dolomitic laminated mudstones. Both cycles are characterized by microbially bound carbonates ranging from thrombolytic to crenulated laminated structures that are overlain by anhydrite and salt. Stacking patterns of the Z1 3rd-order cycle reveal three 5th-order parasequences stacking into two 4th-order sequences; Z2 3rd-order cycle is composed of three 4th-order parasequences that first deepen and then shallow upwards

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions.

  11. High resolution facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the Siluro-Devonian succession of Al Kufrah basin (SE Libya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindre, Laurent; Le Heron, Daniel; Bjørnseth, Hans Morten

    2012-11-01

    New fieldwork data collected from the flanks of Al Kufrah basin, SE Libya, provide insight into the controls on Siluro-Devonian sedimentation patterns along the eastern part of the North Gondwanan platform. A stratigraphic and sequential correlation framework from the northern and eastern flanks of the basin is presented for the Tanezzuft, Akakus, Tadrart and Binem formations. Ten facies associations are recognised, classified within three process-driven groups, facilitating high-resolution sequence analysis and highlighting key regional unconformities. The basal, shaly Tanezzuft formation is organised into a regional transgressive cycle that overlies upper Ordovician glacially-related deposits of the Mamuniyat formation. The shale grade upward into the heterogeneous Akakus formation that comprises complex deltaic thin sandy strata interbedded with silty shale and siltstones, widely influenced by storm to tide related flows. In Jabal az Zalmah (northern flank), four 3rd order transgressive-regressive (T/R) depositional sequences were identified, whilst only one in Jabal 'Asba (eastern flank), indicating significant erosion of the Akakus due to the Caledonian deformation. Depositional cycles are made of sheltered tidal flat deposits which pass upward into lower to upper offshore heterolithic deposits. They are bounded by regional disconformities interpreted as forced regression surfaces. The Silurian Tanezzuft and Akakus formations form together an overall 2nd order regressive succession. The Caledonian unconformity is interpreted as a mega-regional sequence boundary resulting from uplift and erosion during the late Silurian into the early Devonian. The thickness variability of the Akakus formation across Al Kufrah basin is strongly indicative of differential erosion which generated a complex basin physiography. Above, the Tadrart formation of lower Devonian age forms an aggrading braided-style fluvial sandy sequence of approximately constant thickness across the

  12. Interagency Consultation Meeting on Co-operation and Co-ordination in Environmental Education (3rd, Paris, France, November 6-8, 1990). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Education for the Quality of Life.

    United Nations agencies and other intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations concerned with environmental education (EE) met for the third time by invitation of UNESCO in order to develop cooperation and coordination in EE and training among the agencies. This report of the meeting is presented in three sections. The first section reports…

  13. Proceedings of the Midwest Research-to-Practice Conference in Adult and Continuing Education (3rd, DeKalb, Illinois, September 27-28, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb. Coll. of Continuing Education.

    These proceedings consist of 28 presentations. They include, in alphabetical order by author, "Data Collection Methods Used to Determine Training Needs of the Organization and the Adult Learner in Business and Industry" (Bart P. Beaudin), "Sex and the Split Brain: Does the Sex of the Mind Matter?" (Anne A. Bowbeer),…

  14. The Computer: Extension of the Human Mind III. Proceedings of the Annual Summer Computer Conference (3rd, Eugene, Oregon, August 1-3, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Center for Advanced Technology in Education.

    The 13 conference presentations in this proceedings are arranged by general and special interest sessions and listed within each session in the order in which they were presented. These papers are: (1) "Key Issues for the Near Future" (David Moursund); (2) "Educating with Computers: Insights from Cognitive Psychology (and Video Games)" (Morton Ann…

  15. "Team Leadership Training in Vocational Special Needs." Proceedings: Annual Statewide Conference on Vocational Special Needs (3rd, College Station, Texas, April 16,17, and 18, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Marilyn, Ed.; And Others

    These proceedings of a statewide Texas conference focus on the need for cooperation between the leadership in the fields of special and vocational education in order to meet the needs of handicapped students. Featured presentations (1) stress the necessity for this team approach at the top levels of the education-state agency bureaucracy as well…

  16. 1st, 2nd and 3rd Generation Implementations of an eLearning Design: Re-Use from Postgraduate Law to Block/Online Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Sarah; Brewer, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of postgraduate students who were time poor and unable to regularly attend face-to-face classes, one lecturer in the Faculty Law at the University of Wollongong (UOW) sought the assistance of a Learning Designer to redesign the Postgraduate Practical Legal Training (PLT) program into a flexible blended learning format,…

  17. Electric and hybrid vehicle program: Site operator program. Quarterly progress report, April--June, 1994 (3rd quarter of FY-1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1994-10-01

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three major activity categories; advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized. This third quarter report (FY-94) will include a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now included.

  18. Real Time In Situ Observations of Equiaxed Dendrite Coherency in Al-Cu Alloys Using High-Brilliance, 3rd Generation Synchrotron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Andrew G.; Browne, David J.; Mirihanage, Wajira U.; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade synchrotron X-ray sources have fast become the tool of choice for performing in-situ high resolution imaging during alloy solidification. This paper presents the results of an experimental campaign carried out at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, using a Bridgman furnace, to monitor phenomena during solidification of Al-Cu alloys - specifically the onset of equiaxed dendrite coherency. Conventional experimental methods for determining coherency involve measuring the change in viscosity or measuring the change in thermal conductivity across the solidifying melt Conflicts arise when comparing the results of these experimental techniques to find a relationship between cooling rate and coherency fraction. It has been shown that the ratio of average velocity to the average grain diameter has an inversely proportional relationship to coherency fraction. In-situ observation therefore makes it possible to measure these values directly from acquired images sequences and make comparisons with published results.

  19. Proceedings of the OGAMM Meeting (3rd) Held in Keswick-On-Derwentwater, Cumbria, England on September 4-7, 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-07

    University of Florida, USA Multifunctional Sol-Gel Silica Optics 73 by L. L. Hench, University of Florida, USA Molecular Orbital Calculations on Water...efforts that the IST office is promoting. t OVERVIEW MULTIFUNCTIONAL MACRO- MOLECULAR MATERIALS by A. BUCKLEY Hoechst Celanese In order to provide response...to multiple inputs for light beam steering, sensor and/or system protection, multiple electronic functionality is being combined in macro- molecular

  20. Phylogenetic position of tetraodontiform fishes within the higher teleosts: Bayesian inferences based on 44 whole mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Yamanoue, Yusuke; Miya, Masaki; Matsuura, Keiichi; Yagishita, Naoki; Mabuchi, Kohji; Sakai, Harumi; Katoh, Masaya; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-10-01

    Tetraodontiformes includes approximately 350 species assigned to nine families, sharing several reduced morphological features of higher teleosts. The order has been accepted as a monophyletic group by many authors, although several alternative hypotheses exist regarding its phylogenetic position within the higher teleosts. To date, acanthuroids, zeiforms, and lophiiforms have been proposed as sister-groups of the tetraodontiforms. The monophyly and sister-group status was investigated using whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences from 44 purposefully-chosen species (26 sequences newly-determined during the study) that fully represent the major tetraodontiform lineages plus all the groups that have been hypothesized as being close relatives. Partitioned Bayesian analyses were conducted with the three datasets that comprised concatenated nucleotide sequences from 13 protein-coding genes (with and without, or with RY-coding, 3rd codon positions), plus 22 transfer RNA and two ribosomal RNA genes. The resultant trees were well resolved and largely congruent, with most internal branches being supported by high posterior probabilities. Mitogenomic data strongly supported the monophyly of tetraodontiform fishes, placing them as a sister-group of either Lophiiformes plus Caproidei or Caproidei only. The sister-group relationship between Acanthuroidei and Tetraodontiformes was statistically rejected using Bayes factors. These results were confirmed by a reanalysis of the previously published nuclear RAG1 gene sequences using the Bayesian method. Within the Tetraodontiformes, however, monophylies of the three superfamilies were not recovered and further taxonomic sampling and subsequent efforts should clarify these relationships.

  1. The Proceedings of the International Conference on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics (3rd) Held in Paris, France on 16-19 June 1981

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-19

    d (x,yl) O (14) - v cose) + coso (u coso + v Sine)) where Here I cos + v sin 0 is the velocity compoonent norma l to the phase curve of tb flog...The pressure say be critten as to the th degree of freedom. , is the gen- tuh son of frre-surface and body-induced eralized norma ’, At is th. panel...the poten- wake harmonic at order A are annulled by the flow generated by each ApA distribution on eachtial, the panel width has to be small with re

  2. Qualitative and quantitative behaviour of planetary systems; Proceedings of the 3rd Alexander von Humboldt Colloquium on Celestial Mechanics, Ramsau, Austria, Mar. 29-Apr. 4, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Henrard, J.

    1993-06-01

    Topics addressed include planetary theories, the Sitnikov problem, asteroids, resonance, general dynamical systems, and chaos and stability. Particular attention is given to recent progress in the theory and application of symplectic integrators, a computer-aided analysis of the Sitnikov problem, the chaotic behavior of trajectories for the asteroidal resonances, and the resonant motion in the restricted three-body problem. Also discussed are the second order long-period motion of Hyperion, meteorites from the asteroid 6 Hebe, and least squares parameter estimation in chaotic differential equations.

  3. Characteristics, stratigraphic architecture, and time framework of multi-order mixed siliciclastic and carbonate depositional sequences, outcropping Cisco Group (Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian), Eastern Shelf, north-central Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wan; Kominz, Michelle A.

    2003-01-01

    The Cisco Group on the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin is composed of fluvial, deltaic, shelf, shelf-margin, and slope-to-basin carbonate and siliciclastic rocks. Sedimentologic and stratigraphic analyses of 181 meter-to-decimeter-scale depositional sequences exposed in the up-dip shelf indicated that the siliciclastic and carbonate parasequences in the transgressive systems tracts (TST) are thin and upward deepening, whereas those in highstand systems tracts (HST) are thick and upward shallowing. The sequences can be subdivided into five types on the basis of principal lithofacies, and exhibit variable magnitude of facies shift corresponding to variable extents of marine transgression and regression on the shelf. The sequence stacking patterns and their regional persistence suggest a three-level sequence hierarchy controlled by eustasy, whereas local and regional changes in lithology, thickness, and sequence type, magnitude, and absence were controlled by interplay of eustasy, differential shelf subsidence, depositional topography, and pattern of siliciclastic supply. The outcropping Cisco Group is highly incomplete with an estimated 6-11% stratigraphic completeness. The average duration of deposition of the major (third-order) sequences is estimated as 67-102 ka on the up-dip shelf and increases down dip, while the average duration of the major sequence boundaries (SB) is estimated as 831-1066 ka and decreases down dip. The nondepositional and erosional hiatus on the up-dip shelf was represented by lowstand deltaic systems in the basin and slope.

  4. Imagery May Arise from Associations Formed through Sensory Experience: A Network of Spiking Neurons Controlling a Robot Learns Visual Sequences in Order to Perform a Mental Rotation Task

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Fleischer, Jason G.; Chen, Yanqing; Gall, W. Einar; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Mental imagery occurs “when a representation of the type created during the initial phases of perception is present but the stimulus is not actually being perceived.” How does the capability to perform mental imagery arise? Extending the idea that imagery arises from learned associations, we propose that mental rotation, a specific form of imagery, could arise through the mechanism of sequence learning–that is, by learning to regenerate the sequence of mental images perceived while passively observing a rotating object. To demonstrate the feasibility of this proposal, we constructed a simulated nervous system and embedded it within a behaving humanoid robot. By observing a rotating object, the system learns the sequence of neural activity patterns generated by the visual system in response to the object. After learning, it can internally regenerate a similar sequence of neural activations upon briefly viewing the static object. This system learns to perform a mental rotation task in which the subject must determine whether two objects are identical despite differences in orientation. As with human subjects, the time taken to respond is proportional to the angular difference between the two stimuli. Moreover, as reported in humans, the system fills in intermediate angles during the task, and this putative mental rotation activates the same pathways that are activated when the system views physical rotation. This work supports the proposal that mental rotation arises through sequence learning and the idea that mental imagery aids perception through learned associations, and suggests testable predictions for biological experiments. PMID:27653977

  5. Impact of industrial waste water effluents on mycoflora of the shore sediments of the 3rd oxidation pond, with reference to biosorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Eman F

    2002-01-01

    The third oxidation pond at 10th of Ramadan desert receives a number of industrial waste water effluents contaminated with the heavy metal ions Zn, Cd, Cu and Ni. The species diversity and fungal community structure of seven different sites at the onshore sediments and offshore were studied. Mycological analysis resulted in isolation of 3912 fungal colonies, 11.7% of this count were recovered from the onshore sediment sites (4 sites) whereas 88.3% were from the offshore sites (3 sites), in the desert. Fungal counts and species diversity at the onshore sites tend to increase with increasing distance far from the waste water input. A complete accordance was observed among the total fungal counts and species variabilities with organic matter content at each sampling site. This relationship was reversed in case of heavy metal contents with both counts and diversity. Seventeen fungal species belonging to seven genera were isolated from all sites under study. Aspergillus spp. constituted the majority of the isolates (51.7% of the total isolates), followed by Curvularia, Cephalosporium, and Humicola. Of nine isolated Aspergillus spp., A. humicola was the most dominant (37.4% of the total catch) and appeared at all polluted sites. Therefore, A. humicola was chosen to investigate its potential for heavy metals sorption from the contaminated waste water effluent. Four days old biomass pellets could sorb a large amount of heavy metals according to the following sequence: Zn>Cd>Cu>Ni ions. Agitation significantly increased Zn and Cd sorption, but not Cu and Ni. Heavy metals sorption took place at a wide pH range and particularly increased at alkaline pH (8-9).

  6. The 3rd generation Front-End cards of the Pierre Auger surface detectors: Test results and performance in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.; Bäcker, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Buchholz, P.; Fleck, I.; Kampert, K.-H.; Rammes, M.; Rautenberg, J.; Taşcău, O.

    2009-07-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory comprises 1600 water Cherenkov detectors distributed over an area of 3000 km2. The Cherenkov light is detected by three 9-in. photo-multiplier tubes from which the signals of the anode and last dynode are digitized by 10 bit 40 MHz FADCs. An Altera Cyclone FPGA is employed to generate different local triggers and to handle the data transfer to a communication board. After briefly discussing the design of the cards we present an autonomous test-bench, which has been set up in order to test the large number of boards prior to installation in the field. The qualification procedure and the results obtained in the laboratory are presented. Up to three years of operation in the field demonstrate a very good performance and reliability of the Front-End cards.

  7. Provenance and sequence architecture of the Middle-Late Eocene Gehannam and Birket Qarun formations at Wadi Al Hitan, Fayum Province, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, Tarek; El Shahat, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The Middle-Upper Eocene Gehannam and Birket Qarun formations at Wadi Al Hitan (Valley of Whales) in Fayum Province of Egypt are dominated by marine siliciclastic sediments. Sedimentation took place in synclinal basins that were inherited from the Late Cretaceous tectonism. The siliciclastic sediments accumulated in low energy open shallow marine shelf. Most of the siliciclastics are heavily bioturbated by Thalassinoides. The abundance of unstable and moderately stable heavy minerals suggests that the Middle-Upper Eocene clastics were largely derived from the weathered regolith of the exhumed basement rocks of the Red Sea mountains. The ultrastable heavies were mainly recycled from positive landmass that bound the Eocene basins. Two sequence boundaries were observed in the studied succession. The first boundary lies within a rhizolith bearing-sandstone unit that occurs at the boundary between the Gehannam and Birket Qarun formations. The second sequence boundary occurs within the upper part of the Birket Qarun Formation, in a shale horizon bioturbated by Thalassinoides. Three 3rd order depositional sequences were recognized. These sequences may be formed due to tectonic activity that started in the Late Cretaceous and may be rejuvenated again during the Eocene time. Also emergence activities that were active during the Eocene led to the formation of the picked sequences by changing relative sea level. The recorded systems tracts are transgressive systems tract (TST), highstand systems tract (HST), and falling-stage systems tract (FSST).

  8. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a…

  9. All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD).

    PubMed

    Killgrove, Kristina; Montgomery, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Migration within the Roman Empire occurred at multiple scales and was engaged in both voluntarily and involuntarily. Because of the lengthy tradition of classical studies, bioarchaeological analyses must be fully contextualized within the bounds of history, material culture, and epigraphy. In order to assess migration to Rome within an updated contextual framework, strontium isotope analysis was performed on 105 individuals from two cemeteries associated with Imperial Rome-Casal Bertone and Castellaccio Europarco-and oxygen and carbon isotope analyses were performed on a subset of 55 individuals. Statistical analysis and comparisons with expected local ranges found several outliers who likely immigrated to Rome from elsewhere. Demographics of the immigrants show men and children migrated, and a comparison of carbon isotopes from teeth and bone samples suggests the immigrants may have significantly changed their diet. These data represent the first physical evidence of individual migrants to Imperial Rome. This case study demonstrates the importance of employing bioarchaeology to generate a deeper understanding of a complex ancient urban center.

  10. All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD)

    PubMed Central

    Killgrove, Kristina; Montgomery, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Migration within the Roman Empire occurred at multiple scales and was engaged in both voluntarily and involuntarily. Because of the lengthy tradition of classical studies, bioarchaeological analyses must be fully contextualized within the bounds of history, material culture, and epigraphy. In order to assess migration to Rome within an updated contextual framework, strontium isotope analysis was performed on 105 individuals from two cemeteries associated with Imperial Rome—Casal Bertone and Castellaccio Europarco—and oxygen and carbon isotope analyses were performed on a subset of 55 individuals. Statistical analysis and comparisons with expected local ranges found several outliers who likely immigrated to Rome from elsewhere. Demographics of the immigrants show men and children migrated, and a comparison of carbon isotopes from teeth and bone samples suggests the immigrants may have significantly changed their diet. These data represent the first physical evidence of individual migrants to Imperial Rome. This case study demonstrates the importance of employing bioarchaeology to generate a deeper understanding of a complex ancient urban center. PMID:26863610

  11. Lithological and structural characterization of the Longmen Shan fault belt from the 3rd hole of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD-3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haibing; Wang, Huan; Yang, Guang; Xu, Zhiqin; Li, Tianfu; Si, Jialiang; Sun, Zhiming; Huang, Yao; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Jiajia

    2016-11-01

    Drilling in an active fault quickly after a large earthquake is an effective way to study earthquake mechanisms. In order to better understand the mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics of the faults that ruptured during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9), six boreholes were drilled on the two main strands (Yingxiu-Beichuan and Guanxian-Anxian faults) by the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD). This paper focuses on the cores from the WFSD-3 borehole which drilled across the Guanxian-Anxian fault. A detailed petrological study shows that fault gouge and fault breccia are developed in the WFSD-3 cores in the Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation. The thicknesses of fault gouge range from 1 mm to 2.3 m. According to the characteristics of the fault rock combinations and their distribution, at least 22 subsidiary fault zones were recognized in the WFSD-3 cores. The Guanxian-Anxian fault zone is composed of fault rocks from 1192 to 1250.09 m depth, with a real thickness of 50 m ( 60 m thick in the WFSD-3 cores), and an actual damage zone of 160 m ( 980-1192 m depth in the WFSD-3 cores), and shows characteristics of multiple high-strain fault cores. The damage zone is only present in the hanging wall. The actual total thickness of the Guanxian-Anxian fault zone is 210 m. Based on the analyses of comprehensive logging data, characteristics of the fault gouge, and seismic fault structures, the principal slip zone for the Wenchuan earthquake is identified in the black fault gouge at 1249.95 m depth in the cores, which lies almost at the bottom of the Guanxian-Anxian fault zone, and is also confirmed by surface rupture zone observations. The slip plane of the Wenchuan earthquake is a low-angle thrust fault with a dip angle of 38° as estimated from the results of the WFSD-3 core analyses. The results from WFSD-1 showed that the Yingxiu-Beichuan segment is a high-angle thrust fault striking NW with a dip angle of 65°. These two fault

  12. A phylogenetic analysis of woodpeckers and their allies using 12S, Cyt b, and COI nucleotide sequences (class Aves; order Piciformes).

    PubMed

    Webb, David Matthew; Moore, William S

    2005-08-01

    Although the woodpeckers have long been recognized as a natural, monophyletic taxon, morphological analyses of their intra- and intergeneric relationships have produced conflicting results. To clarify this issue, and as part of a larger study of piciform relationships, nucleotide sequences for the 12S ribosomal RNA (12S; 1123 bp), cytochrome b (Cyt b; 1022 bp), and cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI; 1512 bp) mitochondrial genes were obtained from 34 piciform species that included 16 of the 23 currently recognized woodpecker genera (subfamily Picinae), three piculets (subfamily Picumninae), a wryneck (subfamily Jynginae), a honeyguide (family Indicatoridae), and three barbets (infraorder Ramphastides). Analyses were conducted on the individual and combined 12S, Cyt b, and COI sequences with maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian algorithms. Based on the strong, congruent support among the different data partitions and models of sequence evolution, a highly resolved consensus of the relationships among woodpeckers and their allies could be formed. The monophyly of Indicatoridae + Picidae (infraorder Picides), Picidae, Picinae + Picumninae, and Picinae was strongly supported in all analyses. However, the tribes Colaptini, Picini, Campephilini, and Campetherini were shown to be paraphyletic as were the genera of Colaptes and Piculus. A revision of the tribal-level classification of woodpeckers is proposed and the importance of plumage convergence among woodpeckers is discussed.

  13. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    was held in the summer of 2011 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes, and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author. The collection includes regular research papers, a few research briefs and review papers. The review papers are published as 'Comments' articles in Physica Scripta . Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Six papers are devoted to canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Baumert presents a theory of shear-generated turbulence, which is based on a two-fluid concept. Gampert et al investigate the problem of adequate representation of turbulent structures by applying a decomposition of the field of the turbulent kinetic energy into regions of compressive and extensive strain. Paul and Narashima consider the dynamics of a temporal mixing layer using a vortex sheet model. Schaefer et al analyse the joint statistics and conditional mean strain rates of streamline segments in turbulent flows. Sirota and Zybin deepen their discussion of the connection between Lagrangian and Eulerian velocity structure functions in hydrodynamic turbulence. Talbot et al investigate the heterogeneous mixing by considering gases of very nearly equal densities and very different viscosities. Wall-bounded flows. Three papers are dedicated to wall-bounded flows. Mok et al use the Bayesian spectral density approach to identify the dominant free surface fluctuation frequency downstream of an oscillating hydraulic jump. Tejada-Martinez et al employ large eddy numerical simulations to study wind-driven shallow water flows with and without full-depth Langmuir circulation (parallel counter rotating vortices). Wu et al re-evaluate the Karman constant based on a multi-layer analytical theory of Prandtl's mixing length function. Non-equilibrium processes. This theme is represented by two papers. Chasheckhin and Zagumennyi consider non-equilibrium processes

  14. Higher-order hybrid implicit/explicit FDTD time-stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierens, W.

    2016-12-01

    Both partially implicit FDTD methods, and symplectic FDTD methods of high temporal accuracy (3rd or 4th order), are well documented in the literature. In this paper we combine them: we construct a conservative FDTD method which is fourth order accurate in time and is partially implicit. We show that the stability condition for this method depends exclusively on the explicit part, which makes it suitable for use in e.g. modelling wave propagation in plasmas.

  15. Collaborative study for the establishment of the WHO 3(rd) International Standard for Endotoxin, the Ph. Eur. endotoxin biological reference preparation batch 5 and the USP Reference Standard for Endotoxin Lot H0K354.

    PubMed

    Findlay, L; Desai, T; Heath, A; Poole, S; Crivellone, M; Hauck, W; Ambrose, M; Morris, T; Daas, A; Rautmann, G; Buchheit, K H; Spieser, J M; Terao, E

    2015-01-01

    An international collaborative study was organised jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO)/National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM/Council of Europe) for the establishment of harmonised replacement endotoxin standards for these 3 organisations. Thirty-five laboratories worldwide, including Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) and manufacturers enrolled in the study. Three candidate preparations (10/178, 10/190 and 10/196) were produced with the same material and same formulation as the current reference standards with the objective of generating a new (3(rd)) International Standard (IS) with the same potency (10 000 IU/vial) as the current (2(nd)) IS, as well as new European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). and USP standards. The suitability of the candidate preparations to act as the reference standard in assays for endotoxin performed according to compendial methods was evaluated. Their potency was calibrated against the WHO 2(nd) IS for Endotoxin (94/580). Gelation and photometric methods produced similar results for each of the candidate preparations. The overall potency estimates for the 3 batches were comparable. Given the intrinsic assay precision, the observed differences between the batches may be considered unimportant for the intended use of these materials. Overall, these results were in line with those generated for the establishment of the current preparations of reference standards. Accelerated degradation testing of vials stored at elevated temperatures supported the long-term stability of the 3 candidate preparations. It was agreed between the 3 organisations that batch 10/178 be shared between WHO and EDQM and that batches 10/190 and 10/196 be allocated to USP, with a common assigned value of 10 000 IU/vial. This value maintains the continuity of the global harmonisation of reference materials and

  16. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way.

  17. High resolution sequence stratigraphy of Miocene deep-water clastic outcrops, Taranaki coast, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    King, P.R.; Browne, G.H.; Slatt, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    Approximately 700m of deep water clastic deposits of Mt. Messenger Formation are superbly exposed along the Taranaki coast of North Island, New Zealand. Biostratigraphy indicates the interval was deposited during the time span 10.5-9.2m.y. in water depths grading upward from lower bathyal to middle-upper bathyal. This interval is considered part of a 3rd order depositional sequence deposited under conditions of fluctuating relative sea-level, concomitant with high sedimentation rates. Several 4th order depositional sequences, reflecting successive sea-level falls, are recognized within the interval. Sequence boundaries display a range of erosive morphologies from metre-wide canyons to scours several hundred metres across. All components of a generic lowstand systems tract--basin floor fan, channel-levee complex and progading complex--are present in logical and temporal order. They are repetitive through the interval, with the relatively shallower-water components becoming more prevalent upward. Basin floor fan lithologies are mainly m-thick, massive and convolute-bedded sandstones that alternate with cm- and dm-thick massive, horizontally-stratified and ripple-laminated sandstones and bioturbated mudstones. Channel-levee deposits consist of interleaving packages of thin-bedded, climbing-rippled and parallel-laminated sandstones and millstones; infrequent channels are filled with sandstones and mudstones, and sometimes lined with conglomerate. Thin beds of parallel to convoluted mudstone comprise prograding complex deposits. Similar lowstand systems tracts can be recognized and correlated on subsurface seismic reflection profiles and wireline logs. Such correlation has been aided by a continuous outcrop gamma-ray fog obtained over most of the measured interval. In the adjacent Taranaki peninsula, basin floor fan and channel-levee deposits comprise hydrocarbon reservoir intervals. Outcrop and subsurface reservior sandstones exhibit similar permeabilities.

  18. The 3rd International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This Conference Publication contains 71 papers presented at the Third International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio, from April 11 to 13, 1995. The purpose of the workshop was twofold: to exchange information about the progress and promise of combustion science in microgravity and to provide a forum to discuss which areas in microgravity combustion science need to be expanded profitably and which should be included in upcoming NASA Research Announcements (NRA).

  19. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  20. Radiation Therapy Physics, 3rd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendee, William R.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, Eric G.

    2004-08-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an updated and expanded section on computer applications in radiation therapy and electron beam therapy, and features enhanced user-friendliness and visual appeal with a new, easy-to-follow format, including sidebars and a larger trim size. With its user-friendly presentation and broad, comprehensive coverage of radiotherapy physics, this Third Edition doubles as a medical text and handy professional reference.

  1. Coal mine ground control. 3rd ed.

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    2008-09-15

    The third edition not only completely revises and updates the original subject areas, but also is broadened to include a number of new topics such as high horizontal stresses, computer modeling, and highwall stability. The subject areas covered in this book define the current field of coal mine ground control, except for the recently emerging topic of mine seals and some conventional subjects such as coal/rock cutting and impoundment dams. It contains 1,134 references from all published sources, and archived since 1876.

  2. Elementary Science Guide -- 3rd Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieland, Anne; And Others

    Presented is a resource book to be used with instructional kits for elementary school science students, grade 3. The individual units at this grade level are based on curriculum which has been developed by the National Science Foundation in the 1960s and revised to meet student and teacher identified needs in Anchorage, Alaska. Six units are…

  3. Spacecraft Systems Engineering, 3rd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortescue, Peter; Stark, John; Swinerd, Graham

    2003-03-01

    Following on from the hugely successful previous editions, the third edition of Spacecraft Systems Engineering incorporates the most recent technological advances in spacecraft and satellite engineering. With emphasis on recent developments in space activities, this new edition has been completely revised. Every chapter has been updated and rewritten by an expert engineer in the field, with emphasis on the bus rather than the payload. Encompassing the fundamentals of spacecraft engineering, the book begins with front-end system-level issues, such as environment, mission analysis and system engineering, and progresses to a detailed examination of subsystem elements which represent the core of spacecraft design - mechanical, electrical, propulsion, thermal, control etc. This quantitative treatment is supplemented by an appreciation of the interactions between the elements, which deeply influence the process of spacecraft systems design. In particular the revised text includes * A new chapter on small satellites engineering and applications which has been contributed by two internationally-recognised experts, with insights into small satellite systems engineering. * Additions to the mission analysis chapter, treating issues of aero-manouevring, constellation design and small body missions. In summary, this is an outstanding textbook for aerospace engineering and design students, and offers essential reading for spacecraft engineers, designers and research scientists. The comprehensive approach provides an invaluable resource to spacecraft manufacturers and agencies across the world.

  4. Teaching Visually Impaired Children. 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Virginia E.

    2004-01-01

    In this exceptional new third edition, the author has retained much of the practical "how to" approach of the previous editions, but adds depth in two dimensions: learning theory and the educational process. This book is "so comprehensive in scope and complete in detail that it would be the most likely recommended" (from the foreword by Dr.…

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Physics, 3rd edn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett, David

    1999-09-01

    The number of broadly based physics texts written at a level corresponding to second year and above of UK physics degrees is limited. This is such a book thoroughly updated in a third edition, the first edition having been published 20 years ago. The book is unusual in that the reader is referred to the Freeman website www.whfreeman.com/physics for some additional sections. It will be interesting to see whether this proves to be an attractive feature. The coverage reflects the US emphasis on topics and contains both theoretical and experimental details. It should not be regarded as an introductory text although it is clearly written. Thus the first two chapters take the reader straight into relativity, concentrating mainly on special relativity but going on to general relativity. From here the reader is led to ideas of quantization of charge, light and energy, followed by an exploration of the nuclear atom, wavelike properties of particles and Schrödinger's equation. Solution of this equation for the hydrogen atom introduces a section on spectroscopy. The next chapter on statistical physics includes Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics and brings to a close Part 1, which concentrates on the theoretical groundwork. Consistent with its title, the book does not cover traditional aspects of thermodynamics and electromagnetic theory. Part 2 is entitled `Applications' and begins with a chapter on molecular structure and spectra. Lasers and masers are included here but geometrical, physical and nonlinear optics get limited or no coverage. Solid state physics follows but, despite the title of the book, there is little on modern devices, although the section on superconductivity mentions high temperature materials. The chapters on nuclear physics, fission, fusion reactors and medical applications and a chapter on particle physics are comprehensive. Finally a chapter on astrophysics and cosmology is referred to, but the reader must find this at the website. As this is an attractive chapter it is a pity that it is not printed within the book. Although viewing the chapter on the Web gives the benefit of full colour, it is not easy to read the textual information off the screen. Within the printed material, there are good diagrams with the addition of a single colour, burgundy, a colour that is wasted on those of us who are red-green colour-blind! Each chapter is provided with an impressive number of graded problems (it is not easy to provide such a comprehensive range of problems at this level) and numerical answers are given in the back for every third problem. There is a student solution manual available for these problems and a complete instructor's solution manual has also been produced. It is therefore a useful book for both students and lecturers.

  6. Cerebral computed tomography, 3rd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, L.; Nice, C.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the utilization of computed tomography in evaluating patients with intracranial and orbital disorders. It features clinical correlations and provides an overview of general principles, performance, and normal anatomy of CT. It covers evaluation of specific neurologic signs and symptoms, including stroke, metastatic disease, increased intracranial pressure, head injury, pediatric conditions, and more.

  7. Peace Corps. 3rd Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    Projects, operations, and future plans are covered in this annual report for the third year of the Peace Corps. An introduction comments on returning volunteers and presents regional maps with tables for Latin America, Africa, Near East and South Asia, and Far East. Section 1 contains letters and reports from volunteers in Peru, Ivory Coast,…

  8. 3RD Symposium on Applied Surface Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    lithium -- a condition which occurs during under-potential discharge. The surface studies of lithium on carbon showed lithium to be much more mobile in...of surface chemistry. The talk will begin with a summary of results for carbon monoxide chemisorbed on supported Rh as studied by transmission... lithium anode and the high surface-area Shawinigan Black current collector of the Li-LiAsF6 -AN-SO2 battery system have been ana- lyzed by XPS, SAM and

  9. DDN New User Guide, 3rd Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-05

    incomplete or incorrect address is returned to the sender with an error message. If a mail message is undeliverable due to network or machine problems, most... mail programs try to resend it several times before returning it to the sender . Many mail programs allow you to use a local text editor to revise or...username and password. These may be entered in either upper or lowercase. After a successful login, InfoMail notifies user of mail in his " Inbox ." INBOX

  10. SVSI: fast and powerful set-valued system identification approach to identifying rare variants in sequencing studies for ordered categorical traits.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenjian; Kang, Guolian; Zhao, Yanlong; Cui, Yuehua; Yan, Song; Li, Yun; Cheng, Cheng; Pounds, Stanley B; Borowitz, Michael J; Relling, Mary V; Yang, Jun J; Liu, Zhifa; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hunger, Stephen P; Hartford, Christine M; Leung, Wing; Zhang, Ji-Feng

    2015-07-01

    In genetic association studies of an ordered categorical phenotype, it is usual to either regroup multiple categories of the phenotype into two categories and then apply the logistic regression (LG), or apply ordered logistic (oLG), or ordered probit (oPRB) regression, which accounts for the ordinal nature of the phenotype. However, they may lose statistical power or may not control type I error due to their model assumption and/or instable parameter estimation algorithm when the genetic variant is rare or sample size is limited. To solve this problem, we propose a set-valued (SV) system model to identify genetic variants associated with an ordinal categorical phenotype. We couple this model with a SV system identification algorithm to identify all the key system parameters. Simulations and two real data analyses show that SV and LG accurately controlled the Type I error rate even at a significance level of 10(-6) but not oLG and oPRB in some cases. LG had significantly less power than the other three methods due to disregarding of the ordinal nature of the phenotype, and SV had similar or greater power than oLG and oPRB. We argue that SV should be employed in genetic association studies for ordered categorical phenotype.

  11. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  12. Whole exome sequencing reveals the order of genetic changes during malignant transformation and metastasis in a single patient with NF1-plexiform neurofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Dahiya, Sonika; Miller, Christopher A.; Li, Tiandao; Fulton, Robert S.; Zhang, Xiaochun; McDonald, Sandra; DeSchryver, Katherine; Duncavage, Eric J.; Walrath, Jessica; Reilly, Karlyne M.; Abel, Haley J.; Pekmezci, Melike; Perry, Arie; Ley, Timothy J.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) occur at increased frequency in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), where they likely arise from benign plexiform neurofibroma precursors. While previous studies have employed a variety of discovery approaches to discover genes associated with MPNST pathogenesis, it is currently unclear what molecular events are associated with the evolution of MPNST from plexiform neurofibroma. Experimental Design Whole exome sequencing was performed on biopsy materials representing plexiform neurofibroma (n=3), MPNST, and metastasis from a single individual with NF1 over a 14-year period. Additional validation cases were used to assess candidate genes involved in malignant progression, while a murine MPNST model was employed for functional analysis. Results There was an increasing proportion of cells with a somatic NF1 gene mutation as the tumors progressed from benign to malignant, suggesting a clonal process in MPNST development. Copy number variations, including loss of one copy of the TP53 gene, were identified in the primary tumor and the metastatic lesion, but not in benign precursor lesions. A limited number of genes with non-synonymous somatic mutations (βIII-spectrin and ZNF208) were discovered, several of which were validated in additional primary and metastatic MPNST samples. Lastly, increased βIII-spectrin expression was observed in the majority of MPNSTs, and shRNA-mediated knockdown reduced murine MPNST growth in vivo. Conclusion Collectively, the ability to track the molecular evolution of MPNST in a single individual with NF1 offers new insights into the sequence of genetic events important for disease pathogenesis and progression for future mechanistic study. PMID:25925892

  13. Trial-by-trial updating of an internal reference in discrimination tasks: evidence from effects of stimulus order and trial sequence.

    PubMed

    Dyjas, Oliver; Bausenhart, Karin M; Ulrich, Rolf

    2012-11-01

    In psychophysics, participants are often asked to discriminate between a constant standard and a variable comparison. Previous studies have shown that discrimination performance is better when the comparison follows, rather than precedes, the standard. Prominent difference models of psychophysics and decision making cannot easily explain this order effect. However, a simple extension of this model class involving dynamical updating of an internal reference accounts for this order effect. In addition, this Internal Reference Model (IRM) predicts sequential response effects. We examined the predictions of IRM in two duration discrimination experiments. The obtained results are in agreement with the predictions of IRM, suggesting that participants update their internal reference on every trial. Additional simulations show that IRM also accounts for the negative sequential effects observed in single-stimulus paradigms.

  14. Costs, affordability, and feasibility of an essential package of cancer control interventions in low-income and middle-income countries: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    PubMed

    Gelband, Hellen; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Gauvreau, Cindy L; Horton, Susan; Anderson, Benjamin O; Bray, Freddie; Cleary, James; Dare, Anna J; Denny, Lynette; Gospodarowicz, Mary K; Gupta, Sumit; Howard, Scott C; Jaffray, David A; Knaul, Felicia; Levin, Carol; Rabeneck, Linda; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sullivan, Terrence; Trimble, Edward L; Jha, Prabhat

    2016-05-21

    Investments in cancer control--prevention, detection, diagnosis, surgery, other treatment, and palliative care--are increasingly needed in low-income and particularly in middle-income countries, where most of the world's cancer deaths occur without treatment or palliation. To help countries expand locally appropriate services, Cancer (the third volume of nine in Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition) developed an essential package of potentially cost-effective measures for countries to consider and adapt. Interventions included in the package are: prevention of tobacco-related cancer and virus-related liver and cervical cancers; diagnosis and treatment of early breast cancer, cervical cancer, and selected childhood cancers; and widespread availability of palliative care, including opioids. These interventions would cost an additional US$20 billion per year worldwide, constituting 3% of total public spending on health in low-income and middle-income countries. With implementation of an appropriately tailored package, most countries could substantially reduce suffering and premature death from cancer before 2030, with even greater improvements in later decades.

  15. Self-oscillations of a third order PLL in periodic and chaotic mode and its tracking in a slave PLL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, B. C.; Chakraborty, S.

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of a third order phase locked loop (PLL) with a resonant low pass filter (LPF) has been studied numerically in the parameter space of the system. The range of stable synchronous operating zone of the PLL, expressed in terms of system and signal parameters, is estimated. The obtained results are in agreement with the analytically predicted results in the literature. The PLL dynamics in the unstable region is found to have a sequence of period doubling bifurcation and chaos. In the master-slave mode of operation of two 3rd order PLLs, the slave PLL can track the periodic as well as chaotic dynamics of the master PLL for a narrow range of effective frequency offset when other design parameters are within the stable zone as predicted for an isolated PLL. The synchronization of the master and slave PLLs in this condition is proved to be a generalized one using the auxiliary slave system approach. Experimental observations on prototype hardware circuits for an isolated PLL and for a master-slave PLL arrangement are also given.

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of Russian far eastern flatfish (Pleuronectiformes, Pleuronectidae) based on two mitochondrial gene sequences, Co-1 and Cyt-b, with inferences in order phylogeny using complete mitogenome data.

    PubMed

    Kartavtsev, Yuri Phedorovich; Sharina, Svetlana N; Saitoh, Kenji; Imoto, Junichi M; Hanzawa, Naoto; Redin, Alexander D

    2016-01-01

    The systematics and phylogeny of flatfish is investigated on the complete sequence of nucleotides at subunit 1 cytochrome c oxidase (Co-1) and cytochrome b (Cyt-b) genes. In total 17 species from our collection and some species from GenBank were analyzed. Four types of trees were built: Bayesian (BA), maximum likelihood (ML), maximum parsimony (MP), and neighbor joining (NJ). These trees showed similar topology. Two separate clusters on the trees support subfamily Hippoglossoidinae and Hippoglossinae subdivision and monophyletic status of these taxa. The subfamily Pleuronectinae also can be considered monophyletic, if the tribe Microstomini is excluded from it and genus Lepidopsetta is moved into the tribe Pleuronectini. Mitogenomes represented by 25 complete sequences from NCBI GenBank were analyzed. After alignment two sets of nucleotide sequences were formed and investigated independently. One set included 13 structural genes (14,886 bp), the second set comprised by the mtDNA without ND6 gene (10,457 bp). Both data sets give congruent phylogenetic signal that agreed with conventional views on the taxonomy of the order Pleuronectiformes; however, the first set gives better topology. In BA gene tree there are two well supported nodes which include the representatives of suborders Pleuronectoidei and Psettoidei. Within Pleuronectoidei two superfamilies, Pleuronectoidea and Soleidea are highly supported in BA but in all four kinds of gene trees (BA, ML, MP and NJ) the only superfamily Pleuronectoidea is well supported. At the top of hierarchy, all flatfishes belonging to the order Pleuronectiformes forming also a monophyletic clade in our data, with support level of 100% but in BA tree only. The monophyly of the family Pleuronectidae is well supported both by single gene data and by complete mtDNA sequences.

  17. Draft genome sequence of Mesotoga strain PhosAC3, a mesophilic member of the bacterial order Thermotogales, isolated from a digestor treating phosphogypsum in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Hania, Wajdi; Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Persillon, Cécile; Postec, Anne; Hamdi, Moktar; Dolla, Alain; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Le Mer, Jean; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Mesotoga strain PhosAc3 was the first mesophilic cultivated member of the order Thermotogales. This genus currently contain two described species, M. prima and M. infera. Strain PhosAc3, isolated from a Tunisian digestor treating phosphogypsum, is phylogenetically closely related to M. prima strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T). Strain PhosAc3 has a genome of 3.1 Mb with a G+C content of 45.2%. It contains 3,051 protein-coding genes of which 74.6% have their best reciprocal BLAST hit in the genome of the type species, strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T). For this reason we propose to assign strain PhosAc3 as a novel ecotype of the Mesotoga prima species. However, in contrast with the M. prima type strain, (i) it does not ferment sugars but uses them only in the presence of elemental sulfur as terminal electron acceptor, (ii) it produces only acetate and CO2 from sugars, whereas strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T) produces acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate, 2-methyl-butyrate and (iii) sulfides are also end products of the elemental sulfur reduction in theses growth conditions.

  18. Sequences, cycles, and basin dynamics in the Silurian of the Appalachian Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Carlton E.; Goodman, William M.; LoDuca, Steven T.

    1990-12-01

    Field stratigraphic analysis of the Early and medial Silurian strata of Ontario, New York and Pennsylvania permits recognition of six major sequences, reflecting 3rd-order cycles, in the Niagaran (Llandoverian-Ludlovian) of New York and adjacent regions. These sequences correspond approximately to the Medina, lower Clinton, middle Clinton, upper Clinton (two sequences) and Lockport Groups. Each is bounded by widespread unconformities produced by the interplay of eustatic sea-level drop and local tectonic uplift. In general, erosional sequence boundaries and transgressive surfaces are merged, with no record of the lowstand wedge. Each sequence is subdivisible into two to five sub-sequences that are marked by sharp, though generally non-erosional basal discontinuities. Investigation of the Clinton and Lockport Groups corroborates earlier suggestions that carbonate and siliciclassic tongues extended basinward from opposite margins synchronously in response to sea-level drops. Analysis of the thickness and basinward extent of the progradational tongues reveals the existence of multi-scale sedimentary cycles. Sequences and component sub-sequences are correlative basinwide and are synchronous within the resolution of bio- and event-stratigraphy. Major drops in relative sea-level are represented by the sequence-bounding discontinutiies. These surfaces are overlain by siliciclastic wedges near terrigenous source areas, or winnowed carbonate pack- and grainstones on the tectonically passive margin. Overlying highstand deposits, typically shales, calcareous mudstones, and limestones, are separated from lowstand or transgressive deposits by thin condensed intervals commonly marked by phosphatic or glauconitic material and/or surfaces of maximum sediment starvation. The relative highstand deposits of sequences and sub-sequences are developed in relatively deep-water facies and are, at most, slightly progradational. Hence, most sequences and sub-sequences are sharply bounded

  19. Recognizing Sequences of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kiebel, Stefan J.; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    The brain's decoding of fast sensory streams is currently impossible to emulate, even approximately, with artificial agents. For example, robust speech recognition is relatively easy for humans but exceptionally difficult for artificial speech recognition systems. In this paper, we propose that recognition can be simplified with an internal model of how sensory input is generated, when formulated in a Bayesian framework. We show that a plausible candidate for an internal or generative model is a hierarchy of ‘stable heteroclinic channels’. This model describes continuous dynamics in the environment as a hierarchy of sequences, where slower sequences cause faster sequences. Under this model, online recognition corresponds to the dynamic decoding of causal sequences, giving a representation of the environment with predictive power on several timescales. We illustrate the ensuing decoding or recognition scheme using synthetic sequences of syllables, where syllables are sequences of phonemes and phonemes are sequences of sound-wave modulations. By presenting anomalous stimuli, we find that the resulting recognition dynamics disclose inference at multiple time scales and are reminiscent of neuronal dynamics seen in the real brain. PMID:19680429

  20. PREFACE: Selected contributions from the 3rd Theory Meets Industry International Workshop, TMI2009 (Nagoya, Japan, 11-13 November 2009) Selected contributions from the 3rd Theory Meets Industry International Workshop, TMI2009 (Nagoya, Japan, 11-13 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Isao; Hafner, Jürgen; Wimmer, Erich; Asahi, Ryoji

    2010-09-01

    initiocalculations for research and development of a wide variety of materials were presented from the application side. These included materials for fuel cells, solar cells, lithium batteries, heterogeneous catalysts, oxide semiconductors, bioceramics, light-emitting devices, and many others. It is clear that the gap between theory and application is becoming ever narrower, and collaboration between industry and academia is now de rigueur. Some researchers in industry use ab initio tools every day as part of their research and development activities. The language gap between industry and theory is also narrowing, as shown by the active discussions between presenters and audience. TMI2009 was a satellite meeting of the 2nd International Symposium on Advanced Microscopy and Theoretical Calculations (AMTC2), held from 24-26 June, 2010, in Nagoya, Japan. The AMTC series of meetings was organized to commemorate the establishment of the Nanostructures Research Laboratory (NSRL) at the Japan Fine Ceramics Center (JFCC), and as a daughter event of EXPO 2005 Aichi, Japan. We would like to express our thanks to all the staff of the NSRL who helped run the workshop and contributed immeasurably to its success. Financial support for the workshop from the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas 'Nano Materials Science for Atomic-Scale Modification' from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports and Technology (MEXT) and Psi-k Network is also gratefully acknowledged. All submitted papers in this special issue were reviewed in order to meet the high standards of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. We are grateful to the many anonymous referees who made this possible. Last but not least, we would also like to thank all invited and poster contributors (especially those who accepted the burden of writing a full paper), and the Institute of Physics for their help in the preparation of this special issue.

  1. New archaeomagnetic data recovered from the study of celtiberic remains from central Spain (Numantia and Ciadueña, 3rd-1st centuries BC). Implications on the fidelity of the Iberian paleointensity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Catanzariti, G.; Jimeno, A.; Campuzano, S. A.; Benito-Batanero, J. P.; Tabernero-Galán, C.; Roperch, P.

    2016-11-01

    Variations of geomagnetic field in the Iberian Peninsula prior to roman times are poorly constrained. Here we report new archaeomagnetic results from four ceramic collections and two combustion structures recovered in two pre-roman (celtiberic) archaeological sites in central Spain. The studied materials have been dated by archaeological evidences and supported by five radiocarbon dates. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that the characteristic remanent manetization (ChRM) is carried by a low coercivity magnetic phase with Curie temperatures of 530-575 °C, most likely Ti-poor titanomagnetite/titanomaghemite. Archaeointensity determinations were carried out by using the classical Thellier-Thellier protocol including tests and corrections for magnetic anisotropy and cooling rate dependency. Two magnetic behaviours were depicted during the laboratory treatment. Black potsherds and poor heated samples from the kilns, presented two magnetization components, alterations or curved Arai plots and were therefore rejected. In contrast, well heated specimens (red ceramic fragments and well heated samples from the kilns) show one single well defined component of magnetization going through the origin and linear Arai plots providing successful archaeointensity determinations. The effect of anisotropy of the thermoremanent magnetization (ATRM) on paleointensity analysis was systematically investigated obtaining very high ATRM corrections on fine pottery specimens. In some cases, differences between the uncorrected and ATRM corrected paleointensity values reached up to 86 %. The mean intensity values obtained from three selected set of samples were 64.3 ± 5.8 μT; 56.8 ± 3.8 and 56.7 ± 4.6 μT (NUS2, CI2 and CIA, respectively), which contribute to better understand the evolution of the palaeofield intensity in central Iberia during the 3rd-1st centuries BC. The direction of the field at first century BC has also been determined from oriented samples from CIA kilns (D = 357

  2. Major patterns of higher teleostean phylogenies: a new perspective based on 100 complete mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Miya, Masaki; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Endo, Hiromitsu; Ishiguro, Naoya B; Inoue, Jun G; Mukai, Takahiko; Satoh, Takashi P; Yamaguchi, Motoomi; Kawaguchi, Akira; Mabuchi, Kohji; Shirai, Shigeru M; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2003-01-01

    A recent preliminary study using complete mitochondrial DNA sequences from 48 species of teleosts has suggested that higher teleostean phylogenies should be reinvestigated on the basis of more intensive taxonomic sampling. As a second step towards the resolution of higher teleostean phylogenies, which have been described as the "(unresolved) bush at the top of the tree," we reanalyzed their relationships using mitogenomic data from 100 purposefully chosen species that fully represented all of the higher teleostean orders, except for the Batrachoidiformes. Unweighted and weighted maximum parsimony analyses were conducted with the data set that comprised concatenated nucleotide sequences from 12 protein-coding genes (excluding 3rd codon positions) and 21 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes (stem regions only) from each species. The resultant trees were well resolved and largely congruent, with most internal branches being supported by high statistical values. All major, comprehensive groups above ordinal level as currently defined in higher teleosts (with the exception of the Neoteleostei and several monotypic groups), such as the Eurypterygii, Ctenosquamata, Acanthomorpha, Paracanthopterygii, Acanthopterygii, and Percomorpha, appeared to be nonmonophyletic in the present tree. Such incongruities largely resulted from differences in the placement and/or limits of the orders Ateleopodiformes, Lampridiformes, Polymixiiformes, Ophidiiformes, Lophiiformes, Beryciformes, Stephanoberyciformes, and Zeiformes, long-standing problematic taxa in systematic ichthyology. Of these, the resulting phylogenetic positions of the Ophidiiformes and Lophiiformes were totally unexpected, because, although they have consistently been considered relatively primitive groups within higher teleosts (Paracanthopterygii), they were confidently placed within a crown group of teleosts, herein called the Percomorpha. It should be noted that many unexpected, but highly supported relationships were found

  3. Schur monotone decreasing sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Rasul; Saburov, Mansoor; Saburov, Khikmat

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schur monotone decreasing sequences in an n-dimensional space by considering a majorization pre-order. By means of down arrow mappings, we study omega limiting points of bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences. We provide convergence criteria for such kinds of sequences. We prove that a Cesaro mean (or an arithmetic mean) of any bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences converges to a unique limiting point.

  4. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  5. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Norris, Alexis L; Workman, Rachael E; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R; Timp, Winston

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring.

  6. Depositional framework and sequence stratigraphic aspects of the Coniacian Santonian mixed siliciclastic/carbonate Matulla sediments in Nezzazat and Ekma blocks, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Azabi, M. H.; El-Araby, A.

    2007-04-01

    Superb outcrops of mixed siliciclastic/carbonate rocks mark the Coniacian-Santonian Matulla Formation exposed in Nezzazat and Ekma blocks, west central Sinai. They are built up of various lithofacies that reflect minor fluctuations in relative sea-level from lower intertidal to slightly deep subtidal settings. Relying on the facies characteristics and stratal geometries, the siliciclastic rocks are divided into seven depositional facies, including beach foreshore laminated sands, upper shoreface cross-bedded sandstone, lower shoreface massive bioturbated and wave-rippled sandstones, shallow subtidal siltstone and deep subtidal shale/claystone. The carbonate rocks comprise lower intertidal lime-mudstone, floatstone and dolostone, shallow subtidal skeletal shoal of oyster rudstone/bioclastic grainstone, and shoal margin packstone. Oolitic grain-ironstone and ferribands are partially intervened the facies types. Deposition has taken place under varied conditions of restricted, partly open marine circulation, low to high wave energy and normal to raised salinity during alternating periods of abundant and ceased clastic supply. The facies types are arranged into asymmetric upward-shallowing cycles that record multiple small-scale transgressive-regressive events. Lime-mudstone and sandstone normally terminate the regressive events. Four sequence boundaries marking regional relative sea-level falls divide the Matulla Formation into three stratigraphic units. These boundaries are Turonian/Coniacian, intra-Coniacian, Coniacian/Santonian and Santonian/Campanian. They do not fit with those sequence boundaries proposed in Haq et al.'s global eustatic curves (1988) except for the sea-level fall associated with the intra-Coniacian boundary. Other sequence boundaries have resulted from regional tectonic impact of the Syrian Arc Fold System that has been initiated in north Egypt during the Latest Turonian-Coniacian. These boundaries enclose three well-defined 3rd order

  7. Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mansi; Kulshrestha, Samarth; Puri, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Genome sequencing is an important step toward correlating genotypes with phenotypic characters. Sequencing technologies are important in many fields in the life sciences, including functional genomics, transcriptomics, oncology, evolutionary biology, forensic sciences, and many more. The era of sequencing has been divided into three generations. First generation sequencing involved sequencing by synthesis (Sanger sequencing) and sequencing by cleavage (Maxam-Gilbert sequencing). Sanger sequencing led to the completion of various genome sequences (including human) and provided the foundation for development of other sequencing technologies. Since then, various techniques have been developed which can overcome some of the limitations of Sanger sequencing. These techniques are collectively known as "Next-generation sequencing" (NGS), and are further classified into second and third generation technologies. Although NGS methods have many advantages in terms of speed, cost, and parallelism, the accuracy and read length of Sanger sequencing is still superior and has confined the use of NGS mainly to resequencing genomes. Consequently, there is a continuing need to develop improved real time sequencing techniques. This chapter reviews some of the options currently available and provides a generic workflow for sequencing a genome.

  8. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  9. The relationship between shellbed type and sequence architecture: examples from Japan and New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yasuo; Abbott, Stephen T.; Kitamura, Akihisa; Kamp, Peter J. J.; Naish, Tim R.; Kamataki, Takanobu; Saul, Gordon S.

    1998-12-01

    Examples of lithology, fossil content and taphonomic features of shellbeds and intervening less fossiliferous intervals are presented from four Plio-Pleistocene successions (Shimosa Group, Boso Peninsula, Omma Formation, Hokuriku area, Japan, and Okehu, Kai-iwi, and Shakespeare groups in Wanganui, and the Rangitikei Group along the Rangitikei River in New Zealand). As for pre-Pliocene 3rd- and 4th-order depositional sequences, Plio-Pleistocene 5th- to 7th-order depositional sequences contain a variety of shellbeds which are often associated with surfaces or intervals that are characterized by sedimentary condensation, omission or erosion (e.g. sequence boundaries, ravinement surfaces, downlap surfaces and condensed sections). Stratigraphic patterns of shellbed type tend to be similar and repetitive within a basin and a locality. This demonstrates that a specific palaeogeography played an important role in determining the nature of shellbeds. For example, shellbeds formed in the context of toplap are common only in the Shimosa Group, which was deposited in a moderately sheltered sea, the palaeo-Tokyo Bay. Toplap shellbeds are rare in other sequences formed in more open conditions. Despite the variability resulting from such basin characteristics, common styles of shellbeds can be recognized that formed under conditions of marine onlap, backlap, downlap and toplap. Each type of shellbed has a characteristic fossil composition and taphonomy. Onlap and toplap shellbeds contain low-diversity macrobenthic associations including Glycymeris, Mercenaria, Paphies or other bivalves having robust shells, which are often abraded or fragmented. Backlap shellbeds, which are equivalent to the condensed section formed at the maximum transgression, are characterized by dominance of epifaunal macrobenthos such as bryozoa, brachiopoda, pectinid and ostreid bivalves, preserved in a slightly cemented, glauconitic muddy matrix. In contrast to fossils in such condensed sections, the shell

  10. Third order LPF type compensator for flexible rotor suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushita, Osami; Takahashi, Naohiko; Takagi, Michiyuki

    1994-01-01

    The tuning job of the compensator for levitating flexible rotors supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB) concerns providing a good damping effect to the critical speed modes while avoiding the spillover problem on the instability of higher bending modes. In this paper, an idea for design of the control law of the compensator based on utilizing a third order low pass filter (LPF) is proposed to essentially enable elimination of the spillover instability. According to the proposed design method, good damping effects for the critical speeds are obtained by the usual phase lead/lag function. Stabilization for all of higher bending modes is completed by the additional function of the 3rd order LPF due to its phase lag approaching about -270 degrees in the high frequency domain. This idea is made clear by experiments and simulations.

  11. 75 FR 45095 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Terephthalate (PET) Film from Dana Mermelstein South Korea (A-580-807) (3rd Review). (202) 482-1391. Stainless.... Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings Dana Mermelstein from South Korea (A-580-813) (3rd Review)....

  12. 75 FR 67081 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    .... Department contact Antidumping duty proceedings \\1\\ Solid Urea from Russia (A-821-801) (3rd Review)....... Dana Mermelstein; (202) 482-1391. Solid Urea from Ukraine (A-823-801) (3rd Review).........

  13. 75 FR 53637 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. 570-836) (3rd Review). Porcelain-On-Steel Cooking Ware from Taiwan (A- Dana...-814) (3rd Review). Porcelain-On-Steel Cooking Ware from the Jennifer Moats, (202) 482-5047....

  14. 76 FR 45775 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... the People's Republic Julia Hancock, (202) 482- of China (A-570-835) (3rd Review). 1394. Fresh Garlic from the People's Republic of Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482- China (A-570-831) (3rd Review). 1391. Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium from David Goldberger, (202) 482- Russia (A-821-807) (3rd Review)....

  15. Single chain fragment variable antibodies developed by using as target the 3rd fibronectin type III homologous repeat fragment of human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 promote cell migration and neuritogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xuan-Jun; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2015-01-15

    L1CAM plays important roles during ontogeny, including promotion of neuronal cell migration and neuritogenesis, and stimulation of axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and myelination. These functions are at least partially exerted through a 16-mer amino acid sequence in the third fibronectin type III-like repeat of L1, which associates with several interaction partners, including integrins, other adhesion molecules and growth factor receptors. Here, using the Tomlinson I library for phage display, we obtained two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs) against this peptide sequence of human L1, hereafter called H3 peptide. Both scFvs recognize the H3 peptide and the extracellular domain of L1, as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of L1 expresssing cells. Furthermore, both scFvs reduce U-87 MG cell adhesion to fibronectin, while stimulating cell migration. Application of scFvs to human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells promote process outgrowth. Similar to triggering of endogenous L1 functions at the cell surface, both scFvs activate the signal transducers Erk and Src in these cells. Our results indicate that scFvs against a functionally pivotal domain in L1 trigger its regeneration-beneficial functions in vitro, encouraging thoughts on therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in the hope to ameliorate human nervous system diseases.

  16. A 4. 5-megabase yeast artificial chromosome contig from human chromosome 13q14. 3 ordering 9 polymorphic microsatellites (22 sequence-tagged sites) tightly linked to the Wilson disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.; Tomfohrde, J.; Barnes, R. ); Stewart, E.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. ); Le Paslier, D. ); Weissenbach, J. ); Farrer, L. ); Bowcock, A. Eugene McDermott Center of Human Growth and Development, Dallas, TX )

    1993-11-15

    The authors have previously performed a genetic analysis of multiply affected families to map a locus responsible for Wilson disease (WND) to a 0.3-centimorgan (cM) region within chromosome 13q14.3, between D12S31 and D13S59. Here they describe the construction of a contig of [approx]4.5 Mb, which spans this region and extends from D13S25 to D13S59. This contig consists of 28 genomic yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones. Five critical crossover events have been defined in this interval in two unaffected (Centre d'Etudes du Polymorphisme Humain) and three WND families. The combination of sequence tagged site content mapping of YACs with both polymorphic and nonpolymorphic markers and recombination breakpoint mapping resulted in the following order of polymorphic markers: centromere-RB1-D13S25-AFM205vh2-D13S31-D13S227-D13S228-AFM238vc3-D13S133-AFM084xc5-D13S137-D13S169, D13S155-D13S59-telomere. The recombination/physical distance ratio varies from [approx] 3000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S25 to 6000 kb per cM in the region between D13S31 and D13S59. Three WND families exhibiting recombination between the disease locus and D13S31 or D13S59 were genotyped for additional markers in this region and further refined the location of the WND gene to between D13S155 and D13S133. Nine of the markers in this region of <1 cM are polymorphic microsatellites (seven have observed heterozygosities of 70% or above) that will be extremely useful in prenatal and preclinical diagnosis of this disease. This physical map is an essential step in the isolation of the WND gene and is a framework for the identification of candidate genes.

  17. A vision for ubiquitous sequencing.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Yaniv

    2015-10-01

    Genomics has recently celebrated reaching the $1000 genome milestone, making affordable DNA sequencing a reality. With this goal successfully completed, the next goal of the sequencing revolution can be sequencing sensors--miniaturized sequencing devices that are manufactured for real-time applications and deployed in large quantities at low costs. The first part of this manuscript envisions applications that will benefit from moving the sequencers to the samples in a range of domains. In the second part, the manuscript outlines the critical barriers that need to be addressed in order to reach the goal of ubiquitous sequencing sensors.

  18. A vision for ubiquitous sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv

    2015-01-01

    Genomics has recently celebrated reaching the $1000 genome milestone, making affordable DNA sequencing a reality. With this goal successfully completed, the next goal of the sequencing revolution can be sequencing sensors—miniaturized sequencing devices that are manufactured for real-time applications and deployed in large quantities at low costs. The first part of this manuscript envisions applications that will benefit from moving the sequencers to the samples in a range of domains. In the second part, the manuscript outlines the critical barriers that need to be addressed in order to reach the goal of ubiquitous sequencing sensors. PMID:26430149

  19. Sequencing technologies and genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Smoczynski, Rafal; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2011-11-01

    The high-throughput - next generation sequencing (HT-NGS) technologies are currently the hottest topic in the field of human and animals genomics researches, which can produce over 100 times more data compared to the most sophisticated capillary sequencers based on the Sanger method. With the ongoing developments of high throughput sequencing machines and advancement of modern bioinformatics tools at unprecedented pace, the target goal of sequencing individual genomes of living organism at a cost of $1,000 each is seemed to be realistically feasible in the near future. In the relatively short time frame since 2005, the HT-NGS technologies are revolutionizing the human and animal genome researches by analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) or sequencing (ChIP-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), whole genome genotyping, genome wide structural variation, de novo assembling and re-assembling of genome, mutation detection and carrier screening, detection of inherited disorders and complex human diseases, DNA library preparation, paired ends and genomic captures, sequencing of mitochondrial genome and personal genomics. In this review, we addressed the important features of HT-NGS like, first generation DNA sequencers, birth of HT-NGS, second generation HT-NGS platforms, third generation HT-NGS platforms: including single molecule Heliscope™, SMRT™ and RNAP sequencers, Nanopore, Archon Genomics X PRIZE foundation, comparison of second and third HT-NGS platforms, applications, advances and future perspectives of sequencing technologies on human and animal genome research.

  20. Counterbalancing for Serial Order Carryover Effects in Experimental Condition Orders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Reactions of neural, psychological, and social systems are rarely, if ever, independent of previous inputs and states. The potential for serial order carryover effects from one condition to the next in a sequence of experimental trials makes counterbalancing of condition order an essential part of experimental design. Here, a method is proposed…

  1. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  2. Strengthening the influenza vaccine virus selection and development process: Report of the 3rd WHO Informal Consultation for Improving Influenza Vaccine Virus Selection held at WHO headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland, 1-3 April 2014.

    PubMed

    Ampofo, William K; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Bashir, Uzma; Cox, Nancy J; Fasce, Rodrigo; Giovanni, Maria; Grohmann, Gary; Huang, Sue; Katz, Jackie; Mironenko, Alla; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Sasono, Pretty Multihartina; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Siqueira, Marilda; Waddell, Anthony L; Waiboci, Lillian; Wood, John; Zhang, Wenqing; Ziegler, Thedi

    2015-08-26

    Despite long-recognized challenges and constraints associated with their updating and manufacture, influenza vaccines remain at the heart of public health preparedness and response efforts against both seasonal and potentially pandemic influenza viruses. Globally coordinated virological and epidemiological surveillance is the foundation of the influenza vaccine virus selection and development process. Although national influenza surveillance and reporting capabilities are being strengthened and expanded, sustaining and building upon recent gains has become a major challenge. Strengthening the vaccine virus selection process additionally requires the continuation of initiatives to improve the timeliness and representativeness of influenza viruses shared by countries for detailed analysis by the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS). Efforts are also continuing at the national, regional, and global levels to better understand the dynamics of influenza transmission in both temperate and tropical regions. Improved understanding of the degree of influenza seasonality in tropical countries of the world should allow for the strengthening of national vaccination policies and use of the most appropriate available vaccines. There remain a number of limitations and difficulties associated with the use of HAI assays for the antigenic characterization and selection of influenza vaccine viruses by WHOCCs. Current approaches to improving the situation include the more-optimal use of HAI and other assays; improved understanding of the data produced by neutralization assays; and increased standardization of serological testing methods. A number of new technologies and associated tools have the potential to revolutionize influenza surveillance and response activities. These include the increasingly routine use of whole genome next-generation sequencing and other high-throughput approaches. Such approaches could not only become key elements in outbreak

  3. Contribution of cathodoluminescence to the knowledge of manganese speciation into pelagic limestones. Determination of the control of sea-level variations on third-order sequences during the Upper JurassicApport de la cathodoluminescence à la connaissance de la spéciation du manganèse dans les carbonates pélagiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rafélis, Marc; Renard, Maurice; Emmanuel, Laurent; Durlet, Christophe

    2000-03-01

    Mn contents analysis of pelagic carbonates from the Upper Jurassic of the Vocontian trough (Châteauneuf-d'Oze section, Hautes-Alpes) allowed the definition of six third-order eustatic sequences that agree with the chronostratigraphic chart [17]. Cathodoluminescence intensity enables a semi-quantitative approach of Mn trapped in the calcite lattice; thus, CL-results show that most of Mn is found in the pelagic limestones as Mn 2+. The Mn content variations observed in the low stands (low Mn contents) and in the high-stand systems tract samples (high Mn contents) reflect the sea water Mn content variations, which appear to be linked to the hydrothermal activity, especially by the ocean ridge. In the Vocontian realm, third-order sequences of the Upper Jurassic seem to be controlled by tectono-eustatism.

  4. Conservation patterns in different functional sequence categoriesof divergent Drosophila species

    SciTech Connect

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Kislyuk, Andrey; Levine, Michael; Dubchak, Inna

    2005-10-01

    We have explored the distributions of fully conservedungapped blocks in genome-wide pairwise alignments of recently completedspecies of Drosophila: D.yakuba, D.ananassae, D.pseudoobscura, D.virilisand D.mojavensis. Based on these distributions we have found that nearlyevery functional sequence category possesses its own distinctiveconservation pattern, sometimes independent of the overall sequenceconservation level. In the coding and regulatory regions, the ungappedblocks were longer than in introns, UTRs and non-functional sequences. Atthe same time, the blocks in the coding regions carried 3N+2 signaturecharacteristic to synonymic substitutions in the 3rd codon positions.Larger block sizes in transcription regulatory regions can be explainedby the presence of conserved arrays of binding sites for transcriptionfactors. We also have shown that the longest ungapped blocks, or'ultraconserved' sequences, are associated with specific gene groups,including those encoding ion channels and components of the cytoskeleton.We discussed how restrained conservation patterns may help in mappingfunctional sequence categories and improving genomeannotation.

  5. Serial Order: A Parallel Distributed Processing Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Michael I.

    Human behavior shows a variety of serially ordered action sequences. This paper presents a theory of serial order which describes how sequences of actions might be learned and performed. In this theory, parallel interactions across time (coarticulation) and parallel interactions across space (dual-task interference) are viewed as two aspects of a…

  6. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  7. Automated Identification of Nucleotide Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George; Zhu, Dian-Hui

    2007-01-01

    STITCH is a computer program that processes raw nucleotide-sequence data to automatically remove unwanted vector information, perform reverse-complement comparison, stitch shorter sequences together to make longer ones to which the shorter ones presumably belong, and search against the user s choice of private and Internet-accessible public 16S rRNA databases. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] In STITCH, a template 16S rRNA sequence is used to position forward and reverse reads. STITCH then automatically searches known 16S rRNA sequences in the user s chosen database(s) to find the sequence most similar to (the sequence that lies at the smallest edit distance from) each spliced sequence. The result of processing by STITCH is the identification of the most similar well-described bacterium. Whereas previously commercially available software for analyzing genetic sequences operates on one sequence at a time, STITCH can manipulate multiple sequences simultaneously to perform the aforementioned operations. A typical analysis of several dozen sequences (length of the order of 103 base pairs) by use of STITCH is completed in a few minutes, whereas such an analysis performed by use of prior software takes hours or days.

  8. The radiology of joint disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, D.M.; Brown, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a systematic radiographic approach to the arthritides. Part one deals with hand abnormalities ''to facilitate the teaching of basic principles and to dramatize the differences between radiographic features of various arthritides,'' as stated in the forward of the first edition. Part two, ''Arthritis from Head to Foot,'' illustrates the same diseases as they affect other joints. The ABCs (alignment, bone mineralization, cartilage space, soft tissue) approach is followed throughout the book. For example, reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome is dealt with in six different locations, and metatarsal stress fractures are mentioned in a chapter on erosions in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Greater Philadelphia Bioinformatics Alliance (GPBA) 3rd Annual Retreat 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    annotations: Stem cells populations were annotated with a controlled vocabulary describing stem cell differentiation stages (multipotent, totipotent ...A modular analysis of a stem cells populations compendium. Ghislain Bidaut and Christian J. Stoeckert Jr...92 70 PI. A modular analysis of a stem cells populations compendium. Ghislain Bidaut and Christian J

  10. Machining Data Handbook. 3rd Edition. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    1-2 2 .065 210 3-10 1 .065 240 Hot 11-19 1 060 275 M2, M7 150 Rolled. 20-48 1 .050 285 to Normalized, 48 & Finer 1 .030 320 200 Annealed 13r R...250 Annealedor Cold & -==-- i. Drawn - \\- Medium Carbon Leaded 1-2 2 .060 2001L53-10 1 .060 210 2 10L45 Hot 11-19 1 .060 225 M2. M7 10150 o 11137 125...060 210 M2, M7 175 Rolled. 20-48 1 .050 225 to Normalized, 48 & Finer 1 .030 240 225 AnnealeaacowI d R or Cold ;1-2 2 .060 180 Hot Rolled, 3-10 1

  11. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 3rd Quarter 2012 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles will build and deploy 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  12. Learning in Adulthood: A Comprehensive Guide, 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.; Caffarella, Rosemary S.; Baumgartner, Lisa M.

    2006-01-01

    In this updated landmark book, the authors have gathered the seminal work and most current thinking on adult learning into one volume. This book addresses a wide range of topics including: Who are adult learners? How do adults learn? Why are adults involved in learning activities? How does the social context shape the learning that adults are…

  13. Conference on the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (3rd)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-23

    LEARNING AND MEMORY V. Aleman Dept. do Farnacologla y Toxicologia y Dept. do Fisiologia y Neurociencias CINVESTAV-IPN y Division do Neuroclenci a Inst...Vancouver, BC CANADA V6T 1W5 Dr. Victor Aleman Dr. Ronald L. Alkana Dept de Neurociencias School of Pharmacy CINVESTAV-IPN Univ. of Southern California Ave

  14. Orbital motion (3rd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. E.

    The fundamental principles of celestial mechanics are discussed in an introduction for students of astronomy, aerospace engineering, and geography. Chapters are devoted to the dynamic structure of the universe, coordinate and timekeeping systems, the reduction of observational data, the two-body problem, the many-body problem, general and special perturbations, and the stability and evolution of the solar system. Consideration is given to lunar theory, artificial satellites, rocket dynamics and transfer orbits, interplanetary and lunar trajectories, orbit determination and interplanetary navigation, binaries and other few-body systems, and many-body systems of stars. Diagrams, graphs, tables, and problems with solutions are provided.

  15. The 1991 3rd NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1991-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented from the following sessions: (1) featured presentations 1; (2) very large scale integration (VLSI) circuit design; (3) VLSI architecture 1; (4) featured presentations 2; (5) neural networks; (6) VLSI architectures 2; (7) featured presentations 3; (8) verification 1; (9) analog design; (10) verification 2; (11) design innovations 1; (12) asynchronous design; and (13) design innovations 2.

  16. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 62, 3rd Quarter, July 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    effective- ness demands institutional physical and psychological separateness from society that no other profession matches, transcending vocation to...con- siderably upon his biology, psychology , and the accidents of time and place that provided the unique contexts, perhaps the strategic moments...is so much a gestalt that the rela- tions among policy, grand strategy, military strategy, operations, and tactics need to be understood to be

  17. Studies on Metadiscourse Since the 3rd Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Jing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Ting; Gong, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Metadiscourse refer to linguistic resources that are used to refer to the act and the context of writing about some subject matter. Study of metadiscourse provides a gateway for understanding interactional features of texts or speech, looking beyond the ideational dimension of texts at how writers characterize the world and function…

  18. Prediction of Grade of Dropout from 3rd Grade Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Dee Norman; Bleach, Gail

    Measures of background characteristics, school performance, and test achievement were analyzed for four race-by-sex samples of third graders who were known to have later become high school dropouts. In each sample, age in the third grade, course marks, and standardized achievement scores were found to be significantly related to the grade in which…

  19. Proceedings of the 3rd Annual SCOLE Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: modeling and controlling the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) configurations; slewing maneuvers; mathematical models; vibration damping; gravitational effects; structural dynamics; finite element method; distributed parameter system; on-line pulse control; stability augmentation; and stochastic processes.

  20. The Handbook of Research Impact Assessment. 3rd Edition - Revised

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    Vol 18, Iss 1, pp 18-20 Debeurs-E Vandyck-R Vanbalkom-AJLM Lange-A Koele-P, "Assessing the Clinical-Significance of Outcome in Agoraphobia ...an Outcome Measure in Agoraphobia Research - Latent Effects of Exposure on Panic," JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS 1993, Vol 7, Iss 4, pp 307-319

  1. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 54, 3rd Quarter 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    undergone over 40 surgeries and perseveres through an arduous regimen of therapy H ndupress .ndu.edu issue 54, 3 d quarter 2009 / JFQ 9 MULLEN...which there has never been an accounting. In addition to the extreme repression of its citizenry—no kites, no music , no female education, execu...that verdict as premature , yet it is interest- ing to note that the turnaround in Iraq involved the emergence of an admittedly unusual external

  2. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 42, 3rd Quarter, July 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Millett  17  A Prescription for Protecting the Southern Approach by John A. Cope 22   The State Partnership Program: Vision to Reality by Pablo Pagan  26...An Interview with Terry J. Pudas, Acting Director, Department of Defense Office of Force Transformation 36  Implementing the Transformation Vision ...tion in an interview with the office’s acting director, Terry Pudas, who offers insight into the current vision of transformation. In this feature

  3. NS&T Management Observations - 3rd Quarter

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotto, David

    2014-07-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOVIET CONFERENCE ON CRYSTAL GROWTH (3RD),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The USSR symposium on crystal growth covered basic theories and methods for crystal growth, testing and determination. Discussions were made on...crystal growth theories, the water-heating crystal growing method , the flame melting crystal growing method , the effects of environmental conditions on...crystal growth, methods for semi-conductor crystal growth, methods for metallic single crystal growth, etching and formation of imperfections, crystal

  5. Advanced Materials Research with 3RD Generation Synchrotron Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukiassian, P.; D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Aristov, V. Yu.

    H and D surface nanochemistry on an advanced wide band gap semiconductor, silicon carbide is investigated by synchrotron radiation-based core level and valence band photoemission, infrared absorption and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, showing the 1st example of H/D-induced semiconductor surface metallization, that also occurs on a pre-oxidized surface. These results are compared to recent state-of-the-art ab-initio total energy calculations. Most interestingly, an amazing isotopic behavior is observed with a smaller charge transfer from D atoms suggesting the role of dynamical effects. Such findings are especially exciting in semiconductor physics and in interface with biology.

  6. Progress Report from the Chairman, Metallurgical Advisory Board (3rd)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1951-12-01

    held November 27, 1951. gJJU PKOPr*^ 2,14.. 4 ..1 The Bureau of Ordnance selected a 3 " pun mount for study by the special Metallurgical Advisory...mussn REPORT NO. - MAB-16-M 1^ 3 COPY NO. —• *-> o 0*D?y **af* °0l>? THIRD PROGRESS REPORT <S> From the CHAIRMAN, METALLURGICAL ADVISORY BOARD...Board, Chairman Copy No, 3 - Dr, D, W, ErorJc, President, national Acudemy of. Sciences Copy No, A - Professor C, R. Soderberg, Chairman, Division of

  7. Parent Involvement in 3rd Grade Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate how parent involvement impacts student motivation in third grade special education. The study was conducted at Allen Elementary in Genoa, Ohio during the spring of 2011. After reviewing recent literature, it acknowledges the importance of parent participation on student academic education, the effects of…

  8. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nejat Veziroglu, T.

    1980-01-01

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen production and uses, formulation of workable policies on energy use and energy conservation, heat and energy storage, and energy education. The volume of the proceedings presents the papers and lectures in condensed format grouped by subject under forty-two sessions for 319 presentations.

  9. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on Infrared Plasma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. B.; Röpcke, Jürgen; Hempel, Frank

    2009-07-01

    This volume containsd a selection of papers from the third Infrared Plasma Spectroscopy (IPS) Workshop held in Greifswald, Germany in July 2008. Although not all the contributions have been written up in time for the deadline for this volume, nevertheless the 12 contributions presented here give a fair representation of the conference topics. The conference comprised four different types of contribution. Firstly, four invited lectures focussed on the prime areas of interest. Secondly, eight shorter contributed talks, grouped as closely as possible with the appropriate invited lecture. These contributed talks covered topics in both pure and applied infrared plasma spectroscopy. A feature of the two previous IPS conferences has been a contribution from commercial organisations namely those involved in manufacturing devices, detectors and spectrometers. This group of participants formed the third part of the conference programme and gave five oral presentations covering topics like QCL and detector/detection developments and novel spectrometer designs. The fourth contributing group comprised 27 poster presentations. It should be mentioned that some of the latter were poster versions of contributed talks. The conference was remarkable for the wide spread of topics covered in a relatively small meeting, consisting of 44 participants. The participants were made up of 34 scientists from within Europe and 4 from the rest of the world. It is interesting to reflect on changes that have occurred since the previous meeting just a year earlier. Two clear developments which have occurred are the emergence of Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) and their use in Cavity Ring Down (CRD) spectroscopy. A major shift from cw lead salt diode lasers to cw and pulsed QCL in both pure and applied projects now seems to be well under way. The topics covered in the earlier conferences focussed more on applying infrared spectroscopy to plasma monitoring and control. When choosing the topics to cover the scientific committee felt that this time it would be useful to emphasise new spectroscopic developments as well as covering applications. This might serve as a guide as to where the subject of infrared spectroscopy in combination with plasma sources might be heading in the future i.e. to emphasize pure infrared spectroscopy developments. The first invited lecture (G Guelachvili and N Picque) and the last invited lecture (F K Tittel, Y Bakhirkin, R Curl, A Kosterev, R Lewicki, D Thomasz and S So) were chosen to set the scene and realise this objective. The second (R Engeln, R Zijlmans, S Welzel, O Gabriel, J-P van Helden, J Röpcke and D Schram) and third (X Aubert, C Lazzaroni, D Marinov, O Guaitella, S Welzel, A Pipa, J Röpcke and A Rousseau) invited talks focussed on the application of the IR laser techniques with particular emphasis on the role of surfaces in plasmas and the relevance of plasma surface interactions. Surface plasma interactions did not feature strongly in the two earlier meetings and so this topic too, along with the emphasis on novel infrared spectroscopy techniques, represents a new direction for the conference. Paul B Davies and Jürgen Röpcke International Scientific Committee P B Davies, Cambridge, UK: Chair J Röpcke, Greifswald, Germany: Co-Chair R Engeln, Eindhoven, Netherlands G Hancock, Oxford, U K M Hori, Nagoya, Japan H Linnartz, Leiden, Netherlands R Martini, New York, USA J Meichsner, Greifswald, Germany A Rousseau, Paris, France Local Organizing Committee J Röpcke (INP: Chair) F Hempel (INP: Secretary) J Meichsner (IfP, University of Greifswald) N Lang (INP) L Glawe (INP) C Krcka (INP) B Lindemann (INP) Conference photograph

  10. Mathematics in Early Years Education. 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague-Smith, Ann; Price, Alison

    2012-01-01

    This third edition of the best-selling "Mathematics in Nursery Education" provides an accessible introduction to the teaching of mathematics in the early years. Covering all areas of mathematics learning--number and counting, calculation, pattern, shape, measures and data handling--it summarises the research findings and underlying key concepts…

  11. IVHM for the 3rd Generation RLV Program: Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Bill

    2000-01-01

    The objective behind the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) project is to develop and integrate the technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Technological areas discussed include: developing, validating, and transfering next generation IVHM technologies to near term industry and government reusable launch systems; focus NASA on the next generation and highly advanced sensor and software technologies; and validating IVHM systems engineering design process for future programs.

  12. Developmental Surface and Phonological Dysgraphia in German 3rd Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cholewa, Jurgen; Mantey, Stefanie; Heber, Stefanie; Hollweg, Wibke

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of developmental reading and spelling disorders within the framework provided by cognitive neuropsychology has yielded interesting results for several alphabetic orthographies, for example English, Italian, and French. However, this approach has not attracted much attention in German speaking countries up to now. The following…

  13. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  14. Donations Increase for 3rd Year in a Row

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strout, Erin

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about a report on fund-raising campaign done by universities and colleges to support their educational programs. According to the "Voluntary Support of Education" annual report released by the Council for Aid to Education, alumni and other individual donors gave just more than half of the total amount raised. The country's…

  15. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  16. Airfield construction (3rd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goretskii, Leonid I.; Boguslavskii, Adol'f. M.; Serebrenikov, Vadim A.; Barzdo, V. I.; Leshchitskaia, T. P.; Polosin-Nikitin, S. M.

    The principal engineering aspects of airfield construction are discussed. In particular, attention is given to the fundamental principles and organizational aspects of airfield construction; excavation work and airfield layout; construction of drainage systems; foundations and pavements; and quality control and safety engineering. The discussion also covers the operation of various support plants, including concrete production and mixing, production of asphalt-concrete mixtures and organic binders, production of structural steel and reinforced concrete components, and operation of stone quarries and gravel pits.

  17. Joint Force Quarterly (JFQ). Issue 50, 3rd Quarter, 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Richard L. Russell 92 Integration of Coalition Forces into the USCENTCOM Mission By John F. Couture 98 Battling Misperceptions: Challenges to...Army/ Russell Lee Klika); Navy damage control seamen taking samples of simulated anthrax during chemical, biological, radiological drill aboard USS...Instincts and the Dangers of Nuclear Weapons in Iranian Hands Dr. Richard L. Russell is a Professor of National Security Affairs in the Near East

  18. 3rd College of Surgeons Lecture--bringing up surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ong, Siew Chey

    2009-03-01

    The talk traces briefly the development and changes of surgical training in the English-speaking world in the early days and the trials and tribulations of surgical training in Singapore a few decades ago. The factors that brought about the surge of American surgery from late 19th century to the first half of the 20th century are discussed. Structured surgical training leading to the exit point was introduced by William Halsted of Johns Hopkins Hospital around 1892, a system that was later adopted by all other medical disciplines and by all other hospitals in the US. It is considered to be the prime mover of the rapid progress of American medicine. Training surgeons to only the entry point while leaving the competence of trainees to chance, used to be common in the British surgical world. The trend now favours surgical training to the exit point. It is also the system being adopted in Singapore. Increasing demands of high standard of patient care and public accountability no longer allow us to be casual and permissive mentors of future generations of surgeons. Proper surgical upbringing requires a good structured programme that itself needs to be accredited and periodically reviewed. It also requires that discipline be observed on the part of trainees. Knowledge and skills are within the capability of our mentors to impart, but inculcation of good attitude and ethics in trainees is a harder goal to achieve.

  19. 3rd Annual NASA Ames Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    The Space Science and Astrobiology Division at NASA Ames Research Center consists of over 50 civil servants and more than 110 contractors, co-­-ops, post-­-docs and associates. Researchers in the division are pursuing investigations in a variety of fields including exoplanets, planetary science, astrobiology and astrophysics. In addition, division personnel support a wide variety of NASA missions including (but not limited to) Kepler, SOFIA, LADEE, JWST, and New Horizons. With such a wide variety of interesting research going on, distributed among three branches in at least 5 different buildings, it can be difficult to stay abreast of what one's fellow researchers are doing. Our goal in organizing this symposium is to facilitate communication and collaboration among the scientists within the division, and to give center management and other ARC researchers and engineers an opportunity to see what scientific research and science mission work is being done in the division. We are also continuing the tradition within the Space Science and Astrobiology Division to honor one senior and one early career scientist with the Pollack Lecture and the Early Career Lecture, respectively. With the Pollack Lecture, our intent is to select a senior researcher who has made significant contributions to any area of research within the space sciences, and we are pleased to honor Dr. William Borucki this year. With the Early Career Lecture, our intent is to select a young researcher within the division who, by their published scientific papers, shows great promise for the future in any area of space science research, and we are pleased to honor Dr. Melinda Kahre this year

  20. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 38, 3rd Quarter, July 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    anthropologists such as Gregory Bateson served the war effort directly, first conduct- ing intelligence opera- tions in Burma for the Office of...leaders such as General James L. Jones, Jr., USMC, Supreme Allied Commander, Europe, and Admi- ral Gregory G. Johnson, USN, combatant com- mander, Joint

  1. Proceedings: 3rd EPRI Optical Sensor Systems Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    These are the proceedings of the third Optical Sensor System Workshop, part of an ongoing effort by EPRI to support development of optical sensor technology, to identify benefits for utility users, and to position EPRI members as more ''informed buyers'' and users.

  2. JPRS Report, Science and Technology Japan, 3rd Microelectronics Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Cu system Alcosink, with characteristics equivalent to those of A1 20 3 , has already been marketed . However, special care is necessary in the...copper film and to improve the adhesion strength of the copper film. The thickness was adjusted to 5 pm by an Ni-P marketed bath (pH 6.5, 70°C). The AlN...ZnS layer was realized by controlling the air valve and shutter with a computer. N,. 4P C’ 0*C Figure 3. Schematic Diagram of Metallo-Organic Molecular

  3. Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Jerry M.; Dulcan, Mina K.

    The third edition of this textbook continues its tradition of integrating clinical wisdom and scientific research to improve patient care and advocacy for children and families. Each of the 56 chapters presents a summary of a core topic, blending clinical experience with evidence-based practices in assessment and treatment. Divided into 10 parts,…

  4. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 3rd Grade - Grassflat Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade three prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area.…

  5. Rentz's Student Affairs Practice in Higher Education. 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Fiona J. D.

    2004-01-01

    Students in the field, as well as experienced practitioners and administrators, will herein find an up-to-date and in-depth study of the major student affairs functions of a comprehensive campus program. Within its covers, the graduate student will find chapters describing everything the person new to student affairs needs to know about the major…

  6. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 70, 3rd Quarter, July 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    and future. Our compensation system strives to reflect the unique sacrifices our families make—the birthdays missed, friends left behind, and loved...working together to set up a system where pay remains competitive, health care becomes sustainable, and retire- ment stays solvent. Bonds of trust Our...Control System aircraft crew force based nearby at Tinker Air Force Base, my family and I have lasting memories of the power of tornadoes and their

  7. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 74, 3rd Quarter, July 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Nicholas Rostow presents his article on the legal , political, and strategy implications of the practice of targeted killing of terrorists. Cyber...be disagreements between the American public and the Services as to what is right, appropriate, legal , and illegal on any given incident because...We have an education system, a training system, and a legal system. We have people who care and are engaged to help. We’ve got victim care, medical

  8. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 58, 3rd Quarter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    that there are certifications or licenses to “defend,” “fight,” or “wage war” that are comparable to licenses to “practice medicine ,” “pass the bar...to medical workers granting them the right to practice medicine in the military, Indian clinics, mental hospitals, and prisons, but not to...Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2005). 54 Huntington, 62. 55 Ole Holsti, “A Widening Gap between the US Military and Civilian Society

  9. Discipline with Dignity, 3rd Edition: New Challenges, New Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwin, Richard L.; Mendler, Allen N.; Mendler, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1988, this landmark publication has given thousands of teachers timeless advice on not only how to prevent and solve discipline problems but also how to teach discipline as an affirming approach that promotes respect for self and others. Now this expanded 20th Anniversary Edition extends the authors' wisdom to new principles for coping with…

  10. New Material System for 3rd Generation IR Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    CdTe /Si composite substrates. However, in either case, HgCdSe growth experiments were conducted and material characterized . 3.2 HgCdSe Material...indeed tunable, we varied the material fluxes and measured the cut-off wavelength of the layer. Figure 6 shows several films characterized by Fourier...misfit dislocations need to be generated somewhere in the thin film stack to alleviate this energy which ultimately propagates into the IR-absorbing

  11. Structures for the 3rd Generation Reusable Concept Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2001-01-01

    A major goal of NASA is to create an advance space transportation system that provides a safe, affordable highway through the air and into space. The long-term plans are to reduce the risk of crew loss to 1 in 1,000,000 missions and reduce the cost of Low-Earth Orbit by a factor of 100 from today's costs. A third generation reusable concept vehicle (RCV) was developed to assess technologies required to meet NASA's space access goals. The vehicle will launch from Cape Kennedy carrying a 25,000 lb. payload to the International Space Station (ISS). The system is an air breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) hypersonic lifting body with rockets and uses triple point hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellant. The focus of this paper is on the structural concepts and analysis methods used in developing the third generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Member sizes, concepts and material selections will be discussed as well as analysis methods used in optimizing the structure. Analysis based on the HyperSizer structural sizing software will be discussed. Design trades required to optimize structural weight will be presented.

  12. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations.

  13. Advanced Aircrew Display Symposium (3rd), 19-20 May.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    unique attributes of these displays. We are not at the cross roads where the man, with his tremendous innovative and adaptive capabilities, may be the... accidents , increased training requirements and mission ineffectiveness from the aircrew’s inability to assimilate, evaluate, react to, and judge cockpit...Enhancement of safety c. Minimum for mission accomplishment d. Enhancement of mission, accomplishment B. How it is to be displayed 1. By sensory channel a

  14. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  15. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this initiative, funded by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, is to model, validate, and predict, with high fidelity, the microstructural evolution of third-generation high-refractory Ni-based disc superalloys during heat treating and service conditions. This initiative is a natural extension of the DARPA-AIM (Accelerated Insertion of Materials) initiative with GE/Pratt-Whitney and with other process simulation tools. Strong collaboration with the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is a key component of this initiative and the focus of this program is on industrially relevant disk alloys and heat treatment processes identified by GRC. Employing QuesTek s Computational Materials Dynamics technology and PrecipiCalc precipitation simulator, physics-based models are being used to achieve high predictive accuracy and precision. Combining these models with experimental data and probabilistic analysis, "virtual alloy design" can be performed. The predicted microstructures can be optimized to promote desirable features and concurrently eliminate nondesirable phases that can limit the reliability and durability of the alloys. The well-calibrated and well-integrated software tools that are being applied under the proposed program will help gas turbine disk alloy manufacturers, processing facilities, and NASA, to efficiently and effectively improve the performance of current and future disk materials.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book (3rd Edition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    Aluminum ( 2219 T-87 and 2024 T-37) Stainless steel (AMS 355) Titanium-6A14V POD curves added in the Second Edition Data Book for specific applications...Lack of Penetration Defects in Aluminum Alloy GTA Welds Longitudinal and Transverse Fatigue Cracks in Welds with Crowns Longitudinal and Transverse...with some N I)l’ procedures. The detection capability measured is thus specific to a given crack type (fatigue, stress corrosion , tear, etc.). It is thus

  17. Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring [TM]. 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MENTOR, 2009

    2009-01-01

    As a strategy for helping young people succeed in school, work and life, mentoring works. It helps give young people the confidence, resources and support they need to achieve their potential. The fact is this: these positive outcomes are only possible when young people are engaged in high-quality mentoring relationships. The "Elements of…

  18. Legal Concepts in Sport: A Primer. 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Linda Jean

    2008-01-01

    When most people think of legal issues in sport, they think about negligence. However, most professionals will face a much broader range of issues. For instance, topics such as sexual harassment, corporal punishment, drug testing, transportation, and hazing are all of special importance today. Also anti-discrimination laws and the concepts…

  19. 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2013-07-01

    1. Introduction 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' (TMB) is the programme established for scientists, by scientists. It is merit-based, and is shaped by requirements of academic credentials, and novelty and quality of information. The goals of this programme are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, in which the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The programme was founded in 2007 with the support of the international scientific community and of the US National Science Foundation, the US Air Force Office of the Scientific Research and its European Office for Research and Development in the UK, the UNESCO-IAEA International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Italy, the Commissariat l'Energie Atomique in France, the US Department of Energy and the Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Institute for Laser Engineering in Japan, and the University of Chicago in the USA. The International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond provides opportunities to bring together researchers from the areas, which include but are not limited to, fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and communications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium turbulent processes. 2. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to atomistic scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples to list. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or acceleration. Their scaling, spectral and invariant properties differ substantially from those of classical Kolmogorov turbulence. At atomistic and meso-scales, the non-equilibrium dynamics depart dramatically from a standard scenario given by Gibbs statistic ensemble average and quasi-static Boltzmann equation. The singular aspect and the similarity of the non-equilibrium dynamics at macroscopic scales are interplayed with the fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations and with the problem sensitivity to the boundary conditions at discontinuities. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of multi-phase flows suggest new methods for predictive modelling of the multi-scale non-equilibrium dynamics in fluids and plasmas, for error estimates and uncertainty quantifications, as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. 3. International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' The First and Second International Conferences on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond found that: (i) TMB-related problems have in common a set of outstanding research issues; (ii) their solution has a potential to significantly advance a variety of disciplines in science, technology and mathematics; (iii) TMB participants conduct highly innovative research and their interactions strengthen the community's might. Based on the success of the first and second conferences and on the recommendations of the conference round table discussions, and in response to the inquiry of the community, the Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond was organized. The Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond, TMB-2011, was held on 21-28 August 2011 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, and it strengthened and reaffirmed the success of TMB-2009 and 2007. The objectives of the Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond were to: (i) focus the integration of theory, experiments, large-scale numerical simulations and state-of-the-art technologies on the exploration of physical mechanisms of non-equilibrium dynamics, from micro to macro-scales, in both high and low energy density regimes; (ii) foster the application of innovative approaches for tackling the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing problems and for understanding and further extending the range of applicability of canonical considerations; (iii) encourage the development of new approaches and stimulate the application of advanced data analysis techniques for unified characterization of experimental and numerical data sets, for estimation of their quality and information capacity, and for transforming data to knowledge; (iv) further develop the 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' community via organizing a positive and constructive collaborative environment, maintaining the quality of information flux in the community and sharing research methodologies, tools and data among the community members. The objectives were accomplished at TMB-2011. 4. Programme of TMB-2011 TMB-2011 brought together 150 participants, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their careers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry, from developed and developing countries across five continents. The success of TMB-2011 consisted from the successful work of the conference participants, who were responsible professionals caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high, and 205 presentations included about 50 invited lectures, nearly 70 oral talks (3500 min of talks in total), some 90 posters and one round table. The special course on 'Turbulence and Waves' was organized at TMB-2011 with the support of the US Office of Naval Research Global, and included nearly 40 lectures and talks (960 minutes of talks in total). TMB-2011 covered 16 different topics, maintaining the scope and the interdisciplinary character of the meeting and at the same time keeping the focus on a fundamental scientific problem of non-equilibrium processes and on the conference objectives. The topics included: • Canonical turbulent and turbulent mixing: invariant, scaling, spectral properties, scalar transports, convection. • Wall-bounded flows: structure and fundamentals, non-canonical turbulent boundary layers, including unsteady and transitional flows, supersonic and hypersonic flows, shock-boundary layer interactions. • Non-equilibrium processes: unsteady, multiphase and shock-driven turbulent flows, anisotropic non-local dynamics, connection of continuous description at macro-scales to kinetic processes at atomistic scales. • Interfacial dynamics: the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Landau-Darrieus, Saffmann-Taylor. • High energy density physics: inertial confinement and heavy-ion fusion, Z-pinches, light-material and laser-plasma interaction, non-equilibrium heat transfer. • Material science: material transformation under high strain rates, equation of state, impact dynamics, mixing at nano- and micro-scales. • Astrophysics: supernovae, interstellar medium, star formation, stellar interiors, early Universe, cosmic-microwave background, accretion discs. • Magneto-hydrodynamics: magnetic fusion and magnetically confined plasmas, magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, dynamo. • Canonical plasmas: coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere. • Physics of atmosphere: environmental fluid dynamics, forecasting, turbulent flows in stratified media and atmosphere. • Geophysics and Earth science: mantle-lithosphere tectonics, oceanography, turbulent convection under rotation, planetary interiors. • Combustion: dynamics of flames and fires, deflagration-to-detonation transition, blast waves and explosions, flows with chemical reactions, reactive flows in jet engines. • Theoretical aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics: vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness, continuous transports out of thermodynamic equilibrium. • Stochastic processes and probabilistic description: long-tail distributions and anomalous diffusion, data assimilation and processing methodologies, error estimate and uncertainty quantification, statistically unsteady processes. • Advanced numerical simulations: continuous DNS/LES/RANS, molecular dynamics, Monte-Carlo, predictive modelling, validation and verification of numerical models. • Experiments and experimental diagnostics: model experiments in high energy density and low energy density regimes, plasma diagnostics, fluid flow visualizations and control, opto-fluidics, novel optical method, holography, advanced technologies. The abstracts of the 207 accepted presentations of 443 authors were published in Proceedings. Abstracts. The Third International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', 21 -28 August 2011. Copyright (ISBN 92-95003-45-4). All the accepted contributions have been reviewed by the international team of 27 members of the Scientific Committee, with every contribution considered by four to eleven experts. In the majority of cases, the opinions of referees with diverse backgrounds and expertise converged. In 2011, the award 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond for Youth' was issued to Gregory P Bewley (Max Plank Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Germany) and Robert Zimmermann (Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, France) in recognition of their contributions to TMB-related scientific problems. The Best Poster Award was issued by Physica Scripta to Michael Winkler (University of Potsdam, Germany) in recognition of their poster presentation at TMB-2011. 5. Organization and acknowledgments The Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond was organized by the following members of the Organizing Committee: • Snezhana I Abarzhi (Chairperson, University of Chicago, USA) • Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • Hiroshi Azechi (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Vladimir E Fortov (Institute for High Energy Density, Russia) • Boris Galperin (Organizer of the Special Course, University of South Florida, USA) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Christopher J Keane (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) • Joseph J Niemela (Local Organizer, International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • Katepalli R Sreenivasan (New York University, USA) The conference and course were sponsored by several agencies and institutions in the USA, Europe, Russia and Japan. The Organizing Committee of the TMB-2011 gratefully acknowledges support of the: • National Science Foundation (NSF), USA. Programmes: Plasma Physics; Physics Education and Interdisciplinary Research; Astronomy and Astrophysics; Applied Mathematics; Particulate and Multiphase Processes; Combustion, Fire and Plasma Systems • European Office of Aerospace Research and Development (EOARD), UK, of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), USA • Office of Naval Research Global, UK • Department of Energy, Office of Science, USA • US Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), USA. Programme: National Ignition Facility (NIF) • US Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), USA • US Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), USA • The UNESCO- IAEA International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Italy • Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux énergies Alternatives (CEA), France • The University of Chicago, USA • Institute for Laser Engineering (ILE), Japan • Joint Institute for High Temperatures (JIHT) of the Academy of Sciences, Russia • Institute of Physics Publishing (IOP), UK • Physica Scripta , the journal of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for the Science Academies and the Physical Societies of the Nordic Countries and thank them for making this event possible. We express our gratitude to the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee: • S I Abarzhi (University of Chicago, USA) • Y Aglitskiy (Science Applications International Corporation, USA) • H Azechi (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • M J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • S I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) • E Bodenschatz (Max Plank Institute, Germany) • F Cattaneo (University of Chicago, USA) • P Cvitanović (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA) • S Cowley (Imperial College, UK) • S Dalziel (DAMTP, Cambridge, UK) • R Ecke (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • H J Fernando (University of Notre Dame, USA) • Y Fukumoto (Kyushu University, Japan) • B Galperin (University of South Floorida, USA) • S Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • W Gekelman (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) • G A Glatzmaier (University of California at Santa Cruz, USA) • J Glimm (State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA) • W A Goddard III (California Institute of Technology, USA) • F Grinstein (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • J Jimenez (Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain) • L P Kadanoff (The University of Chicago, USA) • D Q Lamb (The University of Chicago, USA) • D P Lathrop (University of Maryland, USA) • S Lebedev (Imperial College, UK) • P Manneville (Ecole Polytechnique, France) • D I Meiron (California Institute of Technology, USA) • P Moin (Stanford University, USA) • A Nepomnyashchy (Technion, Israel) • J Niemela (International Center for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • K Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • S S Orlov (Physical Optics Corporation, USA) • N Peters (RWTS, Aachen, Germany) • S B Pope (Cornell, USA) • A Pouquet (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, USA) • B A Remington (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) • R R Rosales (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA) • R Rosner (Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago, USA) • A J Schmitt (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) • C-W Shu (Brown University, USA) • K R Sreenivasan (New York University, USA) • E Tadmor (University of Maryland, USA) • A L Velikovich (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) • V Yakhot (Boston University, USA) • P K Yeung (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA) • F A Williams (University of California at San Diego, USA) • E Zweibel (University of Wisconsin, USA) We deeply appreciate the work of the Members of Steering Committee for Financial Support: • Snezhana I Abarzhi (University of Chicago, USA) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Joseph J Niemela (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • Walter Gekelman (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) We thank the members of the Committee for the award 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond for Youth': • Boris Galperin (University of South Florida, USA) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Joseph J Niemela (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • Katsunobu Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Katepalli R Sreenivasan (New York University, USA) We greatly acknowledge the effort and dedication of the members of the Committee for Best Poster Award: • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Katsunobu Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Annick Pouquet (National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA) • Walter Gekelman (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) • Graeme Watt (Institute of Physics, UK) We greatly appreciate the work of conference web-master Daniil V Ilyin (University of Chicago, USA). We thank for technical support: • Bhanesh Akula (Texas A & M University, USA) • Ahmad Qamar (University of Chicago, USA) We warmly acknowledge the logistics assistance of the offices and officers of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics: • Conference Support Office, and Ms Katrina Danforth and Ms Daniela Giombi • Financial Office, and Mr Andrej Michelcich and Ms Alessandra Ricci • Visa Office, and Mr Erich Jost and Mr Adriano Maggio • Housing Office, and Ms Tiziana Bottazzi and Ms Dora Photiou • Publications Office, and Mr Guido Comar and Mr Raffaele Corona • Computer Office, and Dr Johannes Grassberger • Science Dissemination Unit, and Dr Enrique Canessa, Dr. Carlo Fonda and Dr Marco Zennaro We gratefully appreciate the support of the members of the Programme Coordination Board: • Snezhana I Abarzhi (University of Chicago, USA) • Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • Sergei I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) • Hiroshi Azechi (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Vladimir E Fortov (Institute for High Energy Density, Russia) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Christopher J Keane (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) • Joseph J Niemela (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • Katsunobu Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Sergei S Orlov (Physical Optics Corporation, USA) • Bruce Remington (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) • Robert Rosner (University of Chicago, USA) • Katepalli R Sreenivasan (New York University, USA) • Alexander L Velikovich (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) 6. The Topical Issue This Topical Issue consists of over 70 articles accepted for publication and represents a substantial part of the Conference contributions, including research papers, research briefs and review papers. The papers are in a broad variety of TMB-2011 themes and are sorted alphabetically by the last name of the first author within each topic. The review papers are published as 'Comments' articles in Physica Scripta . We thank all the authors and the referees for their contributions to this Topical Issue and for offering their expertise, time and effort. To conclude, the TMB programme was organized to serve to advance the state-of-the-art in understanding of fundamental physical properties of non-equilibrium turbulent processes and to have an impact on predictive modelling capabilities, physical description and, ultimately, control of these complex processes. The readers are cordially invited to take a look at this Topical Issue for information on the frontiers of theoretical, numerical and experimental research, and state-of-the-art technology. Welcome to 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond'.

  20. High resolution imaging in cross-section of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor using super-higher-order nonlinear dielectric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinone, N.; Yamasue, K.; Honda, K.; Cho, Y.

    2013-11-01

    Scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy (SNDM) can evaluate carrier or charge distribution in semiconductor devices. High sensitivity to capacitance variation enables SNDM to measure the super-high-order (higher than 3rd) derivative of local capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics directly under the tip (dnC/dVn,n = 3, 4, ...). We demonstrate improvement of carrier density resolution by measurement of dnC/dVn,n = 1, 2, 3, 4 (super-higher-order method) in the cross-sectional observation of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor.

  1. MSLICE Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Morris, John R.

    2011-01-01

    MSLICE Sequencing is a graphical tool for writing sequences and integrating them into RML files, as well as for producing SCMF files for uplink. When operated in a testbed environment, it also supports uplinking these SCMF files to the testbed via Chill. This software features a free-form textural sequence editor featuring syntax coloring, automatic content assistance (including command and argument completion proposals), complete with types, value ranges, unites, and descriptions from the command dictionary that appear as they are typed. The sequence editor also has a "field mode" that allows tabbing between arguments and displays type/range/units/description for each argument as it is edited. Color-coded error and warning annotations on problematic tokens are included, as well as indications of problems that are not visible in the current scroll range. "Quick Fix" suggestions are made for resolving problems, and all the features afforded by modern source editors are also included such as copy/cut/paste, undo/redo, and a sophisticated find-and-replace system optionally using regular expressions. The software offers a full XML editor for RML files, which features syntax coloring, content assistance and problem annotations as above. There is a form-based, "detail view" that allows structured editing of command arguments and sequence parameters when preferred. The "project view" shows the user s "workspace" as a tree of "resources" (projects, folders, and files) that can subsequently be opened in editors by double-clicking. Files can be added, deleted, dragged-dropped/copied-pasted between folders or projects, and these operations are undoable and redoable. A "problems view" contains a tabular list of all problems in the current workspace. Double-clicking on any row in the table opens an editor for the appropriate sequence, scrolling to the specific line with the problem, and highlighting the problematic characters. From there, one can invoke "quick fix" as described

  2. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  3. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution from which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.

  4. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution frommore » which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.« less

  5. American Exceptionalism and a New World Order

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Gutek, Philosophical and Ideological Voices in Education, 3rd ed. (Boston: Pearson Education, 2004). 2 Howard Zinn , The Power and the Glory, Summer...and U.S. Foreign Policy (London: lynne Reinner Publishers, 2002). 7 Howard Zinn , The Power and the Glory, Summer 2005, http://bostonreview.net

  6. Program for Editing Spacecraft Command Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy; Waggoner, Bruce; Kordon, Mark; Hashemi, Mahnaz; Hanks, David; Salcedo, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Sequence Translator, Editor, and Expander Resource (STEER) is a computer program that facilitates construction of sequences and blocks of sequences (hereafter denoted generally as sequence products) for commanding a spacecraft. STEER also provides mechanisms for translating among various sequence product types and quickly expanding activities of a given sequence in chronological order for review and analysis of the sequence. To date, construction of sequence products has generally been done by use of such clumsy mechanisms as text-editor programs, translating among sequence product types has been challenging, and expanding sequences to time-ordered lists has involved arduous processes of converting sequence products to "real" sequences and running them through Class-A software (defined, loosely, as flight and ground software critical to a spacecraft mission). Also, heretofore, generating sequence products in standard formats has been troublesome because precise formatting and syntax are required. STEER alleviates these issues by providing a graphical user interface containing intuitive fields in which the user can enter the necessary information. The STEER expansion function provides a "quick and dirty" means of seeing how a sequence and sequence block would expand into a chronological list, without need to use of Class-A software.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Planctomyces brasiliensis type strain (DSM 5305(T)), phylogenomic analysis and reclassification of Planctomycetes including the descriptions of Gimesia gen. nov., Planctopirus gen. nov. and Rubinisphaera gen. nov. and emended descriptions of the order Planctomycetales and the family Planctomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Scheuner, Carmen; Tindall, Brian J; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Mwirichia, Romano; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Planctomyces brasiliensis Schlesner 1990 belongs to the order Planctomycetales, which differs from other bacterial taxa by several distinctive features such as internal cell compartmentalization, multiplication by forming buds directly from the spherical, ovoid or pear-shaped mother cell and a cell wall consisting of a proteinaceous layer rather than a peptidoglycan layer. The first strains of P. brasiliensis, including the type strain IFAM 1448(T), were isolated from a water sample of Lagoa Vermelha, a salt pit near Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. This is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Planctomyces to be published and the sixth type strain genome sequence from the family Planctomycetaceae. The 6,006,602 bp long genome with its 4,811 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. Phylogenomic analyses indicate that the classification within the Planctomycetaceae is partially in conflict with its evolutionary history, as the positioning of Schlesneria renders the genus Planctomyces paraphyletic. A re-analysis of published fatty-acid measurements also does not support the current arrangement of the two genera. A quantitative comparison of phylogenetic and phenotypic aspects indicates that the three Planctomyces species with type strains available in public culture collections should be placed in separate genera. Thus the genera Gimesia, Planctopirus and Rubinisphaera are proposed to accommodate P. maris, P. limnophilus and P. brasiliensis, respectively. Pronounced differences between the reported G + C content of Gemmata obscuriglobus, Singulisphaera acidiphila and Zavarzinella formosa and G + C content calculated from their genome sequences call for emendation of their species descriptions. In addition to other features, the range of G + C values reported for the genera within the Planctomycetaceae indicates that the descriptions of the family and the order should be

  8. Complete genome sequence of Planctomyces brasiliensis type strain (DSM 5305T), phylogenomic analysis and reclassification of Planctomycetes including the descriptions of Gimesia gen. nov., Planctopirus gen. nov. and Rubinisphaera gen. nov. and emended descriptions of the order Planctomycetales and the family Planctomycetaceae

    DOE PAGES

    Scheuner, Carmen; Tindall, Brian J.; Lu, Megan; ...

    2014-12-08

    Planctomyces brasiliensis Schlesner 1990 belongs to the order Planctomycetales, which differs from other bacterial taxa by several distinctive features such as internal cell compartmentalization, multiplication by forming buds directly from the spherical, ovoid or pear-shaped mother cell and a cell wall consisting of a proteinaceous layer rather than a peptidoglycan layer. The first strains of P. brasiliensis, including the type strain IFAM 1448 T, were isolated from a water sample of Lagoa Vermelha, a salt pit near Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. This is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Planctomyces to be published andmore » the sixth type strain genome sequence from the family Planctomycetaceae. The 6,006,602 bp long genome with its 4,811 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. We study phylogenomic analyses that indicate that the classification within the Planctomycetaceae is partially in conflict with its evolutionary history, as the positioning of Schlesneria renders the genus Planctomyces paraphyletic. A re-analysis of published fatty-acid measurements also does not support the current arrangement of the two genera. A quantitative comparison of phylogenetic and phenotypic aspects indicates that the three Planctomyces species with type strains available in public culture collections should be placed in separate genera. Thus the genera Gimesia, Planctopirus and Rubinisphaera are proposed to accommodate P. maris, P. limnophilus and P. brasiliensis, respectively. Pronounced differences between the reported G + C content of Gemmata obscuriglobus, Singulisphaera acidiphila and Zavarzinella formosa and G + C content calculated from their genome sequences call for emendation of their species descriptions. Lastly, in addition to other features, the range of G + C values reported for the genera within the Planctomycetaceae indicates that the descriptions of the family and the

  9. Complete genome sequence of Planctomyces brasiliensis type strain (DSM 5305T), phylogenomic analysis and reclassification of Planctomycetes including the descriptions of Gimesia gen. nov., Planctopirus gen. nov. and Rubinisphaera gen. nov. and emended descriptions of the order Planctomycetales and the family Planctomycetaceae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Planctomyces brasiliensis Schlesner 1990 belongs to the order Planctomycetales, which differs from other bacterial taxa by several distinctive features such as internal cell compartmentalization, multiplication by forming buds directly from the spherical, ovoid or pear-shaped mother cell and a cell wall consisting of a proteinaceous layer rather than a peptidoglycan layer. The first strains of P. brasiliensis, including the type strain IFAM 1448T, were isolated from a water sample of Lagoa Vermelha, a salt pit near Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. This is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Planctomyces to be published and the sixth type strain genome sequence from the family Planctomycetaceae. The 6,006,602 bp long genome with its 4,811 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. Phylogenomic analyses indicate that the classification within the Planctomycetaceae is partially in conflict with its evolutionary history, as the positioning of Schlesneria renders the genus Planctomyces paraphyletic. A re-analysis of published fatty-acid measurements also does not support the current arrangement of the two genera. A quantitative comparison of phylogenetic and phenotypic aspects indicates that the three Planctomyces species with type strains available in public culture collections should be placed in separate genera. Thus the genera Gimesia, Planctopirus and Rubinisphaera are proposed to accommodate P. maris, P. limnophilus and P. brasiliensis, respectively. Pronounced differences between the reported G + C content of Gemmata obscuriglobus, Singulisphaera acidiphila and Zavarzinella formosa and G + C content calculated from their genome sequences call for emendation of their species descriptions. In addition to other features, the range of G + C values reported for the genera within the Planctomycetaceae indicates that the descriptions of the family and the order should be

  10. Block variables for deterministic aperiodic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörnquist, Michael

    1997-10-01

    We use the concept of block variables to obtain a measure of order/disorder for some one-dimensional deterministic aperiodic sequences. For the Thue - Morse sequence, the Rudin - Shapiro sequence and the period-doubling sequence it is possible to obtain analytical expressions in the limit of infinite sequences. For the Fibonacci sequence, we present some analytical results which can be supported by numerical arguments. It turns out that the block variables show a wide range of different behaviour, some of them indicating that some of the considered sequences are more `random' than other. However, the method does not give any definite answer to the question of which sequence is more disordered than the other and, in this sense, the results obtained are negative. We compare this with some other ways of measuring the amount of order/disorder in such systems, and there seems to be no direct correspondence between the measures.

  11. Rapid Equilibrium-Ordered Enzyme Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Thomas R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) characteristic initial velocity behavior (considering the five-step reaction sequence for rapid equilibrium-order bisubstrate mechanisms); (2) dead-end inhibition; (3) inhibition by single products; and (4) an activator as a leading reactant. (JN)

  12. Single parameter optimization for simultaneous automatic compensation of multiple orders of dispersion for a 1.28 Tbaud signal.

    PubMed

    Paquot, Yvan; Schröder, Jochen; Van Erps, Jürgen; Vo, Trung D; Pelusi, Mark D; Madden, Steve; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2011-12-05

    We report the demonstration of automatic higher-order dispersion compensation for the transmission of 275 fs pulses associated with a Tbaud Optical Time Division Multiplexed (OTDM) signal. Our approach achieves simultaneous automatic compensation for 2nd, 3rd and 4th order dispersion using an LCOS spectral pulse shaper (SPS) as a tunable dispersion compensator and a dispersion monitor made of a photonic-chip-based all-optical RF-spectrum analyzer. The monitoring approach uses a single parameter measurement extracted from the RF-spectrum to drive a multidimensional optimization algorithm. Because these pulses are highly sensitive to fluctuations in the GVD and higher orders of chromatic dispersion, this work represents a key result towards practical transmission of ultrashort optical pulses. The dispersion can be adapted on-the-fly for a 1.28 Tbaud signal at any place in the transmission line using a black box approach.

  13. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Salari, Ali

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to "helix to strand (HE)", "helix to coil (HC)" and "strand to coil (CE)" alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. 76 FR 31587 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Sunset Reviews. Department contact Antidumping Duty Proceedings Light-Walled Rectangular Welded Carbon... Steel Wire Rod from India (A-533-808) Dana Mermelstein, (202) 482-1391. (3rd Review). Welded Carbon...-583-815) ( 3rd Review). Welded Carbon Steel Pipe & Tube from Thailand Dana Mermelstein, (202)...

  15. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  16. Application of the order-of-magnitude analysis to a fourth-order RANS closure for simulating a 2D boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poroseva, Svetlana V.

    2013-11-01

    Simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flows are usually conducted using a set of the simplified Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations obtained by order-of-magnitude analysis (OMA) of the original RANS equations. The resultant equations for the mean-velocity components are closed using the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stresses. In this study OMA is applied to the fourth-order RANS (FORANS) set of equations. The FORANS equations are chosen as they can be closed on the level of the 5th-order correlations without using unknown model coefficients, i.e. no turbulent diffusion modeling is required. New models for the 2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-order velocity-pressure gradient correlations are derived for the current FORANS equations. This set of FORANS equations and models are analyzed for the case of two-dimensional mean flow. The equations include familiar transport terms for the mean-velocity components along with algebraic expressions for velocity correlations of different orders specific to the FORANS approach. Flat plate DNS data (Spalart, 1988) are used to verify these expressions and the areas of the OMA applicability within the boundary layer. The material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AJ61A.

  17. High-order random Raman lasing in a PM fiber with ultimate efficiency and narrow bandwidth

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Sergey A.; Zlobina, Ekaterina A.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Podivilov, Evgeniy V.

    2016-01-01

    Random Raman lasers attract now a great deal of attention as they operate in non-active turbid or transparent scattering media. In the last case, single mode fibers with feedback via Rayleigh backscattering generate a high-quality unidirectional laser beam. However, such fiber lasers have rather poor spectral and polarization properties, worsening with increasing power and Stokes order. Here we demonstrate a linearly-polarized cascaded random Raman lasing in a polarization-maintaining fiber. The quantum efficiency of converting the pump (1.05 μm) into the output radiation is almost independent of the Stokes order, amounting to 79%, 83%, and 77% for the 1st (1.11 μm), 2nd (1.17 μm) and 3rd (1.23 μm) order, respectively, at the polarization extinction ratio >22 dB for all orders. The laser bandwidth grows with increasing order, but it is almost independent of power in the 1–10 W range, amounting to ~1, ~2 and ~3 nm for orders 1–3, respectively. So, the random Raman laser exhibits no degradation of output characteristics with increasing Stokes order. A theory adequately describing the unique laser features has been developed. Thus, a full picture of the cascaded random Raman lasing in fibers is shown. PMID:26940082

  18. Two-dimensional gratings of hexagonal holes for high order diffraction suppression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziwei; Shi, Lina; Pu, Tanchao; Li, Hailiang; Niu, Jiebin; Wang, Guanya; Xie, Changqing

    2017-01-23

    We propose two-dimensional gratings comprised of a large number of identical and similarly oriented hexagonal holes for the high order diffraction suppression. An analytical study of the diffraction property for such gratings, based on both square and triangle arrays, is described. The dependence of the high order diffraction property on the hole shape and size is investigated. Notably, theoretical calculation reveals that the 2nd, 3rd and 4th order diffractions adjacent to the 1st order diffraction can be completely suppressed, and the 5th order diffraction efficiency is as low as 0.01%, which will be submerged in the background noise for most practical applications. The 1st order diffraction intensity efficiency 6.93% can be achieved as the hexagonal holes along y-axis connect with each other. For the case of b=Py/3, the 1st order diffraction intensity efficiency is 3.08%. The experimental results are also presented, confirming the theoretical predictions. Especially, our two-dimensional gratings have the ability to form free-standing structures which are highly desired for the x-ray region. Comparing with the grating of the square array, the grating of the triangle array is easy to be fabricated by silicon planar process due to the large spacing between any two adjacent holes. Our results should be of great interest in a wide spectrum unscrambling from the infrared to the x-ray region.

  19. Contrasting Sequence Groups by Emerging Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kang; Zaïane, Osmar R.

    Group comparison per se is a fundamental task in many scientific endeavours but is also the basis of any classifier. Contrast sets and emerging patterns contrast between groups of categorical data. Comparing groups of sequence data is a relevant task in many applications. We define Emerging Sequences (ESs) as subsequences that are frequent in sequences of one group and less frequent in the sequences of another, and thus distinguishing or contrasting sequences of different classes. There are two challenges to distinguish sequence classes: the extraction of ESs is not trivially efficient and only exact matches of sequences are considered. In our work we address those problems by a suffix tree-based framework and a similar matching mechanism. We propose a classifier based on Emerging Sequences. Evaluating against two learning algorithms based on frequent subsequences and exact matching subsequences, the experiments on two datasets show that our model outperforms the baseline approaches by up to 20% in prediction accuracy.

  20. Image analysis for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Kannappan; Huang, Thomas S.

    1991-07-01

    There is a great deal of interest in automating the process of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing to support the analysis of genomic DNA such as the Human and Mouse Genome projects. In one class of gel-based sequencing protocols autoradiograph images are generated in the final step and usually require manual interpretation to reconstruct the DNA sequence represented by the image. The need to handle a large volume of sequence information necessitates automation of the manual autoradiograph reading step through image analysis in order to reduce the length of time required to obtain sequence data and reduce transcription errors. Various adaptive image enhancement, segmentation and alignment methods were applied to autoradiograph images. The methods are adaptive to the local characteristics of the image such as noise, background signal, or presence of edges. Once the two-dimensional data is converted to a set of aligned one-dimensional profiles waveform analysis is used to determine the location of each band which represents one nucleotide in the sequence. Different classification strategies including a rule-based approach are investigated to map the profile signals, augmented with the original two-dimensional image data as necessary, to textual DNA sequence information.

  1. Ossification sequence heterochrony among amphibians.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Sean M; Harrison, Luke B; Sheil, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Heterochrony is an important mechanism in the evolution of amphibians. Although studies have centered on the relationship between size and shape and the rates of development, ossification sequence heterochrony also may have been important. Rigorous, phylogenetic methods for assessing sequence heterochrony are relatively new, and a comprehensive study of the relative timing of ossification of skeletal elements has not been used to identify instances of sequence heterochrony across Amphibia. In this study, a new version of the program Parsimov-based genetic inference (PGi) was used to identify shifts in ossification sequences across all extant orders of amphibians, for all major structural units of the skeleton. PGi identified a number of heterochronic sequence shifts in all analyses, the most interesting of which seem to be tied to differences in metamorphic patterns among major clades. Early ossification of the vomer, premaxilla, and dentary is retained by Apateon caducus and members of Gymnophiona and Urodela, which lack the strongly biphasic development seen in anurans. In contrast, bones associated with the jaws and face were identified as shifting late in the ancestor of Anura. The bones that do not shift late, and thereby occupy the earliest positions in the anuran cranial sequence, are those in regions of the skull that undergo the least restructuring throughout anuran metamorphosis. Additionally, within Anura, bones of the hind limb and pelvic girdle were also identified as shifting early in the sequence of ossification, which may be a result of functional constraints imposed by the drastic metamorphosis of most anurans.

  2. Integer sequence discovery from small graphs

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis; Petrone, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We have exhaustively enumerated all simple, connected graphs of a finite order and have computed a selection of invariants over this set. Integer sequences were constructed from these invariants and checked against the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS). 141 new sequences were added and six sequences were extended. From the graph database, we were able to programmatically suggest relationships among the invariants. It will be shown that we can readily visualize any sequence of graphs with a given criteria. The code has been released as an open-source framework for further analysis and the database was constructed to be extensible to invariants not considered in this work. PMID:27034526

  3. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  4. Multi-mode heterodyned 5th-order infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Joel D.; Varner, Clyde; Rubtsov, Igor V.

    2016-10-01

    Fifth-order multidimensional infrared spectroscopy with heterodyned detection was carried out in the three-beam dual-frequency configuration. Numerous 5th-order cross peaks were detected for the 4-azidobutyrate-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester compound in solution involving several vibrational modes ranging in frequency from 1045 to 2100 cm-1. Cross peaks involving overtones (2X/Z) and combination bands (XY/Z) among the tags, modes X and Y excited by the first two mid-IR laser pulses, and the reporter, modes Z excited by the third laser pulse, were acquired and the factors affecting the amplitude of 5th-order cross peaks are discussed. The 5th-order cross peaks were detected among modes that are spatially close (a few bonds apart) as well as for modes spatially separated by ca. 12 Å (eight bonds apart). In both cases, the waiting time dependences for the 3rd and 5th order cross peaks were found to be different. In particular, the waiting time at which the cross-peak maximum is reached, the decay time, and the value of a plateau at large waiting times were all differing strongly. The differences are explained by reduced sensitivity of the 5th-order signals to modes coupled weakly to the reporter mode and different relaxation dynamics involving overtone state of the tag. The ability of the 5th-order peaks to single out the modes coupled strongly to the reporter can help identifying specific energy relaxation and transport pathways, which will be useful for understanding energy transport dynamics in molecules. The absorptive 5th-order cross peaks were constructed which report on three-point correlation functions. It is shown that in addition to the triple-frequency correlation functions, a correlation of the frequencies with the mode coupling (anharmonicity) can be naturally measured by the 5th-order spectroscopy. The current limit for detecting 5th-order signals was estimated at the level of 1 × 10-3 in reduced anharmonicity, which is determined by the corresponding two

  5. Multimodal sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  6. Quasi-Fibonacci Numbers of Order 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wituła, Roman; Słota, Damian

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we introduce and investigate the so-called quasi-Fibonacci numbers of order 11 . These numbers are defined by five conjugate recurrence equations of order five. We study some relations and identities concerning these numbers. We present some applications to the decomposition of some polynomials. Many of the identities presented here are the generalizations of the identities characteristic for general recurrence sequences of order three given by Rabinowitz.

  7. An overview of task order 10

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L

    2011-01-12

    Task Order 10 formalizes a collaboration in high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) experiments between LANL and VNIIEF. The focus is the VNIIEF disk explosive magnetic generator (DEMG) technology. The task order outlines a sequence of tasks and deliverables culminating in an experiment which takes place in the US utilizing US explosives and a Russian DEMG. This talk summarizes task order 10. It gives a brief history and present status in terms of the proposed high pressure EOS experiment (ALT-3).

  8. Exact significance test for Markov order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethel, S. D.; Hahs, D. W.

    2014-02-01

    We describe an exact significance test of the null hypothesis that a Markov chain is nth order. The procedure utilizes surrogate data to yield an exact test statistic distribution valid for any sample size. Surrogate data are generated using a novel algorithm that guarantees, per shot, a uniform sampling from the set of sequences that exactly match the nth order properties of the observed data. Using the test, the Markov order of Tel Aviv rainfall data is examined.

  9. Variability of Polychaete Secondary Production in Intertidal Creek Networks along a Stream-Order Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tianjiang; Sheng, Qiang; Wang, Sikai; Wu, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic tidal creek networks are important habitats for sustaining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in salt marsh wetlands. To evaluate the importance of creek heterogeneity in supporting benthic secondary production, we assess the spatial distribution and secondary production of a representative polychaete species (Dentinephtys glabra) in creek networks along a stream-order gradient in a Yangtze River estuarine marsh. Density, biomass, and secondary production of polychaetes were found to be highest in intermediate order creeks. In high order (3rd and 4th) creeks, the density and biomass of D. glabra were higher in creek edge sites than in creek bottom sites, whereas the reverse was true for low order (1st and 2nd) creeks. Secondary production was highest in 2nd order creeks (559.7 mg AFDM m−2 year−1) and was ca. 2 folds higher than in 1st and 4th order creeks. Top fitting AIC models indicated that the secondary production of D. glabra was mainly associated with geomorphological characters including cross-sectional area and bank slope. This suggests that hydrodynamic forces are essential factors influencing secondary production of macrobenthos in salt marshes. This study emphasizes the importance of microhabitat variability when evaluating secondary production and ecosystem functions. PMID:24817092

  10. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  11. Exercise order in resistance training.

    PubMed

    Simão, Roberto; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Figueiredo, Tiago; Dias, Ingrid; Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2012-03-01

    adaptations, greater strength increases were evident by untrained subjects for the first exercise of a given sequence, while strength increases were inhibited for the last exercise of a given sequence. Additionally, based on strength and hypertrophy (i.e. muscle thickness and volume) effect-size data, the research suggests that exercises be ordered based on priority of importance as dictated by the training goal of a programme, irrespective of whether the exercise involves a relatively large or small muscle group. In summary, exercise order is an important variable that should receive greater attention in RT prescription. When prescribed appropriately with other key prescriptive variables (i.e. load, volume, rest interval between sets and exercises), the exercise order can influence the efficiency, safety and ultimate effectiveness of an RT programme.

  12. Implicit learning of fifth- and sixth-order sequential probabilities.

    PubMed

    Remillard, Gilbert

    2010-10-01

    Serial reaction time (SRT) task studies have established that people can implicitly learn sequential contingencies as complex as fourth-order probabilities. The present study examined people's ability to learn fifth-order (Experiment 1) and sixth-order (Experiment 2) probabilities. Remarkably, people learned fifth- and sixth-order probabilities. This suggests that the implicit sequence learning mechanism can operate over a range of at least seven sequence elements.

  13. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  14. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  15. Sequencing Events: Exploring Art and Art Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pamela Geiger; Shaddix, Robin K.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity for upper-elementary students that correlates the actions of archaeologists, patrons, and artists with the sequencing of events in a logical order. Features ancient Egyptian art images. Discusses the preparation of materials, motivation, a pre-writing activity, and writing a story in sequence. (CMK)

  16. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic, amino-acid-degrading and sulfur-reducing bacterium Thermovirga lienii type strain (Cas60314T)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Thermovirga lienii Dahle and Birkeland 2006 is a member to the genomically so far uncharacterized genus Thermovirga in the phylum 'Synergistetes'. Members of the only recently (2007) proposed phylum 'Synergistetes' are of interest because of their isolated phylogenetic position and their diverse habitats, e.g. from man to oil well. The genome of T. lienii Cas60314T is only the 5th genome sequence (3rd completed) from this phylum to be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,999,646 bp long genome (including one plasmid) with its 1,914 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. A Matrix Approach for General Higher Order Linear Recurrences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    properties of linear recurrences (such as the well-known Fibonacci and Pell sequences ). In [2], Er defined k linear recurring sequences of order at...the nth term of the ith generalized order-k Fibonacci sequence . Communicated by Lee See Keong. Received: March 26, 2009; Revised: August 28, 2009...6], the author gave the generalized order-k Fibonacci and Pell (F-P) sequence as follows: For m ≥ 0, n > 0 and 1 ≤ i ≤ k uin = 2 muin−1 + u i n−2

  18. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  19. MRO Sequence Checking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    The MRO Sequence Checking Tool program, mro_check, automates significant portions of the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) sequence checking procedure. Though MRO has similar checks to the ODY s (Mars Odyssey) Mega Check tool, the checks needed for MRO are unique to the MRO spacecraft. The MRO sequence checking tool automates the majority of the sequence validation procedure and check lists that are used to validate the sequences generated by MRO MPST (mission planning and sequencing team). The tool performs more than 50 different checks on the sequence. The automation varies from summarizing data about the sequence needed for visual verification of the sequence, to performing automated checks on the sequence and providing a report for each step. To allow for the addition of new checks as needed, this tool is built in a modular fashion.

  20. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  1. Minimal Orderings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    When minimum orderings proved too difficult to deal with, Rose, Tarjan, and Leuker instead studied minimal orderings and how to compute them (Algorithmic aspects of vertex elimination on graphs, SIAM J. Comput., 5:266-283, 1976). This paper introduces an algorithm that is capable of computing much better minimal orderings much more efficiently than the algorithm in Rose et al. The new insight is a way to use certain structures and concepts from modern sparse Cholesky solvers to re-express one of the basic results in Rose et al. The new algorithm begins with any initial ordering and then refines it until a minimal ordering is obtained. it is simple to obtain high-quality low-cost minimal orderings by using fill-reducing heuristic orderings as initial orderings for the algorithm. We examine several such initial orderings in some detail.

  2. Model of evolution of molecular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liaofu; Tsai, Lu; Lee, Weijiang

    1990-05-01

    A simplified model of the evolution of molecular sequences is proposed. An ensemble of strings is considered that consists of two letters and undergoes random point mutations and natural selections. A set of evolution equations is deduced. From the solution it is found that the first-order (second-order) informational parameters (redundancies) D1 decrease (D2 increase) in the course of evolution. Furthermore, the statistical correlations of the letters (bases) in the sequences are investigated in detail and the short-distance correlation is demonstrated. These results give a preliminary explanation of some physical aspects in the evolution of nucleic acid sequences.

  3. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  4. Design of minimum multiplier fractional order differentiator based on lattice wave digital filter.

    PubMed

    Barsainya, Richa; Rawat, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Manjeet

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel design of fractional order differentiator (FOD) based on lattice wave digital filter (LWDF) is proposed which requires minimum number of multiplier for its structural realization. Firstly, the FOD design problem is formulated as an optimization problem using the transfer function of lattice wave digital filter. Then, three optimization algorithms, namely, genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) are applied to determine the optimal LWDF coefficients. The realization of FOD using LWD structure increases the design accuracy, as only N number of coefficients are to be optimized for Nth order FOD. Finally, two design examples of 3rd and 5th order lattice wave digital fractional order differentiator (LWDFOD) are demonstrated to justify the design accuracy. The performance analysis of the proposed design is carried out based on magnitude response, absolute magnitude error (dB), root mean square (RMS) magnitude error, arithmetic complexity, convergence profile and computation time. Simulation results are attained to show the comparison of the proposed LWDFOD with the published works and it is observed that an improvement of 29% is obtained in the proposed design. The proposed LWDFOD approximates the ideal FOD and surpasses the existing ones reasonably well in mid and high frequency range, thereby making the proposed LWDFOD a promising technique for the design of digital FODs.

  5. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References

    PubMed Central

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization. PMID:26422374

  6. First-order inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  7. ASDC Ordering Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-08

    ... Ordering requires login , searching does not. Projects by science discipline: Aerosols | Clouds | Radiation Budget ... Tropospheric Composition | Field Campaigns All projects Details:  ASDC Ordering Tool ...

  8. The Connell Sum Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullington, Grady D.

    2007-01-01

    The Connell sum sequence refers to the partial sums of the Connell sequence. In this paper, the Connell sequence, Connell sum sequence and generalizations from Iannucci and Mills-Taylor are interpreted as sums of elements of triangles, relating them to polygonal number-stuttered arithmetic progressions. The n-th element of the Connell sum sequence is established as a sharp upper bound for the value of a gamma-labeling of a graph of size n. The limiting behavior and a explicit formula for the Connell (m,r)-sum sequence are also given.

  9. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Drimys, Liriodendron, andPiper: Implications for the phylogeny of magnoliids and the evolution ofGC content

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengqiu, C.; Penaflor, C.; Kuehl, J.V.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Carlson, J.; dePamphilis, C.W.; Boore, J.L.; Jansen, R.K.

    2006-06-01

    The magnoliids represent the largest basal angiosperm clade with four orders, 19 families and 8,500 species. Although several recent angiosperm molecular phylogenies have supported the monophyly of magnoliids and suggested relationships among the orders, the limited number of genes examined resulted in only weak support, and these issues remain controversial. Furthermore, considerable incongruence has resulted in phylogenies supporting three different sets of relationships among magnoliids and the two large angiosperm clades, monocots and eudicots. This is one of the most important remaining issues concerning relationships among basal angiosperms. We sequenced the chloroplast genomes of three magnoliids, Drimys (Canellales), Liriodendron (Magnoliales), and Piper (Piperales), and used these data in combination with 32 other completed angiosperm chloroplast genomes to assess phylogenetic relationships among magnoliids. The Drimys and Piper chloroplast genomes are nearly identical in size at 160,606 and 160,624 bp, respectively. The genomes include a pair of inverted repeats of 26,649 bp (Drimys) and 27,039 (Piper), separated by a small single copy region of 18,621 (Drimys) and 18,878 (Piper) and a large single copy region of 88,685 bp (Drimys) and 87,666 bp (Piper). The gene order of both taxa is nearly identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Calycanthus, the other published magnoliid genome. Comparisons of angiosperm chloroplast genomes indicate that GC content is not uniformly distributed across the genome. Overall GC content ranges from 34-39%, and coding regions have a substantially higher GC content than non-coding regions (both intergenic spacers and introns). Among protein-coding genes, GC content varies by codon position with 1st codon > 2nd codon > 3rd codon, and it varies by functional group with photosynthetic genes having the highest percentage and NADH genes the lowest. Across the genome, GC content is highest in

  10. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  11. Rational engineering of sequence specificity in R.MwoI restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Krzysztof; Boniecki, Michal J.; Kluge, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    R.MwoI is a Type II restriction endonucleases enzyme (REase), which specifically recognizes a palindromic interrupted DNA sequence 5′-GCNNNNNNNGC-3′ (where N indicates any nucleotide), and hydrolyzes the phosphodiester bond in the DNA between the 7th and 8th base in both strands. R.MwoI exhibits remote sequence similarity to R.BglI, a REase with known structure, which recognizes an interrupted palindromic target 5′-GCCNNNNNGGC-3′. A homology model of R.MwoI in complex with DNA was constructed and used to predict functionally important amino acid residues that were subsequently targeted by mutagenesis. The model, together with the supporting experimental data, revealed regions important for recognition of the common bases in DNA sequences recognized by R.BglI and R.MwoI. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, we designed substitutions of the S310 residue in R.MwoI to arginine or glutamic acid, which led to enzyme variants with altered sequence selectivity compared with the wild-type enzyme. The S310R variant of R.MwoI preferred the 5′-GCCNNNNNGGC-3′ sequence as a target, similarly to R.BglI, whereas the S310E variant preferentially cleaved a subset of the MwoI sites, depending on the identity of the 3rd and 9th nucleotide residues. Our results represent a case study of a REase sequence specificity alteration by a single amino acid substitution, based on a theoretical model in the absence of a crystal structure. PMID:22735699

  12. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  13. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  14. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  15. Sequence information signal processor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Waterman, Michael S.; Hunkapillar, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit is used to compare two sequences, such as genetic sequences, to determine which alignment of the sequences produces the greatest similarity. The circuit includes a linear array of series-connected processors, each of which stores a single element from one of the sequences and compares that element with each successive element in the other sequence. For each comparison, the processor generates a scoring parameter that indicates which segment ending at those two elements produces the greatest degree of similarity between the sequences. The processor uses the scoring parameter to generate a similar scoring parameter for a comparison between the stored element and the next successive element from the other sequence. The processor also delivers the scoring parameter to the next processor in the array for use in generating a similar scoring parameter for another pair of elements. The electronic circuit determines which processor and alignment of the sequences produce the scoring parameter with the highest value.

  16. Nonparametric Combinatorial Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, Fabian L.; Jordan, Michael I.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This paper presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three sequence datasets which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  17. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  18. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  19. Function-Based Algorithms for Biological Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohanty, Pragyan Sheela P.

    2015-01-01

    Two problems at two different abstraction levels of computational biology are studied. At the molecular level, efficient pattern matching algorithms in DNA sequences are presented. For gene order data, an efficient data structure is presented capable of storing all gene re-orderings in a systematic manner. A common characteristic of presented…

  20. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware.

  1. Career Academy Course Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Thom; Lenz, Robert

    This career academy course sequence guide is designed to give teachers a quick overview of the course sequences of well-known career academy and career pathway programs from across the country. The guide presents a variety of sample course sequences for the following academy themes: (1) arts and communication; (2) business and finance; (3)…

  2. Symbols of a cosmic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The world runs on networks over which signals communicate sequences of symbols, e.g. numerals. Examining both engineered and natural communications networks reveals an unsuspected order that depends on contact with an unpredictable entity. This order has three roots. The first is a proof within quantum theory that no evidence can ever determine its explanation, so that an agent choosing an explanation must do so unpredictably. The second root is the showing that clocks that step computers do not "tell time" but serve as self-adjusting symbol-handling agents that regulate "logically synchronized" motion in response to unpredictable disturbances. Such a clock-agent has a certain independence as well as the capacity to communicate via unpredictable symbols with other clock-agents and to adjust its own tick rate in response to that communication. The third root is the noticing of unpredictable symbol exchange in natural systems, including the transmission of symbols found in molecular biology. We introduce a symbol-handling agent as a role played in some cases by a person, for example a physicist who chooses an explanation of given experimental outcomes, and in other cases by some other biological entity, and in still other cases by an inanimate device, such as a computer-based detector used in physical measurements. While we forbear to try to explain the propensity of agents at all levels from cells to civilizations to form and operate networks of logically synchronized symbol-handling agents, we point to this propensity as an overlooked cosmic order, an order structured by the unpredictability ensuing from the proof. Appreciating the cosmic order leads to a conception of agency that replaces volition by unpredictability and reconceives the notion of objectivity in a way that makes a place for agency in the world as described by physics. Some specific implications for physics are outlined.

  3. Effects of visual stimuli on temporal order judgments of unimanual finger stimuli.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Satoshi; Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2007-06-01

    Successive tactile stimuli, delivered one to each hand, are referred to spatial representation before they are ordered in time (Yamamoto and Kitazawa in Nat Neurosci 4:759-765 2001a). In the present study, we examined if this applies even when they are delivered unilaterally to fingers of a single hand. Tactile stimuli were delivered left-to-rightward relative to the body (2nd-3rd-4th) or in reverse with stimulus onset asynchrony of 100 ms. Simultaneously with the delivery of tactile stimuli, three of nine small squares arranged in a matrix of 3 x 3 were turned on as if they appeared near the tips of the fingers. Although subjects were instructed to ignore the visual stimuli and make a forced choice between the two orders of tactile stimuli, the correct-judgment probability depended on the direction of visual stimuli. It was greater than 95% when the direction of visual stimuli matched that of the tactile stimuli, but less than 50% when they were opposite to each other. When the right hand was rotated counterclockwise on the horizontal plane (90 degrees ) so that the fingers were pointing to the left, the preferred direction of visual stimuli that yielded the peak correct judgment was also rotated, although not to the full extent. These results show that subjects cannot be basing their tactile temporal order judgment solely on a somatotopic map, but rather on a spatial map on which both visual and tactile signals converge.

  4. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  5. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  6. DNA sequence determination by hybridization: A strategy for efficient large-scale sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoody, J.; Crkvenjakov, R. ); Funkhouser, W.K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L. )

    1993-06-11

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Multiple ordering in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a self-consistent band calculation of the ground-state energy and charge orderings based on a tight-binding scheme in magnetite are presented. They show that below a critical (about 2.2) value of the ratio of interatomic Coulomb energy to bandwidth the lowest energy state has no order. Between this critical value and 2.5, the preferred state is multiply ordered.

  8. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  9. HIV Sequence Databases

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Two important databases are often used in HIV genetic research, the HIV Sequence Database in Los Alamos, which collects all sequences and focuses on annotation and data analysis, and the HIV RT/Protease Sequence Database in Stanford, which collects sequences associated with the development of viral resistance against anti-retroviral drugs and focuses on analysis of those sequences. The types of data and services these two databases offer, the tools they provide, and the way they are set up and operated are described in detail. PMID:12875108

  10. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  11. 75 FR 74681 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Salmon from Norway (A-403- Patricia Tran, (202) 482-1503. 801) (3rd Review). Countervailing Duty Proceedings Fresh & Chilled Atlantic Salmon from Norway (C-403- Patricia Tran, (202) 482-1503. 802)...

  12. 78 FR 60252 - Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Advance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ...) (3rd Review). Ferrovanadium from South Africa (A-791-815) David Goldberger, (202) 482-4136. (2nd Review... Innerspring Units from South Africa David Goldberger, (202) 482-4136. (A-791-821) (1st Review)....

  13. Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  15. Narcissism and birth order.

    PubMed

    Eyring, W E; Sobelman, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the relationship between birth-order position and the development of narcissism, while refining research and theory. The relationship between birth-order status and narcissism was examined with a sample of 79 undergraduate students (55 women and 24 men). These subjects were placed in one of the four following birth-order categories of firstborn, second-born, last-born, and only children. These categories were chosen given their significance in Adlerian theory. Each subject completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and a demographic inventory. Based on psychodynamic theory, it was hypothesized that firstborn children were expected to score highest, but statistical significance was not found for an association between narcissism and birth order. Further research is urged to investigate personality theory as it relates to parenting style and birth order.

  16. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  17. The Hippocampus and Disambiguation of Overlapping Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Agster, Kara L.; Fortin, Norbert J.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Recent models of hippocampal function emphasize its potential role in disambiguating sequences of events that compose distinct episodic memories. In this study, rats were trained to distinguish two overlapping sequences of odor choices. The capacity to disambiguate the sequences was measured by the critical odor choice after the overlapping elements of the sequences. When the sequences were presented in rapid alternation, damage to the hippocampus, produced either by infusions of the neurotoxin ibotenic acid or by radiofrequency current, produced a severe deficit, although animals with radiofrequency lesions relearned the task. When the sequences were presented spaced apart and in random order, animals with radiofrequency hippocampal lesions could perform the task. However, they failed when a memory delay was imposed before the critical choice. These findings support the hypothesis that the hippocampus is involved in representing sequences of nonspatial events, particularly when interference between the sequences is high or when animals must remember across a substantial delay preceding items in a current sequence. PMID:12097529

  18. Using SEQUEST with Theoretically Complete Sequence Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadygov, Rovshan G.

    2015-11-01

    SEQUEST has long been used to identify peptides/proteins from their tandem mass spectra and protein sequence databases. The algorithm has proven to be hugely successful for its sensitivity and specificity in identifying peptides/proteins, the sequences of which are present in the protein sequence databases. In this work, we report on work that attempts a new use for the algorithm by applying it to search a complete list of theoretically possible peptides, a de novo-like sequencing. We used freely available mass spectral data and determined a number of unique peptides as identified by SEQUEST. Using masses of these peptides and the mass accuracy of 0.001 Da, we have created a database of all theoretically possible peptide sequences corresponding to the precursor masses. We used our recently developed algorithm for determining all amino acid compositions corresponding to a mass interval, and used a lexicographic ordering to generate theoretical sequences from the compositions. The newly generated theoretical database was many-fold more complex than the original protein sequence database. We used SEQUEST to search and identify the best matches to the spectra from all theoretically possible peptide sequences. We found that SEQUEST cross-correlation score ranked the correct peptide match among the top sequence matches. The results testify to the high specificity of SEQUEST when combined with the high mass accuracy for intact peptides.

  19. Ordered fast fourier transforms on a massively parallel hypercube multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Charles; Swarztrauber, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Design alternatives for ordered Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) algorithms were examined on massively parallel hypercube multiprocessors such as the Connection Machine. Particular emphasis is placed on reducing communication which is known to dominate the overall computing time. To this end, the order and computational phases of the FFT were combined, and the sequence to processor maps that reduce communication were used. The class of ordered transforms is expanded to include any FFT in which the order of the transform is the same as that of the input sequence. Two such orderings are examined, namely, standard-order and A-order which can be implemented with equal ease on the Connection Machine where orderings are determined by geometries and priorities. If the sequence has N = 2 exp r elements and the hypercube has P = 2 exp d processors, then a standard-order FFT can be implemented with d + r/2 + 1 parallel transmissions. An A-order sequence can be transformed with 2d - r/2 parallel transmissions which is r - d + 1 fewer than the standard order. A parallel method for computing the trigonometric coefficients is presented that does not use trigonometric functions or interprocessor communication. A performance of 0.9 GFLOPS was obtained for an A-order transform on the Connection Machine.

  20. Efficient Graph Sequence Mining Using Reverse Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuchi, Akihiro; Ikuta, Hiroaki; Washio, Takashi

    The mining of frequent subgraphs from labeled graph data has been studied extensively. Furthermore, much attention has recently been paid to frequent pattern mining from graph sequences. A method, called GTRACE, has been proposed to mine frequent patterns from graph sequences under the assumption that changes in graphs are gradual. Although GTRACE mines the frequent patterns efficiently, it still needs substantial computation time to mine the patterns from graph sequences containing large graphs and long sequences. In this paper, we propose a new version of GTRACE that permits efficient mining of frequent patterns based on the principle of a reverse search. The underlying concept of the reverse search is a general scheme for designing efficient algorithms for hard enumeration problems. Our performance study shows that the proposed method is efficient and scalable for mining both long and large graph sequence patterns and is several orders of magnitude faster than the original GTRACE.

  1. ASDC Order Tools

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2012-04-17

    ... users to search our data holdings without logging in to the system. The user, however, must log in before ordering the data. ... Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor II (ACRIM II) Total Solar Irradiance Data Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) data (Selected ...

  2. Court Ordered Desegregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reber, Sarah J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the court ordered desegregation plans, on trends in segregation and white flight, are estimated. The effect of availability of school districts and other factors on the white flight across districts is also mentioned.

  3. Computer assisted multiplex sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Church, G.M.

    1992-08-01

    The objectives of this project are automation and optimization of multiplex sequencing. This year we have integrated direct transfer electrophoresis, automated multiplex hybridizations and automated film reading and applied this toward sequencing of three contiguous E. coli cosmids. Primers for the directed dideoxy sequence walking and sequence confirmation steps were synthesized with a 15 base tag complimentary to an alkaline phosphatase conjugate. A higher throughput synthesis device is well along in testing as are new automated hybridization devices. We have developed software for automatically annotating ORFs and databases of precise termini of proteis and RNA.

  4. Quantum dots in aperiodic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörnquist, Michael; Ouchterlony, Thomas

    1998-12-01

    We study numerically with a Green-function technique one-dimensional arrays of quantum dots with two different models. The arrays are ordered according to the Fibonacci, the Thue-Morse, and the Rudin-Shapiro sequences. As a comparison, results from a periodically ordered chain and also from a random chain are included. The focus is on how the conductance (calculated within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism) depends on the Fermi level. In the first model, we find that in some cases rather small systems (≈60 dots) behave in the same manner as very large systems (>16,000 dots) and this makes it possible in these cases to interpret our results for the small systems in terms of the spectral properties of the infinite systems. In particular, we find that it is possible to see some consequences of the singular continuous spectra that some of the systems possess, at least for temperatures up to 100 mK. In the second model, we study the phenomenon ohmic addition, i.e. when the resistances of the constrictions add up to the total resistance. It results that of the systems studied, it is only the Rudin-Shapiro system that has this behaviour for large structures, while the resistances of the Fibonacci and the Thue-Morse systems might reach a limiting value (as a periodic system does).

  5. High order solution of Poisson problems with piecewise constant coefficients and interface jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Alexandre Noll; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Rosales, Rodolfo Ruben

    2017-04-01

    We present a fast and accurate algorithm to solve Poisson problems in complex geometries, using regular Cartesian grids. We consider a variety of configurations, including Poisson problems with interfaces across which the solution is discontinuous (of the type arising in multi-fluid flows). The algorithm is based on a combination of the Correction Function Method (CFM) and Boundary Integral Methods (BIM). Interface and boundary conditions can be treated in a fast and accurate manner using boundary integral equations, and the associated BIM. Unfortunately, BIM can be costly when the solution is needed everywhere in a grid, e.g. fluid flow problems. We use the CFM to circumvent this issue. The solution from the BIM is used to rewrite the problem as a series of Poisson problems in rectangular domains-which requires the BIM solution at interfaces/boundaries only. These Poisson problems involve discontinuities at interfaces, of the type that the CFM can handle. Hence we use the CFM to solve them (to high order of accuracy) with finite differences and a Fast Fourier Transform based fast Poisson solver. We present 2-D examples of the algorithm applied to Poisson problems involving complex geometries, including cases in which the solution is discontinuous. We show that the algorithm produces solutions that converge with either 3rd or 4th order of accuracy, depending on the type of boundary condition and solution discontinuity.

  6. Orthogonal higher order structure and confirmatory factor analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III).

    PubMed

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a Schmid-Leiman orthogonalization transformation (SLT) to the standardization data published in the French technical manual for the WAIS-III. Results showed that the general factor accounted for 63% of the common variance and that the specific contributions of the 1st-order factors were weak (4.7%-15.9%). We also addressed this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis. Results indicated that the bifactor model (with 1st-order group and general factors) better fit the data than did the traditional higher order structure. Models based on the CHC framework were also tested. Results indicated that a higher order CHC model showed a better fit than did the classical 4-factor model; however, the WAIS bifactor structure was the most adequate. We recommend that users do not discount the Full Scale IQ when interpreting the index scores of the WAIS-III because the general factor accounts for the bulk of the common variance in the French WAIS-III. The 4 index scores cannot be considered to reflect only broad ability because they include a strong contribution of the general factor.

  7. Regularization in Short-Term Memory for Serial Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botvinick, Matthew; Bylsma, Lauren M.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research has shown that short-term memory for serial order can be influenced by background knowledge concerning regularities of sequential structure. Specifically, it has been shown that recall is superior for sequences that fit well with familiar sequencing constraints. The authors report a corresponding effect pertaining to serial…

  8. Building Higher-Order Markov Chain Models with EXCEL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Wai-Ki; Fung, Eric S.; Ng, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    Categorical data sequences occur in many applications such as forecasting, data mining and bioinformatics. In this note, we present higher-order Markov chain models for modelling categorical data sequences with an efficient algorithm for solving the model parameters. The algorithm can be implemented easily in a Microsoft EXCEL worksheet. We give a…

  9. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  10. Arguments from Developmental Order

    PubMed Central

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article1, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind – getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged ‘philosophy of development.’ PMID:27242648

  11. The evolutionary sequence: origin and emergences.

    PubMed

    Fox, S W

    1986-03-01

    The evolutionary sequence is being reexamined experimentally from a "Big Bang"origin to the protocell and from the emergence of protocell and variety of species to Darwin's mental power (mind) and society (The Descent of Man). A most fundamentally revisionary consequence of experiments is an emphasis on endogenous ordering. This principle, seen vividly in ordered copolymerization of amino acids, has had new impact on the theory of Darwinian evolution and has been found to apply to the entire sequence. Herein, I will discuss some problems of dealing with teaching controversial subjects.

  12. The evolutionary sequence: origin and emergences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The evolutionary sequence is being reexamined experimentally from a "Big Bang"origin to the protocell and from the emergence of protocell and variety of species to Darwin's mental power (mind) and society (The Descent of Man). A most fundamentally revisionary consequence of experiments is an emphasis on endogenous ordering. This principle, seen vividly in ordered copolymerization of amino acids, has had new impact on the theory of Darwinian evolution and has been found to apply to the entire sequence. Herein, I will discuss some problems of dealing with teaching controversial subjects.

  13. Sequences, Series, and Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how the computer algebra system Mathematica can be used to enhance the teaching of the topics of sequences and series. Examines its capabilities to find exact, approximate, and graphically generated approximate solutions to problems from these topics and to understand proofs about sequences. (MDH)

  14. Can sequence determine function?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2000-01-01

    The functional annotation of proteins identified in genome sequencing projects is based on similarities to homologs in the databases. As a result of the possible strategies for divergent evolution, homologous enzymes frequently do not catalyze the same reaction, and we conclude that assignment of function from sequence information alone should be viewed with some skepticism. PMID:11178260

  15. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  16. Biotools: Patenting DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonsky, M.D.; Hone, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    The decision, known as In re Deuel{sup 2}, rejects the PTO`s interpretation of a previous decision of the Federal Circuit and makes it more possible that a {open_quotes}nucleic acid of a particular sequence{close_quotes} - commonly known as a gene sequence - may be patentable. 15 refs.

  17. Sequences for Student Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  18. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  19. Agriculture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in agriculture. The guide consists of a course description; general course objectives;…

  20. Historic human impact on low order mountain streams - what role did the dams play?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Annegret; Fuelling, Alexander; Wilder, Nicole; Bork, Hans-Rudolf; Larsen, Joshua R.

    2014-05-01

    The historic damming of central European rivers is extensive, with the highest density concentrated on low-order streams. Construction of dams started mostly in medieval times (~ 1200 years ago) and peaked in the early nineteenth century, resulting in shifting dam densities with different ages and types. Early dams were mainly build for energy , but later their primary purpose shifted to floodplain irrigation . This legacy highlights the intense alteration of small streams by humans in a short time period relative to their Holocene evolution. However, our understanding of the impact of such high number of dams on the ecology, river morphology and sediment storage over longer time periods remains very limited. This knowledge gap becomes critical to address as dam removal and river restoration expands under the implementation of the Water Framework Directive, a European-wide legislative framework. In order to explore the possible effects of this framework on small order streams, we examine the changes that have occurred to a fluvial system since the onset of historic dam building. We combine the analysis of historic maps, chrono-stratigraphy and hydraulic modeling to understand the influence of the large number of dams along the low-order streams in two representative mountain catchments of 3rd and 4th order streams (Elsava and Sinn river in the Spessart and Rhön mountains, Germany). The datings and stratigraphical analysis indicate that the rivers were likely influenced by valley bottom damming before hillslope agriculture caused erosion and an increase of sediment delivery to the streams. Future work will examine the hydraulic behavior of the streams with and without dams in order to better understand their role in floodplain development.