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Sample records for 4-79 molybdenum permalloy

  1. Magnetic properties of sputtered Permalloy/molybdenum multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Romera, M.; Ciudad, D.; Maicas, M.; Aroca, C.

    2011-10-15

    In this work, we report the magnetic properties of sputtered Permalloy (Py: Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20})/molybdenum (Mo) multilayer thin films. We show that it is possible to maintain a low coercivity and a high permeability in thick sputtered Py films when reducing the out-of-plane component of the anisotropy by inserting thin film spacers of a non-magnetic material like Mo. For these kind of multilayers, we have found coercivities which are close to those for single layer films with no out-of-plane anisotropy. The coercivity is also dependent on the number of layers exhibiting a minimum value when each single Py layer has a thickness close to the transition thickness between Neel and Bloch domain walls.

  2. Molybdenum

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Molybdenum ; CASRN 7439 - 98 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  3. Electrodeposition of Nanostructured Permalloy and Permalloy-Magnetite Composite Coatings and Investigation of Their Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli, Sara; Bahrololoom, M. E.

    2016-08-01

    Permalloy and permalloy-magnetite coatings were electrodeposited with the average thickness of 100 µm with certain operating parameters, such as the current density of 100 mA/cm2, pH 3.8, and the temperature of 298 K (25 °C), to fabricate alloy and composite coatings, respectively. The aim was to promote the magnetic properties of permalloy coating in order to extend its magnetic applications. For this purpose, nanocrystalline permalloy and permalloy-magnetite coatings were electrodeposited. The effect of the content of magnetite particles in the bath on magnetic properties of the samples was investigated. Vibrating sample magnetometry was performed to investigate the variation of magnetic properties of the coatings. The optimum amount of magnetite (2 g/L) was determined according to the highest amount of saturated magnetization and a sensible amount of coercivity. The morphology, phase, elemental analyses of the coatings and the chemical composition analysis of the bath were performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, quantometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The magnetization was increased initially and then decreased (after a limited amount of magnetite) by enhancing the content of magnetite particles in the bath. Also, the coercivity was decreased by increasing the amount of magnetite particles in the coatings, which was due to the reduction of the grain size of the permalloy matrix.

  4. Electrodeposition of Nanostructured Permalloy and Permalloy-Magnetite Composite Coatings and Investigation of Their Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli, Sara; Bahrololoom, M. E.

    2016-06-01

    Permalloy and permalloy-magnetite coatings were electrodeposited with the average thickness of 100 µm with certain operating parameters, such as the current density of 100 mA/cm2, pH 3.8, and the temperature of 298 K (25 °C), to fabricate alloy and composite coatings, respectively. The aim was to promote the magnetic properties of permalloy coating in order to extend its magnetic applications. For this purpose, nanocrystalline permalloy and permalloy-magnetite coatings were electrodeposited. The effect of the content of magnetite particles in the bath on magnetic properties of the samples was investigated. Vibrating sample magnetometry was performed to investigate the variation of magnetic properties of the coatings. The optimum amount of magnetite (2 g/L) was determined according to the highest amount of saturated magnetization and a sensible amount of coercivity. The morphology, phase, elemental analyses of the coatings and the chemical composition analysis of the bath were performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, quantometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The magnetization was increased initially and then decreased (after a limited amount of magnetite) by enhancing the content of magnetite particles in the bath. Also, the coercivity was decreased by increasing the amount of magnetite particles in the coatings, which was due to the reduction of the grain size of the permalloy matrix.

  5. Magnetization relaxation in sputtered thin permalloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. C.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Aguiar, F. M. De; Rezende, S. M.; Fermin, J. R.; Azevedo, A.

    2004-05-01

    In order to understand the underlying phenomena of magnetization damping in metallic thin films, samples of permalloy films were grown by magnetron sputtering, and their 8.6-GHz ferromagnetic resonance linewidth ΔH has been measured as a function of the Permalloy (Py) film thickness t, at room temperature. We made samples of Py(t)/Si(001) and X/Py(t)/X/Si(001), with X=Pd (40Å), and Cr (25Å), with 20Å < t < 200Å. While ΔH scales with t-2 in the bare Py/Si series, it is shown that the damping behavior strongly depends on X in the sandwich samples.

  6. Magnetization patterns of permalloy square frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Feng; Wei, Zung-Hang; Chang, Ching-Ray; Wu, J. C.; Hsieh, W. Z.; Usov, Nickolai A.; Lai, Jun-Yang; Yao, Y. D.

    2003-05-01

    Four different magnetization configurations of micron- and submicron-sized permalloy square frames are investigated by numerical simulations and experiments. Beside the pure conventional 90° Neel type wall with zero net magnetic pole, we also obtain numerically another high energy domain wall with positive or negative net magnetic poles in the corner. These three kinds of domain walls constitute four different patterns in square frames. We compare the magnetic pole density distributions derived from the spin configurations of simulation results with the images taken by magnetic force microscopy, and find reasonable agreement between them.

  7. Circular single domains in hemispherical Permalloy nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Clodoaldo I. L de Fonseca, Jakson M.; Sinnecker, João P.; Delatorre, Rafael G.; Garcia, Nicolas; Pasa, André A.

    2014-11-14

    We have studied ferromagnetic Permalloy clusters obtained by electrodeposition on n-type silicon. Magnetization measurements reveal hysteresis loops almost independent on temperature and very similar in shape to those obtained in nanodisks with diameter bigger than 150 nm. The spin configuration for the ground state, obtained by micromagnetic simulation, shows topological vortices with random chirality and polarization. This behavior in the small diameter clusters (∼80 nm) is attributed to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction that arises in its hemispherical geometries. This magnetization behavior can be utilized to explain the magnetoresistance measured with magnetic field in plane and out of sample plane.

  8. Magnetoresistance of single Permalloy circular rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavassori, P.; Busato, A.; Chiapatti, A.; di Bona, A.; Valeri, S.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.

    2007-09-01

    We have measured magnetoresistance in single, 1 μm external diameter, Permalloy (Ni 80Fe 20) circular rings with varied inner hole diameter of 150, 300, and 600 nm and film thickness of 25 nm. The Permalloy ring structures and the 10-nm-thick, 250-nm-wide Au nanocontacts were fabricated on a SiO 2/Si substrate using e-beam lithography. Using a four contact geometry we studied the dependence of the magnetoresistance on the direction of the applied field. The experimental data are explained by considering only the conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Numerical simulations of the current distribution within the samples combined with micromagnetic simulations of the field dependent magnetization profile, yield good agreement with the experimental data. Upon increasing the inner hole diameter (viz. decreasing the ring width) the magnetoresistance measurements show a transition of the reversal process from the "vortex nucleation-displacement-annihilation" sequence to the "onion state-reversed onion state" sequence, typical of narrow nanorings.

  9. Multilayer permalloy films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rook, K.; Zeltser, A. M.; Artman, J. O.; Laughlin, D. E.; Kryder, M. H.

    1991-04-01

    The magnetic properties of single-layer and multilayer 111-line textured Cu and Permalloy films, deposited by MBE on 111-plane Si substrates, have been measured by both ferromagnetic resonance and M-H loop tracer; microstructural characterizations were conducted by TEM, XRD, and reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The single-layer films had lower easy-axis coercivity H(ce) and a lower in-plane anisotropy field than sputter-deposited Permalloy films of similar thickness. The five-layer, Cu-interlayer separated Permalloy structures, having a magnetic thickness in excess of 100 nm, exhibited lower H(ce) than equivalent single-layer films.

  10. Temperature dependence of the magnetic and electrical properties of Permalloy/gadolinium/Permalloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranchal, R.; Aroca, C.; Maicas, M.; López, E.

    2007-09-01

    The magnetic and electrical properties of Permalloy/gadolinium/Permalloy (Py/Gd/Py) trilayers have been studied as a function of temperature by using vibrating sample magnetometer and transport measurements with current in plane configuration. The observed dependence of the magnetic moment with temperature can be explained by a paramagnetic contribution. Electrical measurements show that this contribution is originated by the formation of Gd1-xNix alloys at the Py/Gd interfaces because of the Ni diffusion. Despite the Ni diffusion, we find no evidence of amorphization from either the Py layer or the Py/Gd interfaces. We also obtain the Curie temperature of the Gd1-xNix alloys by the position of inflexion points in the resistance versus temperature curve.

  11. Effect of spacer layer on the magnetization dynamics of permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chen Yin, Yuli; Zhang, Dong; Jiang, Sheng; Yue, Jinjin; Zhai, Ya; Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru

    2015-05-07

    The permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers with different types (Gd and Nd) and thicknesses of spacer layer are investigated using frequency dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements at room temperature, which shows different behaviors with different rare earth spacer layers. By fitting the frequency dependence of the FMR resonance field and linewidth, we find that the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy retains its value for all samples, the perpendicular anisotropy remains almost unchanged for different thickness of Gd layer but the values are tailored by different thicknesses of Nd layer. The Gilbert damping is almost unchanged with different thicknesses of Gd; however, the Gilbert damping is significantly enhanced from 8.4×10{sup −3} to 20.1×10{sup −3} with 6 nm of Nd and then flatten out when the Nd thickness rises above 6 nm.

  12. Time-resolved spin-torque switching and enhanced damping in permalloy/Cu/permalloy spin-valve nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Emley, N C; Krivorotov, I N; Ozatay, O; Garcia, A G F; Sankey, J C; Ralph, D C; Buhrman, R A

    2006-06-23

    We report time-resolved measurements of current-induced reversal of a free magnetic layer in Permalloy/Cu/Permalloy elliptical nanopillars at temperatures T=4.2 K to 160 K. Comparison of the data to Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert macrospin simulations of the free layer switching yields numerical values for the spin torque and the Gilbert damping parameters as functions of T. The damping is strongly T dependent, which we attribute to the presence of an antiferromagnetic oxide layer around the perimeter of the Permalloy free layer. This adventitious antiferromagnetic oxide can have a major impact on spin-torque phenomena. PMID:16907277

  13. Giant magnetoresistance of copper/permalloy multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holody, P.; Chiang, W. C.; Loloee, R.; Bass, J.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Schroeder, P. A.

    1998-11-01

    Current perpendicular (CPP) and current in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistances (MR) have been measured on sputtered Cu/Py (Py=Permalloy) multilayers at 4.2 K. The CPP-MR is several times larger than the CIP-MR. For fixed Py layer thickness, tPy=1.5 nm, both the CPP and CIP MR's show oscillations with increasing tCu with a period similar to that previously reported for the CIP-MR. The CPP data for Cu thicknesses large enough that exchange interactions between Py layers are small are analyzed using the two spin-current model for both infinite and finite spin-diffusion length in Py. The very low coercive field of Py leads to a larger than usual uncertainty in the derived parameters, because of the uncertainty in the degree of antiparallel alignment required for the analysis. Three alternative analyses give bulk and interface spin-dependent anisotropy parameters, β, and γ, of comparable size, so that both must be considered in determining the CPP-MR. Our preferred values, based upon an assumed IPysf=5.5+/-1 nm, are β=0.65+/-0.1 and γ=0.76+/-0.1. These values produce good fits to the CPP-MR's of Co/Cu/Py/Cu multilayers.

  14. Self-assembled monolayers on a ferromagnetic permalloy surface.

    PubMed

    Mattera, Michele; Torres-Cavanillas, Ramón; Prieto-Ruiz, Juan P; Prima-García, Helena; Tatay, Sergio; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Coronado, Eugenio

    2015-05-19

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are nowadays broadly used as surface protectors or modifiers and play a key role in many technological applications. This has motivated the study of their formation in all kind of materials; however, and despite the current interest in molecular spintronics, the study of SAMs on ferromagnetic surfaces remains almost unexplored. In this paper, we report for the first time a methodology for the formation of SAMs of n-alkylphosphonic acids on permalloy in ambient conditions. The formed monolayers have been fully characterized by means of contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectometry. Additionally, the magnetic stability of the modified permalloy after the solution process required for the SAM formation has been confirmed by magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry. Moreover, by means of microcontact printing lithography, very accurate SAM patterns have been transferred onto permalloy surfaces and used as resist mask in a chemical etching process giving rise to submicrometric permalloy surface patterns with potential interest in nanomagnetism, spintronics, and storage technologies. PMID:25919007

  15. Magnetization reversal in permalloy ferromagnetic nanowires investigated with magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. B.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2008-07-01

    The magnetization reversal process in single Permalloy (Ni81Fe19) nanowires has been investigated by magnetoresistance measurements as a function of the angle between the applied field and the wire direction. The Permalloy nanostructures fabricated on an ultrathin film by atomic force microscopy consist of two large rectangular pads connected by a nanowire with the shape of a long thin narrow tape. For each field direction in the plane of the film the dependence of the magnetoresistance on the field value exhibits two main contributions: one from the pads and one from the nanowire. The contribution from the pads is due to a usual anisotropic magnetoresistance characteristic of coherent magnetization rotation, whereas the contribution from the nanowire is an abrupt transition at the switching field. The dependence of the switching field on the in-plane field angle is quantitatively described by a model of nucleation field with the buckling magnetization rotation mode.

  16. Magnetization process modeling of anisotropic magnetoresistive permalloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, H.; Fulmek, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    The results of model calculations by the Jiles-Atherton approach and the energetic model (EM) of ferromagnetic hysteresis are discussed. In contrast to other phenomenological models, the EM parameters are calculated directly from the angle of the magnetization with respect to the easy axis. The transversal Kerr-effect is used to determine the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic permalloy films with uniaxial anisotropy.

  17. Structural, magnetic, and transport properties of Permalloy for spintronic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nahrwold, Gesche; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Albrecht, Ole; Merkt, Ulrich; Meier, Guido

    2010-07-15

    Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) is broadly used to prepare magnetic nanostructures for high-frequency experiments where the magnetization is either excited by electrical currents or magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the material properties is mandatory for thorough understanding its magnetization dynamics. In this work, thin Permalloy films are grown by dc-magnetron sputtering on heated substrates and by thermal evaporation with subsequent annealing. The specific resistance is determined by van der Pauw methods. Point-contact Andreev reflection is employed to determine the spin polarization of the films. The topography is imaged by atomic-force microscopy, and the magnetic microstructure by magnetic-force microscopy. Transmission-electron microscopy and transmission-electron diffraction are performed to determine atomic composition, crystal structure, and morphology. From ferromagnetic resonance absorption spectra the saturation magnetization, the anisotropy, and the Gilbert damping parameter are determined. Coercive fields and anisotropy are measured by magneto-optical Kerr magnetometry. The sum of the findings enables optimization of Permalloy for spintronic experiments.

  18. Effects of interparticle dipole interaction on permalloy thin film arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun-Yang; Lai, Mei-Feng; Chang, Ching-Ray; Wei, Zung-Hang; Wu, J. C.; Lo, I. C.; Kuo, J. H.; Chang, Y. C.; Hsu, Jen-Hwa; Huang, Jia-Rui

    2005-05-01

    The magnetic structures and hysteresis loops of permalloy thin film arrays are investigated here using magnetic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The strength of interparticle dipole interaction can be revealed by the number of single-domain pairs with antiparallel magnetizations when the array is relaxed from a strong hard-axis field. Besides, hysteresis loops obtained by vibrating sample magnetometer measurements show that arrays with narrower interparticle spacings have lower coercivities and remanences. The results obtained from vibrating sample magnetometer are in very good agreement with magnetic force microscopy imaging.

  19. Controllable Magnetization Processes Induced by Nucleation Sites in Permalloy Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying-Jiun Chen,; Chia-Jung Hsu,; Chun-Neng Liao,; Hao-Ting Huang,; Chiun-Peng Lee,; Yi-Hsun Chiu,; Tzu-Yun Tung,; Mei-Feng Lai,

    2010-02-01

    Different arrangements of notches as nucleation sites are demonstrated experimentally and numerically to effectively control the magnetization processes of permalloy rings. In the ring with notches at the same side with respect to field direction, two same-helicity vortex domain walls in the onion state lead to two-step switching going through flux-closure state; in the ring with diagonal notches two opposite-helicity vortex domain walls lead to one-step switching skipping flux-closure state. The switching processes are repeatable in contrast to rings without notches where helicites of two vortex domain walls are random so the switching processes can not be controlled.

  20. Micromagnetic study of magnetic configurations in submicron permalloy disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jonathan Kin; Hertel, Riccardo; Kirschner, J.

    2003-06-01

    We report a finite-element study of magnetic configurations in submicron permalloy disks using micromagnetics principles. Depending on the disk size, many (meta)stable magnetic states such as normal and twisted onion, in-plane vortex, and various buckle states are observed. A diagram is constructed to bring out the dependence of the different remanent states on the disk diameter and thickness. It shows that the disk thickness is the decisive factor in determining whether a vortex state is energetically more favorable than an onion state, and that the disk diameter determines whether some in-plane buckling can be sustainable.

  1. Damping factor estimation using spin wave attenuation in permalloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Manago, Takashi; Yamanoi, Kazuto; Kasai, Shinya; Mitani, Seiji

    2015-05-07

    Damping factor of a Permalloy (Py) thin film is estimated by using the magnetostatic spin wave propagation. The attenuation lengths are obtained by the dependence of the transmission intensity on the antenna distance, and decrease with increasing magnetic fields. The relationship between the attenuation length, damping factor, and external magnetic field is derived theoretically, and the damping factor was determined to be 0.0063 by fitting the magnetic field dependence of the attenuation length, using the derived equation. The obtained value is in good agreement with the general value of Py. Thus, this estimation method of the damping factor using spin waves attenuation can be useful tool for ferromagnetic thin films.

  2. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in wide permalloy strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in soft permalloy strips may exhibit various equilibrium micromagnetic structures depending on the width and thickness of the strip, ranging from the well-known transverse and vortex walls in narrow and thin strips to double and triple vortex walls recently reported in wider strips [V. Estévez and L. Laurson, Phys. Rev. B 91, 054407 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.054407]. Here, we analyze the field driven dynamics of such domain walls in permalloy strips of widths from 240 nm up to 6 μ m , using the known equilibrium domain wall structures as initial configurations. Our micromagnetic simulations show that the domain wall dynamics in wide strips is very complex, and depends strongly on the geometry of the system, as well as on the magnitude of the driving field. We discuss in detail the rich variety of the dynamical behaviors found, including dynamic transitions between different domain wall structures, periodic dynamics of a vortex core close to the strip edge, transitions towards simpler domain wall structures of the multi-vortex domain walls controlled by vortex polarity, and the fact that for some combinations of the strip geometry and the driving field the system cannot support a compact domain wall.

  3. Mixture of a molybdenum carboxylate and a molybdenum dithiophosphate or a molybdenum dithiocarbamate for use in a hydrovisbreaking process

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Kukes, S.G.

    1987-11-10

    A molybdenum is described containing mixture selected from the group consisting of a mixture comprising a molybdenum dithiophosphate and a molybdenum carboxylate and a mixture comprising a molybdenum dithiocarbamate and a molybdenum carboxylate.

  4. Molybdenum disilicide composites

    DOEpatents

    Rodriguez, Robert P.; Petrovic, John J.

    2001-01-01

    Molybdenum disilicide/.beta.'-Si.sub.6-z Al.sub.z O.sub.z N.sub.8-z, wherein z=a number from greater than 0 to about 5, composites are made by use of in situ reactions among .alpha.-silicon nitride, molybdenum disilicide, and aluminum. Molybdenum disilicide within a molybdenum disilicide/.beta.'-Si.sub.6-z Al.sub.z O.sub.z N.sub.8-z eutectoid matrix is the resulting microstructure when the invention method is employed.

  5. Molybdenum nutriture in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum is a trace element that functions as a cofactor for at least four enzymes: sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. In each case, molybdenum is bound to a complex, multi-ring organic component called molybdopterin, forming the e...

  6. Molybdenum disilicide matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Carter, David H.; Gac, Frank D.

    1991-01-01

    A composition consisting of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, which is reinforced with VS silicon carbide whiskers dispersed throughout it and a method of making the reinforced composition. Use of the reinforcing material increases fracture toughness at low temperatures and strength at high temperatures, as compared to pure molybdenum disilicide.

  7. Molybdenum disilicide matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Carter, David H.; Gac, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition consisting of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, which is reinforced with VS silicon carbide whiskers dispersed throughout it and a method of making the reinforced composition. Use of the reinforcing material increases fracture toughness at low temperatures and strength at high temperatures, as compared to pure molybdenum disilicide.

  8. Micromagnetic dissipation, dispersion, and mode conversion in thin permalloy platelets.

    PubMed

    Buess, M; Haug, T; Scheinfein, M R; Back, C H

    2005-04-01

    Micron-sized ferromagnetic Permalloy disks exhibiting an in-plane ferromagnetic vortex structure are excited by a fast rise time perpendicular magnetic field pulse and their modal structure is analyzed. We find azimuthal and axial modes. By a Fourier filtering technique we can separate and analyze the time dependence of individual modes. Analysis of the experimental data demonstrates that the azimuthal modes damp more quickly than the axial modes. We interpret these results as mode conversion from low-frequency azimuthal modes to the fundamental mode which is higher in frequency, i.e., mode-mode coupling in a system with a single Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenological damping constant alpha. PMID:15903957

  9. Dependence of magnetization process on thickness of Permalloy antidot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Merazzo, K. J.; Real, R. P. del; Asenjo, A.; Vazquez, M.

    2011-04-01

    Nanohole films or antidot arrays of Permalloy have been prepared by the sputtering of Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} onto anodic alumina membrane templates. The film thickness varies from 5 to 47 nm and the antidot diameters go from 42 to 61 nm, for a hexagonal lattice parameter of 105 nm. For the thinner antidot films (5 and 10 nm thick), magnetic moments locally distribute in a complex manner to reduce the magnetostatic energy, and their mostly reversible magnetization process is ascribed to spin rotations. In the case of the thicker (20 and 47 nm) antidot films, pseudodomain walls appear and the magnetization process is mostly irreversible where hysteresis denotes the effect of nanoholes pinning to wall motion.

  10. Magnetic stress anisotropy field in plated cylindrical Permalloy films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, O. S.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis is made of the magnetic stress anisotropy field (Hks) arising from internal and external stress sources in plated-wire memory elements. The analysis takes into consideration circumferential composition variation and cylindrical geometry of the Permalloy film. Expressions are derived relating Hks to uniaxial film stress, average composition, and amplitude of composition variation. A result of particular importance is that even for average zeromagnetostrictive composition (ZMC) films, Hks may still make an appreciable contribution to the total anisotropy field if the composition is not uniform. Calculated Hks characteristics are shown to correlate with anisotropy field changes observed in annealing experiments. Examples are given to show the importance of composition uniformity in determining the stability of the anisotropy field. The utility of the analysis is extended by the inclusion of data expressing the inverse relation between anisotropy field and easy-axis dispersion in the film.

  11. Magnetoresistance measurement of permalloy thin film rings with triangular fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Liao, Chun-Neng; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2010-01-01

    Magnetization reversals in permalloy rings controlled by nucleation sites using triangular fins at the same side and diagonal with respect to the field direction are demonstrated by magnetoresistance measurement and micromagnetic simulation. In the ring with triangular fins at the same side, there exists two-step reversal from onion to flux-closure state (or vortex state) and then from flux-closure (or vortex state) to reverse onion state; in the ring with diagonal triangular fins, one-step reversal occurs directly from onion to reverse onion state. The reversal processes are repeatable and controllable in contrast to an ideal ring without triangular fins where one-step and two-step reversals occur randomly in sweep-up and sweep-down processes.

  12. Frequency nonreciprocity of surface spin wave in permalloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladii, O.; Haidar, M.; Henry, Y.; Kostylev, M.; Bailleul, M.

    2016-02-01

    Surface spin waves in thin permalloy films are studied by means of propagative-spin-wave spectroscopy. We observe a systematic difference of up to several tens of MHz when comparing the frequencies of counterpropagating waves. This frequency nonreciprocity effect is modeled using an analytical dipole-exchange theory that considers the mutual influence of nonreciprocal spin wave modal profiles and differences in magnetic anisotropies at the two film surfaces. At moderate film thickness (20 nm and below), the frequency nonreciprocity scales linearly with the wave vector and quadratically with the thickness, whereas a more complex nonmonotonic behavior is observed at larger thickness. Our paper suggests that surface wave frequency nonreciprocity can be used as an accurate spectroscopic probe of magnetic asymmetries in thin ferromagnetic films.

  13. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  14. Ferromagnetic resonance in a topographically modulated permalloy film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenar, J.; Tucciarone, P.; Lee, R. J.; Tice, D.; Chang, R. P. H.; Lee, S. J.; Nevirkovets, I. P.; Heinonen, O.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2015-04-01

    A major focus within the field of magnonics involves the manipulation and control of spin-wave modes. This is usually done by patterning continuous soft magnetic films. Here, we report on work in which we use topographic modifications of a continuous magnetic thin film, rather than lithographic patterning techniques, to modify the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum. To demonstrate this technique we have performed in-plane, broadband, ferromagnetic resonance studies on a 100-nm-thick permalloy film sputtered onto a colloidal crystal with individual sphere diameters of 200 nm. Effects resulting from the, ideally, sixfold-symmetric underlying colloidal crystal were studied as a function of the in-plane field angle through experiment and micromagnetic modeling. Experimentally, we find two primary modes; the ratio of the intensities of these two modes exhibits a sixfold dependence. Detailed micromagnetic modeling shows that both modes are quasiuniform and nodeless in the unit cell but that they reside in different demagnetized regions of the unit cell. Our results demonstrate that topographic modification of magnetic thin films opens additional directions for manipulating ferromagnetic resonant excitations.

  15. Spin-Torque Ferromagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Permalloy Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Carl; Katine, Jordan; Childress, Jeff; Zhu, Jian; Cheng, Xiao; Krivorotov, Ilya

    2009-03-01

    We develop a technique for studies of spectral properties of spin waves excited by spin transfer torque in metallic ferromagnetic nanowires, and apply this technique to measure frequencies and damping constants of several low-energy quantized spin wave modes in permalloy nanowires of rectangular cross section. Our measurements demonstrate that the spin wave spectrum of nanowires as narrow as 100 nm is well described by an analytic theory of dipole-exchange spin waves in thin ferromagnetic strips. Geometric quantization of the spin wave spectrum in nanowires significantly reduces the phase space for magnon-magnon scattering leading to opening and closing of discrete scattering channels as a function of magnetic field. These scattering channels manifest themselves as peaks in plots of spin wave damping versus magnetic field. In particular, we observe damping enhancement of the lowest energy spin wave mode at the values of magnetic field corresponding to three-magnon confluence processes in which two lowest energy magnons merge into a single higher-energy mode magnon.

  16. Depinning of domain walls in permalloy nanowires with asymmetric notches.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; You, B; Ruan, X Z; Liu, M Y; Yang, H L; Zhan, Q F; Li, Z; Lei, N; Zhao, W S; Pan, D F; Wan, J G; Wu, J; Tu, H Q; Wang, J; Zhang, W; Xu, Y B; Du, J

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of the domain wall (DW) motion along the magnetic nanowires is of great importance for fundamental research and potential application in spintronic devices. In this work, a series of permalloy nanowires with an asymmetric notch in the middle were fabricated with only varying the width (d) of the right arm from 200 nm to 1000 nm. The detailed pinning and depinning processes of DWs in these nanowires have been studied by using focused magneto-optic Kerr effect (FMOKE) magnetometer, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and micromagnetic simulation. The experimental results unambiguously exhibit the presence of a DW pinned at the notch in a typical sample with d equal to 500 nm. At a certain range of 200 nm < d < 500 nm, both the experimental and simulated results show that the DW can maintain or change its chirality randomly during passing through the notch, resulting in two DW depinning fields. Those two depinning fields have opposite d dependences, which may be originated from different potential well/barrier generated by the asymmetric notch with varying d. PMID:27600627

  17. Depinning of domain walls in permalloy nanowires with asymmetric notches

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; You, B.; Ruan, X. Z.; Liu, M. Y.; Yang, H. L.; Zhan, Q. F.; Li, Z.; Lei, N.; Zhao, W. S.; Pan, D. F.; Wan, J. G.; Wu, J.; Tu, H. Q.; Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Y. B.; Du, J.

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of the domain wall (DW) motion along the magnetic nanowires is of great importance for fundamental research and potential application in spintronic devices. In this work, a series of permalloy nanowires with an asymmetric notch in the middle were fabricated with only varying the width (d) of the right arm from 200 nm to 1000 nm. The detailed pinning and depinning processes of DWs in these nanowires have been studied by using focused magneto-optic Kerr effect (FMOKE) magnetometer, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and micromagnetic simulation. The experimental results unambiguously exhibit the presence of a DW pinned at the notch in a typical sample with d equal to 500 nm. At a certain range of 200 nm < d < 500 nm, both the experimental and simulated results show that the DW can maintain or change its chirality randomly during passing through the notch, resulting in two DW depinning fields. Those two depinning fields have opposite d dependences, which may be originated from different potential well/barrier generated by the asymmetric notch with varying d. PMID:27600627

  18. Magnetization reversal in individual micrometer-sized polycrystalline Permalloy rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. A.; Hayward, T. J.; Tse, D. H. Y.; Bland, J. A. C.; Castaño, F. J.; Ross, C. A.

    2005-03-01

    The magnetization reversal of individual 2 μm and 5 μm diameter polycrystalline Permalloy rings, with respective widths 0.75 μm and 1 μm, thickness 45 nm, has been investigated by focused magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry. Micromagnetic simulation of the reversal in the 2 μm diameter ring reveals that the onion-to-vortex state switching occurs by nucleation and subsequent annihilation of vortex walls that span the width of the ring, and that the vortex-to-reverse-onion state switching occurs by expansion of a reverse domain. The hysteresis loop shows good agreement with the experimental MOKE loop. Measurements of the switching through one-half of a 5 μm diameter ring enable the determination of the circulation of the vortex states accessed during one applied field cycle. The rings switch via one vortex state (either clockwise or anticlockwise) on both downward and upward applied field sweeps. The number of applied field cycles spent switching via one vortex state before changing to switch via the opposite vortex state is random, likely to be due to the history of the spin configuration and thermal fluctuations.

  19. Magnetic and Electrical Characteristics of Permalloy Thin Tape Bobbin Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Wieserman, William R.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    The core loss, that is, the power loss, of a soft ferromagnetic material is a function of the flux density, frequency, temperature, excitation type (voltage or current), excitation waveform (sine, square, etc.) and lamination or tape thickness. In previously published papers we have reported on the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop results for several polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and amorphous soft magnetic materials. In this previous research we investigated the effect of flux density, frequency, temperature, and excitation waveform for voltage excitation on the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop. In this paper, we will report on an experimental study to investigate the effect of tape thicknesses of 1, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8-mil Permalloy type magnetic materials on the specific core loss. The test cores were fabricated by winding the thin tapes on ceramic bobbin cores. The specific core loss tests were conducted at room temperature and over the frequency range of 10 kHz to 750 kHz using sine wave voltage excitation. The results of this experimental investigation will be presented primarily in graphical form to show the effect of tape thickness, frequency, and magnetic flux density on the specific core loss. Also, the experimental results when applied to power transformer design will be briefly discussed.

  20. Nonlinear ferromagnetic resonance shift in submicron Permalloy ellipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Belova, Lyubov M.; McMichael, Robert D.

    2015-02-01

    We report a systematic study of nonlinearity in the ferromagnetic resonance of a series of submicron Permalloy ellipses with varying aspect ratios. At high excitation powers, the resonances are found to shift to higher or lower applied field. We focus here on the sign of the shift and its dependence on the applied field and shape-induced anisotropy of the ellipses. Using ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy, we find that the measured nonlinear coefficient changes sign as a function of anisotropy field and applied field in qualitative agreement with a macrospin analysis. This macrospin analysis also points to origins of the nonlinearity in a combination of hard-axis in-plane anisotropy and precession ellipticity. In comparison of the macrospin predictions with both experimental and micromagnetic modeling results, we measure/model values of the nonlinear coefficient that are more positive than predicted by the macrospin model. The results are useful in understanding nonlinear physics in nanomagnets and applications of spin-torque oscillators.

  1. Magnetization reversal of an individual exchange-biased permalloy nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchter, A.; Wölbing, R.; Wyss, M.; Kieler, O. F.; Weimann, T.; Kohlmann, J.; Zorin, A. B.; Rüffer, D.; Matteini, F.; Tütüncüoglu, G.; Heimbach, F.; Kleibert, A.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Poggio, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the magnetization reversal mechanism in an individual permalloy (Py) nanotube (NT) using a hybrid magnetometer consisting of a nanometer-scale SQUID (nanoSQUID) and a cantilever torque sensor. The Py NT is affixed to the tip of a Si cantilever and positioned in order to optimally couple its stray flux into a Nb nanoSQUID. We are thus able to measure both the NT's volume magnetization by dynamic cantilever magnetometry and its stray flux using the nanoSQUID. We observe a training effect and a temperature dependence in the magnetic hysteresis, suggesting an exchange bias. We find a low blocking temperature TB=18 ±2 K, indicating the presence of a thin antiferromagnetic native oxide, as confirmed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy on similar samples. Furthermore, we measure changes in the shape of the magnetic hysteresis as a function of temperature and increased training. These observations show that the presence of a thin exchange-coupled native oxide modifies the magnetization reversal process at low temperatures. Complementary information obtained via cantilever and nanoSQUID magnetometry allows us to conclude that, in the absence of exchange coupling, this reversal process is nucleated at the NT's ends and propagates along its length as predicted by theory.

  2. Preparation of thick molybdenum targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thick natural molybdenum deposits on nickel plated copper substrates were prepared by thermal decomposition of molybdenum hexacarbonyl vapors on a heated surface in an inert gas atmosphere. The molybdenum metal atoms are firmly bonded to the substrate atoms, thus providing an excellent thermal contact across the junction. Molybdenum targets thus prepared should be useful for internal bombardment in a cyclotron where thermal energy inputs can exceed 10 kW.

  3. Method of producing molybdenum-99

    DOEpatents

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2013-05-28

    Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

  4. Effects of exchange bias on magnetotransport in permalloy kagome artificial spin ice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le, B. L.; Rench, D. W.; Misra, R.; O’Brien, L.; Leighton, C.; Samarth, N.; Schiffer, P.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the magnetotransport properties of connected kagome artificial spin ice networks composed of permalloy nanowires. Our data show clear evidence of magnetic switching among the wires, both in the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance. An unusual asymmetry with field sweep direction appears at temperatures below about 20 K that appears to be associated with exchange bias resulting from surface oxidation of permalloy, and which disappears in alumina-capped samples. These results demonstrate that exchange bias is a phenomenon that must be considered in understanding the physics of such artificial spin ice systems, and that opens up new possibilities for their control.

  5. Annealing effects in plated-wire memory elements. I - Interdiffusion of copper and Permalloy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudson, C. I.; Kench, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Results of investigations using X-ray diffraction and electron-beam microprobe techniques have shown that copper and Permalloy platings interdiffuse at low temperatures when plated-wire memory elements are annealed for times as short as 50 hr. Measurable interdiffusion between Permalloy platings and gold substrates does not occur in similar conditions. Both magnetic and compositional changes during aging are found to occur by a thermally activated process with activation energies around 38 kcal/mol. It is shown, however, that copper-diffusion and magnetic-dispersion changes during aging are merely concurrent processes, neither being the other's cause.

  6. Diffusion mechanism of exchange bias formation in permalloy-manganese nanostructures at thermo-magnetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Blinov, I V; Krinitsina, T P; Matveev, S A; Milyaev, M A; Sedova, P N; Popov, V V; Ustinov, V V

    2012-09-01

    A mechanism of unidirectional exchange anisotropy formation at thermo-magnetic treatment of permalloy-manganese bilayers has been studied. A shift of hysteresis loops appears at annealing beginning from 230 degrees C. The maximal exchange field of 155 Oe is reached after the 250 degrees C annealing for 2 h. As demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy, the exchange bias and the coercivity growth result from an ordered anti-ferromagnetic NiFeMn phase formation due to the diffusion interaction of permalloy and manganese at annealing. PMID:23035517

  7. Tunable permalloy-based films for magnonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yuli; Pan, Fan; Ahlberg, Martina; Ranjbar, Mojtaba; Dürrenfeld, Philipp; Houshang, Afshin; Haidar, Mohammad; Bergqvist, Lars; Zhai, Ya; Dumas, Randy K.; Delin, Anna; Åkerman, Johan

    2015-07-01

    Using both broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we study the magnetodynamic properties of permalloy (Py,Ni80Fe20) and Py100 -xMx films with M as platinum (Pt), gold (Au), or silver (Ag). From the uniform FMR mode, we extract the saturation magnetization (MS), damping (α ), and inhomogeneous broadening (Δ H0) ; from the first perpendicular standing spin-wave (PSSW) mode, we extract the exchange stiffness (A ). MS and A are found to decrease with increasing alloying, most strongly for Au and less so for Pt. On the other hand, α increases rapidly with both Pt and Au content, while being virtually independent of Ag content. The physical origins of the observed trends in α , MS, and A are analyzed and explained using density functional theory calculations in the coherent potential approximation. The calculated trends quantitatively agree with the experimental observations. The drastically different impacts of Pt, Au, and Ag on the various fundamental magnetodynamic properties will allow for significant design freedom, where different properties can be varied independently of others through careful combinations of the Pt, Au, and Ag contents of Py100 -xMx films. By empirical approximations of each property's concentration dependence, we can dial in any desired combination of magnetodynamic properties within this parameter space. As a proof-of-principle demonstration we design a set of Py100 -x -yPtxAgy films, where the saturation magnetization stays constant throughout the set and the damping can be tuned by a factor of 4.

  8. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  9. Study of inter-dot coupling in nano-patterned permalloy dots array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chien-Tu; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Chang, C. K.; Wang, J. F.; Horng, Lance; Wu, Jong-Ching

    2011-01-01

    We present a series of studies on interdot coupling in the nanometer-scaled permalloy dots array. A standard electron beam lithography in conjunction with lift-off process was employed for patterning 30 nm thick of millions of permalloy dots array with diameter (D) of 500 nm and the aspect ratio S/D of spacing (S) to diameter ranging from 0.2 to 1.25. The magnetization reversal processes were identified to evolve through the vortex nucleation, movement, and annihilation based on magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging in the presence of external magnetic fields. The nucleation field, annihilation field, and moving rate of vortex core were analyzed using M-H loops measured by the alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM). These behaviors are associated with the dipole-dipole interaction in dots array with various interdot spacings.

  10. Large amplitude vortex gyration in permalloy/Bi2Se3 -like heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skirdkov, P. N.; Zvezdin, K. A.; Belanovsky, A. D.; George, J. M.; Wu, J. C.; Cros, V.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the excitation of large amplitude gyrotropic vortex core precession in a permalloy nanodisk by the torques originating from the in-plane microwave current flowing along the interface of the permalloy/Bi2Se3 heterostructures, in which the huge charge-to-spin conversion ratio is observed [A. Mellnik et al., Nature 511, 449 (2014), 10.1038/nature13534]. We consider analytically and by micromagnetic modeling the dependence of this excitation on the frequency and magnitude of the microwave current. The analogies of the vortex dynamics and the Landau phase-transition theory are demonstrated. These findings open the possibility to excite gyrotropic vortex motion with the current densities far lower than by any other means.

  11. Effect of the shape and lateral dimensions on the magnetization reversal in permalloy nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, A. K.; Egorov, S. V.; Uspenskaya, L. S.

    2016-04-01

    Kinetics of magnetization reversal in patterned permalloy films with nanometer thickness is studied by means of magneto-optic visualization technique, Bitter technique and micromagnetic simulations. The reversal modes and critical dimensions at which a change of the magnetization scenario in the structures takes place are determined. The experimentally observed critical dimensions are shown to differ from the calculated ones by two orders of magnitude. The crucial influence of the ferro-fluid on magnetic patterns and magnetization reversal parameters is found.

  12. Magnetic vortex dynamics on a picosecond timescale in a hexagonal permalloy pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, J.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.; Moon, J.-H.; Lee, K.-J.; Anderson, E. H.; Fischer, P.

    2009-12-02

    We have observed a motion of magnetic vortex core in a hexagonal Permalloy pattern by means of Soft X-ray microscopy. Pump-probe stroboscopic observation on a picosecond timescale has been carried out after exciting a ground state vortex structure by an external field pulse of 1 ns duration. Vortex core is excited off from the center position of the hexagonal pattern but the analysis of the core trajectory reveals that the motion is nongyrotropic.

  13. Domain-specific magnetization reversals on a Permalloy square ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. R.; Freeland, J. W.; Srajer, G.; Metlushko, V.; You, Chun-Yeol

    2004-06-01

    We present domain-specific magnetization reversals extracted from soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements on a Permalloy square ring array. The extracted domain-specific hysteresis loops reveal that the magnetization of the domain parallel to the field is strongly pinned, while those of other domains rotate continuously. In comparison with the micromagnetic simulation, the hysteresis loop on the pinned domain indicates a possibility of the coexistence of the square rings with the vortex and onion states.

  14. X-ray Diffraction of Permalloy Nanoparticles Fabricated by Laser Ablation in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.; Midgley, A; Muthu, D; Wrobel, J; Kruger, M

    2009-01-01

    Permalloy (NiFeMo) nanoparticles were fabricated by laser ablation of bulk material in water with a UV pulsed laser. Transmission electron microscope images showed that approximately spherical particles about 50 nm in diameter were formed in the ablation process. All diffraction peaks corresponding to the bulk material were present in the nanoparticles. In addition to these peaks several new peaks were observed in the nanoparticles, which were attributed to nickel oxide.

  15. Measurements of magnetic spin excitations in Permalloy microstructures using nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. J. Jason; Yoon, Seungha; McMichael, Robert

    The magnetic properties of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have enabled emerging applications in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum computing. An NV center is a lattice defect, which behaves like a spin-1 system. NV centers can be prepared in the mz = 0 state by excitation with green light, and the spin state can be detected by the center's fluorescence of red light. The Zeeman splitting of the mz = +/-1 state, combined with a spin coherence time that can approach 1 ms, makes the NV center a sensitive, atom-sized magnetometer. Recently, NV centers have been used to measure spin wave excitations and vortex core dynamics in a Permalloy microdisk. In this talk, we present current NV center measurements on Permalloy micro and nanostructures that build on previous work. Permalloy structures were fabricated on top of a microstrip antenna and the measurements were conducted on a home-built confocal microscope. Preliminary measurements show photoluminescence contrast of ~12% and field detectivity on the order of µT/Hz1/2. This allows for fine field mapping of stray magnetic fields produced by micro and nanostructures, which are typically a few milliteslas in magnitude. Maryland Nanocenter, University of Maryland.

  16. The Electric, Magnetic, and Optical Characterization of Permalloy Oxide Grown by Dual-Ion Beam Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Maclyn; Leblanc, Elizabeth; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Simpson, Nelson; Robinson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) is a commonly used soft magnetic material in magnetic reading heads. Its magnetic properties do not depend on stress, a parameter difficult to control in thin film devices. Permalloy Oxide (PyO) on the other hand, has a high resistivity (>4 .103 Ω cm), is anti-ferromagnetic and has recently been shown to strongly enhance the performance of lateral spin valve devices. Historically, the oxidation of permalloy has been seen as a defect that should be avoided by appropriate encapsulation and very little is known on its electric and optical properties. We deposited thin PyO films by Dual Ion Beam Sputtering (DIBS) at room temperature on various substrates. Van der Pauw and Hall measurements were carried out from 77K to 400K and at magnetic fields up to 9T in order to determine its electronic bandgap, resistivity, free carrier concentration, and its mobility. The dielectric properties and defects were studied using a CV-setup and an impedance analyzer. Magnetic measurements were conducted on a Quantum Design PPMS VSM to determine the state of oxidation. Optical properties were measured by a M2000 Woollam variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. These properties were used to determine film thickness, bandgap and the optical constants of PyO. The authors would like to thank Research Corporation for financial support.

  17. Mineral resource of the month: molybdenum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, Désire E.

    2011-01-01

    The article offers information about the mineral molybdenum. Sources includes byproduct or coproduct copper-molybdenum deposits in the Western Cordillera of North and South America. Among the uses of molybdenum are stainless steel applications, as an alloy material for manufacturing vessels and as lubricants, pigments or chemicals. Also noted is the role played by molybdenum in renewable energy technology.

  18. Oxygen Plasma Interactions with Molybdenum: Formation of Volatile Molybdenum Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saburi, Tei; Murata, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    The oxidation of molybdenum by oxygen plasma was studied. The oxygen plasma was discharged by helicon wave at the frequency of 18.1 MHz and at the power of 200W. The weight change of molybdenum in oxygen plasma was measured at 400 °C and at oxygen pressure of 5 Pa. The specimen was found to be oxidized and to lose it's weight drastically with the oxygen plasma, while the weight change of the specimen in the oxidation without plasma was not observed under the same conditions. The energetic species of oxygen atoms generated by rf plasma is regarded to accelerate the oxidation of molybdenum and the oxidation leads to the formation of volatile molybdenum trioxide at the surface.

  19. Molybdenum enzymes in higher organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Russ; Nishino, Takeshi; Bittner, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the structural and catalytic properties of molybdenum-containing enzymes in eukaryotes is reviewed, along with aspects of the biosynthesis of the cofactor and its insertion into apoprotein. PMID:21516203

  20. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, Jr., R. William

    2000-01-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (a) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (b) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (c) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (d) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (e) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (f) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method. A preferred Mo--Re-ODS alloy contains 7-14 weight % rhenium and 2-4 volume % lanthanum oxide.

  1. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, William R. Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (1) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (2) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (3) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (4) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (5) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (6) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method.

  2. Direct Observation of Switching Processes in Permalloy Rings with Lorentz Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, T.; Zweck, J.

    2004-07-01

    To achieve a deeper understanding of the switching process of magnetic Permalloy rings, Lorentz electron microscopy (LTEM) is used for the first time to image the magnetic configuration of such rings under applied external field conditions. Because of the exceptionally high lateral resolution we find two clearly distiguishable wall configurations present in the so-called “onion state.” Furthermore, we show that a bias field present during a remagnetization cycle prevents the rings from transforming into a flux closure state, in which case remagnetization is a pure domain wall motion process.

  3. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, J.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Bayer, D.; Kurde, J.; Heitkamp, B.; Piantek, M.; Kronast, F.; Aeschlimann, M.; Dürr, H. A.; Kuch, W.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: molybdenum cofactor deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... molybdenum, is essential to the function of several enzymes. These enzymes help break down (metabolize) different substances in the ... molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. Without the cofactor, the metabolic enzymes that rely on it cannot function. The resulting ...

  5. Nitrogen reduction: Molybdenum does it again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrock, Richard R.

    2011-02-01

    Nature reduces dinitrogen under mild conditions using nitrogenases, the most active of which contains molybdenum and iron. The only abiological dinitrogen reduction catalyst that avoids the harsh conditions of the Haber-Bosch process contains just molybdenum.

  6. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.

    1990-12-31

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol%.

  7. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  8. Modifying magnetic switching in permalloy film nanostructures using the native oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojem, A.; Bassett, D.; Wesenberg, D.; Mason, S. J.; Avery, A. D.; Zink, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    Thin films of nickel-iron alloys of the nominal concentration near 80% Ni, are very commonly used in applications and in fundamental studies of spin, charge and heat transport in nanomagnetic systems. These permalloy (Py) films are straightforward to grow by various techniques and typically produce predictable, controllable and repeatable magnetic properties, including small coercivity, low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and low magnetostriction. We have found that greater complexity can be added to the switching behavior of thin films of permalloy by oxidation of thin (~4 nm) layers followed by subsequent growth of Py. Under some circumstances, this can cause apparent negative coercivity in the switching observed in anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of micromachined strips with an expected shape anisotropy. Here we will present results on growth and AMR measurements of the effects in various oxidized Py-Py layered samples. It is not yet clear if the effects are reproducible enough to be used for intentional manipulation of switching behavior in Py nanostructures. We acknowledge support from the NSF CAREER award (DMR-0847796).

  9. Top-down control of dynamic anisotropy in permalloy thin films with stripe domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jinwu; Zhu, Zengtai; Feng, Hongmei; Du, Jinlu; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-11-01

    Permalloy films with different thickness were prepared for comparison, and the dynamic properties of the stripe domains were investigated by using a vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance (VNA-FMR) technique. A top-down approach was used to control the thickness of the films. In the measurement of permeability spectra, an applied magnetic field H app was employed parallel and perpendicular to the stripe domains, respectively. Dynamic pseudo-uniaxial anisotropy fields are derived. In order to explain the anisotropy variation of permalloy films, a theoretical model has been proposed, and the result shows that the pseudo-uniaxial anisotropy can be attributed to the contributions of saturation magnetization, exchange interaction, perpendicular anisotropy, and film thickness. In addition, with the increase of H app, the stripe domains gradually rotate towards the direction of the applied field, which can be clearly observed by magnetic force microscopy. Moreover, the dynamic permeability spectra exhibit a rhythmic variation dependent on the rotation of the stripe domains, i.e. the relationship between the rotational stripe domains and resonance frequency.

  10. Exchange Bias and Magnetotransport in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Brian; Rench, David; Misra, Rajiv; O'Brien, Liam; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice consists of nanoscale ferromagnets arranged in a periodic lattice, with the resultant magnetostatic interactions emulating the local magnetic behavior of spin ice. Kagome artificial spin ice consists of elongated ferromagnetic islands or nanowires arranged in a honeycomb lattice. We present magnetotransport results in connected kagome artificial spin ice composed of permalloy (Ni81Fe19) nanowires. Magnetoresistance was measured as a function of applied field strength at different temperatures. At temperatures below 20 K, the field reversal symmetry of the magnetoresistance is broken. This asymmetry appears to be associated with exchange bias due to the surface oxidation of permalloy and is suppressed in aluminum-capped samples. These results signify that exchange bias can play a substantial role in the physics of artificial spin ice that has potential as a new mode of controlling its behavior. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division under grant number DE-SC0010778. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by the NSF MRSEC under award DMR-0819885 and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme (project no. 299376).

  11. The origin of noise and magnetic hysteresis in crystalline permalloy ring-core fluxgate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narod, B. B.

    2014-06-01

    6-81.3 Mo permalloy, developed in the 1960s for use in high performance ring-core fluxgate sensors, remains the state-of-the-art for permalloy-cored fluxgate magnetometers. The magnetic properties of 6-81.3, namely magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and saturation induction are all optimum in the Fe-Ni-Mo system. In such polycrystalline permalloy fluxgate sensors a single phenomenon may cause both fluxgate noise and magnetic hysteresis, explain Barkhausen jumps, remanence and coercivity, and avoid domain denucleation. The phenomenon, domain wall reconnection, is presented as part of a theoretical model. In the unmagnetized state a coarse-grain high-quality permalloy foil ideally forms stripe domains, which present at the free surface as parallel, uniformly spaced domain walls that cross the entire thickness of the foil. Leakage flux "in" and "out" of alternating domains is a requirement of the random orientation, grain-by-grain, of magnetic easy axes' angles with respect to the foil free surface. Its magnetostatic energy together with domain wall energy determines an energy budget to be minimized. Throughout the magnetization cycle the free surface domain pattern remains essentially unchanged, due to the magnetostatic energy cost such a change would elicit. Thus domain walls are "pinned" to free surfaces. Driven to saturation, domain walls first bulge then reconnect via Barkhausen jumps to form a new domain configuration this author has called "channel domains", that are attached to free surfaces. The approach to saturation now continues as reversible channel domain compression. Driving the permalloy deeper into saturation compresses the channel domains to arbitrarily small thickness, but will not cause them to denucleate. Returning from saturation the channel domain structure will survive through zero H, thus explaining remanence. The Barkhausen jumps being irreversible exothermic events are sources of fluxgate noise, powered by the energy

  12. The origin of noise and magnetic hysteresis in crystalline permalloy ring-core fluxgate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narod, B. B.

    2014-09-01

    Developed in the 1960s for use in high-performance ring-core fluxgate sensors, 6-81.3 Mo permalloy remains the state of the art for permalloy-cored fluxgate magnetometers. The magnetic properties of 6-81.3, namely magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and saturation induction, are all optimum in the Fe-Ni-Mo system. In such polycrystalline permalloy fluxgate sensors, a single phenomenon may cause both fluxgate noise and magnetic hysteresis; explain Barkhausen jumps, remanence and coercivity; and avoid domain denucleation. This phenomenon, domain wall reconnection, is presented as part of a theoretical model. In the unmagnetized state a coarse-grain high-quality permalloy foil ideally forms stripe domains, which present at the free surface as parallel, uniformly spaced domain walls that cross the entire thickness of the foil. Leakage flux "in" and "out" of alternating domains is a requirement of the random orientation, grain by grain, of magnetic easy axes' angles with respect to the foil free surface. Its magnetostatic energy together with domain wall energy determines an energy budget to be minimized. Throughout the magnetization cycle the free-surface domain pattern remains essentially unchanged, due to the magnetostatic energy cost such a change would elicit. Thus domain walls are "pinned" to free surfaces. Driven to saturation, domain walls first bulge then reconnect via Barkhausen jumps to form a new domain configuration that I have called "channel domains", which are attached to free surfaces. The approach to saturation now continues as reversible channel domain compression. Driving the permalloy deeper into saturation compresses the channel domains to arbitrarily small thickness, but will not cause them to denucleate. Returning from saturation the channel domain structure will survive through zero H, thus explaining remanence. The Barkhausen jumps, being irreversible exothermic events, are sources of fluxgate noise powered by the energy

  13. Weldable ductile molybdenum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Byun, Thak Sang; Schneibel, Joachim H; Miller, Michael K; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys are attractive structural materials for high-temperature applications. However, various practical issues have limited its use. One concern relates to the loss of ductility occurring in the heat-affected weld zone caused by segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries. In this study, a series of arc melted molybdenum alloys have been produced containing controlled additions of B, C, Zr, and Al. These alloys were characterized with respect to their tensile properties, smooth bend properties, and impact energy for both the base metal and welds. These alloys were compared with a very high purity low carbon arc cast molybdenum reference. For discussion purposes the alloys produced are separated into two categories: Mo Al B alloys, and Mo Zr B alloys. The properties of Mo Zr B alloy welds containing higher carbon levels exhibited slight improvement over unalloyed molybdenum, though the base-metal properties for all Mo Zr B alloys were somewhat inconsistent with properties better, or worse, than unalloyed molybdenum. A Mo Al B alloy exhibited the best DBTT values for welds, and the base metal properties were comparable to or slightly better than unalloyed molybdenum. The Mo Al B alloy contained a low volume fraction of second-phase particles, with segregation of boron and carbon to grain boundaries believed to displace oxygen resulting in improved weld properties. The volume fractions of second-phase particles are higher for the Mo Zr B alloys, and these alloys were prone to brittle fracture. It is also noted that these Mo Zr B alloys exhibited segregation of zirconium, boron and carbon to the grain boundaries.

  14. Determination of small amounts of molybdenum in tungsten and molybdenum ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Wells, R.C.

    1943-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for the determination of small amounts of molybdenum in tungsten and molybdenum ores. After removing iron and other major constituents the molybdenum thiocyanate color is developed in water-acetone solutions, using ammonium citrate to eliminate the interference of tungsten. Comparison is made by titrating a blank with a standard molybdenum solution. Aliquots are adjusted to deal with amounts of molybdenum ranging from 0.01 to 1.30 mg.

  15. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  16. SURFACE TREATMENT OF MOLYBDENUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Coffer, C.O.

    1961-12-01

    A process of descaling molybdenum articles comprises first immersing them in an aqueous sodium hydroxide-potassium permanganate solution of between 60 and 85 deg C, rinsing, and then immersing them in an aqueous solution containing a mixture of sulfuric, hydrochloric, and chromic acids.

  17. Enhanced molybdenum uptake in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a cofactor for nitrate reductase. When nitrate reductase activity is limited by Mo deficiency, crop yields are also potentially limited. Plant deficiencies in Mo often occur in acidic soil due to mineral fixation. The long-term goal is to identify genes that can be used to develop...

  18. Molybdenum recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blossom, John W.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the flow of molybdenum in the United States in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which molybdenum was recycled. Molybdenum was mostly recycled from products of molybdenum-bearing steels and superalloys, with some molybdenum products recovered specifically for their high molybdenum content. In 1998, 8,000 metric tons (t) of molybdenum was estimated to have been recycled, and the recycling rate was calculated to be 33 percent, with recycling efficiency at about 30 percent.

  19. The origin of noise and hysteresis in permalloy ring-core fluxgate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narod, Barry

    2013-04-01

    in permalloy ring-core fluxgate sensors a single phenomenon may cause both fluxgate noise and magnetic hysteresis. It also provides an explanation for Barkhausen noise, remanence and coercivity. It can also resolve the "domain nucleation problem." in the unmagnetized state a high-quality permalloy foil takes a domain structure generally referred to as "stripe domains," which present at the free surface as parallel, uniformly spaced domain walls bounding regions of alternating 'in' and 'out' leakage flux, and domain walls crossing the entire thickness of the foil. The leakage flux is a requirement of the random orientation, grain-by-grain, of magnetic easy axes' angles with respect to the foil free surface, and creates a free space field with a magnetostatic energy cost. This together with domain wall energy determines an energy budget to be minimized. Throughout the magnetization cycle the free surface domain pattern remains essentially unchanged, due to the extreme magnetostatic energy cost such a change would elicit. Thus domain walls are 'pinned' to free surfaces. As the fluxgate core is driven to saturation, domain walls pinned at the free surfaces first bulge then reconnect to form a new domain configuration this author has called "channel domains", which are attached to free surfaces. Energy released during the domain wall reconnection manifests as Barkhausen noise, while the reconnection itself manifests as a Barkhausen jump. The approach to saturation now continues as reversible channel domain compression. Driving the permalloy into deep saturation will compress the channel domains to arbitrarily small thickness, but will not cause them to denucleate. Returning from saturation the channel domain structure will survive through zero drive H, thus explaining remanence. The Barkhausen jumps being irreversible, exothermic events are sources of fluxgate noise. It is also the case that fluxgate signal power is proportional to B-H loop curvature, that is to the

  20. Research update: Spin transfer torques in permalloy on monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Wei; Sklenar, Joseph; Hsu, Bo; Jiang, Wanjun; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Xiao, Jiao; Fradin, Frank Y.; Liu, Yaohua; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; et al

    2016-03-03

    We observe current induced spin transfertorque resonance in permalloy (Py) grown on monolayer MoS2. By passing rf current through the Py/MoS2 bilayer, field-like and damping-like torques are induced which excite the ferromagnetic resonance of Py. The signals are detected via a homodyne voltage from anisotropic magnetoresistance of Py. In comparison to other bilayer systems with strong spin-orbit torques, the monolayer MoS2 cannot provide bulk spin Hall effects and thus indicates the purely interfacial nature of the spin transfer torques. Furthermore, our results indicate the potential of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide for the use of interfacial spin-orbitronics applications.

  1. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance State Space of Permalloy Nanowires with Domain Wall Pinning Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Corte-León, Héctor; Nabaei, Vahid; Manzin, Alessandra; Fletcher, Jonathan; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Schumacher, Hans W.; Kazakova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The domain wall-related change in the anisotropic magnetoresistance in L-shaped permalloy nanowires is measured as a function of the magnitude and orientation of the applied magnetic field. The magnetoresistance curves, compiled into so-called domain wall magnetoresistance state space maps, are used to identify highly reproducible transitions between domain states. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic modelling are correlated with the transport measurements of the devices in order to identify different magnetization states. Analysis allows to determine the optimal working parameters for specific devices, such as the minimal field required to switch magnetization or the most appropriate angle for maximal separation of the pinning/depinning fields. Moreover, the complete state space maps can be used to predict evolution of nanodevices in magnetic field without a need of additional electrical measurements and for repayable initialization of magnetic sensors into a well-specified state. PMID:25116470

  2. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  3. Microstructure investigation and magnetic study of permalloy thin films grown by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamrani, Sabrina; Guittoum, Abderrahim; Schäfer, Rudolf; Pofahl, Stefan; Neu, Volker; Hemmous, Messaoud; Benbrahim, Nassima

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of thickness on the structural and magnetic properties of permalloy thin films, evaporated on glass substrate. The films thicknesses range from 16 to 90 nm. From X-ray diffraction spectra analysis, we show that the thinner films present a "1,1,1" preferred orientation. However, the thicker films exhibit a random orientation. The grains size increases and the lattice parameter decreases with increasing thickness. The magnetic force microscopy observations display cross-tie walls features only for the two thicker films (60 and 90 nm thick films). The magnetic microstructure, carried out by Kerr microscopy technique, shows the presence of magnetic domains changing with the direction of applied magnetic field. The coercive field, Hc, was found to decrease from 6.5 for 16 to 1.75 Oe for 90 nm. All these results will be discussed and correlated.

  4. Magnetic vortex-antivortex dynamics on a picosecond timescale in a rectangular Permalloy pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.-H.; Mesler-Lai, B.; Anderson, E.; Fischer, P.; Moon, J.-H.; Lee, K.-J.

    2009-06-25

    We report our experimental finding that there exists a pair of magnetic vortex and antivortex generated during an excited motion of a magnetic vortex core. Two vortices structure in 2 x 4 {micro}m{sup 2} rectangular Permalloy pattern is excited by an external field pulse of 1-ns duration, where each vortex is excited and followed by the vortex core splitting. X-ray microscopy with high spatiotemporal resolution enables us to observe a linking domain between two temporarily generated pairs of vortex-antivortex cores only surviving for several hundreds of picoseconds. The linking domain structure is found to depend on the combinational configuration of two original vortex cores, which is supported by micromagnetic simulations with a very good agreement.

  5. Spin wave amplification using the spin Hall effect in permalloy/platinum bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladii, O.; Collet, M.; Garcia-Hernandez, K.; Cheng, C.; Xavier, S.; Bortolotti, P.; Cros, V.; Henry, Y.; Kim, J.-V.; Anane, A.; Bailleul, M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of an electrical current on the attenuation length of a 900 nm wavelength spin-wave in a permalloy/Pt bilayer using propagating spin-wave spectroscopy. The modification of the spin-wave relaxation rate is linear in current density, reaching up to 14% for a current density of 2.3 × 1011 A/m2 in Pt. This change is attributed to the spin transfer torque induced by the spin Hall effect and corresponds to an effective spin Hall angle of 0.13, which is among the highest values reported so far. The spin Hall effect thus appears as an efficient way of amplifying/attenuating propagating spin waves.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Temperature-Dependent Gilbert Damping in Permalloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuelei; Song, Qi; Yang, See-Hun; Su, Tang; Yuan, Wei; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Shi, Jing; Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The Gilbert damping of ferromagnetic materials is arguably the most important but least understood phenomenological parameter that dictates real-time magnetization dynamics. Understanding the physical origin of the Gilbert damping is highly relevant to developing future fast switching spintronics devices such as magnetic sensors and magnetic random access memory. Here, we report an experimental study of temperature-dependent Gilbert damping in permalloy (Py) thin films of varying thicknesses by ferromagnetic resonance. From the thickness dependence, two independent contributions to the Gilbert damping are identified, namely bulk damping and surface damping. Of particular interest, bulk damping decreases monotonically as the temperature decreases, while surface damping shows an enhancement peak at the temperature of ~50 K. These results provide an important insight to the physical origin of the Gilbert damping in ultrathin magnetic films.

  7. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in single layers of permalloy: Evidence of magnonic charge pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, A.; Cunha, R. O.; Estrada, F.; Alves Santos, O.; Mendes, J. B. S.; Vilela-Leão, L. H.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of a DC voltage in single layers of permalloy (Ni81Fe19 ) when the magnetization is undergoing ferromagnetic resonance is investigated in a series of samples with thickness varying from 4.0 to 150 nm. By sweeping the external field at a fixed microwave frequency, we measure a DC voltage at the ends of the layer as a function of the in-plane angle for each sample. The asymmetric voltage signal generated at the resonance field is a superposition of symmetric Lorentzian and antisymmetric Lorentzian derivative line shapes. The in-plane dependence of both symmetric and antisymmetric signals cannot be explained as due to spin rectification (SRE) only. The results are well explained by a model that takes into account in addition to the SRE the contribution of the recent discovered effect of magnonic charge pumping that converts magnetization dynamics into charge current by means of the spin orbit coupling.

  8. Research Update: Spin transfer torques in permalloy on monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Sklenar, Joseph; Hsu, Bo; Jiang, Wanjun; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Xiao, Jiao; Fradin, Frank Y.; Liu, Yaohua; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; Yang, Zheng; Hoffmann, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We observe current induced spin transfer torque resonance in permalloy (Py) grown on monolayer MoS2. By passing rf current through the Py/MoS2 bilayer, field-like and damping-like torques are induced which excite the ferromagnetic resonance of Py. The signals are detected via a homodyne voltage from anisotropic magnetoresistance of Py. In comparison to other bilayer systems with strong spin-orbit torques, the monolayer MoS2 cannot provide bulk spin Hall effects and thus indicates the purely interfacial nature of the spin transfer torques. Therefore our results indicate the potential of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide for the use of interfacial spin-orbitronics applications.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Temperature-Dependent Gilbert Damping in Permalloy Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuelei; Song, Qi; Yang, See-Hun; Su, Tang; Yuan, Wei; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Shi, Jing; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The Gilbert damping of ferromagnetic materials is arguably the most important but least understood phenomenological parameter that dictates real-time magnetization dynamics. Understanding the physical origin of the Gilbert damping is highly relevant to developing future fast switching spintronics devices such as magnetic sensors and magnetic random access memory. Here, we report an experimental study of temperature-dependent Gilbert damping in permalloy (Py) thin films of varying thicknesses by ferromagnetic resonance. From the thickness dependence, two independent contributions to the Gilbert damping are identified, namely bulk damping and surface damping. Of particular interest, bulk damping decreases monotonically as the temperature decreases, while surface damping shows an enhancement peak at the temperature of ~50 K. These results provide an important insight to the physical origin of the Gilbert damping in ultrathin magnetic films. PMID:26961411

  10. Micromagnetic simulation of domain wall dynamics in Permalloy nanotubes at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, I.; Hrkac, G.; Schrefl, T.

    2008-07-01

    The formation and motion of a single cross-tie type domain wall (DW) was studied in a Ni80Fe20 Permalloy nanotube of 50 nm thickness and 500 nm length by means of micromagnetic simulations. Circular magnetization curves, calculated with circumferential ac magnetic fields applied on the nanotube, showed that the propagation of the DW along the nanotube length occurred for hrms values as low as 166 A/m at a frequency of 250 MHz. In general, the observed DW motion exhibited an out-of-phase oscillating character, relative to the applied hac field, with a normalized phase shift of 0.20 being independent of hrms. The DW damping was observed at 10 GHz.

  11. Magnetic thermal stability of permalloy microstructures with shape-induced bi-axial anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telepinsky, Yevgeniy; Sinwani, Omer; Mor, Vladislav; Schultz, Moty; Klein, Lior

    2016-02-01

    We study the thermal stability of the magnetization states in permalloy microstructures in the form of two crossing elongated ellipses, a shape which yields effective bi-axial magnetic anisotropy in the overlap area. We prepare the structure with the magnetization along one of the easy axes of magnetization and measure the waiting time for switching when a magnetic field favoring the other easy axis is applied. The waiting time for switching is measured as a function of the applied magnetic field and temperature. We determine the energy barrier for switching and estimate the thermal stability of the structures. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations. The results indicate exceptional stability which makes such structures appealing for a variety of applications including magnetic random access memory based on the planar Hall effect.

  12. Self-induced inverse spin Hall effect in permalloy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, Ayaka; Ando, Yuichiro; Kitamura, Yuta; Emoto, Hiroyuki; Shikoh, Eiji; Delmo, Michael P.; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-06-01

    Inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) allows the conversion of pure spin current into charge current in nonmagnetic materials due to spin-orbit interaction (SOI). In ferromagnetic materials (FMs), SOI is known to contribute to anomalous Hall effect, anisotropic magnetoresistance, and other spin-dependent transport phenomena. However, SOI in FM has been ignored in ISHE studies in spintronic devices, and the possibility of "self-induced ISHE" in FM has never been explored until now. In this paper, we demonstrate the experimental verification of ISHE in FM. We found that the spin-pumping-induced spin current in permalloy (Py) film generates a transverse electromotive force (EMF) in the film itself, which results from the coupling of spin current and SOI in Py. The control experiments ruled out spin rectification effect and anomalous Nernst effect as the origin of the EMF.

  13. Structural, electrical and magnetic properties of evaporated permalloy thin films: effect of substrate and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittoum, A.; Bourzami, A.; Layadi, A.; Schmerber, G.

    2012-05-01

    We have studied the effects of the substrate and the thickness on the structural, electrical and magnetic properties of permalloy thin films Ni81Fe19 (Py). Series of Py thin films were evaporated on four various substrates: glass, kapton, Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1). The thickness ranges from 13 nm to 190 nm. We show that evaporated permalloy on kapton and Si(1 1 1) present a strong ⟨1 1 1⟩ preferred orientation for samples thicker than 85 nm; however, the films grown on glass and Si(1 0 0) present a weak (1 1 1) texture for most of these samples. Generally, the lattice constant for Py/glass, Py/Si(1 0 0) and Py/Si(1 1 1) samples is found to be smaller than the bulk value (abulk), while for the Py/kapton, it is larger than abulk. There is an overall increase of the grain sizes (100 Å-480 Å) with thickness for Py/Si(1 1 1), Py/Si(1 0 0) and Py/glass. For the Py/kapton samples, the grain sizes (about 130 Å) seem to be independent of the thickness. The resistivity, ρ, decreases with increasing thickness for all samples. The highest values of ρ were observed in the Py/kapton thin films, diffusion at the grain boundaries might be in part responsible for these high values. The magnetization easy axis is found to be in the film plane for all samples. For all series, the two thinner films seem to exhibit a perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The coercive field, HC//, values range from 1 Oe to 67 Oe. A peak in the HC// vs. t curve is observed for Py/Si while for Py on glass and Py/kapton, HC// seems to be constant. We also observed that for the thicker Py/Si(1 1 1) samples, the coercivity decreases as the grain sizes increase.

  14. High power ferromagnetic resonance and spin wave instability processes in Permalloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sung Yong; Krivosik, Pavol; Kraemer, Michael A.; Olson, Heidi M.; Nazarov, Alexey V.; Patton, Carl E.

    2004-08-01

    The high power ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) response, as well as butterfly curves of the spin wave instability threshold microwave field amplitude hcrit versus in-plane static field H profiles, have been measured for Permalloy films with thicknesses of 104, 128, and 270nm at a nominal pumping frequency of 9.37GHz. The hcrit values range from about 1 to 7Oe. Both the resonance saturation response at the FMR field and the subsidiary absorption (SA) response for static fields below the FMR field are similar in appearance to those for bulk ferrites. Butterfly curves over the SA response region, while similar to those for ferrites, exhibit a film thickness dependent band edge cutoff effect not found in bulk ferrites. The SA butterfly curve data were analyzed on the basis of a spin wave instability theory adapted to thin films. The observed shift in the SA band edge cutoff with thickness agrees with calculations based on the thin film dispersion response and the assumption of first order instability processes with critical modes at one half the pumping frequency. The fitted SA spin wave linewidths give values consistent with metallic relaxation processes, but indicate critical modes with wave vectors that always make relatively small 0°-20° angles with the static field, very different from the critical modes for bulk ferrites. Three key conclusions from this work are (1) the nonlinear microwave FMR response in Permalloy films is a threshold effect related to well established spin wave instability processes, (2) the details of the SA response are controlled largely by the thin film spin wave dispersion, and (3) these nonlinear processes occur for very small precession angles.

  15. Molybdenum cofactor and human disease.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    Four molybdenum-dependent enzymes are known in humans, each harboring a pterin-based molybdenum cofactor (Moco) in the active site. They catalyze redox reactions using water as oxygen acceptor or donator. Moco is synthesized by a conserved biosynthetic pathway. Moco deficiency results in a severe inborn error of metabolism causing often early childhood death. Disease-causing symptoms mainly go back to the lack of sulfite oxidase (SO) activity, an enzyme in cysteine catabolism. Besides their name-giving functions, Mo-enzymes have been recognized to catalyze novel reactions, including the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. In this review we cover the biosynthesis of Moco, key features of Moco-enzymes and focus on their deficiency. Underlying disease mechanisms as well as treatment options will be discussed. PMID:27055119

  16. Mechanical properties of electron-beam-melted molybdenum and dilute molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A study of molybdenum and three dilute molybdenum-rhenium alloys was undertaken to determine the effects of rhenium on the low temperature ductility and other mechanical properties of molybdenum. Alloys containing 3.9, 5.9, and 7.7 atomic percent rhenium exhibited lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures than did the unalloyed molybdenum. The maximum improvement in the annealed condition was observed for molybdenum - 7.7 rhenium, which had a ductile-brittle transition temperature approximately 200 C (360 F) lower than that for unalloyed molybdenum. Rhenium additions also increased the low and high temperature tensile strengths and the high temperature creep strength of molybdenum. The mechanical behavior of dilute molybdenum-rhenium alloys is similar to that observed for dilute tungsten-rhenium alloys.

  17. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  18. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  19. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  20. Zirconia-molybdenum disilicide composites

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of molybdenum disilicide and zirconium oxide in one of three forms: pure, partially stabilized, or fully stabilized and methods of making the compositions. The stabilized zirconia is crystallographically stabilized by mixing it with yttrium oxide, calcium oxide, cerium oxide, or magnesium oxide and it may be partially stabilized or fully stabilized depending on the amount of stabilizing agent in the mixture.

  1. Proximity effect of magnetic permalloy nanoelements used to induce AMR changes in magnetic biosensor nanowires at specific receptor sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Iain; Ding, An; Xu, Yongbing

    2015-08-01

    We present simulated, substrate bound, permalloy nanowires with receptor sites for magnetic, aqueously suspended nanoelements that are able to induce an anisotropic magnetoresistive effect in nanowire circuits. The permalloy nanoelements were also simulated to determine the remanent spin configuration and were designed to be bound by antibody mediated interactions with biological ligands at the receptor sites in order to act as a biosensor. All results were simulated using micromagnetic simulations by the Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF). The simulations revealed that anisotropic magnetoresistive changes were induced at the bridging sections between adjacent nanowires, next to the receptor sites, which connect the two adjacent nanowires. The electrical resistance across the nanowires reduced after the inclusion of the nanoelements at the receptor sites. We therefore conclude that this nanowire configuration is useful for an inexpensive diagnostic biosensor.

  2. Annealed CVD molybdenum thin film surface

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Gary E.; Seraphin, Bernhard O.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum thin films deposited by pyrolytic decomposition of Mo(CO).sub.6 attain, after anneal in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures greater than 700.degree. C., infrared reflectance values greater than reflectance of supersmooth bulk molybdenum. Black molybdenum films deposited under oxidizing conditions and annealed, when covered with an anti-reflecting coating, approach the ideal solar collector characteristic of visible light absorber and infrared energy reflector.

  3. Mineral resource of the month: molybdenum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magyar, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Molybdenum is a metallic element that is most frequently used in alloy and stainless steels, which together represent the single largest market for molybdenum. Molybdenum has also proven invaluable in carbon steel, cast iron and superalloys. Its alloying versatility is unmatched because its addition enhances material performance under high-stress conditions in expanded temperature ranges and in highly corrosive environments. The metal is also used in catalysts, other chemicals, lubricants and many other applications.

  4. The influence of Nd dopants on spin and orbital moments in Nd-doped permalloy thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chen Zhang, Wen E-mail: yazhai@seu.edu.cn; Zhai, Ya E-mail: yazhai@seu.edu.cn; Wong, P. K. J.; You, Biao; Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru

    2014-08-25

    Magnetic properties of Nd{sub X}-Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20(1−X)} thin films have been investigated using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at room temperature. With the Nd concentration increasing, the ratio of orbital-to-spin moment of Ni and Fe increases significantly, indicating that the spin-orbit coupling in permalloy thin films is enhanced due to the Nd impurities. The spin and orbital moments have been obtained by the sum rules analysis, which shows that the Nd impurities lead to a strong dispersion of spin moments of Fe and Ni while have no effect on orbital moments in Nd-doped permalloy thin films. Element-specific XMCD hysteresis loops suggest an antiferromagnetic coupling between the magnetic moments of Nd and permalloy at room temperature. The static magnetic properties have been studied by vibrating sample magnetometer for comparison, which shows a nice agreement with the XMCD results.

  5. Molybdenum Enzymes, Cofactors, and Model Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgmayer, S. J. N; Stiefel, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) molybdoenzymes (examining their distribution and metabolic role, composition and redox strategy, cofactors, substrate reactions, and mechanistic possibilities); (2) structural information on molybdenum (Mo) centers; (3) modeling studies (Mo-co models, nitrogenase models, and the MO-S duo); and (4) the copper-molybdenum antagonism.…

  6. Formation of alumina-nickel-molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V.I.; Basov, V.G.; Vagin, A.I.; Kalechits, I.V.

    1982-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained in physical and chemical studies of alumina-nickel-molybdenum oxide catalysts as well as binary system and the individual oxides, the conclusions show that the commercial catalyst consists mainly of nickel and aluminium molybdates, aluminium molybdates, molybdenum oxide, and the alumina support. 4 figures.

  7. Dynamic Modeling of Molybdenum Metabolism in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum is an essential nutrient in the human diet and is a cofactor for several enzymes. While intakes can vary widely with geographical region, both deficiency and toxicity in humans are rare. To determine if humans have adaptive mechanisms for maintaining molybdenum status under varying inta...

  8. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Eagan, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum, and adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures of between about 900.degree. and about 950.degree.C. to form a hermatically sealed insulator body.

  9. Characterization of low dimensional molybdenum sulfide nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho-Bragado, G. Alejandra; Elechiguerra, Jose Luis; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2008-03-15

    It is presented a detailed structural characterization of a nanostructured form of molybdenum disulfide. The material consists of a layer of highly textured molybdenum sulfide growing off a molybdenum dioxide core. The structure and chemical composition of the synthesized nanostructured sulfide was compared to two well-known forms of molybdenum disulfide, i.e. a commercial molybdenite sample and a poorly crystalline sulfide. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that the material reported here presents crystalline nanodomains with a crystal structure corresponding to the 2H polytype of molybdenum disulfide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate the differences between our sulfide and other materials such as amorphous MoS{sub 3}, oxysulfides and poorly crystalline MoS{sub 2}, corroborating the molybdenite-2H stacking in this form of sulfide. The material under study showed a high proportion of crystalline planes different from the basal plane.

  10. Comparison of Current and Field Driven Domain Wall Motion in Beaded Permalloy Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, Enno; Dutta, Sumit; Ross, Caroline A.

    2015-03-01

    Domain wall based devices are promising candidates for non-volatile memory devices with no static power consumption. A common approach is the use of (field assisted) current driven domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires. In such systems local variations in linewidth act as obstacles for propagating domain walls. In this study we compare simulated field driven and current driven domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with anti-notches. The simulations were obtained using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetics Framework (OOMMF). The wires with a constant thickness of 8 nm exhibit linewidths ranging from 40 nm to 300 nm. Circular shaped anti-notches extend the linewidth locally by 10% to 30% and raise information about the domain wall propagation in such beaded nanowires. The results are interpreted in terms of the observed propagation behavior and summarized in maps indicating ranges of different ability to overcome the pinning caused by anti-notches of different sizes. Furthermore, regimes of favored domain wall type (transverse walls or vortex walls) and complex propagation effects like walker breakdown behavior or dynamic change between domain wall structures are identified The authors thank the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) for funding.

  11. Current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with a rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, J. H.; Miao, B. F.; Sun, L.; You, B.; Hu, An; Ding, H. F.

    2011-11-01

    We performed micromagnetic simulations of the current-induced domain wall motion in permalloy nanowires with rectangular cross-section. In the absence of the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, a threshold current, J{sub c} is required to drive the domain wall moving continuously. We find that J{sub c} is proportional to the maximum cross product of the demagnetization field and magnetization orientation of the domain wall and the domain wall width. With varying both the wire thickness and width, a minimum threshold current in the order of 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} is obtained when the thickness is equivalent to the wire width. With the nonadiabatic spin-transfer term, the calculated domain wall velocity {nu} equals to the adiabatic spin transfer velocity u when the current is far above the Walker limit J{sub w}. Below J{sub w}, {nu}=({beta}/{alpha})u, where {beta} is the nonadiabatic parameter and {alpha} is the damping factor. For different {beta}, we find the Walker limit can be scaled as J{sub w}=({alpha}/{beta}-{alpha})J{sub c}. Our simulations agree well with the one dimensional analytical calculation, suggesting the findings are the general behaviors of the systems in this particular geometry.

  12. Engineered smart substrate with embedded patterned permalloy thin film for radio frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yujia; Rahman, B. M. Farid; Wang, Tengxing; Nowrin, Chamok; Ali, Mohammod; Wang, Guoan

    2015-05-01

    Multifunctional and frequency-agile devices are promising components that satisfy multiple standards of modern wireless communication system. This paper provides a unique method to develop tunable RF components based on engineered smart substrate where the smart substrate contain patterned Permalloy (Py) thin film on high-resistivity silicon. The permeability of Py can be adjusted by changing the DC current, thus allowing tunable RF circuits and components. Single or multi-layer patterns can be developed. To demonstrate tunability of the smart substrate, a frequency reconfigurable patch antenna was fabricated on Liquid Crystal Polymer substrate and bonded to the proposed smart substrate. The patch antenna was tested, which revealed that the center frequency of operation could be tuned from 2.38 GHz to 2.43 GHz by changing the DC current from 0 mA to 500 mA. Similarly, a transmission line based phase shifter was also fabricated on another smart substrate, which showed that the phase shifter could provide continuous 90° phase shift from 2.35 GHz to 2.15 GHz under different DC current bias conditions.

  13. Field evolution of the magnetic normal modes in elongated permalloy nanometric rings.

    PubMed

    Gubbiotti, G; Madami, M; Tacchi, S; Carlotti, G; Pasquale, M; Singh, N; Goolaup, S; Adeyeye, A O

    2007-10-10

    The eigenmode spectrum of elongated permalloy rings with relatively wide arms is investigated by combined Brillouin light scattering and ferromagnetic resonance measurements as a function of the applied field intensity, encompassing both vortex and onion ground states. To reproduce the frequencies and the spatial profiles of the measured modes we performed micromagnetic simulations which solve the discretized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in the time domain and calculate locally the Fourier transform. This allowed us to correlate the field dependence of different modes to their localization inside different portions of the rings. With the rings in the vortex ground state, in addition to radial, fundamental, and azimuthal modes, a localized mode, existing in the element portions where the internal field assumes its minima, has been measured and identified. This latter mode, whose frequency decreases for increasing field intensity, becomes soft near the transition from vortex to onion state and determines the change in symmetry of the magnetic ground state. After the transition, it is replaced by two edge modes, localized on the internal and external boundary of the rings, respectively. PMID:22049127

  14. Differential Domain Wall Propagation in Y-Shaped Permalloy Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bipul; Chen, Ting-Chieh; Shiu, Deng-Shiang; Horng, Lance; Wu, Jong-Ching

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report an investigation of magnetic domain wall (DW) evolution and propagation in Y-shaped permalloy (Py) nanowire (NW) devices. The devices are fabricated using standard electron-beam lithography technique. Each device consists of three connected NWs that form a Y-junction structure with one branch connecting either symmetrically or asymmetrically to a circular disk for DW nucleation. The DW dynamics in the devices are studied by in situ magnetic force microscopy (MFM) by pinning the DWs to triangular notches at each branch of the two devices. We observe that the DW injection field values differ depending on whether they are connected to the circular disks symmetrically or asymmetrically. However, after they pass the Y-junctions, a selection is made by the DWs to propagate easily either through both or through only one particular outgoing branch of the devices. The experimental observations are analyzed by micromagnetic simulation. It can be inferred from the results that the influence of detailed geometrical shape of the devices leads to significantly different interactions among the innate topological defects and the notches with the injected DWs.

  15. Magnetic Structure, Magnetization Reversal and Spin Dynamics of Micron-sized Permalloy Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaobin; Liu, Zhigang; Malac, Marek; Qian, Hui; Freeman, Mark; Metlushko, Vitali; Ilic, Bojan

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic ring structure is currently of great interest due to its potential application for magnetic storage and sensors [1]. In this talk, we present a study of 2 μm sized Permalloy rings on 25 nm SiN membrane prepared by electron beam lithography. The magnetic structures are examined by Lorentz microscopy. The Lorentz microscopy images indicate that the demagnetized state is the expected circulation of the magnetization. The head-to-head or tail-to-tail domains in the onion states (remanence after saturation) are found to be vortices. Diffractional magnetooptic Kerr effect magnetometry [2] is used (in zero, first, and second orders) to study the magnetization reversal, and the results are compared to the micromagnetic modeling based on Landau-Liftshitz-Gilbert equation. Finally, ultrafast scanning Kerr microscopy in spectroscopic mode is used to study the spin dynamics of the ring [3]. The ultrafast transient field is applied perpendicular to the rings, while a dc bias is applied in the plane. We find that the processional frequency in the circulating magnetization state is almost bias field-independent, while it splits into two field-dependent frequencies at larger bias (>100 Oe). These results will also be discussed in relation to micromagnetic modeling. [1] J.-G. Zhu, et al., JAP 87, 6668 (2000). [2] P. Vavassori, et al., PRB 67, 134429 (2003). [3] W. K. Hiebert, et al., PRL 79, 1134 (1997).

  16. Field evolution of the magnetic normal modes in elongated permalloy nanometric rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Carlotti, G.; Pasquale, M.; Singh, N.; Goolaup, S.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2007-10-01

    The eigenmode spectrum of elongated permalloy rings with relatively wide arms is investigated by combined Brillouin light scattering and ferromagnetic resonance measurements as a function of the applied field intensity, encompassing both vortex and onion ground states. To reproduce the frequencies and the spatial profiles of the measured modes we performed micromagnetic simulations which solve the discretized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in the time domain and calculate locally the Fourier transform. This allowed us to correlate the field dependence of different modes to their localization inside different portions of the rings. With the rings in the vortex ground state, in addition to radial, fundamental, and azimuthal modes, a localized mode, existing in the element portions where the internal field assumes its minima, has been measured and identified. This latter mode, whose frequency decreases for increasing field intensity, becomes soft near the transition from vortex to onion state and determines the change in symmetry of the magnetic ground state. After the transition, it is replaced by two edge modes, localized on the internal and external boundary of the rings, respectively.

  17. Spin-orbit interaction enhancement in permalloy thin films by Pt doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabec, A.; Gonçalves, F. J. T.; Spencer, C. S.; Arenholz, E.; N'Diaye, A. T.; Stamps, R. L.; Marrows, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The spin-orbit interaction is an inherent part of magnetism, which links up the independent world of spins to the atomic lattice, thus controlling many functional properties of magnetic materials. In the widely used 3 d transition metal ferromagnetic films, the spin-orbit interaction is relatively weak, due to low atomic number. Here we show that it is possible to enhance and tune the spin-orbit interaction by adding 5 d platinum dopants into permalloy (Ni81Fe19 ) thin films by a cosputtering technique. This is achieved without significant changes of the magnetic properties, due to the vicinity of Pt to meeting the Stoner criterion for the ferromagnetic state. The spin-orbit interaction is investigated by means of transport measurements (the anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect), ferromagnetic resonance measurements to determine the Gilbert damping, as well as by measuring the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the L3 and L2 x-ray absorption edges to reveal the ratio of orbital to spin magnetic moments. It is shown that the effective spin-orbit interaction increases with Pt concentration within the 0%-10% Pt concentration range in a way that is consistent with theoretical expectations for all four measurements.

  18. Annealing influence on the exchange stiffness constant of Permalloy films with stripe domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jinwu; Zhu, Zengtai; Song, Chengkun; Feng, Hongmei; Jing, Panpan; Wang, Xiangqian; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of the annealing influence on the stripe domains structure in Permalloy films has been performed by comparing the static and dynamic magnetic properties. An increasing exchange stiffness constant A ex is found when the annealing temperature rises. The magnetic force microscopy images show that the width of stripe domain increases with the increase of annealing temperature, and the increasing exchange stiffness constant is considered to be the most prominent reason. A perpendicular standing spin-wave model is used to deduce the A ex from the evolution of resonance frequencies, and the A ex increases nearly twice from 7.2  ×  10‑7 ergs cm‑1 for the as-deposited film to 12.9  ×  10‑7 ergs cm‑1 for the film annealing at 400 °C. Micromagnetic calculation is also used to compute the magnetization configuration, and the results agree well with the experimental conclusions.

  19. Observation of Novel Low-Field FMR modes in Permalloy Antidot Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Long, Lance; Bhat, Vinayak; Farmer, Barry; Woods, Justin; Hastings, Todd; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John

    2013-03-01

    Permalloy films of thickness 23 nm were patterned with square arrays of square antidots (AD) with feature size D = 120 nm, and lattice constants d = 200, 300, 500 and 700 nm (total sample area = 2 mm x 2mm), using electron beam lithography. Our broad-band (frequencies f = 10 MHz-15 GHz) and narrow-band (9.7 GHz) FMR measurements of even dilute (D/d <<1) AD lattices (ADL) reveal remarkably reproducible absorption spectra in the low-frequency, hysteretic regime in which disordered domain wall (DW) patterns and unsaturated magnetization textures are expected for unpatterned films, but in the present case are strongly affected by the periodic ADL. Other modes in the saturated regime exhibit strong dependence on the angle between the applied DC field H and the ADL axes, as confirmed by our micromagnetic simulations. Novel modes are observed at DC fields above that of the uniform mode, which simulations indicate are localized at AD edges. Other novel modes are observed for DC fields below that of the uniform mode, which simulated power and phase maps indicate are confined to ADL interstices oriented parallel to H. These results show even dilute AD concentrations can effect strong control of DW evolution. Research at Kentucky is supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45653 and NSF Grant EPS-0814194.

  20. Spin wave eigenmodes in single and coupled sub-150 nm rectangular permalloy dots

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, G. Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Gubbiotti, G.; Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W.

    2015-05-07

    We present the results of a Brillouin light scattering investigation of thermally excited spin wave eigenmodes in square arrays of either isolated rectangular dots of permalloy or twins of dipolarly coupled elements, placed side-by-side or head-to-tail. The nanodots, fabricated by e-beam lithography and lift-off, are 20 nm thick and have the major size D in the range between 90 nm and 150 nm. The experimental spectra show the presence of two main peaks, corresponding to modes localized either at the edges or in the center of the dots. Their frequency dependence on the dot size and on the interaction with adjacent elements has been measured and successfully interpreted on the basis of dynamical micromagnetic simulations. The latter enabled us also to describe the spatial profile of the eigenmodes, putting in evidence the effects induced by the dipolar interaction between coupled dots. In particular, in twinned dots the demagnetizing field is appreciably modified in proximity of the “internal edges” if compared to the “external” ones, leading to a splitting of the edge mode. These results can be relevant for the exploitation of sub-150 nm magnetic dots in new applications, such as magnonic metamaterials, bit-patterned storage media, and nano-magnetic logic devices.

  1. Magnetically actuated bi-directional microactuators with permalloy and Fe/Pt hard magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C. T.; Shen, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    Bi-directional polyimide (PI) electromagnetic microactuator with different geometries are designed, fabricated and tested. Fabrication of the electromagnetic microactuator consists of 10 μm thick Ni/Fe (80/20) permalloy deposition on the PI diaphragm by electroplating, high aspect ratio electroplating of copper planar coil with 10 μm in thickness, bulk micromachining, and excimer laser selective ablation. They were fabricated by a novel concept avoiding the etching selectivity and residual stress problems during wafer etching. A mathematical model is created by ANSYS software to analyze the microactuator. The external magnetic field intensity (Hext) generated by the planar coil is simulated by ANSYS software. ANSYS software is used to predict the deflection angle of the microactuator. Besides, to provide bi-directional and large deflection angle of microactuator, hard magnet Fe/Pt is deposited at a low temperature of 300 °C by sputtering onto the PI diaphragm to produce a perpendicular magnetic anisotropic field. This magnetic field can enhance the interaction with Hext to induce attractive and repulsive bi-directional force to provide large displacement. The results of magnetic microactuator with and without hard magnets are compared and discussed. The preliminary result reveals that the electromagnetic microactuator with hard magnet shows a greater deflection angle than that without one.

  2. Application of sub-micrometer patterned permalloy thin film in tunable radio frequency inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, B.M. Farid; Divan, Ralu; Rosenmann, Daniel; Wang, Tengxing; Peng, Yujia; Wang, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical tunable meander line inductor using coplanar waveguide structures with patterned permalloy (Py) thin film has been designed and implemented in this paper. High resistivity Si substrate is used to reduce the dielectric loss from the substrate. Inductor is implemented with a 60 nm thick Py deposited and patterned on top of the gold meander line, and Py film is patterned with dimension of 440 nm 10 lm to create the shape anisotropy field, which in turn increases the FMR frequency. Compared to a regular meanderline inductor without the application of sub-micrometer patterned Py thin film, the inductance density has been increased to 20% for the implemented inductor with patterned Py. Measured FMR frequency of the patterned Py is 4.51 GHz without the application of any external magnetic field. This has enabled the inductor application in the practical circuit boards, where the large external magnet is unavailable. Inductance tunability of the implemented inductor is demonstrated by applying a DC current. Applied DC current creates a magnetic field along the hard axis of the patterned Py thin film, which changes the magnetic moment of the thin film and thus, decreases the inductance of the line. Measured results show that the inductance density of the inductor can be varied 5% by applying 300 mA DC current, larger inductance tunability is achievable by increasing the thickness of Py film. VC 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4918766

  3. Nanolaminated Permalloy Core for High-Flux, High-Frequency Ultracompact Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Kim, M; Galle, P; Herrault, F; Shafer, R; Park, JY; Allen, MG

    2013-09-01

    Metallic magnetic materials have desirable magnetic properties, including high permeability, and high saturation flux density, when compared with their ferrite counterparts. However, eddy-current losses preclude their use in many switching converter applications, due to the challenge of simultaneously achieving sufficiently thin laminations such that eddy currents are suppressed (e.g., 500 nm-1 mu m for megahertz frequencies), while simultaneously achieving overall core thicknesses such that substantial power can be handled. A CMOS-compatible fabrication process based on robot-assisted sequential electrodeposition followed by selective chemical etching has been developed for the realization of a core of substantial overall thickness (tens to hundreds of micrometers) comprised of multiple, stacked permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanolaminations. Tests of toroidal inductors with nanolaminated cores showed negligible eddy-current loss relative to total core loss even at a peak flux density of 0.5 T in the megahertz frequency range. To illustrate the use of these cores, a buck power converter topology is implemented with switching frequencies of 1-2 MHz. Power conversion efficiency greater than 85% with peak operating flux density of 0.3-0.5 T in the core and converter output power level exceeding 5 W was achieved.

  4. Polarized neutron reflection study of the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of Permalloy on Ni 0.5Co 0.5O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felcher, G. P.; Huang, Y. Y.; Carey, M.; Berkowitz, A.

    1993-03-01

    Couples of ferromagnetic Permalloy/antiferromagnetic metal oxide exhibit unidirectional magnetic anisotropy along a magnetic field applied during cooling. Polarized neutron reflection has been used to check if the effect is due to a bias of the antiferromagnetic configuration in the oxide, where the layer immediately adjacent to the Permalloy is polarized parallel to the easy direction of magnetization. The measurements were made on a sample consisting of 300ÅPermalloy/500ÅNi 0.5Co 0.5O. Polarized neutron reflectivities were taken at the four corners of the magnetic hysteresis loop at 20 K. A faint magnetic signal consistent with the unidirectional bias of the F / AF structure was observed. This behavior is discussed in the light of the current theories.

  5. The influence of FeTi and NiTi intermetallide additions on high-temperature oxidation of permalloy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, V.N.; Lavrenko, V.A.; Panasyuk, O.A.; Blasova, O.V.; Protsenko, T.G.

    1995-11-01

    As a rule powder metallurgy Permalloy alloys are used in production of parts for electronic instruments. For the purpose of controlling the magnetic and electrical properties and also the wear (in the case of production of magnetic heads) and corrosion resistance appropriate additions of metals or such compounds as carbides and oxides are added to the alloy. In this work use of FeTi and NiTi intermetallides produced by reaction sintering of powders of pure metals in a protective atmosphere as alloying additions to Permalloy is recommended. The size of the original powders is less than 100 {mu}m. For reaction sintering at temperature 50{degrees}C above the eutectic temperature in the Ti-TiFe and TiNi-Ni systems was selected. The contents of titanium, iron, and oxygen in the FeTi alloy is 51.9, 45.7, and 2.4 wt.%, respectively, and of titanium, nickel, and oxygen in the NiTi alloy 59.6, 31.9, and 4.6 wt.%. High-temperature oxidation in air up to 1300{degrees}C with a rate of change in temperature of 15{degrees}C of type 78N Permalloy with additions of FeTi and NiTi alloys was investigated with use of methods of differential thermal and differential thermogravimetric analyses on an OD-103 derivatograph under nonisothermal conditions. The reaction products were studied by x-ray diffraction phase analysis on a DRON-3 instrument in CoK{sub {alpha}}-radiation. Pure 78N alloy powder with a composition of 78.1% Ni + 19.3% Fe (specimen 1) and also with additions of 1% FeTi (specimen 2) and 1% NiTi (specimen 3) were subjected to oxidation.

  6. Separation of molybdenum and technetium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, J. D.; Gagnon, K.; Wilson, J. S.; Romaniuk, J.; Abrams, D. N.; McQuarrie, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    After the production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction, there is a requirement for separating 99mTc from bulk 100Mo. Although a number of separation methods have been demonstrated, the possibility of using a cartridge-based system is particularly attractive for routine use in a good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulatory environment. This study confirmed that hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) solid phase extraction (SPE) with PEG as stationary phase is an efficient and easily automated method for separating molybdate and pertechnetate, and that PEG degradation in the conditions used does not affect the performance of the resin. In addition, reversed phase SPE using Waters Oasis® HLB shows promise for successful separation of molybdenum and technetium and work continues to extend this technology to readily available commercial SPE cartridges.

  7. Permalloy and Co50Pd50 as ferromagnetic contacts for magnetoresistance measurements in carbon nanotube-based transport structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Caitlin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on carbon nanotube (CNT) 2-terminal spin-valve devices are presented. Results from samples with both permalloy (Py) and CoPd contacts show repeatable MR switching. In performing gate-dependent MR measurements on the Py-contacted CNTs, two distinct transport regimes are identified, and their transport behavior is discussed with respect to optimizing MR. Results from the first CoPd-contacted CNTs indicate a stable magnetic response with a higher magnitude than that of a Py-contacted nanotube in the same transport regime.

  8. Collective spin excitations in bicomponent magnonic crystals consisting of bilayer permalloy/Fe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Yang, Z.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Kostylev, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the developing field of magnonics, it is very important to achieve tailoring of spin wave propagation by both a proper combination of materials with different magnetic properties and their nanostructuring on the submicrometric scale. With this in mind, we have exploited deep ultraviolet lithography, in combination with the tilted shadow deposition technique, to fabricate arrays of closely spaced bilayer nanowires (NWs), with separation d =100 nm and periodicity a =440 nm , having bottom and top layers made of permalloy and iron, respectively. The NWs have either a "rectangular" cross section (bottom and upper layers of equal width) or an "L-shaped" cross section (upper layer of half width). The frequency dispersion of collective spin wave excitations in the above bilayered NW arrays has been measured by the Brillouin light-scattering technique while sweeping the wave vector perpendicularly to the wire length over three Brillouin zones of the reciprocal space. For the rectangular NWs, the lowest-frequency fundamental mode, characterized by a quasiuniform profile of the amplitude of the dynamic magnetization across the NW width, exhibits a sizable and periodic frequency dispersion. A similar dispersive mode is also present in L-shaped NWs, but the mode amplitude is concentrated in the thin side of the NWs. The width and the center frequency of the magnonic band associated with the above fundamental modes have been analyzed, showing that both can be tuned by varying the external applied field. Moreover, for the L-shaped NWs it is shown that there is also a second dispersive mode, at higher frequency, characterized by an amplitude concentrated in the thick side of the NW. These experimental results have been quantitatively reproduced by an original numerical model that includes a two-dimensional Green's function description of the dipole field of the dynamic magnetization and interlayer exchange coupling between the layers.

  9. Magnetostatic dipolar domain-wall pinning in chains of permalloy triangular rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavassori, P.; Bisero, D.; Bonanni, V.; Busato, A.; Grimsditch, M.; Lebecki, K. M.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.

    2008-11-01

    In a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigated the details of the motion and pinning of domain walls in isolated and interacting permalloy triangular rings (side 2μm , width 250 nm, and thickness 25 nm). To induce interaction between the rings, they were arranged either in vertical chains with an apex of each triangle in proximity to the edge center of the triangle above it or in horizontal chains where the proximity is between the adjacent corners of the triangles. Using longitudinal and diffraction magneto-optic Kerr effects, magnetic force microscopy, and micromagnetic simulations, we determined the field dependence of the spin structure in the rings. In all cases the remnant state of each ring is an “onion” state characterized by two domain walls—one head to head the other tail to tail—pinned at the apexes. In isolated rings the magnetization reversal occurs between two onion states via the formation of an intermediate vortex state, which arises from the motion and annihilation of the two domain walls. In the case of the horizontal chains the reversal mechanism is unchanged except that the dipolar interaction affects the field range in which the rings are in the vortex state. In the case of vertical chains an additional intermediate state is observed during reversal. The new state involves a domain wall pinned at the center of the edge that is in close proximity to the apex of its neighbor. We show that the domain-wall motion in this last case can be modeled by a triple potential well. Because the new state requires that a domain wall be pinned at the neighboring apex, our observations can be viewed as a very elementary form of magnetic logic.

  10. Efficient spin transport through native oxides of nickel and permalloy with platinum and gold overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, B. L.; Manno, M.; O'Brien, L.; Lotze, J.; Weiler, M.; Bassett, D.; Mason, S. J.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Johnson, M.; Leighton, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of spin pumping detected by the inverse spin Hall effect voltage and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy in a series of metallic ferromagnet/normal metal thin film stacks. We compare heterostructures grown in situ to those where either a magnetic or nonmagnetic oxide is introduced between the two metals. The heterostructures, either nickel with a platinum overlayer (Ni/Pt) or the nickel-iron alloy permalloy (Py) with a gold overlayer (Py/Au), were also characterized in detail using grazing-incidence x-ray reflectivity, Auger electron spectroscopy, and both SQUID and alternating-gradient magnetometry. We verify the presence of oxide layers, characterize layer thickness, composition, and roughness, and probe saturation magnetization, coercivity, and anisotropy. The results show that while the presence of a nonmagnetic oxide at the interface suppresses spin transport from the ferromagnet to the nonmagnetic metal, a thin magnetic oxide (here the native oxide formed on both Py and Ni) somewhat enhances the product of the spin-mixing conductance and the spin Hall angle. We also observe clear evidence of an out-of-plane component of magnetic anisotropy in Ni/Pt samples that is enhanced in the presence of the native oxide, resulting in perpendicular exchange bias. Finally, the dc inverse spin Hall voltages generated at ferromagnetic resonance in our Py/Au samples are large, and suggest values for the spin Hall angle in gold of 0.04 <αSH<0.22 , in line with the highest values reported for Au. This is interpreted as resulting from Fe impurities. We present indirect evidence that the Au films described here indeed have significant impurity levels.

  11. Magnetostatic dipolar domain-wall pinning in chains of permalloy triangular rings.

    SciTech Connect

    Vavassori, P.; Bisero, D.; Bonanni, V.; Busato, A.; Grimsditch, M.; Lebecki, K. M.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.; Materials Science Division; CIC nanoGUNE Consolider; Univ. di Ferrara; CNR-INFM National Research Centre; Polish Academy of Science; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Cornell Univ.

    2008-01-01

    In a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigated the details of the motion and pinning of domain walls in isolated and interacting permalloy triangular rings (side 2 {micro}m, width 250 nm, and thickness 25 nm). To induce interaction between the rings, they were arranged either in vertical chains with an apex of each triangle in proximity to the edge center of the triangle above it or in horizontal chains where the proximity is between the adjacent corners of the triangles. Using longitudinal and diffraction magneto-optic Kerr effects, magnetic force microscopy, and micromagnetic simulations, we determined the field dependence of the spin structure in the rings. In all cases the remnant state of each ring is an 'onion' state characterized by two domain walls - one head to head the other tail to tail - pinned at the apexes. In isolated rings the magnetization reversal occurs between two onion states via the formation of an intermediate vortex state, which arises from the motion and annihilation of the two domain walls. In the case of the horizontal chains the reversal mechanism is unchanged except that the dipolar interaction affects the field range in which the rings are in the vortex state. In the case of vertical chains an additional intermediate state is observed during reversal. The new state involves a domain wall pinned at the center of the edge that is in close proximity to the apex of its neighbor. We show that the domain-wall motion in this last case can be modeled by a triple potential well. Because the new state requires that a domain wall be pinned at the neighboring apex, our observations can be viewed as a very elementary form of magnetic logic.

  12. Transfer of molybdenum disulfide to various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, G. C.; Pepper, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with molybdenum disulfide single crystals in contact with sputter cleaned surfaces of copper, nickel, gold, and 304 stainless steel. Transfer of the molybdenum disulfide to the metals was monitored with Auger electron spectroscopy. Results of the investigation indicate molybdenum disulfide transfers to all clean metal surfaces after a single pass over the metal surface with film thickness observed to increase with repeated passes over the same surfaces. Large particle transfer occurs when the orientation of the crystallites is other than basal. This is frequently accompanied by abrasion of the metal. Adhesion of molybdenum disulfide films occurred readily to copper and nickel, less readily to 304 stainless steel, and even less effectively to the gold, which indicates a chemical effect.

  13. Upper critical field of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical field of sintered and sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide Cu(x)Mo6S8 was measured and found to exceed the Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (1966) value for a type II superconductor characterized by dirty limit, weak isotropic electron phonon coupling, and no paramagnetic limiting. It is suggested that the enhancement results from anisotropy or clean limit or both. Other ternary molybdenum sulfides appear to show similar anomalies.

  14. High-yield fabrication of 60 nm Permalloy nanodiscs in well-defined magnetic vortex state for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiriena-Goikoetxea, M.; García-Arribas, A.; Rouco, M.; Svalov, A. V.; Barandiaran, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    Permalloy disc structures in magnetic vortex state constitute a promising new type of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. They present high saturation magnetisation and lack of remanence, which ease the remote manipulation of the particles by magnetic fields and avoid the problem of agglomeration, respectively. Importantly, they are also endowed with the capability of low-frequency magneto-mechanical actuation. This effect has already been shown to produce cancer cell destruction using functionalized discs, about 1 μm in diameter, attached to the cell membrane. Here, Permalloy nanodiscs down to 60 nm in diameter are obtained by hole-mask colloidal lithography, which is proved to be a cost-effective method for the uniform patterning of large substrate areas, with a high production yield of nanostructures. The characterisation of the magnetic behaviour of the nanodiscs, complemented with micromagnetic simulations, confirms that they present a very well defined magnetic vortex configuration, unprecedented, to our knowledge, for nanostructures of this size prepared by a high-yield method. The successful detachment of the gold-covered nanodiscs from the substrate is also demonstrated by the use of sacrificial layers.

  15. High-yield fabrication of 60 nm Permalloy nanodiscs in well-defined magnetic vortex state for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Goiriena-Goikoetxea, M; García-Arribas, A; Rouco, M; Svalov, A V; Barandiaran, J M

    2016-04-29

    Permalloy disc structures in magnetic vortex state constitute a promising new type of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. They present high saturation magnetisation and lack of remanence, which ease the remote manipulation of the particles by magnetic fields and avoid the problem of agglomeration, respectively. Importantly, they are also endowed with the capability of low-frequency magneto-mechanical actuation. This effect has already been shown to produce cancer cell destruction using functionalized discs, about 1 μm in diameter, attached to the cell membrane. Here, Permalloy nanodiscs down to 60 nm in diameter are obtained by hole-mask colloidal lithography, which is proved to be a cost-effective method for the uniform patterning of large substrate areas, with a high production yield of nanostructures. The characterisation of the magnetic behaviour of the nanodiscs, complemented with micromagnetic simulations, confirms that they present a very well defined magnetic vortex configuration, unprecedented, to our knowledge, for nanostructures of this size prepared by a high-yield method. The successful detachment of the gold-covered nanodiscs from the substrate is also demonstrated by the use of sacrificial layers. PMID:26984933

  16. Influence of Pt Doping on Gilbert Damping in Permalloy Films and Comparison with the Perpendicularly Magnetized Alloy Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Shigemi; Kubota, Takahide; Zhang, Xianmin; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Oogane, Mikihiko; Ando, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2011-10-01

    Effects of Pt doping on magnetic properties and Gilbert damping are investigated for Ni80Fe20 permalloy films to compare with damping in alloy films containing Pt with a large perpendicular anisotropy. Gilbert damping constant α and g-factor g for (Ni80Fe20)100-xPtx (x = 0-34 at. %) are evaluated from out-of-plane angular variations of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth and resonance field with an analysis based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Data of angular dependence of the FMR linewidth are fitted reasonably well by a theoretical model without having to take into account any extrinsic influences on linewidth, thereby allowing us to determine precise values of α. The α values show variation with increasing Pt concentration rising by ˜0.06 at a Pt concentration of 34 at. %, which is very close to those in perpendicularly magnetized CoCrPt and FePt film reported recently. Nevertheless, Gilbert damping rate G for the Pt doped permalloy films is smaller than those in CoCrPt and FePt films. These experimental results are discussed with a spin-orbit torque theory.

  17. Effects of copper sulfate supplement on growth, tissue concentration, and ruminal solubilities of molybdenum and copper in sheep fed low and high molybdenum diets

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan, M.; Veira, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Each of four groups of six wethers were fed one of a low molybdenum, high molybdenum, high molybdenum plus copper sulfate, or high molybdenum plus copper sulfate corn silage-based diet for ad libitum intake for 221 days. Average daily gains and ratios of feed/gain were depressed for the high molybdenum diet as compared with the low molybdenum diet suggesting molybdenum toxicity in sheep fed the high molybdenum diet. This was alleviated partly by the copper sulfate supplement. The supplement also decreased solubility of both copper and molybdenum in the rumen but had no effect on copper concentration in blood plasma. Concentration of molybdenum was higher in both liver and kidney in sheep fed high-molybdenum diets as compared with low-molybdenum diets. Copper concentration was higher in kidneys of sheep fed high-molybdenum diets, but no difference was significant in liver copper between sheep fed diets high or low in molybdenum.

  18. Molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 is catalyzed by a novel molybdenum-reducing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Rahman, M F A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a V max for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent K m for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent V max and apparent K m values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m ) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M(-1) s(-1). The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction. PMID:24724104

  19. Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 Is Catalyzed by a Novel Molybdenum-Reducing Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Shukor, M. Y.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Rahman, M. F. A.; Shamaan, N. A.; Syed, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a Vmax for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent Km for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent Vmax and apparent Km values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M−1 s−1. The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction. PMID:24724104

  20. Zinc deficiency in molybdenum poisoned cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Parada, R.

    1981-02-01

    Clinical signs ascribable to zinc deficiency were noted in a group of Friesian cows industrially poisoned with molybdenum. Zinc, copper, and molybdenum were determined in blood serum and black hair, and in the contaminated alfalfa pasture the group grazed on. Hematological parameters, and serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase activity, were also determined. Pooled samples of alfalfa from 2 uncontaminated pastures, and of blood, serum and black hair of clinically normal Friesian cattle grazing on these were used as controls. A mixed contamination of the polluted pasture with molybdenum and copper was found, both metals being inversely correlated with he distance to the polluting chimney. Zinc concentrations were normal and not significantly correlated with the distance to the chimney very high molybdenum was found in serum and hair of the poisoned animals; copper was normal in serum and hair. Low calcium and Alkaline phosphatase activity were found in serum, both variables being significantly correlated with serum zinc. Reduced red blood cell number, packed cell volumes and hemoglobin concentrations were also found, but no significant correlation of these parameters with any of the trace metals in serum or hair was found. Signs ascribed to zinc deficiency were consistent with the reduction of zinc in serum and hair and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity in serum. A zinc deficiency conditioned by a simultaneous increased intake of molybdenum and copper is proposed.

  1. Western Molybdenum Company mine, Chewelah District, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, John R.

    1954-01-01

    The Western Molybdenum Co. mine was opened many years ago to obtain copper. The only production was several carloads of crude copper ore shipped during World War I. An unsuccessful attempt to produce molybdenum was made in 1939-1941.

  2. Molybdenum scavenging by iron monosulfide.

    PubMed

    Helz, George R; Vorlicek, Trent P; Kahn, Mani D

    2004-08-15

    Molybdenum profiles in dated sediment cores provide useful historical information about anoxia in anthropogenically impacted natural waters but would be of greater service if Mo fixation mechanisms were better understood. Here, we explore Mo scavenging by precipitated FeS in a model system consisting of an FeIII-bearing kaolinite (KGa-1B) dispersed in NaHS solutions. Test solutions contain 18 microM thiomolybdates (mainly MoOS3(2-)). Optically measuring dissolved polysulfides monitors the rate of FeS production from FeIII minerals. Even though the exposed clay surface area is large (450 m2/L), the clay itself sorbs little Mo at pH 8.6. As FeS forms, Mo is taken up in initial Mo/Fe mole ratios of 0.04-0.06, irrespective of HS- concentration (4-40 mM range). After about a day, Mo expulsion from the solids begins, accompanied by net polysulfide consumption. These changes reflect recrystallization of amorphous FeS to more ordered products such as greigite. FeS captures some MoO4(2-) but captures thiomolybdates more effectively. Kaolinite accelerates conversion of MoOS3(2-) to MoS4(2-), as predicted previously, and thiomolybdates facilitate reduction of FeIII minerals in the clay compared to Mo-free solutions. FeS is a potentially effective, transient scavenging agent for Mo in sulfidic environments, although FeS2 and organic matter appear to be the ultimate sedimentary hosts. PMID:15382851

  3. Effect of molybdenum treatment on molybdenum concentration and nitrate reduction in maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Béla; Puskás-Preszner, Anita; Huzsvai, László; Lévai, László; Bódi, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Since 1940 molybdenum has been known as an essential trace element in plant nutrition and physiology. It has a central role in nitrogen metabolism, and its deficiency leads to nitrate accumulation in plants. In this study, we cultivated maize seedlings (Zea mays L. cv. Norma SC) in nutrient solution and soil (rhizoboxes) to investigate the effect of molybdenum treatment on the absorption of molybdenum, sulfur and iron. These elements have been previously shown to play important roles in nitrate reduction, because they are necessary for the function of the nitrate reductase enzyme. We also investigated the relationship between molybdenum treatments and different nitrogen forms in maize. Molybdenum treatments were 0, 0.96, 9.6 and 96 μg kg(-1) in the nutrition solution experiments, and 0, 30, 90, 270 mg kg(-1) in the rhizobox experiments. On the basis of our results, the increased Mo level produced higher plant available Mo concentration in nutrient solution and in soil, which resulted increased concentration of Mo in shoots and roots of maize seedlings. In addition it was observed that maize seedlings accumulated more molybdenum in their roots than in their shoots at all treatments. In contrast, molybdenum treatments did not affect significantly either iron or sulfur concentrations in the plant, even if these elements (Mo, S and Fe) play alike important roles in nitrogen metabolism. Furthermore, the physiological molybdenum level (1× Mo = 0.01 μM) reduced NO3-N and enhanced the NH4-N concentrations in seedlings, suggesting that nitrate reduction was more intense under a well-balanced molybdenum supply. PMID:26226599

  4. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  5. Pre-treatment for molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy articles to be plated

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Ralph R.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a method for etching a molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy surface to promote the formation of an adherent bond with a subsequently deposited metallic plating. In a typical application, the method is used as a pre-treatment for surfaces to be electrolessly plated with nickel. The pre-treatment comprises exposing the crystal boundaries of the surface by (a) anodizing the surface in acidic solution to form a continuous film of gray molybdenum oxide thereon and (b) removing the film.

  6. Effect of using stencil masks made by focused ion beam milling on permalloy (Ni81Fe19) nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bates, J R; Miyahara, Y; Burgess, J A J; Iglesias-Freire, O; Grütter, P

    2013-03-22

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling is a common fabrication technique to make nanostencil masks which has the unintended consequence of gallium ion implantation surrounding milled features in silicon nitride membranes. We observe major changes in film structure, chemical composition, and magnetic behaviour of permalloy nanostructures deposited by electron beam evaporation using silicon nitride stencil masks made by a FIB as compared to stencil masks made by regular lithography techniques. We characterize the stenciled structures and both types of masks using transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, magnetic force microscopy and kelvin probe force microscopy. All these techniques demonstrate distinct differences at a length scale of a 1-100 nm for the structures made using stencil mask fabricated using a FIB. The origin of these differences seems to be related to the presence of implanted ions, a detailed understanding of the mechanism however remains to be developed. PMID:23449320

  7. Evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys. [Reactor core heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is critically examined. Pure molybdenum's high ductile-brittle transition temperature appears to be its major disadvantage. The candidate materials examined in detail for this application include low carbon arc-cast molybdenum, TZM-molybdenum alloy, and molybdenum-rhenium alloys. Published engineering properties are collected and compared, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15% rhenium offer the best combination. Hardware is presently being made from electron beam melted Mo-13Re to test this conclusion.

  8. Molybdenum silicide based materials and their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Z.; Stiglich, J.; Sudarshan, T.S.

    1999-06-01

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is a promising candidate material for high temperature structural applications. It is a high melting point (2030 C) material with excellent oxidation resistance and a moderate density (6.24 g/cm{sup 3}). However, low toughness at low temperatures and high creep rates at elevated temperatures have hindered its commercialization in structural applications. Much effort has been invested in MoSi{sub 2} composites as alternatives to pure molybdenum disilicide for oxidizing and aggressive environments. Molybdenum disilicide-based heating elements have been used extensively in high-temperature furnaces. The low electrical resistance of silicides in combination with high thermal stability, electron-migration resistance, and excellent diffusion-barrier characteristics is important for microelectronic applications. Projected applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include turbine airfoils, combustion chamber components in oxidizing environments, missile nozzles, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing. On this paper, synthesis, fabrication, and properties of the monolithic and composite molybdenum silicides are reviewed.

  9. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment–theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 1013 cm−2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices. PMID:25695374

  10. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  11. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10(13) cm(-2) is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices. PMID:25695374

  12. Molybdenum oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film comprising molybdenum oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  13. Post-Irradiation Fracture Toughness of Unalloyed Molybdenum, ODS molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum following irradiation at 244C to 507C

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available unalloyed molybdenum (Low Carbon Arc Cast (LCAC)), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum were neutron irradiated at temperatures of nominally 244 C, 407 C, and 509 C to neutron fluences between 1.0 to 4.6x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV). Post-irradiation fracture toughness testing was performed. All alloys exhibited a Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature that was defined to occur at 30 4 MPa-m1/2. The highest post-irradiated fracture toughness values (26-107 MPa-m1/2) and lowest DBTT (100-150 C) was observed for ODS molybdenum in the L-T orientation. The finer grain size for ODS molybdenum results in fine laminates that improve the ductile laminate toughening. The results for ODS molybdenum are anisotropic with lower post-irradiated toughness values (20-30 MPa-m1/2) and higher DBTT (450-600 C) in the T-L orientation. The results for T-L ODS molybdenum are consistent or slightly better than those for LCAC molybdenum (21-71 MPa-m1/2 and 450-800 C DBTT). The fracture toughness values measured for LCAC and T-L ODS molybdenum at temperatures below the DBTT were determined to be 8-18 MPa-m1/2. Lower non-irradiated fracture toughness values were measured for TZM molybdenum that are attributed to the large carbide precipitates serving as preferential fracture initiation sites. The role of microstructure and grain size on post-irradiated fracture toughness was evaluated by comparing the results for LCAC molybdenum and ODS molybdenum.

  14. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. R.; Bakar, N. A.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Johari, W. L. W.; Ahmad, S. A.; Jirangon, H.; Syed, M. A.; Shukor, M. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr−1, 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution. PMID:24369531

  15. Biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor and the molybdenum cofactor in Klebsiella pneumoniae: effect of sulfur source.

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, R A; Imperial, J; Shah, V K; Brill, W J

    1985-01-01

    NifQ- and Mol- mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae show an elevated molybdenum requirement for nitrogen fixation. Substitution of cystine for sulfate as the sulfur source in the medium reduced the molybdenum requirement of these mutants to levels required by the wild type. Cystine also increased the intracellular molybdenum accumulation of NifQ- and Mol- mutants. Cystine did not affect the molybdenum requirement or accumulation in wild-type K. pneumoniae. Sulfate transport and metabolism in K. pneumoniae were repressed by cystine. However, the effect of cystine on the molybdenum requirement could not be explained by an interaction between sulfate and molybdate at the transport level. Cystine increased the molybdenum requirement of Mol- mutants for nitrate reductase activity by at least 100-fold. Cystine had the same effect on the molybdenum requirement for nitrate reductase activity in Escherichia coli ChlD- mutants. This shows that cystine does not have a generalized effect on molybdenum metabolism. Millimolar concentrations of molybdate inhibited nitrogenase and nitrate reductase derepression with sulfate as the sulfur source, but not with cystine. The inhibition was the result of a specific antagonism of sulfate metabolism by molybdate. The effects of nifQ and mol mutations on nitrogenase could be suppressed either by the addition of cystine or by high concentrations of molybdate. This suggests that a sulfur donor and molybdenum interact at an early step in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor. This interaction might occur nonenzymatically when the levels of the reactants are high. PMID:3905765

  16. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  17. Critical currents in sputtered copper molybdenum sulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Kammerdiner, L.; Luo, H.-L.

    1977-01-01

    Critical currents in a sputtered Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide have been measured at 4.2 K as a function of applied magnetic field. Self-field critical-current values up to 10 to the 9th A/sq m were found, decreasing to 10 to the 8th A/sq m at 3 T. Graphs of pinning forces versus field were found to be independent of field direction, and the pinning mechanism is sample independent. Critical-current densities for sputtered lead molybdenum sulphide are estimated to be about 10 to the 8th A/sq m at 26 T based on a scaling law for pinning.

  18. Alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Study of some of the physicochemical properties of compounds obtained by subjecting natural molybdenite and single crystals of molybdenum disulfide grown by chemical vapor transport to intercalation with the alkali group of metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Reported data and results include: (1) the intercalation of the entire alkali metal group, (2) stoichiometries and X-ray data on all of the compounds, and (3) superconductivity data for all the intercalation compounds.

  19. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  20. New slow-releasing molybdenum fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Siladitya; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Ghosh, Kunal; Varadachari, Chandrika

    2008-02-27

    This paper describes a new water-insoluble molybdenum compound that has been developed as a slow-release fertilizer. The compound is an inorganic polymer formed by inclusion of molybdenum within a long-chain polyphosphate structure. It was designed by a process of "reverse engineering" of the molecule. Synthesis involved reaction of phosphoric acid with magnesium oxide, molybdenum trioxide, and sodium carbonate at 275 degrees C. Kinetics of reaction revealed complex multistage processes. X-ray diffraction patterns showed a crystalline nature with short-range as well as long-range ordering. The magnesium sodium polymolybdophosphate had ideal slow-release characteristics; it had low water solubility and high citrate solubility and was powdery, free flowing, and nonhygroscopic. Field testing showed an 80% increase in yield of green gram at a low dose of 0.04 kg/ha Mo. Nodulation increased by over 161%, and N content of gram increased by 20%. The slow-release fertilizer would provide an effective, low-cost, and environmentaly friendly alternative to Mo fertilization. PMID:18247562

  1. Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Daniel L.; Pedrazas, Nicholas A.; Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2013-11-01

    A new abnormal grain growth phenomenon that occurs only during continuous plastic straining, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed in molybdenum (Mo) at elevated temperature. DAGG was produced in two commercial-purity molybdenum sheets and in a commercial-purity molybdenum wire. Single crystals, centimeters in length, were created in these materials through the DAGG process. DAGG was observed only at temperatures of 1713 K (1440 °C) and above and occurred across the range of strain rates investigated, ~10-5 to 10-4 s-1. DAGG initiates only after a critical plastic strain, which decreases with increasing temperature but is insensitive to strain rate. Following initiation of an abnormal grain, the rate of boundary migration during DAGG is on the order of 10 mm/min. This rapid growth provides a convenient means of producing large single crystals in the solid state. When significant normal grain growth occurs prior to DAGG, island grains result. DAGG was observed in sheet materials with two very different primary recrystallization textures. DAGG grains in Mo favor boundary growth along the tensile axis in a <110> direction, preferentially producing single crystals with orientations from an approximately <110> fiber family of orientations. A mechanism of boundary unpinning is proposed to explain the dependence of boundary migration on plastic straining during DAGG.

  2. A solvent extraction study of molybdenum chloride and molybdenum thiocyanate complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Lillie, E.G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of reducing agents on molybdenum(VI) solutions in hydrochloric acid was studied by a solvent extraction technique to elucidate the composition of the colored molybdenum thiocyanate complex. Neither copper(I) chloride nor ascorbic acid have any effect on the extraction of MoO2Cl2; it is inferred that tin(II) chloride reduces Mo(VI) stepwise to a polynuclear Mo(V)??Mo(VI) complex and then to Mo(V). The colored thiocyanate complex produced by copper(I) and by ascorbic acid differs only slightly in extraction characteristics from the uncolored Mo(VI) complex. It is suggested that the color may be produced by an isomerization reaction of MoO2(SCN)2, and thus that the colored species may be a hexavalent rather than pentavalent molybdenum complex. ?? 1974.

  3. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Yenjai, Sudarat; Malaikaew, Pinpinat; Liwporncharoenvong, Teerayuth; Buranaprapuk, Apinya

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No need of reducing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of {approx}23, {approx}19 and {approx}16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) was incubated at 37 Degree-Sign C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 Degree-Sign C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein

  4. High-Strength Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Permalloy Nanoparticle/Poly(vinyl alcohol) Multifunctional Nanocomposite Fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gengheng; Wang, Yi-Qi; Byun, Joon-Hyung; Yi, Jin-Woo; Yoon, Sang-Su; Cha, Hwa-Jin; Lee, Jea-Uk; Oh, Youngseok; Jung, Byung-Mun; Moon, Ho-Jun; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-11-24

    Magnetic nanocomposite fibers are a topic of intense research due to their potential breakthrough applications such as smart magnetic-field-response devices and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. However, clustering of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix is a recognized challenge for obtaining a property-controllable nanocomposite fiber. Another challenge is that the strength and ductility of the nanocomposite fiber decrease significantly with increased weight loading of magnetic nanoparticles in the fiber. Here, we report high-strength single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/permalloy nanoparticle (PNP)/poly(vinyl alcohol) multifunctional nanocomposite fibers fabricated by wet spinning. The weight loadings of SWNTs and PNPs in the fiber were as high as 12.0 and 38.0%, respectively. The tensile strength of the fiber was as high as 700 MPa, and electrical conductivity reached 96.7 S m(-1). The saturation magnetization (Ms) was as high as 24.8 emu g(-1). The EMI attenuation of a fabric woven from the prepared fiber approached 100% when tested with electromagnetic waves with a frequency higher than 6 GHz. The present study demonstrates that a magnetic-field-response device can be designed using the fabricated multifunctional nanocomposite fiber. PMID:26431310

  5. High performance tunable slow wave elements enabled with nano-patterned permalloy thin film for compact radio frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid Rahman, B. M.; Divan, Ralu; Zhang, Hanqiao; Rosenmann, Daniel; Peng, Yujia; Wang, Xuehe; Wang, Guoan

    2014-05-01

    Slow wave elements are promising structures to design compact RF (radio frequency) and mmwave components. This paper reports a comparative study on different types of coplanar wave-guide (CPW) slow wave structures (SWS). New techniques including the use of defected ground structure and the different signal conductor shape have been implemented to achieve higher slow wave effect with comparative loss. Results show that over 42% and 35% reduction in length is reported in the expense of only 0.3 dB and 0.1 dB insertion loss, respectively, which can end up with 66% and 58% area reduction for the design of a branch line coupler. Implementation of the sub micrometer patterned Permalloy (Py) thin film on top of the simple SWS has been demonstrated for the first time to increase the slow wave effect. Comparing with the traditional slow wave structure, with 100 nm thick Py patterns, the inductance per unit length of the SWS has been increased from 879 nH/m to 963 nH/m. The slow wave effect of the designed structure is also tunable by applied DC current. Measured results have shown that the phase shift can be changed from 94° to 90.5° by applying 150 mA DC current. This provides a solution in designing RF passive components which can work in multiple frequency bands.

  6. Sub-nanosecond resolution x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy of magnetization processes in a permalloy ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeb, D.; Krasyuk, A.; Oelsner, A.; Nepijko, S. A.; Elmers, H. J.; Kuksov, A.; Schneider, C. M.; Schönhense, G.

    2005-04-01

    Fast magnetization processes in a microstructured permalloy ring with 80 µm o.d. and 30 nm thickness have been observed by photoemission electron microscopy exploiting x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the magnetic contrast mechanism. As a high speed probe we employed synchrotron radiation pulses at the ESRF (Grenoble) operated in 16-bunch mode, yielding photon pulses of 105 ps FWHM with a period of 176 ns. Fast magnetic field pulses have been generated by means of current pulses through coplanar waveguides with the magnetic structure being lithographically prepared on their surface. A stroboscopic pump-probe set-up with a variable time delay between the field pulse and photon pulse allowed us to take snapshots of the dynamic response of the magnetic domain structure. We observed coherent magnetization rotation during the leading edge part of the field pulse, the formation of a characteristic domain pattern ('onion state') in the plateau region of the pulse and the fast formation of a striped domain pattern (incoherent magnetization rotation) during the trailing edge part of the field pulse. A numerical simulation confirmed essential features of the stroboscopic image series.

  7. Using permalloy based planar hall effect sensors to capture and detect superparamagnetic beads for lab on a chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volmer, Marius; Avram, Marioara

    2015-05-01

    Experimental studies have been carried out on planar Hall effect (PHE) sensors used to detect magnetic nanoparticles employed as labels for biodetection applications. Disk shaped sensors, 1 mm diameter, were structured on Permalloy film, 20 nm thick. To control the sensor magnetisation state and thus the field sensitivity and linearity, a DC biasing field has been applied parallel to the driving current. Maghemite nanoparticles (10 nm) functionalised with Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 were immobilised over the sensor surface using particular magnetisation state and applied magnetic fields. In order to obtain a higher response from the magnetic nanoparticles, it was used a detection setup which allows the application of magnetic fields larger than 100 Oe but avoiding saturation of the PHE signal. Based on this setup, two field scanning methods are presented in this paper. During our experiments, low magnetic moments, of about 1.87×10-5 emu, have been easily detected. This value corresponds to a mass of 9.35 μg of maghemite nanoparticles functionalised with PEG 6000. The results suggest that this type of structure is feasible for building low cost micrometer sized PHE sensors to be used for high-resolution bio sensing applications.

  8. Nickel-zinc ferrite/permalloy (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4/Ni-Fe) soft magnetic nanocomposites fabricated by electro-infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao; Kelly, Stefan J.; Andrew, Jennifer S.; Arnold, David P.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetically soft NiZn ferrite (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) nanoparticles are embedded within a permalloy (Ni-Fe) matrix via an electro-infiltration process as thin films intended for use as on-chip inductor cores in the MHz frequency regime. A layer of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles is first deposited, and then permalloy is electroplated through the voids to encapsulate the particles and form three-dimensional ferrite/alloy nanocomposites. The composites are estimated to contain 37% ferrite by volume and exhibit a relative permeability of ˜320, a saturation of ˜1.15 T, and an operational bandwidth of 93 MHz. Compared to a permalloy thin film of similar thickness, the nanocomposite exhibits 39% higher electrical resistivity and 50% higher bandwidth.

  9. Predicting Boron, Molybdenum, Selenium, and Arsenic Adsorption in Soil Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A chemical surface complexation model was applied to boron, molybdenum, selenium, and arsenic adsorption on up to 49 soils selected for variation in soil properties. The surface complexation model was able to fit boron, molybdenum, selenite, and arsenate adsorption on the soils. General regression...

  10. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  11. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-04-29

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities.

  12. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  13. Normal state properties of the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    By making a large number of normal state and superconducting properties measurements, all on the same ternary molybdenum sulfide samples, we obtain values for Fermi surface and superconducting parameters. From these we conclude that sputtered ternary molybdenum sulfides are not completely in the dirty superconductor limit, and that they are d-band metals with a high electron carrier density.

  14. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  15. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  16. Molybdenum oxide nanocubes: Synthesis and characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Muthamizh, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Manigandan, R.; Kumar, S. Praveen; Munusamy, S.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2015-06-24

    Molybdenum oxide nanoparticles were prepared by Solid state synthesis. The MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by using commercially available ammonium heptamolybdate. The XRD pattern reveals that the synthesized MoO{sub 3} has orthorhombic structure. In addition, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD data. The Raman analysis confirm the presence of Mo-O in MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles. DRS-UV analysis shows that MoO{sub 3} has a band gap of 2.89 eV. FE-SEM analysis confirms the material morphology in cubes with nano scale.

  17. Strong vortex core pinning and Barkhausen-free magnetization response in thin Permalloy disks induced by implantation of 1 × 10{sup 4} Ga{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fani Sani, F. E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca; Losby, J. E.; Diao, Z.; Parsons, L. C.; Burgess, J. A. J.; Hiebert, W. K.; Freeman, M. R. E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca; Vick, D.

    2014-05-07

    Artificial vortex core pinning sites are induced in thin Permalloy disks by point exposure to as few as 10 000 ions from a focused Ga{sup +} beam. These pinning sites yield a first-order change in the magnetization response of the disk. A single site can keep the vortex core pinned over an applied field range comparable to the vortex annihilation field of the unaltered disk. Several widely separated sites can work together to keep the core pinned in one place, while the Barkhausen effect is eliminated from the magnetization curve over a range approaching the saturation moment of the disk.

  18. Strong vortex core pinning and Barkhausen-free magnetization response in thin Permalloy disks induced by implantation of 1 × 104 Ga+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani Sani, F.; Losby, J. E.; Diao, Z.; Parsons, L. C.; Burgess, J. A. J.; Vick, D.; Hiebert, W. K.; Freeman, M. R.

    2014-05-01

    Artificial vortex core pinning sites are induced in thin Permalloy disks by point exposure to as few as 10 000 ions from a focused Ga+ beam. These pinning sites yield a first-order change in the magnetization response of the disk. A single site can keep the vortex core pinned over an applied field range comparable to the vortex annihilation field of the unaltered disk. Several widely separated sites can work together to keep the core pinned in one place, while the Barkhausen effect is eliminated from the magnetization curve over a range approaching the saturation moment of the disk.

  19. Biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor and the molybdenum cofactor in Klebsiella pneumoniae: effect of sulfur source

    SciTech Connect

    Ugalde, R.A.; Imperial, J.; Shah, V.K.; Brill, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    NifQ/sup -/ and Mol/sup -/ mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae show an elevated molybdenum requirement for nitrogen fixation. Substitution of cystine for sulfate as the sulfur source in the medium reduced the molybdenum requirement of these mutants to levels required by the wild type. Cystine also increased the intracellular molybdenum accumulation of NifQ/sup -/ and Mol/sup -/ mutants. Cystine did not affect the molybdenum requirement or accumulation in wild-type K. pneumoniae. Sulfate transport and metabolism in K. pneumoniae were repressed by cystine. However, the effect of cystine on the molybdenum requirement could not be explained by an interaction between sulfate and molybdate at the transport level. The data show that cystine does not have a generalized effect on molybdenum metabolism. Millimolar concentrations of molybdate inhibited nitrogenase and nitrate reductase derepression with sulfate as the sulfur source, but not with cystine. The inhibition was the result of a specific antagonism of sulfate metabolism by molybdate. This study suggests that a sulfur donor and molybdenum interact at an early step in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor. This interaction might occur nonenzymatically when the levels of the reactants are high.

  20. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

    1999-02-02

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi{sub 2} heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for structural integrity. 7 figs.

  1. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Mitchell K.; Akinc, Mufit

    1999-02-02

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi.sub.2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 for structural integrity.

  2. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  3. Chill block melt spinning of nickel-molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemker, Kevin J.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of Ni-Mo alloys ranging in composition from pure nickel to Ni-40 at. pct molybdenum were cast by the chill block melt-spinning rapid solidification technique and examined by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. Casting difficulties were encountered with lean alloys, but richer alloys spread more readily on the casting wheel. Alloy microstructures for 5 to 37.5 at. pct molybdenum ribbons were primarily cellular/dendritic; microstructure feature size decreased with increasing molybdenum content. Extended solubility of molybdenum in gamma-nickel, with fcc lattice parameter increasing with composition to the 1.05 power, was observed up to 37/5 at. pct molybdenum. Substoichiometric Ni-Mo (delta) nucleated on the wheel side of the ribbons of compositions 35, 37.5, and 40 at. pct molybdenum. The amount of partitionless delta-phase thus formed increased with increasing molybdenum content and quench rate. This substoichiometric delta transformed readily to a fine structure gamma-delta mixture.

  4. Spreading of liquid Silver and Silver-Molybdenum alloys on molybdenum substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Nicole; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2002-08-01

    The spreading of liquid Ag and Ag-Mo alloys on molybdenum substrates has been studied using a drop-transfer setup. Even though initial spreading velocities as fast as {approx}1 m/s have been recorded in some experiments, a large variation in the spreading dynamics has been observed, and there is no unique relationship between the contact angle and the spreading velocity. This can be attributed to the formation of ridges at the triple junction, the movement of which controls spreading. The fastest spreading rates are consistent with results reported for low temperature liquids; these can be described using a molecular-kinetic model. Spreading kinetics and final contact angles were similar for pure silver and silver-molybdenum liquids.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of molybdenum oxide using bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido) molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuch, Adam Sundaram, Ganesh

    2014-01-15

    Molybdenum trioxide films have been deposited using thermal atomic layer deposition techniques with bis(tert-butylimido)bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum. Films were deposited at temperatures from 100 to 300 °C using ozone as the oxidant for the process. The Mo precursor was evaluated for thermal stability and volatility using thermogravimetric analysis and static vapor pressure measurements. Film properties were evaluated with ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and secondary electron microscopy. The growth rate per cycle was determined to extend from 0.3 to 2.4 Å/cycle with <4% nonuniformity (1-sigma) with-in-wafer across a 150 mm wafer for the investigated temperature range.

  6. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  7. The extended family of hexagonal molybdenum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hartl, Monika; Daemen, Luke; Lunk, J H; Hartl, H; Frisk, A T; Shendervich, I; Mauder, D; Feist, M; Eckelt, R

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 40 years, a large number of isostructural compounds in the system MoO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O have been published. The reported molecular formulae of 'hexagonal molybdenum oxide' (HEMO) varied from MoO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.33NH{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O (0.09 {le} n {le} 0.69) to MoO{sub 3} {center_dot} mNH{sub 3} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O (0.09 {le} m {le} 0.20; 0.18 {le} n {le} 0.60). Samples, prepared by the acidification route, were investigated using thermal analysis coupled on-line to a mass spectrometer for evolved gas analysis; X-ray powder diffraction; Fourier Transform Infrared, Raman and Magic-Angle-Spinning {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy; Incoherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering. The X-ray study of a selected monocrystal confirmed the presence of the well-known framework of edge-sharing MoO{sub 6} octahedra: Space group P6{sub 3}/m, a = 10.527(1), c =3.7245(7) {angstrom}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}. The structure of the synthesized samples can best be described by the structural formula (NH{sub 4})[Mo{sub x}{open_square}{sub 1/2+p/2}(O{sub 3x + 1/2-p/2})(OH){sub p}] {center_dot} yH{sub 2}O (x 5.9-7.1; p {approx} 0.1; y = 1.2-2.6), which is consistent with the existence of one vacancy for 12-15 molybdenum sites. The 'chimie douce' reaction of MoO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.155NH{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.440H{sub 2}O with a 1:1 mixture of NO/NO{sub 2} at 100 C resulted in the synthesis of MoO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.539H{sub 2}O. Tailored nano-sized molybdenum powders can be produced using HEMO as precursor.

  8. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  9. Pterin chemistry and its relationship to the molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Partha; Burgmayer, Sharon J.N.

    2011-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor is composed of a molybdenum coordinated by one or two rather complicated ligands known as either molybdopterin or pyranopterin. Pterin is one of a large family of bicyclic N-heterocycles called pteridines. Such molecules are widely found in Nature, having various forms to perform a variety of biological functions. This article describes the basic nomenclature of pterin, their biological roles, structure, chemical synthesis and redox reactivity. In addition, the biosynthesis of pterins and current models of the molybdenum cofactor are discussed. PMID:21607119

  10. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FROM URANIUM/MOLYBDENUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R; Ann Visser, A; James Laurinat, J

    2007-10-15

    The Savannah River Site will recycle a nuclear fuel comprised of 90% uranium-10% molybdenum by weight. The process flowsheet calls for dissolution of the material in nitric acid to a uranium concentration of 15-20 g/L without the formation of precipitates. The dissolution will be followed by separation of uranium from molybdenum using solvent extraction with 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin. Testing with the fuel validated dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature. Batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed for the extraction, strip and wash stages with particular focus on the distribution of molybdenum.

  11. Carbonization behavior of pitches containing fine molybdenum particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Atsushi; Wang, Xiangsheng; Kabe, Toshiaki . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Shono, Hiroaki . Mineral Fiber Research Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    In the carbonization of coal tar pitch and naphthalene pitch containing fine molybdenum particles, it was found by using a tritium tracer method that the fine molybdenum particles added into pitch in advance can selectively catalyze the dehydrogenation and polycondensation of saturated hydrocarbons below 700 C, and thereby the carbonization yield of coal tar pitch containing partially saturated structures or aliphatic side chains in its component molecules increased. Further, it could be inferred that the fine molybdenum particles mainly accelerate the release of the hydrogen which is difficult to isotopically exchange with water in the preparation of tritiated pitch in the presence of Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3].

  12. Superconducting properties of evaporated copper molybdenum sulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of copper molybdenum sulfide were produced by coevaporation. Those that were superconducting contained only the ternary compound and free molybdenum. The range of copper content in the ternary compound was as large as that in polycrystalline material, that is, it includes either phase alone, or a mixture of the two phases of this material. This is in contrast with sputtered materials where copper concentration has been limited to a narrower range. The upper critical field and the critical current were measured as functions of external magnetic field, and found to be similar to those of sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide, when the comparison was made for samples having the same amount of copper.

  13. Pressure-induced metallization of molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Zhang, Haidong; Goncharov, Alexander F; Lobanov, Sergey S; Kagayama, Tomoko; Sakata, Masafumi; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-07-18

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements of molybdenum disulfide MoS(2) are performed at pressures up to 81 GPa in diamond anvil cells. Above 20 GPa, we find discontinuous changes in Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns which provide evidence for isostructural phase transition from 2H(c) to 2H(a) modification through layer sliding previously predicted theoretically. This first-order transition, which is completed around 40 GPa, is characterized by a collapse in the c-lattice parameter and volume and also by changes in interlayer bonding. After the phase transition completion, MoS(2) becomes metallic. The reversibility of the phase transition is identified from all these techniques. PMID:25083660

  14. Molybdenum Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.

    2012-08-01

    Peterson (2011) has analyzed HST spectra near 2000Å of five metal-poor turnoff stars with mild enhancements of heavy r-process elements. Two stars, HD 94028 and HD 160617, are unique in showing an extreme overabundance of the light trans-ironic element molybdenum (Z = 42), but less extreme enhancements of Zr (Z = 40) and Ru (Z = 44). Of several nucleosynthesis scenarios that can produce nuclei in this mass range in the oldest stars, a high-entropy wind (HEW) acting in a core-collapse supernova seems uniquely capable of a high overproduction confined to a narrow mass range. That this unusual elemental distribution is achieved only under very limited physical conditions suggests that very few individual nucleosynthesis events were responsible for the synthesis of the light trans-ironic elements in these stars, even though both are only moderately metal-poor.

  15. Ultrafast response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haining; Zhang, Changjian; Chan, Weimin; Tiwari, Sandip; Rana, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    The strong light emission and absorption exhibited by single atomic layer transitional metal dichalcogenides in the visible to near-infrared wavelength range make them attractive for optoelectronic applications. In this work, using two-pulse photovoltage correlation technique, we show that monolayer molybdenum disulfide photodetector can have intrinsic response times as short as 3 ps implying photodetection bandwidths as wide as 300 GHz. The fast photodetector response is a result of the short electron–hole and exciton lifetimes in this material. Recombination of photoexcited carriers in most two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides is dominated by nonradiative processes, most notable among which is Auger scattering. The fast response time, and the ease of fabrication of these devices, make them interesting for low-cost ultrafast optical communication links. PMID:26572726

  16. Advances in rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.; Stiles, J. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    The lithium molybdenum disulfide system as demonstrated in a C size cell, offers performance characteristics for applications where light weight and low volume are important. A gravimetric energy density of 90 watt hours per kilogram can be achieved in a C size cell package. The combination of charge retention capabilities, high energy density and a state of charge indicator in a rechargeable cell provides power package for a wide range of devices. The system overcomes the memory effect in Nicads where the full capacity of the battery cannot be utilized unless it was utilized on previous cycles. The development of cells with an advanced electrolyte formulation led to an improved rate capability especially at low temperatures and to a significantly improved life cycle.

  17. Environmental behavior of two molybdenum porphyry systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Wanty, R.B.; Berger, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    Our study focuses on the geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of a variety of molybdenum (Mo) porphyry systems. The systems are either high fluorine, granite, Climax-type, systems (e.g. Mount Emmons/ Redwell Mo deposit, Colorado and Questa Mo deposit, New Mexico) or low fluorine granodiorite systems (e.g. Buckingham Stockwork Mo deposit, Battle Mountain, Nevada and Cannivan Gulch Mo deposit, Montana). The water quality of streams, natural springs, mine discharge, and ground water from drill holes were assessed in the region of these deposits. The ultimate goal of our study is to understand the environmental behavior of these Mo porphyry systems in the context of geologic setting, hydrologic regime, and climate.

  18. A terminal molybdenum arsenide complex synthesized from yellow arsenic.

    PubMed

    Curley, John J; Piro, Nicholas A; Cummins, Christopher C

    2009-10-19

    A terminal molybdenum arsenide complex is synthesized in one step from the reactive As(4) molecule. The properties of this complex with its arsenic atom ligand are discussed in relation to the analogous nitride and phosphide complexes. PMID:19764796

  19. Improved molybdenum disulfide-silver motor brushes have extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, J. C.; King, H. M.

    1964-01-01

    Motor brushes of proper quantities of molybdenum disulfide and copper or silver are manufactured by sintering techniques. Graphite molds are used. These brushes operate satisfactorily for long periods in normal atmosphere or in a high-vacuum environment.

  20. Modeling of Oxidation of Molybdenum Particles during Plasma Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, James Russell; Wan, Y. P.; Jiang, X. Y.; Sampath, S.; Prasad, V.; Herman, H.

    2001-06-01

    An oxidation model for molybdenum particles during the plasma spray deposition process is presented. Based on a well-verified model for plasma chemistry and the heating and phase change of particles in a plasma plume, this model accounts for the oxidant diffusion around the surface of particles or splats, oxidation on the surface, as well as oxygen diffusion in molten molybdenum. Calculations are performed for a single molybdenum particle sprayed under Metco-9MB spraying conditions. The oxidation features of particles during the flight are compared with those during the deposition. The result shows the dominance of oxidation of a molybdenum particle during the flight, as well as during deposition when the substrate temperature is high (above 400 °C).

  1. High Molybdenum availability for evolution in a Mesoproterozoic lacustrine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, John; Spinks, Samuel; Andrews, Steven; Thayalan, Wanethon; Bowden, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Trace metal data for Proterozoic marine euxinic sediments imply that the expansion of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and diversification of eukaryotes were delayed while the availability of bioessential metals such as molybdenum in the ocean was limited. However, there is increasing recognition that the Mesoproterozoic evolution of nitrogen fixation and eukaryotic life may have been promoted in marginal marine and terrestrial environments, including lakes, rather than in the deep ocean. Molybdenum availability is critical to life in lakes, just as it is in the oceans. It is, therefore, important to assess molybdenum availability to the lacustrine environment in the Mesoproterozoic. Here we show that the flux of molybdenum to a Mesoproterozoic lake was 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than typical fluxes in the modern and ancient marine environment. Thus, there was no barrier to availability to prevent evolution in the terrestrial environment, in contrast to the nutrient-limited Mesoproterozoic oceans.

  2. Molybdenum-UO2 cermet irradiation at 1145 K.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.

    1971-01-01

    Two molybdenum-uranium dioxide cermet fuel pins with molybdenum clad were fission-heated in a forced-convection helium coolant for sufficient time to achieve 5.3% burnup. The cermet core contained 20 wt % of 93.2% enriched uranium dioxide. The results were as follows: there was no visible change in the appearance of the molybdenum clad during irradiation; the maximum increase in diameter of the fuel pins was 0.8%; there was no migration of uranium dioxide along grain boundaries and no evident interaction between molybdenum and uranium dioxide; and, finally, approximately 12% of the fission gas formed was released from the cermet core into the gas plenum.

  3. Synthesis of Dinitrogen and Dihydrogen Complexes of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Leonard J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents background information, safety notes, and laboratory procedures for synthesizing dinitrogen and dihydrogen complexes of molybdenum. The one-step method described is suitable for advanced inorganic chemistry classes. (SK)

  4. Electroplating and stripping copper on molybdenum and niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Molybdenum and niobium are often electroplated and subsequently stripped of copper. Since general standard plating techniques produce poor quality coatings, general procedures have been optimized and specified to give good results.

  5. High Molybdenum availability for evolution in a Mesoproterozoic lacustrine environment.

    PubMed

    Parnell, John; Spinks, Samuel; Andrews, Steven; Thayalan, Wanethon; Bowden, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Trace metal data for Proterozoic marine euxinic sediments imply that the expansion of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and diversification of eukaryotes were delayed while the availability of bioessential metals such as molybdenum in the ocean was limited. However, there is increasing recognition that the Mesoproterozoic evolution of nitrogen fixation and eukaryotic life may have been promoted in marginal marine and terrestrial environments, including lakes, rather than in the deep ocean. Molybdenum availability is critical to life in lakes, just as it is in the oceans. It is, therefore, important to assess molybdenum availability to the lacustrine environment in the Mesoproterozoic. Here we show that the flux of molybdenum to a Mesoproterozoic lake was 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than typical fluxes in the modern and ancient marine environment. Thus, there was no barrier to availability to prevent evolution in the terrestrial environment, in contrast to the nutrient-limited Mesoproterozoic oceans. PMID:25988499

  6. Molybdenum-A Key Component of Metal Alloys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum, whose chemical symbol is Mo, was first recognized as an element in 1778. Until that time, the mineral molybdenite-the most important source of molybdenum-was believed to be a lead mineral because of its metallic gray color, greasy feel, and softness. In the late 19th century, French metallurgists discovered that molybdenum, when alloyed (mixed) with steel in small quantities, creates a substance that is remarkably tougher than steel alone and is highly resistant to heat. The alloy was found to be ideal for making tools and armor plate. Today, the most common use of molybdenum is as an alloying agent in stainless steel, alloy steels, and superalloys to enhance hardness, strength, and resistance to corrosion.

  7. Oxidation characteristics of molybdenum-zirconium oxide cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitzinger, B.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of molybdenum is affected by the factors of temperature, the oxygen pressure in the oxidizing atmosphere, and the time of exposure. Studies of the oxidation characteristics of Mo show that the oxidation rate increases strongly when the temperature exceeds 600 C. Investigations of the behavior of cermets with various percentages of zirconium oxide are discussed, taking into account oxidation conditions at temperatures under and above the melting point of molybdenum trioxide.

  8. A study of the mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement in molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taheri, M.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polycrystalline molybdenum samples in both the 'as annealed' and hydrogenized conditions were studied. The results indicate that hydrogen does not alter the yield stress of samples significantly although it reduces both the ultimate tensile strength and the ductility considerably. Fractographic study of samples shows a tendency to intercrystalline cracking of the hydrogenised molybdenum at low temperatures. In the light of the results, a mechanism involving grain boundary weakening is suggested.

  9. Isotopically Modified Molybdenum: Production for Application in Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Bonarev, A. K.; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Borisevich, V. D.; Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.

    The possibility to use the isotopically modified molybdenum as a constructive material for the fuel rods of light water and fast reactors is discussed. The calculations demonstrate that the isotopically modified molybdenum with an average neutron absorption cross-section comparable to that of zirconium can be obtained with the reasonable for practice cost by a cascade of gas centrifuges, specially designed for separation of non-uranium isotopes.

  10. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.

    1994-04-05

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

  11. Carminic acid as a reagent for the spectrofluorimetric determination of molybdenum and tungsten-II Determination of molybdenum in mild steel.

    PubMed

    Kirkbright, G F; West, T S; Woodward, C

    1966-12-01

    A method is described for the spectrofluorimetric determination of molybdenum in mild steel down to 0.01 %. After dissolution of the sample, molybdenum is separated from the bulk of iron by extraction of molybdenum(V) thiocyanate with isoamyl acetate. It is then determined with carminic acid as described in Part I. PMID:18960052

  12. Electron accelerator-based production of molybdenum-99: Bremsstrahlung and photoneutron generation from molybdenum vs. tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsechanski, A.; Bielajew, A. F.; Archambault, J. P.; Mainegra-Hing, E.

    2016-01-01

    A new "one-stage" approach for production of 99Mo and other radioisotopes by means of an electron linear accelerator is described. It is based on using a molybdenum target both as a bremsstrahlung converter and as a radioisotope producing target for the production of 99Mo via the photoneutron reaction 100Mo(γ,n)99Mo. Bremsstrahlung characteristics, such as bremsstrahlung efficiency, angular distribution, and energy deposition for molybdenum targets were obtained by means of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation code system. As a result of our simulations, it is concluded that a 60 MeV electron beam incident on a thick Mo target will have greater bremsstrahlung efficiency than the same thickness (in units of r0) W target, for target thickness z > 1.84r0, where r0 is the electron range. A 50 MeV electron beam incident on a Mo target will result in greater bremsstrahlung efficiency than the same thickness W target (in units of r0) for target thickness case: z ⩾ 2.0r0. It is shown for the one-stage approach with thicknesses of (1.84-2.0)r0, that the 99Mo-production bremsstrahlung efficiency of a molybdenum target is greater by ∼100% at 30 MeV and by ∼70% at 60 MeV compared to the values for tungsten of the same thickness (in units of the appropriate r0) in the traditional two-stage approach (W converter and separate 99Mo producing target). This advantage of the one-stage approach arises from the fact that the bremsstrahlung produced is attenuated only once from attenuation in the molybdenum converter/target. In the traditional, two-stage approach, the bremsstrahlung generated in the W-converter/target is attenuated both in the converter in the 99Mo-producing molybdenum target. The photoneutron production yield of molybdenum and tantalum (as a substitute for tungsten) target was calculated by means of the MCNP5 transport code. On the basis of these data, the specific activity for the one-stage approach of three enriched 100Mo-targets of a 2 cm diameter and

  13. Molybdenum oxide and molybdenum oxide-nitride back contacts for CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Drayton, Jennifer A. Geisthardt, Russell M. Sites, James R.; Williams, Desiree D. Cramer, Corson L. Williams, John D.

    2015-07-15

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) and molybdenum oxynitride (MoON) thin film back contacts were formed by a unique ion-beam sputtering and ion-beam-assisted deposition process onto CdTe solar cells and compared to back contacts made using carbon–nickel (C/Ni) paint. Glancing-incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that partially crystalline MoO{sub x} films are created with a mixture of Mo, MoO{sub 2}, and MoO{sub 3} components. Lower crystallinity content is observed in the MoON films, with an additional component of molybdenum nitride present. Three different film thicknesses of MoO{sub x} and MoON were investigated that were capped in situ in Ni. Small area devices were delineated and characterized using current–voltage (J-V), capacitance–frequency, capacitance–voltage, electroluminescence, and light beam-induced current techniques. In addition, J-V data measured as a function of temperature (JVT) were used to estimate back barrier heights for each thickness of MoO{sub x} and MoON and for the C/Ni paint. Characterization prior to stressing indicated the devices were similar in performance. Characterization after stress testing indicated little change to cells with 120 and 180-nm thick MoO{sub x} and MoON films. However, moderate-to-large cell degradation was observed for 60-nm thick MoO{sub x} and MoON films and for C/Ni painted back contacts.

  14. Dilithiation of Bis(benzene)molybdenum and subsequent isolation of a molybdenum-containing paracyclophane.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Buggisch, Nele; Englert, Ulli; Homberger, Melanie; Kupfer, Thomas; Leusser, Dirk; Lutz, Matthias; Radacki, Krzysztof

    2007-04-18

    The homoleptic sandwich complex bis(benzene)molybdenum, [Mo(eta6-C6H6)2], was successfully dilithiated by employing an excess of BuLi in the presence of N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (up to 6 equiv each) at slightly elevated temperatures furnishing the highly reactive, ring metalated species [Mo(eta6-C6H5Li)2].tmeda in high yields. Alternatively, this compound was synthesized upon prolonged sonication with 5 equiv of tBuLi/tmeda without heating. An X-ray crystal structure determination revealed a symmetrical, dimeric composition in the solid state, i.e., a formula of [Mo(eta6-C6H5Li)2]2.(thf)6, where the six-membered rings are connected by two pairs of bridging lithium atoms. The synthesis of an elusive ansa-bridged complex failed in the case of a [1]bora and a [1]sila bridge due to the thermal lability of the resulting compounds. Instead, reverse addition of the dilithio precursor to an excess of the appropriate element dihalide facilitated the isolation of several unstrained, 1,1'-disubstituted derivatives, namely, [Mo{eta6-C6H5(BN(SiMe3)2X)}2] (X = Cl, Br) and [Mo{eta6-C6H5(SiiPr2Cl)}2], respectively. However, the incorporation of a less congesting [2]sila bridge was accomplished. In addition to the formation of [Mo{(eta6-C6H5)2Si2Me4}], a molybdenum-containing paracylophane complex was isolated and characterized by means of crystal structure analysis. The ancillary formation of 1 equiv of bis(benzene)molybdenum strongly suggests that this species is generated by deprotonation of the ansa-bridged complex by the dilithiated precursor and subsequent reaction with a second equivalent of the disilane. PMID:17375929

  15. Molybdenum-base cermet fuel development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, James P.; Gurwell, William E.; Moss, Ronald W.; White, George D.; Seifert, David A.

    Development of a multimegawatt (MMW) space nuclear power system requires identification and resolution of several technical feasibility issues before selecting one or more promising system concepts. Demonstration of reactor fuel fabrication technology is required for cermet-fueled reactor concepts. The MMW reactor fuel development activity at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on producing a molybdenum-matrix uranium-nitride (UN) fueled cermte. This cermet is to have a high matrix density (greater than or equal to 95 percent) for high strength and high thermal conductance coupled with a high particle (UN) porosity (approximately 25 percent) for retention of released fission gas at high burnup. Fabrication process development involves the use of porous TiN microspheres as surrogate fuel material until porous Un microspheres become available. Process development was conducted in the areas of microsphere synthesis, particle sealing/coating, and high-energy-rate forming (HERF) and the vacuum hot press consolidation techniques. This paper summarizes the status of these activities.

  16. Scalable Production of Molybdenum Disulfide Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Carl H; Kybert, Nicholas J; Schneier, Camilla; Xi, Jin; Romero, Gabriela; Saven, Jeffery G; Liu, Renyu; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2016-06-28

    We demonstrate arrays of opioid biosensors based on chemical vapor deposition grown molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field effect transistors (FETs) coupled to a computationally redesigned, water-soluble variant of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). By transferring dense films of monolayer MoS2 crystals onto prefabricated electrode arrays, we obtain high-quality FETs with clean surfaces that allow for reproducible protein attachment. The fabrication yield of MoS2 FETs and biosensors exceeds 95%, with an average mobility of 2.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (36 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) at room temperature under ambient (in vacuo). An atomic length nickel-mediated linker chemistry enables target binding events that occur very close to the MoS2 surface to maximize sensitivity. The biosensor response calibration curve for a synthetic opioid peptide known to bind to the wild-type MOR indicates binding affinity that matches values determined using traditional techniques and a limit of detection ∼3 nM (1.5 ng/mL). The combination of scalable array fabrication and rapid, precise binding readout enabled by the MoS2 transistor offers the prospect of a solid-state drug testing platform for rapid readout of the interactions between novel drugs and their intended protein targets. PMID:27227361

  17. Intrinsic structural defects in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a two-dimensional direct band gap semiconductor with distinctive mechanical, electronic, optical and chemical properties that can be utilized for novel nanoelectronics and optoelectronics devices. The performance of these electronic devices strongly depends on the quality and defect morphology of the MoS2 layers. Yet, little is known about the atomic structure of defects present in monolayer MoS2 and their influences on the material properties. Here we provide a systematic study of various intrinsic structural defects, including point defects, grain boundaries, and edges, in chemical vapor phase grown monolayer MoS2 via direct atomic resolution imaging, and explore their energy landscape and electronic properties using first-principles calculations. We discover that one-dimensional metallic wires can be created via two different types of 60 grain boundaries consisting of distinct 4-fold ring chains. A new type of edge reconstruction, representing a transition state during growth, was also identified, providing insights into the material growth mechanism. The atomic scale study of structural defects presented here brings new opportunities to tailor the properties of MoS2 via controlled synthesis and defect engineering.

  18. Vertically aligned biaxially textured molybdenum thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rahul; Riley, Michael; Lee, Sabrina; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Vertically aligned, biaxially textured molybdenum nanorods were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering with glancing flux incidence (alpha = 85 degrees with respect to the substrate normal) and a two-step substrate-rotation mode. These nanorods were identified with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. The formation of a vertically aligned biaxial texture with a [110] out-of-plane orientation was combined with a [-110] in-plane orientation. The kinetics of the growth process was found to be highly sensitive to an optimum rest time of 35 seconds for the two-step substrate rotation mode. At all other rest times, the nanorods possessed two separate biaxial textures each tilted toward one flux direction. While the in-plane texture for the vertical nanorods maintains maximum flux capture area, inclined Mo nanorods deposited at alpha = 85 degrees without substrate rotation display a [-1-1-4] in-plane texture that does not comply with the maximum flux capture area argument. Finally, an in situ capping film was deposited with normal flux incidence over the biaxially textured vertical nanorods resulting in a thin film over the porous nanorods. This capping film possessed the same biaxial texture as the nanorods and could serve as an effective substrate for the epitaxial growth of other functional materials.

  19. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  20. Structural phase transitions in monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha June; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has provided opportunities to develop ultimate thin channel devices. In contrast to graphene, the existence of moderate band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling gives rise to exotic electronic properties which vary with layer thickness, lattice structure, and symmetry. TMDs commonly appear in two structures with distinct symmetries, trigonal prismatic 2H and octahedral 1T phases which are semiconducting and metallic, respectively. In this work, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides (MoX2, where X = S, Se, Te) through first-principles density functional calculations. We find a tendency that the semiconducting 2H phase is more stable than the metallic 1T phase. We show that a spontaneous symmetry breaking of 1T phase leads to various distorted octahedral (1T') phases, thus inducing a metal-to-semiconductor transition. We discuss the effects of carrier doping on the structural stability and the modification of the electronic structure. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under Grant No. NRF-2005-0093845 and Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Grant No. SSTFBA1401-08.

  1. Molybdenum disilicide composites produced by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.; Bartlett, A.H.

    1998-05-25

    The intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is being considered for high temperature structural applications because of its high melting point and superior oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The lack of high temperature strength, creep resistance and low temperature ductility has hindered its progress for structural applications. Plasma spraying of coatings and structural components of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites offers an exciting processing alternative to conventional powder processing methods due to superior flexibility and the ability to tailor properties. Laminate, discontinuous and in situ reinforced composites have been produced with secondary reinforcements of Ta, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Laminate composites, in particular, have been shown to improve the damage tolerance of MoSi{sub 2} during high temperature melting operations. A review of research which as been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory on plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based composites to improve low temperature fracture toughness, thermal shock resistance, high temperature strength and creep resistance will be discussed.

  2. The biological and toxicological importance of molybdenum in the environment and in the nutrition of plants, animals and man. Part 1: Molybdenum in plants.

    PubMed

    Anke, M; Seifert, M

    2007-09-01

    In 1930, Bortels showed that molybdenum is necessary for nitrogen fixation in Acetobacter, and in 1939 Arnon and Stout reported that molybdenum is essential for life in higher plants. Nitrogenase is the nitrogen-fixing enzyme complex, while nitrate reductase requires molybdenum for its activity. Molybdenum occurs in the earth crust with an abundance of 1.0-1.4 mg/kg. The molybdenum content of the vegetation is determined by the amount of this element in the soil and its pH-value. The weathering soils of granite, porphyry, gneiss and Rotliegendes produce a molybdenum-rich vegetation. Significantly poorer in Mo is the vegetation on loess, diluvial sands, alluvial riverside soils and especially on Keuper and Muschelkalk weathering soils, which produce legumes and, e.g. cauliflower with molybdenum deficiency symptoms. The molybdenum content of the flora decreases with increasing age. Legumes store the highest molybdenum levels in the bulbs of their roots; on average, they accumulate more molybdenum than herbs and grasses do. The danger of molybdenum toxicity in plants is small. PMID:17899788

  3. Evidence of native oxides on the capping and substrate of Permalloy gratings by magneto-optical spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, Roman; Mistrik, Jan; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Visnovsky, Stefan; Demokritov, Sergej O.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2005-06-06

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders at polar magnetization is applied to Permalloy wire gratings deposited on Si substrates and protected by Cr capping. The experimental MOKE data are compared with data simulated using the local modes method. The extensive simulations of the MOKE spectroscopic parameters exhibit significant sensitivity to t(Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and t(SiO{sub 2}), the thicknesses of native oxide layers developed on the capping and the substrate, respectively. The approach may be useful for monitoring the basic micromagnetic properties of small elements with nanometer-scale resolution, as well as for monitoring the deposition processes and aging of magnetic nanostructures in magnetic recording and magnetic random access memory technologies.

  4. Enhanced exchange bias and improved ferromagnetic properties in Permalloy-BiFe0.95Co0.05O3 core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Javed, K; Li, W J; Ali, S S; Shi, D W; Khan, U; Riaz, S; Han, X F

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid core-shell nanostructures consisting of permalloy (Ni80Fe20) and multiferroic(BiFeO3, BFO/BiFe0.95Co0.05O3, BFC) materials were synthesized by a two-step method, based on wet chemical impregnation and subsequent electrodeposition within porous alumina membranes. Structural and magnetic characterizations have been done to investigate doping effect on magnetic properties and exchange bias. The magnetometry analysis revealed significant enhancements of the exchange bias and coercivity in NiFe-BFC core-shell nanostructures as compared with NiFe-BFO core-shell nanostructures. The enhancements can be attributed to the effective reduction of ferromagnet domain sizes between adjacent layers of core-shell structure. It indicates that it is possible to improve properties of multiferroic composites by site-engineering method. Our approach opens a pathway to obtain optimized nanostructured multiferroic composites exhibiting tunable magnetic properties. PMID:26658956

  5. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination of molybdenum in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, J. L.; Rondón, C.; Burguera, M.; Roa, M. E.; Petit de Peña, Y.

    2002-03-01

    A method for the determination of molybdenum in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was developed and evaluated. Erbium (25 μg) was chosen from several potential chemical modifiers (Sm, Lu, Ho, Eu and Pd+Mg) as the most appropriate for the sensitive and reliable determination of molybdenum in such sample. The process used was direct dilution of the sample in a ratio 1:2 with a 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 solution. The injection of 20 μl of a solution of 15% (w/v) hydrogen peroxide and running the temperature program after 5 firings greatly reduced the effect of build-up of carbonaceous residues within the atomizer. The limit of detection and working ranges, respectively, were 0.6 and 2.0-100.0 μg l -1, and the characteristic mass was 7.2 pg. The relative standard deviation varied from 0.8 to 1.5% for within and between batch determinations, respectively. The determination of molybdenum in Seronorm™ Trace Elements in Whole Blood with known added amounts of the analyte was performed to asses the accuracy. The optimized procedure has been applied to the determination of molybdenum in whole blood specimens of 20 subjects taken before and 10-12 h after receiving an over-supply of 1 mg of molybdenum. The molybdenum concentrations (±S.D.) were 10.9±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 9.9-11.6 μg Mo l -1) and 15.4±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 13.1-16.9 μg Mo l -1) for the individuals before and after the administration of molybdenum.

  6. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  7. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  8. Yield strength of molybdenum at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qiumin; Bi, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Jing, Fuqian; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Sheng

    2007-07-01

    In the diamond anvil cell technology, the pressure gradient approach is one of the three major methods in determining the yield strength for various materials at high pressures. In the present work, by in situ measuring the thickness of the sample foil, we have improved the traditional technique in this method. Based on this modification, the yield strength of molybdenum at pressures has been measured. Our main experimental conclusions are as follows: (1) The measured yield strength data for three samples with different initial thickness (100, 250, and 500 microm) are in good agreement above a peak pressure of 10 GPa. (2) The measured yield strength can be fitted into a linear formula Y=0.48(+/-0.19)+0.14(+/-0.01)P (Y and P denote the yield strength and local pressure, respectively, both of them are in gigapascals) in the local pressure range of 8-21 GPa. This result is in good agreement with both Y=0.46+0.13P determined in the pressure range of 5-24 GPa measured by the radial x-ray diffraction technique and the previous shock wave data below 10 GPa. (3) The zero-pressure yield strength of Mo is 0.5 GPa when we extrapolate our experimental data into the ambient pressure. It is close to the tensile strength of 0.7 GPa determined by Bridgman [Phys. Rev. 48, 825 (1934)] previously. The modified method described in this article therefore provides the confidence in determination of the yield strength at high pressures. PMID:17672772

  9. Butene oxidation by molybdenum crystallographic shear compounds

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    The reduced molybdenum oxides Mo/sub 4/O/sub 11/-orh, Mo/sub 4/O/sub 11/-mon, Mo/sub 8/O/sub 23/, and Mo/sub 18/O/sub 52/ were synthesized. These compounds, as well as MoO/sub 3/, were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies, and BET surface area measurements. The oxides were then studied in a pulsed reactor at 500/sup 0/C in the selective oxidation of butene and butadiene. The data suggested a process in which the surface site must become more oxidized in parallel with the oxidation of the adsorbed hydrocarbon. Evidence supporting this idea included the high selectivity to maleic anhydride observed over a completely oxidized surface and differences in the reactivity of butene and butadiende. In particular, oxygen insertion into butadiene to form furan occurred in the absence of gas phase O/sub 2/ over the reduced phases, while oxygen insertion into butene required the presence of molecular oxygen. Maleic anhydride formation required the presence of molecular oxygen except in the case of butadiene oxidation over MoO/sub 3/. The long range ordering of defects, known as crystallographic shear, was not shown to have any influence on the initial interaction of reactant and solid. However, the unusual coordination geometries and surface structures that are thought to be caused by the presence of shear planes may be related to the differences in catalytic selectivity observed for these oxides.

  10. METHOD FOR FORMING A COATING OF MOLYBDENUM CARBIDE ON A CARBON BODY

    DOEpatents

    Simnad, M.T.

    1962-04-01

    A method is described for coating a carbon bodywith molybdenum carbide in such a manner that the carbon body is rendered less permeable to the flow of gases and has increased resistance to corrosion and erosion. The method includes coating a carbon body with molybdenum trioxide by contacting it at a temperature below the condensation temperature with molybdenum trioxide vapors and thereafter carburizing the molybdenum trioxide in situ in an inert atmosphere on the carhon body. (AEC)

  11. HVOF and plasma sprayed molybdenum coatings -- microstructure and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, S.; Kreye, H.

    1995-12-31

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spray experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation mechanism of molybdenum in the spray process and to determine how the various process parameters affect the microstructure and properties of the coatings. HVOF coatings exhibit their highest hardness and wear resistance at an oxygen content of 6 to 8% by weight. Such an oxygen level can be achieved with Mo and Mo-MoO{sub 2} composite powders as well. In the plasma spray process oxidation of molybdenum is less pronounced and Mo-MoO{sub 2} composite powders containing 6 to 8% oxygen have to be used to obtain similar properties as compared to HVOF-coatings. When Mo-Mo{sub 2}C composite powders are used oxidation of molybdenum becomes greatly reduced and highly wear resistant coatings are obtained at a low hardness level in both spray processes.

  12. Molecular Epoxidation Reactions Catalyzed by Rhenium, Molybdenum, and Iron Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kück, Jens W; Reich, Robert M; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-02-01

    Epoxidations are of high relevance in many organic syntheses, both in industry and academia. In this personal account, the development of rhenium, molybdenum, and iron complexes in molecular epoxidation catalysis is presented. Methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) is the benchmark catalyst for these reactions, with a thoroughly investigated mechanism and reactivity profile. More recently, highly active molecular molybdenum and iron catalysts have emerged, challenging the extraordinary role of MTO in epoxidation catalysis with high turnover frequencies (TOFs). This development is highlighted in its use of cheaper, more readily available metals, and the challenges of using base metals in catalysis are discussed. These results show the promise that relatively cheap and abundant metals, such as molybdenum and iron, hold for the future of epoxidation catalysis. PMID:26776087

  13. Recent Developments in Homogeneous Dinitrogen Reduction by Molybdenum and Iron

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, K. Cory; Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of gaseous nitrogen (N2) is a challenge for industrial, biological and synthetic chemists, who want to understand the formation of ammonia (NH3) for agriculture and also want to form N-C and N-Si bonds for fine chemical synthesis. The iron-molybdenum active site of nitrogenase has inspired chemists to explore the ability of iron and molybdenum complexes to bring about transformations related to N2 reduction. This area of research has gained significant momentum, and the last two years have witnessed a number of significant advances in synthetic Fe-N2 and Mo-N2 chemistry. In addition, the identities of all atoms in the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase have finally been elucidated, and the discovery of a carbide has generated new questions and targets for coordination chemists. This Perspective summarizes the recent work on iron and molydenum complexes, and highlights the opportunities for continued research. PMID:23787744

  14. 40 CFR 421.210 - Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. 421.210 Section 421.210 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Molybdenum and Rhenium Subcategory § 421.210 Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  15. 40 CFR 421.210 - Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. 421.210 Section 421.210 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Molybdenum and Rhenium Subcategory § 421.210 Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  16. 40 CFR 421.210 - Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. 421.210 Section 421.210 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Molybdenum and Rhenium Subcategory § 421.210 Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  17. 40 CFR 421.220 - Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. 421.220 Section 421.220 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.220 Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  18. 40 CFR 421.220 - Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. 421.220 Section 421.220 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.220 Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  19. 40 CFR 421.220 - Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. 421.220 Section 421.220 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.220 Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  20. 40 CFR 421.220 - Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. 421.220 Section 421.220 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.220 Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  1. 40 CFR 421.220 - Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. 421.220 Section 421.220 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Molybdenum and Vanadium Subcategory § 421.220 Applicability: Description of the secondary molybdenum and vanadium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  2. 40 CFR 421.210 - Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Molybdenum and Rhenium Subcategory § 421.210 Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to... primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. 421.210 Section 421.210 Protection of...

  3. 40 CFR 421.210 - Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Molybdenum and Rhenium Subcategory § 421.210 Applicability: Description of the primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to... primary molybdenum and rhenium subcategory. 421.210 Section 421.210 Protection of...

  4. HEU and LEU comparison in the production of Molybdenum-99

    SciTech Connect

    Cestau, Daniel; Novello, Ariel; Cristini, Pablo; Bronca, Marcelo; Centurion, Roberto; Bavaro, Ricardo; Cestau, Julian; Carranza, Eduardo

    2008-07-15

    Fission Molybdenum-99 from LEU targets is being produced in Argentina, at the Ezeiza Atomic Centre, since 2002. Before 2002, Argentina produced for more than 15 years fission molybdenum-99 from HEU targets. Both production procedures involve the irradiation of the targets composed by an Uranium-Aluminium compound 'meat' cladded with aluminum and a chemical processing of the targets. A statistic relative efficiency analysis of the production results, a brief description of the LEU method and quality control data of both procedures will be presented. (author)

  5. Selective emission multilayer coatings for a molybdenum thermophotovoltaic radiator

    DOEpatents

    Cockeram, Brian Vern

    2004-01-27

    Multilayer coating designs have been developed to provide selective emission for a molybdenum thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator surface. These coatings increase the surface emissivity of a molybdenum TPV radiator substrate in the wavelength range that matches the bandgap of the TPV cells to increase the power density of the TPV system. Radiator emission at wavelengths greater than the bandgap energy of the TPV cells is greatly reduced through the use of these coatings, which significantly increases the efficiency of the TPV system. The use of this coating greatly improves the performance of a TPV system, and the coating can be tailored to match the bandgap of any practical TPV system.

  6. Breaking America’s Dependence on Foreign…Molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Brief Unstructured Abstract Approximately 9 million nuclear cardiology studies performed each year in the United States employ technetium-99m, which is produced from the decay of molybdenum-99. The fragility of the worldwide technetium-99m supply chain has been underscored by current shortages caused by an unplanned shutdown of Europe’s largest reactor. The majority of the United States’ supply derives from a reactor in Canada nearing the end of its lifespan, whose planned replacements have been recently cancelled. In this article, the clinical importance of technetium-99m and our tenuous dependence on foreign supply of Molybdenum is addressed. PMID:19356583

  7. Magnetoresistance measurements of superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, R.; Arasu, A. V. Thanikai; Amaladass, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    Molybdenum nitride thin films have been deposited on aluminum nitride buffered glass substrates by reactive DC sputtering. GIXRD measurements indicate formation of nano-crystalline molybdenum nitride thin films. The transition temperature of MoN thin film is 7.52 K. The transition width is less than 0.1 K. The upper critical field Bc2(0), calculated using GLAG theory is 12.52 T. The transition width for 400 µA current increased initially upto 3 T and then decreased, while that for 100 µA current transition width did not decrease.

  8. A review of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed with particular emphasis on high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. Precipitate strengthening is highly effective at 0.4 to 0.8 times the melting temperature in these metals, with HfC being most effective in tungsten and molybdenum, and Ta(B,C) most effective in chromium. Low-temperature ductility can be improved by alloying to promote rhenium ductilizing or solution softening. The low-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys appear related to electronic interactions rather than to the usual metallurgical considerations.

  9. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  10. Tungsten-molybdenum fractionation in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerin, T. Jade; Helz, George R.; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) concentrations were measured in surface waters and sediment pore waters of Terrebonne Bay, a shallow estuary in the Mississippi River delta, to investigate the biogeochemical processes that fractionate these Group 6 elements relative to one another during transit from weathering to sedimentary environments. Although many of the chemical properties of W and Mo are similar, the two elements behave autonomously, and the fractionation mechanisms are only partly understood. In sulfidic pore waters, dissolved Mo is depleted relative to river water-seawater mixtures, whereas dissolved W is >10-fold enriched. Reductive dissolution of poorly crystalline phases like ferrihydrite, which is a preferential host of W relative to Mo in grain coatings on river-borne particles, can explain the dissolved W enrichment. Dissolved W becomes increasingly enriched as H2S(aq) rises above about 60 μM due to transformation of WO42- to thiotungstates as well as to additional reductive dissolution of phases that host W. In contrast, as rising sulfide transforms MoO42- to thiomolybdates in pore waters, dissolved Mo is suppressed, probably owing to equilibration with an Fe-Mo-S phase. This putative phase appears to control the aqueous ion product, Q = [Fe2+][MoS42-]0.6 [H2S0]0.4/[H+]0.8, at a value of 10-7.78. Concentrations of dissolved W and Mo in pore waters bear no relation to concentrations in surface waters of the same salinity. In surface waters, dissolved Mo is nearly conserved in the estuarine mixing zone. Dissolved W appears also to be conserved except for several cases where W may have been enhanced by exchange with underlying, W-rich pore waters. With increasing salinity, the molar Mo/W ratio rises from about 10 to about 1000 in surface waters whereas it is mostly <10 in underlying pore waters and in highly sulfidic pore waters is mostly near 1. Differences in two chemical properties may account for this fractionation of Mo with respect to

  11. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. PMID:25214300

  12. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  13. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  14. Application of the solid lubricant molybdenum disulfide by sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J.; Spalvins, T.

    1968-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide lubricant film is deposited on two substrates, niobium and nickel-chromium alloys, by means of physical direct-current sputtering. The sputtering system uses a three-electrode /triode/ geometry - a thermionic cathode, an anode, and the target, all enclosed in a vacuum chamber.

  15. Molybdenum-platinum-oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a solid electrolyte carrying a thin film comprising molybdenum-platinum-oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  16. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This patent pertains to compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia. Fabrication, fracture toughness, and bend strength are covered.

  17. Process for producing molybdenum foil and collapsible tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretts, G. R.; Gavert, R. B.; Groschke, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Manufacturing process produces molybdenum foil 0.002 cm thick and 305 m long, and forms foil into high-strength, thin-walled tubing which can be flattened for storage on a spool. Desirable metal properties include high thermal conductivity stiffness, yield and tensile stress, and low thermal expansion coeffecient.

  18. Dissolution kinetics of a sintered molybdenum coating applied on ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz`ko, V.S.

    1994-11-01

    Using weighing and corrosion diagrams, the etching parameters are determined for a sintered M-21 molybdenum coating applied to VK 94-1 vacuum-tight ceramics. Dissolution of M-21 in an alkaline solution of potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) can be treated as a corrosion process proceeding with kinetic control.

  19. Molybdenum Hazards to Fish, Wildlife, and Invertebrates: A Synoptic Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    1989-01-01

    Ecological and toxicological aspects of molybdenum (Mo) in the environment are briefly reviewed, with emphasis on fish and wildlife. Subtopics include sources and uses, chemical properties, mode of action, background concentrations in biological and nonbiological samples, and lethal and sublethal effects on terrestrial plants and invertebrates, aquatic organisms, birds, and mammals. Current recommendations for Mo and the protection of sensitive living resources are presented.

  20. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1995-01-17

    Compositions are disclosed consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  1. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  2. HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF MOLYBDENUM IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molybdenum plays an important biological role as a micronutrient for plants and animals. At high levels it can be toxic to animals. While concentrations in surface waters are generally less than 5 micrograms Mo/L, concentrations as high as 500 micrograms Mo/L have been reported i...

  3. Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Storage and bioavailability of molybdenum in soils increased by organic matter complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichard, Thomas; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Myneni, Satish C. B.; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Kraepiel, Anne M. L.

    2009-09-01

    The micronutrient molybdenum is a necessary component of the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase. Molybdenum is very rare in soils, and is usually present in a highly soluble form, making it susceptible to leaching. However, it is generally thought that molybdenum attaches to mineral surfaces in acidic soils; this would prevent its escape into the groundwater, but would also impede uptake by microbes. Here we use X-ray spectroscopy to examine the chemical speciation of molybdenum in soil samples from forests in Arizona and New Jersey. We show that in the leaf litter layer, most of the molybdenum forms strong complexes with plant-derived tannins and tannin-like compounds; molybdenum binds to these organic ligands across a wide pH range. In deeper soils, molybdenum binds to both iron oxides and natural organic matter. We suggest that the molybdenum bound to organic matter can be captured by small complexing agents that are released by nitrogen-fixing bacteria; the molybdenum can then be incorporated into nitrogenase. We conclude that the binding of molybdenum to natural organic matter helps prevent leaching of molybdenum, and is thus a critical step in securing new nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems.

  5. Storage and Bioavailability of Molybdenum in Soils Increased by Organic Matter Complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Wichard, T.; Mishra, B; Myneni, S; Bellenger, J; Kraepiel, A

    2009-01-01

    The micronutrient molybdenum is a necessary component of the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase1, 2. Molybdenum is very rare in soils, and is usually present in a highly soluble form, making it susceptible to leaching3, 4. However, it is generally thought that molybdenum attaches to mineral surfaces in acidic soils; this would prevent its escape into the groundwater, but would also impede uptake by microbes3. Here we use X-ray spectroscopy to examine the chemical speciation of molybdenum in soil samples from forests in Arizona and New Jersey. We show that in the leaf litter layer, most of the molybdenum forms strong complexes with plant-derived tannins and tannin-like compounds; molybdenum binds to these organic ligands across a wide pH range. In deeper soils, molybdenum binds to both iron oxides and natural organic matter. We suggest that the molybdenum bound to organic matter can be captured by small complexing agents that are released by nitrogen-fixing bacteria; the molybdenum can then be incorporated into nitrogenase. We conclude that the binding of molybdenum to natural organic matter helps prevent leaching of molybdenum, and is thus a critical step in securing new nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems.

  6. Electrodeposition of low contraction chromium/molybdenum alloys using pulse-reverse plating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.D.; Langston, S.

    1994-12-01

    The use of modulated pulse periodic reverse (pulse-reverse) current to electrodeposit a low contraction (LC) chromium/molybdenum alloy has been evaluated. When using one full pulse-reverse plating cycle, the percent molybdenum in the deposit increased almost 400 percent (from 1 to 4 percent) as the current in the reverse cycle was increased from 0 to 10 amps. However, when the pulse reverse current was carried to six full plating cycles, the percent molybdenum in the deposit was not dependent upon the current and remained constant at about 1 percent. This is about the same percent molybdenum that could be expected in direct current-plated LC chromium/molybdenum alloy and about half the percent molybdenum that could be expected in an on/off pulse-plated LC chromium/molybdenum alloy.

  7. Molybdenum Isotopes in Some Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Masuda, A.

    1992-07-01

    Measurement of all seven stable Mo isotopes in iron meteorites has been continued for study of possible direct evidences for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and information on extinct radioactive nuclides. Mo in iron meteorite was extracted by using recently developed chemical separation method [1], then loaded on 5 pass zone refined Re ribbon. Molybdenum isotope analysis was performed [2] in a VG SECTOR 54-30 thermal ionization mass spectrometer using a Faraday collector in peak jumping mode. The measured ratios of Mo were normalized provisionally to ^94Mo/^98Mo = 0.3802. Particular caution was drawn on the isobaric interferences of Zr, Ru, etc., which were negligible as a result. A small but distinct anomaly of Mo isotopes was found in Acuna iron meteorite. The normalized data show a growth trend from ^92Mo to ^97Mo, and this increment decreased suddenly at ^98Mo, then slightly increased at ^100Mo. The isotope variations might be explained as a result of excess s-process component (^95Mo to ^98Mo) contained in the sample. Gibeon suggested that isotopic anomalies at ^92Mo, ^95Mo, and ^97Mo are about -3-epsilon, -1.2-epsilon, and -0.5-epsilon respectively. It is difficult to give a perfect explanation to the observed data at present. However, it is interesting to note that ^92Mo (N=50) has a closed shell and only ^95Mo and ^97Mo are even-odd nuclides in all seven stable Mo isotopes and the 30-keV Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross sections for ^95Mo and ^97Mo are about 3 times bigger than others [3]. The depletions at ^95Mo and ^97Mo might be attributed to the higher cross section for their destruction by (n, gamma) reaction. The apparent opposite aberrations are found for Odessa iron. We reported anomalies of Mo isotopes in a specimen of Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite [4,5]. Further investigations have shown that the isotopic compositions of Mo in this iron are heterogeneous and that the "general anomaly" of Mo isotopes is related with the

  8. Uranium-Molybdenum Dissolution Flowsheet Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2007-03-01

    The Super Kukla (SK) Prompt Burst Reactor operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. The SK material is a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight at approximately 20% 235U enrichment. H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) requested that the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) define a flowsheet for safely and efficiently dissolving the SK material. The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO3) in the H-Canyon dissolvers to a U concentration of 15-20 g/L (3-4 g/L 235U) without the formation of precipitates or the generation of a flammable gas mixture. Testing with SK material validated the applicability of dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature for various U and U-Mo metals. Based on the data, the SK material can be dissolved in boiling 3.0-6.0 M HNO3 to a U concentration of 15-20 g/L and a corresponding Mo concentration of 1.7-2.2 g/L. The optimum flowsheet will use 4.0-5.0 M HNO3 for the starting acid. Any nickel (Ni) cladding associated with the material will dissolve readily. After dissolution is complete, traditional solvent extraction flowsheets can be used to recover and purify the U. Dissolution rates for the SK material are consistent with those reported in the literature and are adequate for H-Canyon processing. When the SK material dissolved at 70-100 o C in 1-6 M HNO3, the reaction bubbled vigorously and released nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Gas generation tests in 1 M and 2 M HNO3 at 100 o C generated less than 0.1 volume percent hydrogen (H2) gas. It is known that higher HNO3 concentrations are less favorable for H2 production. All tests at 70-100 o C produced sufficient gas to mix the solutions without external agitation. At room temperature in 5 M HNO3, the U-Mo dissolved slowly and the U-laden solution sank to the bottom of the dissolution vessel because of its greater density. The effect of the density difference insures that the SK material cannot dissolve and

  9. Reflectance, Optical Properties, and Stability of Molybdenum/Strontium and Molybdenum/Yttrium Multilayer Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kjornrattanawanich, B

    2002-09-01

    The motivation of this work is to develop high reflectance normal-incidence multilayer mirrors in the 8-12 nm wavelength region for applications in astronomy and extreme ultraviolet lithography. To achieve this goal, Mo/Sr and Mo/Y multilayers were studied. These multilayers were deposited with a UHV magnetron sputtering system and their reflectances were measured with synchrotron radiation. High normal-incidence reflectances of 23% at 8.8 nm, 40.8% at 9.4 nm, and 48.3% at 10.5 nm were achieved. However, the reflectance of Mo/Sr multilayers decreased rapidly after exposure to air. Attempts to use thin layers of carbon to passivate the surface of Mo/Sr multilayers were unsuccessful. Experimental results on the refractive index {tilde n} = 1-{delta} + i{beta} of yttrium and molybdenum in the 50-1300 eV energy region are reported in this work. This is the first time ever that values on the refractive index of yttrium are measured in this energy range. The absorption part {beta} was determined through transmittance measurements. The dispersive part {delta} was calculated by means of the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The newly determined values of the refractive index of molybdenum are in excellent agreement with the published data. Those of yttrium are more accurate and contain fine structures around the yttrium M-absorption edges where Mo/Y multilayers operate. These improved sets of optical data lead to better design and modeling of the optical properties of Mo/Y multilayers. The reflectance quality of Mo/Y multilayers is dependent on their optical and structural properties. To correlate these properties with the multilayer reflectance, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze samples. Normal-incidence reflectances of 32.6% at 9.27 nm, 38.4% at 9.48 nm, and 29.6% at 9.46 nm were obtained from three representative Mo/Y multilayers which had about 0%, 25%, and 39% atomic oxygen assimilated in their

  10. Simulation of three-dimensional nonperiodic structures of {pi}-vertical Bloch line (pi-VBL) and 2{pi}-VBL (2pi-VBL) in Permalloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Redjdal, M.; Kakay, A.; Trunk, T.; Ruane, M. F.; Humphrey, F. B.

    2001-06-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic structures of pi-vertical-Bloch line (VBL) and 2pi-VBL are investigated in 80{endash}320-nm-thick Permalloy films using direct integration of the Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation in an 128{times}128{times}80 point Cartesian lattice. A pi-VBL reflects the shapes of its adjacent walls, which change with film thickness. The pi-VBL conducts the flux between walls of opposite chirality by letting the magnetization rotate out of the plane of the walls via a vortex structure. The Neel caps switch chirality via a {open_quotes}converging point,{close_quotes} or cross-tie, flux at one surface and a vortex flux, or a swirl, at the other surface. The pi-VBL energy per unit area is 0.44, 0.20, and 0.30 erg/cm2 in 80, 160, and 320 nm films, respectively. The corresponding pi-VBL widths are 88, 60, and 86 nm. A stable winding 2pi-VBL structure was also computed by combining two pi-VBL structures of appropriate chirality. The Neel caps intersect via the pair-(swirl, converging point) like flux at both surfaces. The width of the 2pi-VBL is 140 nm and its energy per unit area is 0.57 erg/cm2. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Thermal and electrical conductivity of approximately 100-nm permalloy, Ni, Co, Al, and Cu films and examination of the Wiedemann-Franz Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, A. D.; Mason, S. J.; Bassett, D.; Wesenberg, D.; Zink, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of thermal and electrical conductivity of polycrystalline permalloy (Ni-Fe), aluminum, copper, cobalt, and nickel thin films with thickness <200 nm. A micromachined silicon-nitride membrane thermal-isolation platform allows measurements of both transport properties on a single film and an accurate probe of the Wiedemann-Franz (WF) law expected to relate the two. Through careful elimination of possible effects of surface scattering of phonons in the supporting membrane, we find excellent agreement with WF in a thin Ni-Fe film over nearly the entire temperature range from 77 to 325 K. All other materials studied here deviate somewhat from the WF prediction of electronic thermal conductivity with a Lorenz number, L , suppressed from the free-electron value by 10 %to20 % . For Al and Cu we compare the results to predictions of the theoretical expression for the Lorenz number as a function of T . This comparison indicates two different types of deviation from expected behavior. In the Cu film, a higher than expected L at lower T indicates an additional thermal conduction mechanism, while at higher T lower than expected values suggests an additional inelastic scattering mechanism for electrons. We suggest the additional low-T L indicates a phonon contribution to thermal conductivity and consider increased electron-phonon scattering at grain boundaries or surfaces to explain the high-T reduction in L .

  12. Preparation of molybdenum carbides with multiple morphologies using surfactants as carbon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfen; Wang, Zhiqi; Chen, Shougang

    2012-10-15

    Molybdenum carbides with surfactants as carbon sources were prepared using the carbothermal reduction of the appropriate precursors (molybdenum oxides deposited on surfactant micelles) at 1023 K under hydrogen gas. The carburized products were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and BET surface area measurements. From the SEM images, hollow microspherical and rod-like molybdenum carbides were observed. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the annealing time of carburization had a large effect on the conversion of molybdenum oxides to molybdenum carbides. And BET surface area measurements indicated that the difference of carbon sources brought a big difference in specific surface areas of molybdenum carbides. - Graphical abstract: Molybdenum carbides having hollow microspherical and hollow rod-like morphologies that are different from the conventional monodipersed platelet-like morphologies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum carbides were prepared using surfactants as carbon sources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The kinds of surfactants affected the morphologies of molybdenum carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time of heat preservation at 1023 K affected the carburization process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum carbides with hollow structures had larger specific surface areas.

  13. Measurement of low levels of molybdenum in the environment by using aquatic insects

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, T.

    1982-10-01

    Starting at high altitudes and extending down the valley, near and below a molybdenum mine, aquatic insects and water samples were collected for atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of molybdenum. Eight stations were sampled in the East River - Upper Gunnison Rive drainage, Gunnison County, Colorado. Five water samples were collected at each station by using resin column extraction of ions. No molybdenum was found above the detectable level of 1 ..mu..g/L in any of the water samples, even after concentrating the ions in the water 40 times. The geographical profile of insect-molybdenum in this area starts very low at Gothic, increases at all stations around the molybdenum lode, peaks at SR-2, and then decreases as the riverine system flows farther away from the main ore body. The plotting of the insect molybdenum concentrations on a continuum graph correlated with a known lode of molybdenum. Molybdenum-insect data sets should be collected above, near, and below other suspected molybdenum lodes to prove the feasibility of using aquatic insects to prospect for molybdenum. (JMT)

  14. Contrast and dose with molybdenum, molybdenum-rhodium, and rhodium-rhodium target-filter combinations in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Gingold, E.L.; Wu, Xizeng; Barnes, G.T.

    1997-03-01

    Molybdenum target-molybdenum filter (Mo-Mo) source assemblies are commonly used for screen-film mammography and produce spectra rich in bremsstrahlung between 15 and 20 keV, and molybdenum characteristic x-rays (K{sub {alpha}} = 17.5 keV and K{sub {beta}} = 19.6 keV) that are, optimal for imaging a large segment of patients. With the normal variability of breast size and tissue composition that occurs in the population, Mo-Mo spectra are not always optimal, however. Particularly for thick, fibroglandular breast tissue, higher energy spectra are required, and are achieved to a limited degree by operating Mo-Mo tubes at higher tube potentials. At these higher tube potentials (28-31 kVp), the spectrum exiting the breast has a large contribution from bremsstrahlung of more than 23 keV. Most of the lower energy photons, including the molybdenum characteristic x-rays, are absorbed and result in a higher average tissue dose than is necessary. Incident spectra with x-ray energies in the 20-23 keV range are preferable. Such spectra have been realized with higher atomic number materials, such as rhodium (Rh), used for the anode or k-edge filter. The higher K-absorption edge of rhodium allows transmission of bremsstrahlung in the 20-23.2 keV range, and at a given kilovoltage the Rh-Rh combination results in a more penetrating beam than either Mo-Mo or Mo-Rh (molybdenum x-ray tube anode with rhodium K-edge filter) because of the difference in energy between the rhodium and molybdenum characteristic x-rays. The greater penetrating power of these spectra results in decreased entrance skin exposure and average glandular dose to the breast than with the conventional Mo-Mo spectra. However, associated with this can be a reduction in subject contrast in the mammogram. The objective of this study was to compare the contrast and dose produced with the three source assemblies as a function of x-ray tube potential, breast thickness, and breast parenchymal composition.

  15. Thermoelectric transport properties of molybdenum from abinitio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Martin; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2014-10-01

    We employ abinitio simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the electronic transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and thermopower) of molybdenum over a broad range of thermodynamic states. By comparing to available experimental data, we show that DFT is able to describe the desired transport properties of this refractory metal with high accuracy. Most noteworthy, both the positive sign and the quantitative values of the thermopower of solid molybdenum are reproduced very well. We calculate the electrical and thermal conductivity in the solid and the fluid phase between 1000 and 20 000 K and a wide span in density and develop empirical fit formulas for direct use in practical applications, such as magneto-hydrodynamics simulations. The influence of thermal expansion in conductivity measurements at constant pressure is also discussed in some detail.

  16. Layered Vanadium and Molybdenum Oxides: Batteries and Electrochromics

    SciTech Connect

    Chernova, N. A.; Roppolo, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Whittingham, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The layered oxides of vanadium and molybdenum have been studied for close to 40 years as possible cathode materials for lithium batteries or electrochromic systems. The highly distorted metal octahedra naturally lead to the formation of a wide range of layer structures, which can intercalate lithium levels exceeding 300 Ah/kg. They have found continuing success in medical devices, such as pacemakers, but many challenges remain in their application in long-lived rechargeable devices. Their high-energy storage capability remains an encouragement to researchers to resolve the stability concerns of vanadium dissolution and the tendency of lithium and vanadium to mix changing the crystal structure on cycling the lithium in and out. Nanomorphologies have enabled higher reactivities to be obtained for both vanadium and molybdenum oxides, and with the latter show promise for electrochromic displays.

  17. Microemulsion-mediated synthesis of nanosize molybdenum sulfide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Boakye, E.; Radovic, L.R.; Osseo-Asare, K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    A microemulsion-based method for the synthesis of molybdenum sulfide nanoparticles is reported. Molybdenum sulfide particles in the size range 10--80 nm have been precipitated in water-in-oil microemulsions (water-containing inverse micelles) formulated with polyoxyethylene(5)nonylphenyl ether (NP-5). The particles were synthesized in the NP-5/cyclohexane/water microemulsion system by acidifying ammonium tetrathiomolybdate solubilized in the water cores of the inverse micelles. Particle characterization was accomplished by chemical analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. The small size and the cage-like nature of the microemulsion water cores limit particle growth and aggregation. The particle size was found to be a function of the water-to-surfactant molar ratio and the average number of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ions solubilized per water core. These trends are rationalized in terms of classical nucleation theory and aggregative growth concepts.

  18. High pressure polyhydrides of molybdenum: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Yin, Ketao; Wang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    We present results from first-principles calculations on molybdenum polyhydrides under pressure. In addition to the experimental ε-phase of MoH, we find several novel structures of MoH2 and MoH3 at pressures below 100 GPa. A hexagonal structure of MoH2 becomes stable with respect to decomposition into MoH and H2 above 9 GPa, and transforms into an orthorhombic structure at 24 GPa, which remains stable up to 100 GPa. MoH3 is unstable relative to decomposition into MoH and H2 over the whole pressure range studied. Electronic structure calculations reveal that molybdenum polyhydrides are metallic under pressure.

  19. Evolution of interlayer coupling in twisted molybdenum disulfide bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaihui; Zhang, Liming; Cao, Ting; Jin, Chenhao; Qiu, Diana; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex; Yang, Peidong; Louie, Steve G.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Van der Waals coupling is emerging as a powerful method to engineer physical properties of atomically thin two-dimensional materials. In coupled graphene-graphene and graphene-boron nitride layers, interesting physical phenomena ranging from Fermi velocity renormalization to Hofstadter’s butterfly pattern have been demonstrated. Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides, another family of two-dimensional-layered semiconductors, can show distinct coupling phenomena. Here we demonstrate the evolution of interlayer coupling with twist angles in as-grown molybdenum disulfide bilayers. We find that the indirect bandgap size varies appreciably with the stacking configuration: it shows the largest redshift for AA- and AB-stacked bilayers, and a significantly smaller but constant redshift for all other twist angles. Our observations, together with ab initio calculations, reveal that this evolution of interlayer coupling originates from the repulsive steric effects that leads to different interlayer separations between the two molybdenum disulfide layers in different stacking configurations.

  20. Molybdenum-UO2 cerment irradiation at 1145 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.

    1971-01-01

    Two molybdenum-UO2 cermet fuel pins were fission heated in a helium-cooled loop at a temperature of 1145 K and to a total burnup of 5.3 % of the U-235. After irradiation the fuel pins were measured to check dimensional stability, punctured at the plenums to determine fission gas release, and examined metallographically to determine the effect of irradiation. Burnup was determined in several sections of the fuel pin. The results of the postirradiation examination indicated: (1) There was no visible change in the fuel pins on irradiation under the above conditions. (2) The maximum swelling of the fuel pins was less than 1%. (3) There was no migration of UO2 and no visible interaction between the molybdenum and the UO2. (4) Approximately 12% of the fission gas formed was released from the cermet cone into the gas plenum.

  1. Dichroic spin–valley photocurrent in monolayer molybdenum disulphide

    PubMed Central

    Eginligil, Mustafa; Cao, Bingchen; Wang, Zilong; Shen, Xiaonan; Cong, Chunxiao; Shang, Jingzhi; Soci, Cesare; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    The aim of valleytronics is to exploit confinement of charge carriers in local valleys of the energy bands of semiconductors as an additional degree of freedom in optoelectronic devices. Thanks to strong direct excitonic transitions in spin-coupled K valleys, monolayer molybdenum disulphide is a rapidly emerging valleytronic material, with high valley polarization in photoluminescence. Here we elucidate the excitonic physics of this material by light helicity-dependent photocurrent studies of phototransistors. We demonstrate that large photocurrent dichroism (up to 60%) can also be achieved in high-quality molybdenum disulphide monolayers grown by chemical vapour deposition, due to the circular photogalvanic effect on resonant excitations. This opens up new opportunities for valleytonic applications in which selective control of spin–valley-coupled photocurrents can be used to implement polarization-sensitive light-detection schemes or integrated spintronic devices, as well as biochemical sensors operating at visible frequencies. PMID:26134143

  2. Mechanical Properties of Iron Alumininides Intermetallic Alloy with Molybdenum Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhailawati, H.; Fauzi, M. N. A.

    2010-03-11

    In this work, FeAl-based alloys with and without molybdenum addition were fabricated by sintering of mechanically alloyed powders in order to investigate the effect of molybdenum on iron aluminide mechanical properties. Bulk samples were prepared by mechanical alloying for 4 hours, pressing at 360 MPa and sintering at 1000 deg. C for 2 hours. The specimens were tested in compression at room temperature using Instron machine. The phase identification and microstructure of the consolidated material was examined by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope correspondingly. Results show that 2.5 wt%Mo addition significantly increased the ultimate stress and ultimate strain in compressive mode due to solid solution hardening. However, the addition of Mo more than 2.5 wt% was accompanied by a reduction in both properties caused by the presence of Mo-rich precipitate particles.

  3. Sintering, Microstructure, and Electrical Conductivity of Zirconia-Molybdenum Cermet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanling; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jieyu

    2015-08-01

    Monolithic zirconia-molybdenum ( m-ZrO2/Mo) cermets of different compositions (5-40 vol.% Mo) and different initial Mo particles sizes (0.08-13 μm) were prepared by traditional powder metallurgy process. The influences of metal content and initial particle sizes on the densification behavior, microstructure, and electrical conductivity of the cermets were studied. A percolation threshold value was obtained about 17.1 vol.% molybdenum fraction, above which a sharp increase in the electrical conductivity was observed. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of cermets was studied. The cermet containing 5 vol.% Mo showed the ionic nature of the conductivity, while the metallic nature was observed in the samples of Mo fraction up to 16 vol.%. The activation of conductivity for ionic type of conductivity and the temperature coefficient of resistivity as well as the effect of porosity on electronic type conductivity are discussed.

  4. Modified chemical route for deposition of molybdenum disulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Akshay N. Sartale, S. D.

    2014-04-24

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using a modified chemical route. Sodium molybdate and sodium sulphide were used as precursors for molybdenum and sulphur respectively. The route involves formation of tetrathiomolybdate ions (MoS{sub 4}{sup 2−}) and further reduction by sodium borohydride to form MoS{sub 2}. The deposition was performed at room temperature. The deposited films were annealed in argon atmosphere at 1073 K for 1 hour to improve its crystallinity. The deposited films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy for optical studies and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structure determination.

  5. Structural Framework for Metal Incorporation during Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Schindelin, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is essential for the catalytic activity of all molybdenum-containing enzymes with the exception of nitrogenase. Moco biosynthesis follows an evolutionarily highly conserved pathway and genetic deficiencies in the corresponding human enzymes result in Moco deficiency, which manifests itself in severe neurological symptoms and death in childhood. In humans the final steps of Moco biosynthesis are catalyzed by gephyrin, specifically the penultimate adenylation of molybdopterin (MPT) by its N-terminal G domain (GephG) and the final metal incorporation by its C-terminal E domain (GephE). To better understand the poorly defined molecular framework of this final step, we determined high-resolution crystal structures of GephE in the apo state and in complex with ADP, AMP, and molybdate. Our data provide novel insights into the catalytic steps leading to final Moco maturation, namely deadenylation as well as molybdate binding and insertion. PMID:27112598

  6. Molybdenum work function determined by electron emission microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, D. L.; Campbell, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A polycrystalline molybdenum sample was recrystallized and thermally stabilized. Quantitative measurements of the emission from each individual grain were obtained with an electron emission microscope. The effective work function for each grain was then calculated. The crystallographic orientation of each grain was determined by Laue back-reflection techniques. A polar plot of effective work function vs crystallographic orientation for the sample was constructed to provide a correlation between effective work function and crystallographic orientation.

  7. Retention of Sputtered Molybdenum on Ion Engine Discharge Chamber Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Dever, Joyce A.; Power, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Grit-blasted anode surfaces are commonly used in ion engines to ensure adherence of sputtered coatings. Next generation ion engines will require higher power levels, longer operating times, and thus there will likely be thicker sputtered coatings on their anode surfaces than observed to date on 2.3 kW-class xenon ion engines. The thickness of coatings on the anode of a 10 kW, 40-centimeter diameter thruster, for example, may be 22 micrometers or more after extended operation. Grit-blasted wire mesh, titanium, and aluminum coupons were coated with molybdenum at accelerated rates to establish coating stability after the deposition process and after thermal cycling tests. These accelerated deposition rates are roughly three orders of magnitude more rapid than the rates at which the screen grid is sputtered in a 2.3 kW-class, 30-centimeter diameter ion engine. Using both RF and DC sputtering processes, the molybdenum coating thicknesses ranged from 8 to 130 micrometers, and deposition rates from 1.8 micrometers per hour to 5.1 micrometers per hour. In all cases, the molybdenum coatings were stable after the deposition process, and there was no evidence of spalling of the coatings after 20 cycles from about -60 to +320 C. The stable, 130 micrometer molybdenum coating on wire mesh is 26 times thicker than the thickest coating found on the anode of a 2.3 kW, xenon ion engine that was tested for 8200 hr. Additionally, this coating on wire mesh coupon is estimated to be a factor of greater than 4 thicker than one would expect to obtain on the anode of the next generation ion engine which may have xenon throughputs as high as 550 kg.

  8. CdTe solar cells on thin molybdenum substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulionis, Ilvydas

    2000-10-01

    We report on the development of Mo/(ZnTe:N)/CdTe/CdS/ITO (inverted structure) solar cells grown by radio frequency sputtering. The 0.1 mm thick molybdenum substrate is lightweight and flexible which is advantageous for both terrestrial and space applications. Conversion efficiencies close to 8 percent have been achieved for 5 square millimeter area devices. The photovoltaic activity has also been observed on similar cells deposited on Mo coated kapton and stainless steel substrates.

  9. The nuclear response of molybdenum to supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Ydrefors, E.; Suhonen, J.

    2011-12-16

    Neutrino-nucleus interactions play a prominent role in many astrophysical applications. Knowledge about nuclear responses to neutrinos is therefore of paramount importance. We present cross sections for neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering off the stable (A = 92,94,95,96,97,98,100) molybdenum isotopes. The nuclear responses for these nuclei are additionally computed by folding the computed cross sections with a Fermi-Dirac distribution.

  10. Performance and Safety Characteristics of Lithium-molybdenum Disulfide Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The lithium-molybdenum disulfide system offers attractive characteristics including high rate capability, successful operation up to 75 C, a very low self-discharge rate, a good cycle life and safety characteristics which compare favorably to those of other lithium cells. Moreover, the materials and manufacturing costs for the system is effectively controlled, so the cells should ultimately be competitive with currently marketed rechargeable cells.

  11. Molybdenum as a contact material in zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Peterson, R. L.

    2014-05-12

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are of increasing interest for a variety of thin film electronics applications. Here, the contact properties of different source/drain electrode materials to solution-processed amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors are studied using the transmission line method. The width-normalized contact resistance between ZTO and sputtered molybdenum is measured to be 8.7 Ω-cm, which is 10, 20, and 600 times smaller than that of gold/titanium, indium tin oxide, and evaporated molybdenum electrodes, respectively. The superior contact formed using sputtered molybdenum is due to a favorable work function lineup, an insulator-free interface, bombardment of ZTO during molybdenum sputtering, and trap-assisted tunneling. The transfer length of the sputtered molybdenum/ZTO contact is 0.34 μm, opening the door to future radio-frequency sub-micron molybdenum/ZTO thin film transistors.

  12. Densification of molybdenum and molybdenum alloy powders using hot isostatic pressing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Ahmad, I.; Isserow, S.; Warenchak, R.

    1985-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine a superior erosion-resistant gun-barrel liner material with improved properties at higher temperatures. Four categories of powders were examined: 1. TZM spherical containing 0.5 titanium, 0.08 zirconium, and 0.02 carbon (wt. % nominally), balance molybdenum (Mo), produced by REP (Rotating Electrode Process), PREP (Plasma Rotating Electrode Process), and PMRS (Plasma Melted and Rapidly Solidified); 2. Mo reduced 2 and 5 microns; 3. Mo-0.1% cobalt, co-reduced; 4. Mo-5 wt. % alumina (A12O3), dispersion strengthened. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) densification occurred at 15-30 Ksi, 1300-1600 C, for 1.5 to 3.0 hours. The TZM REP/PREP powders (220/74 microns) were not fully densified even at 1600 C, 30 Ksi, 3 hours. Point-particle contact prevented complete void elimination. TZM PMRS powder (24.7 microns) achieved 99% of theoretical density while maintaining a small grain size (10.4 ASTM eq.) Bend deflection and fracture energies were approximately three times those for PREP powder at a bend rupture strength of about 120 Ksi. Mo reduced and Mo-0.1% Co powders showed less (or the same) ductility with increasing HIP temperatures. Fractures were intergranular with decreased bend rupture and compression strength. The Mo-5A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ powder maintained a fine grain size (13 ASTM eq.), but with fracture energies usually less than 0.6 in.-lbs. Included are results from bending and compression testing with metallographic and fracture mode interpretation.

  13. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  14. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  15. On the Origin of the Lightest Molybdenum Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J L; Hoffman, R D; Pruet, J

    2007-10-24

    We discuss implications of recent precision measurements for the {sup 93}Rh proton separation energy for the production of the lightest molybdenum isotopes in proton-rich type II supernova ejecta. It has recently been shown that a novel neutrino-induced process makes these ejecta a promising site for the production of the light molybdenum isotopes and other 'p-nuclei' with atomic mass near 100. The origin of these isotopes has long been uncertain. A distinguishing feature of nucleosynthesis in neutrino-irradiated outflows is that the relative production of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo is set by a competition governed by the proton separation energy of {sup 93}Rh. We use detailed nuclear network calculations and the recent experimental results for this proton separation energy to place constraints on the outflow characteristics that produce the lightest molybdenum isotopes in their solar proportions. It is found that for the conditions calculated in recent two-dimensional supernova simulations, and also for a large range of outflow characteristics around these conditions, the solar ratio of {sup 92}Mo to {sup 94}Mo cannot be achieved. This suggests that either proton-rich winds from type II supernova do not exclusively produce both isotopes, or that these winds are qualitatively different than calculated in today's supernova models.

  16. Pulsed electrodeposition and characterization of molybdenum diselenide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Delphine, S. Mary; Jayachandran, M.; Sanjeeviraja, C. . E-mail: sanjeeviraja@rediffmail.com

    2005-01-04

    Molybdenum dichalcogenides are semiconductors with layered type structure, which can act as efficient electrodes in the realization of photoelectrochemical solar cells. The main advantage of this molybdenum diselenide (MoSe{sub 2}) semiconductor is the prevention of electrolyte corrosion because of the phototransitions involving non-bonding d-d orbital of the Mo atoms. Polycrystalline molybdenum diselenide thin films are prepared by pulsed electrodeposition on conducting glass and titanium substrates in galvanostatic mode from an ammoniacal solution of H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} and SeO{sub 2}. The growth kinetics of the film was studied and the deposition parameters such as electrolyte bath concentration, bath temperature, time of deposition, deposition current, pH of the electrolyte and duty cycle of the current are optimized. X-ray diffraction analysis of the as deposited and annealed films showed the presence of highly textured MoSe{sub 2} films with polycrystalline nature. EDAX spectrum of the surface composition confirms the nearly stoichiometric MoSe{sub 2} nature of the film. Surface morphology studies by scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows that the films are pinhole free and of device quality nature. The optical absorption spectra show an indirect band gap value of 1.16 eV. Conductivity measurements were carried out at different temperatures and electrical constants such as activation energy, trapped energy state and barrier height were calculated.

  17. A study of high-velocity combustion wire molybdenum coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, S. C.; Calla, Eklavya

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, coatings manufactured using the high-velocity combustion wire (HVCW) spray process have been studied. Molybdenum coatings were prepared in this study, and wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDX) investigations were carried out to ascertain the oxygen content of the coating and its distribution. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the coating was also carried out to determine the phases present in the coating. Based on the above data, the authors explain the HVCW-sprayed molybdenum coating microstructure properties. These coatings were also sprayed using a modified aircap design. The parameters varied for the molybdenum coatings by HVCW and were (1) the distance of the substrate from the spray gun and (2) the wire feed rate of the gun. The wear test and coefficient of friction measurements were also carried out for the coatings. Air plasma spraying of Mo-25% NiCrBSi coatings was carried out, and these coatings were further checked for wear friction properties.

  18. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO{sub 4} propylene carbonate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 cm{sup 2}/C.

  19. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  20. Criticality experiments and analysis of molybdenum reflected cylindrical uranyl fluoride water solution reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.; Fox, T.; Mueller, R.

    1972-01-01

    Clean criticality data were obtained from molybdenum-reflected cylindrical uranyl-fluoride-water solution reactors. Using ENDF/B molybdenum cross sections, a nine energy group two-dimensional transport calculation of a reflected reactor configuration predicted criticality to within 7 cents of the experimental value. For these reactors, it was necessary to compute the reflector resonance integral by a detailed transport calculation at the core-reflector interface volume in the energy region of the two dominant resonances of natural molybdenum.

  1. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  2. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  3. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  4. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  5. 38 CFR 4.79 - Schedule of ratings-eye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to special monthly compensation under 38 CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Visual Fields Rating... CFR 3.350. Ratings for Impairment of Muscle Function Degree of diplopia Equivalentvisual acuity.../200 (6/60) (2) Lateral 20/70 (6/21) (3) Up 20/40 (6/12) Note: In accordance with 38 CFR 4.31,...

  6. Ni 80Fe 20 permalloy nanoparticles: Wet chemical preparation, size control and their dynamic permeability characteristics when composited with Fe micron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G. W.; Pei, W. L.; Ren, Y. P.; Shimada, Y.; Endo, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.

    2009-12-01

    Ni 80Fe 20 permalloy nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared by the polyol processing at 180 °C for 2 h and their particle sizes can be precisely controlled in the size range of 20-440 nm by proper addition of K 2PtCl 4 agent. X-ray diffraction results show that the Ni-Fe NPs are of FCC structure, and a homogeneous composition and a narrow size distribution of these NPs have been confirmed by scanning electron microscopy assisted with energy dispersion spectroscopy of X-ray (SEM-EDX). The saturation magnetization of ~440nm NPs is 80.8 emu/g that is comparable to that of bulk Ni 80Fe 20 alloys, but it decreases to 28.7 emu/g for ~20 nm NPs. The coercive force decreases from 90 to 3 Oe with decreasing NP size. The wide range of particle size is exploited to seek for high permeability composite particles. The planar type samples composed of the NiFe NPs exhibit low initial permeability due to the deteriorated magnetic softness and low packing density. However, when they are mixed with Fe micron particles, the initial permeability significantly increases depending on the mixing ratio and the NiFe NP size. A maximum initial permeability is achieved to be ~9.1 at 1 GHz for the Fe-10 vol%NiFe (~20 nmΦ), which is about three times that of pure Fe micron particles. The effects of Ni-Fe particle size, volume percentage and solvent on the static and dynamic permeability are discussed.

  7. CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION EMISSIONS FROM MOLYBDENUM ROASTING. VOLUME 2. ALTERNATIVES FOR CONTROL OF WEAK SULFUR DIOXIDE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the second phase of a three phase effort evaluating (1) characterization of particulate control of a molybdenum sulfide roasters, (2) assessment of sulfur dioxide abatement alternatives for nonferrous smelting and, in particular, for molybdenum roasting, and (3...

  8. Relief Creation on Molybdenum Plates in Discharges Initiated by Gyrotron Radiation in Metal-Dielectric Powder Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Malakhov, D. V.; Sorokin, A. A.; Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Letunov, A. A.; Petrov, A. E.; Ryabikina, I. G.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Sokolov, A. S.; Smirnov, V. A.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2016-02-01

    We show the possibility of creating a metal microcrystalline relief (micro- and nanosized) on molybdenum plates in a plasma gas-phase discharge initiated by gyrotron radiation in molybdenum-dielectric powder mixtures.

  9. Electron-diffraction study of the interaction of carbon with the products of reduction of molybdenum from the trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Solonin, Yu. M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper studies the mechanisms of the structural transformations at the remaining possible stages of the process of reduction of molybdenum trioxide by hydrogen in the presence of simultaneous interaction of the reaction products with carbon. The authors find that the intermediate molybdenum suboxide (NaC1 structural type) in this case restructures directly into hexagonal molybdenum carbide. The hexagonal Mo/sub 2/C apparently forms on the (110) planes of molybdenum.

  10. Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution Analytical Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Weaver, Jamie L.

    2015-11-01

    This document is a companion report to a previous report, PNNL 24519, Measurement of Actinides in Molybdenum-99 Solution, A Brief Review of the Literature, August 2015. In this companion report, we report a fast, accurate, newly developed analytical method for measurement of trace alpha-emitting actinide elements in commercial high-activity molybdenum-99 solution. Molybdenum-99 is widely used to produce 99mTc for medical imaging. Because it is used as a radiopharmaceutical, its purity must be proven to be extremely high, particularly for the alpha emitting actinides. The sample of 99Mo solution is measured into a vessel (such as a polyethylene centrifuge tube) and acidified with dilute nitric acid. A gadolinium carrier is added (50 µg). Tracers and spikes are added as necessary. Then the solution is made strongly basic with ammonium hydroxide, which causes the gadolinium carrier to precipitate as hydrous Gd(OH)3. The precipitate of Gd(OH)3 carries all of the actinide elements. The suspension of gadolinium hydroxide is then passed through a membrane filter to make a counting mount suitable for direct alpha spectrometry. The high-activity 99Mo and 99mTc pass through the membrane filter and are separated from the alpha emitters. The gadolinium hydroxide, carrying any trace actinide elements that might be present in the sample, forms a thin, uniform cake on the surface of the membrane filter. The filter cake is first washed with dilute ammonium hydroxide to push the last traces of molybdate through, then with water. The filter is then mounted on a stainless steel counting disk. Finally, the alpha emitting actinide elements are measured by alpha spectrometry.

  11. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-01-01

    We have performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. The ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems. PMID:26876194

  12. Sintering behavior of biporous molybdenum-copper pseudoalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshev, L.I.; Kostornov, A.G.; Pavlenko, N.P.; Rostunova, O.N.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes solid- and liquid-phase sintering experiments performed on a biporous molybdenum-copper material, the purpose of which was to investigate the processes taking place at the microporosity level. It is shown that the sintering is accompanied by an increase in pore size at the macroporosity level, which is a manifestation of the law of zonal separation. At the microporosity level, the sintering of a biporous material determines the structural characteristics of the material at the macroporosity level. Some characteristics of the solidand liquid-phase sintering behavior of the material investigated have been established.

  13. Physicochemical investigation of NiAl with small molybdenum additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troshkina, V. A.; Kucherenko, L. A.; Fadeeva, V. I.; Aristova, N. M.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of four cast NiAl alloys, three of them containing 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 at. % Mo., were homogenized for 10, 10, and 140 hr at 1373, 1523 and 1273 K, respectively, then kept at 1073, 1173 and 1323 K for 60, 120 and 3 hr, respectively, and quenched in icy water. The precipitation of a metastable Ni3Mo phase was observed at temperatures between 1073 and 1523 K. Molybdenum substituted for nickel was found to inhibit the lattice disordering in NiAl at 1073 and 1523 K.

  14. Processing-Structure Correlation in DC Sputtered Molybdenum Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majid; Islam, Mohammad; Akram, Aftab; Manzoor, Umair

    2013-12-01

    Molybdenum thin films were sputter deposited under different conditions of DC power and chamber pressure. The structure and topography of the films were investigated using AFM, SEM and XRD techniques. Van der Pauw method and tape test were employed to determine electrical resistivity and interfacial strength to the substrate, respectively. All the films are of sub-micron thickness with maximum growth rate of 78 nm/min and crystallite size in the range of 4 to 21 nm. The films produced at high power and low pressure exhibit compressive residual strains, low electrical resistivity and poor adhesion to the glass substrate, whereas the converse is true for films produced at high pressure.

  15. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-02-15

    We performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. Furthermore, the ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems.

  16. Geology of the Starr molybdenum mine, Okanogan County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Creasey, S.C.

    1954-01-01

    The Starr molybdenum mine, Okanogan County, Wash., is about 5 airline miles west of Tonasket in the north-central part of the State. The mineralized zone has been explored to a depth of 250 feet by means of three adit levels, one sublevel, and a raise which connects two of the adits and the sublevel. In all, there are about 2,700 feet of underground workings. The mine has neither machinery nor a developed water supply adequate for any work other than a small exploratory program.

  17. A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.

    1986-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

  18. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J; Prasankumar, Rohit P

    2016-01-01

    We have performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. The ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems. PMID:26876194

  19. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum

  20. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  1. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  2. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  3. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. (a)...

  5. Leaching of molybdenum and arsenic from uranium ore and mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    A sequential, selective extraction procedure was used to assess the effects of sulfuric acid milling on the geochemical associations of molybdenum and arsenic in a uranium ore blend, and the tailings derived therefrom. The milling process removed about 21% of the molybdenum and 53% of the arsenic initially present in the ore. While about one-half of the molybdenum in the ore was water soluble, only about 14% existed in this form in the tailings. The major portion of the extractable molybdenum in the tailings appears to be associated with hydrous oxides of iron, and with alkaline earth sulfate precipitates. In contrast with the pattern seen for molybdenum, the partitioning of arsenic into the various extractable fractions differs little between the ore and the tailings. ?? 1984.

  6. Molybdenum and copper levels in white-tailed deer near uranium mines in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.; LeLeux, J.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum toxicity, molybdenosis, in ruminant animals has been identified in at least 15 states and in Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand. In most western states, molybdenosis has been associated with strip-mine spoil deposits. Molybdenum toxicity has been diagnosed in cattle pastured near uranium strip-mine spoils in several Texas counties. Recent reports from hunters and the authors' observations indicated that white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus ) that fed near uranium-mine spoil deposits may also have been exposed to high levels of molybdenum. The objectives of this study were to determine if white-tailed deer from a South Texas uranium mining district were accumulating harmful levels of molybdenum and to compare molybdenum and copper levels with antler development in deer from the mined area vs. an unmined control area.

  7. Studies by electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectroscopy of the environment of the metal in the molybdenum cofactor of molybdenum-containing enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, T R; Bray, R C

    1984-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor prepared by denaturing xanthine oxidase by heat treatment or other methods was partially purified by anaerobic gel filtration in the presence of sodium dithionite, with little loss of activity. A range of products with different elution volumes was obtained. This behaviour is apparently related to association of the molybdenum cofactor with various residual peptides. E.p.r. signals from molybdenum (V) in the active cofactor, present either in crude preparations or in purified fractions, may be generated in dimethyl sulphoxide solution by controlled oxidation carried out on the molybdenum cofactor alone or in the presence of added thiols. The g-values of the spectra suggest that in the oxidized cofactor molybdenum has one terminal oxygen ligand and four ligands from thiolate groups. It is proposed that two of these are from the organic part of the cofactor and two from cysteine residues in the protein or in residual peptides. A signal generated in high yield with little loss of cofactor activity in the presence of thiophenol has g parallel = 2.0258 and g = 1.9793. It is suggested that in this species two cysteine residues have been replaced by two thiophenol molecules. The possible usefulness of the thiophenol complex in further purification of the molybdenum cofactor is discussed. PMID:6091619

  8. Role of molybdenum in dinitrogen fixation by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, J; Mortenson, L E

    1975-01-01

    The role of Mo in the activity and synthesis of the nitrogenase components of Clostridium pasteurianum has been studied by observing the competition of Mo with its structural analogue W. Clostridial cells when fixing N2 appeared strictly dependent upon the available Mo, showing maximal N2-fixing activity at molybdate concentrations in the media of 10 muM. Cells grown in media with 3 times 10(-6) muM Mo, although showing good growth, had only 15% as much N2-fixing activity. In the presence of W the synthesis of both nitrogenase components, molybdoferredoxin and azoferredoxin, was affected. Attempts to produce nitrogenase in W-grown cells by addition of high molybdenum to the media in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis showed that Mo incorporation into a possible inactive preformed apoenzyme did not occur. Unlike other molybdoenzyme-containing cells, in which W either is incorporated in place of Mo to yield inactive protein or initiates the production of apoprotein, C. pasteurianum forms neither a tungsten substituted molybdoferredoxin nor an apoprotein. It is concluded that in C. pasteurianum molybdenum is an essential requirement for both the biosynthesis and activity of its nitrogenase. PMID:1158853

  9. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I.; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R.; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP—used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor’s nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  10. Magnetic ordering in lanthanide-molybdenum oxide nanostructure arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Joseph; Le, Son; Schneemeyer, Lynn; Olsen, Patti; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo; Seiler, David; Richter, Curt

    Reduced ternary molybdenum oxides, or bronzes, offer an attractive materials platform to study a wide variety of remarkable physical phenomena in a system with highly varied structural chemistry. Interesting electronic behaviors, such as superconductivity, charge density waves, and magnetism, in these materials arise from the strong hybridization of the 4d states of high-valent Mo with O p orbitals. We investigate a series of molybdenum bronze materials with Lanthanide-Mo16O44 composition that can be described as a three-dimensional array of metallic Mo8O32 nanostructures computationally predicted to contain a single charge with spin 1/2 separated by insulating MoO4 tetrahedra. This study reveals novel magnetic ordering in Lanthanide-Mo16O44 systems arising, not from the inclusion of magnetic elements, but rather from an exchange interaction between cubic Mo8O32 units. Here, we report the magnetometry and transport behaviors of a series of Lanthanide-Mo16O44 materials, emphasizing an observed low-temperature phase transition signifying the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering between the arrayed nanostructures, and relate these behaviors to their experimentally-characterized structures to reveal the intriguing physics of these correlated electronic systems.

  11. Authigenic Molybdenum Isotopes Record Lake Baikal in the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, E.; Liu, H.; Lee, D.

    2013-12-01

    Authigenic molybdenum isotope signatures in marine sediments reflect the mechanisms of deposits under both oxic and reducing conditions. The studies are mainly focusing on marine environment, and the application on lake record is rare. A three-meters long gravity core (GC-99; 52°05'23'N, 105°50'24'E; water depth 201m) from Lake Baikal is studied for Mo isotopes and concentration. The result is using to examine the sources of material or/and the changes in conditions of Lake Baikal with climate changes. To approach on extracting Mo isotope signal directly related to lake water, a sequential leaching technique to extract the Mo isotopes coating on the Fe-Mn oxides and a robust chromatography technique to purify molybdenum isotopes is modified and used for all lake sediment samples. Then, Mo isotope composition is measured by applying double spike method with Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). According to the Mo concentration and its isotope composition δ98/95Mo relative to NIST-SRM-3134, the results imply Lake Baikal stayed oxic condition over the last 24 ka. Moreover, the sediment core GC-99 from Lake Baikal imply two stages fluctuations of the lake environment separated at core depth of 100cm (around 12ka); and the shifting of δ98/95Mo isotope composition shows that the lake during interglacial period was more oxic than the last glacial period due to absence of ice cover.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of several molybdenum chloride cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, W.W.

    1983-06-01

    Investigation into the direct synthesis of Mo/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/(P(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/)/sub 4/ from Mo/sub 2/(OAc)/sub 4/ led to a synthetic procedure that produces yields greater than 80%. The single-crystal structure disclosed a planar rectangular cluster of molybdenum atoms. Metal-metal bond distances suggest that the long edges of the rectangular cluster should be considered to be single bonds and the short metal-metal bonds to be triple bonds. This view is reinforced by an extended Hueckel calculation. Attempts to add a metal atom to Mo/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/ to form Mo/sub 5/Cl/sub 10/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 3/ led instead to a compound with the composition Mo/sub 8/Cl/sub 16/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/. Solution and reflectance uv-visible spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra suggest that tetranuclear molybdenum units are present. The facile reaction between Mo/sub 8/Cl/sub 16/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and PR/sub 3/ imply that the linkage between tetrameric units is weak.

  13. Physical properties about metal matrix FGM of molybdenum and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kouichi; Nishida, Shinichi

    1995-11-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) have been made trials to produce by a lot of fabrication processes such as the powder metallurgical method, the plasma spraying, the diffusion bonding, the physical vapor deposition method, the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) etc. In the most cases of these processes, dissimilar materials are combined or bonded directly. The various physical properties are discontinuous at the bonded interface of the dissimilar materials. In order to overcome the problem, functionally gradient materials (FGM) have been considered recently, and have attracted the authors. Its compositions are prepared so that physical properties continuously vary across the bond interface of the dissimilar metals. In this study, a FGM is produced by a new process based on HIP. Copper and molybdenum, which are distinct in the thermo-physical property to each other, are the constitutents for the FGM. This composition have been confirmed by absorbed electron and characteristics X-ray images of each mixed layer for FGM to be uniform or continuous. The following items have been investigated and compared with the linear law of mixture rule: Vickers hardness, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity at a one-dimensional non-steady state. Those physical properties have been identified to depend on the mixing ratios of copper and molybdenum. Pretty good agreements have been obtained between the experimental data and the calculated values according to the linear law of mixture rule.

  14. Full Densification of Molybdenum Powders Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Soueidan, M.; Fabrègue, D.; Buttay, C.; Bley, V.; Allard, B.; Morel, H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure molybdenum powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) under various temperatures and holding times, under a pressure of 77 MPa and a heating rate at 700 K/min (700 °C/min). After sintering, a carbide layer was observed at the surface. The carbide layer thickness, the relative density of the sample as well as the microhardness, and the grain size of Mo were measured. The carbide thickness depends on time and temperature, and it was found that the carbide layer grows in a parabolic manner, with the activation energy of carbon diffusion in Mo being equal to 34 Kcal/mol. The densification of Mo is controlled mainly by the sintering temperature and the holding time. The molybdenum powder was successfully consolidated by SPS in short times. A relative density of 100 pct is achieved at a sintering temperature of 2123.15 K (1850 °C) and a holding time of 30 minutes. It was shown that the hardness decreases slightly with temperature and time. It should be related to the increase in grain size with the sintering temperature and time.

  15. Full Densification of Molybdenum Powders Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Soueidan, M.; Fabrègue, D.; Buttay, C.; Bley, V.; Allard, B.; Morel, H.

    2012-05-01

    Pure molybdenum powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) under various temperatures and holding times, under a pressure of 77 MPa and a heating rate at 700 K/min (700 °C/min). After sintering, a carbide layer was observed at the surface. The carbide layer thickness, the relative density of the sample as well as the microhardness, and the grain size of Mo were measured. The carbide thickness depends on time and temperature, and it was found that the carbide layer grows in a parabolic manner, with the activation energy of carbon diffusion in Mo being equal to 34 Kcal/mol. The densification of Mo is controlled mainly by the sintering temperature and the holding time. The molybdenum powder was successfully consolidated by SPS in short times. A relative density of 100 pct is achieved at a sintering temperature of 2123.15 K (1850 °C) and a holding time of 30 minutes. It was shown that the hardness decreases slightly with temperature and time. It should be related to the increase in grain size with the sintering temperature and time.

  16. Nanostructured Molybdenum Oxides for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Deshpande, Rohit; Parilla, Phil; Jones, Kim; To, Bobby; Mahan, Harv; Dillon, Anne

    2007-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are the current power sources of choice for portable electronics. Although such batteries are commercially successful, they are not keeping pace with the rapid advances in computing technologies. Also, further improvement of performance and simultaneous reduction in cost as well as material toxicity remain the subject of intensive research. Here we report the synthesis and electrochemical performance of a novel molybdenum oxide nanoparticle anode that dramatically improves current Li-ion battery technologies. Crystalline MoOx nanoparticles have been grown by an economical hot-wire chemical-vapor-deposition (HWCVD) technique and a recently developed electrophoresis technique is employed for the fabrication of porous nanoparticle anodes. Our material exhibits a high reversible capacity of ˜600 mAh/g in the range 0.005-3.0 V with excellent cycling characteristics as well as high-rate capability. Both cycling stability and rate capability issues are addressed by employing these porous molybdenum oxide films that consist of nanoscale active particles. These materials will impact the next generations of rechargeable lithium batteries, not only for applications in consumer electronics, but also for clean energy storage and use in hybrid electric vehicles.

  17. Supported molybdenum carbide catalysts: Structure-function relationships for hydrodenitrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Dolce, G.M.; Thompson, L.T.

    1997-12-31

    There continues to be a need for new catalysts that can efficiently upgrade petroleum crudes. Heavy oils and coal-derived liquids contain higher levels of nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen than conventional light crudes, and therefore require more rigorous refining. Currently available commercial catalysts are not as active and efficient at hydrotreating these heavy oils compared to light crudes. Early transition metal carbides and nitrides have been shown to be active for the hydrotreatment of model compounds and petroleum crudes. In this paper the authors describe their investigations of the structural and compositional properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported molybdenum carbides and efforts to correlate these properties with their pyridine and quinoline hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activities. The HDN activities of the materials scaled linearly with the loading and oxygen chemisorptive uptake. Oxygen chemisorption results also suggested that the molybdenum carbide particles were highly dispersed and perhaps raft-like. Using temperature programmed desorption and infrared spectroscopy of carbon monoxide, they were able to identify two types of sites on the carbides; sites on top of the particle and sites at the perimeter. They have tentatively concluded that the most active sites for HDN were on top of the supported carbide particles.

  18. High temperature oxidation of molybdenum in water vapor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. T.; Sooby, E. S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Cheng, B.; Maloy, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum has recently gained attention as a candidate cladding material for use in light water reactors. Its excellent high temperature mechanical properties and stability under irradiation suggest that it could offer benefits to performance under a wide range of reactor conditions, but little is known about its oxidation behavior in water vapor containing atmospheres. The current study was undertaken to elucidate the oxidation behavior of molybdenum in water vapor environments to 1200 °C in order to provide an initial assessment of its feasibility as a light water reactor cladding. Initial observations indicate that at temperatures below 1000 °C, the kinetics of mass loss in water vapor would not be detrimental to cladding integrity during an off-normal event. Above 1000 °C, degradation is more rapid but remains slower than observed for optimized zirconium cladding alloys. The effect of hydrogen-water vapor and oxygen-water vapor mixtures on material loss was also explored at elevated temperatures. Parts-per-million levels of either hydrogen or oxygen will minimally impact performance, but hydrogen contents in excess of 1000 ppm were observed to limit volatilization at 1000 °C.

  19. Molybdenum-silicon multilayer mirrors for the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Mrowka, S.; Hetrick, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Multilayer structures of molybdenum and silicon have been synthesized by sputter deposition onto flat silicon single-crystal silicon substrates and spherically ground (0.5and 22.0-m radii) fused silica substrates; and the reflectivities for 170.4-A (72.8-eV), 160.1-A (77.4-eV), and 228-A (54.4-eV) light measured at near normal incidence. Observed peak values ranged from 26.2 to 78 percent, the highest reflectivities occurring closest to normal incidence. Energy resolutions were about 10 in all cases. Model calculations were performed using optical constants and experimentally determined multilayer structural parameters. In all cases the measured reflectivities were equal to or larger (by up to a factor of 2) than the calculated values, a result attributed to uncertainty in the optical constants used in the calculations. Experimental and calculated angular-peak positions and energy resolutions were in good agreement. The high reflectivities of these molybdenum-silicon structures will make possible application of traditional optics approaches in the EUV and support new developments including free-electron lasers.

  20. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on processing parameters and in-situ oxygen gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, L.E.; Jellison, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture toughness properties have been determined for laser welds in different grades of molybdenum. The fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum was consistently less than the fracture toughness of welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum. These differences cannot be attributed to oxygen content, since the oxygen level was nominally the same for all grades of molybdenum examined in this program. Alloy additions of titanium by means of physically deposited coatings significantly improved the fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum, whereas titanium additions to welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum decreased the fracture toughness slightly. Pulsed laser welds exhibited fine columnar structures and, in the case of sintered molybdenum, superior fracture toughness when compared with continuous wave laser welds. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Influence of oxygen concentration on mechanical properties of molybdenum powder during sintering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Back-Kyu; Oh, Jung-Min; Shon, In-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lim, Jae-Won

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the influence of oxygen concentration on the mechanical properties of sintered bodies produced from commercial and low-oxygen molybdenum powder via pulsed-current-activated sintering was determined. The hardness of the sintered bodies increased with the sintering temperature up to 1,500 degrees C and then decreased with further temperature increase. The hardness of the sintered low-oxygen-molybdenum body was slightly higher than the rest of the sintered bodies. This was because the relative density of the sintered low-oxygen-molybdenum body increased more than that of others as the sintering temperature increased. Furthermore, the grain size of the sintered commercial-molybdenum body was larger than that of the sintered low-oxygen-molybdenum body. This was attributed to the positive effect of molybdenum oxide on grain growth during sintering. Thus, it was established that low-oxygen molybdenum powder can suppress grain growth during sintering, resulting in improved mechanical properties of the sintered bodies. PMID:25971004

  2. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Soncini, V.

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF2 implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF2 implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  3. Selective Autooxidation of Ethanol over Titania-Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts: Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Carlos; Thirunavukkarasu, K; Anilkumar, M; Shiju, N R; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    We study the selective catalytic oxidation of ethanol with air as a sustainable alternative route to acetaldehyde. The reaction is catalysed by molybdenum oxide supported on titania, in a flow reactor under ambient pressure. High selectivity to acetaldehyde (70%–89%, depending on the Mo loading) is obtained at 150 °C. Subsequently, we investigate the structure/performance relationship for various molybdenum oxide species using a combination of techniques including diffuse reflectance UV-visible, infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction. As their surface density increases, the monomeric molybdenum oxide species undergo two-dimensional and three-dimensional oligomerisation. This results in polymolybdates and molybdenum oxide crystallites. Importantly, the ethanol oxidation rate depends not only on the overall molybdenum loading and dispersion, but also on the type of molybdenum oxide species prevalent at each surface density and on the domain size. As the molybdenum oxide oligomerisation increases, electron delocalisation becomes easier. This lowers the absorption edge energy and increases the reaction rate. PMID:23396482

  4. Characterization of chlD gene required for molybdenum utilization in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Amy, N.K.

    1986-05-01

    ChlD mutants in E. coli have altered biochemical utilization of molybdenum from wild type cells. These mutants have reduced nitrate reductase and molybdenum cofactor activities when grown in low concentrations of molybdenum. When molybdenum is supplemented to 100..mu..M the mutants have wild type levels of both activities. In this study they have isolated a single copy episome containing the chlD gene using interrupted mating techniques as well as a multiple copy plasmid pBR322 with an insert containing the chlD gene using cloning techniques. The introduction of these additional chlD genes into a chlD mutant healed the phenotype when grown in low molybdenum concentrations. This indicates the chlD locus encodes for a transacting gene product. The restoration of phenotype was identical for both the single copy as well as multiple copy merodiploids. The pBR322 with the insert containing the chlD gene is currently being further characterized by restriction mapping. Previous studies have shown that the expression of the chlD gene as measured by ..beta..-galactosidase activity in chlD lac operon fusion mutants was high in cells grown in low molybdenum concentrations and low in cells grown in high molybdenum concentrations. This expression was unaltered when the episome containing the chlD gene was introduced into the chlD lac operon fusion mutant. This indicates that the product of the chlD gene is not required for regulation by molybdenum. The effect of multiple copies of the chlD gene on the expression of the chlD lac operon fusion is presently being studied. The eventual goal of these studies is to determine the function of the chlD gene in the activation of molybdenum.

  5. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOEpatents

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  6. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOEpatents

    Hilsenbeck, Shane J.; McCarley, Robert E.; Schrader, Glenn L.; Xie, Xiaobing

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

  7. Role of electron concentration in softening and hardening of ternary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of various combinations of hafnium, tantalum, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum in ternary molybdenum alloys on alloy softening and hardening were determined. Hardness tests were conducted at four test temperatures over the temperature range 77 to 411 K. Results showed that hardness data for ternary molybdenum alloys could be correlated with anticipated results from binary data based upon expressions involving the number of s and d electrons contributed by the solute elements. The correlation indicated that electron concentration plays a dominant role in controlling the hardness of ternary molybdenum alloys.

  8. Comparison of effects on crustaceans: carbon nanoparticles and molybdenum compounds nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumerte, A.; Sakale, G.; Zavickis, J.; Putna, I.; Balode, M.; Mrzel, A.; Knite, M.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNM) and molybdenum compound nanostructures are materials with various applications yet little is known regarding the toxicity of these nanoparticles in pristine form in aquatic environment. Daphnia magna standard acute toxicity test (EN ISO 6341:1996; freshwater) and Artemia salina standard acute toxicity test (ArtoxKit standard method; 15 ppt saltwater) were applied to assess the toxicity of non-modified CNM and molybdenum compound nanowires in water. It has been observed that CNM are more toxic in freshwater suspensions and somewhat more toxic than the tested molybdenum compound nanowires.

  9. Superconductivity in the alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The complete series of alkali metals, lithium through cesium, have been intercalated into molybdenum disulphide, using both the liquid ammonia and vapor techniques. All the intercalates with the exception of lithium yielded full superconducting transitions with onset temperatures of 6 K for AxMoS2(Ax=K,Rb,Cs) and 4 K for BxMoS2(Bx=Li,Na). The superconducting transition for lithium was incomplete down to 1.5 K. Stoichiometries and unit cell parameters have been determined for the intercalation compounds. Both rhombohedral and hexagonal polymorphs of MoS2 have been intercalated and found to exhibit the same superconductivity behavior. The nature of the extraneous superconducting transition of some intercalated samples on exposure to air was elucidated.

  10. Enhanced electrochromism in cerium doped molybdenum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanasankar, M.; Purushothaman, K.K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2010-12-15

    Cerium (5-15% by weight) doped molybdenum oxide thin films have been prepared on FTO coated glass substrate at 250 {sup o}C using sol-gel dip coating method. The structural and morphological changes were observed with the help of XRD, SEM and EDS analysis. The amorphous structure of the Ce doped samples, favours easy intercalation and deintercalation processes. Mo oxide films with 10 wt.% of Ce exhibit maximum anodic diffusion coefficient of 24.99 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 2}/s and the change in optical transmittance of ({Delta}T at 550 nm) of 79.28% between coloured and bleached state with the optical density of ({Delta}OD) 1.15.

  11. Selective and efficient electrochemical biosensing of ultrathin molybdenum disulfide sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Vusa, Chiranjeevi S. R.; Alwarappan, Subbiah

    2014-08-01

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sheets were synthesized and isolated via solvent-assisted chemical exfoliation. The charge-dependent electrochemical activities of these MoS2 sheets were studied using positively charged hexamine ruthenium (III) chloride and negatively charged ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox probes. Ultrathin MoS2 sheet-based electrodes were employed for the electrochemical detection of an important neurotransmitter, namely dopamine (DA), in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). MoS2 electrodes were identified as being capable of distinguishing the coexistence of the DA and the AA with an excellent stability. Moreover, the enzymatic detection of the glucose was studied by immobilizing glucose oxidase on the MoS2. This study opens enzymatic and non-enzymatic electrochemical biosensing applications of atomic MoS2 sheets, which will supplement their established electronic applications.

  12. Wet chemical thinning of molybdenum disulfide down to its monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Amara, Kiran Kumar; Chu, Leiqiang; Kumar, Rajeev; Toh, Minglin; Eda, Goki

    2014-09-01

    We report on the preparation of mono- and bi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) from a bulk crystal by facile wet chemical etching. We show that concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) effectively etches thin MoS{sub 2} crystals from their edges via formation of MoO{sub 3}. Interestingly, etching of thin crystals on a substrate leaves behind unreacted mono- and bilayer sheets. The flakes obtained by chemical etching exhibit electronic quality comparable to that of mechanically exfoliated counterparts. Our findings indicate that the self-limiting chemical etching is a promising top-down route to preparing atomically thin crystals from bulk layer compounds.

  13. Temperature effect on optical spectra of monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soklaski, Ryan; Liang, Yufeng; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    Recently, measured optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra reveal substantial frequency shifts of both exciton and trion peaks as monolayer molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, is cooled from 363 K to 4 K. First-principles simulations using the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation approach satisfactorily reproduce these frequency shifts by incorporating the thermal expansion effect. Studying these temperature effects in monolayer MoS2 is crucial for rectifying the results of available experiments with the previous predictions of zero-temperature-limit simulations. Moreover, our estimated thermal expansion coefficient of monolayer MoS2 is less than that of bulk counterpart by tracking the frequency shifts of the exciton peaks in optical spectra. This may serve as a convenient way to estimate thermal expansion coefficients of general two-dimensional chalcogenides.

  14. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  15. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    1981-01-01

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  16. High Performance Molybdenum Disulfide Amorphous Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili-Rad, Mohammad R.; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2013-01-01

    One important use of layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could be in making novel heterojunction devices leading to functionalities unachievable using conventional semiconductors. Here we demonstrate a metal-semiconductor-metal heterojunction photodetector, made of MoS2 and amorphous silicon (a-Si), with rise and fall times of about 0.3 ms. The transient response does not show persistent (residual) photoconductivity, unlike conventional a-Si devices where it may last 3–5 ms, thus making this heterojunction roughly 10X faster. A photoresponsivity of 210 mA/W is measured at green light, the wavelength used in commercial imaging systems, which is 2−4X larger than that of a-Si and best reported MoS2 devices. The device could find applications in large area electronics, such as biomedical imaging, where a fast response is critical. PMID:23907598

  17. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-12-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  18. Towards slide enhancement with the titanium-molybdenum wire?

    PubMed

    Thiry, Pol; Barthélémi, Stéphane

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to improve the tribological properties of titanium-molybdenum wire. Following an analysis of the wire/bracket/ligation friction parameters and an overview of the technological research into means of reducing such friction,we set up several types of surface treatment in the laboratory by physical deposition in the vapor phase and using cold plasma technology. The specimens obtained underwent two types of tribological tests and were then subjected to traction and bending tests in order to determine the variations in their mechanical properties induced by the different types of treatment. For purposes of comparison, all the tests were conducted on untreated wire, TMA® Low-friction® wire and stainless steel wire and with two types of elastomeric ties. We were able to demonstrate some remarkable slide performances obtained using cold plasma nitriding while preserving the mechanical properties. A significant difference was observed relative to the other surface treatments. PMID:21094102

  19. The Myszkow porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Eppinger, R.G.; Lason, K.; Slosarz, J.; Podemski, M.

    1994-01-01

    The porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit at Myszkow, south-central Poland, lies in the Cracow-Silesian orogenic belt, in the vicinity of a Paleozoic boundary between two tectonic plates. The deposit is hosted in a complex that includes early Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks intruded in the late Paleozoic by a predominantly granodioritic pluton. This deposit exhibits many features that are typical of porphyry copper deposits associated with calc-alkaline intrusive rocks, including ore- and alteration-mineral suites, zoning of ore and alteration minerals, fluid-inclusion chemistry, tectonic setting, and structural style of veining. Unusual features of the Myszkow deposit include high concentrations of tungsten and the late Paleozoic (Variscan) age. -Authors

  20. The history of development of molybdenum alloys for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Wittenauer, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    Molybdenum was first isolated as an element in 1893 and found initial commercial application as a filament support for incandescent lamps in 1910. The advent of arc melting practice in the 1940s led to an increase in availability of Mo sheet, bar, and plate products. Alloy development programs were heavily supported starting in the 1950s and several key alloys emerged over the next twenty years that remain in use to the present time such as Mo-TZM, unalloyed Mo, and Mo-Re. In recent years, improved understanding of the role of oxygen and carbide distributions at grain boundaries have led to increased reliability and use of Mo in aerospace products. Current developmental programs in areas of propulsion and energy conversion will ensure the prominent position of Mo as a high-temperature structural material. This paper highlights some of these key developments in the evolution of Mo alloys.

  1. Predicting the stability of surface phases of molybdenum selenides

    SciTech Connect

    Roma, Guido; Ghorbani, Elaheh; Mirhosseini, Hossein; Kühne, Thomas D.; Kiss, Janos; Felser, Claudia

    2014-02-10

    The selenization of molybdenum might become an important step in the production of nanostructures based on the layered compound MoSe{sub 2}. It is already technologically relevant for the production of thin film chalcopyrite solar cells. However, the control of the process is still very poor, due to the lack of basic knowledge of the surface thermodynamics of the system. Here, we present a theoretical study on the stability of surface adlayers of Se on the Mo(110) surface, predicting surface patterns and their stability range in terms of temperature and selenium partial pressure. Our results, based on density functional theory, show that the attainable Se coverages range from 1/4 to 3/4 of a monolayer for systems in equilibrium with a gas formed of Se molecules. We provide simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images to help the experimental characterization of adsorbed surface patterns.

  2. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A series of fourteen (14) novel high-strength molybdenum alloy compositions containing a dispersion of very fine (< 1 {mu}m diameter) oxide particles were consolidated using two proprietary powder metallurgy techniques. The developmental compositions were evaluated to determine the microstructural stability and mechanical properties from cryogenic (-148{degrees}F) to elevated temperatures (4000{degrees}F) for material in the as-swaged (>98% cold work) condition and for as-swaged material in the heat treated condition. Extremely fine oxide particle sizes (<1000 {Angstrom}) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for a number of the experimental compositions in the as-swaged condition. A one hour recrystallization temperature as high as 3990{degrees}F was measured and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as low as {approximately}58{degrees}F for material in the recrystallized condition was determined. The preliminary results support the alloy design concept feasibility.

  3. Friction Properties of Molybdenum Alloyed Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianliang; Xiong Dangsheng; Wu Hongyan

    2011-01-17

    The high-temperature properties of steel surface can be improved by molybdenum surface alloying. Molybdenzing was carried out on carbon steel in the multi-function double glow plasma surface alloying furnace. The friction and wear tests were conducted on a high temperature ball-on-disk tribometer under the temperature of 25 deg. C{approx}600 deg. C. The contents of alloy element varied with alloyed layer were detected by SEM attached with EDS. The molybdenized layer is composed of the deposited layer and diffused layer. The micro-hardness of alloyed layer decreases from HV650 on the top layer to HV240. The friction coefficient of molybdenized layer decreases from 0.5{approx}0.6 to 0.2{approx}0.3 and wear rate decreases by 20% at elevated temperature after molybdenizing.

  4. Temperature effect on optical spectra of monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Soklaski, Ryan; Liang, Yufeng; Yang, Li

    2014-05-12

    Recently, measured optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra reveal substantial frequency shifts of both exciton and trion peaks as monolayer molybdenum disulfide, MoS{sub 2}, is cooled from 363 K to 4 K. First-principles simulations using the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation approach satisfactorily reproduce these frequency shifts by incorporating the thermal expansion effect. Studying these temperature effects in monolayer MoS{sub 2} is crucial for rectifying the results of available experiments with the previous predictions of zero-temperature-limit simulations. Moreover, our estimated thermal expansion coefficient of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is less than that of bulk counterpart by tracking the frequency shifts of the exciton peaks in optical spectra. This may serve as a convenient way to estimate thermal expansion coefficients of general two-dimensional chalcogenides.

  5. Spreading of Viscous Liquids at High Temperature: Silicate Glasseson Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Moya, Jose S.; Tomsia,Antoni P.

    2004-12-15

    The spreading of Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, spreading can take place under reactive or non-reactive conditions. As the nucleation of the reaction product under reactive conditions is slow in comparison to the spreading kinetics, in both cases the glass front moves on the metal surface with similar spreading velocities. Spreading can be described using a molecular dynamics model where the main contribution to the wetting activation energy comes from the viscous interactions in the liquid. Enhanced interfacial diffusions in low-oxygen activities (reactive cases) form triple-line ridges that can pin the wetting front and cause a stick-slip motion.

  6. Study of molybdenum electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, Janine Carvalho; Martini, Emilse Maria Agostini; Brum, Cauã; de Souza, Michèle Oberson; de Souza, Roberto Fernando

    The molybdenum electrode, Mo, has been investigated for hydrogen production via water electrolysis in 10 vol.% aqueous solutions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI·BF 4) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS measurements show that the Mo system has much higher interfacial capacitance, and correspondently the electrical double layer formed on this electrode is thicker than those formed on nickel or platinum. The positive displacement of potential of zero charge (PZC) values indicates the specific adsorption of the imidazolium cation on the Mo surface. This study provides an elegant explanation for the better performance of Mo electrodes in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER): the BMI cation acts as an intermediate for the proton transfer from water to the electrode surface, thereby decreasing the overpotential of HER. This model explains the synergism between Mo and the BMI cation in the HER process.

  7. Piezoelectric resonator assembly with thin molybdenum mounting clips

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R. Donald

    1981-01-01

    A resonator mounting assembly wherein the resonator blank is mounted agai an essentially planar surface presented by a plurality of peripherally disposed mounting clips and bonded to this surface to provide substantially all the mechanical support for the blank in a direction normal to the major faces of the resonator blank, while being flexible in the directions parallel to said major faces so as to minimize radial stresses on the resonator blank, particularly during thermal cycling of the resonator assembly. The clips are fabricated of a low thermal expansion material, such as molybdenum, which also has considerable yield strength after exposure to processing temperatures; the bonding of the clips to the edges of the resonator blank can be achieved by a polyimide containing electrically conductive particles.

  8. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 {micro}F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 {micro}F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 {micro}s, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charging voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed by using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  9. Soil organic matter regulates molybdenum storage and mobility in forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, Jade A; Perakis, Steven; King, Elizabeth K; Pett-Ridge, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is essential to a suite of nitrogen (N) cycling processes in ecosystems, but there is limited information on its distribution within soils and relationship to plant and bedrock pools. We examined soil, bedrock, and plant Mo variation across 24 forests spanning wide soil pH gradients on both basaltic and sedimentary lithologies in the Oregon Coast Range. We found that the oxidizable organic fraction of surface mineral soil accounted for an average of 33 %of bulk soil Mo across all sites, followed by 1.4 % associated with reducible Fe, Al, and Mn-oxides, and 1.4 % in exchangeable ion form. Exchangeable Mo was greatest at low pH, and its positive correlation with soil carbon (C) suggests organic matter as the source of readily exchangeable Mo. Molybdenum accumulation integrated over soil profiles to 1 m depth (τMoNb) increased with soil C, indicating that soil organic matter regulates long-term Mo retention and loss from soil. Foliar Mo concentrations displayed no relationship with bulk soil Mo, and were not correlated with organic horizon Mo or soil extractable Mo, suggesting active plant regulation of Mo uptake and/or poor fidelity of extractable pools to bioavailability. We estimate from precipitation sampling that atmospheric deposition supplies, on average, over 10 times more Mo annually than does litterfall to soil. In contrast, bedrock lithology had negligible effects on foliar and soil Mo concentrations and on Mo distribution among soil fractions. We conclude that atmospheric inputs may be a significant source of Mo to forest ecosystems, and that strong Mo retention by soil organic matter limits ecosystem Mo loss via dissolution and leaching pathways.

  10. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio; Sato, Eiichi; Takahashi, Kei; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Sasaki, Katsuaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-09-01

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 (mu) F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charge voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 microsecond(s) , and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 (mu) C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charged voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  11. Formation of molybdenum boride cermet coating by the detonation spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gao; Zu-Kun, Hei; Xiaolei, Xu; Gang, Xin

    2001-09-01

    The effects of the powder particle size and the acetylene/oxygen gas flow ratio during the detonation spray process on the amount of molybdenum phase, porosity, and hardness of the coatings using MoB powder were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), etc. The results show that the presence of metallic molybdenum in the coating results from decomposition of MoB powder during thermal spray. The compositions of the coatings are metallic Mo, MoB, and Mo2B, which are different from the phases of the original powder. The amount of molybdenum phase increases monotonously with the oxygen/acetylene ratio, but the increasing rate for the fine powder is faster than that for the coarse powder. The porosity and hardness of the coating are related to the amount of molybdenum phase. The phase constitution of the coating is discussed.

  12. Molybdenum and tungsten nanostructures and methods for making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Kotaro, Sasaki; Chen, Wei-Fu; Muckerman, James T; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2015-01-06

    The present invention provides molybdenum and tungsten nanostructures, for example, nanosheets and nanoparticles, and methods of making and using same, including using such nanostructures as catlysts for hydrogen evolution reactions.

  13. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  14. Alkene to carbyne: tandem Lewis acid activation and dehydrogenation of a molybdenum ethylene complex.

    PubMed

    Stennett, Tom E; Haddow, Mairi F; Wass, Duncan F

    2013-10-18

    Carbyne formation: Treatment of a molybdenum ethylene complex with B(C6 F5 )3 induces ditopic activation of an ethylene ligand and acceptor-assisted ethane elimination to generate a novel type of zwitterionic carbyne complex. PMID:24038792

  15. High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, Jr., R. William; Geller, Clint B.

    1999-01-01

    A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2-4% by volume (.about.1-4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T.sub.m of molybdenum.

  16. Influence of organic amendments on the mobilization of molybdenum in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Calderone, S.J.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    Recent attention has been focused on toxic levels of selenium (Se), arsenic, chromium, mercury, boron and molybdenum (Mo) accumulating in saline agricultural evaporation pond waters. Although this is an effective disposal practice for agricultural drainage water, the ponds attract wildlife and waterfowl which may create adverse environmental risks. There is a major concern with the Mo content in these saline waters and its effect on the upper food chain. Molybdenum can be fixed in soil or liberated into soil solution and become available for biotic uptake. Molybdenum is a metallic element that can exist in different valences and oxidation states. Oxidation and alkaline conditions favor Mo mobility. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of various organic materials on the solubilization and mobilization of molybdenum in soil.

  17. High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, Jr. William R.; Geller, Clint B.

    1997-12-01

    A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2--4% by volume ({approximately}1--4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T{sub m} of molybdenum.

  18. Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, David C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

  19. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kögerler, Paul

    2012-08-01

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {Mo(V/VI)(154/176)} archetypes, and a {Mo(V/VI)(368)} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {Mo(V/VI)(102)}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {Mo(V/VI)(368)} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {Mo(V/VI)(102)}-type Keplerates. PMID:22717474

  20. Structural and morphological properties of mesoporous carbon coated molybdenum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Kumar, C. Sasi

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we report the structural and morphological properties of mesoporous carbon coated molybdenum oxide films. The deposition of films was carried out in a two-step process, the first step involves deposition of molybdenum and carbon bilayer thin films using DC magnetron sputtering. In the second step the sample was ex-situ annealed in a muffle furnace at different temperatures (400°C to 600°C) and air cooled in the ambient atmosphere. The formation of the meso-porous carbon clusters on molybdenum oxide during the cooling step was investigated using FESEM and AFM techniques. The structural details were explored using XRD. The meso-porous carbon were found growing over molybdenum oxide layer as a result of segregation phenomena.

  1. High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Geller, C.B.

    1999-02-09

    A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2--4% by volume (ca. 1--4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T{sub m} of molybdenum. 10 figs.

  2. In vitro synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase from iron, sulfur, molybdenum, and homocitrate using purified proteins.

    PubMed

    Curatti, Leonardo; Hernandez, Jose A; Igarashi, Robert Y; Soboh, Basem; Zhao, Dehua; Rubio, Luis M

    2007-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation, the conversion of atmospheric N2 to NH3, is an essential process in the global biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen that supports life on Earth. Most of the biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by the molybdenum nitrogenase, which contains at its active site one of the most complex metal cofactors known to date, the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co). FeMo-co is composed of 7Fe, 9S, Mo, R-homocitrate, and one unidentified light atom. Here we demonstrate the complete in vitro synthesis of FeMo-co from Fe(2+), S(2-), MoO4(2-), and R-homocitrate using only purified Nif proteins. This synthesis provides direct biochemical support to the current model of FeMo-co biosynthesis. A minimal in vitro system, containing NifB, NifEN, and NifH proteins, together with Fe(2+), S(2-), MoO4(2-), R-homocitrate, S-adenosyl methionine, and Mg-ATP, is sufficient for the synthesis of FeMo-co and the activation of apo-dinitrogenase under anaerobic-reducing conditions. This in vitro system also provides a biochemical approach to further study the function of accessory proteins involved in nitrogenase maturation (as shown here for NifX and NafY). The significance of these findings in the understanding of the complete FeMo-co biosynthetic pathway and in the study of other complex Fe-S cluster biosyntheses is discussed. PMID:17978192

  3. The Application of Gravity and CSAMT Survey on Baishan Molybdenum Deposit, Hami, Xinjiang,China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Lu, H.; Zhang, K.

    2014-12-01

    Baishan molybdenum deposit is located in the eastern Tianshan Carboniferous rift at Hami, Xinjiang, China, where exposed upper Carboniferous Gandun formation. Molybdenum ore appeared at thermal contact metamorphism hornfelsed banded quartz stockwork in the concealed porphyritic granite top, Potassium and metal sulfide mineralization existed in the top of concealed rockbody.The Baishan molybdenum ore bodies were delineated 2700 meters long and 40 meters thickness, with molybdenum @ 0.59%. The main orebody shows in stratoid, small orebody appears in lenticular and vein.In order to predict potential resources, we proposes a combined method of CSAMT and GS technology,and has applied it to the survey of concealed molybdenum deposit in the Baishan.This combind method can explore to larger depths, discriminate anomalies well and has higher resolution to deep objects, thus it is an efficient tool for surveys.By drilling, we found there exsit a hidden granite body in 1400 meters deep of Hami Baishan molybdenum mine, it confirmed that Baishan molybdenum mine is a porphyry molybdenum ore. Cataclastic hornfelsed zone in the coping granite are the product of heat contact metamorphism, the ore materials are mainly derived from deep magma hydrothermal solution. The CSAMT and Gravity Survey were able to reflect the space and intrusive boundary in rough of buried granite body clearly, deep hidden granite showed high-resistivity and high-gravity anomaly and the low-resistivity anomaly distributied around them, drilling verified that 200-2500Ω low-resistivity anomaly range at top of high-resistivity corresponded to the molybdenum ore horizon. Line 15 of southern section shows two low resistance anomaly zone, and the surface of them is corresponding to the granite and intrusive contact parts,inferring it was caused by the fault structure.In granite gravity anomaly is obviously high and the width is about 560m,Δg residual value is 400 × 10-8m/s2. According to the control of

  4. Material and Energy Flows Associated with Select Metals in GREET 2. Molybdenum, Platinum, Zinc, Nickel, Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, Pahola T.; Dai, Qiang; Sullivan, John L.; Kelly, Jarod C.; Dunn, Jennifer B.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we analyzed the material and energy consumption from mining to production of molybdenum, platinum, zinc, and nickel. We also analyzed the production of solar- and semiconductor-grade silicon. We described new additions to and expansions of the data in GREET 2. In some cases, we used operating permits and sustainability reports to estimate the material and energy flows for molybdenum, platinum, and nickel, while for zinc and silicon we relied on information provided in the literature.

  5. Substoichiometric two-dimensional molybdenum oxide flakes: a plasmonic gas sensing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaif, Manal M. Y. A.; Field, Matthew R.; Murdoch, Billy J.; Daeneke, Torben; Latham, Kay; Chrimes, Adam F.; Zoolfakar, Ahmad Sabirin; Russo, Salvy P.; Ou, Jian Zhen; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxides at their various stoichiometries are promising candidates for generating plasmon resonances in visible light range. Herein, we demonstrate plasmonic 2D molybdenum oxide flakes for gas sensing applications, in which hydrogen (H2) is selected as a model gas. The 2D molybdenum oxide flakes are obtained using a grinding-assisted liquid exfoliation method and exposed to simulated sunlight to acquire its substoichiometric quasi-metallic form. After the exposure to H2 gas molecules, the quasi-metallic molybdenum oxide flakes are partially transformed into semiconducting states, thus gradually losing their plasmonic properties. The novel 2D plasmonic sensing platform is tested using different concentrations of H2 gas at various operating temperatures to comprehensively assess its sensing performance. The presented 2D plasmonic system offers great opportunities for future sensing and optical applications.Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxides at their various stoichiometries are promising candidates for generating plasmon resonances in visible light range. Herein, we demonstrate plasmonic 2D molybdenum oxide flakes for gas sensing applications, in which hydrogen (H2) is selected as a model gas. The 2D molybdenum oxide flakes are obtained using a grinding-assisted liquid exfoliation method and exposed to simulated sunlight to acquire its substoichiometric quasi-metallic form. After the exposure to H2 gas molecules, the quasi-metallic molybdenum oxide flakes are partially transformed into semiconducting states, thus gradually losing their plasmonic properties. The novel 2D plasmonic sensing platform is tested using different concentrations of H2 gas at various operating temperatures to comprehensively assess its sensing performance. The presented 2D plasmonic system offers great opportunities for future sensing and optical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details on optical gas measurement setup and

  6. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  7. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  8. Rapid chemical test for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, John C

    1932-01-01

    This note describes a simple, rapid, qualitative test which can be applied to solutions of drilling or chips for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel. The test is based on the orange-red compound which is formed when thiocyanate and inequivalent molybdenum react. This test is much more reliable than the potassium ethylxanthate test which has been recommended for a like purpose. A list of the apparatus and reagents which are required, and a description of the procedure follows.

  9. Electrochemical way of molybdenum extraction from the Bimetallic systems of Mo-W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudreeva, L. K.; Nauryzbaev, M. K.; Kurbatov, A. P.; Kamysbaev, D. H.; Adilbekova, A. O.; Mukataeva, Z. S.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical dissolution of molybdenum and tungsten was investigated in water- dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) media at different concentrations of lithium chloride and magnesium perchlorate. The terms of efficient extraction of molybdenum from bimetallic systems of Mo-W have been determined. The polarization curves of the electrooxidation of molybdenum in the solution of 0.25 M LiCl in the DMSO at the different rates of rotations and the scan rate equal to 50 mV/s were obtained. In the presence of the addition of water at the potential of 0.1-0.75 V the small area of polarizability occurs, then with increasing potentials above 1.5 V there is a sharp increase of the oxidation current. Comparison of the current values of anodic dissolution of molybdenum and tungsten showed that the rate of anodic dissolution of molybdenum significantly exceeds the rate of anodic dissolution of tungsten. In the case of molybdenum, the dissolution process is limited by diffusion, in the case of tungsten - by the passive film formation on the electrode surface.

  10. Environmental exposure to metals and male reproductive hormones: Circulating testosterone is inversely associated with blood molybdenum

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, John D.; Rossano, Mary G.; Protas, Bridget; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Diamond, Michael P.; Puscheck, Elizabeth; Daly, Douglas; Paneth, Nigel; Wirth, Julia J.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective To explore associations between exposure to metals and male reproductive hormone levels. Design Cross-sectional epidemiology study with adjustment for potential confounders. Setting Metal concentrations and reproductive hormone levels were measured in blood samples collected from 219 men. Patients: Men recruited through two Michigan, USA infertility clinics. Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Serum FSH, LH, inhibin B, testosterone, and SHBG. Results Cadmium, copper and lead were all significantly or suggestively positively associated with testosterone when modeled individually (p-values = 0.1, 0.03, and 0.07, respectively), findings that are consistent with limited previous human and animal studies. Conversely, molybdenum was associated with reduced testosterone (p-value for trend = 0.001). A significant inverse trend between molybdenum and testosterone remained when additionally considering other metals in the model, where a positive association between testosterone and zinc was also found. Finally, in exploratory analysis there was evidence for an interaction between molybdenum and zinc, where high molybdenum was associated with a 37% reduction in testosterone (relative to the population median level) among men with low zinc. Conclusions While reductions in testosterone and reproductive toxicity following molybdenum exposure have been previously demonstrated in animal studies, more research is needed to determine whether molybdenum poses a risk to human reproductive health. PMID:18990371

  11. Calculated mammographic spectra confirmed with attenuation curves for molybdenum, rhodium, and tungsten targets.

    PubMed

    Blough, M M; Waggener, R G; Payne, W H; Terry, J A

    1998-09-01

    A model for calculating mammographic spectra independent of measured data and fitting parameters is presented. This model is based on first principles. Spectra were calculated using various target and filter combinations such as molybdenum/molybdenum, molybdenum/rhodium, rhodium/rhodium, and tungsten/aluminum. Once the spectra were calculated, attenuation curves were calculated and compared to measured attenuation curves. The attenuation curves were calculated and measured using aluminum alloy 1100 or high purity aluminum filtration. Percent differences were computed between the measured and calculated attenuation curves resulting in an average of 5.21% difference for tungsten/aluminum, 2.26% for molybdenum/molybdenum, 3.35% for rhodium/rhodium, and 3.18% for molybdenum/rhodium. Calculated spectra were also compared to measured spectra from the Food and Drug Administration [Fewell and Shuping, Handbook of Mammographic X-ray Spectra (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1979)] and a comparison will also be presented. PMID:9775364

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of sulfided hexanuclear molybdenum cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, D.

    1990-09-21

    Hexanuclear molybdenum clusters with mixed chloride and sulfide bridging ligands were prepared by reacting {alpha}-MoCl{sub 2} with sodium hydrosulfide in the presence of sodium butoxide. The resulting species, Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub (8-x)}S{sub x}{center dot}npy(x {congruent} 3.6, n {congruent} 4, py = pyridine), was pyrophoric and insoluble. The mixed sulfide chloride cluster species Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}{center dot}6OPEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub {approximately}5}Cl{sub {approximately}3}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} were isolated and characterized. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV/visible spectra were obtained for each fraction. The completely sulfided cluster, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3}, was prepared similarly and used in various experiments as a possible precursor to Chevrel phase materials of the type Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}or M{sub n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}. With the goal of removing all of the triethylphosphine ligands, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} was reacted with the transition metal carbonyls molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dicobalt octacarbonyl. Reaction on the molecular sulfide cluster with copper(I) chloride in toluene gave a completely insoluble product. The reaction of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} with propylene sulfide gave a product whose infrared spectra showed only very weak peaks associated with coordinated triethylphosphine. The elemental analysis of this product fit the formula Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}5SPEt{sub 3}. Reactivity of the outer ligands of the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}npy and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}(6{minus}x)PrNH{sub x} clusters were investigated. Crystalline Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6THT was recovered from the reaction of the n-propylamine derivative with THT. A crystal structure determination was done. 87 refs., 12 fig., 15 tabs.

  13. The bioconcentration and bioaccumulation factors for molybdenum in the aquatic environment from natural environmental concentrations up to the toxicity boundary.

    PubMed

    Regoli, Lidia; Van Tilborg, Wim; Heijerick, Dagobert; Stubblefield, William; Carey, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    In a regulatory context, bioaccumulation or bioconcentration factors are used for considering secondary poisoning potential and assessing risks to human health via the food chain. In this paper, literature data on the bioaccumulation of molybdenum in the aquatic organisms are reviewed and assessed for relevance and reliability. The data available in the literature were generated at exposure concentrations below those recommended in the REACH registration dossiers for molybdenum compounds i.e. PNEC(freshwater) 12.7 mg Mo/L. To address possible environmental concerns at regulatorily-relevant molybdenum concentrations, both a field study and a laboratory study were conducted. In the field study, whole body and organ-specific molybdenum levels were evaluated in fish (eel, stickleback, perch, carp bream, roach) held in the discharge water collector tanks of a molybdenum processing plant, containing a mean measured molybdenum level of 1.03 mg Mo/L. In the laboratory study, rainbow trout were exposed to two different nominal molybdenum levels (1.0 and 12.7 mg Mo/L), for 60 days followed by a 60-day depuration period. Whole body concentrations in rainbow trout during the exposure period were between <0.20 and 0.53 mg Mo/L. Muscle tissue molybdenum concentrations in fish taken from both experiments remained below 0.2mg/kg dry wt. These studies show an inverse relationship between exposure concentration and bioconcentration or bioaccumulation factor for molybdenum. In aquatic organisms, and in fish in particular, internal molybdenum concentrations are maintained in the presence of variation in external molybdenum concentrations. These observations must be considered when evaluating potential risks associated with the bioconcentration and/or bioaccumulation of molybdenum in the aquatic environment. PMID:22846769

  14. A Method for the Calculation of Lattice Energies of Complex Crystals with Application to the Oxides of Molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, William S.

    1961-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of molybdenum dioxide and molybdenum trioxide in order to extend the knowledge of factors Involved in the oxidation of molybdenum. New methods were developed for calculating the lattice energies based on electrostatic valence theory, and the coulombic, polarization, Van der Waals, and repulsion energie's were calculated. The crystal structure was examined and structure details were correlated with lattice energy.

  15. As-cast uranium-molybdenum based metallic fuel candidates and the effects of carbon addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwood, Van Stephen

    The objective of this research was to develop and recommend a metallic nuclear fuel candidate that lowered the onset temperature of gamma phase formation comparable or better than the uranium-10 wt. pct. molybdenum alloy, offered a solidus temperature as high or higher than uranium-10 wt. pct. zirconium (1250°C), and stabilized the fuel phase against interaction with iron and steel at least as much as uranium-10 wt. pct. zirconium stabilized the fuel phase. Two new as-cast alloy compositions were characterized to assess thermal equilibrium boundaries of the gamma phase field and the effect of carbon addition up to 0.22 wt. pct. The first system investigated was uranium- x wt. pct. M where x ranged between 5-20 wt. pct. M was held at a constant ratio of 50 wt. pct. molybdenum, 43 wt. pct. titanium, and 7 wt. pct. zirconium. The second system investigated was the uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system in the range 90 wt. pct. uranium - 10 wt. pct. molybdenum - 0 wt. pct. tungsten to 80 wt. pct. uranium - 10 wt. pct. molybdenum - 10 wt. pct. tungsten. The results showed that the solidus temperature increased with increased addition of M up to 12.5 wt. pct. for the uranium-M system. Alloy additions of titanium and zirconium were removed from uranium-molybdenum solid solution by carbide formation and segregation. The uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system solidus temperature increased to 1218°C at 2.5 wt. pct. with no significant change in temperature up to 5 wt. pct. tungsten suggesting the solubility limit of tungsten had been reached. Carbides were observed with surrounding areas enriched in both molybdenum and tungsten. The peak solidus temperatures for the alloy systems were roughly the same at 1226°C for the uranium-M system and 1218°C for the uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system. The uranium-molybdenum-tungsten system required less alloy addition to achieve similar solidus temperatures as the uranium-M system.

  16. The History of the Discovery of the Molybdenum Cofactor and Novel Aspects of its Biosynthesis in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Leimkühler, Silke; Wuebbens, Margot M; Rajagopalan, K V

    2011-05-01

    Biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in bacteria is described with a detailed analysis of each individual reaction leading to the formation of stable intermediates during the synthesis of molybdopterin from GTP. As a starting point, the discovery of molybdopterin and the elucidation of its structure through the study of stable degradation products are described. Subsequent to molybdopterin synthesis, the molybdenum atom is added to the molybdopterin dithiolene group to form the molybdenum cofactor. This cofactor is either inserted directly into specific molybdoenzymes or is further modified by the addition of nucleotides to the molybdopterin phosphate group or the replacement of ligands at the molybdenum center. PMID:21528011

  17. Bioaccessibility of micron-sized powder particles of molybdenum metal, iron metal, molybdenum oxides and ferromolybdenum--Importance of surface oxides.

    PubMed

    Mörsdorf, Alexander; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Yolanda

    2015-08-01

    The European chemical framework REACH requires that hazards and risks posed by chemicals, including alloys and metals, that are manufactured, imported or used in different products (substances or articles) are identified and proven safe for humans and the environment. Metals and alloys need hence to be investigated on their extent of released metals (bioaccessibility) in biologically relevant environments. Read-across from available studies may be used for similar materials. This study investigates the release of molybdenum and iron from powder particles of molybdenum metal (Mo), a ferromolybdenum alloy (FeMo), an iron metal powder (Fe), MoO2, and MoO3 in different synthetic body fluids of pH ranging from 1.5 to 7.4 and of different composition. Spectroscopic tools and cyclic voltammetry have been employed to characterize surface oxides, microscopy, light scattering and nitrogen absorption for particle characterization, and atomic absorption spectroscopy to quantify released amounts of metals. The release of molybdenum from the Mo powder generally increased with pH and was influenced by the fluid composition. The mixed iron and molybdenum surface oxide of the FeMo powder acted as a barrier both at acidic and weakly alkaline conditions. These findings underline the importance of the surface oxide characteristics for the bioaccessibility of metal alloys. PMID:26032492

  18. Recovery of cobalt, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium from an aqueous ammonia and ammonium salt solution by coextracting molybdenum and vanadium and sequential extraction of nickel and cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Hubred, G.L.; Van Leirsburg, D.A.

    1984-02-28

    A method is claimed for recovering metal values from an aqueous stream. The metal values are preferably obtained from leaching spent hydroprocessing catalysts, and include nickel, cobalt, vanadium and molybdenum. The metal values are extracted, isolated and purified by liquid, liquid extraction techniques.

  19. Optoelectrical Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)--Ferroelectric Memories.

    PubMed

    Lipatov, Alexey; Sharma, Pankaj; Gruverman, Alexei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2015-08-25

    In this study, we fabricated and tested electronic and memory properties of field-effect transistors (FETs) based on monolayer or few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) on a lead zirconium titanate (Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, PZT) substrate that was used as a gate dielectric. MoS2-PZT FETs exhibit a large hysteresis of electronic transport with high ON/OFF ratios. We demonstrate that the interplay of polarization and interfacial phenomena strongly affects the electronic behavior and memory characteristics of MoS2-PZT FETs. We further demonstrate that MoS2-PZT memories have a number of advantages and unique features compared to their graphene-based counterparts as well as commercial ferroelectric random-access memories (FeRAMs), such as nondestructive data readout, low operation voltage, wide memory window and the possibility to write and erase them both electrically and optically. This dual optoelectrical operation of these memories can simplify the device architecture and offer additional practical functionalities, such as an instant optical erase of large data arrays that is unavailable for many conventional memories. PMID:26222209

  20. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  1. Template synthesis and characterization of molybdenum disulfide nanotubules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dongbo; Feng, Yi; Zhu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xuebin; Li, Bin; Liu, Huiqiang

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The image is a SEM image of branched MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, which are prepared in AAO templates. It is obvious to observe the branch of MoS{sub 2} nanotubes (labeled by arrows), and it reflects the microcosmic morphologies of pores in templates. Highlights: {yields} Large quantities of hollow MoS2 tubules. {yields} Explanation for the formation of branched shape. {yields} Explanation for the morphology of bamboo-like structure. -- Abstract: Molybdenum disulfide nanotubules were prepared by thermal decomposition of ammonium thiomolybdate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) precursors on anodized aluminum oxide template. Large quantities of hollow MoS{sub 2} nanotubules with the bamboo-like structure were obtained. The morphology and structures of MoS{sub 2} tubules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron diffraction and optical absorption spectroscopy. MoS{sub 2} nanotubules completely reflected the three-dimensional structure of nanopores in template. The properties of Mo-S chemical bonds in lattice structure and the wetting state between porous surface and precursor have a great effect on the formation of sections in nanotubules, the ridges in the nanopores also play a very special role of this formation.

  2. Processing and properties of molybdenum silicide intermetallics containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    Molybdenum-silicon-boron intermetallics with the composition Mo-10.5 Si-1.1 B, wt% (Mo-26.7 Si-7.3 B, at. %) were fabricated by several processing techniques. Powder processing (PM) resulted in macrocrack-free material containing no or only few microcracks. The PM materials contained quasi-equilibrium pores and large concentrations of oxygen. Average room temperature flexure strengths of 270 MPa were obtained. At 1,200 C in air, flexure strengths as high as 600 MPa were observed. These high values are attributed to crack healing and incipient plasticity. Ingot metallurgy (IM) materials contained much less oxygen than their PM counterparts. Depending on the cooling rate during solidification, they developed either mostly macrocracks or mostly microcracks. Due to the high flaw densities, the room temperature flexure strengths were only of the order of 100 MPa. However, the flexure strengths at 1,200 C were up to 3 times higher than those at room temperature. Again, this is attributed to crack healing and incipient plasticity. The IM materials will require secondary processing to develop their full potential. A preliminary examination of secondary processing routes included isothermal forging and hot extrusion.

  3. Molybdenum Sequestration in Brassica Species. A Role for Anthocyanins?1

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Kerry L.; McGrath, Steve P.; Lombi, Enzo; Stack, Stephen M.; Terry, Norman; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.

    2001-01-01

    To elucidate plant mechanisms involved in molybdenum (Mo) sequestration and tolerance, Brassica spp. seedlings were supplied with molybdate, and the effects on plant physiology, morphology, and biochemistry were analyzed. When supplied with (colorless) molybdate Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) seedlings accumulated water-soluble blue crystals in their peripheral cell layers. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis showed that Mo accumulated predominantly in the vacuoles of the epidermal cells. Therefore, the blue crystals are likely to be a Mo compound. The x-ray absorption spectrum of the plant-accumulated Mo was different than that for molybdate, indicating complexation with a plant molecule. Because the blue compound was water soluble and showed a pH-dependent color change, possible involvement of anthocyanins was investigated. An anthocyanin-less mutant of Brassica rapa (“fast plants”) was compared with varieties containing normal or high anthocyanin levels. The anthocyanin-less mutant did not show accumulation of a blue compound when supplied with molybdate. In the anthocyanin-containing varieties, the blue compound colocalized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers. Mo accumulation by the three B. rapa varieties was positively correlated with anthocyanin content. Addition of molybdate to purified B. rapa anthocyanin resulted in an in vitro color change from pink to blue. Therefore, Mo appears to be sequestered in vacuoles of the peripheral cell layers of Brassica spp. as a blue compound, probably a Mo-anthocyanin complex. PMID:11500539

  4. Melting of aluminum, molybdenum and the light actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Yang, L H; Boehler, R

    2004-06-25

    A semi-empirical model was used to explain why the measured melting curves of molybdenum, and the other bcc transition metals, have an unusually low slope (dT/dP{approx}0). The total binding energy of Mo is written as the sum of the repulsive energy of the ions and sp-electrons (modeled by an inverse 6th power potential) and the d-band cohesive energy described by the well known Friedel equation. Using literature values for the Mo band width energy, the number of d-electrons and their volume dependence, we find that a small broadening of the liquid d-band width ({approx}1%) leads to an increase in the stability of the liquid relative to the solid. This is sufficient to depress the melting temperature and lower the melting slope to a value in agreement with the diamond-anvil cell measurements. Omission of the d-band physics results in an Al-like melting curve with a much steeper melt slope. The model, when applied to the f-electrons of the light actinides (Th-Am), gives agreement with the observed fall and rise in the melting temperature with increasing atomic number.

  5. Estimating natural background groundwater chemistry, Questa molybdenum mine, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Phillip L.; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Walker, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    This 2 1/2 day field trip will present an overview of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project whose objective was to estimate pre-mining groundwater chemistry at the Questa molybdenum mine, New Mexico. Because of intense debate among stakeholders regarding pre-mining groundwater chemistry standards, the New Mexico Environment Department and Chevron Mining Inc. (formerly Molycorp) agreed that the USGS should determine pre-mining groundwater quality at the site. In 2001, the USGS began a 5-year, multidisciplinary investigation to estimate pre-mining groundwater chemistry utilizing a detailed assessment of a proximal natural analog site and applied an interdisciplinary approach to infer pre-mining conditions. The trip will include a surface tour of the Questa mine and key locations in the erosion scar areas and along the Red River. The trip will provide participants with a detailed understanding of geochemical processes that influence pre-mining environmental baselines in mineralized areas and estimation techniques for determining pre-mining baseline conditions.

  6. One-Dimensional Electrical Contact to Molybdenum Disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng; Ra, Changho; Ahmed, Faisal; Lee, Daeyeong; Choi, Minsup; Liu, Xiaochi; Qu, Deshun; Yoo, Won Jong; Nano Device Processing Lab Team

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is one of the promising two-dimensional materials for future application in nano electronics, which has high carrier mobility, very good stability under atmosphere, proper band gap, etc. However, its application to electronic switching devices is hindered by Fermi level pinning at metal-MoS2 interfaces. Here, we experimentally demonstrate one-dimensional electrical contact to MoS2 formed via controllable plasma etching. We fabricated Al/MoS2 FET (n-type), Mo/MoS2 FET (n-type), and Pd/MoS2 FET (ambipolar). For Mo/MoS2 FET (n-type), on/off current ratio is around 108 and mobility is around 104 cm2/(Vs). By contrast, for Pd/MoS2 FET (ambipolar), on/off current ratio is around 108, hole mobility is ranged from 350 to 650 cm2/(Vs), and the mean free path of holes at 9K is around 23 nm. All the measured mobilities are evaluated by using two-terminal field-effect configuration. We can also achieve complementary logic gates with intrinsic MoS2/metal one-dimensional electrical contact.

  7. Copper and molybdenum in silicate melt-aqueous fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Candela, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The partitioning of copper (Cu) and molybdenum (Mo) between silicate melts and aqueous fluids has been determined. The vapor/melt partition coefficient for Cu, D(Cu) was found to be D(Cu) = 9.2 m/sub Cl//sup v/ at NNO. The partition coefficient for Mo, D(Mo), is equal to 2.5 at NNO and QFM, and is independent of the F and Cl concentration. Equations have been derived for the efficiency of the removal of the metals from magmas into aqueous fluids. Copper is concentrated so efficiently into a moderately to highly saline aqueous phase that liquid-vapor extraction seems to be a reasonable process to account for the concentration of Cu in porphyry Cu deposits. However, geological evidence suggests that Cu behaves as a compatible element during magmatic processes(BPC > 1). Therefore, the efficiency of Cu removal from magmas into aqueous fluids is strongly dependent upon the amount of the melt crystallized before water saturation, and efficient extraction of Cu results when aqueous fluids are evolved early in the crystallization of the intrusion. The value of D(Mo) is small relative to D(Cu) at moderate to high chloride concentrations, and the extraction of Mo from melts into aqueous fluids therefore tends to be less efficient. However, vapor-liquid partitioning can extract the requisite quantities of Mo from granitic melts of batholithic size.

  8. Differential reduction of CO₂ by molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases.

    PubMed

    Rebelein, Johannes G; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2014-10-20

    The molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are two homologous enzymes with distinct structural and catalytic features. Previously, it was demonstrated that the V nitrogenase was nearly 700 times more active than its Mo counterpart in reducing CO to hydrocarbons. Herein, a similar discrepancy between the two nitrogenases in the reduction of CO2 is reported, with the V nitrogenase being capable of reducing CO2 to CO, CD4, C2D4, and C2D6, and its Mo counterpart only capable of reducing CO2 to CO. Furthermore, it is shown that the V nitrogenase may direct the formation of CD4 in part via CO2-derived CO, but that it does not catalyze the formation of C2D4 and C2D6 along this route. The exciting observation of a V nitrogenase-catalyzed C-C coupling with CO2 as the origin of the building blocks adds another interesting reaction to the catalytic repertoire of this unique enzyme system. The differential activities of the V and Mo nitrogenases in CO2 reduction provide an important framework for systematic investigations of this reaction in the future. PMID:25205285

  9. Sequential biological process for molybdenum extraction from hydrodesulphurization spent catalyst.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Shruti; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    Spent catalyst bioleaching with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans has been widely studied and low Mo leaching has often been reported. This work describes an enhanced extraction of Mo via a two stage sequential process for the bioleaching of hydrodesulphurization spent catalyst containing Molybdenum, Nickel and, Aluminium. In the first stage, two-step bioleaching was performed using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, and achieved 89.4% Ni, 20.9% Mo and 12.7% Al extraction in 15 days. To increase Mo extraction, the bioleached catalyst was subjected to a second stage bioleaching using Escherichia coli, during which 99% of the remaining Mo was extracted in 25 days. This sequential bioleaching strategy selectively extracted Ni in the first stage and Mo in the second stage, and is a more environmentally friendly alternative to sequential chemical leaching with alkaline reagents for improved Mo extraction. Kinetic modelling to establish the rate determining step in both stages of bioleaching showed that in the first stage, Mo extraction was chemical reaction controlled whereas in the subsequent stage, product layer diffusion model provided the best fit. PMID:27351900

  10. Molybdenum sequestration in Brassica species. A role for anthocyanins?

    PubMed

    Hale, K L; McGrath, S P; Lombi, E; Stack, S M; Terry, N; Pickering, I J; George, G N; Pilon-Smits, E A

    2001-08-01

    To elucidate plant mechanisms involved in molybdenum (Mo) sequestration and tolerance, Brassica spp. seedlings were supplied with molybdate, and the effects on plant physiology, morphology, and biochemistry were analyzed. When supplied with (colorless) molybdate Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) seedlings accumulated water-soluble blue crystals in their peripheral cell layers. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis showed that Mo accumulated predominantly in the vacuoles of the epidermal cells. Therefore, the blue crystals are likely to be a Mo compound. The x-ray absorption spectrum of the plant-accumulated Mo was different than that for molybdate, indicating complexation with a plant molecule. Because the blue compound was water soluble and showed a pH-dependent color change, possible involvement of anthocyanins was investigated. An anthocyanin-less mutant of Brassica rapa ("fast plants") was compared with varieties containing normal or high anthocyanin levels. The anthocyanin-less mutant did not show accumulation of a blue compound when supplied with molybdate. In the anthocyanin-containing varieties, the blue compound colocalized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers. Mo accumulation by the three B. rapa varieties was positively correlated with anthocyanin content. Addition of molybdate to purified B. rapa anthocyanin resulted in an in vitro color change from pink to blue. Therefore, Mo appears to be sequestered in vacuoles of the peripheral cell layers of Brassica spp. as a blue compound, probably a Mo-anthocyanin complex. PMID:11500539

  11. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  12. Sulfite Oxidase Catalyzes Single-Electron Transfer at Molybdenum Domain to Reduce Nitrite to Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Krizowski, Sabina; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Niks, Dimitri; Tejero, Jesús; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Wang, Ling; Ragireddy, Venkata; Frizzell, Sheila; Kelley, Eric E.; Zhang, Yingze; Basu, Partha; Hille, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Recent studies suggest that the molybdenum enzymes xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and mARC exhibit nitrite reductase activity at low oxygen pressures. However, inhibition studies of xanthine oxidase in humans have failed to block nitrite-dependent changes in blood flow, leading to continued exploration for other candidate nitrite reductases. Another physiologically important molybdenum enzyme—sulfite oxidase (SO)—has not been extensively studied. Results: Using gas-phase nitric oxide (NO) detection and physiological concentrations of nitrite, SO functions as nitrite reductase in the presence of a one-electron donor, exhibiting redox coupling of substrate oxidation and nitrite reduction to form NO. With sulfite, the physiological substrate, SO only facilitates one turnover of nitrite reduction. Studies with recombinant heme and molybdenum domains of SO indicate that nitrite reduction occurs at the molybdenum center via coupled oxidation of Mo(IV) to Mo(V). Reaction rates of nitrite to NO decreased in the presence of a functional heme domain, mediated by steric and redox effects of this domain. Using knockdown of all molybdopterin enzymes and SO in fibroblasts isolated from patients with genetic deficiencies of molybdenum cofactor and SO, respectively, SO was found to significantly contribute to hypoxic nitrite signaling as demonstrated by activation of the canonical NO-sGC-cGMP pathway. Innovation: Nitrite binds to and is reduced at the molybdenum site of mammalian SO, which may be allosterically regulated by heme and molybdenum domain interactions, and contributes to the mammalian nitrate-nitrite-NO signaling pathway in human fibroblasts. Conclusion: SO is a putative mammalian nitrite reductase, catalyzing nitrite reduction at the Mo(IV) center. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 283–294. PMID:25314640

  13. Microstructures and Hardness/Wear Performance of High-Carbon Stellite Alloys Containing Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Yao, J. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yao, M. X.; Collier, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Conventional high-carbon Stellite alloys contain a certain amount of tungsten which mainly serves to provide strengthening to the solid solution matrix. These alloys are designed for combating severe wear. High-carbon molybdenum-containing Stellite alloys are newly developed 700 series of Stellite family, with molybdenum replacing tungsten, which are particularly employed in severe wear condition with corrosion also involved. Three high-carbon Stellite alloys, designated as Stellite 706, Stellite 712, and Stellite 720, with different carbon and molybdenum contents, are studied experimentally in this research, focusing on microstructure and phases, hardness, and wear resistance, using SEM/EDX/XRD techniques, a Rockwell hardness tester, and a pin-on-disk tribometer. It is found that both carbon and molybdenum contents influence the microstructures of these alloys significantly. The former determines the volume fraction of carbides in the alloys, and the latter governs the amount of molybdenum-rich carbides precipitated in the alloys. The hardness and wear resistance of these alloys are increased with the carbide volume fraction. However, with the same or similar carbon content, high-carbon CoCrMo Stellite alloys exhibit worse wear resistance than high-carbon CoCrW Stellite alloys.

  14. Molybdenum, Tungsten, and Aluminium Substitution for Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Performance of Higher Manganese Silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhi Truong, D. Y.; Berthebaud, David; Gascoin, Franck; Kleinke, Holger

    2015-10-01

    An easy and efficient process involving ball milling under soft conditions and spark plasma sintering was used to synthesize higher manganese silicide (HMS)-based compounds, for example MnSi1.75Ge0.02, with different molybdenum, tungsten, and aluminium substitution. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the samples after sintering showed the main phase to be HMS with the presence of some side products. Molybdenum substitution enlarges the unit cells more than tungsten substitution, owing to its greater solubility in the HMS structure, whereas substitution with aluminium did not substantially alter the cell parameters. The electrical resistivity of HMS-based compounds was reduced by <10% by this substitution, because of increased carrier concentrations. Changes of the Seebeck coefficient were insignificant after molybdenum and aluminium substitution whereas tungsten substitution slightly reduced the thermopower of the base material by approximately 8% over the whole temperature range; this was ascribed to reduced carrier mobility as a result of enhanced scattering. Substitution with any combination of two of these elements resulted in no crucial modification of the electrical properties of the base material. Large decreases of lattice thermal conductivity were observed, because of enhanced phonon scattering, with the highest reduction up to 25% for molybdenum substitution; this resulted in a 20% decrease of total thermal conductivity, which contributed to improvement of the figure of merit ZT of the HMS-based materials. The maximum ZT value was approximately 0.40 for the material with 2 at.% molybdenum substitution at the Mn sites.

  15. Reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue by Enterobacter sp. strain Dr.Y13.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Rahman, M F; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2009-09-01

    Extensive use of metals in various industrial applications has caused substantial environmental pollution. Molybdenum-reducing bacteria isolated from soils can be used to remove molybdenum from contaminated environments. In this work we have isolated a local bacterium with the capability to reduce soluble molybdate to the insoluble molybdenum blue. We studied several factors that would optimize molybdate reduction. Electron donor sources such as glucose, sucrose, lactose, maltose and fructose (in decreasing efficiency) supported molybdate reduction after 24 h of incubation with optimum glucose concentration for molybdate reduction at 1.5% (w/v). The optimum pH, phosphate and molybdate concentrations, and temperature for molybdate reduction were pH 6.5, 5.0, 25 to 50 mM and 37 degrees C, respectively. The Mo-blue produced by cellular reduction exhibited a unique absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Metal ions such as chromium, cadmium, copper, silver and mercury caused approximately 73, 71, 81, 77 and 78% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. All of the respiratory inhibitors tested namely rotenone, azide, cyanide and antimycin A did not show any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting components of the electron transport system are not responsible for the reducing activity. The isolate was tentatively identified as Enterobacter sp. strain Dr.Y13 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. PMID:19455513

  16. Synthesis and characterisation of thiosemicarbazonato molybdenum(VI) complexes and their in vitro antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, Visnja; Dilović, Ivica; Rubcić, Mirta; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Kralj, Marijeta; Matković-Calogović, Dubravka; Piantanida, Ivo; Novak, Predrag; Rozman, Andrea; Cindrić, Marina

    2010-01-01

    New dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were obtained by the reaction of [MoO2(acac)2] with thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from 3-thiosemicarbazide and 4-(diethylamino)salicylaldehyde (H2L1), 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (H2L2) or 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (H2L3). In all complexes thiosemicarbazonato ligands are coordinated to molybdenum as tridentate ONS-donors. Octahedral coordination of each molybdenum atom is completed by methanol molecule (in 1a-3a) or by oxygen atom of Mo=O unit from the neighbouring molecule (in 1-3). All complexes were characterized by means of chemical analyses, IR spectroscopy, TG and NMR measurements. The molecular structures of the ligand H2L2 and complex [MoO2L2(CH3OH)].CH3OH (2a) have been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The characterisation of thiosemicarbazonato molybdenum(VI) complexes (1-4) as well as of the 4-phenylthisemicarbazonato molybdenum(VI) complexes (5-8) in aqueous medium revealed that upon dissolving complexes in water, most likely to some extent dissociation took place, although experimental data didn't allow exact quantification of dissociation. The antiproliferative effects of studied molybdenum(VI) complexes (1-8) on the human cell lines were identical to the activity of their corresponding ligands. PMID:19815314

  17. The role of oxygen in porous molybdenum electrodes for the alkali metal thermoelectric converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Nagasubramanian, G.; Khanna, S. K.; Bankston, C. P.; Thakoor, A. P.; Cole, T.

    1986-01-01

    A model for chemical reactions in porous molybdenum electrodes is presented which is based on thermochemical and kinetic data, known sodium-molybdenum-oxygen chemistry, X-ray diffraction analysis of molybdenum and molybdenum oxide electrodes, and the electrochemical behavior of the cell. Enhanced sodium transport through the electrode in its optimum performance state is found to be due to the high sodium ion conductivity of molten Na2MoO4 in the pores, and the electrical conduction to the molybdenum matrix by Na2Mo3O6. The decline of electrode performance is shown to be due to a combination of loss mechanisms for the Na-Mo-O compounds including reduction at short circuit, disproportionation of Na2Mo3O6 at open circuit, and the evaporation of Na2MoO4 at elevated temperature. It is suggested that operation of the cell at moderate voltage of about 0.5 V corresponding to maximum power may be a more stable condition for the porous electrode than open-circuit stand or short-circuit, where degradation reactions are heightened.

  18. X-ray Diffraction Study of Molybdenum to 900 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T.; Collins, G. W.; Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a transition metal that is important as a high-pressure standard. Its equation of state, structure, and melting behavior have been explored extensively in both experimental and theoretical studies. Melting data up to the Mbar pressure region from static compression experiments in the diamond anvil cell [Errandonea et al. 2004] are inconsistent with shock wave sound velocity measurements [Hixson et al., 1989]. There are also conflicting reports as to whether body-centered cubic (BCC) Mo transforms to a face-centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) or double hexagonal close packed (DHCP) structure at either high pressure or high pressure and temperature conditions [Belonoshko et al. 2008, Mikhaylushkin et al., 2008 and Cazorla et al., 2008]. Recently, a phase transition from BCC to the DHCP phase at 660 GPa and 0 K was predicted using the particle swam optimization (PSO) method (Wang et al, 2013). Here we report an x-ray diffraction study of dynamically compressed molybdenum. Experiments were conducted using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Mo targets were either ramp or shock compressed using a laser drive. In ramp loading, the sample is compressed sufficiently slowly that a shock wave does not form. This results in lower temperatures, keeping the sample in the solid state to higher pressures. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed using quasi-monochromatic x-rays from a highly ionized He-α Cu source and image plate detectors. Upon ramp compression, we found no evidence of phase transition in solid Mo up to 900 GPa. The observed peaks can be assigned to the (110) and (200) or (220) reflections of BCC Mo up to the highest pressure, indicating that Mo does not melt under ramp loading to maximum pressure reached. Under shock loading, we did not observe any evidence for the solid-solid phase transformation around 210 GPa as reported in previous work (Hixson et al, 1989). The BCC

  19. Fate and Transport of Molybdenum Disulfide Nanomaterials in Sand Columns

    PubMed Central

    Lanphere, Jacob D.; Luth, Corey J.; Guiney, Linda M.; Mansukhani, Nikhita D.; Hersam, Mark C.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Research and development of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) (e.g., molybdenum disulfide [MoS2]) in electronic, optical, and catalytic applications has been growing rapidly. However, there is little known regarding the behavior of these particles once released into aquatic environments. Therefore, an in-depth study regarding the fate and transport of two popular types of MoS2 nanomaterials, lithiated (MoS2-Li) and Pluronic PF-87 dispersed (MoS2-PL), was conducted in saturated porous media (quartz sand) to identify which form would be least mobile in aquatic environments. The electrokinetic properties and hydrodynamic diameters of MoS2 as a function of ionic strength and pH were determined using a zeta potential analyzer and dynamic light scattering techniques. Results suggest that the stability is significantly decreased beginning at 10 and 31.6 mM KCl, for MoS2-PL and MoS2-Li, respectively. Transport study results from breakthrough curves, column dissections, and release experiments suggest that MoS2-PL exhibits a greater affinity to be irreversibly bound to quartz surfaces as compared with the MoS2-Li at a similar ionic strength. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory was used to help explain the unique interactions between the MoS2-PL and MoS2-Li surfaces between particles and with the quartz collectors. Overall, the results suggest that the fate and transport of MoS2 is dependent on the type of MoS2 that enters the environment, where MoS2-PL will be least mobile and more likely be deposited in porous media from pluronic–quartz interactions, whereas MoS2-Li will travel greater distances and have a greater tendency to be remobilized in sand columns. PMID:25741176

  20. Hydrometallation of model compounds of a cobalt-molybdenum catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.; Smith, M.C.; Petersen, E.E.

    1983-05-01

    One solution to corrosion and environmental problems is to remove sulfur from the fuel or feedstock before burning or processing by catalytic hydrosulfurization (HDS). Besides sulfur, heavy petroleum fractions and coal liquids contain high levels of trace metal compounds compared to traditional HDS feedstocks. In resids, these metals are mainly vanadium and nickel and in coal-liquids they are mostly titanium and iron. Under typical HDS conditions the organometallic compounds in these liquids also decompose and yield metal-free organics and metal sulfides. This hydrometallation (HDM) reaction is a double-edged sword. Since the sulfides are insoluble in the oil, the reaction effectively demetallizes the feedstock. This is desirable because, like sulfur, these metals pose environmental corrosion, and catalyst poisoning problems. The undesirable aspect of the reaction is that these insoluble metal sulfides collect in and around the HDS catalyst pellets, plugging pores and covering active surface sites thereby reducing both the HDS and the HDM catalytic activity. The deactivating effect of metal deposition on HDS and HDM is the focus of this study. Since the metal sulfides produced by HDM remain at the site of their reaction, the amount of metal at any point in the catalyst is a record of the reaction rate at that point. By carefully measuring the metal concentrations inside a series of cobalt-molybdenum-alumina catalyst pellets exposed for different lengths of time, demetallation rate profiles are measured within the pellets. There is no similar way to measure local HDS rates. Measurements of the global HDS rates, a knowledge of HDS kinetics, and measurements of the local HDM rates permit us to model the effect of metal deposits on catalyst activity. We have chosen to work with two model classes of compounds, metal naphthenates and metalloporphyrins.

  1. Molybdenum Storage in Cyanobacteria: "Mopping" Up Excess Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Wolfe-Simon, F.; Anbar, A. D.

    2008-12-01

    The heavy metal molybdenum (Mo) plays an essential role in the nitrogen (N) cycle. In order to acquire N from the environment, microorganisms utilize Mo-containing enzymes such as nitrogenase (for N2 fixation) and nitrate reductase (for NO3- assimilation). N2-fixing cyanobacteria likely played an important role in both marine and terrestrial N cycling throughout Earth history. Low Mo levels in Precambrian oceans may have necessitated evolution of cyanobacterial Mo-storage ("Mop") proteins. If so, mop genes were likely lost in marine cyanobacteria after the rise of Mo (to approximately 100 nanomolar (nM) 600 Ma (Scott et al., 2008)). The distribution of mop genes in N2-fixing cyanobacteria supports this hypothesis; freshwater species contain this gene whereas marine species lack it. To assess the importance of Mo-storage in modern environments we are integrating laboratory and field investigations. In the lab, we grew N2-fixing freshwater cyanobacteria possessing the mop gene at high Mo levels (1500 nM) to assess whether excess Mo is accumulated Extremely high intracellular accumulation of Mo, much higher than could be accounted for by nitrogenase requirements alone, was observed. Investigation of mop gene expression and protein localization in Mo-replete and deplete conditions is underway. In the field, we are isolating indigenous cyanobacteria and cloning mop genes from Castle Lake, California. This field locale is of particular interest because previous studies show that periphyton consortia in this lake assimilate large quantities of N, even though Mo concentrations are <5 nM. This adaptation to low Mo may be aided by intracellular Mo storage.

  2. Synthesis and structure of dihydridodichlorotetrakis(dimethyl-phenylphosphine)molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Lenenko, V.S.; Yanovskii, A.I.; Struchkov, Yu.T.; Shur, V.B.; Vol'pin, M.E.

    1987-03-01

    The reduction of (THF)/sub 3/MoCl/sub 3/ by magnesium in THF in the presence of Me/sub 2/PhP followed by treatment with MeOH gives the hydride complex of molybdenum (Me/sub 2/PhP)/sub 4/-MoH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (I), which has been characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy and investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis (-120/sup 0/C, lambdaMo, 3656 reflections, R = 0.077). The crystals of I are triclinic, and at -120/sup 0/C a = 8.902, b = 9.820, c = 22.73 A ..cap alpha.. = 86.13, ..beta.. = 89.28, ..gamma.. = 67.62/sup 0/, Z = 2, and the space group is P anti 1. The hydride H atoms could not be located objectively; however, their positions were established approximately on the basis of the arrangement of the remaining ligands. The coordination polyhedron of the Mo atom may be described as a distorted triangular dodecahedron. The lengths of the Mo-P bonds differ appreciably: the longer Mo-P bonds, which are equal to 2.544 and 2.531 A, form a 157.8/sup 0/ angle with one another, the angle between the two shorter Mo-P bonds, which measure 2.459 and 2.445 A, is equal to 119.6/sup 0/, and the remaining PMoP angles lie in the range from 90.6 to 100.0/sup 0/. The Mo-P and Mo-Cl bonds (2.542 and 2.532 A) in complex I are close to the corresponding distances in the tungsten analog, which was previously investigated.

  3. Ergonomic study of an operator's work of a molybdenum plant.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Esteban; Meyer, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    This study was part of an ergonomic program which is being carried out through an agreement between the University of Concepción and a Chilean private mining company. The purpose of this case study was to identify working conditions in which the physical and mental workload could be over the capabilities of the operator. He was responsible for loading trucks with sacks of molybdenum and for downloading reagents and handles them. The methods employed in this study included electronic records, interviews, surveys, review of the company standards, a time study and physical and mental workload analysis. Results showed that 84% of the time the operator was carrying out principal and secondary activities and no break periods were detected. It was found that the pace of work and the shift system generated unfavorable conditions by imbalance in the workload on the different days of the week. In the light of the results recommendations were made for a number of ergonomic changes. Most of them were accepted by the company. The most important achievement was a change in the shift system. The overload of the operator was due to the fact that he was in a shift working 5 days and resting on weekends. The imbalance was mainly because the work of the week end was accumulated for Monday. As a result of the study, the company contracted a second worker for this job and adopted a 7x7 shift system, meaning that they work seven days and rest seven days. An evaluation carried out two month after adopting the new shift revealed that changes were well accepted by the worker. PMID:22317731

  4. (Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)molybdenum(IV) chloride. Synthesis, structure, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Abugideiri, F.; Desai, J.U.; Gordon, J.C.

    1994-08-17

    Three different syntheses of trichloro(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)molybdenum(IV) are described, I.E. (1) thermal decarbonylation of Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 3}(CO){sub 2}, (2) reduction of Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 4}, and (3) chlorination of [Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 2}]{sub 2}. A fourth route (conproportionation of [Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 2}]{sub 2} and Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 4}) has been investigated by {sup 1}H-NMR. The product has a dinuclear, dichloro-bridged structure with a four-legged piano stool geometry around each metal atom; the two piano stools have a mutual anti arrangement and the two metals are 3.888(1) {Angstrom} from each other, indicating the absence of a direct metal-metal bonding interaction. Crystal data: monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 8.424(1) {Angstrom}, b = 13.323(4) {Angstrom}, c = 11.266(2) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 93.87(1){degrees}, V = 1261.6(8) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2, R = 0.038, R{sub w} = 0.057 for 127 parameters and 1350 observed reflections with F{sub o}{sup 2} > 3{sigma}(F{sub o}{sup 2}). The temperature dependent magnetic moment of the material could be fit to the sum of two Bleany-Bowers equations. [Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 3}]{sub 2} reacts readily with CO, Cl{sup {minus}}, and PMe{sub 3} to afford Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 3}(CO){sub 2}, [Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 4}]{sup {minus}}, and Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 3}(PMe{sub 3}), respectively, while the reaction with 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe) affords the reduction product Cp{sup *}MoCl{sub 2}(dppe).

  5. Isotopic fingerprints of anthropogenic molybdenum in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Chappaz, Anthony; Lyons, Timothy W; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Anbar, Ariel D

    2012-10-16

    We measured the molybdenum isotope compositions (δ(98)Mo) of well-dated sediment cores from two lakes in eastern Canada in an effort to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic contributions to these freshwater aquatic systems. Previously, Chappaz et al. (1) ascribed pronounced 20th-century Mo concentration enrichments in these lakes to anthropogenic inputs. δ(98)Mo values in the deeper sediments (reflecting predominantly natural Mo sources) differ dramatically between the two lakes: -0.32 ± 0.17‰ for oxic Lake Tantare and +0.64 ± 0.09‰ for anoxic Lake Vose. Sediment layers previously identified as enriched in anthropogenic Mo, however, reveal significant δ(98)Mo shifts of ± 0.3‰, resulting in isotopically heavier values of +0.05 ± 0.18‰ in Lake Tantare and lighter values of +0.31 ± 0.03‰ in Lake Vose. We argue that anthropogenic Mo modifies the isotopic composition of the recent sediments, and we determine δ(98)Mo(anthropogenic) values of 0.1 ± 0.1‰ (Lake Vose) and 0.2 ± 0.2‰ (Lake Tantare). These calculated inputs are consistent with the δ(98)Mo of molybdenite (MoS(2)) likely delivered to the lakes via smelting of porphyry copper deposits (Lake Vose) or through combustion of coal and oil also containing Mo (Lake Tantare). Our results confirm the utility of Mo isotopes as a promising fingerprint of human impacts and perhaps the specific sources of contamination. Importantly, the magnitudes of the anthropogenic inputs are large enough, relative to the natural Mo cycles in each lake, to have an impact on the microbiological communities. PMID:22970917

  6. Aqueous corrosion behavior of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Levi D.

    Nuclear fuel characterization requires understanding of the various conditions to which materials are exposed in-reactor. One of these important conditions is corrosion, particularly that of fuel constituents. Therefore, corrosion behavior is of special interest and an essential part of nuclear materials characterization efforts. In support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization's Reactor Conversion Program, monolithic uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) is being investigated as a low enriched uranium alternative to highly enriched uranium dispersion fuel currently used in domestic high performance research reactors. The aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Mo is being examined at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of U-Mo fuel fabrication capability activity. No prior study adequately represents this behavior given the current state of alloy composition and thermomechanical processing methods, and research reactor water chemistry. Two main measurement techniques were employed to evaluate U-Mo corrosion behavior. Low-temperature corrosion rate values were determined by means of U-Mo immersion testing and subsequent mass-loss measurements. The electrochemical behavior of each processing condition was also qualitatively examined using the techniques of corrosion potential and anodic potentiodynamic polarization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical metallography (OM) imagery and hardness measurements provided supplemental corrosion analysis in an effort to relate material corrosion behavior to processing. The processing effects investigated as part of this were those of homogenization heat treatment (employed to mitigate the effects of coring in castings) and sub-eutectoid heat treatment, meant to represent additional steps in fabrication (such as hot isostatic pressing) performed at similar temperatures. Immersion mass loss measurements and electrochemical results both showed very little appreciable difference between

  7. Phase identification in reactive sintering of molybdenum disilicide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Alba, J. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Molybdenum disilicide has been predominantly used for furnace heating elements, but recently there has been interest in its use for high temperature structural applications. The reason for this increased interest stems from its desirable characteristics which are a high melting point, relatively low density, good oxidation resistance, relatively good thermal conductivity and electronically conductive. The melting point of MoSi{sub 2} is approximately 2030{degrees}C as compared to a melting point of 1340{degrees}C for the Ni-based superalloys. This could potentially give MoSi{sub 2} a big advantage over the Ni-based superalloys in turbine applications because the operating temperature can be increased resulting in an increase in turbine efficiency and reduced emissions. The relatively low density (6.25g/cm{sup 3}) compared to the Ni-based superalloys (8.9 g/cm{sup 3}) is an important advantage in turbine applications because of the need for low weight. Good oxidation resistance stems from the ability of MoSi{sub 2} to form a protective SiO{sub 2} surface layer when exposed to oxygen. Another advantageous feature of MoSi{sub 2} is its thermal conductivity which is superior to Ni-based superalloys at low temperatures and comparable to the Ni-based superalloys at high temperatures. This allows heat to be dissipated at a rate better than ceramics and comparable to metals. MoSi{sub 2} is electrically conductive allowing it to be electro discharge machined. This is desirable since conventional ceramics are not generally conductive and cannot be electro discharge machined.

  8. New pathways to tungsten and molybdenum oxides, nitrides and azides

    SciTech Connect

    Close, M.R.

    1992-10-07

    [WNCl{sub 3}]{sub 4} was prepared and characterized structurally by X-ray diffraction. [WNCl{sub 3}]{sub 4} crystallizes in space group P{bar 1} as planar 8-membered W-N rings interconnected through chloride bridges. The inter-tetramer linkage is weak and broken easily to accommodate basic ligands in the site trans to the W-N triple bond. Reactivity of WNCl{sub 3}, with nitriding agents, such as ammonia, trimethylsilylazide and lithium nitride, has been investigated, which resulted in preparation of new tungsten azido and nitrido compounds. Second, the reactivity of the metal dimers MO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 4} and MO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}py{sub 4} with trimethylsilylazide has been explored, and the reactions in pyridine were found to yield a material corresponding to the formulation, MoN(N{sub 3})py. Thermolytic decomposition of this azide at 280{degree}C was performed under argon, dynamic vacuum or ammonia. Thermal decomposition in ammonia produces a molybdenum nitride relatively free of carbon with a Mo:N ratio of 1:1.8. WNCl{sub 3} was converted into a hexagonal ammonium tungsten bronze, (NH{sub 4}){sub 0.28}WO{sub 3-y}(NH){sub y}. This synthesis increased the probability of isoelectronic imido substitution for oxide in the bronze framework. Rietveld refinements of neutron powder data indicated strongly that nitrogen, in the form of imide, does not substitute for oxygen. A model for ammonium cation motion in the hexagonal channels of the bronze was developed. Electrical resistivity measurements on a pressed pellet of this hexagonal bronze show a temperature dependence like that of a low-band gap semiconductor, in contrast to conventionally prepared metallic hexagonal bronze phases.

  9. Differential expression of proteins in response to molybdenum deficiency in winter wheat leaves under low-temperature stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient for plants. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cold resistance enhanced by molybdenum application in winter wheat, we applied a proteomic approach to investigate the differential expression of proteins in response to molybden...

  10. Hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanomaterials with controlled morphology and strong plasmonic absorption for photothermal ablation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Guosheng; Shen, Jia; Jiang, Feiran; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Wenyao; An, Lei; Zou, Rujia; Chen, Zhigang; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2014-03-26

    The molybdenum oxide nanosheets have shown strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, the long alky chains of ligands made them hydrophobic and less biocompatible. To meet the requirements of molybdenum based nanomaterials for use as a future photothermal therapy, a simple hydrothermal route has been developed for hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanospheres and nanoribbons using a molybdenum precursor and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). First, molybdenum oxide nanomaterials prepared in the presence of PEG exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in near-infrared (NIR) region, compared with that of no PEG. Second, elevation of synthetic temperature leads to a gradual transformation of molybdenum oxide nanospheres into nanoribbons, entailing the evolution of an intense LSPR absorption in the NIR region. Third, as-prepared molybdenum oxide nanomaterials coated with PEG possess a hydrophilic property and thus can be directly used for biological applications without additional post treatments. Moreover, molybdenum oxide nanoribbons as a model of photothermal materials can efficiently convert the 980 nm wavelength laser energy into heat energy, and this localized hyperthermia produces the effective thermal ablation of cancer cells, meaning a potential photothermal material. PMID:24564332

  11. Strain hardening and structural changes in molybdenum in tension with the application of ultrasonic vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Ivashchenko, V.V.; Kozlov, A.V.; Moiseev, V.F.; Mordyuk, N.S.; Pechkovskii, E.P.

    1985-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the amplitude of the applied ultrasonic vibrations on the rules of strain hardening and their interrelationship with the structural changes in molybdenum in tension. The investigated molybdenum was rolled at 950 degrees C into 1 mm thick sheet and annealed at 950 degrees C for 1 hours. In the tension of molybdenum with the application of ultrasonic vibrations, the general rules of strain hardening are observed, but under the influence of the ultrasonic vibration, the stage of parabolic hardening with a tangle type dislocation structure is significantly broadened within the studied range of amplitudes. A later transition to the stage of formatin of the dislocation cell structure is noted.

  12. The Extreme Overabundance of Molybdenum in Two Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2011-11-01

    We report determinations of the molybdenum abundances in five mildly to extremely metal-poor turnoff stars using five Mo II lines near 2000 Å. In two of the stars, the abundance of molybdenum is found to be extremely enhanced, as high or higher than the neighboring even-Z elements ruthenium and zirconium. Of the several nucleosynthesis scenarios envisioned for the production of nuclei in this mass range in the oldest stars, a high-entropy wind acting in a core-collapse supernova seems uniquely capable of the twin aspects of a high molybdenum overproduction confined to a narrow mass range. Whatever the details of the nucleosynthesis mechanism, however, this unusual excess suggests that very few individual nucleosynthesis events were responsible for the synthesis of the light trans-Fe heavy elements in these cases, an unexpected result given that both are only moderately metal-poor.

  13. Recent developments in the homogeneous reduction of dinitrogen by molybdenum and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, K. Cory; Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-07-01

    The reduction of gaseous nitrogen is a challenge for industrial, biological and synthetic chemists. Major goals include understanding the formation of ammonia for agriculture, and forming N-C and N-Si bonds for the synthesis of fine chemicals. The iron-molybdenum active site of the enzyme nitrogenase has inspired chemists to explore iron and molybdenum complexes in transformations related to N2 reduction. This area of research has gained significant momentum, and the past two years have witnessed a number of significant advances in synthetic Fe-N2 and Mo-N2 chemistry. Furthermore, the identities of all atoms in the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase have finally been elucidated, and the discovery of a carbide has generated new questions and targets for coordination chemists. This Perspective summarizes the recent work on iron and molydenum complexes, and highlights the opportunities for continued research.

  14. Optoelectronic crystal of artificial atoms in strain-textured molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Contryman, Alex W.; Qian, Xiaofeng; Ardakani, Sina Moeini; Gong, Yongji; Wang, Xingli; Weisse, Jeffery M.; Lee, Chi Hwan; Zhao, Jiheng; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Li, Ju; Manoharan, Hari C.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    The isolation of the two-dimensional semiconductor molybdenum disulphide introduced a new optically active material possessing a band gap that can be facilely tuned via elastic strain. As an atomically thin membrane with exceptional strength, monolayer molybdenum disulphide subjected to biaxial strain can embed wide band gap variations overlapping the visible light spectrum, with calculations showing the modified electronic potential emanating from point-induced tensile strain perturbations mimics the Coulomb potential in a mesoscopic atom. Here we realize and confirm this `artificial atom' concept via capillary-pressure-induced nanoindentation of monolayer molybdenum disulphide from a tailored nanopattern, and demonstrate that a synthetic superlattice of these building blocks forms an optoelectronic crystal capable of broadband light absorption and efficient funnelling of photogenerated excitons to points of maximum strain at the artificial-atom nuclei. Such two-dimensional semiconductors with spatially textured band gaps represent a new class of materials, which may find applications in next-generation optoelectronics or photovoltaics.

  15. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-21

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors. PMID:25177907

  16. Structure and photochromic properties of molybdenum-containing silica gels obtained by molecular-lamination method

    SciTech Connect

    Belotserkovskaya, N.G.; Dobychin, D.P.; Pak, V.N.

    1992-05-10

    The structure and physicochemical properties of molybdenum-containing silica gels obtained by molecular lamination have been studied quite extensively. Up to the present, however, no studies have been made of the influence of the pore structure of the original silica gel on the structure and properties of molybdenum-containing silica gels (MSG). The problem is quite important, since molybdenum silicas obtained by molecular lamination may find applications in catalysis and as sensors of UV radiation. In either case, the structure of the support is not a factor to be ignored. Here, the authors are reporting on an investigation of the structure of MSG materials with different pore structures and their susceptibility to reduction of the Mo(VI) oxide groupings when exposed to UV radiation. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Ion pairs of a molybdenum thiocyanate complex with dyes of the xanthene series

    SciTech Connect

    Ganago, L.I.; Ivanova, I.F.

    1988-03-10

    It has been ascertained that thiocyanate complexes of molybdenum react with dyes of the xanthene series, Rhodamine 6G and Rhodamine B, to form ion pairs. The Mo:SCN:Rhod. component ratios are respectively 1:5:2 and 1:6:3. The ion pairs are stable in an acid medium: 4.5-5.5 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (MTC-Rhod. 6G) and 3 M H/sub 2/SO (MTC-Rhod. B), and their molecular extinction coefficients are 2.22 x 10/sup 5/ and 3.8 x 10/sub 5/ respectively; MTC in a molybdenum thiocyanate complex. A procedure has been worked out for determining molybdenum in films, making use of the reaction of forming an MTC-Rhod. B ion pair.

  18. THE EXTREME OVERABUNDANCE OF MOLYBDENUM IN TWO METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2011-11-20

    We report determinations of the molybdenum abundances in five mildly to extremely metal-poor turnoff stars using five Mo II lines near 2000 A. In two of the stars, the abundance of molybdenum is found to be extremely enhanced, as high or higher than the neighboring even-Z elements ruthenium and zirconium. Of the several nucleosynthesis scenarios envisioned for the production of nuclei in this mass range in the oldest stars, a high-entropy wind acting in a core-collapse supernova seems uniquely capable of the twin aspects of a high molybdenum overproduction confined to a narrow mass range. Whatever the details of the nucleosynthesis mechanism, however, this unusual excess suggests that very few individual nucleosynthesis events were responsible for the synthesis of the light trans-Fe heavy elements in these cases, an unexpected result given that both are only moderately metal-poor.

  19. Influence of nickel and molybdenum on the phase stability and mechanical properties of maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Nasim, I.; Husain, S.W. )

    1994-04-01

    The effect of nickel and molybdenum concentrations on the phase transformation and mechanical properties of conventional 10Ni(350) maraging steel has been investigated. Both of these elements act as strong austenite stabilizers. When the concentration of molybdenum or nickel is greater than 7.5 or 24 wt%, respectively, the austenite phase remains stable up to room temperature. In both molybdenum- and nickel-alloyed steels, the austenite phase could be transformed to martensite by either dipping the material in liquid nitrogen or subjecting it to cold working. When 7.5 wt% Mo and 24 wt% Ni were added in combination, however, the austenite phase obtained at room temperature did not transform to martensite when liquid-nitrogen quenched or even when cold rolled to greater than 95% reduction. The aging response of these materials has also been investigated using optical, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Selective intercalation of o-phenylene diamine into molybdenum oxide layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Ke Cao Huiqun; Qiu Qi

    2009-03-05

    o-Phenylene diamine molecules were intercalated into molybdenum oxide layers by an in situ co-precipitation method. The structure and composition of the intercalated material were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and elemental analysis. XRD data evidenced a layered structure with a spacing of 18 A, which corresponds to an organic-inorganic hybrid-layered structure. IR and UV-vis spectra indicated the polymerization of o-phenylene between the molybdenum oxide layers. It was also observed that compared with aniline molecules, o-phenylene diamine molecules can be selectively intercalated into molybdenum oxide layers. We provide evidence that affinity for o-phenylene diamine to form intermolecular polymers is the reason for its selective intercalation. The polymer chain structure of o-phenylene diamine makes it a preferential guest species compared with aniline. We believe that this opens a new way to create organic-inorganic hybrid structures.

  1. The role of FeS clusters for molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and molybdoenzymes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum is the only second row transition metal essential for biological systems, which is biologically available as molybdate ion. In eukarya, bacteria and archaea, molybdenum is bound to either to a tricyclic pyranopterin, thereby forming the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), or in some bacteria to the FeS cluster based iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco), which forms the active site of nitrogenase. To date more than 50 Moco-containing enzymes have been purified and biochemically or structurally characterized. The physiological role of molybdenum in these enzymes is fundamental to organisms, since the reactions include the catalysis of key steps in carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. The catalyzed reactions are in most cases oxo-transfer reactions or the hydroxylation of carbon centers. The biosynthesis of Moco has been intensively studied, in addition to its insertion into molybdoenzymes. In particular, a link between the biosynthesis and maturation of molybdoenzymes and the biosynthesis and distribution of FeS clusters has been identified in the last years: 1) The synthesis of the first intermediate in Moco biosynthesis requires an FeS-cluster containing protein, 2) The sulfurtransferase for the dithiolene group in Moco is common also for the synthesis of FeS clusters, thiamin and thiolated tRNAs, 3) the modification of the active site with a sulfur atom additionally involves a sulfurtransferase, 4) most molybdoenzymes in bacteria require FeS clusters as additional redox active cofactors. In this review we will focus on the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor in bacteria, its modification and insertion into molybdoenzymes, with an emphasis to its link to FeS cluster biosynthesis and sulfur transfer. PMID:25268953

  2. Survey of Portions of the Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Molybdenum Quaternary System at 1,200 Degrees C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rideout, Sheldon Paul; Beck, Paul A

    1953-01-01

    A survey was made of portions of the chromium-cobalt-nickel-molybdenum quaternary system at 1,200 degrees c by means of microscopic and x-ray diffraction studies. Since the face-centered cubic (alpha) solid solutions form the matrix of almost all practically useful high-temperature alloys, the solid solubility limits of the quaternary alpha phase were determined up to 20 percent molybdenum. The component cobalt-nickel-molybdenum, chromium-cobalt-molybdenum, and chromium-nickel-molybdenum ternary systems were also studied. The survey of these systems was confined to the determination of the boundaries of the face-centered cubic (alpha) solid solutions and of the phases coexisting with alpha at 1,200 degrees c.

  3. Mouse model for molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B recapitulates the phenotype observed in molybdenum cofactor deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubiczka-Smorag, Joanna; Santamaria-Araujo, Jose Angel; Metz, Imke; Kumar, Avadh; Hakroush, Samy; Brueck, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Guenter; Burfeind, Peter; Reiss, Jochen; Smorag, Lukasz

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive disorder, mainly caused by mutations in MOCS1 (MoCo deficiency type A) or MOCS2 (MoCo deficiency type B) genes; the absence of active MoCo results in a deficiency in all MoCo-dependent enzymes. Patients with MoCo deficiency present with neonatal seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, brain atrophy and early childhood death. Although substitution therapy with cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP) has been successfully used in both Mocs1 knockout mice and in patients with MoCo deficiency type A, there is currently no Mocs2 knockout mouse and no curative therapy for patients with MoCo deficiency type B. Therefore, we generated and characterized a Mocs2-null mouse model of MoCo deficiency type B. Expression analyses of Mocs2 revealed a ubiquitous expression pattern; however, at the cellular level, specific cells show prominent Mocs2 expression, e.g., neuronal cells in cortex, hippocampus and brainstem. Phenotypic analyses demonstrated that Mocs2 knockout mice failed to thrive and died within 11 days after birth. None of the tested MoCo-dependent enzymes were active in Mocs2-deficient mice, leading to elevated concentrations of purines, such as hypoxanthine and xanthine, and non-detectable levels of uric acid in the serum and urine. Moreover, elevated concentrations of S-sulfocysteine were measured in the serum and urine. Increased levels of xanthine resulted in bladder and kidney stone formation, whereas increased concentrations of toxic sulfite triggered neuronal apoptosis. In conclusion, Mocs2-deficient mice recapitulate the severe phenotype observed in humans and can now serve as a model for preclinical therapeutic approaches for MoCo deficiency type B. PMID:27138983

  4. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of molybdenum rhenium alloys and their improvement by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Ueda, Kazukiyo; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation-induced embrittlement is one of the major problems with molybdenum alloys, which have been considered as one of the candidates for divertor structural materials. The effects of rhenium content, heat-treatment and irradiation condition on mechanical properties and microstructural development of molybdenum rhenium alloys were studied after neutron exposure by FFTF/MOTA up to high fluence (˜1 × 10 27 n/m 2, En>0.1 MeV). Appreciable plastic deformation was observed in a bending test on stress-relieved Mo-5 wt% Re irradiated at high temperatures. Fine, dense precipitates were observed in Mo-41 wt% Re, resulting in large hardening and embrittlement.

  5. Separation of Molybdenum-Uranium by a Process Combining Ion Exchange Resin and Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, A.; Setti, L.; Djennane, A.; Melikchi, R.

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the electrodeionization with ion-exchange resin is suitable for removing uranium from a solution containing molybdenum. A hybrid process combining ion exchange (resins and membranes) using electric current. For this electroextraction process, the cation exchange resin is introduced into an electrodialysis cell and compressed between two cations exchange membranes. We have investigated a continuous electroextraction process. As important result we note that: The factor of selectivity,r, for molybdenum versus uranium is superior to 3; the concentration in radio active element (U3O8) is lower than 1.5 mg L-1 and small cell voltage is observed.

  6. Monocrystalline molybdenum silicide based quantum dot superlattices grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelli, Guillaume; Silveira Stein, Sergio; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Faucherand, Pascal; Montès, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the growth of doped monocrystalline molybdenum-silicide-based quantum dot superlattices (QDSL). This is the first time that such nanostructured materials integrating molybdenum silicide nanodots have been grown. QDSL are grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD). We present here their crystallographic structures and chemical properties, as well as the influence of the nanostructuration on their thermal and electrical properties. Particularly, it will be shown some specific characteristics for these QDSL, such as a localization of nanodots between the layers, unlike other silicide based QDSL, an accumulation of doping atoms near the nanodots, and a strong decrease of the thermal conductivity obtained thanks to the nanostructuration.

  7. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    SciTech Connect

    Geissbühler, Jonas Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  8. Investigation of welding and brazing of molybdenum and TZM alloy tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, Wayne E.

    1991-01-01

    This effort involved investigating the welding and brazing techniques of molybdenum tubes to be used as cartridges in the crystal growth cartridge. Information is given in the form of charts and photomicrographs. It was found that the recrystallization temperature of molybdenum can be increased by alloying it with 0.5 percent titanium and 0.1 percent zirconium. Recrystallization temperatures for this alloy, known as TZM, become significant around 2500 F. A series of microhardness tests were run on samples of virgin and heat soaked TZM. The test results are given in tabular form. It was concluded that powder metallurgy TZM may be an acceptable cartridge material.

  9. Individual and combined toxicity of manganese and molybdenum to mussel, Mytilus edulis, larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.D.; Mitchell, D.G.; Chapman, P.M.

    1986-08-01

    During toxicity testing of mine tailings from the proposed Quartz Hill molybdenum mine, which will be situated near Ketchikan, Alaska, the metals molybdenum (Mo) and manganese (Mn) showed evidence of leaching from the tailings. In order to determine whether these metals could be responsible for toxicities observed previously, Mytilus edulis mussel larvae bioassays (ASTM 1984) were conducted with these metals, both individually and in combination. The results of the bioassays showed that these metals could account for only a very small proportion of the tailings toxicity.

  10. Improved porous mixture of molybdenum nitride and tantalum oxide as a charge storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, C.Z.; Pynenburg, R.A.J.; Tsai, K.C.

    1998-04-01

    High surface area {gamma}-molybdenum nitride has shown promise as a charge storage material. The addition of amorphous tantalum oxide to the molybdenum nitride system not only improves the film cohesion tremendously, but also widens the voltage stability window from 0.8 to 1.1 V. This occurs without adversely effecting the capacitance. Ultracapacitors, also called supercapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, are high power storage devices which have found application in products as diverse as cardiac pacemakers, cellular phones, electric vehicles, and air bags.

  11. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbühler, Jonas; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Barraud, Loris; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  12. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  13. Effect of external magnetic field on valence-electron structures of Fe and Ni in Invar, Permalloy and the other Fe-Ni alloys by using Kβ-to-Kα X-ray intensity ratios.

    PubMed

    Alım, Bünyamin; Han, İbrahim; Demir, Lütfü

    2016-06-01

    The effect of external magnetic field on the valence-electron structures of Fe and Ni in various Fe-Ni alloy compositions was investigated by using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Firstly, Kβ-to-Kα X-ray intensity ratios of Fe and Ni in Invar (Fe0.64Ni0.36), Permalloy (Fe0.20Ni0.80) and FexNi1-x (x=0, 0.40, 0.52, 0.55, 0.61, and 1) alloys were measured without any magnetic field and under 0.5 and 1T external magnetic fields, separately. Later, the valence-electron structures of Fe and Ni in both pure form and alloys were obtained by comparison of measured X-ray intensity ratios with the results of multi-configurations Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations. The results obtained for valence-electron structures of Fe and Ni in various Fe-Ni alloys were evaluated in terms of magnetic field effect, delocalization and/or charge transfer phenomena. The results have shown that valence electron structure of Fe and Ni in Fe-Ni alloys are dependent on both external magnetic field and concentration of alloy elements. PMID:26974486

  14. Complex Molybdenum Isotope Behavior During Weathering and Erosional Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Burton, K.; Halliday, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    The oceans play a major role in regulating global climate because they both react and drive changes in other geochemical reservoirs. Non-traditional stable isotope systems have become important proxies for changes in ocean chemistry making the quantification of these changes possible. Molybdenum isotopes have great potential as tracers of changes in the oxygenation of the oceans over geological time scales. Although significant progress has been made and the amount of data on the biogeochemical behaviour of Mo in the marine environment has been increasing rapidly over the last few years, some important aspects of Mo geochemistry remain poorly understood. These include diagenetic processes at continental margins and continental weathering. Mo isotope behaviour in these settings has a potentially large impact on the interpretation of the geological record. A recent study of Archer and Vance (2008) has shown that dissolved Mo in many of Earths major rivers has a heavy isotope composition relative to most magmatic rocks. A potential cause for this isotope composition in modern rivers is isotope fractionation during weathering and erosion processes. We investigated Mo isotope behaviour in weathering profiles from Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Results clearly show significant Mo isotope fractionation during chemical weathering. Mo retained in saprolithe samples from Hawaii has light isotope compositions of up to -0.5 permill. The extent of fractionation is dependent on redox-conditions in the investigated profiles. The particular setting of these profiles keeps other factors that might influence the Mo isotope composition to a minimum. The results also indicate the possible use of Mo isotope signals as paleoredox-proxy of weathering processes. However, a weathering profile with intermittent changes in redox, pH and porewater saturation show more variable Mo isotope signals with partly positive isotope values. Sequential extractions of saphrolite samples show a clear

  15. An efficient molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen generation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min-Rui; Liang, Jin-Xia; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The electroreduction of water for sustainable hydrogen production is a critical component of several developing clean-energy technologies, such as water splitting and fuel cells. However, finding a cheap and efficient alternative catalyst to replace currently used platinum-based catalysts is still a prerequisite for the commercialization of these technologies. Here we report a robust and highly active catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction that is constructed by in situ growth of molybdenum disulfide on the surface of cobalt diselenide. In acidic media, the molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide catalyst exhibits fast hydrogen evolution kinetics with onset potential of −11 mV and Tafel slope of 36 mV per decade, which is the best among the non-noble metal hydrogen evolution catalysts and even approaches to the commercial platinum/carbon catalyst. The high hydrogen evolution activity of molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid is likely due to the electrocatalytic synergistic effects between hydrogen evolution-active molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide materials and the much increased catalytic sites. PMID:25585911

  16. An efficient molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Rui; Liang, Jin-Xia; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The electroreduction of water for sustainable hydrogen production is a critical component of several developing clean-energy technologies, such as water splitting and fuel cells. However, finding a cheap and efficient alternative catalyst to replace currently used platinum-based catalysts is still a prerequisite for the commercialization of these technologies. Here we report a robust and highly active catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction that is constructed by in situ growth of molybdenum disulfide on the surface of cobalt diselenide. In acidic media, the molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide catalyst exhibits fast hydrogen evolution kinetics with onset potential of -11 mV and Tafel slope of 36 mV per decade, which is the best among the non-noble metal hydrogen evolution catalysts and even approaches to the commercial platinum/carbon catalyst. The high hydrogen evolution activity of molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid is likely due to the electrocatalytic synergistic effects between hydrogen evolution-active molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide materials and the much increased catalytic sites. PMID:25585911

  17. A structure-based catalytic mechanism for the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, R; Hof, P; Duarte, R O; Moura, J J; Moura, I; Liu, M Y; LeGall, J; Hille, R; Archer, M; Romão, M J

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of the xanthine oxidase-related molybdenum-iron protein aldehyde oxido-reductase from the sulfate reducing anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas (Mop) was analyzed in its desulfo-, sulfo-, oxidized, reduced, and alcohol-bound forms at 1.8-A resolution. In the sulfo-form the molybdenum molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor has a dithiolene-bound fac-[Mo, = O, = S, ---(OH2)] substructure. Bound inhibitory isopropanol in the inner compartment of the substrate binding tunnel is a model for the Michaelis complex of the reaction with aldehydes (H-C = O,-R). The reaction is proposed to proceed by transfer of the molybdenum-bound water molecule as OH- after proton transfer to Glu-869 to the carbonyl carbon of the substrate in concert with hydride transfer to the sulfido group to generate [MoIV, = O, -SH, ---(O-C = O, -R)). Dissociation of the carboxylic acid product may be facilitated by transient binding of Glu-869 to the molybdenum. The metal-bound water is replenished from a chain of internal water molecules. A second alcohol binding site in the spacious outer compartment may cause the strong substrate inhibition observed. This compartment is the putative binding site of large inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8799115

  18. Low-temperature growth of layered molybdenum disulphide with controlled clusters.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jihun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kang, Il-Suk; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Taesung; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Layered molybdenum disulphide was grown at a low-temperature of 350 °C using chemical vapour deposition by elaborately controlling the cluster size. The molybdenum disulphide grown under various sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratios were examined. Using spectroscopy and microscopy, the effect of the cluster size on the layered growth was investigated in terms of the morphology, grain size, and impurity incorporation. Triangular single-crystal domains were grown at an optimized sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratio. Furthermore, it is proved that the nucleation sites on the silicon-dioxide substrate were related with the grain size. A polycrystalline monolayer with the 100-nm grain size was grown on a nucleation site confined substrate by high-vacuum annealing. In addition, a field-effect transistor was fabricated with a MoS2 monolayer and exhibited a mobility and on/off ratio of 0.15 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(5), respectively. PMID:26902316

  19. Electrotransport of Molybdenum Through an Electrodialysis Membrane. Concentration and Potentiel Profiles in Aqueous Interfacial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Azzedine; Benmhidi, Kamel

    In the first part we have observed the electrotransport of molybdenum in carbonate media (OH-,CO=3) through a commercial electrodialysis anion exchange membrane. The values of the molybdenum, hydrogen oxide and carbonate fluxes obtained in this study show that molybdenum is present as molybdate ion MoO=4 in carbonate solution and that the molybdyl tricarbonate ion existence hypothesis MoO2(CO3)4-3 an't no longer be maintained. In order to confirm this result we have studied the electrotransport of molybdenum and carbonate ions with different CO=3/MoO=4 ratio. The used theory is based on the fact that, the concentration ratio in the membrane equals the one of the same species within the solution. These hypothesis have to be justified given that this equality is actually usual for unstirred layers extremity. Therefore, in the second part the concentration and the potential profiles in aqueous interfacial layers were determined by a numerical resolution of the Nernst-Planck electrodiffusion equation coupled with the Poisson equation. The obtained concentration profiles from numerical resolution differ from 3 to 6% from the ones acquired by analytical resolution method assuming the constant electrical field hypothesis for OH-, CO=3 ions, respectively. However the potential profiles display that constant electrical field hypothesis is strictly valid.

  20. Magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide: a potential material for pollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Mambrini, Raquel V; Fonseca, Thales L; Dias, Anderson; Oliveira, Luiz C A; Araujo, Maria Helena; Moura, Flávia C C

    2012-11-30

    New magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide, Ni/Mo(2)C, have been produced via catalytic chemical vapor deposition from ethanol. Scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies suggest that the CVD process occurs in a single step. This process involves the reduction of NiMo oxides at different temperatures (700, 800 and 900°C) with catalytic deposition of carbon from ethanol producing molybdenum carbide on Ni surface. In the absence of molybdenum the formation of Ni/C was observed. The magnetic molybdenum carbide was successfully used as pollutants removal by adsorption of sulfur and nitrogen compounds from liquid fuels and model dyes such as methylene blue and indigo carmine. The dibenzothiofene adsorption process over Ni/Mo(2)C reached approximately 20 mg g(-1), notably higher than other materials described in the literature and also removed almost all methylene blue dye. The great advantage of these carbide composites is that they may be easily recovered magnetically and reused. PMID:23036701

  1. Low-temperature growth of layered molybdenum disulphide with controlled clusters

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Jihun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kang, Il-Suk; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Taesung; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Layered molybdenum disulphide was grown at a low-temperature of 350 °C using chemical vapour deposition by elaborately controlling the cluster size. The molybdenum disulphide grown under various sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratios were examined. Using spectroscopy and microscopy, the effect of the cluster size on the layered growth was investigated in terms of the morphology, grain size, and impurity incorporation. Triangular single-crystal domains were grown at an optimized sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratio. Furthermore, it is proved that the nucleation sites on the silicon-dioxide substrate were related with the grain size. A polycrystalline monolayer with the 100-nm grain size was grown on a nucleation site confined substrate by high-vacuum annealing. In addition, a field-effect transistor was fabricated with a MoS2 monolayer and exhibited a mobility and on/off ratio of 0.15 cm2 V−1 s−1 and 105, respectively. PMID:26902316

  2. Coordination polymer structure and revisited hydrogen evolution catalytic mechanism for amorphous molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phong D.; Tran, Thu V.; Orio, Maylis; Torelli, Stephane; Truong, Quang Duc; Nayuki, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Chiam, Sing Yang; Yi, Ren; Honma, Itaru; Barber, James; Artero, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are very attractive noble-metal-free electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water. The atomic structure and identity of the catalytically active sites have been well established for crystalline molybdenum disulfide (c-MoS2) but not for amorphous molybdenum sulfide (a-MoSx), which exhibits significantly higher HER activity compared to its crystalline counterpart. Here we show that HER-active a-MoSx, prepared either as nanoparticles or as films, is a molecular-based coordination polymer consisting of discrete [Mo3S13]2- building blocks. Of the three terminal disulfide (S22-) ligands within these clusters, two are shared to form the polymer chain. The third one remains free and generates molybdenum hydride moieties as the active site under H2 evolution conditions. Such a molecular structure therefore provides a basis for revisiting the mechanism of a-MoSx catalytic activity, as well as explaining some of its special properties such as reductive activation and corrosion. Our findings open up new avenues for the rational optimization of this HER electrocatalyst as an alternative to platinum.

  3. Chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by xray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR ischemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  4. Austenite Grain Growth and Precipitate Evolution in a Carburizing Steel with Combined Niobium and Molybdenum Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, Charles M.; Findley, Kip O.; Speer, John G.

    2015-11-01

    Austenite grain growth and microalloy precipitate size and composition evolution during thermal processing were investigated in a carburizing steel containing various additions of niobium and molybdenum. Molybdenum delayed the onset of abnormal austenite grain growth and reduced the coarsening of niobium-rich precipitates during isothermal soaking at 1323 K, 1373 K, and 1423 K (1050 °C, 1100 °C, and 1150 °C). Possible mechanisms for the retardation of niobium-rich precipitate coarsening in austenite due to molybdenum are considered. The amount of Nb in solution and in precipitates at 1373 K (1100 °C) did not vary over the holding times evaluated. In contrast, the amount of molybdenum in (Nb,Mo)C precipitates decreased with time, due to rejection of Mo into austenite and/or dissolution of fine Mo-rich precipitates. In hot-rolled alloys, soaking in the austenite regime resulted in coarsening of the niobium-rich precipitates at a rate that exceeded that predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner relation for volume-diffusion-controlled coarsening. This behavior is attributed to an initial bimodal precipitate size distribution in hot-rolled alloys that results in accelerated coarsening rates during soaking. Modification of the initial precipitate size distribution by thermal processing significantly lowered precipitate coarsening rates during soaking and delayed the associated onset of abnormal austenite grain growth.

  5. Synthesis of MCM-41 frameworks incorporating oxygen-sulphur derivates of molybdenum and tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Cortes, Sergio L. . E-mail: sergio.gonzalezcortes@chem.ox.ac.uk; Xiao Tiancun; Al-Megren, Hamid A.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Luisa; Rees, Nick; Hannus, Istvan; Mehn, Dora; Li Jiang; Green, Malcolm L.H. . E-mail: malcolm.green@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2005-07-12

    The first examples of mesostructured materials containing Mo- and W-oxo-sulphur species incorporated into a poorly ordered MCM-41 framework have been prepared under hydrothermal condition and alkaline medium. The incorporation of oxygen-sulphur derivates of molybdenum and tungsten not only increases significantly the pore diameter, but also improves the thermal stability of the MCM-41-related mesoporous material.

  6. Behavior of dissolved molybdenum during localized corrosion of austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Huang, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    An in situ study of the chemistry of molybdenum during localized of corrosion of stainless steel in chloride solutions has been carried using energy dispersive x-ray techniques. An artificial pit was used to maintained a one dimensional diffusion geometry by dissolving back the cross section of strip of Type 316 stainless steel foil mounted in an epoxy resin. A high intensity 8 {mu}m diameter polychromatic x-ray beam at Beamline x26A was scanned across the steel, a salt layer on the steel, and the concentrated dissolution products within the artificial pit. The resulting x-ray fluorescence was analyzed to determine changes in concentration of the constituent alloying elements. It has been found that the salt layer on the steel was formed mainly by iron chloride and all other alloying elements were present at relatively lower concentrations than n the steel. Virtually no chromium remained in the salt layer. Also, little molybdenum was present negating proposed corrosion inhibition by a definitive molybdenum forming salt layer. Within the concentrated artificial pit solution it was found that alloying elements dissolved and migrated down a concentration gradient, but closer to the mouth of deep ({approximately}2 mm) pits, precipitation of molybdenum occurred to a minor extent that did not affect the localized corrosion processes.

  7. Microsegregation in high-molybdenum austenitic stainless steel laser beam and gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kujanpaeae, V.P.; David, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel with 6% molybdenum (thickness 6 mm) was welded using laser beam (LB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes at various welding speeds. Depending on the welding speed the primary dendrite spacing ranged from 12 to 17 ..mu..m and from 2 to 7 ..mu..m for the GTA and LB welds, respectively. Extensive segregation of molybdenum was observed in the GTA welds. The segregation ratio for molybdenum, C/sub ID//C/sub D/, was found to be 1.9 in the GTA weld, and 1.2 in the LB weld. Distribution of iron, chromium and nickel was found nearly uniform in both welds. A recovered microstructure was observed after a post-weld annealing heat treatment. Annealing had a profound effect on the molybdenum segregation ratio in the laser weld. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) determined by a standard test was 55/sup 0/C for welds made using both processes, whereas it was 75/sup 0/C for the base metal. Upon homogenization the CPT of the laser beam weld increased to the base metal value, while that of the gas tungsten arc weld remained at 60/sup 0/C.

  8. Molybdenum determination in iron matrices by ICP-AES after separation and preconcentration using polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S L; dos Santos, H C; de Jesus, D S

    2001-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for the separation and determination of molybdenum in iron matrices by a batch process. It is based on the solid-phase extraction of the molybdenum(V) ion as thiocyanate complex on polyurethane (PU) foam. The extraction parameters were optimized. Using 0.20 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid, a thiocyanate concentration of 0.10 mol L-1, 100 mg of polyurethane foam and shaking time of 10 min, molybdenum (5-400 micrograms) can be separated and preconcentrated from large amounts of iron (10 mg). Desorption was carried out instantaneously by conc. nitric acid or acetone. Distribution coefficients, sorption capacity of the PU foam and coefficients of variation were also evaluated. The effect of some ions on the separation procedure was assessed. Iron(III) should be reduced to iron(II). The proposed procedure was used to determine molybdenum in standard iron matrices such as steel and pure iron. The achieved results did not show significant differences with certified values. PMID:11225364

  9. Low-temperature growth of layered molybdenum disulphide with controlled clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jihun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kang, Il-Suk; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Taesung; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Layered molybdenum disulphide was grown at a low-temperature of 350 °C using chemical vapour deposition by elaborately controlling the cluster size. The molybdenum disulphide grown under various sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratios were examined. Using spectroscopy and microscopy, the effect of the cluster size on the layered growth was investigated in terms of the morphology, grain size, and impurity incorporation. Triangular single-crystal domains were grown at an optimized sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratio. Furthermore, it is proved that the nucleation sites on the silicon-dioxide substrate were related with the grain size. A polycrystalline monolayer with the 100-nm grain size was grown on a nucleation site confined substrate by high-vacuum annealing. In addition, a field-effect transistor was fabricated with a MoS2 monolayer and exhibited a mobility and on/off ratio of 0.15 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 105, respectively.

  10. Electrosprayed molybdenum trioxide aqueous solution and its application in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer. PMID:25148047

  11. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, S R; Bonner, B P; Ryerson, F J; Hart, M M

    2006-01-27

    Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures and numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density.

  12. Coordination polymer structure and revisited hydrogen evolution catalytic mechanism for amorphous molybdenum sulfide.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong D; Tran, Thu V; Orio, Maylis; Torelli, Stephane; Truong, Quang Duc; Nayuki, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Chiam, Sing Yang; Yi, Ren; Honma, Itaru; Barber, James; Artero, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are very attractive noble-metal-free electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water. The atomic structure and identity of the catalytically active sites have been well established for crystalline molybdenum disulfide (c-MoS2) but not for amorphous molybdenum sulfide (a-MoSx), which exhibits significantly higher HER activity compared to its crystalline counterpart. Here we show that HER-active a-MoSx, prepared either as nanoparticles or as films, is a molecular-based coordination polymer consisting of discrete [Mo3S13](2-) building blocks. Of the three terminal disulfide (S2(2-)) ligands within these clusters, two are shared to form the polymer chain. The third one remains free and generates molybdenum hydride moieties as the active site under H2 evolution conditions. Such a molecular structure therefore provides a basis for revisiting the mechanism of a-MoSx catalytic activity, as well as explaining some of its special properties such as reductive activation and corrosion. Our findings open up new avenues for the rational optimization of this HER electrocatalyst as an alternative to platinum. PMID:26974410

  13. Chemical Nature and Reaction Mechanisms of the Molybdenum Cofactor of Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by x-ray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR is chemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  14. Field Validation of Molybdenum Accumulation as an Indicator of Hypoxic Water Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments have shown that the accumulation rate of authigenic molybdenum (Mo) in marine sediments may serve as a quantitative surrogate for direct measurement of hypoxic conditions in overlying waters: Mo accumulation in the top 1 cm of sediment is linearly related t...

  15. MoS{sub 2} nanotube exfoliation as new synthesis pathway to molybdenum blue

    SciTech Connect

    Visic, B.; Gunde, M. Klanjsek; Kovac, J.; Iskra, I.; Jelenc, J.; Remskar, M.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: ► New synthesis approach to obtaining molybdenum blue via exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. ► Material is prone to self assembly and is stable in high vacuum. ► Molecules are as small as 2 nm and their clusters are up to tens of nanometers. ► Change in absorption and oxidation states from the precursor MoS{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Molybdenum blue-type materials are usually obtained by partially reducing Mo{sup VI+} in acidic solutions, while in the presented method it is formed in ethanol solution of exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, where the MoS{sub 2} flakes are the preferential location for their growth. Material was investigated by means of scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, showing the structure and self assembly, while also confirming that it is stable in high vacuum with molecules as small as 1.6 nm and the agglomerates of few tens of nanometres. The ultraviolet–visible and photoelectron spectrometry show the change in absorption properties and oxidation states from MoS{sub 2} structure to molybdenum blue, while the presence of sulphur suggests that this is a new type of molybdenum blue material.

  16. Field Validation of Molybdenum Accumulation in Sediments as an Indication of Hypoxic Water Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of authigenic molybdenum (Mo) in marine sediments has often been used as qualitative indicator of periods of hypoxic bottom water, but rarely, if ever, used quantitatively. Laboratory experiments have shown that the accumulation rate of Mo may serve as a quantitative...

  17. Laboratory Determination of Molybdenum Accumulation Rates as a Measure of Hypoxic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox sensitive metals, such as molybdenum (Mo), are enriched in reducing sediments due to authigenic fixation in anoxic interstitial waters of sediments. This study tested whether the process of fixation and accumulation of Mo in sediments could provide a geochemical indicator o...

  18. Molybdenum Accumulation in Marine Sediments as an Indicator of Hypoxic Water Conditions (NACAETAC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct monitoring of hypoxic water column conditions over large spatial and temporal extents is difficult due to the substantial logistical and financial investment required. Recent studies have indicated that concentrations of molybdenum (Mo) in marine sediments may serve as a u...

  19. Electrosprayed Molybdenum Trioxide Aqueous Solution and Its Application in Organic Photovoltaic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer. PMID:25148047

  20. Oxidation, volatilization, and redistribution of molybdenum from TZM alloy in air

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Petti, D.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Schuetz, S.T.

    2000-01-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases. Oxidized molybdenum in turn is susceptible to losses from volatile molybdenum trioxide species, MoO{sub 3}(m), in air and the hydroxide, MoO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, formed from water vapor. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of these volatile species during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. In this report the authors present experimental results on the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800 C. These results are compared with calculations obtained from a vaporization mass transfer model using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures of MoO{sub 3}(g) over pure solid MoO{sub 3} and an expression for the vapor pressures of MoO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} from the literature. Calculations correlate well with experimental data.

  1. Oxidation, Volatilization, and Redistribution of Molybdenum from TZM Alloy in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Mccarthy, Kathryn Ann; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The excellent high temperature strength and thermal conductivity of molybdenum-base alloys provide attractive features for components in advanced magnetic and inertial fusion devices. Refractory metal alloys react readily with oxygen and other gases. Oxidized molybdenum in turn is susceptible to losses from volatile molybdenum trioxide species, (MoO3)m, in air and the hydroxide, MoO2(OH)2, formed from water vapor. Transport of radioactivity by the volatilization, migration, and re-deposition of these volatile species during a potential accident involving a loss of vacuum or inert environment represents a safety issue. In this report we present experimental results on the oxidation, volatilization and re-deposition of molybdenum from TZM in flowing air between 400 and 800°C. These results are compared with calculations obtained from a vaporization mass transfer model using chemical thermodynamic data for vapor pressures of MoO3(g) over pure solid MoO3 and an expression for the vapor pressures of MoO2(OH)2 from the literature. Calculations correlate well with experimental data.

  2. A Model for the Active-Site Formation Process in DMSO Reductase Family Molybdenum Enzymes Involving Oxido-Alcoholato and Oxido-Thiolato Molybdenum(VI) Core Structures.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Sato, Masanori; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Mieda, Kaoru; Ogura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Giles, Logan J; Pokhrel, Amrit; Kirk, Martin L; Itoh, Shinobu

    2016-02-15

    New bis(ene-1,2-dithiolato)-oxido-alcoholato molybdenum(VI) and -oxido-thiolato molybdenum(VI) anionic complexes, denoted as [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) (E = O, S; L = dimethoxycarboxylate-1,2-ethylenedithiolate), were obtained from the reaction of the corresponding dioxido-molybdenum(VI) precursor complex with either an alcohol or a thiol in the presence of an organic acid (e.g., 10-camphorsulfonic acid) at low temperature. The [Mo(VI)O(ER)L2](-) complexes were isolated and characterized, and the structure of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) was determined by X-ray crystallography. The Mo(VI) center in [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) exhibits a distorted octahedral geometry with the two ene-1,2-dithiolate ligands being symmetry inequivalent. The computed structure of [Mo(VI)O(SR)L2](-) is essentially identical to that of [Mo(VI)O(OR)L2](-). The electronic structures of the resulting molybdenum(VI) complexes were evaluated using electronic absorption spectroscopy and bonding calculations. The nature of the distorted O(h) geometry in these [Mo(VI)O(EEt)L2](-) complexes results in a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital wave function that possesses strong π* interactions between the Mo(d(xy)) orbital and the cis S(p(z)) orbital localized on one sulfur donor from a single ene-1,2-dithiolate ligand. The presence of a covalent Mo-S(dithiolene) bonding interaction in these monooxido Mo(VI) compounds contributes to their low-energy ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions. A second important d-p π bonding interaction derives from the ∼180° O(oxo)-Mo-E-C dihedral angle involving the alcoholate and thiolate donors, and this contributes to ancillary ligand contributions to the electronic structure of these species. The formation of [Mo(VI)O(OEt)L2](-) and [Mo(VI)O(SEt)L2](-) from the dioxidomolybdenum(VI) precursor may be regarded as a model for the active-site formation process that occurs in the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes. PMID:26816115

  3. Effect of molybdenum on structure, microstructure and mechanical properties of biomedical Ti-20Zr-Mo alloys.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Pedro Akira Bazaglia; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Grandini, Carlos Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Titanium has an allotropic transformation around 883°C. Below this temperature, the crystalline structure is hexagonal close-packed (α phase), changing to body-centered cubic (β phase). Zirconium has the same allotropic transformation around 862°C. Molybdenum has body-centered cubic structure, being a strong β-stabilizer for the formation of titanium alloys. In this paper, the effect of substitutional molybdenum was analyzed on the structure, microstructure and selected mechanical properties of Ti-20Zr-Mo (wt%) alloys to be used in biomedical applications. The samples were prepared by arc-melting and characterized by x-ray diffraction with subsequent refinement by the Rietveld method, optical and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were analyzed by Vickers microhardness and dynamic elasticity modulus. X-ray measurements and Rietveld analysis revealed the presence of α' phase without molybdenum, α'+α″ phases with 2.5wt% of molybdenum, α″+β phases with 5 and 7.5wt% of molybdenum, and only β phase with 10wt% of molybdenum. These results were corroborated by microscopy results, with a microstructure composed of grains of β phase and lamellae and needles of α' and α″ phase in intra-grain the region. The hardness of the alloy was higher than the commercially pure titanium, due to the action of zirconium and molybdenum as hardening agents. The samples have a smaller elasticity modulus than the commercially pure titanium. PMID:27287149

  4. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Properties of the Molybdenum-containing, NAD+-dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Niks, Dimitri; Duvvuru, Jayant; Escalona, Miguel; Hille, Russ

    2016-01-15

    We have examined the rapid reaction kinetics and spectroscopic properties of the molybdenum-containing, NAD(+)-dependent FdsABG formate dehydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha. We confirm previous steady-state studies of the enzyme and extend its characterization to a rapid kinetic study of the reductive half-reaction (the reaction of formate with oxidized enzyme). We have also characterized the electron paramagnetic resonance signal of the molybdenum center in its Mo(V) state and demonstrated the direct transfer of the substrate Cα hydrogen to the molybdenum center in the course of the reaction. Varying temperature, microwave power, and level of enzyme reduction, we are able to clearly identify the electron paramagnetic resonance signals for four of the iron/sulfur clusters of the enzyme and find suggestive evidence for two others; we observe a magnetic interaction between the molybdenum center and one of the iron/sulfur centers, permitting assignment of this signal to a specific iron/sulfur cluster in the enzyme. In light of recent advances in our understanding of the structure of the molybdenum center, we propose a reaction mechanism involving direct hydride transfer from formate to a molybdenum-sulfur group of the molybdenum center. PMID:26553877

  5. Hexavalent Molybdenum Reduction to Mo-Blue by a Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulfate-Degrading Klebsiella oxytoca Strain DRY14

    PubMed Central

    Halmi, M. I. E.; Zuhainis, S. W.; Yusof, M. T.; Shaharuddin, N. A.; Helmi, W.; Shukor, Y.; Syed, M. A.; Ahmad, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria with the ability to tolerate, remove, and/or degrade several xenobiotics simultaneously are urgently needed for remediation of polluted sites. A previously isolated bacterium with sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS-) degrading capacity was found to be able to reduce molybdenum to the nontoxic molybdenum blue. The optimal pH, carbon source, molybdate concentration, and temperature supporting molybdate reduction were pH 7.0, glucose at 1.5% (w/v), between 25 and 30 mM, and 25°C, respectively. The optimum phosphate concentration for molybdate reduction was 5 mM. The Mo-blue produced exhibits an absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. None of the respiratory inhibitors tested showed any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting that the electron transport system of this bacterium is not the site of molybdenum reduction. Chromium, cadmium, silver, copper, mercury, and lead caused approximately 77, 65, 77, 89, 80, and 80% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. Ferrous and stannous ions markedly increased the activity of molybdenum-reducing activity in this bacterium. The maximum tolerable concentration of SDS as a cocontaminant was 3 g/L. The characteristics of this bacterium make it a suitable candidate for molybdenum bioremediation of sites cocontaminated with detergent pollutant. PMID:24383052

  6. Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

  7. Comparison of radiation shielding ratios of nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Kim, M. S.; Rhim, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, radiation shielding fibers using non-hazardous nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum instead of lead were developed and evaluated. Among the elements with high densities and atomic numbers, non-hazardous elements such as bismuth trioxide and molybdenum were chosen as a shielding element. Then, bismuth trioxide (Bi2O3) with average particle size 1-500 µm was ball milled for 10 min to produce a powdered form of nanoparticles with average particle size of 10-100 nm. Bismuth trioxide nanoparticles were dispersed to make a colloidal suspension, followed by spreading and hardening onto one or two sides of fabric, to create the radiation shielding fabric. The thicknesses of the shielding sheets using nano-sized bismuth and molybdenum were 0.4 and 0.7 mm. According to the lead equivalent test of X-ray shielding products suggested by KS, the equivalent dose was measured, followed by calculation of the shielding rate. The shielding rate of bismuth with 0.4 mm thickness and at 50 kVp was 90.5%, which is comparable to lead of 0.082 mm thickness. The shielding rate of molybdenum was 51.89%%, which is comparable to lead of 0.034 mm. At a thickness of 0.7 mm, the shielding rate of bismuth was 98.73%, equivalent to 0.101 mm Pb, whereas the shielding rate of molybdenum was 74.68%, equivalent to 0.045 mm Pb. In conclusion, the radiation shielding fibers using nano-sized bismuth developed in this study are capable of reducing radiation exposure by X-ray and its low-dose scatter ray.

  8. The impact of atmospheric species on the degradation of CIGS solar cells and molybdenum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theelen, Mirjam; Foster, Christopher; Steijvers, Henk; Barreau, Nicolas; Frijters, Corné; Vroon, Zeger; Zeman, Miro

    2015-09-01

    CIGS solar cells and non-covered molybdenum areas and scribes were exposed to liquid water purged with the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and air in order to investigate their degradation behavior. The samples were analyzed by electrical, compositional and optical measurements before, during and after exposure in order to follow the degradation behavior of these samples as a function of time. The CIGS solar cells showed a rapid decrease in conversion efficiency when exposed to water purged with a combination of CO2 and N2 as well as to water purged with air, while their efficiency was slowly reduced in unpurged water and water purged with N2 or O2. Cross-section SEM showed that the exposure of samples to H2O with large concentrations of CO2 led to the dissolution of the ZnO:Al layer, likely starting from the grain boundaries. Preliminary studies showed that molybdenum films and scribes degraded in the combined presence of H2O and O2, while they were stable in the presence of H2O combined with N2 or CO2. Degradation was the most severe on positions where the molybdenum was mechanically damaged and the MoSe2 film was removed before exposure, for example in the middle of the P3 scribe. Exposure to H2O and O2 led to the disappearance of the metallic molybdenum, leaving behind an insoluble red brown material, which is likely a molybdenum oxide such as MoO2.

  9. Atom probe study of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Babinsky, K.; Weidow, J.; Knabl, W.; Lorich, A.; Leitner, H.; Primig, S.

    2014-01-15

    Molybdenum, a metal with excellent physical, chemical and high-temperature properties, is an interesting material for applications in lighting-technology, high performance electronics, high temperature furnace construction and coating technology. However, its applicability as a structural material is limited because of the poor oxidation resistance at high temperatures and a brittle-to-ductile transition around room temperature, which is influenced by the grain size and the content of interstitial impurities at the grain boundaries. Due to the progress of the powder metallurgical production during the last decades, the amount of impurities in the current quality of molybdenum has become so small that surface sensitive techniques are not applicable anymore. Therefore, the atom probe, which allows the detection of small amounts of impurities as well as their location, seems to be a more suitable technique. However, a site-specific specimen preparation procedure for grain boundaries in refractory metals with a dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope is still required. The present investigation describes the development and successful application of such a site-specific preparation technique for grain boundaries in molybdenum, which is significantly improved by a combination with transmission electron microscopy. This complimentary technique helps to improve the visibility of grain boundaries during the last preparation steps and to evidence the presence of grain and subgrain boundaries without segregants in atom probe specimens. Furthermore, in industrially processed and recrystallized molybdenum sheets grain boundary segregation of oxygen, nitrogen and potassium is successfully detected close to segregated regions which are believed to be former sinter pores. - Highlights: • First study of grain boundary segregation in molybdenum by atom probe • Site-specific preparation technique by FIB and TEM successfully developed • Grain boundary segregation of

  10. Removal of Vanadium(III) and Molybdenum(V) from Wastewater Using Posidonia oceanica (Tracheophyta) Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Chiara; Totti, Cecilia; Beolchini, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The use of dried and re-hydrated biomass of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica was investigated as an alternative and –low-cost biomaterial for removal of vanadium(III) and molybdenum(V) from wastewaters. Initial characterisation of this biomaterial identified carboxylic groups on the cuticle as potentially responsible for cation sorption, and confirmed the toxic-metal bioaccumulation. The combined effects on biosorption performance of equilibrium pH and metal concentrations were investigated in an ideal single-metal system and in more real-life multicomponent systems. There were either with one metal (vanadium or molybdenum) and sodium nitrate, as representative of high ionic strength systems, or with the two metals (vanadium and molybdenum). For the single-metal solutions, the optimum was at pH 3, where a significant proportion of vanadium was removed (ca. 70%) while there was ca. 40% adsorption of molybdenum. The data obtained from the more real-life multicomponent systems showed that biosorption of one metal was improved both by the presence of the other metal and by high ionic strength, suggesting a synergistic effect on biosorption rather than competition. There data ware used for the development of a simple multi-metal equilibrium model based on the non-competitive Langmuir approach, which was successfully fitted to experimental data and represents a useful support tool for the prediction of biosorption performance in such real-life systems. Overall, the results suggest that biomass of P. oceanica can be used as an efficient biosorbent for removal of vanadium(III) and molybdenum(V) from aqueous solutions. This process thus offers an eco-compatible solution for the reuse of the waste material of leaves that accumulate on the beach due to both human activities and to storms at sea. PMID:24204692

  11. Molybdenum behaviour in the low salinity zone during estuarine mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Rebecca A.; Wouters, Hanne; Dickson, Alex J.; Pearce, Christopher R.; Porcelli, Don; Gíslason, Sigurður R.; Burton, Kevin W.

    2015-04-01

    Molybdenum is the most abundant trace metal in the oceans (~10 ppb) [1], with a residence time of ~800 ka, and an almost uniform isotope composition of 2.1 o [2] and it has been thought to behave conservatively upon mixing between rivers and oceans [3]. However, more recent studies have shown examples of non-conservative behaviour in estuaries [4], [5]. In order to improve the quantitative interpretation of the Mo palaeo-proxy for redox conditions this study presents preliminary data from two estuaries, with a view to understanding the potential for estuarine modification of rivers, the most dominant source of Mo to the oceans. The Kalix and Råne rivers, drain into the Bothnian Bay, Sweden. Samples are from three locations along each estuary at 0.5, 5.0 and 10.0 m depths, collected under ice conditions. The salinity range was 0.1-2.3 PSU (Kalix) and 0.04-2.5 PSU (Råne). Mo concentrations increase with salinity from 0.3 to 1.0 ppb (Kalix) and 0.4 to 0.9 ppb (Råne) (±10%). In the Kalix, the measured [Mo] values fit closely with the theoretical conservative mixing line between the river and sea water endmembers (measured R2=0.93) whilst in the Råne estuary the measured [Mo] have a poor fit (measured R2=0.25). The dissolved load was analysed for Mo isotopes relative to NIST 3134 with the Kalix δ98Mo of 1.07-1.97 o (2s.e. 0.02 ) with an R2=0.51 (against 1/[Mo]) and Råne δ98Mo of 1.54-2.16 o (2s.e. 0.05) with an R2=0.01 (against 1/[Mo]). It is clear from concentration and isotope data that non conservative behaviour is observed in these estuaries with isotope exchange that has not greatly altered Mo concentration. This is especially notable in the Råne estuary. Similar non-conservative behaviour has been observed in Li isotopes in the same estuaries [6]. This work explores the interactions between the dissolved and suspended phases, and processes controlling Mo input to the oceans. [1] Collier, R. W. 1985. Limnology and Oceanography, 1351-1354 [2] Nakagawa, Y et

  12. Molybdenum disulfide nanowires and nanoribbons by electrochemical/chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Walter, E C; van der Veer, W E; Murray, B J; Newberg, J T; Bohannan, E W; Switzer, J A; Hemminger, J C; Penner, R M

    2005-03-01

    Molybdenum disulfide nanowires and nanoribbons have been synthesized by a two-step, electrochemical/chemical synthetic method. In the first step, MoO(x) wires (a mixture of MoO(2) and MoO(3)) were electrodeposited size-selectively by electrochemical step-edge decoration on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Then, MoO(x) precursor wires were converted to MoS(2) by exposure to H(2)S either at 500-700 degrees C, producing "low-temperature" or LT MoS(2) nanowires that were predominantly 2H phase, or above 800 degrees C producing "high-temperature" or HT MoS(2) ribbons that were predominantly 3R phase. The majority of these MoS(2) wires and ribbons were more than 50 microm in length and were organized into parallel arrays containing hundreds of wires or ribbons. MoS(2) nanostructures were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy. HT and LT MoS(2) nanowires were structurally distinct: LT MoS(2) wires were hemicylindrical in shape and nearly identical in diameter to the MoO(x) precursor wires from which they were derived. LT MoS(2) wires were polycrystalline, and the internal structure consisted of many interwoven, multilayer strands of MoS(2); HT MoS(2) ribbons were 50-800 nm in width and 3-100 nm thick, composed of planar crystallites of 3R-MoS(2). These layers grew in van der Waals contact with the HOPG surface so that the c-axis of the 3R-MoS(2) unit cell was oriented perpendicular to the plane of the graphite surface. Arrays of MoS(2) wires and ribbons could be cleanly separated from the HOPG surface and transferred to glass for electrical and optical characterization. Optical absorption measurements of HT MoS(2) nanoribbons reveal a direct gap near 1.95 eV and two exciton peaks, A1 and B1, characteristic of 3R-MoS(2). These exciton peaks shifted to higher energy by up to 80 meV as

  13. Argon gas concentration effects on nanostructured molybdenum nitride layer growth using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, S.; Shah, M. S.; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Khan, N.; Khalid, N.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of argon concentration (10%-40%) on the surface properties of molybdenum is studied in nitrogen-argon mixture using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge. The analysis is carried out by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Vickers microhardness tester to investigate surface properties of the nitrided samples. XRD results exhibit the formation of molybdenum nitrides. Crystallite size analysis and SEM morphology confirm the growth of nanostructured molybdenum nitride layers. Moreover, significant increase in surface hardness (by a factor of about two times) is found when the sample is treated for 30% argon in nitrogen-argon mixed plasma.

  14. Development of a potentiometric EDTA method for determination of molybdenum. Use of the analysis for molybdenite concentrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khristova, R.; Vanmen, M.

    1986-01-01

    Based on considerations of principles and experimental data, the interference of sulfate ions in poteniometric titration of EDTA with FeCl3 was confirmed. The method of back complexometric titration of molybdenum of Nonova and Gasheva was improved by replacing hydrazine sulfate with hydrazine hydrochloride for reduction of Mo(VI) to Mo(V). The method can be used for one to tenths of mg of molybdenum with 0.04 mg standard deviation. The specific method of determination of molybdenum in molybdenite concentrates is presented.

  15. Promoters controlling expression of the alternative nitrogenase and the molybdenum uptake system in Rhodobacter capsulatus are activated by NtrC, independent of sigma54, and repressed by molybdenum.

    PubMed Central

    Kutsche, M; Leimkühler, S; Angermüller, S; Klipp, W

    1996-01-01

    The alternative nitrogenase of Rhodobacter capsulatus is expressed only under conditions of nitrogen and molybdenum depletion. The analysis of anfA-lacZ fusions demonstrated that this dual control occurred at the level of transcription of anfA, which encodes a transcriptional activator specific for the alternative nitrogenase. The anfA promoter was found to be activated under nitrogen-limiting conditions by NtrC in a sigma54-independent manner. In addition, anfA transcription was repressed by traces of molybdenum. This molybdenum-dependent repression of anfA was released in R. capsulatus mutants carrying either lesions in the high-affinity molybdenum uptake system (modABCD) or a double deletion of mopA and mopB, two genes encoding molybdenum-pterin-binding proteins. The expression of the molybdenum transport system itself was shown to be negatively regulated by molybdenum and, unexpectedly, to be also regulated by NtrC. This finding is in line with the presence of two tandemly arranged DNA motifs located in front of the R. capsulatus mopA-modABCD operon, which are homologous to R. capsulatus NtrC binding sites. Mapping of the transcriptional initiation sites of mopA and anfA revealed promoter sequences exhibiting significant homology to each other but no homology to known prokaryotic promoters. In addition, a conserved DNA sequence of dyad symmetry overlapping the transcriptional initiation sites of mopA and anfA was found. Deletions within this element resulted in molybdenum-independent expression of anfA, indicating that this DNA sequence may be the target of MopA/MopB-mediated repression. PMID:8606177

  16. Growth of phase-pure, crack-free single crystals and large-grained polycrystals of molybdenum disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossetti, M.

    1970-01-01

    High purity molybdenum disilicide crystals are prepared by zone melting sintered compacts. This method yields single crystals or polycrystals free from macrocracks which allow better measurement and evaluation of mechanical properties.

  17. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.; Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J.; Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M.; Lux-Steiner, M.

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  18. A Quantitative Model for the Exchange Current of Porous Molybdenum Electrodes on Sodium Beta-Alumina in Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; LeDuc, H.; Cortez, R. H.; Saipetch, C.; Shields, V.; Manatt, K.; Homer, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the exchange current developed for porous molybdenum electrodes on sodium beta-alumina ceramics in low pressure sodium vapor, but which has general applicability to gas/porous metal electrodes on solid electrolytes.

  19. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide

  20. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2007-05-31

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for <200 mg Mo/g U (200 ppm). Since natural U has about 10 mg Mo/g U, the required purity of the 1EU product prior to blending is about 800 mg Mo/g U, allowing for uncertainties. HCE requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) define a flowsheet for the safe and efficient processing of the U-10Mo material. This report presents a computational model of the solvent extraction portion of the proposed flowsheet. The two main objectives of the computational model are to demonstrate that the Mo impurity requirement can be met and to show that the solvent feed rates in the proposed flowsheet, in particular to 1A and 1D Banks, are adequate to prevent refluxing of U and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety. SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction), a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that supports Argonne National Laboratory's proprietary AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) code, was selected to model the U/Mo separation flowsheet. SASSE spreadsheet models of H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent