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Sample records for 4-8 hz alpha

  1. Treatment with anti-LFA-1 alpha monoclonal antibody selectively interferes with the maturation of CD4- 8+ thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Revilla, C; González, A L; Conde, C; López-Hoyos, M; Merino, J

    1997-04-01

    Maturation of T lymphocytes in the thymus is driven by signals provided by soluble factors and by the direct interaction between thymocytes and stromal cells. Although the interaction between T-cell receptor (TCR) and major histocompalibility complex (MHC) molecules on stromal cells is crucial for T-cell development, other accessory molecules seem to play a role in this process. In order to better understand the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) molecules in thymocyte maturation, mice were treated from birth with saturating doses of non-cytolytic-specific monoclonal antibodies. The effect of this treatment on thymocyte subpopulations and the expression of CD3 and TCR-alpha beta by these cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Our data demonstrated that the effective saturation of LFA-1 alpha chain in the thymus, but not ICAM-I or LFA-I beta chain, selectively interfered with the maturation of CD8+ T cells, as manifested by a marked reduction in the frequency of CD4-8+ thymocytes expressing high levels of CD3 and TCR-alpha beta. This selective reduction was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and spleen cells. The analysis of the frequencies of various V beta TCR showed that CD4-8+ thymocytes were globally affected by the treatment. These results underline the importance of the interaction between LFA-1 and its ligands in the maturation of CD8+ T cells and document the existence of different molecular requirements for the differentiation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  2. Intermittent 20-HZ-photic stimulation leads to a uniform reduction of alpha-global field power in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rau, R; Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    19-channel-EEGs were recorded from scalp surface of 30 healthy subjects (16m, 14f, mean age: 34 ys, SD: 11.7 ys) at rest and under IPS (Intermittent Photic Stimulation) at rates of 5, 10 and 20 Hertz (Hz). Digitalized data underwent spectral analysis with fast fourier transfomation (FFT) yielding the basis for the computation of global field power (GFP). For quantification GFP values in the frequency ranges of 5, 10 and 20 Hz at rest were divided by the corresponding data gained under IPS. While ratios from PDE data showed no stable parameter due to high interindividual variability, ratios of alpha-power turned out to be uniform in all subjects: IPS at 20 Hz always led to a suppression of alpha-power. Dividing alpha-GFP at rest by alpha-GFP under 20-Hz IPS thus resulted in a ratio < 1. We conclude that ratios from GFP data are a stable diagnostic paradigma.

  3. Decreased electroencephalogram alpha band [8-13 Hz] power in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a study of alpha activity in an awake relaxed state.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Jayashree; Bhatia, Manvir; Sahu, Shweta; Anand, Sneh

    2005-03-01

    An attempt was made to quantitatively analyze the alpha activity in the awake relaxed state of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients and was compared with normals. ALS patients showed significantly low amplitude with a corresponding alpha band (8-13 Hz) power reduction, in both hemispheres though the change was more prominent in the left hemisphere. A review of the literature revealed no studies done on alpha oscillations in ALS patients; hence the results may have important implications for the interpretation of resting state brain activities.

  4. Effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields on electroencephalographic alpha activity, dental pain threshold and cardiovascular parameters in humans.

    PubMed

    Ghione, Sergio; Seppia, Cristina Del; Mezzasalma, Lorena; Bonfiglio, Luca

    Recent studies indicate that exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF MFs) influences human electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha activity and pain perception. In the present study we analyse the effect on electrical EEG activity in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) and on nociception in 40 healthy male volunteers after 90-min exposure of the head to 50 Hz ELF MFs at a flux density of 40 or 80 microT in a double-blind randomized sham-controlled study. Since cardiovascular regulation is functionally related to pain modulation, we also measured blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during treatment. Alpha activity after 80 microT magnetic treatment almost doubled compared to sham treatment. Pain threshold after 40 microT magnetic treatment was significantly lower than after sham treatment. No effects were found for BP and HR. We suggest that these results may be explained by a modulation of sensory gating processes through the opioidergic system, that in turn is influenced by magnetic exposure.

  5. Analysis of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) expression by human peripheral blood CD4-8- alpha/beta T cells demonstrates preferential use of several V beta genes and an invariant TCR alpha chain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    CD4-CD8- (double negative [DN]) alpha/beta T cells are a largely uncharacterized subpopulation of unknown function. To investigate whether these cells are selected to recognize particular antigens or antigen-presenting molecules, DN alpha/beta T cells were purified from the peripheral blood of five normal donors and their T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains were examined. Random cloning of TCR alpha chains by single-sided polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification identified an invariant rearrangement between V alpha 24 and J alpha Q, with no N region diversity, which was expressed preferentially by DN alpha/beta T cells from all donors. Random cloning also identified a precise V alpha 7.2-J alpha (IGRJa14) rearrangement, with two variable amino acids encoded in the V-J junction, which was enriched in the DN alpha/beta T cell preparations from some, but not all, donors. Analysis of TCR beta chains by quantitative PCR amplification demonstrated that the expression of four V beta gene families, V beta 2, 8, 11, and 13, was markedly increased in these DN alpha/beta T cell preparations. The expression of particular TCRs by DN alpha/beta T cells from multiple donors indicates that these cells, or at least a subpopulation of cells with this phenotype, recognize a limited spectrum of antigens and suggests that they may use nonpolymorphic antigen-presenting molecules. PMID:8391057

  6. Structure and magnetism of [n-BuNH3]12[Cu4(GeW9O34)2].14H2O sandwiching a rhomblike Cu4(8+) tetragon through alpha-Keggin linkage.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Toshihiro; Abe, Hiroko; Ishikawa, Eri; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Ohshima, Yuhgo

    2009-01-05

    A sandwich-type polyoxometalate, [Cu(4)(GeW(9)O(34))(2)](12-) (1a), in which two B-alpha-[GeW(9)O(34)](12-) ligands sandwich a rhomblike Cu(4)(8+) tetragon through alpha-Kappaeggin linkage, is first isolated as a [n-BuNH(3)](+) salt, [n-BuNH(3)](12)[Cu(4)(GeW(9)O(34))(2)].14H(2)O (1). A Cu(4)O(14) cluster for the rhomblike Cu(4)(8+) tetragon in 1a with C(2h) local symmetry consists of two Jahn-Teller (JT) distorted CuO(6) octahedra (at internal sites) with a short diagonal Cu(int)...Cu(int) distance of 3.10-3.11 A and two CuO(5) square pyramids (at external site) with a long diagonal Cu(ext)...Cu(ext) distance of 5.34-5.35 A, the feature of which is different from [Cu(4)(H(2)O)(2)(GeW(9)O(34))(2)](12-) (2a), comprising the four JT-distorted CuO(6) octahedral Cu(4)(8+) tetragons through beta-Keggin linkage: the axial Cu(ext)-O bond distance (2.27-2.29 A) for 1a is shorter than the corresponding JT-axial distance (2.36 A) for 2a. Measurements of magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy for 1 are carried out for better understanding of the molecular magnetism of the Cu(4)(8+) tetragon in comparison with 2a. The analysis of the magnetic behavior, based on the isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian comprising three exchange parameters (J, J', and J''), gives J = -24.1 cm(-1) for the Cu(ext)..Cu(int) sides, J' = -99.1 cm(-1) for the Cu(int)...Cu(int) diagonal, and J'' = +0.04 cm(-1) for the Cu(ext)...Cu(ext) diagonal of the Cu(4)(8+) rhombus. The S = 1 ground state of 1 displays g(||) = 2.42, g( perpendicular)= 2.07, D = -1.44 x 10(-2) cm(-1), and |A(Cu||)| = 46.5 x 10(-4) cm(-1). An observation of the asymmetric magnetization between a positive and a negative pulsed field (up to 10(3) T/s) at 0.5 K on the hysteresis loop indicates the quantum tunneling at zero field. The magnetic exchange interactions of four unpaired d(x(2)-y(2))-electron spins are discussed in terms of the point-dipole approximation, and the primary contribution

  7. K(alpha) x-ray emission characterization of 100 Hz, 15 mJ femtosecond laser system with high contrast ratio.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Serbanescu, C; Kincaid, R E; Krol, A; Kieffer, J C

    2008-12-12

    We report K(alpha) x-ray production with a high energy (110 mJ per pulse at 800 nm before compression/15 mJ at 400 nm after compression), high repetition rate (100 Hz), and high pulse contrast (better than 10(-9) at 400 nm) laser system. To develop laser-based x-ray sources for biomedical imaging requires to use high-energy and high-power ultra-fast laser system where compression is achieved under vacuum. Using this type of laser system, we demonstrate long-term stability of the x-ray yield, conversion efficiency higher than 1.5 x 10(-5) with a Mo target, and the x-ray spot size close to the optical focal spot. This high-repetition K(alpha) x-ray source can be very useful for x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

  8. Increased alpha (8-12 Hz) activity during slow wave sleep as a marker for the transition from implicit knowledge to explicit insight.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during the night between two sessions of the NRT. Alpha (8-12 Hz) EEG power during slow wave sleep (SWS) emerged as a specific marker of the transformation of presleep implicit knowledge to postsleep explicit knowledge (ExK). Beta power during SWS was increased whenever ExK was attained after sleep, irrespective of presleep knowledge. No such EEG predictors of insight were found during Sleep Stage 2 and rapid eye movement sleep. These results support the view that it is neuronal memory reprocessing during sleep, in particular during SWS, that lays the foundations for restructuring those task-related representations in the brain that are necessary for promoting the gain of ExK.

  9. Umbra Ver. 4.8

    SciTech Connect

    Oppel, III, Fred; Hart, Brian; Hart, Derek; Linebarger, John; Rigdon, J. Brian; Wolfenbarger, Paul; Xavier, Patrick; & Gottlieb, Eric

    2010-02-24

    Umbra is a software package that has been in development at Sandia National Laboratories since 1995, under the name Umbra since 1997. Umbra is a software framework written in C++ and Tcl/Tk that has been applied to many operations, primarily dealing with robotics and simulation. Umbra executables are C++ libraries orchestrated with Tcl/Tk scripts. Two major feature upgrades occurred from 4.7 to 4.8 1. System Umbra Module with its own Update Graph within the C++ framework. 2. New terrain graph for fast line-of-sight calculations All else were minor updates such as later versions of Visual Studio, OpenSceneGraph and Boost.

  10. 10 Hz flicker improves recognition memory in older people

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan; Ramaswamy, Deepa; Oulhaj, Abderrahim

    2006-01-01

    Background 10 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms correlate with memory performance. Alpha and memory decline in older people. We wished to test if alpha-like EEG activity contributes to memory formation. Flicker can elicit alpha-like EEG activity. We tested if alpha-frequency flicker enhances memory in older people. Pariticpants aged 67–92 identified short words that followed 1 s of flicker at 9.0 Hz, 9.5 Hz, 10.0 Hz, 10.2 Hz, 10.5 Hz, 11.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz or 500 Hz. A few minutes later, we tested participants' recognition of the words (without flicker). Results Flicker frequencies close to 10 Hz (9.5–11.0 Hz) facilitated the identification of the test words in older participants. The same flicker frequencies increased recognition of the words more than other frequencies (9.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz and 500 Hz), irrespective of age. Conclusion The frequency-specificity of flicker's effects in our participants paralleled the power spectrum of EEG alpha in the general population. This indicates that alpha-like EEG activity may subserve memory processes. Flicker may be able to help memory problems in older people. PMID:16515710

  11. 15 CFR 4.8 - Classified Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classified Information. 4.8 Section 4... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 4.8 Classified Information. In processing a request for information..., the information shall be reviewed to determine whether it should remain classified. Ordinarily...

  12. Adaptive 4-8 Texture Hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, L M; Duchaineau, M A; Joy, K I

    2004-08-02

    We address the texture level-of-detail problem for extremely large surfaces such as terrain during real-time, view-dependent rendering. A novel texture hierarchy is introduced based on 4-8 refinement of raster tiles, in which the texture grids in effect rotate 45 degrees for each level of refinement. This hierarchy provides twice as many levels of detail as conventional quad-tree-style refinement schemes such as mipmaps, and thus provides per-pixel view-dependent filtering that is twice as close to the ideal cutoff frequency for an average pixel. Because of this more gradual change in low-pass filtering, and due to the more precise emulation of the ideal cutoff frequency, we find in practice that the transitions between texture levels of detail are not perceptible. This allows rendering systems to avoid the complexity and performance costs of per-pixel blending between texture levels of detail. The 4-8 texturing scheme is integrated into a variant of the Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) algorithm for view-dependent multiresolution mesh generation. Improvements to ROAM included here are: the diamond data structure as a streamlined replacement for the triangle bintree elements, the use of low-pass-filtered geometry patches in place of individual triangles, integration of 4-8 textures, and a simple out-of-core data access mechanism for texture and geometry tiles.

  13. 16 CFR 4.8 - Costs for obtaining Commission records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Costs for obtaining Commission records. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE MISCELLANEOUS RULES § 4.8 Costs for obtaining Commission records. (a) Definitions. For the purpose of...

  14. 16 CFR 4.8 - Costs for obtaining Commission records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Costs for obtaining Commission records. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE MISCELLANEOUS RULES § 4.8 Costs for obtaining Commission records. (a) Definitions. For the purpose of...

  15. 16 CFR 4.8 - Costs for obtaining Commission records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Costs for obtaining Commission records. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE MISCELLANEOUS RULES § 4.8 Costs for obtaining Commission records. (a) Definitions. For the purpose of...

  16. 10 CFR 4.8 - Information collection requirements: OMB approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 4.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE COMMISSION General Provisions § 4.8 Information collection requirements: OMB approval. (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has submitted the...

  17. White-matter vascular lesions correlate with alpha EEG sources in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Pievani, Michela; Toscano, Leonia; Del Percio, Claudio; Geroldi, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miniussi, Carlo; Rossini, Paolo M

    2008-01-01

    It is an open issue if vascular and Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions represent additive factors in the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as a preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at group level. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms, which are affected (i.e. decreased in amplitude) by AD processes, are relatively preserved in MCI subjects in whom the cognitive decline is mainly explained by white-matter vascular load. Resting EEG was recorded in 40 healthy elderly (Nold), 80 MCI, and 40 AD subjects. In the MCI subjects, white-matter vascular load was quantified based on MRI (0-30 Wahlund visual rating scale). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4Hz), theta (4-8Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13Hz), beta 1 (13-20Hz), and beta 2 (20-30Hz). Low resolution electromagnetic source tomography (LORETA) was used for EEG source analysis. As expected, we observed that alpha 1 sources in parietal, occipital, and temporal areas were lower in amplitude in the AD and MCI subjects than in the Nold subjects, whereas the amplitude of wide delta sources was higher in the AD than in the Nold and MCI subjects. As novel results, the amplitude of parietal, occipital, and temporal alpha 1 sources was higher in the MCI V+ (high vascular load; N=42; MMSE=26) than MCI V- group (low vascular load; N=37; MMSE=26.7). Furthermore, a weak but significant (p<0.05) positive statistical correlation was found between the parietal alpha 1 sources and the score of Wahlund scale across all MCI subjects (i.e. the more severe white-matter lesions, the higher parietal alpha source power). The present results are in line with the additive model of cognitive impairment postulating that this arises as the sum of neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular lesions.

  18. 43 CFR 3802.4-8 - Cessation of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Exploration and Mining, Wilderness Review Program § 3802.4-8 Cessation of operations. The operator...

  19. Portraits of Outstanding Explorers. Grades 4-8+.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Doris Hunter

    This resource book provides information and activity sheets on explorers of North America. The five sections of the book trace the explorers' contributions both geographically and chronologically. Each section includes thought questions, biographical portraits and skill activities for grades 4-8. Section 1, "They Opened the Door,"…

  20. AIDS Prevention Education Project, Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissell, Barbara K.; And Others

    A curriculum guide for an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention education program for grades 4-8 is presented in this document. The purpose of these materials is to serve as a resource to encourage and facilitate AIDS education in order to prevent the disease. It is recommended that this AIDS program be taught as part of the human…

  1. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-8 - Pooled investment vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pooled investment vehicles... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.206(4)-8 Pooled investment vehicles. (a) Prohibition. It shall constitute a fraudulent, deceptive, or manipulative...

  2. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-8 - Pooled investment vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pooled investment vehicles... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.206(4)-8 Pooled investment vehicles. (a) Prohibition. It shall constitute a fraudulent, deceptive, or manipulative...

  3. Elementary Acid Rain Kit, Interdisciplinary, Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    An interdisciplinary approach for teaching about acid rain is offered in this curriculum guide for teachers of grades 4-8. Skill and concept areas of science, math, social studies, art, and the language arts are developed in 12 activities which focus on the acid rain problems. A matrix of the activities and subject areas indicates the coverage…

  4. Total Synthesis of (−)-4,8,10-Tridesmethyl Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Velvadapu, Venkata; Paul, Tapas; Wagh, Bharat; Glassford, Ian; DeBrosse, Charles; Andrade, Rodrigo B.

    2011-01-01

    Novel sources of antibiotics are required to address the serious problem of antibiotic resistance. Telithromycin (2) is a third-generation macrolide antibiotic prepared from erythromycin (1) and used clinically since 2004. Herein we report the details of our efforts that ultimately led to the total synthesis of (−)-4,8,10-tridesmethyl telithromycin (3) wherein methyl groups have been replaced with hydrogens. The synthesis of desmethyl macrolides has emerged as a novel strategy for preparing bioactive antibiotics. PMID:21815685

  5. Cylinder-shaped ultrasonic motors 4.8 mm in diameter using electroactive piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Laihui; Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wang, Haixia; Luo, Haosu

    2007-01-01

    Two cylinder-shaped ultrasonic motors 4.8mm in diameter were developed. This kind of motor was driven by four pieces of piezoelectric materials, which were used to excite the two first-bending vibrations. Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystal and Pb(Zr ,Ti)O3 (PZT) ceramic piezoelectric materials were used as drive elements. The motor based on PMNT crystals could operate at a voltage of 25Vp-p (peak to peak). When driven by a 100Vp-p voltage, the motor could run at frequency ranging from 26to68kHz and the revolution speed reached 450rpm. Its maximum output torque was 0.6mNm. The motor based on the PZT ceramic did not exhibit high performance as the PMNT crystal motor. The piezoelectric materials affect the performance of the motors greatly.

  6. Differentiation of CD3-4-8- human fetal thymocytes in vivo: characterization of a CD3-4+8- intermediate

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Human thymocyte differentiation was examined by injecting fetal thymic progenitor populations into human thymic xenografts in SCID-hu mice. Thymic progenitors were fluorescently labeled with the lipophilic dye PKH2. The phenotypes of their progeny could be identified by flow cytometric analysis of cells with a very high fluorescent PKH2 signal. Intrathymic injection of purified triple negative (TN) CD3-4-8- thymocytes resulted in the sequential appearance of CD3-4+8-, CD3-4+8+, and CD3+4+8+ cells, with the subsequent appearance of small numbers of phenotypically mature CD3+4+8- and CD3+4-8+ cells over a 4-d period. Sorted CD3-4+8- thymocytes injected intrathymically rapidly differentiated to CD4+8+ cells. CD4+8+ fetal thymocytes in cell cycle differentiated into phenotypically mature CD3+4+8- and CD3+4-8+ populations, whereas nondividing CD4+8+ cells failed to differentiate after intrathymic transfer. The number of cell divisions that occurred between the injection of TN thymocytes and their progeny at different time points was estimated based on the decrease in the intensity of the PKH2 label. The average length of the cell cycle for the TN population was calculated to be 24 h. The SCID-hu model thus provides a useful tool for studying the kinetics of cell division and differentiation of human thymocytes in vivo. PMID:8315382

  7. 42 CFR 4.8 - Publication of the Library and information about the Library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Publication of the Library and information about the Library. 4.8 Section 4.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.8 Publication of the Library and...

  8. 42 CFR 4.8 - Publication of the Library and information about the Library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of the Library and information about the Library. 4.8 Section 4.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.8 Publication of the Library and...

  9. 42 CFR 4.8 - Publication of the Library and information about the Library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Publication of the Library and information about the Library. 4.8 Section 4.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.8 Publication of the Library and...

  10. 42 CFR 4.8 - Publication of the Library and information about the Library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Publication of the Library and information about the Library. 4.8 Section 4.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.8 Publication of the Library and...

  11. 42 CFR 4.8 - Publication of the Library and information about the Library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publication of the Library and information about the Library. 4.8 Section 4.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE § 4.8 Publication of the Library and...

  12. Resting-State Alpha in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alpha Associations with Thalamic Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, J. Christopher; Heiken, Kory; Chen, Yu-Han; Herrington, John D.; Chow, Vivian; Liu, Song; Bloy, Luke; Huang, Mingxiong; Pandey, Juhi; Cannon, Katelyn M.; Qasmieh, Saba; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha circuits (8-12 Hz), necessary for basic and complex brain processes, are abnormal in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study obtained estimates of resting-state (RS) alpha activity in children with ASD and examined associations between alpha activity, age, and clinical symptoms. Given that the thalamus modulates cortical RS alpha…

  13. Event-related delta, theta, alpha and gamma correlates to auditory oddball processing during Vipassana meditation.

    PubMed

    Cahn, B Rael; Delorme, Arnaud; Polich, John

    2013-01-01

    Long-term Vipassana meditators sat in meditation vs. a control (instructed mind wandering) states for 25 min, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded and condition order counterbalanced. For the last 4 min, a three-stimulus auditory oddball series was presented during both meditation and control periods through headphones and no task imposed. Time-frequency analysis demonstrated that meditation relative to the control condition evinced decreased evoked delta (2-4 Hz) power to distracter stimuli concomitantly with a greater event-related reduction of late (500-900 ms) alpha-1 (8-10 Hz) activity, which indexed altered dynamics of attentional engagement to distracters. Additionally, standard stimuli were associated with increased early event-related alpha phase synchrony (inter-trial coherence) and evoked theta (4-8 Hz) phase synchrony, suggesting enhanced processing of the habituated standard background stimuli. Finally, during meditation, there was a greater differential early-evoked gamma power to the different stimulus classes. Correlation analysis indicated that this effect stemmed from a meditation state-related increase in early distracter-evoked gamma power and phase synchrony specific to longer-term expert practitioners. The findings suggest that Vipassana meditation evokes a brain state of enhanced perceptual clarity and decreased automated reactivity.

  14. The 10 Hz Frequency: A Fulcrum For Transitional Brain States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Mahaffey, S.; Urbano, F. J.; Phillips, C.

    2016-01-01

    A 10 Hz rhythm is present in the occipital cortex when the eyes are closed (alpha waves), in the precentral cortex at rest (mu rhythm), in the superior and middle temporal lobe (tau rhythm), in the inferior olive (projection to cerebellar cortex), and in physiological tremor (underlying all voluntary movement). These are all considered resting rhythms in the waking brain which are “replaced” by higher frequency activity with sensorimotor stimulation. That is, the 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is replaced on the one hand by lower frequencies during sleep, or on the other hand by higher frequencies during volition and cognition. The 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is proposed as the natural frequency of the brain during quiet waking, but is replaced by higher frequencies capable of permitting more complex functions, or by lower frequencies during sleep and inactivity. At the center of the transition shifts to and from the resting rhythm is the reticular activating system, a phylogenetically preserved area of the brain essential for preconscious awareness. PMID:27547831

  15. Argipressin(4-8) upregulate CTP: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kan-Yan; Xiong, Ying; Du, Yu-Cang

    2002-07-01

    In order to study the effect of argipressin(4-8)(AVP(4-8)) on the mRNA level and activity of cytidine triphosphate: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase(CCT) in rat hippocampal neurons, and elucidate it's possible mechanism. Rat hippocampal neurons treated with AVP(4-8) or actinomycin D were incubated with different time periods. The mRNA level of CCT was detected using RT-PCR plus Southern blot, CCT activity was determined by measuring the rate of incorporation of (14)C - phosphocholine into cytidine diphosphate-choline(CDP-choline). It was found that AVP4-8 could upregulate the CCT mRNA in rat hippocampal neurons. ZDC(C)PR, the antagonist of AVP(4-8), could greatly inhibit this upregulation. Using actinomycin D to inhibite the eucaryotic transcription, it was found that the halflife of CCT mRNA could be prolonged by coincubation with AVP(4-8). Meanwhile, AVP(4-8) could also increase CCT activity in rat hippocampal neurons. These results demonstrated that AVP(4-8) upregulated CCT mRNA level and its activity through stabilizing the CCT mRNA in rat hippocampal neurons.

  16. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  17. Muscle plasticity: comparison of a 30-Hz burst with 10-Hz continuous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A S; Stone, H E; Roessmann, U; Burke, M; Tisdale, E; Mortimer, J T

    1989-03-01

    The changes in the contractile properties induced by a 30-Hz phasic stimulation paradigm were measured and compared with the changes induced by a 10-Hz continuous stimulation paradigm. The study was performed on the tibialis anterior muscles of cats with one paradigm applied to one hindlimb muscle and the other to the contralateral limb. Both hindlimb muscles received the same number of stimuli in a day, making the average stimulation frequency 10 Hz. Two periods of daily stimulation were studied, 8 and 24 h/day. Muscles stimulated at 30 Hz produced greater overall tetanic tension and, during a prolonged stimulation test, exerted a greater mean tension than muscles stimulated at 10 Hz (50 and 32% increase for animals stimulated for 8 and 24 h/day, respectively). Muscle mass was least reduced and fewer pathological abnormalities were observed in the muscles stimulated at 30 Hz. There were no apparent differences in the histochemistry or biochemistry between muscles stimulated at 10 and 30 Hz, which could account for these differences in muscle properties. These results indicate the 30-Hz paradigm may be better suited than 10 Hz continuous stimulation for applications requiring sustained muscle tension such as correction of scoliosis or muscle conditioning for motor prostheses.

  18. Differentiation of human mature thymocytes: existence of a T3+4-8- intermediate stage.

    PubMed

    De la Hera, A; Toribio, M L; Marquez, C; Marcos, M A; Cabrero, E; Martinez-A, C

    1986-06-01

    A T3 complex-bearing subpopulation was characterized within an in vivo cycling T4-8- early thymocyte compartment which contains cells constitutively expressing interleukin 2 and transferrin receptors. We show differentiation in vitro of both mature subsets of thymocytes (T3+4+8- and T3+4-8+) from the above T4-8- compartment, their appearance being preceded by cells in a T3+4-8- intermediate stage. Furthermore, those mature thymocytes generated in vitro contain functionally competent cells which use T3, T4 and T8 structures for their cytolytic activity. The finding of T3+4-8- thymocytes in vivo, together with the observation that T3 antigen expression precedes that of T4 or T8 molecules in vitro, shows that T3 (and presumably Ti) is present early in ontogeny, and suggests that T3+4-8- cells constitute an "intermediate" stage relevant to the connection between early precursors and mature thymocytes during T lymphocyte ontogeny.

  19. Megawatt, 330 Hz PRF tunable gyrotron experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spark, S. N.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    1994-12-01

    Repetitively pulsed and cw gyrotrons have hitherto used thermionic cathodes, whereas cold cathode gyrotrons have normally operated as ‘single shot’ devices. The novel results presented here show that cold cathode gyrotrons can be successfully pulsed repetitively. A tunable gyrotron with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 150Hz is demonstrated. This system developed >4MW mm-wave output pulses at 100GHz. The gyrotron is based on a two-electrode configuration comprising a field-immersed, field emission, cold cathode and a shaped anode cavity. A superconducting magnet was used to produce the homogeneous intra-cavity magnetic field and a cable pulser was used to drive the electron beam. This pulser produced up to a (200±20)kV pulse with 10ns rise time, a 100ns flat top, a 10ns decay with a characteristic impedance of 200Ω. The energy storage capacity of the cable pulser was 35J. The charging unit limited the maximum PRF to 330Hz. Due to spark gap switching limitations 330Hz was only obtainable in 5 to 10 pulse bursts. For substantial periods of the order of 30 seconds, 100Hz PRF was achieved over an oscillating range of 28 to 100GHz and 150Hz PRF was achieved at 80GHz. No degradation effects on the mm-wave output pulse was evident due to diode recovery time throughout this series of results. A subsequent conclusion is that the diode recovery time in our cold cathode gyrotron is less than 3ms.

  20. Effect of gravity on human spontaneous 10-Hz electroencephalographic oscillations during the arrest reaction.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Leroy, A; De Saedeleer, C; Bengoetxea, A; Lipshits, M; Cebolla, A; Servais, L; Dan, B; Berthoz, A; McIntyre, J

    2006-11-22

    Electroencephalographic oscillations at 10 Hz (alpha and mu rhythms) are the most prominent rhythms observed in awake, relaxed (eye-closed) subjects. These oscillations may be considered as a marker of cortical inactivity or an index of the active inhibition of the sensory information. Different cortical sources may participate in the 10-Hz oscillation and appear to be modulated by the sensory context and functional demands. In microgravity, the marked reduction in multimodal graviceptive inputs to cortical networks participating in the representation of space could be expected to affect the 10-Hz activity. The effect of microgravity on this basic oscillation has heretofore not been studied quantitatively. Because the alpha rhythm has a functional role in the regulation of network properties of the visual areas, we hypothesised that the absence of gravity would affect its strength. Here, we report the results of an experiment conducted over the course of 3 space flights, in which we quantified the power of the 10-Hz activity in relation to the arrest reaction (i.e., in 2 distinct physiological states: eyes open and eyes closed). We observed that the power of the spontaneous 10-Hz oscillation recorded in the eyes-closed state in the parieto-occipital (alpha rhythm) and sensorimotor areas (mu rhythm) increased in the absence of gravity. The suppression coefficient during the arrest reaction and the related spectral perturbations produced by eye-opening/closure state transition also increased in on orbit. These results are discussed in terms of current theories on the source and the importance of the alpha rhythm for cognitive function.

  1. Gerbil middle-ear sound transmission from 100 Hz to 60 kHz1

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Cooper, Nigel P.; Rosowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Middle-ear sound transmission was evaluated as the middle-ear transfer admittance HMY (the ratio of stapes velocity to ear-canal sound pressure near the umbo) in gerbils during closed-field sound stimulation at frequencies from 0.1 to 60 kHz, a range that spans the gerbil’s audiometric range. Similar measurements were performed in two laboratories. The HMY magnitude (a) increased with frequency below 1 kHz, (b) remained approximately constant with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, and (c) decreased substantially from 35 to 50 kHz. The HMY phase increased linearly with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, consistent with a 20–29 μs delay, and flattened at higher frequencies. Measurements from different directions showed that stapes motion is predominantly pistonlike except in a narrow frequency band around 10 kHz. Cochlear input impedance was estimated from HMY and previously-measured cochlear sound pressure. Results do not support the idea that the middle ear is a lossless matched transmission line. Results support the ideas that (1) middle-ear transmission is consistent with a mechanical transmission line or multiresonant network between 5 and 35 kHz and decreases at higher frequencies, (2) stapes motion is pistonlike over most of the gerbil auditory range, and (3) middle-ear transmission properties are a determinant of the audiogram. PMID:18646983

  2. Gerbil middle-ear sound transmission from 100 Hz to 60 kHz.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Cooper, Nigel P; Rosowski, John J

    2008-07-01

    Middle-ear sound transmission was evaluated as the middle-ear transfer admittance H(MY) (the ratio of stapes velocity to ear-canal sound pressure near the umbo) in gerbils during closed-field sound stimulation at frequencies from 0.1 to 60 kHz, a range that spans the gerbil's audiometric range. Similar measurements were performed in two laboratories. The H(MY) magnitude (a) increased with frequency below 1 kHz, (b) remained approximately constant with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, and (c) decreased substantially from 35 to 50 kHz. The H(MY) phase increased linearly with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, consistent with a 20-29 micros delay, and flattened at higher frequencies. Measurements from different directions showed that stapes motion is predominantly pistonlike except in a narrow frequency band around 10 kHz. Cochlear input impedance was estimated from H(MY) and previously-measured cochlear sound pressure. Results do not support the idea that the middle ear is a lossless matched transmission line. Results support the ideas that (1) middle-ear transmission is consistent with a mechanical transmission line or multiresonant network between 5 and 35 kHz and decreases at higher frequencies, (2) stapes motion is pistonlike over most of the gerbil auditory range, and (3) middle-ear transmission properties are a determinant of the audiogram.

  3. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  4. Humans perceive flicker artifacts at 500 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, James; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lee, Hung-Chi

    2015-02-01

    Humans perceive a stable average intensity image without flicker artifacts when a television or monitor updates at a sufficiently fast rate. This rate, known as the critical flicker fusion rate, has been studied for both spatially uniform lights, and spatio-temporal displays. These studies have included both stabilized and unstablized retinal images, and report the maximum observable rate as 50-90 Hz. A separate line of research has reported that fast eye movements known as saccades allow simple modulated LEDs to be observed at very high rates. Here we show that humans perceive visual flicker artifacts at rates over 500 Hz when a display includes high frequency spatial edges. This rate is many times higher than previously reported. As a result, modern display designs which use complex spatio-temporal coding need to update much faster than conventional TVs, which traditionally presented a simple sequence of natural images.

  5. Flight test of 4-Hz and 30-Hz Omega receiver front-end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L.

    1976-01-01

    In-flight information was gathered on two Omega receiver analog modules, one having a 4-Hz bandwidth and the other a 30-Hz bandwidth. The Mini-O receiver was also monitored. An improved signal-to-noise characteristic of the narrower bandwidth front-end with negligible loss in dynamic range indicates that the 4-Hz front-end is the more desirable for the prototype Omega receivers. The Mini-O receiver was found to function quite satisfactorily on its second test flight, and has a very real potential for a low-cost, low-power, compact and light-weight Omega receiver.

  6. Interleukin 2 promotes growth and cytolytic activity in human T3+4-8- thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    de la Hera, A; Toribio, M L; Marquez, C; Martinez, C

    1985-01-01

    Human thymocytes bearing T3 but neither T4 nor T8 antigens (T3+4-8- cells) were obtained after negative selection of thymocytes, either fresh or cultured in medium containing recombinant interleukin 2 (IL-2), by treatment with Na1/34, OKT4A and B9.4 monoclonal antibodies (which recognize T6, T4, and T8 antigens, respectively) and complement. Quantitative flow cytometry showed a 98% pure population of T3+4-8- lymphocytes, which included proliferating cells. The growth and maturation requirements of these thymocytes were characterized and related to the T3-receptor complex and IL-2 pathways, thought to be used by mature lymphocytes. The results show that addition of recombinant IL-2 promotes, in a dose-dependent way, proliferation and acquisition of effector functions by cultured T3+4-8- thymocytes, the growth being inhibitable by monoclonal antibody 33B73 (anti-Tac). Furthermore, cytolytic activity of T3+4-8- cells induced by recombinant IL-2 is specifically blocked by monoclonal antibody OKT3, showing that it operates via the T3-receptor complex and does not require either T4 or T8 molecules. The finding of in vitro responsiveness to recombinant IL-2 in T3+4-8- thymocytes suggests a role of IL-2 in the growth and maturation of cells committed to the T-cell lineage, during intrathymic differentiation, prior to expression of T4 and T8 molecules. PMID:3929254

  7. Human CD4- 8- T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D; Longo, Dan L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    Human CD4(-)8(-) T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4(-)8(-) T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-beta. At 2-5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4(-)8(-) T cells enhance the generation of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4(-)8(-) T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFbeta their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4(-)8(-) T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Consider the Earth: Environmental Activities for Grades 4-8. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Julie M.

    This book is designed to educate students in grades 4-8 about eight specific aspects of the environment. Activity-oriented experiences for both urban and rural children to gain certain understandings are provided. Concepts addressed include the fact that humans are animals and are living organisms, animals differ from plants in their ability to…

  9. Logic: A Unit for 4-8 Graders, Especially Gifted and Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runkle, Susan; Tansey, Pam

    The unit on logic is intended to teach critical thinking for gifted and talented students in grades 4-8. Sections are presented separately for students in grades 4-5 and 6-8. The younger students are instructed in such areas as scientific logic, math logic, spatial reasoning, deductive logic, inductive logic, and reasoning with analogies. The…

  10. 28. Photographic copy of construction drawing, dated 3/22/1923, corrected 4/8/1925, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photographic copy of construction drawing, dated 3/22/1923, corrected 4/8/1925, in possession of SCIP Office, Coolidge, AZ. United States Indian Service, Irrigation. SECTIONS OF SOUTHSIDE INTAKE - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Sacaton Dam & Bridge, Gila River, T4S R6E S12/13, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  11. 30. Photographic copy of construction drawing, dated 11/19/1928, corrected 4/8/1925, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photographic copy of construction drawing, dated 11/19/1928, corrected 4/8/1925, in possession of SCIP Office, Coolidge, AZ. United States Indian Service, Irrigation. ELEVATION AND SECTIONS BRIDGE SPAN - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Sacaton Dam & Bridge, Gila River, T4S R6E S12/13, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  12. 43 CFR 1610.4-8 - Selection of resource management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Selection of resource management plan..., BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.4-8 Selection of resource management plan. After publication of the draft resource management plan and draft environmental impact statement, the Field...

  13. 43 CFR 1610.4-8 - Selection of resource management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selection of resource management plan..., BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.4-8 Selection of resource management plan. After publication of the draft resource management plan and draft environmental impact statement, the Field...

  14. Brain oscillatory 4-35 Hz EEG responses during an n-back task with complex visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Jussi; Kivikangas, Markus; Alafuzoff, Aleksander; Hakala, Tero; Krause, Christina M

    2012-05-10

    Brain oscillatory responses of 4-35 Hz EEG frequencies elicited during performance of a visual n-back task with complex visual stimuli were assessed in 20 adult volunteers. Spectral power changes were assessed separately for target and non-target stimuli in four different memory load conditions (0, 1, 2, and 3-back). The presentation of both target and non-target stimuli elicited long-lasting ~4-8 Hz power increases, which were more prominent at the beginning of stimulus onset during presentation of target stimuli, as compared to non-target stimuli, in the 0-back memory load condition. ~8-25 Hz power decreases appeared at stimulus onset. These power decreases were more prominent during the presentation of target stimuli, as compared to non-target stimuli, and their duration increased as a function of memory load between the 0-, 1-, and 2-back, but not the 3-back, memory load conditions. The current results provide further evidence in support of the notion of a complex interplay between both ~4-8 Hz power increases and ~8-25 Hz power decreases during cognitive memory task performance.

  15. Phenol oxidation through its adduct formation with chromium complex of 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Jayanthi; Guadalupe, Hernández J.; Thangarasu, Pandiyan

    2017-04-01

    Structural and electronic properties of [cis-[Cr(tmpcH)X2]n+ (n = 2 or 4; X = OH-, Cl-, Br- and H2O; tmpcH = 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane were analyzed by DFT and TD-DFT methods. The local reactivity active site of the ligand was determined by the condensed-to atom Fukui indexes (CAFI) f(r). In the study, the axial bond distance with metal ion undergoes a considerable change from shorter to longer as OH < Cl- < Br- < H2O, agreeing with the molecular orbital analysis where the dz2 energy is lowered for OH- compared to H2O at the axial position. After analyzing the geometrical data collected from literature for the complexes of Cr(II), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn (II) with tmpcH, it was found that the bond distance decreases with increasing number of d-electrons in the 3d orbital, suggesting that the over-lapping of oribital (π) from Npy with the metal d-orbital is more effective than those from Ncyclam with metal d-orbital. Therefore, the change of different oxidation states for [cis-[Cr(tmpcH)X2]n+ influences significantly the geometrical and electronic parameters. For cis-[Cr(tmpcH)Cl2]2+ the calculated bands are red shifted except for the lower energy band (595 nm) which agrees qualitatively with the experimental one; in addition, the effect of solvent on the electronic transition was analyzed. Furthermore, we collected the electronic data for several chromium complexes from the literature, and compared with our results by plotting the data against number of chromium compounds. Finally, the phenol oxidation properties of the chromium complexes were studied, and phenol forms an adduct with [Cr(tmpcH)Cl]3+ to yield [Cr(tmpcH)Cl-OPh]2+ which could produce the phenol radical, which is enhanced by the presence of -OCH3 group at para- position in the phenolic ring.

  16. Dielectric properties of skeletal muscle during ischemia in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 200 MHz.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M; Kirlum, H J; Schlegel, C; Gebhard, M M

    1999-04-20

    The complex dielectric properties of canine skeletal muscles were measured at 25 degrees C during ischemia in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 200 MHz. The dielectric spectrum of skeletal muscle shows an alpha-dispersion below 1 kHz and a beta-dispersion with a relaxation frequency of about 100 kHz. The alpha-dispersion disappears between 450 and 500 min of ischemia time, the same time during which mechanical contraction was observed, and was restored later. During ischemia, the beta-dispersion is shifted continuously to higher frequencies; and at frequencies above 50 MHz, a decrease of the real part of the dielectric permittivity was measured. The dielectric loss factor decreases during ischemia at frequencies below 500 kHz, only interrupted by a short increase, coinciding with the disappearance of the alpha-dispersion. The principal processes that happen during ischemia inside the skeletal muscle tissues were studied with the help of a model especially designed to simulate membrane effects on the dielectric spectrum. The disappearance of the alpha-dispersion is explained by an increase of conductivity in the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Shifting beta-dispersion to higher frequencies is a result of metabolically produced ions and therefore increasing conductivity of the intracellular medium. Decreasing dielectric permittivity at frequencies above 50 MHz and decreasing dielectric loss factor at low frequencies are caused by the cell edema.

  17. SDSS J094604.90+183541.8: A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR AT z = 4.8

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Bian Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Hall, Patrick B.; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-08-15

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed quasar identified serendipitously in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The object, SDSS J094604.90+183541.8, was initially targeted for spectroscopy as a luminous red galaxy, but the SDSS spectrum has the features of both a z = 0.388 galaxy and a z = 4.8 quasar. We have obtained additional imaging that resolves the system into two quasar images separated by 3.''06 and a bright galaxy that is strongly blended with one of the quasar images. We confirm spectroscopically that the two quasar images represent a single-lensed source at z = 4.8 with a total magnification of 3.2, and we derive a model for the lensing galaxy. This is the highest redshift lensed quasar currently known. We examine the issues surrounding the selection of such an unusual object from existing data and briefly discuss implications for lensed quasar surveys.

  18. Vector Sum Excited Linear Prediction (VSELP) speech coding at 4.8 kbps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerson, Ira A.; Jasiuk, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Code Excited Linear Prediction (CELP) speech coders exhibit good performance at data rates as low as 4800 bps. The major drawback to CELP type coders is their larger computational requirements. The Vector Sum Excited Linear Prediction (VSELP) speech coder utilizes a codebook with a structure which allows for a very efficient search procedure. Other advantages of the VSELP codebook structure is discussed and a detailed description of a 4.8 kbps VSELP coder is given. This coder is an improved version of the VSELP algorithm, which finished first in the NSA's evaluation of the 4.8 kbps speech coders. The coder uses a subsample resolution single tap long term predictor, a single VSELP excitation codebook, a novel gain quantizer which is robust to channel errors, and a new adaptive pre/postfilter arrangement.

  19. Desmethyl Macrolides: Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,8-Didesmethyl Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need for novel sources of antibiotics to address the incessant and inevitable onset of bacterial resistance. To this end, we have initiated a structure-based drug design program that features a desmethylation strategy (i.e., replacing methyl groups with hydrogens). Herein, we report the total synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of 4,8-didesmethyl telithromycin (5), a novel desmethyl analogue of the third-generation ketolide antibiotic telithromycin (2), which is an FDA-approved semisynthetic derivative of erythromycin (1). We found 5 to be eight times more active than previously prepared 4,8,10-tridesmethyl congener (3) and two times more active than 4,10-didesmethyl regioisomer (4) in MIC assays. While less potent than telithromycin (2) and paralleling the observations made in the previous study of 4,10-didesmethyl analogue (4), the inclusion of a single methyl group improves biological activity, thus supporting its role in antibiotic activity. PMID:24015325

  20. RNA polymerase I-Rrn3 complex at 4.8 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Christoph; Plitzko, Jürgen; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Transcription of ribosomal DNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) requires the initiation factor Rrn3. Here we report the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 4.8 Å resolution. The structure reveals how Rrn3 binding converts an inactive Pol I dimer into an initiation-competent monomeric complex and provides insights into the mechanisms of Pol I-specific initiation and regulation.

  1. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  2. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  3. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  4. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  5. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  6. Alpha Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions such as high blood pressure and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Find out more about this class of medication. ... these conditions: High blood pressure Enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) Though alpha blockers are commonly used to treat ...

  7. Alpha fetoprotein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alpha fetoprotein - series References Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al. Prenatal diagnosis and fetal therapy. In: Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al, eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. ...

  8. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  9. Validity and interunit reliability of 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units for assessing athlete movement demands.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard J; Watsford, Mark L; Kelly, Stephen J; Pine, Matthew J; Spurrs, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and interunit reliability of 10 Hz (Catapult) and 15 Hz (GPSports) Global Positioning System (GPS) units and investigate the differences between these units as measures of team sport athlete movement demands. A team sport simulation circuit was completed by 8 trained male participants. The movement demands examined included: total distance covered (TD), average peak speed, and the distance covered, time spent, and the number of efforts performed low-speed running (0.00-13.99 km · h(-1)), high-speed running (14.00-19.99 km · h(-1)), and very high-speed running (>20.00 km · h(-1)). The degree of difference between the 10 Hz and the 15 Hz GPS units and validity was assessed using a paired samples t-test. Pearson's correlations were also used for validity assessment. Interunit reliability was established using percentage typical error of measurement (%TEM) and intraclass correlations. The findings revealed that 10 Hz GPS units were a valid (p > 0.05) and reliable (%TEM = 1.3%) measure of TD. In contrast, the 15 Hz GPS units exhibited lower validity for TD and average peak speed. Further, as the speed of movement increased the level of error for the 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units increased (%TEM = 0.8-19.9). The findings from this study suggest that comparisons should not be undertaken between 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units. In general, the 10 Hz GPS units measured movement demands with greater validity and interunit reliability than the 15 Hz units, however, both 10 Hz and 15 Hz units provided the improved measures of movement demands in comparison to 1 Hz and 5 Hz GPS units.

  10. Effects of 6/6 and 4/8 watch systems on sleepiness among bridge officers.

    PubMed

    Härmä, Mikko; Partinen, Markku; Repo, Risto; Sorsa, Matti; Siivonen, Pertti

    2008-04-01

    During the last ten years, severe sleepiness or falling asleep by watch keeping officers has been a direct or a contributing factor in a number of maritime accidents. This study examined the relationship between two watch systems and its impact on fatigue and sleepiness in bridge officers. A questionnaire and a sleep/work diary were sent to a representative sample of the Finnish Maritime Officer Association. In all, 185 bridge officers answered the questionnaire on sleep, work hours, and safety, including the Skogby Excessive Daytime Sleepiness index (SEDS); 42% of the bridge officers worked two 4 h watches (4/8) per day, while 26% worked two 6 h watches per day (6/6). Ninety-five of the participants completed a sleep diary for seven consecutive days while at sea. The timing of the watch duties and sleep was recorded, as was subjective sleepiness every 2 h using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). 17.6% of the participants had fallen asleep at least once while on duty during their career. Compared to the 4/8 watch system, the officers working the 6/6 watch system reported shorter sleep durations, more frequent nodding-off on duty (7.3% vs. 1.5%), and excessive sleepiness (32% vs. 16% with SEDS>14). Based on a logistic regression analysis, high SEDS was significantly related with probable obstructive sleep apnea (OR 5.7), the 6/6 watch system (OR 4.0), and morningness-eveningness while controlling simultaneously several individual and sleep-related factors. Subjective sleepiness (KSS) was highest at 04:00 and 06:00 h. In a multivariate analysis, the KSS was significantly related to time of day, time after awaking, sleep length, and interactions of the watch systems with age, morningness-eveningness, and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) score. Severe sleepiness at 04:00-06:00 h was especially problematic in the 6/6 watch system among evening types and among the bridge officers with high ESS. The results suggest the 6/6 watch system is related to a higher risk of

  11. Observation of gamma rays with a 4.8 hour periodicity from CYG X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Energetic (E35 MeV) Gamma rays were observed from Cyg X-3 with the SAS-2 Gamma ray telescope. They are modulated at the 4.8 sup h period observed in the X-ray and infrared regions, and within the statistical error are in phase with this emission. The flux above 100 MeV has an average value of (4.4 + or - 1.1)x 10 to the -6 power/sq cm/sec. If the distance to Cyg X-3 is 10 kpcs, this flux implies a luminosity of more than 10 to the 37th power ergs/s if the radiation is isotropic and about 10 to the 36th power ergs/s if the radiation is restricted to a cone of one steradian, as it might be in a pulsar.

  12. Large Binocular Telescope Observations of Europa Occulting Io's Volcanoes at 4.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, Michael F.; Conrad, Albert; Resnick, Aaron; Leisenring, Jarron; Hinz, Phil; de Pater, Imke; de Kleer, Katherine; Spencer, John; Skemer, Andrew; Woodward, Charles E.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Defrére, Denis

    2015-11-01

    On 8 March 2015 Europa passed nearly centrally in front of Io. The Large Binocular Telescope observed this event in dual-aperture AO-corrected Fizeau interferometric imaging mode using the mid-infrared imager LMIRcam operating behind the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) at a broadband wavelength of 4.8 μm (M-band). Occultation light curves generated from frames recorded every 123 milliseconds show that both Loki and Pele/Pillan were well resolved. Europa's center shifted by 2 kilometers relative to Io from frame-to-frame. The derived light curve for Loki is consistent with the double-lobed structure reported by Conrad et al. (2015) using direct interferometric imaging with LBTI.

  13. LARP LHC 4.8 GHZ Schottky System Initial Commissioning with Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Jansson, Andreas; Jones, O.Rhodri; Caspers, Fritz; /CERN

    2011-03-18

    The LHC Schottky system consists for four independent 4.8 GHz triple down conversion receivers with associated data acquisition systems. Each system is capable of measuring tune, chromaticity, momentum spread in either horizontal or vertical planes; two systems per beam. The hardware commissioning has taken place from spring through fall of 2010. With nominal bunch beam currents of 10{sup 11} protons, the first incoherent Schottky signals were detected and analyzed. This paper will report on these initial commissioning results. A companion paper will report on the data analysis curve fitting and remote control user interface of the system. The Schottky system for the LHC was proposed in 2004 under the auspices of the LARP collaboration. Similar systems were commissioned in 2003 in the Fermilab Tevatron and Recycler accelerators as a means of measuring tunes noninvasively. The Schottky detector is based on the stochastic cooling pickups that were developed for the Fermilab Antiproton Source Debuncher cooling upgrade completed in 2002. These slotted line waveguide pickups have the advantage of large aperture coupled with high beam coupling characteristics. For stochastic cooling, wide bandwidths are integral to cooling performance. The bandwidth of slotted waveguide pickups can be tailored by choosing the length of the pickup and slot spacing. The Debuncher project covered the 4-8 GHz band with eight bands of pickups, each with approximately 500 MHz of bandwidth. For use as a Schottky detector, bandwidths of 100-200 MHz are required for gating, resulting in higher transfer impedance than those used for stochastic cooling. Details of hardware functionality are reported previously.

  14. Morphological analysis on the coherence of kHz QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Chang, H. K.; Zhang, C. M.; Wang, D. H.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Song, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We take the recently published data of twin kHz quasi-period oscillations (QPOs) in neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) as the samples, and investigate the morphology of the samples, which focuses on the quality factor, peak frequency of kHz QPOs, and try to infer their physical mechanism. We notice that: (1) The quality factors of upper kHz QPOs are low (2˜20 in general) and increase with the kHz QPO peak frequencies for both Z and Atoll sources. (2) The distribution of quality factor versus frequency for the lower kHz QPOs are quite different between Z and Atoll sources. For most Z source samples, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are low (usually lower than 15) and rise steadily with the peak frequencies except for Sco X-1, which drop abruptly at the frequency of about 750 Hz. While for most Atoll sources, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are very high (from 2 to 200) and usually have a rising part, a maximum and an abrupt drop. (3) There are three Atoll sources (4U 1728-34, 4U 1636-53 and 4U 1608-52) of displaying very high quality factors for lower kHz QPOs. These three sources have been detected with the spin frequencies and sidebands, in which the source with higher spin frequency presents higher quality factor of lower kHz QPOs and lower difference between sideband frequency and lower kHz QPO frequency.

  15. Extension of non-invasive EEG into the kHz range for evoked thalamocortical activity by means of very low noise amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Scheer, H J; Fedele, T; Curio, G; Burghoff, M

    2011-12-01

    Ultrafast electroencephalographic signals, having frequencies above 500 Hz, can be observed in somatosensory evoked potential measurements. Usually, these recordings have a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) because weak signals are overlaid by intrinsic noise of much higher amplitude like that generated by biological sources and the amplifier. As an example, recordings at the scalp taken during electrical stimulation of the median nerve show a 600 Hz burst with submicro-volt amplitudes which can be extracted from noise by the use of massive averaging and digital signal processing only. We have investigated this signal by means of a very low noise amplifier made in-house (minimal voltage noise 2.7 nV Hz(-1/2), FET inputs). We examined how the SNR of the data is altered by the bandwidth and the use of amplifiers with different intrinsic amplifier noise levels of 12 and 4.8 nV Hz(-1/2), respectively. By analyzing different frequency contributions of the signal, we found an extremely weak 1 kHz component superimposed onto the well-known 600 Hz burst. Previously such high-frequency electroencephalogram responses around 1 kHz have only been observed by deep brain electrodes implanted for tremor therapy of Parkinson patients. For the non-invasive measurement of such signals, we recommend that amplifier noise should not exceed 4 nV Hz(-1/2).

  16. Star formation and black hole growth at z ≅ 4.8

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, Hagai; Mor, Rivay; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Shemmer, Ohad; Lira, Paulina

    2014-08-10

    We report Herschel/SPIRE, Spitzer and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations of 44 z ≅ 4.8 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This flux-limited sample contains the highest mass black holes (BHs) at this redshift. Ten of the objects were detected by Herschel and five show emission that is not clearly associated with the AGNs. The star formation (SF) luminosity (L{sub SF}) obtained by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) with standard SF templates, taking into account AGN contribution, is in the range 10{sup 46.62}-10{sup 47.21} erg s{sup –1} corresponding to SF rates of 1090-4240 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Fitting with very luminous submillimeter galaxy SEDs gives SF rates that are smaller by 0.05 dex when using all bands and 0.1 dex when ignoring the 250 μm band. A 40 K graybody fits to only the 500 μm fluxes reduce L{sub SF} by about a factor of two. A stacking analysis of 29 undetected sources gives significant signals in all three bands. A SF template fit indicates L{sub SF} = 10{sup 46.19-46.23} erg s{sup –1} depending on the assumed AGN contribution. A 40 K fit to the stacked 500 μm flux gives L{sub SF} = 10{sup 45.95} erg s{sup –1}. The mean BH mass (M{sub BH}) and AGN luminosity (L{sub AGN}) of the detected sources are significantly higher than those of the undetected ones. The spectral differences are seen all the way from UV to far infrared wavelengths. The mean optical-UV spectra are similar to those predicted for thin accretion disks around BHs with similar masses and accretion rates. We suggest two alternative explanations to the correlation of L{sub SF}, L{sub AGN} and M{sub BH}, one involving no AGN feedback and the second involving moderate feedback that affects, but does not totally quench, SF in three-quarters of the sources. We compare our L{sub SF} and L{sub AGN} to lower redshift samples and show a new correlation between L{sub SF} and M{sub BH}. We also examine several rather speculative ideas about

  17. Was the Timpson, Texas, M4.8 event induced by fluid injection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z.; Eichhubl, P.; Gale, J.; Olson, J. E.; Frohlich, C.; Gono, V.

    2014-12-01

    A M4.8 earthquake with dominant strike-slip near Timpson, east Texas, the largest documented earthquake to date in that region, has received extensive attention due to the possible linkage to waste water injection. The reliably located aftershocks align along a previously mapped fault striking about N42°W. Two active injection wells are located within 3 km of the aftershocks. One injection well became operational in August 2006 with an average injection rate of 42,750 m3/mo at an average pumping pressure of 12.4 MPa at depths between 1853 and 1868 m. Six months later, the second well started injection at 15,600 m3/mo. To investigate the causative relationship between fluid injection and possibly induced seismic fault slip, we integrated geologic and geophysical data into a poroelastic finite element model to simulate the spatial and temporal evolution of pore pressure and stress fields and analyze the stability of fault by applying the Coulomb failure criterion. Parametric studies were performed to analyze the sensitivity of Coulomb failure stress to the variability of input parameters including permeability of injection layer, fault orientation and permeability, and orientation and magnitude of stress state prior to injection. Assuming a Byerlee friction coefficient of 0.6, and using best available estimates of layer permeability, fault orientation, and stress tensor orientation and magnitude, we calculated fault slip occurs 55 months after the start of injection in the model, close to the observed delay of 69 months between injection and the M4.8 event. However, even with principal stress directions and fault orientation being reasonably well constrained, Coulomb failure stress is highly sensitive to input parameters resulting in large uncertainties in correlating injection rate and volume with the onset of induced seismic events. In addition, injection layer and fault zone permeability has a profound effect on the pore pressure evolution. These results

  18. Star Formation and Black Hole Growth at z ~= 4.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Mor, Rivay; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Shemmer, Ohad; Lira, Paulina

    2014-08-01

    We report Herschel/SPIRE, Spitzer and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations of 44 z ~= 4.8 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This flux-limited sample contains the highest mass black holes (BHs) at this redshift. Ten of the objects were detected by Herschel and five show emission that is not clearly associated with the AGNs. The star formation (SF) luminosity (L SF) obtained by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) with standard SF templates, taking into account AGN contribution, is in the range 1046.62-1047.21 erg s-1 corresponding to SF rates of 1090-4240 M ⊙ yr-1. Fitting with very luminous submillimeter galaxy SEDs gives SF rates that are smaller by 0.05 dex when using all bands and 0.1 dex when ignoring the 250 μm band. A 40 K graybody fits to only the 500 μm fluxes reduce L SF by about a factor of two. A stacking analysis of 29 undetected sources gives significant signals in all three bands. A SF template fit indicates L SF = 1046.19-46.23 erg s-1 depending on the assumed AGN contribution. A 40 K fit to the stacked 500 μm flux gives L SF = 1045.95 erg s-1. The mean BH mass (M BH) and AGN luminosity (L AGN) of the detected sources are significantly higher than those of the undetected ones. The spectral differences are seen all the way from UV to far infrared wavelengths. The mean optical-UV spectra are similar to those predicted for thin accretion disks around BHs with similar masses and accretion rates. We suggest two alternative explanations to the correlation of L SF, L AGN and M BH, one involving no AGN feedback and the second involving moderate feedback that affects, but does not totally quench, SF in three-quarters of the sources. We compare our L SF and L AGN to lower redshift samples and show a new correlation between L SF and M BH. We also examine several rather speculative ideas about the host galaxy properties including the possibility that the detected sources are above the SF mass sequence (MS) at z ~= 4.8

  19. A 3.1-4.8 GHz CMOS receiver for MB-OFDM UWB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang, Yang; Wang, Yao; Jiangwei, Yin; Renliang, Zheng; Wei, Li; Ning, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2009-01-01

    An integrated fully differential ultra-wideband CMOS receiver for 3.1-4.8 GHz MB-OFDM systems is presented. A gain controllable low noise amplifier and a merged quadrature mixer are integrated as the RF front-end. Five order Gm-C type low pass filters and VGAs are also integrated for both I and Q IF paths in the receiver. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in a Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process and achieves a maximum total voltage gain of 65 dB, an AGC range of 45 dB with about 6 dB/step, an averaged total noise figure of 6.4 to 8.8 dB over 3 bands and an in-band IIP3 of -5.1 dBm. The receiver occupies 2.3 mm2 and consumes 110 mA from a 1.8 V supply including test buffers and a digital module.

  20. An ERP study of conflict monitoring in 4-8-year old children: associations with temperament.

    PubMed

    Buss, Kristin A; Dennis, Tracy A; Brooker, Rebecca J; Sippel, Lauren M

    2011-04-01

    Although there is great interest in identifying the neural correlates of cognitive processes that create risk for psychopathology, there is a paucity of research in young children. One event-related potential (ERP), the N2, is thought to index conflict monitoring and has been linked cognitive and affective risk factors for anxiety. Most of this research, however, has been conducted with adults, adolescents, and older children, but not with younger children. To address this gap, the current study examined 26 4-8-year-olds, who completed a cued flanker task while EEG was continuously recorded. We assessed whether the N2 was detectable in this group of young children and examined associations between the N2 and factors reflecting affective risk (e.g., reduced executive attention, temperamental effortful control, and temperamental surgency). We documented an N2 effect (greater N2 amplitude to incongruent versus congruent flankers), but only in children older than 6 years of age. Increases in the N2 effect were associated with less efficient executive attention and lower temperamental effortful control. We discuss the implications of these findings and consider how they may inform future studies on biomarkers for cognitive and affective risk factors for anxiety.

  1. A 4.8 kbps code-excited linear predictive coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremain, Thomas E.; Campbell, Joseph P., Jr.; Welch, Vanoy C.

    1988-01-01

    A secure voice system STU-3 capable of providing end-to-end secure voice communications (1984) was developed. The terminal for the new system will be built around the standard LPC-10 voice processor algorithm. The performance of the present STU-3 processor is considered to be good, its response to nonspeech sounds such as whistles, coughs and impulse-like noises may not be completely acceptable. Speech in noisy environments also causes problems with the LPC-10 voice algorithm. In addition, there is always a demand for something better. It is hoped that LPC-10's 2.4 kbps voice performance will be complemented with a very high quality speech coder operating at a higher data rate. This new coder is one of a number of candidate algorithms being considered for an upgraded version of the STU-3 in late 1989. The problems of designing a code-excited linear predictive (CELP) coder to provide very high quality speech at a 4.8 kbps data rate that can be implemented on today's hardware are considered.

  2. Familial Constitutional Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4 & 8: Phenotypically Normal Mother and Abnormal Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Fulesh

    2016-01-01

    Balanced chromosome translocations carriers mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression but may have more risk of recurrent spontaneous abortions &/or children with serious birth defects due to unbalanced chromosome complements. Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements have variable clinical expression and are rare. We present here a case report of three siblings affected with intellectual disability and minor dysmorphic features of face and limbs, born to a non-consanguineous couple in which mother had 5 abortions. The constitutional chromosome analysis revealed balanced translocation t (4;8) in mother and all the three siblings were karyotypically normal. Chromosomal microarray in one of the probands revealed partial monosomy 8pter-p23 and a partial trisomy 4pter-p16. Phenotypic features were recorded in 3 probands using Human Phenotype Ontology terms to query web-based tool Phenomizer. The harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is very important especially in case of rare genetic conditions and the heterogeneous phenotypes which make it even more challenging. The prevalence of sub-microscopic unbalanced translocations may be under-reported due to lesser use of molecular genetic analysis. The familial expression of abnormal phenotypes including intellectual disability make the individuals candidate for molecular genetic analysis and phenotyping to help defer the status of idiopathic mental retardation and identify sub-entity of genetic condition. PMID:27190830

  3. Implementing dosimetry in GATE: dose-point kernel validation with GEANT4 4.8.1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Ludovic; Chouin, Nicolas; Bitar, Abdalkader; Lisbona, Albert; Bardiès, Manuel

    2007-02-01

    GATE is a recent Monte Carlo code, based on GEANT4, and used in nuclear medicine mainly for imaging and detector design. Our goal was to implement dosimetry within GATE (i.e., combining the excellent potential of Gate for image modeling with GEANT4 dosimetric capabilities. The latest release of GEANT4 (4.8.1) completely revised the electron multiple scattering propagation algorithm. In this work, we calculated dose point kernels (DPK) for 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1, and 3 MeV monoenergetic electrons. We then compared our results with data obtained with another Monte Carlo code (MCNPX) or from the reference publication from Berger and Seltzer. To facilitate comparison, all calculated dose distributions were scaled to the corresponding R(CSDA), as given by the ESTAR NIST web database. Some GEANT4 parameters (i.e., Stepmax), or the shell thickness, had to be adjusted in order to achieve good agreement for energies below 1 MeV. For all energies except 10 keV, calculated DPKs do not differ significantly from the reference, as assessed by a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. This preliminary step allowed us to consider the integration of GEANT4 dosimetric capabilities within the Gate framework.

  4. The 2009 earthquake, magnitude mb 4.8, in the Pantanal Wetlands, west-central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fábio L; Assumpção, Marcelo; Facincani, Edna M; França, George S; Assine, Mario L; Paranhos, Antônio C; Gamarra, Roberto M

    2016-09-01

    The main goal of this paper is to characterize the Coxim earthquake occurred in June 15th, 2009 in the Pantanal Basin and to discuss the relationship between its faulting mechanism with the Transbrasiliano Lineament. The earthquake had maximum intensity MM V causing damage in farm houses and was felt in several cities located around, including Campo Grande and Goiânia. The event had an mb 4.8 magnitude and depth was 6 km, i.e., it occurred in the upper crust, within the basement and 5 km below the Cenozoic sedimentary cover. The mechanism, a thrust fault mechanism with lateral motion, was obtained by P-wave first-motion polarities and confirmed by regional waveform modelling. The two nodal planes have orientations (strike/dip) of 300°/55° and 180°/55° and the orientation of the P-axis is approximately NE-SW. The results are similar to the Pantanal earthquake of 1964 with mb 5.4 and NE-SW compressional axis. Both events show that Pantanal Basin is a seismically active area, under compressional stress. The focal mechanism of the 1964 and 2009 events have no nodal plane that could be directly associated with the main SW-NE trending Transbrasiliano system indicating that a direct link of the Transbrasiliano with the seismicity in the Pantanal Basin is improbable.

  5. The ANGPTL3-4-8 model, a molecular mechanism for triglyceride trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a rate-limiting enzyme for hydrolysing circulating triglycerides (TG) into free fatty acids that are taken up by peripheral tissues. Postprandial LPL activity rises in white adipose tissue (WAT), but declines in the heart and skeletal muscle, thereby directing circulating TG to WAT for storage; the reverse is true during fasting. However, the mechanism for the tissue-specific regulation of LPL activity during the fed–fast cycle has been elusive. Recent identification of lipasin/angiopoietin-like 8 (Angptl8), a feeding-induced hepatokine, together with Angptl3 and Angptl4, provides intriguing, yet puzzling, insights, because all the three Angptl members are LPL inhibitors, and the deficiency (overexpression) of any one causes hypotriglyceridaemia (hypertriglyceridaemia). Then, why does nature need all of the three? Our recent data that Angptl8 negatively regulates LPL activity specifically in cardiac and skeletal muscles suggest an Angptl3-4-8 model: feeding induces Angptl8, activating the Angptl8–Angptl3 pathway, which inhibits LPL in cardiac and skeletal muscles, thereby making circulating TG available for uptake by WAT, in which LPL activity is elevated owing to diminished Angptl4; the reverse is true during fasting, which suppresses Angptl8 but induces Angptl4, thereby directing TG to muscles. The model suggests a general framework for how TG trafficking is regulated. PMID:27053679

  6. A study of DNA tube formation mechanisms using 4-, 8-, and 12-helix DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yonggang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Junping; Yan, Hao

    2006-04-05

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a new family of rectangular-shaped DNA nanostructures (DNA tiles) containing 4, 8, and 12 helices. The self-assembled morphologies of the three tiles were also investigated. The motivation for designing this set of DNA nanostructures originated from the desire to produce DNA lattices containing periodic cavities of programmable dimensions and to investigate the mechanism of DNA tube formation. Nine assembly scenarios have been investigated through the combination of the three different tiles and three sticky end association strategies. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed self-assembled structures with varied cavity sizes, lattice morphologies, and orientations. Six samples show only tube formation, two samples show both 2D lattices (>2 microm) and tubes, and one sample shows only 2D lattices without tubes. We found that a lower tile dimensional anisotropy, weaker connection, and corrugated design favor the large 2D array formation, while the opposite (higher tile anisotropy, stronger connection, and uncorrugated design) favors tube formation. We discuss these observations in terms of an energy balance at equilibrium and the kinetic competition between diffusion-limited lateral lattice growth versus fluctuation of the lattice to form tubes at an early stage of the assembly. The DNA nanostructures and their self-assembly demonstrated herein not only provide a new repertoire of scaffolds to template the organization of nanoscale materials, but may also provide useful information for investigating other self-assembly systems.

  7. Phase transition and conduction mechanism in Pb2Na0.8R0.2Nb4.8Fe0.2O15 material (R=rare earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziane, M.; Taibi, M.; Boukhari, A.

    2013-11-01

    Electrical properties of Pb2Na0.8Eu0.2Nb4.8Fe0.2O15 tungsten bronze compound were investigated. Ferroelectric phase transition of diffuse type is observed at 395 °C. Conductivity study as a function of temperature (RT-600 °C) and at three different frequencies (10, 100 and 1000 kHz) suggests the existence of dominant ionic conduction. The rise of ac conductivity on increasing temperature supports the NTCR (negative temperature coefficient of resistance) behaviour of the material. The activation energies have been evaluated from ac conductivity using Arrhenius equation and discussed. Different conduction mechanisms were identified. For comparison, the conducting properties of Pb2Na0.8R0.2Nb4.8Fe0.2O15 (R=Dy, Nd, La) were also investigated.

  8. Propagation of shear bands in Ti{sub 66.1}Cu{sub 8}Ni{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 7.2}Nb{sub 13.9} nanostructure-dendrite composite during deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.B.; Das, J.; Baier, F.; Eckert, J.

    2005-04-25

    During deformation of Ti{sub 66.1}Cu{sub 8}Ni{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 7.2}Nb{sub 13.9} nanostructure-dendrite composite, primary and secondary shear bands form under perpendicular orientation. Detailed investigation of the microstructure of deformed specimens reveals deformed body-centered-cubic (bcc) {beta}-Ti dendrites forming a stepped morphology at the interfaces between the bcc {beta}-Ti dendrites and the nanostructured matrix, consisting of hexagonal close packed (hcp) {alpha}-Ti and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) Ti{sub 2}Cu phases. In the nanostructured matrix, the primary shear bands pass through coherent grain boundaries between the hcp {alpha}-Ti and the bct Ti{sub 2}Cu phases. In contrast, the secondary shear bands in the nanostructured matrix are arrested by sandwiched nanoscale grains of the hcp {alpha}-Ti and bct Ti{sub 2}Cu phases.

  9. Brain oscillatory 4-30 Hz responses during a visual n-back memory task with varying memory load.

    PubMed

    Pesonen, Mirka; Hämäläinen, Heikki; Krause, Christina M

    2007-03-23

    Brain oscillatory responses of 4-30 Hz EEG frequencies elicited during the performance of a visual n-back task were examined in 36 adult volunteers. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) responses were examined separately for targets and non-targets in four different memory load conditions (0-, 1-, 2- and 3-back). The presentation of all stimuli in all memory load conditions elicited long-lasting theta frequency (approximately 4-6 Hz) ERS responses which were of greater magnitude for the target stimuli as compared to the non-target stimuli. Alpha frequency range (approximately 8-12 Hz) ERD responses were observed in all memory load conditions for both targets and non-targets. The duration of these alpha ERD responses increased with increasing memory load and reaction time. In all memory load conditions, early appearing beta rhythm (approximately 14-30 Hz) ERD responses were elicited, and with increasing memory load, these beta ERD responses became longer in duration. Additionally, beta ERS responses were observed in the 0- and 1-back memory load conditions. The current results reveal a complex interplay between brain oscillations at different frequencies during a cognitive task performance.

  10. Comparing microbubble cavitation at 500 kHz and 70 kHz related to micellar drug delivery using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Diaz de la Rosa, Mario A; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that ultrasonic drug release at 70kHz was found to correlate with the presence of subharmonic emissions. No evidence of drug release or of the subharmonic emissions were detected in experiments at 500kHz. In an attempt to understand the difference in drug release behavior between low- and mid-frequency ultrasound, a mathematical model of a bubble oscillator was developed to explore the difference in the behavior of a single 10-μm bubble under 500- and 70-kHz ultrasound. The dynamics were found to be fundamentally different; the 500-kHz bubble follows a period-doubling route to chaos while a 70-kHz bubble follows an intermittent route to chaos. We propose that this type of "intermittent subharmonic" oscillation behavior is associated with the drug release observed experimentally.

  11. Investigation of incomplete fusion dynamics at energy 4-8 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Harish; Tali, Suhail A.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Singh, D.; Ali, Rahbar; Kumar, Kamal; Sathik, N. P. M.; Parashari, Siddharth; Ali, Asif; Dubey, R.; Bala, Indu; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.

    2017-04-01

    The recoil-catcher activation technique followed by the offline γ-ray spectroscopy has been adopted for the excitation function measurement of residues populated in 12,13C induced reactions with 175Lu target at lower projectile energies ≈ 4- 8 MeV /nucleon. The independent cross-sections for some of the populated residues have been estimated by subtracting the contributions of higher charge precursor isobars from the measured cumulative cross-sections. The measured excitation functions are compared with theoretical predictions based on statistical model code PACE-4. This comparison reveals that complete fusion process solely contributes in the formation of xn-pxn channels and an enhancement in the measured cross-sections of α-emitting channels from the theoretical predictions may be attributed to the incomplete fusion process. The incomplete fusion probability is found to be higher in case of 12C than for a one neutron rich projectile 13C throughout the incident energy region. Present findings obtained for 12,13C + 175Lu systems have been compared with informations extracted from previously studied systems and projectile structure is found to strongly affect the incomplete fusion dynamics in terms of projectile α-Q-value along with projectile-target mass-asymmetry. Moreover, it may be pointed out that Morgenstern's mass-asymmetry systematic is probably the projectile structure dependent systematic. A substantial contribution to incomplete fusion coming from collision trajectories with ℓ ≤ℓcrit is also observed, contrary to the SUMRULE model assumptions.

  12. Real-time optimal adaptation for planetary geometry and texture: 4-8 tile hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lok M; Duchaineau, Mark A; Joy, Kenneth I

    2005-01-01

    The real-time display of huge geometry and imagery databases involves view-dependent approximations, typically through the use of precomputed hierarchies that are selectively refined at runtime. A classic motivating problem is terrain visualization in which planetary databases involving billions of elevation and color values are displayed on PC graphics hardware at high frame rates. This paper introduces a new diamond data structure for the basic selective-refinement processing, which is a streamlined method of representing the well-known hierarchies of right triangles that have enjoyed much success in real-time, view-dependent terrain display. Regular-grid tiles are proposed as the payload data per diamond for both geometry and texture. The use of 4-8 grid refinement and coarsening schemes allows level-of-detail transitions that are twice as gradual as traditional quadtree-based hierarchies, as well as very high-quality low-pass filtering compared to subsampling-based hierarchies. An out-of-core storage organization is introduced based on Sierpinski indices per diamond, along with a tile preprocessing framework based on fine-to-coarse, same-level, and coarse-to-fine gathering operations. To attain optimal frame-to-frame coherence and processing-order priorities, dual split and merge queues are developed similar to the Realtime Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) Algorithm, as well as an adaptation of the ROAM frustum culling technique. Example applications of lake-detection and procedural terrain generation demonstrate the flexibility of the tile processing framework.

  13. Analysis of the DA white dwarf HZ 43 A and its companion star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiwotzki, R.; Barstow, M. A.; Fleming, T.; Holweger, H.; Jordan, S.; Werner, K.

    1993-11-01

    The DA white dwarf HZ 43 A (WD 1314+293) is analyzed based on a newly obtained optical spectrogram. We demonstrate that the derived parameters Teff = 49.000 K and log g = 7.7 are in agreement with the observed Ly-alpha line, the slope of the UV continuum, and the measured trigonometric parallax. The EXOSAT spectrograms of Paerels et al. (1986) are used to obtain upper limits for the atmospheric abundance of helium, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen of HZ 43 A by applying the new parameters and up-to-date Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres. The result is discussed within the framework of diffusion calculations. It turns out that the resulting abundances of the CNO elements are below the predictions of theory making HZ 43 A an unique object. A red/near-infrared spectrum of the companion star HZ 43 B is used to reclassify it and to estimate temperature and metallicity. We calculate EUV fluxes from models with the derived stellar parameters and use them to check the flux calibrations of EXOSAT and ROSAT. The agreement between predicted and measured count rates is reasonable for the ROSAT-Wide Field Camera (WFC) filters. Most EXOSAT photometric filters exhibit deviations. These are marginally consistent with our error limits for the LX 3000, LX 4000, and the PPL filters. The Al/P calibration is in error. Discrepant results are obtained for the EXOSAT spectrograph and the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). These inconsistencies may cause systematic errors, if for instance PSPC measurements are combined with WFC data for an analysis.

  14. Diffractive and refractive timescales at 4.8 GHz in PSR B0329+54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, W.; Kijak, J.; Gupta, Y.; Krzeszowski, K.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: We present the results of flux density monitoring of PSR B0329+54 at the frequency of 4.8 GHz using the 32-m TCfA radiotelescope. The observations were conducted between 2002 and 2005. The main goal of the project was to find interstellar scintillation (ISS) parameters for the pulsar at the frequency at which it was never studied in detail. To achieve this, the 20 observing sessions consisted of 3-min integrations, which on average lasted 24 h. This gave us sufficient sensitivity to all types of flux density variations over a wide range of timescales. The character of the observations makes our project unique amongst other ISS oriented observing programs, at least at high frequency. Methods: Flux density time series obtained for each session were analysed using structure functions. For some of the individual sessions as well as for the general average structure function we were able to identify two distinctive timescales present, the timescales of diffractive and refractive scintillations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case when both scintillation timescales, tDISS = 42.7 min and tRISS = 305 min, were observed simultaneously in a uniform data set and estimated using the same method. Results: The obtained values of the ISS parameters combined with the data found in the literature allowed us to study the frequency dependence of these parameters over a wide range of observing frequencies, which is crucial for understanding the ISM turbulence. We found that the Kolmogorov spectrum is not best suited for describing the density fluctuations of the ISM, and a power-law spectrum with β = 4 seems to fit better with our results. We were also able to estimate the transition frequency (transition from strong to weak scintillation regimes) as νc = 10.1 GHz, much higher than was previously predicted. We were also able to estimate the strength of scattering parameter u = 2.67 and the Fresnel scale as rF = 6.7 × 108 m.

  15. Age-related effects on verbal and visuospatial memory are mediated by theta and alpha II rhythms.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Johanna Louise; Kober, Silvia Erika; Witte, Matthias; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Both electrical brain activity during rest and memory functions change across the lifespan. Moreover, electrical brain activity is associated with memory functions. However, the interplay between all these effects has been investigated only scarcely. The present study investigated the extent to which the power of resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) frequencies mediates the impact of aging on verbal and visuospatial memory. Seventy healthy participants with 22 to 83years of age completed a visuospatial and verbal learning and memory test and provided eyes-open and eyes-closed resting-state EEG data. Robust age-related effects on behavioral and EEG data were observed. Mediation analyses showed that the relative power of the theta (4-8Hz) frequency band in fronto-central locations partly explained the negative age-related effect on delayed recall in the verbal memory task. The relative power of the alpha II (10-12Hz) frequency band in mainly parietal locations partly explained the negative impact of age on immediate and delayed recall in the visuospatial task. Results indicate that spontaneous brain activity carries specific information about aging processes and predicts the level of competence in verbal and visuospatial memory tasks.

  16. Phytotoxicity of 4,8-dihydroxy-1-tetralone isolated from Carya cathayensis Sarg. to various plant species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Xian; Yu, Min-Feng; Ruan, Xiao; Zhang, Yu-Zhu; Wang, Qiang

    2014-09-26

    The aqueous extract from Carya cathayensis Sarg. exocarp was centrifuged, filtered, and separated into 11 elution fractions by X-5 macroporous resin chromatography. A phenolic compound, 4,8-dihydroxy-1-tetralone (4,8-DHT) was isolated from the fractions with the strongest phytotoxicity by bioassy-guided fractionation, and investigated for phytotoxicity on lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), onion (Allium cepa L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The testing results showed that the treatment with 0.6 mM 4,8-DHT could significantly depress the germination vigor of lettuce and wheat, reduce the germination rate of lettuce and cucumber, and also inhibit radicle length, plumule length, and fresh weight of seedlings of lettuce and onion, but could significantly promote plumule length and fresh weight of seedlings of cucumber (p < 0.05). For the tested five plants, the 4,8-DHT was the most active to the seed germination and seedling growth of lettuce, indicating that the phytotoxicity of 4,8-DHT had the selectivity of dosage, action target (plant type) and content (seed germination or seedling growth).

  17. Dynamics of alpha oscillations elucidate facial affect recognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan G; Rockstroh, Brigitte S; Popova, Petia; Carolus, Almut M; Miller, Gregory A

    2014-03-01

    Impaired facial affect recognition is characteristic of schizophrenia and has been related to impaired social function, but the relevant neural mechanisms have not been fully identified. The present study sought to identify the role of oscillatory alpha activity in that deficit during the process of facial emotion recognition. Neuromagnetic brain activity was monitored while 44 schizophrenia patients and 44 healthy controls viewed 5-s videos showing human faces gradually changing from neutral to fearful or happy expressions or from the neutral face of one poser to the neutral face of another. Recognition performance was determined separately by self-report. Relative to prestimulus baseline, controls exhibited a 10- to 15-Hz power increase prior to full recognition and a 10- to 15-Hz power decrease during the postrecognition phase. These results support recent proposals about the function of alpha-band oscillations in normal stimulus evaluation. The patients failed to show this sequence of alpha power increase and decrease and also showed low 10- to 15-Hz power and high 10- to 15-Hz connectivity during the prestimulus baseline. In light of the proposal that a combination of alpha power increase and functional disconnection facilitates information intake and processing, the finding of an abnormal association of low baseline alpha power and high connectivity in schizophrenia suggests a state of impaired readiness that fosters abnormal dynamics during facial affect recognition.

  18. 40-Hz EEG activity during hypnotic induction and hypnotic testing.

    PubMed

    DePascalis, V; Penna, P M

    1990-04-01

    The present study evaluates changes in left and right 40-Hz EEG production for 19 high and 20 low hypnotizable female Ss during the hypnotic induction and the administration of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) of the Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard (1962). Scalp recorded 40-Hz EEG density was obtained from the middle of the O1-P3-T5 and O2-P4-T6 triangles. As the hypnotic induction proceeded, high hypnotizable Ss exhibited a shift to greater right-hemisphere activity as compared to a waking-state rest condition. In contrast, low hypnotizable Ss, showed a reduction in left- and right-hemisphere activity. No differences between groups for SHSS:C ideomotor items were observed. A main effect for Hypnotizability among SHSS:C imaginative items was found. A Hypnotizability x Hemisphere x Trial interaction was found for both sensory distortion and imaginative SHSS:C items. A comparison was made between low versus high hypnotizable Ss of 40-Hz EEG activity while they passed the same item. The results of these comparisons indicate that differences in brain activity might be partially related to the differences between experiencing a hypnotic suggestion or failing to do so. Significant relationships between 40-Hz EEG production and hypnotizability and 40-Hz EEG production and level of amnesia were also found.

  19. Coherent 40-Hz Oscillation Characterizes Dream State in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo; Ribary, Urs

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic recording from five normal human adults demonstrates large 40-Hz coherent magnetic activity in the awake and in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep states that is very reduced during delta sleep (deep sleep characterized by delta waves in the electroencephalogram). This 40-Hz magnetic oscillation has been shown to be reset by sensory stimuli in the awake state. Such resetting is not observed during REM or delta sleep. The 40 Hz in REM sleep is characterized, as is that in the awake state, by a fronto-occiptal phase shift over the head. This phase shift has a maximum duration of thickapprox12-13 msec. Because 40-Hz oscillation is seen in wakefulness and in dreaming, we propose it to be a correlate of cognition, probably resultant from coherent 40-Hz resonance between thalamocortical-specific and nonspecific loops. Moreover, we proposed that the specific loops give the content of cognition, and a nonspecific loop gives the temporal binding required for the unity of cognitive experience.

  20. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995: 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mele, Gary D.; Holley, Daniel C.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic applied sound (74 to 79 dB, SPL) with octave band center frequencies of either 8, 16 or 32 kHz for up to 60 days. Control cages had ambient sound levels of about 62 dB (SPL). Groups of rats (test vs. control; N=9 per group) were euthanized after 0. 5. 14, 30, and 60 days. On each euthanasia day, objective evaluation of their physiology and behavior was performed using a Stress Assessment Battery (SAB) of measures. In addition, rat hearing was assessed using the brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAER) method after 60 days of exposure. No statistically significant differences in mean daily food use could be attributed to the presence of the applied test sound. Test rats used 5% more water than control rats. In the 8 kHz and 32 kHz tests this amount was statistically significant(P less than .05). This is a minor difference of questionable physiological significance. However, it may be an indication of a small reaction to the constant applied sound. Across all test frequencies, day 5 test rats had 6% larger spleens than control rats. No other body or organ weight differences were found to be statistically significant with respect to the application of sound. This spleen effect may be a transient adaptive process related to adaptation to the constant applied noise. No significant test effect on differential white blood cell counts could be demonstrated. One group demonstrated a low eosinophil count (16 kHz experiment, day 14 test group). However this was highly suspect. Across all test frequencies studied, day 5 test rats had 17% fewer total leukocytes than day 5 control rats. Sound exposed test rats exhibited 44% lower plasma corticosterone concentrations than did control rats. Note that the plasma corticosterone concentration was lower in the sound exposed test animals than the control animals in every instance (frequency exposure and number of days exposed).

  1. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation.

  2. Man and Environment for the Intermediate Grades; A Curriculum Guide for Environmental Studies for Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Environmental Education, Miami, FL.

    This curriculum guide consists of environmental studies modules for grades 4-8. The curriculum, which is organized around major concepts, is intended to serve as a guide for program development and as a framework for compiling and sharing ideas on methods and application on a national basis. Each module may be utilized as an integral part of the…

  3. Thermographic detection of fatigue damage of pressure vessel steels at 1,000 Hz and 20 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Wang, H.; Jiang, L.; Yang, B.; Huang, J.Y.; Kuo, R.C.; Huang, J.G.

    2000-01-31

    Fatigue behavior is strongly affected by the environment, materials, and loading conditions. The process of fatigue can be categorized into three stages: crack initiation, growth, and final fracture. Nondestruction evaluation (NDE) of fatigue damage is of critical importance for life assessments and structural integrity evaluations. Several NDE methods, including ultrasonics, acoustic emission, and thermography, have been used to monitor fatigue damage. However, relatively little work has been conducted to assess fatigue characteristics using thermographic infrared techniques. In this paper, a thermographic infrared imaging system was used to detect the heat conditions of fatigued pressure vessel steels at 1,000 Hz and 20 Hz. Moreover, the fatigue behavior has been investigated at 1,000 Hz using an advanced electrohydraulic machine.

  4. Syllabic (~2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (~1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (~2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of “fluctuation” range (~1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (~2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. PMID:24035819

  5. Comparison of the Effects of 1 Hz and 20 Hz rTMS on Motor Recovery in Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul; Choi, Hee Eun; Lee, Byeong-Ju; Lee, Ki Hoon; Lim, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the low frequency (1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with high frequency (20 Hz) rTMS on motor functional improvement of the affected upper extremity in subacute stroke patients. Methods Forty patients with subacute ischemic stroke participated in this study. The first group received 10 sessions of 20 Hz rTMS at ipsilesional M1 area and the other group received 10 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS at contralesional M1 area. Motor training of the hemiparetic hand was conducted after each rTMS train. All the patients received conventional occupational therapy immediately after each rTMS session. Manual function test (MFT), Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Brunnstrom recovery stage, and grip strength were used to assess motor function before, at the end of, and one month after the last session of rTMS. Results No adverse side effects were reported during the course of the experiment using rTMS. No significant difference in motor function of the affected upper extremity was observed between the two groups before rTMS. Significant improvements in MFT, FMS, MBI, and Brunnstrom stage were observed in the both groups at the end of the last rTMS session and one month later (p<0.05). No significant difference was found between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion There was no significant difference in motor function of the affected upper extremity between 1 Hz and 20 Hz rTMS during the subacute period of ischemic stroke. Thus, we cannot conclude which has a greater effect. PMID:25379487

  6. Nondeletional alpha-thalassemia: first description of alpha Hph alpha and alpha Nco alpha mutations in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Colomer, D; Aymerich, M; Pujades, A; Vives-Corrons, J L

    1996-07-01

    Several different deletions underlie the molecular basis of alpha-thalassemia. The most common alpha-thalassemia determinant in Spain is the rightward deletion (-alpha 3.7). To our knowledge, however, no cases of alpha-thalassemia due to nondeletional mutations have so far been described in this particular Mediterranean area. Here, we report the existence of nondeletional forms of alpha-thalassemia in ten Spanish families. The alpha 2-globin gene was characterized in ten unrelated patients and their relatives only when the presence of deletional alpha-thalassemia was ruled out. The alpha 2-globin gene analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction enzyme analysis or by allelespecific priming. This allowed the identification of a 5-base pair (bp) deletion at the donor site of IVS I (alpha Hph alpha) in 9 cases and the alpha 2 initiation codon mutation (alpha Nco alpha) in one case. Although these alpha 2-globin gene mutations are found in other mediterranean areas, our results demonstrate their presence in the Spanish population and suggest that the alpha Hph alpha/alpha alpha genotype is probably the most common nondeletional form of alpha-thalassemia in Spain.

  7. High-frequency (1000 Hz) tympanometry in normal neonates.

    PubMed

    Kei, Joseph; Allison-Levick, Julie; Dockray, Jacqueline; Harrys, Rachel; Kirkegard, Christina; Wong, Janet; Maurer, Marion; Hegarty, Jayne; Young, June; Tudehope, David

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of high frequency (1000 Hz) acoustic admittance results obtained from normal neonates were described in this study. Participants were 170 healthy neonates (96 boys and 74 girls) aged between 1 and 6 days (mean = 3.26 days, SD = 0.92). Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and 226 Hz and 1000 Hz probe tone tympanograms were obtained from the participants using a Madsen Capella OAE/middle ear analyser. The results showed that of the 170 neonates, 34 were not successfully tested in both ears, 14 failed the TEOAE screen in one or both ears, and 122 (70 boys, 52 girls) passed the TEOAE screen in both ears and also maintained an acceptable probe seal during tympanometry. The 1000 Hz tympanometric data for the 122 neonates (244 ears) showed a single-peaked tympanogram in 225 ears (92.2%), a flat-sloping tympanogram in 14 ears (5.7%), a double-peaked tympanogram in 3 ears (1.2%) and other unusual shapes in 2 ears (0.8%). There was a significant ear effect, with right ears showing significantly higher mean peak compensated static admittance and tympanometric width, but lower mean acoustic admittance at +200 daPa and gradient than left ears. No significant gender effects or its interaction with ear were found. The normative tympanometric data derived from this cohort may serve as a guide for detecting middle ear dysfunction in neonates.

  8. High Sensitivity Optomechanical Reference Accelerometer over 10 kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-05

    measurements and observations in seismology and gravimetry. 2 High sensitivity optomechanical reference accele Approved for public release; distribution is...and this category of accelerometers, outlining a path for high sensitivity reference acceleration measurements and observations in seismology and...Traditional applications require either high acceleration resolution, such as in gravimetry or seismology well below 100 Hz, or large bandwidths, as for

  9. Evaluation of the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection

    PubMed Central

    Panatto, Donatella; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara; Icardi, Giancarlo; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection. The review was conducted in accordance with the standards of the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” guidelines. The following databases were accessed: ISI/Web of Knowledge (WoS), MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, ProQuest, the Cochrane Library and EconLit. Specific literature on health economics was also manually inspected. Thirty-three studies were included. The quality of the studies assessed in accordance with the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist was good. All studies evaluated direct costs, apart from one which dealt only with indirect costs. Indirect costs were evaluated by 12 studies. The economic burden of HZ has increased over time. HZ management and drug prescriptions generate the highest direct costs. While increasing age, co-morbidities and drug treatment were found to predict higher direct costs, being employed was correlated with higher indirect costs, and thus with the onset age of the disease. Despite some differences among the selected studies, particularly with regard to indirect costs, all concur that HZ is a widespread disease which has a heavy social and economic burden. PMID:25483704

  10. Comparison of ultrasonic degradation rates constants of methylene blue at 22.8 kHz, 127 kHz, and 490 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Techniques such as solvent extraction, incineration, chemical dehalogenation, and biodegradation have been investigated for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds. We found ultrasound to be an attractive technology for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in water. However, the effects of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate constants were not investigated quantitatively. In this study, the degradation process of a model for hazardous organic compound methylene blue was investigated using ultrasonic irradiation. The study focused on the effects of ultrasonic frequency and ultrasonic power on the degradation rate constant. The apparent degradation rate constants were estimated based on time dependence of methylene blue concentration assuming pseudo-first-order kinetics for the decomposition. A linear relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and ultrasonic power was identified. In addition, the apparent degradation rate constants at frequencies of 127 and 490 kHz were much larger than those at 22.8 kHz. A relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and the sonochemical efficiency value (SE value) was also found. Based on these results, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue based on the ultrasonic power and the SE value is proposed in this study.

  11. Somatosensory Anticipatory Alpha Activity Increases to Suppress Distracting Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haegens, Saskia; Luther, Lisa; Jensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Effective processing of sensory input in daily life requires attentional selection and amplification of relevant input and, just as importantly, attenuation of irrelevant information. It has been proposed that top-down modulation of oscillatory alpha band activity (8-14 Hz) serves to allocate resources to various regions, depending on task…

  12. Tympanometry in Infants: A Study of the Sensitivity and Specificity of 226-Hz and 1,000-Hz Probe Tones

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Michele Picanço; Costa, Nayara Thais de Oliveira; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction For infants under 6 months, the literature recommends 1,000-Hz tympanometry, which has a greater sensitivity for the correct identification of middle ear disorders in this population. Objective To systematically analyze national and international publications found in electronic databases that used tympanometry with 226-Hz and 1,000-Hz probe tones. Data Synthesis Initially, we identified 36 articles in the SciELO database, 11 in the Latin American and Caribbean Literature on the Health Sciences (LILACS) database, 199 in MEDLINE, 0 in the Cochrane database, 16 in ISI Web of Knowledge, and 185 in the Scopus database. We excluded 433 articles because they did not fit the selection criteria, leaving 14 publications that were analyzed in their entirety. Conclusions The 1,000-Hz tone test has greater sensitivity and specificity for the correct identification of tympanometric curve changes. However, it is necessary to clarify the doubts that still exist regarding the use of this test frequency. Improved methods for rating curves, standardization of normality criteria, and the types of curves found in infants should be addressed. PMID:25992044

  13. The contribution of different frequency bands of fMRI data to the correlation with EEG alpha rhythm.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Zhichao; Xu, Lele; Zuo, Tian; Xie, Dongliang; Zhang, Jiacai; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia

    2014-01-16

    Alpha rhythm is a prominent EEG rhythm observed during resting state and is thought to be related to multiple cognitive processes. Previous simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG)/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated that alpha rhythm is associated with blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in several different functional networks. How these networks influence alpha rhythm respectively is unclear. The low-frequency oscillations (LFO) in spontaneous BOLD activity are thought to contribute to the local correlations in resting state. Recent studies suggested that either LFO or other components of fMRI can be further divided into sub-components on different frequency bands. We hypothesized that those BOLD sub-components characterized the contributions of different brain networks to alpha rhythm. To test this hypothesis, EEG and fMRI data were simultaneously recorded from 17 human subjects performing an eyes-close resting state experiment. EEG alpha rhythm was correlated with the filtered fMRI time courses at different frequency bands (0.01-0.08 Hz, 0.08-0.25 Hz, 0.01-0.027 Hz, 0.027-0.073 Hz, 0.073-0.198 Hz, and 0.198-0.25 Hz). The results demonstrated significant relations between alpha rhythm and the BOLD signals in the visual network and in the attention network at LFO band, especially at the very low frequency band (0.01-0.027 Hz).

  14. Pre-stimulus alpha power affects vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by noxious stimuli.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Le Pera, Domenica; Marzano, Nicola; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2008-03-28

    It is well known that scalp potentials evoked by nonpainful visual and auditory stimuli are enhanced in amplitude when preceded by pre-stimulus low-amplitude alpha rhythms. This study tested the hypothesis that the same holds for the amplitude of vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by brief noxious laser stimuli, an issue of interest for clinical perspective. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes during laser noxious stimulation. The artifact-free vertex N2-P2 complex was spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Pre-stimulus alpha power was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subject's individual alpha frequency peak (i.e. about 6-8Hz for alpha 1, 8-10Hz for alpha 2 and 10-12Hz for alpha 3 sub-band). Individual EEG single trials were divided in two sub-groups. The strong-alpha sub-group (high band power) included halfway of all EEG single trials, namely those having the highest pre-stimulus alpha power. Weak-alpha sub-group (low band power) included the remaining trials. Averaging procedure provided laser evoked potentials for both trial sub-groups. No significant effect was found for alpha 1 and alpha 2 sub-bands. Conversely, compared to strong-alpha 3 sub-group, weak-alpha 3 sub-group showed vertex N2-P2 potentials having significantly higher amplitude (p<0.05). These results extend to the later phases of pain processing systems the notion that generation mechanisms of pre-stimulus alpha rhythms and (laser) evoked potentials are intrinsically related and subjected to fluctuating "noise". That "noise" could explain the trial-by-trial variability of laser evoked potentials and perception.

  15. Seismicity Pattern Changes before the M = 4.8 Aeolian Archipelago (Italy) Earthquake of August 16, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the seismicity patterns associated with an M = 4.8 earthquake recorded in the Aeolian Archipelago on 16, August, 2010, by means of the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. This earthquake triggered landslides at Lipari; a rock fall on the flanks of the Vulcano, Lipari, and Salina islands, and some damages to the village of Lipari. The RTL algorithm is widely used for investigating precursory seismicity changes before large and moderate earthquakes. We examined both the spatial and temporal characteristics of seismicity changes in the Aeolian Archipelago region before the M = 4.8 earthquake. The results obtained reveal 6-7 months of seismic quiescence which started about 15 months before the earthquake. The spatial distribution shows an extensive area characterized by seismic quiescence that suggests a relationship between quiescence and the Aeolian Archipelago regional tectonics. PMID:24511288

  16. Seismicity pattern changes before the M = 4.8 Aeolian Archipelago (Italy) earthquake of August 16, 2010.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Salvatore; Laudani, Antonino; Mangiagli, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the seismicity patterns associated with an M = 4.8 earthquake recorded in the Aeolian Archipelago on 16, August, 2010, by means of the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. This earthquake triggered landslides at Lipari; a rock fall on the flanks of the Vulcano, Lipari, and Salina islands, and some damages to the village of Lipari. The RTL algorithm is widely used for investigating precursory seismicity changes before large and moderate earthquakes. We examined both the spatial and temporal characteristics of seismicity changes in the Aeolian Archipelago region before the M = 4.8 earthquake. The results obtained reveal 6-7 months of seismic quiescence which started about 15 months before the earthquake. The spatial distribution shows an extensive area characterized by seismic quiescence that suggests a relationship between quiescence and the Aeolian Archipelago regional tectonics.

  17. Comparison of coupling of humans to electric and magnetic fields with frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Kaune, W.T.; Guttman, J.L.; Kavet, R.

    1997-03-01

    Recent laboratory and epidemiological results have stimulated interest in the hypothesis that human beings may exhibit biological responses to magnetic and/or electric field transients with frequencies in the range between 100 Hz and 100 kHz. Much can be learned about the response of a system to a transient stimulation by understanding its response to sinusoidal disturbances over the entire frequency range of interest. Thus, the main effort of this paper was to compare the strengths of the electric fields induced in homogeneous ellipsoidal models by uniform 100 Hz through 100 kHz electric and magnetic fields. Over this frequency range, external electric fields of about 25--2,000 V/m (depending primarily on the orientation of the body relative to the field) are required to induce electric fields inside models of adults and children that are similar in strength to those induced by an external 1 {mu}T magnetic field. Additional analysis indicates that electric fields induced by uniform external electric and magnetic fields and by the nonuniform electric and magnetic fields produced by idealized point sources will not differ by more than a factor of two until the sources are brought close to the body. Published data on electric and magnetic field transients in residential environments indicate that, for most field orientations, the magnetic component will induce stronger electric fields inside adults and children than the electric component. This conclusion is also true for the currents induced in humans by typical levels of 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in US residences.

  18. Summaries of the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, March 4-8, 1996. Volume 2; AIRSAR Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yunjin (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the summaries for the Sixth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop, held in Pasadena, California, on March 4-8, 1996. The main workshop is divided into two smaller workshops as follows: The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) workshop, on March 4-6. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 1. The Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) workshop, on March 6-8. The summaries for this workshop appear in Volume 2.

  19. An effective science tutorial model for at-risk, academically unacceptable students in grades 4 -- 8: A Delphi study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, J. Kathleen

    This study explored science-specific strategies and materials that might be effective components in a Response to Intervention (RTI) science tutorial model for at-risk, academically unsuccessful students in grades 4 -- 8. Through an iterative Delphi process of responding to three rounds of questionnaires, a nationwide panel of 63 experts in the field of science education identified and came to consensus on 44 effective strategies and six instructional materials and types of equipment for supplemental instruction in science, resulting in a three tier RTI tutorial model. This model provides an initial guide for science educators in applicable practices for each tier of the RTI framework, and was developed to assist administrators, program managers, and science educators in developing effective, systemic RTI instructional programming for science education in grades 4 -- 8, and may provide an additional planning tool in determining evidence-based practices that may lead to achievement for at-risk, academically unsuccessful students in grades 4 -- 8. Future research on specific intervention strategies within science and their effects on science achievement are needed, as well as a further examination to test the efficacy of the model on rates of science achievement for at-risk, academically unsuccessful students.

  20. Cortical Alpha Oscillations Predict Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Smith, Michael L.; Kadis, Darren S.; Moore, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding speech in noise (SiN) is a complex task involving sensory encoding and cognitive resources including working memory and attention. Previous work has shown that brain oscillations, particularly alpha rhythms (8–12 Hz) play important roles in sensory processes involving working memory and attention. However, no previous study has examined brain oscillations during performance of a continuous speech perception test. The aim of this study was to measure cortical alpha during attentive listening in a commonly used SiN task (digits-in-noise, DiN) to better understand the neural processes associated with “top-down” cognitive processing in adverse listening environments. We recruited 14 normal hearing (NH) young adults. DiN speech reception threshold (SRT) was measured in an initial behavioral experiment. EEG activity was then collected: (i) while performing the DiN near SRT; and (ii) while attending to a silent, close-caption video during presentation of identical digit stimuli that the participant was instructed to ignore. Three main results were obtained: (1) during attentive (“active”) listening to the DiN, a number of distinct neural oscillations were observed (mainly alpha with some beta; 15–30 Hz). No oscillations were observed during attention to the video (“passive” listening); (2) overall, alpha event-related synchronization (ERS) of central/parietal sources were observed during active listening when data were grand averaged across all participants. In some participants, a smaller magnitude alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD), originating in temporal regions, was observed; and (3) when individual EEG trials were sorted according to correct and incorrect digit identification, the temporal alpha ERD was consistently greater on correctly identified trials. No such consistency was observed with the central/parietal alpha ERS. These data demonstrate that changes in alpha activity are specific to listening conditions. To our

  1. Cortical Alpha Oscillations Predict Speech Intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Smith, Michael L; Kadis, Darren S; Moore, David R

    2017-01-01

    Understanding speech in noise (SiN) is a complex task involving sensory encoding and cognitive resources including working memory and attention. Previous work has shown that brain oscillations, particularly alpha rhythms (8-12 Hz) play important roles in sensory processes involving working memory and attention. However, no previous study has examined brain oscillations during performance of a continuous speech perception test. The aim of this study was to measure cortical alpha during attentive listening in a commonly used SiN task (digits-in-noise, DiN) to better understand the neural processes associated with "top-down" cognitive processing in adverse listening environments. We recruited 14 normal hearing (NH) young adults. DiN speech reception threshold (SRT) was measured in an initial behavioral experiment. EEG activity was then collected: (i) while performing the DiN near SRT; and (ii) while attending to a silent, close-caption video during presentation of identical digit stimuli that the participant was instructed to ignore. Three main results were obtained: (1) during attentive ("active") listening to the DiN, a number of distinct neural oscillations were observed (mainly alpha with some beta; 15-30 Hz). No oscillations were observed during attention to the video ("passive" listening); (2) overall, alpha event-related synchronization (ERS) of central/parietal sources were observed during active listening when data were grand averaged across all participants. In some participants, a smaller magnitude alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD), originating in temporal regions, was observed; and (3) when individual EEG trials were sorted according to correct and incorrect digit identification, the temporal alpha ERD was consistently greater on correctly identified trials. No such consistency was observed with the central/parietal alpha ERS. These data demonstrate that changes in alpha activity are specific to listening conditions. To our knowledge, this is the

  2. Calcium protects differentiating neuroblastoma cells during 50 Hz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Tonini, R; Baroni, M D; Masala, E; Micheletti, M; Ferroni, A; Mazzanti, M

    2001-11-01

    Despite growing concern about electromagnetic radiation, the interaction between 50- to 60-Hz fields and biological structures remains obscure. Epidemiological studies have failed to prove a significantly correlation between exposure to radiation fields and particular pathologies. We demonstrate that a 50- to 60-Hz magnetic field interacts with cell differentiation through two opposing mechanisms: it antagonizes the shift in cell membrane surface charges that occur during the early phases of differentiation and it modulates hyperpolarizing K channels by increasing intracellular Ca. The simultaneous onset of both mechanisms prevents alterations in cell differentiation. We propose that cells are normally protected against electromagnetic insult. Pathologies may arise, however, if intracellular Ca regulation or K channel activation malfunctions.

  3. Sounds in the Ocean at 1-100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Andrew, Rex K.; Odom, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  4. Sounds in the ocean at 1-100 Hz.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D; Stafford, Kathleen M; Andrew, Rex K; Odom, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  5. Modeling a 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A257 378 /7 Modeling A 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System by Kenneth Alan Malmquist B.S., Drexel University, Philadelphia (1985) Submitted in...Massachusetts Institute of Technology/ Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 92-28033 Vll1 Nlf • 92 BLANK PAR Modeling A 300 kIz Bathymetric Sonar System by...Deep Submergence Laboratory has developed a family of calibrated high frequency bathymetric sonar systems for underwater survey. It is useful to have a

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging at frequencies below 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Körber, Rainer; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Fedele, Tommaso; Albrecht, Hans-Helge; Mario Cassará, Antonino; Hartwig, Stefan; Trahms, Lutz; Haase, Jürgen; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Within the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) community the trend is going to higher and higher magnetic fields, ranging from 1.5 T to 7 T, corresponding to Larmor frequencies of 63.8-298 MHz. Since for high-field MRI the magnetization increases with the applied magnetic field, the signal-to-noise-ratio increases as well, thus enabling higher image resolutions. On the other hand, MRI is possible also at ultra-low magnetic fields, as was shown by different groups. The goal of our development was to reach a Larmor frequency range of the low-field MRI system corresponding to the frequency range of human brain activities ranging from near zero-frequency (near-DC) to over 1 kHz. Here, first 2D MRI images of phantoms taken at Larmor frequencies of 100 Hz and 731 Hz will be shown and discussed. These frequencies are examples of brain activity triggered by electrostimulation of the median nerve. The method will allow the magnetic fields of the brain currents to influence the magnetic resonance image, and thus lead to a direct functional imaging modality of neuronal currents.

  7. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-03

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  8. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  9. Microwave differential dilatometer measures 10 - 12 m, at 1 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschero, G.; Mango, F.; Gizdulich, P.

    1996-12-01

    To check and measure the converse piezoelectric effect in bone samples, we had to detect displacements in the range of 1-100 pm with three kinds of restrictions: (1) the biological nature of the samples imposes severe limits in selecting a suitable device and method; (2) such a method has to take into account some clinical applications to which the experiment is devoted; (3) the piezoelectric behavior of bone samples is particularly interesting at low frequencies, around 1 Hz. For such reasons we modified an existing dilatometer based on a microwave differential spectrometer. A 14 GHz klystron, linearly modulated in frequency by a triangular 50 Hz voltage applied to the repeller, is connected, via magic T, to two identical cavities tunable around 14 GHz and whose resonance curves are recorded by crystal detectors. When one of the two cavities changes its height according to the length variations of the sample, its resonance frequency varies resulting in a shift of the resonant curve with respect to the resonance curve of the other cavity acting as reference. The comparison between the cavities' responses is performed by a pulse technique transforming the frequency shifts into time intervals, that are then converted into dc voltages. The differential character of this measurement avoids the need for the microwave source stabilization. The relative shift in frequency is measured with an accuracy better than 500 Hz. This accuracy allows us to measure displacements smaller than 7 nm in the cavity's height. After 2 h of warmup, thanks to the differential arrangement of the system, thermal or other drifts are not detectable within a lapse of time of 12 h. This feature allows coherent signal averaging over long periods. With a piezoelectric ceramic stack moving 100 pm in square wave fashion at 50 mHz we found that the signal to noise ratio was 20 dB after 1000 cycles of signal averaging, when our bandpass filter was tuned at 1 Hz. In conclusion, this system can detect

  10. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  11. L- and M-cone input to 12Hz and 30Hz flicker ERGs across the human retina.

    PubMed

    Challa, N K; McKeefry, D; Parry, N R A; Kremers, J; Murray, I J; Panorgias, A

    2010-09-01

    We recorded L- and M-cone isolating ERGs from human subjects using a silent substitution technique at temporal rates of 12 and 30 Hz. These frequencies isolate the activity of cone-opponent and non-opponent post-receptoral mechanisms, respectively. ERGs were obtained using a sequence of stimuli with different spatial configurations comprising; (1) circular stimuli of different sizes which increased in 10° steps up to 70°diameter, or (2) annular stimuli with a 70° outer diameter but with different sized central ablations from 10° up to 60°. L- and M-cone isolating ERGs were obtained from five colour normal subjects using a DTL fibre electrode. Fourier analysis of the ERGs was performed and we measured the amplitude of the first harmonic of the response. For 12 Hz ERGs the L:M cone response amplitude ratio (L:M(ERG)) was close to unity and remained stable irrespective of the spatial configuration of the stimulus. The maintenance of this balanced ratio points to the existence of cone selective input across the human retina for the L-M cone opponent mechanism. For 30 Hz the L:M(ERG) ratio was greater than unity but varied depending upon which region of the retina was being stimulated. This variation we consider to be a consequence of the global response properties of M-cone ERGs rather than representing a real variation in L:M cone ratios across the retina.

  12. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  13. Production of glycosylated physiologically "normal" human alpha 1-antitrypsin by mouse fibroblasts modified by insertion of a human alpha 1-antitrypsin cDNA using a retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Garver, R I; Chytil, A; Karlsson, S; Fells, G A; Brantly, M L; Courtney, M; Kantoff, P W; Nienhuis, A W; Anderson, W F; Crystal, R G

    1987-01-01

    Alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder characterized by reduced serum levels of alpha 1AT, resulting in destruction of the lower respiratory tract by neutrophil elastase. As an approach to augment alpha 1AT levels in this disorder with physiologically normal human alpha 1AT, we have integrated a full-length normal human alpha 1AT cDNA into the genome of mouse fibroblasts. To accomplish this, the retroviral vector N2 was modified by inserting the simian virus 40 early promoter followed by the alpha 1AT cDNA. Southern analysis demonstrated that the intact cDNA was present in the genome of selected clones of the transfected murine fibroblasts psi 2 and infected NIH 3T3. The clones produced three mRNA transcripts (5.8, 4.8, and 2.4 kilobases) containing human alpha 1AT sequences, secreted an alpha 1AT molecule recognized by an anti-human alpha 1AT antibody, with the same molecular mass (52 kDa) as normal human alpha 1AT and that complexed with and inhibited human neutrophil elastase. The psi 2 produced alpha 1AT was glycosylated, and when infused intravenously into mice, it had a serum half-life similar to normal alpha 1AT purified from human plasma and markedly longer than that of nonglycosylated human alpha 1AT cDNA-directed yeast-produced alpha 1AT. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a retroviral vector to insert the normal human alpha 1AT cDNA into non-alpha 1AT-producing cells, resulting in the synthesis and secretion of physiologically "normal" human alpha 1AT. Images PMID:3029759

  14. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  15. Design and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sam, R.C.; Yeh, J.J.; Leslie, K.R.; Rapoport, W.R.

    1988-06-01

    The design, analysis, and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser are described. Built as the wavelength selective laser for a molecular laser isotope separation program, the laser has to satisfy specifications on its tuning band, linewidth, output energy, temporal behavior, and repetition rate required by the process. The key design feature is the use of a tandem rod oscillator with concave curvature on rod ends for thermal lensing compensation. A model was developed to project the stability range and beam quality relative to repetition rate. The performance results of a delivered system are presented and future developments are discussed.

  16. 1-kHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu

    2016-07-01

    A femtosecond Raman laser utilising compressed hydrogen is experimentally investigated under pumping by radiation from a 1-kHz-repetition-rate Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of double-pulse pumping, the conditions are determined, which correspond to the minimal energy dispersion of Stokes pulses. The optical scheme is realised, which is capable of ensuring the long-term stability of the average power of the first Stokes component with a variation of less than 2%. The Stokes pulses are produced with a pulse duration of 60 fs and energy of 0.26 mJ at a conversion efficiency of 14%.

  17. The kinetics of T cell antigen receptor expression by subgroups of CD4+8+ thymocytes: delineation of CD4+8+3(2+) thymocytes as post- selection intermediates leading to mature T cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Cortical thymocytes from adult mice, separated on the basis of coexpression of CD4 and CD8 or of binding of high levels of peanut agglutinin (PNA), were subdivided according to the level of expression of the T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex. The incidence of dividing cells in the resultant subpopulations was determined by DNA staining. Precursor-product relationships and the timing of TCR-CD3 acquisition were studied using continuous in vivo [3H]TdR labeling and radioautography. The extent of intrathymic selection for TCR specificity in the subpopulations was determined from the incidence of cells bearing V beta 6 or V beta 17a in different mouse strains. The majority of dividing CD4+8+ blast cells expressed extremely low levels of TCR-CD3, indicating that TCR expression and specificity selection generally occurred after division ceased. The [3H]TdR-labeling studies indicated that postdivision TCR expression was rapid, and that those nondividing cortical thymocytes which had not expressed significant levels of TCR by day 1, remained extremely low or negative for their entire 3.6-d lifespan. Small cortical thymocytes which expressed moderate levels of TCR-CD3, were predominantly an unselected population with a lifespan of 3.8 d. A small subgroup of CD4+8+ PNA+ cortical thymocytes expressing high levels of TCR-CD3 was identified as a nondividing intermediate between the small cortical thymocytes expressing moderate levels of TCR and mature medullary thymocytes. These intermediates showed a 1-d lag in [3H]TdR labeling, then a 3.4-d transit time. The cell flux through this intermediate subpopulation was approximately 10(6) cells/d, similar to the rate of turnover of mature thymocytes; thus, although only 3-4% of thymocytes progressed to this intermediate state, once reaching it most then progressed to full maturity. In accordance with this, the incidence of the V beta selection markers within the intermediate subpopulation indicated that both positive and negative

  18. The design and fabrication of multiple dichroic beamsplitters for the MIRI spectrometer (4.8-29μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Martyn; Hawkins, Gary; Olofsson, Goran

    2004-10-01

    The spectrometer sub-system of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) contains four channels which spectrally multiplex the incoming radiation. This incident radiation, spanning a wavelength range from 4.8 to 28.8μm is spectrally divided between the channels using sets of three dichroics combined in series along the optical trains. The four channels, with overlapping wavelengths 4.8-7.8, 7.4-11.9, 11.4-18.3 and 18.3-28.8μm, are in-turn each split into three wavelength ranges to provide the required resolving power with the available detector pixels. This splitting of the wavelengths within each channel is achieved using three separate sets of dichroics and diffraction gratings, mounted on two wheels. This paper describes the design of the dichroics together with a spectral performance model developed to simulate the system spectral throughput for each of the four channels of the MIRI instrument. Details of the spectral design, manufacture, testing and mounting of the dichroics are presented together with the opto-mechanical layout of the instrument.

  19. A new photosystem II reaction center component (4.8 kDa protein) encoded by chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, M; Inoue, Y

    1988-12-05

    The photosystem II reaction center complex, so-called D1-D2-cytochrome b-559 complex, isolated from higher plants contains a new component of about 4.8 kDa [(1988) Plant Cell Physiol. 29, 1233-1239]. The partial amino acid sequence of this component from spinach was determined after release of N-terminal blockage. The determined sequence matched an open reading frame (ORF36) of the chloroplast genome from tobacco and liverwort, which is located downstream from the psbK gene and forms an operon with psbK. The predicted product consists of 36 amino acid residues and has a single membrane-spanning segment. High homology between the tobacco and liverwort genes, and its presence in the reaction center complex suggest an important role for this component in the photosystem II complex. Since this gene corresponds to a part of the formerly designated psbI gene, we propose to revise the definition of psbI as the gene encoding the 4.8 kDa reaction center component.

  20. Slip-stacking Dynamics and the 20 Hz Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly doubles the proton intensity. The Proton Improvement Plan II intensity upgrades require a reduction in slip-stacking losses by approximately a factor of 2. We study the single-particle dynamics that determine the stability of slip-stacking particles. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We show the particle loss as a function of time. We calculate the injection efficiency as a function of longitudinal emittance and aspect-ratio. We demonstrate that the losses from RF single particle dynamics can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on beam parameters) by upgrading the Fermilab Booster from a 15-Hz cycle-rate to a 20-Hz cycle-rate. We recommend a change in injection scheme to eliminate the need for a greater momentum aperture in the Fermilab Recycler.

  1. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  2. Theoretical investigation of a novel high density cage compound 4,8,11,14,15-pentanitro-2,6,9,13-tetraoxa-4,8,11,14,15-pentaazaheptacyclo[5.5.1.1(3,11).1(5,9)] pentadecane.

    PubMed

    Lin, He; Zhu, Shun-guan; Zhang, Lin; Peng, Xin-hua; Chen, Peng-yuan; Li, Hong-zhen

    2013-03-01

    A novel polynitro cage compound 4,8,11,14,15-pentanitro-2,6,9,13-tetraoxa-4,8,11,14,15-pentaazaheptacyclo [5.5.1.1(3,11).1(5,9)]pentadecane(PNTOPAHP) has been designed and investigated at the DFT-B3LYP/6-31(d) level. Properties, such as electronic structure, IR spectrum, heat of formation, thermodynamic properties and crystal structure have been predicted. This compound is most likely to crystallize in C2/c space group, and the corresponding cell parameters are Z = 8, a = 29.78 Å, b = 6.42 Å, c = 32.69 Å, α = 90.00°, β = 151.05°, γ = 90.00° and ρ = 1.94 g/cm(3). In addition, the detonation velocity and pressure have also been calculated by the empirical Kamlet-Jacobs equation. As a result, the detonation velocity and pressure of this compound are 9.82 km/s, 44.67 GPa, respectively, a little higher than those of 4,10-dinitro-2,6,8,12-tetraoxa-4,10-diazaisowurtzitane(TEX, 9.28 km/s, 40.72 GPa). This compound has a comparable chemical stability to TEX, based on the N-NO(2) trigger bond length analysis. The bond dissociation energy ranges from 153.09 kJ mol(-1) to 186.04 kJ mol(-1), which indicates that this compound meets the thermal stability requirement as an exploitable HEDM.

  3. Structure and expression of elongation factor 1 alpha in tomato.

    PubMed Central

    Pokalsky, A R; Hiatt, W R; Ridge, N; Rasmussen, R; Houck, C M; Shewmaker, C K

    1989-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone, LeEF-1, has been isolated from tomato for the alpha subunit of elongation factor 1 (EF-1 alpha), a polypeptide which plays a central role in protein synthesis. The 448 amino acid protein encoded by this cDNA appears highly homologous to other EF-1 alpha s having a high degree of similarity (75-78%) to EF1 alpha previously described from both lower eukaryotes and animals. Southern analysis indicated that EF-1 alpha belongs to a small multigene family of 4-8 members in tomato. The pattern of expression of EF-1 alpha mRNA in various tomato tissues was analyzed by Northern analysis, in vitro translation and in situ hybridization. EF-1 alpha mRNA is an abundant species and higher levels of mRNA were found in developing tissues such as young leaves and green fruit compared to the mRNA levels observed in older tissues. The increased levels of EF-1 alpha mRNA therefore appear to correlate with higher levels of protein synthesis in developing tissues. Images PMID:2748335

  4. Individual differences in alpha frequency drive crossmodal illusory perception.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Roberto; Rees, Geraint; Romei, Vincenzo

    2015-01-19

    Perception routinely integrates inputs from different senses. Stimulus temporal proximity critically determines whether or not these inputs are bound together. Despite the temporal window of integration being a widely accepted notion, its neurophysiological substrate remains unclear. Many types of common audio-visual interactions occur within a time window of ∼100 ms. For example, in the sound-induced double-flash illusion, when two beeps are presented within ∼100 ms together with one flash, a second illusory flash is often perceived. Due to their intrinsic rhythmic nature, brain oscillations are one candidate mechanism for gating the temporal window of integration. Interestingly, occipital alpha band oscillations cycle on average every ∼100 ms, with peak frequencies ranging between 8 and 14 Hz (i.e., 120-60 ms cycle). Moreover, presenting a brief tone can phase-reset such oscillations in visual cortex. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the duration of each alpha cycle might provide the temporal unit to bind audio-visual events. Here, we first recorded EEG while participants performed the sound-induced double-flash illusion task and found positive correlation between individual alpha frequency (IAF) peak and the size of the temporal window of the illusion. Participants then performed the same task while receiving occipital transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), to modulate oscillatory activity either at their IAF or at off-peak alpha frequencies (IAF±2 Hz). Compared to IAF tACS, IAF-2 Hz and IAF+2 Hz tACS, respectively, enlarged and shrunk the temporal window of illusion, suggesting that alpha oscillations might represent the temporal unit of visual processing that cyclically gates perception and the neurophysiological substrate promoting audio-visual interactions.

  5. Synthesis, properties and formation of (RCp)Co- and (RCp)Rh-stabilized[4.8]3cyclacene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kornmayer, Stefan C; Hellbach, Björn; Rominger, Frank; Gleiter, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Metal-stabilized belts: A torus, 3, consisting of three four- and three eight-membered conjugated rings and stabilized by (RCp)Co- and (RCp)Rh- units, was generated by irradiation of [(RCp)Co(CO)(2)] and [(RCp)Rh(C(2)H(4))(2)], respectively, and 1.Eleven metal stabilized [4.8](3)cyclacene derivatives were synthesized. The substances were prepared in one-pot reactions by irradiation of a solution of 5,6,11,12-tetradehydro-dibenzo[a,e]cyclooctatetraene and the corresponding cobalt reagents or rhodium compounds. The resulting cyclacene derivatives reveal D(3h) symmetry in solution. In the solid state the hoop shaped systems crystallize in layers, which are intercalated with solvent layers. To unravel the mechanism of the one-pot reaction we isolated an intermediate, which shows almost planar cyclooctatetraene rings.

  6. Effects of Contralateral Noise on the 20-Hz Auditory Steady State Response - Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Usubuchi, Hajime; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years). The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation) applied to the contralateral ear. PMID:24915061

  7. Effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz auditory steady state response--magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Usubuchi, Hajime; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years). The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation) applied to the contralateral ear.

  8. Investigation on Two-Stage 300 HZ Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H. K.; Yang, L. W.; Hong, G. T.; Luo, E. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-04-01

    In the past few years, ultra-high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are becoming a research hotspot for their portability and compactness in aerospace and aviation applications. For preliminary research, a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler working at 300 Hz driven by a thermoacoustic engine is established to investigate the problems due to ultra high frequency, and several results have been derived in our early reports. In order to study the effect of thermal penetration depth, this paper presents the cooler adopting copper mesh as the regenerator, and comparison with stainless steel mesh is given. In addition, the influence of inertance tube on the lowest possible cooler temperature is also tested. Finally, we discuss the improvement for getting a lower temperature.

  9. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  10. EV drivetrain inverter with V/HZ optimization

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.; O'Neil, Walter K.

    1986-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A.C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A.C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A.C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a micro-computer which calculates optimized machine control data signals from various parametric inputs and during steady state load conditions, seeks a best V/HZ ratio to minimize battery current drawn (system losses) from a D.C. power source (32). In the preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  11. 17 CFR 4.8 - Exemption from certain requirements of rule 4.26 with respect to pools offered or sold in certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption from certain... under the Securities Act. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions...

  12. 17 CFR 4.8 - Exemption from certain requirements of rule 4.26 with respect to pools offered or sold in certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption from certain... under the Securities Act. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions...

  13. 17 CFR 4.8 - Exemption from certain requirements of rule 4.26 with respect to pools offered or sold in certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption from certain... under the Securities Act. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions...

  14. 17 CFR 4.8 - Exemption from certain requirements of rule 4.26 with respect to pools offered or sold in certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption from certain... under the Securities Act. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions...

  15. 17 CFR 4.8 - Exemption from certain requirements of rule 4.26 with respect to pools offered or sold in certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exemption from certain... under the Securities Act. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions...

  16. Comparing the Effects of 10-Hz Repetitive TMS on Tasks of Visual STM and Attention

    PubMed Central

    Emrich, Stephen M.; Johnson, Jeffrey S.; Sutterer, David W.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that visual STM (VSTM) and attention are tightly linked processes that share a number of neuroanatomical substrates. Here, we used repetitive TMS (rTMS) along with simultaneous EEG to examine the causal relationship between intraparietal sulcus functioning and performance on tasks of attention and VSTM. Participants performed two tasks in which they were required to attend to or remember colored items over a brief interval, with 10-Hz rTMS applied on some of the trials. Although no overall behavioral changes were observed across either task, rTMS did affect individual performance on both the attention and VSTM tasks in a manner that was predicted by individual differences in baseline performance. Furthermore, rTMS also affected ongoing oscillations in the alpha and beta bands, and these changes were related to the observed change in behavioral performance. The results reveal a causal relationship between intraparietal sulcus activity and tasks measuring both visual attention and VSTM. PMID:27626224

  17. Effects of alpha adrenoceptor blockade on renal nerve stimulation-induced norepinephrine release and vasoconstriction in the dog kidney.

    PubMed

    Hisa, H; Araki, S; Tomura, Y; Hayashi, Y; Satoh, S

    1989-02-01

    Effects of alpha-antagonists on renal norepinephrine (NE) release and vasoconstriction induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) were examined in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. RNS at 1,2 and 3 Hz (1 msec duration, 10-20 V) for 1 min decreased renal blood flow (RBF) and increased both the renal venous NE concentration (NEC) and calculated renal NE efflux (NEE). The RBF responses to 2 and 3 Hz RNS and NEC responses to 1, 2 and 3 Hz RNS during intrarenal arterial infusion of yohimbine (1.0 micrograms/kg/min) were greater than those observed during the control period. The NEE responses to 1 and 2 Hz RNS, but not to 3 Hz RNS, were also potentiated by the yohimbine infusion. Prazosin treatment (0.2 mg/kg i.v.) attenuated the RBF responses. Subsequent infusion of yohimbine potentiated both the NEC and NEE responses to 1, 2 and 3 Hz RNS in this alpha-1 adrenoceptor-blocked state. These results suggest that an alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated inhibitory mechanism of neural NE release exists in the dog kidney, which can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines to modulate the neural control of renal hemodynamics. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor-mediated renal vasoconstriction may affect the evaluation of neural NE release by NEE when high-frequency RNS is applied during inhibition of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated mechanism.

  18. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior.

  19. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  20. Geomechanical analysis of fluid injection and seismic fault slip for the Mw4.8 Timpson, Texas, earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqiang; Eichhubl, Peter; Gale, Julia F. W.

    2016-04-01

    An earthquake sequence that culminated in a Mw4.8 strike-slip event near Timpson, east Texas, the largest reported earthquake to date in that region, had previously been attributed to wastewater injection starting 17 months before the onset of recorded seismic activity. To test if this earthquake sequence can be attributed to wastewater injection, we conducted coupled poroelastic finite element simulations to assess the spatial and temporal evolution of pore pressure and stress field in the vicinity of the injection wells and to calculate the Coulomb failure stress on the seismogenic fault as a function of the permeability of the injection layer, fault orientation, fault permeability, and orientation and magnitude of the in situ stress. We find that injection-induced fault slip is plausible within the range of selected model input parameters, with slip favored by low reservoir permeability, low fault permeability, and a favorable orientation of the fault relative to the in situ stress state. Other combinations of equally plausible input parameters predict no slip within 96 months of simulated injection. Under most favorable boundary conditions for fault slip, fault slip occurs 7 months after the start of injection. Our results highlight the importance of detailed geomechanical site characterization for robust fault stability assessment prior to wastewater injection.

  1. ``IT'S ALL IN MOTION" -- A Hands-On Astronomy Workshop For Teachers of Grades 4-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, M. L.; Liu, C.; Conod, K.

    1999-12-01

    We describe the implementation and results of a four day hands-on astronomy workshop for in-service teachers of grades 4-8. This project, funded by a 1998-1999 IDEAS grant through the Space Telescope Science Institute, included 20 teacher participants from northern New Jersey. We used the workshop's unifying theme -- ``It's All in Motion!" -- to present to the teachers fundamental astrophysical concepts, relevant math and computer skills, and astronomy activities for their classrooms. We learned that there is a great need for this type of training, especially in New Jersey where there are new core curriculum standards and a newly mandated test in science for students in 4th and 8th grades. While the teachers learned content at different rates, the hands-on format gave them confidence to try some of these activities in their classes, especially among under-represented minorities. The most effective activities included human sundials, Sunspotters to measure the rotation of the Earth in 2 minutes, craters in the sand, group mini-reports from posters, speed calculations, physics and astronomy songs, the Ophiuchus Sculpture, a planetarium visit (especially needed in our urban area where the light pollution is severe), and Internet guided sites (See http://www.csam.montclair.edu/ west/ideasresources.html).

  2. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... frequency 5167.5 kHz. The frequency 5167.5 kHz may be used by any station authorized under this part...

  3. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  4. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  5. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  6. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  7. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  8. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  9. 20 kHz Space Station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.; Wolff, Fredrick J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station represents the next major U.S. commitment in space. The efficient delivery of power to multiple user loads is key to that success. In 1969, NASA Lewis Research Center began a series of studies with component and circuit developments that led to the high frequency bi-directional, four quadrant resonant driven converter. Additional studies and subsequent developments into the early 1980's have shown how the high frequency ac power system could provide overall advantages to many aerospace power systems. Because of its wide versatility, it also has outstanding advantages for the Space Station Program and its wide range of users. High frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources - photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines or nuclear Lewis distribution system testbed. The testbed demonstrates flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology as well as high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume.

  10. CFD simulation of a 300 Hz thermoacoustic standing wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoyao; Dai, W.; Luo, Ercang

    2010-09-01

    High frequency operation of standing wave thermoacoustic heat engines is attractive for space applications due to compact size and high reliability. To expedite practical use, further improvement and optimization should be based on deep understanding and quantitative analysis. This article focuses on using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to investigate nonlinear phenomena and processes of a 300 Hz standing wave thermoacoustic engine (SWTE). The calculated model was tested in detail, which indicated that the co-axially stacked tube model was suitable for the simulation of SWTEs. Two methods of imposing temperature gradient across the stack were studied, and the processes of mean pressure increasing, pressure wave amplification and saturation were obtained under the thermal boundary condition of applying heating power. The acoustic fields were given, and the flow vortices and their evolution in both ends of the stack and resonator were observed. Moreover, a comparison between the simulation and experiments was made, which demonstrated the validity and power of the CFD simulation for characterizing complicated nonlinear phenomenon involved in the self-excited SWTEs.

  11. kHz Ion Acceleration Under Variable Background Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, John T.; Feister, S.; Frische, K.; Austin, D. R.; Ngirmang, G. K.; Peterson, A. C.; Smith, J.; Klim, A.; Orban, C.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    High-repetition rate, ultra-high intensity lasers are coming online, opening new possibilities for statistical approaches and applications to High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) research through relativistic laser-plasma interactions (RLPI). A new experimental framework including high-repetition rate solid-density targets, high-acquisition rate detectors, data acquisition, and analysis is needed to take advantage of these new possibilities. At the Extreme Light Laboratory at AFRL, development of a liquid target system has enabled us to perform 1kHz RLPI experiments in 0.03-20 mbar background pressures and intensities up to 5 1018 W/cm2. However, RLPI studied here transpires within a moderate vacuum, which may affect the strength of the electrostatic coupling between the energetic electrons and target ions, altering expected results for both the detected electrons and accelerated ions. Both the experimental methods and measurements of the ion acceleration from sub-micron solid density targets with variable background pressures will be presented. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the AFOSR, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra and from the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  12. ALPHA CONTAMINATION MONITORING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This project was conducted to determine the alpha hazard existing in the vicinity of the missile launch pad following the destruction of a missile ...were used for plutonium particle collection. Because all warhead-carrying missiles were properly launched after Project 2.3 was approved, no alpha contamination data was obtained.

  13. Electroacupuncture at 2/100 Hz Activates Antinociceptive Spinal Mechanisms Different from Those Activated by Electroacupuncture at 2 and 100 Hz in Responder Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josie Resende Torres; da Silva, Marcelo Lourenço; Prado, Wiliam Alves

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of intrathecal injection of desipramine and fluoxetine (selective inhibitors of norepinephrine and 5-HT uptake, resp.), thiorphan and neostigmine (inhibitors of enkephalinase and acetylcholinesterase, resp.), gabapentin (a GABA releaser), and vigabatrin (an inhibitor of GABA-transaminase) on the antinociception induced by 2 Hz, 100 Hz, or 2/100 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) applied bilaterally to the Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) acupoints using the rat tail-flick test. We show that 2 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after the administration of drugs that increase the spinal availability of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or GABA; 100 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after drug that increases the spinal availability of norepinephrine; 2/100 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after drugs that increase the spinal availability of endogenous opioids or GABA. We conclude that the antinociceptive effect of 2/100 Hz EA is different from the synergistic effect of alternate stimulation at 2 and 100 Hz because the effect of the former is not changed by increasing the spinal availability of serotonin and lasts longer after the administration of vigabatrin. The combination of EA with drugs that increase the availability of spinal neurotransmitters involved in the modulation of nociceptive inputs may result in a synergistic antinociceptive effect in the rat tail-flick test. PMID:24159340

  14. Clozapine augments delta, theta, and right frontal EEG alpha power in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Maccrimmon, D; Brunet, D; Criollo, M; Galin, H; Lawson, J S

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To explore the Quantitative EEG (QEEG) effects of established clozapine therapy regimes compared to those of previous ineffective antipsychotic regimes among 64 chronic (DSM-IV) schizophrenic patients. Methods. Data from 20 EEG channels referenced to linked ears were collected before and during maintenance clozapine therapy (mean duration 1.4 years). Absolute power was calculated in six frequency bands: delta (0.4-3.6 Hz), theta (4.2-7.8 Hz), alpha (8.2-11.8 Hz), beta1 (12.2-15.8 Hz), beta2 (16.2-19.8 Hz), and beta3 (20.2-23.8 Hz). Results. Clozapine augments power globally in the delta and theta bands, but this effect is more pronounced over frontal areas. Beta3 power was reduced. Alpha showed a frontal increase, more pronounced in the right, coupled with a posterior decrease with no net change in overall power. Conclusion. The demonstration of a significant clozapine-induced alpha topographic shift frontally and to the right is a novel discovery that may serve to encourage further investigations of subcortical structures in attempts to better understand the diverse aetiologies and optimal treatments of the schizophrenias.

  15. Clozapine Augments Delta, Theta, and Right Frontal EEG Alpha Power in Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    MacCrimmon, D.; Brunet, D.; Criollo, M.; Galin, H.; Lawson, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To explore the Quantitative EEG (QEEG) effects of established clozapine therapy regimes compared to those of previous ineffective antipsychotic regimes among 64 chronic (DSM-IV) schizophrenic patients. Methods. Data from 20 EEG channels referenced to linked ears were collected before and during maintenance clozapine therapy (mean duration 1.4 years). Absolute power was calculated in six frequency bands: delta (0.4–3.6 Hz), theta (4.2–7.8 Hz), alpha (8.2–11.8 Hz), beta1 (12.2–15.8 Hz), beta2 (16.2–19.8 Hz), and beta3 (20.2–23.8 Hz). Results. Clozapine augments power globally in the delta and theta bands, but this effect is more pronounced over frontal areas. Beta3 power was reduced. Alpha showed a frontal increase, more pronounced in the right, coupled with a posterior decrease with no net change in overall power. Conclusion. The demonstration of a significant clozapine-induced alpha topographic shift frontally and to the right is a novel discovery that may serve to encourage further investigations of subcortical structures in attempts to better understand the diverse aetiologies and optimal treatments of the schizophrenias. PMID:23738206

  16. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  17. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  18. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  19. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  20. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Deficient attention modulation of lateralized alpha power in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kustermann, Thomas; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Kienle, Johanna; Miller, Gregory A; Popov, Tzvetan

    2016-06-01

    Modulation of 8-14 Hz (alpha) activity in posterior brain regions is associated with covert attention deployment in visuospatial tasks. Alpha power decrease contralateral to to-be-attended stimuli is believed to foster subsequent processing, such as retention of task-relevant input. Degradation of this alpha-regulation mechanism may reflect an early stage of disturbed attention regulation contributing to impaired attention and working memory commonly found in schizophrenia. The present study tested this hypothesis of early disturbed attention regulation by examining alpha power modulation in a lateralized cued delayed response task in 14 schizophrenia patients (SZ) and 25 healthy controls (HC). Participants were instructed to remember the location of a 100-ms saccade-target cue in the left or right visual hemifield in order to perform a delayed saccade to that location after a retention interval. As expected, alpha power decrease during the retention interval was larger in contralateral than ipsilateral posterior regions, and SZ showed less of this lateralization than did HC. In particular, SZ failed to show hemifield-specific alpha modulation in posterior right hemisphere. Results suggest less efficient modulation of alpha oscillations that are considered critical for attention deployment and item encoding and, hence, may affect subsequent spatial working memory performance.

  2. Alpha synchronization and anxiety: implications for inhibition vs. alertness hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Levin, Evgenij A

    2006-02-01

    Although there is much evidence that alpha oscillations are linked with processes of perception, attention and semantic memory, their functional significance remains uncertain. Synchronization in the alpha frequency range is taken to be a marker of cognitive inactivity, active inhibition of sensory information, or a means of inhibition of non-task relevant cortical areas. Here we propose an alternative interpretation which posits that higher alpha power during reference interval signifies higher readiness of alpha system to information processing. Predictions derived from the inhibition and alertness hypotheses were tested during presentation of acoustic stimuli (tone 1000 Hz) and neutral words to 30 males (18-25 years) with different levels of trait anxiety. On the whole, predictions derived from the inhibition theory were not confirmed and findings more corresponded to the alertness hypothesis. High-anxiety subjects showed higher alpha power during reference interval simultaneously with higher magnitude of event-related desynchronization and higher amplitude of phase-locked alpha responses. These findings are discussed in terms of functional significance of alpha band synchronization and desynchronization.

  3. Reexamination of the {alpha}-{alpha}''fishbone'' potential

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J. P.; McEwen, J. E.; Elhanafy, M.; Smith, E.; Woodhouse, R.; Papp, Z.

    2011-09-15

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the {alpha}-{alpha} fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-{alpha} resonance energies, experimental phase shifts, and three-{alpha} binding energies. We found that, essentially, a simple Gaussian can provide a good description of two-{alpha} and three-{alpha} experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  4. Short-term variability of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) at 4.8 AU from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Duffard, R.; Pozuelos, F.; Moreno, F.; Fernández-Valenzuela, E.

    2015-03-01

    Context. We observed comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) during six nights in February 2013 when it was at 4.8 AU from the Sun. At this distance and time the comet was not very active and it was theoretically possible to detect photometric variations likely due to the rotation of the cometary nucleus. Aims: The goal of this work is to obtain differential photometry of the comet inner coma using different aperture radii in order to derive a possible rotational period. Methods: Large field of view images were obtained with a 4 k × 4 k CCD at the f/3 0.77 m telescope of La Hita Observatory in Spain. Aperture photometry was performed in order to get relative magnitude variation versus time. Using calibrated star fields we also obtained ISON's R-magnitudes versus time. We applied a Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis to get possible periodicities for the observed brightness variations, directly related with the rotation of the cometary nucleus. Results: The comet light curve obtained is very shallow, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.03 ± 0.02 mag. A tentative synodic rotational period (single-peaked) of 14.4 ± 1.2 h for ISON's nucleus is obtained from our analysis, but there are other possibilities. We studied the possible effect of the seeing variations in the obtained periodicities during the same night, and from night to night. These seeing variations had no effect on the derived periodicity. We discuss and interpret all possible solutions for the rotational period of ISON's nucleus. Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A52

  5. Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

  6. The 17 May 2012 M4.8 earthquake near Timpson, East Texas: An event possibly triggered by fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff; Ellsworth, William; Brown, Wesley A.; Brunt, Michael; Luetgert, Jim; MacDonald, Tim; Walter, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This study summarizes our investigation of the 17 May 2012 MW-RMT4.8 earthquake near Timpson, Texas, the largest earthquake recorded historically in eastern Texas. To identify preshocks and aftershocks of the 17 May event we examined the arrivals recorded at Nacogdoches (NATX) 30 km from the 17 May epicenter, at nearby USArray Transportable Array stations, and at eight temporary stations deployed between 26 May 2012 and mid-2013. At NATX we identified seven preshocks, the earliest occurring in April 2008. Reliably located aftershocks recorded by the temporary stations lie along a 6 km long NW-SE linear trend corresponding to a previously mapped basement fault that extends across the highest-intensity (MMI VII) region of the 17 May main shock. Earthquakes in this sequence are relatively shallow—with focal depths ranging from 1.6 to 4.6 km. Evidence supporting these depths include: hypocentral locations of exceptionally well-recorded aftershocks, S-P intervals at the nearest stations, and comparisons of synthetics and observed seismograms. Within 3 km of the linear trend of aftershock activity there are two Class II injection disposal wells injecting at 1.9 km depth beginning in August 2006 and February 2007, with injection rates averaging 42,750 m3/mo and 15,600 m3/mo, respectively. Several observations support the hypothesis that fluid injection triggered the Timpson sequence: well-located epicenters are situated near a mapped basement fault and near high-volume injection wells, focal depths are at or below the depths of injection, and the earliest preshock (April 2008) occurred after the onset of injection in 2006.

  7. Effects of 50 Hz electric currents on vigilance and concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Stollery, B T

    1987-01-01

    Seventy six male volunteers were studied in a crossover trial to assess the effect on the central nervous system of 50 Hz electric currents. Currents totalling 500 microamperes were passed through electrodes attached to the head, upper arms, and feet, simulating exposure to a vertical electric field of about 36 kV/m. Exposure and sham exposure sessions were assigned using double blind techniques and current passed for about 5.5 hours during the exposure session. A series of psychological tests comprising self reports of mood and performance tests of memory, attention, and verbal skills were administered. The present paper discusses the effects of those currents on vigilance and sustained concentration and examines the hypothesis that electric fields act as stressors. The results indicate that vigilance and concentration were not influenced by exposure, nor do they support the hypothesis of a stress reaction. Although brief reports of sensations at electrode sites compromised the double blind conditions to some extent, the performance changes associated with these reports were independent of exposure per se. Within the vigilance task there were two possible exposure effects on the time taken to identify non-target numbers. Firstly, the non-targets were identified more slowly during the first hour of exposure. Secondly, for subjects not reporting sensations, non-target latencies on the second day were slower in the exposed group--there were no corresponding differences on the first day. The interpretation of this effect is complicated by its apparent restriction to the second day and may indicate some kind of state dependent transfer phenomenon. PMID:3814542

  8. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  9. Distraction affects frontal alpha rhythms related to expectancy of pain: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Del Percio, Claudio; Le Pera, Domenica; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Chen, Andrew C N; De Armas, Liala; Miliucci, Roberto; Restuccia, Domenico; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2006-07-01

    Previous electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence has shown event-related desynchronization (ERD) of alpha rhythms before predictable painful stimuli, as a possible neural concomitant of attentional preparatory processes (Babiloni, C., Brancucci, A., Babiloni, F., Capotosto, P., Carducci, F., Cincotti, F., Arendt-Nielsen, L., Chen, A.C., Rossini, P.M., 2003. Anticipatory cortical responses during the expectancy of a predictable painful stimulation. A high-resolution electroencephalography study. Eur. J. Neurosci. 18 (6) 1692-700). This study tested the hypothesis that alpha ERD before predictable painful stimuli is reduced as an effect of distraction. A visual warning stimulus preceded a laser painful stimulation, which was strictly followed by visual imperative stimuli. In the Pain (control) condition, no task was required after the imperative stimuli. In the Pain + Movement condition, subjects had to perform a movement of the right index finger. In the Pain + Cognition condition, they had to mentally perform an arithmetical task. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes. Artifact-free recordings were spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Alpha ERD was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subjects' individual alpha frequency peak (i.e., about 6-8 Hz, 8-10 Hz, 10-12 Hz). Compared to the control condition, the subjects reported a significantly lower stimulus intensity perception and unpleasantness in the Pain + Movement and Pain + Cognition conditions. In addition, there was a cancellation of the alpha 3 ERD (i.e., about 10-12 Hz) in Pain + Cognition condition and even a generation of a statistically significant alpha 3 ERS in Pain + Movement condition. These effects were maximum over fronto-central midline. These results suggest that distraction during the expectancy of pain is related to a reduced neural desynchronization of fronto-central midline alpha rhythms (i.e., reduced cortical activation) towards an overt hyper

  10. Power and Phase of Alpha Oscillations Reveal an Interaction between Spatial and Temporal Visual Attention.

    PubMed

    Kizuk, Sayeed A D; Mathewson, Kyle E

    2017-03-01

    Oscillatory brain rhythms can bias attention via phase and amplitude changes, which modulate sensory activity, biasing information to be processed or ignored. Alpha band (7-14 Hz) oscillations lateralize with spatial attention and rhythmically inhibit visual activity and awareness through pulses of inhibition. Here we show that human observers' awareness of spatially unattended targets is dependent on both alpha power and alpha phase at target onset. Following a predictive directional cue, alpha oscillations were entrained bilaterally using repetitive visual stimuli. Subsequently, we presented either spatially cued or uncued targets at SOAs either validly or invalidly predicted in time by the entrainers. Temporal validity maximally modulated perceptual performance outside the spatial focus of attention and was associated with both increased alpha power and increased neural entrainment of phase in the hemisphere processing spatially unattended information. The results demonstrate that alpha oscillations represent a pulsating inhibition, which impedes visual processing for unattended space.

  11. Cellular characterization of blastocysts derived from rabbit 4-, 8- and 16-cell embryos and isolated blastomeres cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tao, T; Niemann, H

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the developmental potential of isolated rabbit blastomeres under various culture conditions to gain insight into their ability to form the two cell lineages of a viable blastocyst. Intact embryos at the 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell stages and blastomeres isolated from 4-, 8- and 16-cell rabbit embryos (1/4, 1/8 or 1/16 blastomeres respectively) were cultured in drops of one of three different media, each supplemented with either fetal calf serum (FCS), bovine serum albumin (BSA) or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The effects of the extracellular matrix fibronectin (FN) on the development of isolated rabbit blastomeres were also investigated. Supplementation of the medium with FCS yielded a higher (P < 0.05) proportion of blastocysts than BSA or PVA, predominantly from 1/4 blastomeres. No major differences were found between the three basic culture media. In 1/4, 1/8 or 1/16 blastomeres, blastocyst formation rates were greater (P < 0.05) in groups cultured in matrix-free (54.5, 59.6 and 54.6% respectively) than in FN-coated groups (35.4, 46.0 and 26.1% respectively). Only in blastocysts derived from 1/4 blastomeres, were the numbers of inner cell mass (ICM) and total cells of blastocysts higher (P < 0.05) in FN-coated groups than in matrix-free groups (12.7 +/- 1.1 versus 8.5 +/- 0.7 ICM, 73.8 +/- 3. 7 versus 57.8 +/- 3.3 total cells). The percentage of blastocysts derived from single blastomeres with ICM cells decreased with increasing cell stage of the parent embryos in FN-coated (93.6, 78.3 and 44.0%, respectively) as well as matrix-free groups (96.2, 69.3 and 55.2%). In FN-coated groups, after 96 h (1/4) or 72 h (1/8 and 1/16) of culture, approximately 20-30% of blastomeres did not develop into normal blastocysts but formed sheets with 30-50 cells attached to the bottom of the dishes. These results indicate that the development of rabbit blastomeres shares important characteristics with those from mouse and domestic species and

  12. IUSSP activities. Committee on Historical Demography. Report: Conference on Asian Population History, Taipei, Taiwan, 4-8 January 1996.

    PubMed

    Osirike, A B

    1996-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the Asian Population History Conference held in Taipei, Taiwan, January 4-8, 1996. 41 papers were presented on seven themes: Asian population growth, epidemiological transition and public health, mortality trends in pretransitional populations, marriage patterns and demographic systems, fertility levels and trends in pretransitional Asian populations, migration and population distribution, and family systems. Papers were presented by Anthony Reid; Chris Wilson; Bruce Fetter; Sumit Guha; Sheila Zurbrigg; Timothy Dyson and Monica Das Gupta; Cameron Campbell; Robert Shepherd; Ann Jannetta; Chai-Bin Park, Eise Yokoyama, and Sadahiko Nozaki; Peter Boomgaard; Jose Antonio Ortega Osona; Osamu Saito; Ts'ui-jung Liu and Shi-yung Liu; Wen Shang Yang; Dallas Fernando; Bruce Caldwell; A. Francis Gealogo; S. Irudaya Rajan; Kiyoshi Hamano; Guo Songyi; Wang Feng and James Lee; Christopher Langford; Terence H. Hull; Paul K.C. Liu; Xizhe Peng and Yangfang Hou; Ken'ichi Tomobe; Nokiro O. Tsuya; Peter Xenos; Daniel Doeppers; Chaonan Chen and Su-fen Liu; Jiang Tao; Akira Hayami and Emiko Ochiai; Arthur P. Wolf and Chuang Ying-chang; Myron L. Cohen; Burton Pasternak; Zhongwei Zhao; Li-shou Yang, Arland Thornton, and Tamara Hareven; Chi-chun Yi and Yu-hsia Lu; Lai Huimin; Ding Yizhuang; and John Caldwell, who chaired the concluding session. John Caldwell concluded that the conference provided an impressive collection of findings on Asian population history. There was much more research possible, particularly research based on India's rich historical data archives. Research was needed to confirm the assertion that Asian mortality transition began after the two world wars. A focus on natural family planning methods used prior to the transition was suggested. International Union for Scientific Study of Population Committee Chairman David Reher suggested multidisciplinary research on Asian differences in fertility, mortality, and migration. Hayami and Ts

  13. Thalamic mechanisms underlying alpha-delta sleep with implications for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-delta sleep is the abnormal intrusion of alpha activity (8- to 13-Hz oscillations) into the delta activity (1- to 4-Hz oscillations) that defines slow-wave sleep. Alpha-delta sleep is especially prevalent in fibromyalgia patients, and there is evidence suggesting that the irregularities in the sleep of these patients may cause the muscle and tissue pain that characterizes the disorder. We constructed a biophysically realistic mathematical model of alpha-delta sleep. Imaging studies in fibromyalgia patients suggesting altered levels of activity in the thalamus motivated a thalamic model as the source of alpha activity. Since sodium oxybate helps to alleviate the symptoms of fibromyalgia and reduces the amount of alpha-delta sleep in fibromyalgia patients, we examined how changes in the molecular targets of sodium oxybate affected alpha-delta activity in our circuit. Our model shows how alterations in GABAB currents and two thalamic currents, Ih (a hyperpolarization-activated current) and a potassium leak current, transform a circuit that normally produces delta oscillations into one that produces alpha-delta activity. Our findings suggest that drugs that reduce Ih conductances and/or increase potassium conductances, without necessarily increasing GABAB conductances, might be sufficient to restore delta sleep. Furthermore, they suggest that delta sleep might be restored by drugs that preferentially target these currents in the thalamus; such drugs might have fewer side effects than drugs that act systemically. PMID:26245315

  14. Changes in acoustic startle reflex in rats induced by playback of 22-kHz calls.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    In aversive or dangerous situations, adult rats emit long characteristic ultrasonic calls, often termed "22-kHz calls," which have been suggested to play a role of alarm calls. Although the playback experiment is one of the most effective ways to investigate the alarming properties of 22-kHz calls, clear behavioral evidence showing the anxiogenic effects of these playback stimuli has not been directly obtained to date. In this study, we investigated whether playback of 22-kHz calls or synthesized sine tones could change the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), enhancement of which is widely considered to be a reliable index of anxiety-related negative affective states in rats. Playback of 22-kHz calls significantly enhanced the ASR in rats. Enhancement effects caused by playback of 22-kHz calls from young rats were relatively weak compared to those after calls from adult rats. Playback of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones enhanced ASR in subjects, but not synthesized 60-kHz tones. Further, shortening the individual call duration of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones also enhanced the ASR. Accordingly, it is suggested that 22-kHz calls induce anxiety by socially communicated alarming signals in rats. The results also demonstrated that call frequency, i.e., of 22kHz, appears important for ultrasonic alarm-signal communication in rats.

  15. Dynamics of alpha control: Preparatory suppression of posterior alpha oscillations by frontal modulators revealed with combined EEG and event-related optical signal (EROS)

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Kyle E.; Beck, Diane M.; Ro, Tony; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of brain processes facilitating conscious experience of external stimuli. Previously we proposed that alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations, which fluctuate with both sustained and directed attention, represent a pulsed inhibition of ongoing sensory brain activity. Here we tested the prediction that inhibitory alpha oscillations in visual cortex are modulated by top-down signals from frontoparietal attention networks. We measured modulations in phase-coherent alpha oscillations from superficial frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices using the event-related optical signal (EROS), a measure of neuronal activity affording high spatiotemporal resolution, along with concurrently-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG), while subjects performed a visual target-detection task. The pre-target alpha oscillations measured with EEG and EROS from posterior areas were larger for subsequently undetected targets, supporting alpha's inhibitory role. Using EROS, we localized brain correlates of these awareness-related alpha oscillations measured at the scalp to the cuneus and precuneus. Crucially, EROS alpha suppression correlated with posterior EEG alpha power across subjects. Sorting the EROS data based on EEG alpha power quartiles to investigate alpha modulators revealed that suppression of posterior alpha was preceded by increased activity in regions of the dorsal attention network, and decreased activity in regions of the cingulo-opercular network. Cross-correlations revealed the temporal dynamics of activity within these preparatory networks prior to posterior alpha modulation. The novel combination of EEG and EROS afforded localization of the sources and correlates of alpha oscillations and their temporal relationships, supporting our proposal that top-down control from attention networks modulates both posterior alpha and awareness of visual stimuli. PMID:24702458

  16. Alpha One Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Languages French (Francais) German (Deutsch) Italian (Italiano) Spanish (Español) Portuguese (Portugues) Swedish (Svenska) Donate One Time Monthly Keep In Touch | About Us | Contact Us | What is the Alpha-1 ...

  17. Coaching the alpha male.

    PubMed

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  18. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  19. Children with autism spectrum disorder have reduced otoacoustic emissions at the 1 kHz mid-frequency region.

    PubMed

    Bennetto, Loisa; Keith, Jessica M; Allen, Paul D; Luebke, Anne E

    2017-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviorally diagnosed disorder of early onset characterized by impairment in social communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors. Some of the earliest signs of ASD involve auditory processing, and a recent study found that hearing thresholds in children with ASD in the mid-range frequencies were significantly related to receptive and expressive language measures. In addition, otoacoustic emissions have been used to detect reduced cochlear function in the presence of normal audiometric thresholds. We were interested then to know if otoacoustic emissions in children with normal audiometric thresholds would also reveal differences between children with ASD and typical developing (TD) controls in mid-frequency regions. Our objective was to specifically measure baseline afferent otoacoustic emissions (distortion-product otoacoustic emissions [DPOAEs]), transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TrOAEs), and efferent suppression, in 35 children with high-functioning ASD compared with 42 aged-matched TD controls. All participants were males 6-17 years old, with normal audiometry, and rigorously characterized via Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Children with ASD had greatly reduced DPOAE responses in the 1 kHz frequency range, yet had comparable DPOAE responses at 0.5 and 4-8 kHz regions. Furthermore, analysis of the spectral features of TrOAEs revealed significantly decreased emissions in ASD in similar frequencies. No significant differences were noted in DPOAE or TrOAE noise floors, middle ear muscle reflex activity, or efferent suppression between children with ASD and TD controls. In conclusion, attention to specific-frequency deficits using non-invasive measures of cochlear function may be important in auditory processing impairments found in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 337-345. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  1. Spatial Attention and the Effects of Frontoparietal Alpha Band Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    van Schouwenburg, Martine R.; Zanto, Theodore P.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2017-01-01

    A frontoparietal network has long been implicated in top-down control of attention. Recent studies have suggested that this network might communicate through coherence in the alpha band. Here we aimed to test the effect of coherent alpha (8–12 Hz) stimulation on the frontoparietal network. To this end, we recorded behavioral performance and electroencephalography (EEG) data while participants were engaged in a spatial attention task. Furthermore, participants received transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the right frontal and parietal cortex, which oscillated coherently in-phase within the alpha band. Compared to a group of participants that received sham stimulation, we found that coherent frontoparietal alpha band stimulation altered a behavioral spatial attention bias. Neurally, the groups showed hemispheric-specific differences in alpha coherence between the frontal and parietal-occipital cortex. These results provide preliminary evidence that alpha coherence in the frontoparietal network might play a role in top-down control of spatial attention. PMID:28174529

  2. Effects of 3 Hz and 60 Hz Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Anxiety-Like Behaviors, Memory Retention of Passive Avoidance and Electrophysiological Properties of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Amin; Shahani, Minoo; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Semnanian, Saeed; Rahmati Roudsari, Mohammad; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Hasanzadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The effects of electromagnetic fields on biological organisms have been a controversial and also interesting debate over the past few decades, despite the wide range of investigations, many aspects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF/EMFs) effects including mechanism of their interaction with live organisms and also their possible biological applications still remain ambiguous. In the present study, we investigated whether the exposures of ELF/EMF with frequencies of 3 Hz and 60 Hz can affect the memory, anxiety like behaviors, electrophysiological properties and brain’s proteome in rats. Methods: Male rats were exposed to 3 Hz and 60 Hz ELF/EMFs in a protocol consisting of 2 cycles of 2 h/day exposure for 4 days separated with a 2-day interval. Short term memory and anxiety like behaviors were assessed immediately, 1 and 2 weeks after the exposures. Effects of short term exposure were also assessed using electrophysiological approach immediately after 2 hours exposure. Results: Behavioral test revealed that immediately after the end of exposures, locomotor activity of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposed groups significantly decreased compared to sham group. This exposure protocol had no effect on anxiety like behavior during the 2 weeks after the treatment and also on short term memory. A significant reduction in firing rate of locus coeruleus (LC) was found after 2 hours of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposures. Proteome analysis also revealed global changes in whole brain proteome after treatment. Conclusion: Here, some evidence regarding the fact that such exposures can alter locomotor activity and neurons firing rate in male rats were presented. PMID:27330708

  3. Growth, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Er3+-Doped and Er3+/Yb3+-Codoped Li3Ba2La3(WO4)8 Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bin; Lin, Zhoubin; Zhang, Lizhen; Huang, Yisheng; Wang, Guofu

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the growth and spectral properties of Er3+-doped and Er3+/Yb3+-codoped Li3Ba2La3(WO4)8 crystals. The Er3+: Li3Ba2La3(WO4)8 crystal with dimensions of 56 mm×28 mm×9 mm and Er3+/Yb3+: Li3Ba2La3(WO4)8 crystal with dimensions of 52 mm×24 mm×8 mm were obtained by the top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method. Thermal expansion coefficients and thermal conductivity of both crystals were measured. The spectroscopic characterizations of both crystals were investigated. The spectroscopic analysis reveals that the Er3+/Yb3+: Li3Ba2La3(WO4)8 crystal has much better optical properties than the Er3+: Li3Ba2La3(WO4)8 crystal, thus it may become a potential candidate for solid-state laser gain medium material. PMID:22808214

  4. 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields enhance cell proliferation and DNA damage: possible involvement of a redox mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Federica I; Torsello, Angela; Tedesco, Beatrice; Fasanella, Silvia; Boninsegna, Alma; D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Grassi, Claudio; Azzena, Gian Battista; Cittadini, Achille

    2005-03-22

    HL-60 leukemia cells, Rat-1 fibroblasts and WI-38 diploid fibroblasts were exposed for 24-72 h to 0.5-1.0-mT 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF). This treatment induced a dose-dependent increase in the proliferation rate of all cell types, namely about 30% increase of cell proliferation after 72-h exposure to 1.0 mT. This was accompanied by increased percentage of cells in the S-phase after 12- and 48-h exposure. The ability of ELF-EMF to induce DNA damage was also investigated by measuring DNA strand breaks. A dose-dependent increase in DNA damage was observed in all cell lines, with two peaks occurring at 24 and 72 h. A similar pattern of DNA damage was observed by measuring formation of 8-OHdG adducts. The effects of ELF-EMF on cell proliferation and DNA damage were prevented by pretreatment of cells with an antioxidant like alpha-tocopherol, suggesting that redox reactions were involved. Accordingly, Rat-1 fibroblasts that had been exposed to ELF-EMF for 3 or 24 h exhibited a significant increase in dichlorofluorescein-detectable reactive oxygen species, which was blunted by alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Cells exposed to ELF-EMF and examined as early as 6 h after treatment initiation also exhibited modifications of NF kappa B-related proteins (p65-p50 and I kappa B alpha), which were suggestive of increased formation of p65-p50 or p65-p65 active forms, a process usually attributed to redox reactions. These results suggest that ELF-EMF influence proliferation and DNA damage in both normal and tumor cells through the action of free radical species. This information may be of value for appraising the pathophysiologic consequences of an exposure to ELF-EMF.

  5. Alarm pheromone does not modulate 22-kHz calls in male rats.

    PubMed

    Muyama, Hiromi; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Inagaki, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-03-15

    Rats are known to emit a series of ultrasonic vocalizations, termed 22-kHz calls, when exposed to distressing stimuli. Pharmacological studies have indicated that anxiety mediates 22-kHz calls in distressed rats. We previously found that exposure to the rat alarm pheromone increases anxiety in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the alarm pheromone would increase 22-kHz calls in pheromone-exposed rats. Accordingly, we tested whether exposure to the alarm pheromone induced 22-kHz calls, as well as whether the alarm pheromone increased 22-kHz calls in response to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS). Rats were first fear-conditioned to an auditory and contextual CS. On the following day, the rats were either exposed to the alarm pheromone or a control odor that was released from the neck region of odor-donor rats. Then, the rats were re-exposed to the aversive CS. The alarm pheromone neither induced 22-kHz calls nor increased 22-kHz calls in response to the aversive CS. In contrast, the control odor unexpectedly reduced the total number and duration of 22-kHz calls elicited by the aversive CS, as well as the duration of freezing. These results suggest that the alarm pheromone does not affect 22-kHz calls in rats. However, we may have found evidence for an appeasing olfactory signal, released from the neck region of odor-donor rats.

  6. On the existence of oscillations in solar filaments observed in H alpha and C IV lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmieder, B.; Malherbe, J. M.; Mein, P.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Time sequence observations of filaments in both the H alpha line and the 1548 A C IV line were analyzed with the Fourier transform technique in the frequency range (1 - 10 mHz). No oscillation is detected in filaments except at the footpoints where a steady velocity gradient is large. The energy is probably due to convective motions rather than pressure oscillations.

  7. Regional electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha power and asymmetry in older adults: a study of short-term test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Karen J; Hashemi, Ali; Sheng, Bruce; Sekuler, Allison B; Bennett, Patrick J; Schmidt, Louis A

    2015-01-01

    Although regional alpha power and asymmetry measures have been widely used as indices of individual differences in emotional processing and affective style in younger populations, there have been relatively few studies that have examined these measures in older adults. Here, we examined the short-term test-retest reliability of resting regional alpha power (7.5-12.5 Hz) and asymmetry in a sample of 38 active, community-dwelling older adults (M age = 71.2, SD = 6.5 years). Resting electroencephalogram recordings were made before and after a perceptual computer task. Pearson and intra-class correlations indicated acceptable test-retest reliability for alpha power and asymmetry measures in all regions. Interestingly, alpha asymmetry appeared to be less affected by the task than was alpha power. Findings suggest that alpha asymmetry may reflect more enduring, "trait-like" characteristics, while alpha power may reflect more "state-like" processes in older adults.

  8. Alpha irradiation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, S C; Mount, M E

    1999-03-26

    With the end of the Cold War and the associated limitations imposed on the nuclear weapons stockpile by strategic arms treaties, much has changed in the stockpile stewardship program. Weapons that were originally designed for stockpile lives on the order of 15 to 20 years are now being evaluated for much longer periods: in some cases as much as 60 years. As such, issues that were once considered to be of no consequence are being reexamined. Among these is the extent of the radiation dose received by secondary organics over time that results from the intrinsic alpha source of the weapon components. This report describes the results of work performed to estimate the alpha radiation deposition in the organic components of an LLNL system at specific points in its stockpile life. Included are discussions of the development of the intrinsic time- and energy-dependent alpha source term per unit mass, estimation of the effective source and absorber material thicknesses, development of a simplified model for the total intrinsic alpha source term and energy deposition in the absorber, and the alpha radiation deposition in the organic components of a selected LLNL weapon.

  9. Upper limit on the amplitude of gravitational waves around 0.1Â Hz from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Shohei; Tazai, Rina; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2014-03-01

    The global positioning system (GPS) is composed of 31 satellites having atomic clocks with 10-15 accuracy on board and enables one to calibrate the primary standard for frequency on the ground. Using the fact that oscillators on the ground have been successfully stabilized with high accuracy by receiving radio waves emitted from the GPS satellites, we set a constraint on the strain amplitude of the gravitational wave background hc. We find that the GPS has already placed a meaningful constraint, and the constraint on the continuous component of gravitational waves is given as hc<4.8×10-12(1/f) at 10-2≲f ≲100 Hz for stabilized oscillators with Δν /ν≃10-12. Thanks to the advantage of the Doppler tracking method, seismic oscillations do not affect the current constraint. Constraints on hc in the same frequency range from the velocity measurements by the lunar explorers in the Apollo mission are also derived.

  10. Independent Causal Contributions of Alpha- and Beta-Band Oscillations during Movement Selection

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Arjen; Marshall, Tom R.; Esterer, Sophie; Sharp, Poppy; Dijkerman, H. Chris; de Lange, Floris P.; Toni, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    To select a movement, specific neuronal populations controlling particular features of that movement need to be activated, whereas other populations are downregulated. The selective (dis)inhibition of cortical sensorimotor populations is governed by rhythmic neural activity in the alpha (8–12 Hz) and beta (15–25 Hz) frequency range. However, it is unclear whether and how these rhythms contribute independently to motor behavior. Building on a recent dissociation of the sensorimotor alpha- and beta-band rhythms, we test the hypothesis that the beta-band rhythm governs the disinhibition of task-relevant neuronal populations, whereas the alpha-band rhythm suppresses neurons that may interfere with task performance. Cortical alpha- and beta-band rhythms were manipulated with transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) while human participants selected how to grasp an object. Stimulation was applied at either 10 or 20 Hz and was imposed on the sensorimotor cortex contralaterally or ipsilaterally to the grasping hand. In line with task-induced changes in endogenous spectral power, the effect of the tACS intervention depended on the frequency and site of stimulation. Whereas tACS stimulation generally increased movement selection times, 10 Hz stimulation led to relatively faster selection times when applied to the hemisphere ipsilateral to the grasping hand, compared with other stimulation conditions. These effects occurred selectively when multiple movements were considered. These observations functionally differentiate the causal contribution of alpha- and beta-band oscillations to movement selection. The findings suggest that sensorimotor beta-band rhythms disinhibit task-relevant populations, whereas alpha-band rhythms inhibit neuronal populations that could interfere with movement selection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study shows dissociable effects of 10 Hz and 20 Hz tACS on the duration of movement selection. These observations have two elements of

  11. Environmental and Pharmacological Modulation of Amphetamine-Induced 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rippberger, Henrike; van Gaalen, Marcel M.; Schwarting, Rainer K.W.; WÖhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats emit high-frequency 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in appetitive situations like social interactions. Drugs of abuse are probably the most potent non-social elicitors of 50-kHz USV, possibly reflecting their euphorigenic properties. Psychostimulants induce the strongest elevation in 50-kHz USV emission, particularly amphetamine (AMPH), either when applied systemically or locally into the nucleus accumbens (Nacc). Emission of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV depends on test context, such as the presence of conspecifics, and can be manipulated pharmacologically by targeting major neurotransmitter systems, including dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5-HT), but also protein kinase C (PKC) signaling. Several D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, as well as typical and atypical antipsychotics block the AMPH-induced elevation in 50-kHz USV. Inhibiting D1 and D2 receptors in the Nacc abolishes AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV, indicating a key role for this brain area. NA neurotransmission also regulates AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission given that α1 receptor antagonists and α2 receptor agonists exert attenuating effects. Supporting the involvement of the 5-HT system, AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV are attenuated by 5-HT2C receptor activation, whereas 5-HT2C receptor antagonism leads to the opposite effect. Finally, treatment with lithium, tamoxifen, and myricitrin was all found to result in a complete abolishment of the AMPH-induced increase in 50-kHz USV, suggesting the involvement of PKC signaling. Neurotransmitter systems involved in AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission only partially overlap with other AMPH-induced behaviors like hyperlocomotion. The validity of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV as a preclinical model for neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed, particularly with relevance to altered drive and mood seen in bipolar disorder. PMID:26411764

  12. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  13. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  14. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FA-HZ1, an Efficient Dibenzofuran-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Fawad; Hu, Haiyang; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas sp. FA-HZ1, an efficient dibenzofuran-degrading bacterium, was isolated from landfill leachate. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain FA-HZ1, which contains only one circular chromosome. The complete genome sequence will be essential for revealing the molecular mechanisms of dibenzofuran degradation. PMID:28209830

  16. Sub-kHz Linewidth GaSb Semiconductor Diode Lasers Operating Near 2 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagheri, Mahmood; Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We report on the phase noise properties of DFB lasers operating near 2.0 microns. Measured noise spectra indicate intrinsic laser linewidths below 1 kHz. An effective linewidth of less than 200 kHz for 5 ms measurement times is estimated.

  17. 2 kHz high power smart transducer for acoustic sub-bottom profiling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathishkumar, R.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a 2 kHz Tonpilz projector was designed using a Terfenol-D and modeled in ATILA. For the purpose of modeling studies, it has been determined that a radiating head mass exhibits better transmitting current response (TCR) at 136 mm diameter, where the resonance occurs at 2.4 kHz and the peak value of 118 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1 m occurs at 12 kHz. Also bolt at a 46 mm distance from the center of the head mass offers resonance at 2.4 kHz, and the peak value of 115.3 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1m occurs at 11.5 kHz. This optimized design is fabricated and molded with polyurethane of 3 mm thickness. The prototype was tested at the Acoustic Test Facility (ATF) of National Institute of Ocean Technology (NIOT) for its underwater performances. Based on the result, the fundamental resonance was determined to be 2.18 kHz and the peak value of TCR of 182 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1m occurs at 14 kHz. The maximum value of the RS was found to be -190 dB re 1V/μPa at 1m at a frequency of 2.1 kHz.

  18. Chiral Recognition in Molecular and Macromolecular Pairs of(S)- and (R)- 1-Cyano-2-Methylpropyl 4’((4-(8-Vinyloxyoctyloxy)Benzoyl) Biphenyl-4-Carboxylate Enantiomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    2ArH, o to - COOH ), 7.60 (d, J=8.oHz. -kArll. m to - COOH and m to -OCOO-), 7.33 (d, J=8.7Hz, 2ArH, o to -OCOO-), 3.89 ýS )- i-lBnzyloxycarhonyl-2...1H, -COOCH( COOH )-), 3.94 (s. 3t . (1 I CH -. 2.4-4 m. 111. -ClhC’i; r2. 1.17-1-13 (2d, J=5.8Hz, 6H, -CH(CH 3)2). iS - i-(" Cano-2- 1eth,, Ipropil 4...protecting group of (S)-6 and (R)-6 was removed by hydrogenolysis to produce (S)-7 and (R)-7, respectively. Afterwards, the - COOH group of (S)-7 and (R

  19. A Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Multicultural Education Curriculum for Grades 4-8. Cultural Exchange Task Cards [and] Test Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzler, Sally; And Others

    These activities for grades 4-8 are designed to promote understanding, appreciation, and respect for the diversity of cultures in the United States. Activities focus on four groups: American Indians, blacks, Asian Americans, and Mexican Americans. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the material is appropriate for fine arts, language arts, home…

  20. Manitoba Physical Education Assessment 1993. French Immersion Program: Grades 4, 8, 11. Final Report = Evaluation de L'Education Physique (1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    This study assessed the strengths, weaknesses, and degree of implementation of the Manitoba (Canada) Physical Education curriculum in grades 4, 8, and 11 in French Immersion Schools. This report presents the conclusions and recommendations resulting from a review and interpretation of the findings by the Physical Education Educators on the grade…

  1. Development and testing of a 20-kHz component test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.; Sundberg, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A history of the General Dynamics Space Systems Division 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including its current configuration and its role in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. Highlights and results are presented on a series of tests conducted on the 20 kHz Breadboard. The first test presented is the 20 kHz Breadboard Acceptance test. This test verified the operation of the delivered Breadboard and also characterized the main components of the system. Next, an indepth efficiency testing effort is presented. The tests attempted to apportion all the power losses in the 20 kHz Breadboard Main Invert Units. Distortion test data is presented showing the distortion characteristics of a Mapham inverter. Lastly, current work on the 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including Main Inverter Unit paralleling tests. Conclusions are summarized and references given.

  2. Effects of mindfulness meditation training on anticipatory alpha modulation in primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Catherine E; Jones, Stephanie R; Wan, Qian; Pritchett, Dominique L; Wasserman, Rachel H; Wexler, Anna; Villanueva, Joel J; Shaw, Jessica R; Lazar, Sara W; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Littenberg, Ronnie; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Moore, Christopher I

    2011-05-30

    During selective attention, ∼7-14 Hz alpha rhythms are modulated in early sensory cortices, suggesting a mechanistic role for these dynamics in perception. Here, we investigated whether alpha modulation can be enhanced by "mindfulness" meditation (MM), a program training practitioners in sustained attention to body and breath-related sensations. We hypothesized that participants in the MM group would exhibit enhanced alpha power modulation in a localized representation in the primary somatosensory neocortex in response to a cue, as compared to participants in the control group. Healthy subjects were randomized to 8-weeks of MM training or a control group. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recording of the SI finger representation, we found meditators demonstrated enhanced alpha power modulation in response to a cue. This finding is the first to show enhanced local alpha modulation following sustained attentional training, and implicates this form of enhanced dynamic neural regulation in the behavioral effects of meditative practice.

  3. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo at low doses.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Azure, M T; Narra, V R; Rao, D V

    1994-03-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit alpha particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The 224Ra daughters 212Pb and 212Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of alpha and beta particles in their decay to stable 208Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of 212Pb and its daughters. When 212Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters 212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D37) was 0.143 +/- 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D37 for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po, was used to obtain an RBE-LET relationship for alpha particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBE alpha = 4.8 - 6.1 x 10(-2) LET + 1.0 x 10(-3) LET2. Similarly, the dependence of RBE on alpha-particle energy E alpha was given by RBE alpha = 22 E(-0.73) alpha. These relationships, based on in vivo experimental data, may be valuable in predicting biological effects of alpha-particle emitters.

  4. Pilot Study EURAMET.AUV.V-P1: Bilateral comparison on magnitude of the complex charge sensitivity of accelerometers from 10 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Claire; Hermawanto, Denny

    2017-01-01

    The results of a Pilot Study EURAMET.AUV.V-P1 between LNE (France) and RCM-LIPI (Indonesia) are reported. This bilateral comparison of sinusoidal vibration was organized after the implementation of various improvements at RCM-LIPI following a previous (unpublished) comparison that had revealed discrepancies in their results at frequencies above 5 kHz. The results of this Pilot Study, using the same accelerometers as the earlier comparison, demonstrate that the discrepancies at high frequencies have been resolved. For both the back-to-back and the single-ended accelerometers tested, the sensitivities of the RCM-LIPI and the LNE over the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz now agree within their declared uncertainties. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV.

  5. Human exposure standards in the frequency range 1 Hz To 100 kHz: the case for adoption of the IEEE standard.

    PubMed

    Patrick Reilly, J

    2014-10-01

    Differences between IEEE C95 Standards (C95.6-2002 and C95.1-2005) in the low-frequency (1 Hz-100 kHz) and the ICNIRP-2010 guidelines appear across the frequency spectrum. Factors accounting for lack of convergence include: differences between the IEEE standards and the ICNIRP guidelines with respect to biological induction models, stated objectives, data trail from experimentally derived thresholds through physical and biological principles, selection and justification of safety/reduction factors, use of probability models, compliance standards for the limbs as distinct from the whole body, defined population categories, strategies for central nervous system protection below 20 Hz, and correspondence of environmental electric field limits with contact currents. This paper discusses these factors and makes the case for adoption of the limits in the IEEE standards.

  6. From Alpha to Omega

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czaja, Paul Clement

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha point of the authors' life as a Montessori educator began in 1959, when he was a graduate student studying philosophy at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York. While studying the works of the great American philosopher William James, the author came across the writings of Maria Montessori and immediately became captivated by her…

  7. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  8. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L. Computer Sciences Corp., Seabrook, MD Iowa State Univ., Ames )

    1989-12-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs.

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator of 5000 Hz frequency provides better analgesia than that of 100 Hz frequency in mice muscle pain model.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tsung; Chien, Hsiao-Jung; Lin, Ya-Chi; Liu, Yen-Chin

    2017-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENSs) have been proved to be effective in muscle pain management for several decades. However, there is no consensus for the optimal TENS program. Previous research demonstrated that a 100 Hz TENS (L-TENS) provided better analgesia than a conventional TENS (< 5 Hz). However, no research compared a higher-frequency (> 100 Hz) TENS with a 100 Hz TENS. We used a 5000 Hz (5 kHz) frequency TENS (M-TENS) and an L-TENS to compare analgesic effect on a mice skin/muscle incision retraction model. Three groups of mice were used (sham, L-TENS, and M-TENS) and applied with different TENS programs on Day 4 after the mice skin/muscle incision retraction model; TENS therapy was continued as 20 min/d for 3 days. Mice analgesic effects were measured via Von Frey microfilaments with the up-down method. After therapy, mice spinal cord dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were harvested for cytokine evaluation (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) with the Western blotting method. Our data demonstrated that the M-TENS produced better analgesia than the L-TENS. Cytokine in the spinal cord or DRG all expressed lower than that of the sham group. However, there is no difference in both cytokine levels between TENSs of different frequencies in the spinal cord and DRG. We concluded that the M-TENS produced faster and better mechanical analgesia than the L-TENS in the mice skin/muscle incision retraction model. Those behavior differences were not in accordance with cytokine changes in the spinal cord or DRG.

  10. Mutual interaction of histamine H3-receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors on noradrenergic terminals in mouse and rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Behling, A; Lümmen, G; Malinowska, B; Göthert, M

    1992-06-01

    Brain cortex slices were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline and superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine. We studied the inhibition of the electrically evoked tritium overflow caused by histamine in the presence of alpha-adrenoceptor ligands (mouse and rat brain cortex), and the inhibition caused by talipexole (the former B-HT 920) in the presence of H3-receptor ligands (mouse brain cortex). In mouse brain cortex slices, the inhibitory effect of histamine on the tritium overflow evoked by 36 pulses, 0.3 Hz was not changed by the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, but increased by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine. When the current strength or the duration of electrical pulses was reduced to compensate for the increase in evoked tritium overflow produced by rauwolscine, the latter still enhanced the effect of histamine. The histamine-induced inhibition of tritium overflow evoked by 360 pulses, 3 Hz was not affected by the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine but attenuated by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist talipexole. Finally, the inhibition by histamine of the tritium overflow evoked by 3 pulses, 100 Hz was attenuated by talipexole but not affected by rauwolscine. Conversely, the inhibitory effect of talipexole on tritium overflow elicited by 360 pulses, 3 Hz was slightly attenuated by the H3-receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine but not affected by the H3-receptor antagonist thioperamide. In rat brain cortex slices, histamine only tended to inhibit tritium overflow evoked by 360 pulses, 3 Hz, both in the absence of alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists and in the presence of prazosin. However, histamine markedly inhibited the evoked overflow in the presence of rauwolscine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Alpha frequency, cognitive load and memory performance.

    PubMed

    Klimesch, W; Schimke, H; Pfurtscheller, G

    1993-01-01

    EEG-signals were recorded from subjects as they performed a modified version of Schneider's and Shiffrin's memory search paradigm. The hypothesis was tested whether individual (centre of gravity) alpha frequency, termed IAF, is related to memory performance and/or attentional demands. The results show that memory performance exerts the strongest effect on IAF. As compared to a resting period, the difference in IAF between age-matched good and bad memory performers reached a maximum when subjects were actually retrieving information from their memory. During retrieval, the IAF of good performers is 1.25 Hz higher than for bad performers. Attentional and task demands also tend to reduce IAF, but as compared to memory performance-to a much lesser degree. The results of amplitude analyses demonstrate further that during retrieval, alpha desynchronization is more pronounced for bad performers than for good performers. Taken together, the results indicate that a decrease in IAF is always related to a drop in performance.

  12. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  13. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E K; Zhang, X F; Han, L H; Harrison, G H; Davis, C C; Zhou, X J; Ioffe, V; McCready, W A; Abraham, J M; Meltzer, S J

    1998-12-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  14. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  15. Prospective randomized comparison of dacarbazine (DTIC) versus DTIC plus interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Young, A M; Marsden, J; Goodman, A; Burton, A; Dunn, J A

    2001-01-01

    Dacarbazine (DTIC) has been the mainstay of chemotherapy for metastatic melanoma for over two decades, but only 15%-20% of patients respond and benefit is usually transient. Randomized studies combining DTIC with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in advanced disease have so far been inconclusive in terms of response and survival. We report a randomized prospective pilot Phase III trial of DTIC +IFN-alpha in patients with metastatic melanoma. The primary endpoint was death. A total of 61 patients were randomized between April 1995 and April 1998. Differences in survival between groups were assessed using log-rank analysis. Quality of life was measured using the European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer QLQ C30 (+3) questionnaire. Fifty-seven patients died during the study. The median survival for patients receiving DTIC was 7.2 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4-9.0); it was 4.8 months for DTIC + IFN-alpha (95% CI 2.0-8.0). There was no significant difference in survival between the two treatment arms (chi2 unadjusted = 0.15, P = 0.70; chi2 adjusted = 0.01, P = 0.91). The 6-month survival of those patients randomized to DTIC alone was 58% compared with 40% for those patients randomized to DTIC + IFN-alpha. There were no differences in quality of life between treatment groups. This study failed to demonstrate a survival benefit for patients receiving IFN-alpha in combination with DTIC. These results are inconclusive primarily owing to the small size of the trial. A meta-analysis is required to determine whether there is a role for the addition of IFN-alpha to DTIC in the treatment of this disease.

  16. HB Hillingdon [alpha46(CE4)Phe-->Val (alpha1 Or alpha2)]: a new alpha chain hemoglobin variant.

    PubMed

    Babb, Anna; Solaiman, Susannah; Green, Brian N; Mantio, Debbie; Patel, Ketan

    2009-01-01

    Routine antenatal hemoglobinopathy screening detected a new alpha chain variant that eluted with Hb A(2) on cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in a lady of Sri Lankan origin who had normal hematological indices. The mutation was identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) as alpha46(CE4)Phe-->Val, inferring that the variant was due to a single base change at codon 46 (TTC>GTC) of the alpha1- or alpha2-globin genes.

  17. Air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Sato, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Air puff-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in adult rats, termed "22-kHz calls," have been applied as a useful animal model to develop psychoneurological and psychopharmacological studies focusing on human aversive affective disorders. To date, all previous studies on air puff-induced 22-kHz calls have used outbred rats. Furthermore, newly developed gene targeting technologies, which are essential for further advancement of biomedical experiments using air puff-induced 22-kHz calls, have enabled the production of genetically modified rats using inbred rat strains. Therefore, we considered it necessary to assess air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred rats. In this study, we assessed differences in air puff-induced 22-kHz calls between inbred F344 rats and outbred Wistar rats. Male F344 rats displayed similar total (summed) duration of air puff-induced 22 kHz vocalizations to that of male Wistar rats, however, Wistar rats emitted fewer calls of longer duration, while F344 rats emitted higher number of vocalizations of shorter duration. Additionally, female F344 rats emitted fewer air puff-induced 22-kHz calls than did males, thus confirming the existence of a sex difference that was previously reported for outbred Wistar rats. The results of this study could confirm the reliability of air puff stimulus for induction of a similar amount of emissions of 22-kHz calls in different rat strains, enabling the use of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred F344 rats and derived genetically modified animals in future studies concerning human aversive affective disorders.

  18. Benefits of 20 kHz PMAD in a nuclear space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1987-01-01

    Compared to existing systems, high frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety benefits. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources; photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines and nuclear. A 25 kW, 20 kHz ac power distribution system testbed was recently (1986) developed. The testbed possesses maximum flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology while maintaining high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume. Several aspects of the 20 kHz power management and distribution (PMAD) system that have particular benefits for a nuclear power Space Station are discussed.

  19. 4 Hz oscillations synchronize prefrontal-amygdala circuits during fear behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Karalis, Nikolaos; Dejean, Cyril; Chaudun, Fabrice; Khoder, Suzana; Rozeske, Robert R.; Wurtz, Hélène; Bagur, Sophie; Benchenane, Karim; Sirota, Anton; Courtin, Julien; Herry, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Fear expression relies on the coordinated activity of prefrontal and amygdala circuits, yet the mechanisms allowing long-range network synchronization during fear remain unknown. Using a combination of extracellular recordings, pharmacological, and optogenetic manipulations we report that freezing, a behavioural expression of fear, temporally coincides with the development of sustained, internally generated 4 Hz oscillations within prefrontal-amygdala circuits. 4 Hz oscillations predict freezing onset and offset and synchronize prefrontal-amygdala circuits. Optogenetic induction of prefrontal 4 Hz oscillations coordinates prefrontal-amygdala activity and elicits fear behaviour. These results unravel a novel sustained oscillatory mechanism mediating prefrontal-amygdala coupling during fear behaviour. PMID:26878674

  20. On the Feasibility of Multi-kHz Acquisition Rate Tomographic-PIV in Turbulent Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    measurements in a turbulent flame at multi-kHz acquisition rates with current generation laser and camera technology. To this end, a setup consisting of...four CMOS cameras and a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser was implemented to test the technique in a lifted turbulent jet flame. While the cameras were capable...of kHz-rate image acquisition, the laser operated at a pulse repetition rate of only 10 Hz. However, use of this laser allowed exploration of the

  1. Simultaneous quantification of GABAergic 3alpha,5alpha/3alpha,5beta neuroactive steroids in human and rat serum.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Patrizia; O'Buckley, Todd K; Alward, Sarah E; Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Girdler, Susan S; Morrow, A Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and produce inhibitory neurobehavioral and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite substantial information on the progesterone derivative (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP, allopregnanolone), the physiological significance of the other endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids has remained elusive. Here, we describe the validation of a method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to simultaneously identify serum levels of the eight 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone. The method shows specificity, sensitivity and enhanced throughput compared to other methods already available for neuroactive steroid quantification. Administration of pregnenolone to rats and progesterone to women produced selective effects on the 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced neuroactive steroids, indicating differential regulation of their biosynthetic pathways. Pregnenolone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1488%, p<0.001), (3alpha,5alpha)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THDOC, +205%, p<0.01), (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxyandrostan-17-one (3alpha,5alpha-A, +216%, p<0.001), (3alpha,5alpha,17beta)-androstane-3,17-diol (3alpha,5alpha-A-diol, +190%, p<0.01). (3alpha,5beta)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5beta-THP) and (3alpha,5beta)-3-hydroxyandrostan-17-one (3alpha,5beta-A) were not altered, while (3alpha,5beta)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5beta-THDOC) and (3alpha,5beta,17beta)-androstane-3,17-diol (3alpha,5beta-A-diol) were increased from undetectable levels to 271+/-100 and 2.4+/-0.9 pg+/-SEM, respectively (5/8 rats). Progesterone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1806%, p<0.0001), 3alpha,5beta-THP (+575%, p<0.001), 3alpha,5alpha

  2. The ALPHA Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, G. M.; Capell, M.

    1998-12-01

    The ALPHA Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) will be the first large magnetic spectrometer in space. It is scheduled to be installed on the future International Space Station ALPHA (ISSA) in the year 2002 to perform measurements of the charged particle composition to answer fundamental questions in particle physics and astrophysics. Before installation on ISSA, AMS will fly on the shuttle DISCOVERY for a period of 10 days starting in May 1998. This will enable AMS to perform a test of the apparatus and first measurements. The AMS detector has five major components: A permanent NdFeB magnet, six planes of Silicon double-sided microstrip detectors, a plastic scintillator time of flight hodoscope, a plastic scintillator anticoincidence counter and an Aerogel Cherenkov threshold counter. In addition, there are electronics, support infrastructure and interfaces.

  3. Pheromone synthesis. Part 245: Synthesis and chromatographic analysis of the four stereoisomers of 4,8-dimethyldecanal, the male aggregation pheromone of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All four stereoisomers of 4,8-dimethyldecanal (1) were synthesized from the enantiomers of 2-methyl-1-butanol and citronellal. Enantioselective GC analysis enabled separation of (4R,8R)-1 and (4R,8S)-1 from a mixture of (4S,8R)-1 and (4S,8S)-1, when octakis- (2,3-di-O-methoxymethyl-6-O-t-butyldimet...

  4. Optical wireless transmission of 405 nm, 1.45 Gbit/s optical IM/DD-OFDM signals through a 4.8 m underwater channel.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Mizukoshi, Izumi; Hanawa, Masanori

    2015-01-26

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate wireless transmission of optical intensity modulation/direct detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (IM/DD-OFDM) signals in an underwater channel using a field programmable gate array based real-time transmitter. The real-time transmission of a 405 nm 1.45 Gbit/s optical OFDM signal through a 4.8 m underwater channel with an error vector magnitude of approximately 10% was successfully achieved.

  5. Effect of level, duration, and inter-pulse interval of 1-2 kHz sonar signal exposures on harbor porpoise hearing.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; Gransier, Robin; Rambags, Martijn; Claeys, Naomi

    2014-07-01

    Safety criteria for underwater low-frequency active sonar sounds produced during naval exercises are needed to protect harbor porpoise hearing. As a first step toward defining criteria, a porpoise was exposed to sequences consisting of series of 1-s, 1-2 kHz sonar down-sweeps without harmonics (as fatiguing noise) at various combinations of average received sound pressure levels (SPLs; 144-179 dB re 1 μPa), exposure durations (1.9-240 min), and duty cycles (5%-100%). Hearing thresholds were determined for a narrow-band frequency-swept sine wave centered at 1.5 kHz before exposure to the fatiguing noise, and at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, 96, 144, and 1400 min after exposure, to quantify temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) and recovery of hearing. Results show that the inter-pulse interval of the fatiguing noise is an important parameter in determining the magnitude of noise-induced TTS. For the reported range of exposure combinations (duration and SPL), the energy of the exposure (i.e., cumulative sound exposure level; SELcum) can be used to predict the induced TTS, if the inter-pulse interval is known. Exposures with equal SELcum but with different inter-pulse intervals do not result in the same induced TTS.

  6. Source parameters of a M4.8 and its accompanying repeating earthquakes off Kamaishi, NE Japan: Implications for the hierarchical structure of asperities and earthquake cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uchida, N.; Matsuzawa, T.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Imanishi, K.; Okada, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-01-01

    We determine the source parameters of a M4.9 ?? 0.1 'characteristic earthquake' sequence and its accompanying microearthquakes at ???50 km depth on the subduction plate boundary offshore of Kamaishi, NE Japan. The microearthquakes tend to occur more frequently in the latter half of the recurrence intervals of the M4.9 ?? 0.1 events. Our results show that the microearthquakes are repeating events and they are located not only around but also within the slip area for the 2001 M4.8 event. From the hierarchical structure of slip areas and smaller stress drops for the microearthquakes compared to the M4.8 event, we infer the small repeating earthquakes rupture relatively weak patches in and around the slip area for the M4.8 event and their activity reflects a stress concentration process and/or change in frictional property (healing) at the area. We also infer the patches for the M4.9 ?? 0.1 and other repeating earthquakes undergo aseismic slip during their interseismic period. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Effect of diet and age on jejunal and circulating lymphocyte subsets in children with coeliac disease: persistence of CD4-8-intraepithelial T cells through treatment.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, M A; Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M

    1990-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the relative numbers of T lymphocyte subsets in 61 jejunal biopsies and in peripheral blood of 35 children with coeliac disease, and of 13 healthy controls. The T cell numbers in the lamina propria were unaffected by a change from gluten-free to gluten containing diet in the patients. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (where the CD8 cells predominated) were significantly raised in patients taking gluten. Ten to 20% of the patients' intraepithelial CD3 (mature T) cells expressed neither CD8 nor CD4 surface antigens. This CD4 8 T cell population persisted through gluten elimination and challenge. The circulating lymphocyte subsets showed little variation with the diet although there was a marked increase in the proportion (14.9%) of CD4 8 T cells in patients during gluten elimination. In the histologically normal jejunal mucosa from control subjects, the age of the subject showed a positive correlation with villus intraepithelial CD3+ and CD8+ cells, and crypt intraepithelial CD4+ cells. No clear cut effect of age was observed on lamina propria lymphocyte counts of the controls, or on the lymphocyte counts in jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients. The observed CD3+4-8- lymphocytes may represent activated cells unable to present their surface antigens, or they may be gamma delta-receptor bearing T cells, which could have a significant role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  8. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    An overall description of this research program is presented. The objectives are to investigate using nonhuman primates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high-intensity, 60 Hz, electric fields. 6 tabs.

  9. Early diet affects the development of 3-6 Hz EEG activity in infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study investigated whether diet affects brain physiological functions during infancy. Power spectra (3-6 Hz) of electroencephalographic signals (high density recordings) in the bilateral prefrontal, frontal, central, parietal, occipital, anterior temporal, mid-temporal, and posteri...

  10. EEG alpha rhythms and transient chromatic and achromatic pattern visual evoked potentials in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mei Ying; Chan, Kar Ying; Chiang, Jaclyn; Milston, Rebecca; Suttle, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Transient chromatic pattern visual evoked potentials (VEPs) have been found to be less repeatable in morphology in children than in adults at low to moderate chromatic contrasts. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether low repeatability of VEP components can be associated with high alpha power, in a comparison of alpha activity in children and adults. Transient chromatic contrast and achromatic resolution VEPs were recorded in children (n = 14, mean 9.6 years) and adults (n = 12, mean 21.8 years) with normal vision and assessed for repeatability. Isoluminant chromatic (magenta-cyan) and luminance-modulated achromatic grating stimuli were presented at and above psychophysical threshold levels, in pattern onset-offset at 2 Hz temporal frequency. EEGs (eyes closed and open) were recorded as single sweeps (1 s long) over three 30 s periods while facing a uniform computer display. An index of VEP detectability by observation was developed based on VEP component repeatability. The index was examined for correlations with alpha-wave parameters. Alpha power was calculated as the sum of the powers of 8-13 Hz frequencies of the EEG sweeps (using the discrete Fourier transform). Alpha power variability was calculated using the standard deviation of the powers of each sweep in a 30 s time period. The children had significantly higher alpha powers than the adults for both the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Alpha power variability was significantly higher for the eyes-open condition only. There was no relationship between alpha power parameters and index of VEP detectability by observation for both the chromatic and achromatic grating stimuli. Poor repeatability of transient pattern VEPs is not associated with high alpha power or its variability in EEG measurements in older children or young adults at Oz.

  11. The Modified HZ Conjugate Gradient Algorithm for Large-Scale Nonsmooth Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gonglin; Sheng, Zhou; Liu, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the Hager and Zhang (HZ) conjugate gradient (CG) method and the modified HZ (MHZ) CG method are presented for large-scale nonsmooth convex minimization. Under some mild conditions, convergent results of the proposed methods are established. Numerical results show that the presented methods can be better efficiency for large-scale nonsmooth problems, and several problems are tested (with the maximum dimensions to 100,000 variables).

  12. Is the spinal cord the generator of 16-Hz orthostatic tremor?

    PubMed

    Norton, Jonathan A; Wood, Duncan E; Day, Brian L

    2004-02-24

    Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by 16-Hz motor activity that is coherent between muscles. It has been suggested that this tremor originates in the brain. This view is questioned by findings from a patient with complete paraplegia who experiences intermittent leg spasms at rest. The EMG activity within the spasms showed a 16-Hz component that was coherent between muscles unilaterally and bilaterally. This raises the possibility that the spinal cord could be the source of orthostatic tremor.

  13. The effects of a 50-Hz magnetic field on the cardiovascular system in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ling; Wan, Baoquan; Liu, Xingfa; Zhang, Yemao; Lai, Jinsheng; Ruan, Guoran; He, Mengying; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    A 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) is a potential health-risk factor. Its effects on the cardiovascular system have not been fully investigated. This study was conducted to explore the effects of long-term exposure to a 50-Hz MF on the cardiovascular system. In the study, an exposure system was constructed, and the distribution of the 50-Hz MF was determined. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to a 50-Hz MF at 100 μT for 24 weeks, 20 h per day, while another 64 rats were sham exposed. During the exposure, blood pressure was measured every 4 weeks. After 24 weeks, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and electrocardiography were performed. Moreover, heart and body weight were recorded, and haematoxylin–eosin staining and real-time PCR were conducted. The results showed that compared with the sham group, exposure to a 50-Hz MF did not exert any effects on blood pressure, pulse rate, heart rate or cardiac rhythm. Furthermore, echocardiography and cardiac catheterization showed that there were no significant differences in the cardiac morphology or haemodynamics. In addition, histopathological examination showed that exposure to a 50-Hz MF had no effects on the structure of the heart. Finally, expression of the cardiac hypertrophy–related genes did not show any significant differences between the 50-Hz MF exposure group and the sham group. Taken together, in SD rats, exposure to a 50-Hz/100 μT MF for 24 weeks did not show any obvious effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:27694282

  14. Aging and the 4-kHz Air-Bone Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed age- and sex-related patterns in the prevalence and 10-year incidence of 4-kHz air-bone gaps and associated factors. Method: Data were obtained as part of the longitudinal, population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study ( Cruickshanks et al., 1998). An air-bone gap at 4 kHz was defined as an…

  15. The Modified HZ Conjugate Gradient Algorithm for Large-Scale Nonsmooth Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Gonglin; Sheng, Zhou; Liu, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the Hager and Zhang (HZ) conjugate gradient (CG) method and the modified HZ (MHZ) CG method are presented for large-scale nonsmooth convex minimization. Under some mild conditions, convergent results of the proposed methods are established. Numerical results show that the presented methods can be better efficiency for large-scale nonsmooth problems, and several problems are tested (with the maximum dimensions to 100,000 variables). PMID:27780245

  16. In vitro host range of the Hz-1 nonoccluded virus in insect cell lines.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Arthur H; Grasela, James J; Ignoffo, Carlo M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 13 insect cell lines spanning 4 orders (Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Homoptera) were tested for their ability to replicate the nonoccluded virus Hz-1. Only the Lepidopteran cell lines supported replication of the virus with TN-CL1 and BCIRL-HZ-AM1 producing the highest titers of 2.4 x 10(8) tissue culture infective dose (TCID)50/ml and 2.0 x 10(8) TCID50/ml, respectively. A codling moth cell line (CP-169) was the only Lepidopteran cell line that did not replicate the virus and transfection of this cell line with Hz-1 DNA failed to replicate the virus. Also, transfection with DNA from a recombinant baculovirus carrying the red fluorescent protein gene (AcMNPVhsp70 Red) was not expressed in CP-169 cells. The replication cycle of Hz-1 in BCIRL-HZ-AM1 cells showed that this virus replicated rapidly starting at 16 h postinoculation (p.i.) and reaching a peak titer of 1.0 x 10(8) TCID50/ml 56 h postinoculation. Hz-1 when compared with several other baculoviruses has the widest in vitro host spectrum.

  17. An extrasolar extreme-ultraviolet object. II - The nature of HZ 43. [hot white dwarf star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Liebert, J.; Lampton, M.; Spinrad, H.; Bowyer, S.; Gatewood, G.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of data are presented concerning the spectrum, distance, temperature, and evolutionary state of the hot white dwarf HZ 43, the first extrasolar object to be detected in the EUV band. The data include spectrophotometry of the star and its red dwarf companion (HZ 43B), a trigonometric parallax for the star, its tangential velocity, and results of soft X-ray and EUV observations. The main conclusions are that: (1) the spectrum of HZ 43A is that of a hot DAwk star, (2) HZ 43B is a dM3.5e star, (3) the distance of the system is about 65 pc, (4) the tangential velocity is not atypical of white dwarfs, and (5) the stellar energy distribution of HZ 43A is well fitted by a black body with an effective temperature of approximately 110,000 K. Evolutionary implications of the existence of an object as hot as HZ 43A are briefly considered, and it is suggested that the progenitors of hot DA stars must include objects hotter than spectral type sdB, with logical possibilities being nuclei of planetary nebulae and sdO stars.

  18. Excessive synchronization of basal ganglia neurons at 20 Hz slows movement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung Chu; Litvak, Vladimir; Gilbertson, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea; Lu, Chin Song; Lee, Shih Tseng; Tsai, Chon Haw; Tisch, Stephen; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Excessive synchronization of neuronal activity at around 20 Hz is a common finding in the basal ganglia of patients with untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). Correlative evidence suggests, but does not prove, that this spontaneous activity may contribute to slowness of movement in this condition. Here we investigate whether externally imposed synchronization through direct stimulation of the region of the subthalamic nucleus at 20 Hz can slow motor performance in a simple unimanual tapping task and whether this effect is frequency selective. Tapping rates were recorded on 42 sides in 22 patients with PD after overnight withdrawal of medication. Tapping was performed without stimulation and during bilateral stimulation at 20 Hz, 50 Hz and 130 Hz. We found that tapping rates were slowed by 8.2+/-3.2% (p=0.014) during 20-Hz stimulation in subjects with relatively preserved baseline function in the task. This effect was frequency selective. The current data provide proof of the principle that excessive beta synchrony within the basal ganglia-cortical loop may contribute to the slowing of movements in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Cara L.; Malavar, Jordan C.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Rats emit 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol’s stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50 kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50 kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50 kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50 kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50 kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning. PMID:24914463

  20. The influence of visuospatial attention on unattended auditory 40 Hz responses.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cullen; Gupta, Cota Navin; Plis, Sergey M; Damaraju, Eswar; Khullar, Siddharth; Calhoun, Vince D; Bridwell, David A

    2013-01-01

    Information must integrate from multiple brain areas in healthy cognition and perception. The present study examined the extent to which cortical responses within one sensory modality are modulated by a complex task conducted within another sensory modality. Electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured to a 40 Hz auditory stimulus while individuals attended to modulations in the amplitude of the 40 Hz stimulus, and as a function of the difficulty of the popular computer game Tetris. The steady-state response to the 40 Hz stimulus was isolated by Fourier analysis of the EEG. The response at the stimulus frequency was normalized by the response within the surrounding frequencies, generating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Seven out of eight individuals demonstrate a monotonic increase in the log SNR of the 40 Hz responses going from the difficult visuospatial task to the easy visuospatial task to attending to the auditory stimuli. This pattern is represented statistically by a One-Way ANOVA, indicating significant differences in log SNR across the three tasks. The sensitivity of 40 Hz auditory responses to the visuospatial load was further demonstrated by a significant correlation between log SNR and the difficulty (i.e., speed) of the Tetris task. Thus, the results demonstrate that 40 Hz auditory cortical responses are influenced by an individual's goal-directed attention to the stimulus, and by the degree of difficulty of a complex visuospatial task.

  1. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Buck, Cara L; Malavar, Jordan C; George, Olivier; Koob, George F; Vendruscolo, Leandro F

    2014-09-01

    Rats emit 50kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol's stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning.

  2. Proceedings of the NASTRAN (Tradename) Users’ Colloquium (15th) Held in Kansas City, Missouri on 4-8 May 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    HVAC duct hanger system over an extensive frequency range. The finite element, component mode synthesis, and statistical energy analysis methods are...800-5,000 Hz) analysis was conducted with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) coupled with a closed-form harmonic beam analysis program. These...resonances may be obtained by using a finer frequency increment. Statistical Energy Analysis The basic assumption used in SEA analysis is that within each band

  3. Syllabic (∼2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (∼1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F

    2013-11-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (∼2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of "fluctuation" range (∼1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (∼2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  4. The phase of prestimulus alpha oscillations affects tactile perception.

    PubMed

    Ai, Lei; Ro, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that neural oscillations in the 8- to 12-Hz range influence sensory perception. In the current study, we examined whether both the power and phase of these mu/alpha oscillations predict successful conscious tactile perception. Near-threshold tactile stimuli were applied to the left hand while electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded over the contralateral right somatosensory cortex. We found a significant inverted U-shaped relationship between prestimulus mu/alpha power and detection rate, suggesting that there is an intermediate level of alpha power that is optimal for tactile perception. We also found a significant difference in phase angle concentration at stimulus onset that predicted whether the upcoming tactile stimulus was perceived or missed. As has been shown in the visual system, these findings suggest that these mu/alpha oscillations measured over somatosensory areas exert a strong inhibitory control on tactile perception and that pulsed inhibition by these oscillations shapes the state of brain activity necessary for conscious perception. They further suggest that these common phasic processing mechanisms across different sensory modalities and brain regions may reflect a common underlying encoding principle in perceptual processing that leads to momentary windows of perceptual awareness.

  5. Alpha phase determines successful lexical decision in noise.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Antje; Henry, Molly J; Scharinger, Mathias; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-18

    Psychophysical target detection has been shown to be modulated by slow oscillatory brain phase. However, thus far, only low-level sensory stimuli have been used as targets. The current human electroencephalography (EEG) study examined the influence of neural oscillatory phase on a lexical-decision task performed for stimuli embedded in noise. Neural phase angles were compared for correct versus incorrect lexical decisions using a phase bifurcation index (BI), which quantifies differences in mean phase angles and phase concentrations between correct and incorrect trials. Neural phase angles in the alpha frequency range (8-12 Hz) over right anterior sensors were approximately antiphase in a prestimulus time window, and thus successfully distinguished between correct and incorrect lexical decisions. Moreover, alpha-band oscillations were again approximately antiphase across participants for correct versus incorrect trials during a later peristimulus time window (∼500 ms) at left-central electrodes. Strikingly, lexical decision accuracy was not predicted by either event-related potentials (ERPs) or oscillatory power measures. We suggest that correct lexical decisions depend both on successful sensory processing, which is made possible by the alignment of stimulus onset with an optimal alpha phase, as well as integration and weighting of decisional information, which is coupled to alpha phase immediately following the critical manipulation that differentiated words from pseudowords. The current study constitutes a first step toward characterizing the role of dynamic oscillatory brain states for higher cognitive functions, such as spoken word recognition.

  6. Cortical alpha oscillations as a tool for auditory selective inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Antje; Wöstmann, Malte; Obleser, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Listening to speech is often demanding because of signal degradations and the presence of distracting sounds (i.e., “noise”). The question how the brain achieves the task of extracting only relevant information from the mixture of sounds reaching the ear (i.e., “cocktail party problem”) is still open. In analogy to recent findings in vision, we propose cortical alpha (~10 Hz) oscillations measurable using M/EEG as a pivotal mechanism to selectively inhibit the processing of noise to improve auditory selective attention to task-relevant signals. We review initial evidence of enhanced alpha activity in selective listening tasks, suggesting a significant role of alpha-modulated noise suppression in speech. We discuss the importance of dissociating between noise interference in the auditory periphery (i.e., energetic masking) and noise interference with more central cognitive aspects of speech processing (i.e., informational masking). Finally, we point out the adverse effects of age-related hearing loss and/or cognitive decline on auditory selective inhibition. With this perspective article, we set the stage for future studies on the inhibitory role of alpha oscillations for speech processing in challenging listening situations. PMID:24904385

  7. Radiofrequency signal affects alpha band in resting electroencephalogram

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Rania; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Hugueville, Laurent; Ducorps, Antoine; Lemaréchal, Jean-Didier; Thuróczy, György; de Seze, René

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human resting EEG with a control of some parameters that are known to affect alpha band, such as electrode impedance, salivary cortisol, and caffeine. Eyes-open and eyes-closed resting EEG data were recorded in 26 healthy young subjects under two conditions: sham exposure and real exposure in double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover design. Spectral power of EEG rhythms was calculated for the alpha band (8–12 Hz). Saliva samples were collected before and after the study. Salivary cortisol and caffeine were assessed by ELISA and HPLC, respectively. The electrode impedance was recorded at the beginning of each run. Compared with the sham session, the exposure session showed a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) decrease of the alpha band spectral power during closed-eyes condition. This effect persisted in the postexposure session (P < 0.0001). No significant changes were detected in electrode impedance, salivary cortisol, and caffeine in the sham session compared with the exposure one. These results suggest that GSM-EMFs of a mobile phone affect the alpha band within spectral power of resting human EEG. PMID:25695646

  8. BOLD fractional contribution to resting-state functional connectivity above 0.1 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan; Glover, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) spontaneous signals from resting-state (RS) brains have typically been characterized by low-pass filtered timeseries at frequencies ≤ 0.1 Hz, and studies of these low-frequency fluctuations have contributed exceptional understanding of the baseline functions of our brain. Very recently, emerging evidence has demonstrated that spontaneous activities may persist in higher frequency bands (even up to 0.8 Hz), while presenting less variable network patterns across the scan duration. However, as an indirect measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signal results from an inherently slow hemodynamic process, which in fact might be too slow to accommodate the observed high-frequency functional connectivity (FC). To examine whether the observed high-frequency spontaneous FC originates from BOLD contrast, we collected RS data as a function of echo time (TE). Here we focus on two specific resting state networks – the default-mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN), and the major findings are fourfold: (1) we observed BOLD-like linear TE-dependence in the spontaneous activity at frequency bands up to 0.5 Hz (the maximum frequency that can be resolved with TR = 1s), supporting neural relevance of the RSFC at higher frequency range; (2) Conventional models of hemodynamic response functions must be modified to support resting state BOLD contrast, especially at higher frequencies; (3) there are increased fractions of non-BOLD-like contributions to the RSFC above the conventional 0.1 Hz (non-BOLD/BOLD contrast at 0.4~0.5 Hz is ~ 4 times that at <0.1 Hz); and (4) the spatial patterns of RSFC are frequency-dependent. Possible mechanisms underlying the present findings and technical concerns regarding RSFC above 0.1 Hz are discussed. PMID:25497686

  9. THE SPECTRAL-TIMING PROPERTIES OF UPPER AND LOWER kHz QPOs

    SciTech Connect

    Peille, Philippe; Barret, Didier; Uttley, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Soft lags from the emission of the lower kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have been reported from 4U1608-522 and 4U1636-536. Those lags hold prospects for constraining the origin of the QPO emission. In this paper, we investigate the spectral-timing properties of both the lower and upper kHz QPOs from the neutron star binary 4U1728-34, using the entire Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer archive on this source. We show that the lag-energy spectra of the two QPOs are systematically different: while the lower kHz QPO shows soft lags, the upper kHz QPO shows either a flat lag-energy spectrum or hard variations lagging softer variations. This suggests two different QPO-generation mechanisms. We also performed the first spectral deconvolution of the covariance spectra of both kHz QPOs. The QPO spectra are consistent with Comptonized blackbody emission, similar to the one found in the time-averaged spectrum, but with a higher seed-photon temperature, suggesting that a more compact inner region of the Comptonization layer (boundary/spreading layer, corona) is responsible for the QPO emission. Considering our results together with other recent findings, this leads us to the hypothesis that the lower kHz QPO signal is generated by coherent oscillations of the compact boundary layer region itself. The upper kHz QPO signal may then be linked to less-coherent accretion-rate variations produced in the inner accretion disk, and is then detected when they reach the boundary layer.

  10. EEG Alpha Production Correlates of Cognitive Style Differences and Recall of Metaphor from Poetry. Technical Report No. 324.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddix, Michael D.; Dunn, Bruce R.

    Differences in metaphor recall from poetry were investigated using 10 female and 10 male college student subjects hypothesized as having either an analytic or a holistic processing style. Style was determined using bilateral alpha (8-13Hz) scores measured from the cerebral cortex. It was suggested, on the basis of bimodal theory, that holistic…

  11. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  12. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Ni(II) complex with 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7,14-dienium bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Yusoff, Latifah M.; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.; Ismail, Wafiuddin; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2014-09-03

    Nickel(II) complex have been synthesized by treating a 14-membered ring tetraaza macrocyclic compound, 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7,14-dienium, bromide (Me{sub 6}N{sub 4}H{sub 4})Br{sub 2} with nickel acetate in metanol. The complex was characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis), and single crystal diffraction (X-ray). The nickel atom coordinates through four nitrogen atoms in the ligand. Square planar geometry has been proposed for this complex.

  14. All-polymer bulk heterojuction solar cells with 4.8% efficiency achieved by solution processing from a co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Earmme, Taeshik; Hwang, Ye-Jin; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Jenekhe, Samson A

    2014-09-17

    All-polymer solar cells with 4.8% power conversion efficiency are achieved via solution processing from a co-solvent. The observed short-circuit current density of 10.5 mA cm(-2) and external quantum efficiency of 61.3% are also the best reported in all-polymer solar cells so far. The results demonstrate that processing the active layer from a co-solvent is an important strategy in achieving highly efficient all-polymer solar cells.

  15. Safety study of 50 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, David H.; Lomarev, Mikhail; Wassermann, Eric; Lopez, Grisel; Houdayer, Elise; Fasano, Rebecca E.; Dang, Nguyet; Hallett, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in treating Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the best values for rTMS parameters are not established. 50 Hz rTMS may be superior to ≤ 25 Hz rTMS investigated so far. The objective of this study was to determine if 50 Hz rTMS could be delivered safely in PD patients since current safety limits are exceeded. Methods 50 Hz rTMS was applied with a circular coil on the primary motor cortex (M1). Stimulation intensity was first tested at 60% rest motor threshold [RMT] and 0.5 sec train duration and then increased in 0.5 sec steps to 2 sec, and by 10% steps to 90% RMT. Multi-channel electromyography (EMG) was recorded to control for signs of increasing time-locked EMG activity including correlates of the spread of excitation and after-discharges, or an increase of M1 excitability. Pre- and post-50 Hz rTMS assessments included EEG, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Grooved Pegboard Test, Serial Reaction Time Task (SRTT), Folstein Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Verbal Fluency to control for motor and cognitive side effects. Results Ten PD patients were investigated. Multi-channel EMG showed no signs of increased time-locked EMG activity including correlates of the spread of excitation and after-discharges, or increased M1 excitability in 9 patients. A PD patient with bi-temporal spikes in the pre-testing EEG had clinical and EMG correlates of spread of excitation at 90% RMT, but no seizure activity. Pre- and post-50 Hz assessment showed no changes. No adverse events were observed. 50 Hz rTMS was well tolerated except by one patient who wished to terminate the study due to facial muscle stimulation. Conclusion 50 Hz rTMS at an intensity of 90% RMT for 2 sec appears safe in patients with PD, but caution should be taken for patients with paroxysmal EEG activity. For this reason, comprehensive screening should include EEG before higher-frequency rTMS is applied

  16. Are alpha-gliadins glycosylated?

    PubMed

    Turner, J B; Garner, G V; Gordon, D B; Brookes, S J; Smith, C A

    2002-02-01

    Alpha-gliadins isolated by carboxymethylcellulose chromatography contain noncovalently bound glucose probably due to contaminating proteoglycans and to material shed from the column. Traces of carbohydrate remain strongly bound to alpha-gliadins even after harsh denaturation, but our results indicate alpha-gliadins are not glycoproteins. Suggestions that gliadins are glycoproteins are probably due to contamination with this glucose and the presence of these proteoglycans.

  17. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  18. 47 CFR 73.30 - Petition for authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the 1605-1705 kHz band. 73.30 Section 73.30 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... authorization of an allotment in the 1605-1705 kHz band. (a) Any party interested in operating an AM broadcast station on one of the ten channels in the 1605-1705 kHz band must file a petition for the establishment...

  19. 40 Hz auditory steady state response to linguistic features of stimuli during auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Yan, Zheng; Gao, Xiao-rong

    2013-10-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain, depending on the modulation frequency used. In general, responses induced by low rates (≤40 Hz) emanate mostly from central structures of the brain, and responses from high rates (≥80 Hz) emanate mostly from the peripheral auditory nerve or brainstem structures. Besides, it was reported that the gamma band ASSR (30-90 Hz) played an important role in working memory, speech understanding and recognition. This paper investigated the 40 Hz ASSR evoked by modulated speech and reversed speech. The speech was Chinese phrase voice, and the noise-like reversed speech was obtained by temporally reversing the speech. Both auditory stimuli were modulated with a frequency of 40 Hz. Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with hallucination symptom participated in the experiment. Results showed reduction in left auditory cortex response when healthy subjects listened to the reversed speech compared with the speech. In contrast, when the patients who experienced auditory hallucinations listened to the reversed speech, the auditory cortex of left hemispheric responded more actively. The ASSR results were consistent with the behavior results of patients. Therefore, the gamma band ASSR is expected to be helpful for rapid and objective diagnosis of hallucination in clinic.

  20. Modulation of the ∽20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm to passive movement and tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Eeva; Laaksonen, Kristina; Piitulainen, Harri; Parkkonen, Lauri; Forss, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Background Integration of afferent somatosensory input with motor-cortex output is essential for accurate movements. Prior studies have shown that tactile input modulates motor-cortex excitability, which is reflected in the reactivity of the ∽20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm. ∽20-Hz rebound is connected to inhibition or deactivation of motor cortex whereas suppression has been associated with increased motor cortex activity. Although tactile sense carries important information for controlling voluntary actions, proprioception likely provides the most essential feedback for motor control. Methods To clarify how passive movement modulates motor-cortex excitability, we studied with magnetoencephalography (MEG) the amplitudes and peak latencies of suppression and rebound of the ∽20-Hz rhythm elicited by tactile stimulation and passive movement of right and left index fingers in 22 healthy volunteers. Results Passive movement elicited a stronger and more robust ∽20-Hz rebound than tactile stimulation. In contrast, the suppression amplitudes did not differ between the two stimulus types. Conclusion Our findings suggest that suppression and rebound represent activity of two functionally distinct neuronal populations. The ∽20-Hz rebound to passive movement could be a suitable tool to study the functional state of the motor cortex both in healthy subjects and in patients with motor disorders. PMID:25874163

  1. Is 1 Hz rTMS Always Inhibitory in Healthy Individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Caparelli, EC; Backus, W; Telang, F; Wang, GJ; Maloney, T; Goldstein, RZ; Henn, F

    2012-01-01

    1 Hz repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is considered to have an inhibitory effect in healthy people because it suppresses the excitability of the motor or visual cortex that is expressed as an increase in the motor or the phosphene threshold (PT), respectively. However, the underlying mechanisms and the brain structures involved in the action of rTMS are still unknown. In this study we used two sessions of simultaneous TMS-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), one before and one after, 15 minutes of 1Hz rTMS to map changes in brain function associated with the reduction in cortical excitability of the primary visual cortex induced by 1 Hz rTMS, when TMS was applied on the occipital area of healthy volunteers. Two groups were evaluated, one group composed of people that can see phosphenes, and another of those lacking this perception. The inhibitory effect, induced by the 1 Hz rTMS, was observed through the increase of the PT, in the first group, but did not lead to a global reduction in brain activation, instead, showed change in the activation pattern before and after rTMS. Conversely, for the second group, changes in brain activation were observed just in few brain areas, suggesting that the effect of 1 Hz rTMS might not be inhibitory for everyone and that the concept of inhibitory/excitatory effect of rTMS may need to be revised. PMID:22930669

  2. Transionospheric attenuation of 100 kHz radio waves inferred from satellite and ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Parrot, Michel; Ash, Matthew; Astin, Ivan; Williams, Paul; Talhi, R.

    2009-03-01

    Around fifty LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) transmitters in the northern hemisphere currently launch continuously pulsed 100 kHz radio waves into the Earth's atmosphere for marine navigation. It is discovered that the 100 kHz radio waves from the LORAN transmissions can be detected by the DEMETER satellite at an altitude of ~660 km above the transmitters. These novel electric field measurements in space enable the determination of the nocturnal transionospheric attenuation by comparison with ground based electric field measurements. The electric field measurements on the satellite indicate that the nocturnal transionospheric attenuation of 100 kHz radio waves from LORAN transmissions is equivalent to a nocturnal subionospheric attenuation of the 100 kHz radio waves at a distance of ~7-9 Mm. The radio waves exhibit an average subionospheric attenuation of ~5 dB/Mm and it is concluded that the nocturnal transionospheric attenuation of 100 kHz radio waves is ~35-45 dB. This result enables future space missions to quantify the intensity of lightning discharges associated with transient luminous events and terrestrial γ-ray flashes.

  3. Feasibility of a bilateral 4000–6000 Hz notch as a phenotype for genetic association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Susan L.; Richter, Scott J.; Teglas, Sandra L.; Bhatt, Ishan S.; Morehouse, Robin C.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Henrich, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a worldwide health problem and a growing concern among young people. Although some people appear to be more susceptible to NIHL, genetic association studies lack a specific phenotype. We tested the feasibility of a bilateral 4000–6000 Hz audiometric notch as a phenotype for identifying genetic contributions to hearing loss in young adults. Design A case-control-control study was conducted to examine selected SNPs in 52 genes previously associated with hearing loss and/or expressed in the cochlea. A notch was defined as a minimum of a 15-dB drop at 4000–6000 Hz from the previous best threshold with a 5-dB ‘recovery’ at 8000 Hz. Study sample Participants were 252 individuals of European descent taken from a population of 640 young adults who are students of classical music. Participants were grouped as No-notch (NN), Unilateral Notch (UN), or Bilateral Notch (BN). Results The strongest evidence of a genetic association with the 4000–6000 Hz notch was a nonsynonymous SNP variant in the ESRR? gene (rs61742642:C>T, P386S). Carriers of the minor allele accounted for 26% of all bilateral losses. Conclusion This study indicates that the 4000–6000 Hz bilateral notch is a feasible phenotype for identifying genetic susceptibility to hearing loss. PMID:25938503

  4. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  5. Diversity of lanthanide(III)-organic extended frameworks with a 4,8-disulfonyl-2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid ligand: syntheses, structures, and magnetic and luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wu-Fang; Wang, Yu-Ling; Shan, Zeng-Mei; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Tang, Jinkui

    2012-02-20

    A sulfonate-carboxylate ligand, 4,8-disulfonyl-2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid (H(4)-DSNDA), and eight new lanthanide coordination polymers {[Pr(4)(OH)(4)(DSNDA)(2)(H(2)O)(12)](H(2)O)(10)}(n) (1), [Ln(H(2)-DSNDA)(0.5)(DSNDA)(0.5)(H(2)O)(5)](n) (Ln = La(2), Nd(3), Sm(4), Eu(5), Gd(6), and Dy(7)), and {[Er(H-DSNDA)(H(2)O)(4)](H(2)O)}(n) (8) have been synthesized. Detailed crystal structures of these compounds have been investigated. Compound 1 has a 3D framework featuring the unique cubane-shaped [Pr(4)(μ(3)-OH)(4)] clusters and is a binodal 4,8-connected network with (4(16)·6(12))(4(4)·6(2))(2) topology. Compounds 2-7 are isostructural and have 2D layered structures. Compound 8 is also a 2D layer but belongs to different structural types. The luminescence behavior of compound Eu(5) shows that the π-rich aromatic organic ligands efficiently transfer the absorbed light energy to the Eu(III) ions, thus enhancing the overall luminescent properties of compound Eu(5). The magnetic properties of all compounds except for the diamagnetic La(2) compound have been investigated. In addition, elemental analysis, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric analysis of these compounds are also described.

  6. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Reading Improvement Program for Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marable, June Morehead

    This document discusses the founding and establishment of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's reading experience pilot project. The efforts of this project were aligned with those of Right to Read and Reading Is Fundamental (RIF). Because of the response from parents and children, plans are being made to increase present operations within the next…

  7. Molecular characterization of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J K; Pearson, W R; Lynch, K R

    1991-02-01

    Three 'alpha 1-adrenoceptors' and three 'alpha 2-adrenoceptors' have now been cloned. How closely do these receptors match the native receptors that have been identified pharmacologically? What are the properties of these receptors, and how do they relate to other members of the cationic amine receptor family? Kevin Lynch and his colleagues discuss these questions in this review.

  8. Phase transition and conduction mechanism in Pb{sub 2}Na{sub 0.8}R{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 4.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 15} material (R=rare earth)

    SciTech Connect

    Bouziane, M.; Taibi, M.; Boukhari, A.

    2013-11-15

    Electrical properties of Pb{sub 2}Na{sub 0.8}Eu{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 4.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 15} tungsten bronze compound were investigated. Ferroelectric phase transition of diffuse type is observed at 395 °C. Conductivity study as a function of temperature (RT-600 °C) and at three different frequencies (10, 100 and 1000 kHz) suggests the existence of dominant ionic conduction. The rise of ac conductivity on increasing temperature supports the NTCR (negative temperature coefficient of resistance) behaviour of the material. The activation energies have been evaluated from ac conductivity using Arrhenius equation and discussed. Different conduction mechanisms were identified. For comparison, the conducting properties of Pb{sub 2}Na{sub 0.8}R{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 4.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 15} (R=Dy, Nd, La) were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Thermal evolution of lnσ{sub ac} of Pb{sub 2}Na{sub 0.8}Eu{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 4.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 15} at selected frequencies. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We found that TB compounds exhibit a diffuse type of first- order transition. • A negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behaviour is observed. • Three conduction mechanisms were identified: n-and/or p-type at low temperatures. • The conduction mechanism in the studied compounds is very complex.

  9. Plasma antennas driven by 5–20 kHz AC power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiansen Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-15

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5–20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  10. 2- to 3-kHz continuum emissions as possible indications of global heliospheric 'breathing'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzedzielski, S.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper analyzes the main features of 2- to 3-kHz heliospheric emissions in the context of a general heliospheric 'breathing' as inferred from the Voyager 2 solar wind average ram pressure data. Triggers for the three 3-kHz emission events seen to date are suggested, and good agreement is obtained in timing and expected postshock frequency for termination shock distances of about 90 AU. It is suggested that the visibility of the individual 3-kHz events and their observed upward frequency drift are enhanced when the postulated global heliospheric expansion results in the formation of a transient, compressed external plasma barrier around the heliopause that prevents radiation escape for several months. The average termination shock distance is estimated to be in the range 80-90 AU.

  11. Cosmic ray scintillations in the frequency range from 0.00001 to 0.01 Hz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Lheureux, J.

    1978-01-01

    Power spectra of the flux variations in cosmic rays of energy greater than a few GeV are presented. The data were obtained at balloon altitudes (40-45 km) from two scintillation-type detectors flown for six hours from Palestine, Texas, on November 4, 1972. The large area detectors had effective count rates up to 2000 cps setting the Poisson noise level in the power spectra of the relative fluctuations at 0.001/Hz. The analysis was made on the singles rate of each of the counters as well as on the coincidence rates between them. In all cases, the spectra between 0.0001 and 0.002 Hz are power laws in frequency of the form f to the exponent negative gamma, where gamma is between 1.5 and 2.0. No significant peaks in the range 0.0001 to 0.01 Hz are observed.

  12. Plasma antennas driven by 5-20 kHz AC power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiansen; Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-01

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5-20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  13. Low frequency, ca. 40 Hz, pulse trains recorded in the humpback whale assembly in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Darling, James D

    2015-11-01

    During studies of humpback whale song and social sounds in Hawaii, bouts of low frequency (ca. 40 Hz) pulses were periodically recorded. One example was made near an active group of eight adults (included 22 bouts, 2-13 s long, over 90 min); another close to an adult male-female pair (12 bouts, 9-93 s long, over 22 min). The mean peak and center frequencies (39 to 40 Hz) and bandwidth (13 Hz) were similar in both, but the organization of the pulses differed. Song components, social sounds, bubble trains, or other species do not provide a ready explanation for this sound.

  14. Observations of backscatter from sand and gravel seafloors between 170 and 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Ward, Larry G

    2015-10-01

    Interpreting observations of frequency-dependence in backscatter from the seafloor offers many challenges, either because multiple frequencies are used for different observations that will later be merged or simply because seafloor scattering models are not well-understood above 100 kHz. Hindering the understanding of these observations is the paucity of reported, calibrated acoustic measurements above 100 kHz. This manuscript seeks to help elucidate the linkages between seafloor properties and frequency-dependent seafloor backscatter by describing observations of backscatter collected from sand, gravel, and bedrock seafloors at frequencies between 170 and 250 kHz and at a grazing angle of 45°. Overall, the frequency dependence appeared weak for all seafloor types, with a slight increase in seafloor scattering strength with increasing frequency for an area with unimodal, very poorly to moderately well sorted, slightly granular to granular medium sand with significant amounts of shell debris and a slight decrease in all other locations.

  15. Study on a pneumatically driven split stirling cryocooler operating above 100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. Y.; Yuan, Y.; Ge, Z. G.; Song, Y. J.; Gan, Z. H.; Wu, Y. N.

    2014-01-01

    Higher operating frequency can improve power density in a cryocooler thereby can effectively reduce the volume and weight of the whole system while maintaining comparable efficiency. A pneumatically driven split-Stirling cryocooler operating above 100 Hz was designed, manufactured and tested. Effect of parameters on the performance was investigated using Sage. Experiments on the cold head were performed using a commercial linear compressor. The cryocooler achieved a no-load temperature of about 77 K with a cool down time to 80 K of 6.9 min at 105 Hz and 2.50 MPa, and the maximum net cooling power of 0.31 W was gained at 90.0 K at 105 Hz and 3.25 MPa.

  16. Low-frequency sounds and psychological tests at 7, 18, and 40 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damijan, Zbigniew; Kasprzak, Cezary; Panuszka, Ryszard

    2004-05-01

    Research included the results of tests aimed to determine how LFN (low-frequency noise) with the dominating frequency (7 Hz at 120 dB, 18 Hz at 120 dB, and 40 Hz at 110 dB) influences human brain potentials and understanding the dependency of results achieved in psychological questionnaires. The psychological questionnaires (EPQ-R Eysencks and SSS-5 Zuckermans) were analyzed. Presented issue existences difference, relative influence LFN on human biopotentials, dependence from acquired results in ranges EPQ-R Eysencks and SSS-5 Zuckermans. The test included 96 experiments. Standard EEG potentials, ECG potentials, and EDP (dermal) were recorded before, during and after subject's 35-min exposures to LFN. Evident differences in changed bio-signals especially in EEG subject's dispersion, were easily determined and correlated to questionnaire reports.

  17. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  18. Design, synthesis and potential 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test activity of some novel 2-(substituted)-3-{[substituted]amino}quinazolin-4(3H)-one.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Shrivastava, Birendra; Pandeya, Surendra N; Stables, James P

    2011-04-01

    Thirty new 2-(substituted)-3-{[substituted]amino}quinazolin-4(3H)-one were designed and synthesized keeping in view the structural requirement of pharmacophore and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity and neurotoxicity. The anticonvulsant activity of the titled compounds was assessed using the 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test. The most active compound of the series was 3-({(E)-[3-(4-chloro-3-methylphenoxy)phenyl]methylidene}amino)-2-phenylquinazolin-4(3H)-one PhQZ 7, which showed 100% protection (4/4, 0.5 h) and 75% protection (3/4, 0.25 h) at a dose of 100 mg/kg in mice. A computational study was carried out for calculation of pharmacophore pattern and prediction of pharmacokinetic properties. Titled compounds have also exhibited good binding properties with epilepsy molecular targets such as glutamate, GABA (A) delta and GABA (A) alpha-1 receptors, in Lamarckian genetic algorithm based flexible docking studies.

  19. 0.1-Hz 1-PW Ti:Sapphire Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Jeong, Tae Moon; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Jongmin

    2010-04-01

    Ultrashort quantum beam facility (UQBF) project in Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI), GIST aims to develop a 0.1-Hz petawatt Ti:sapphire laser system based on chirped pulse amplification. Currently, the average output energy of 46.3 J has been reached at 0.1-Hz repetition rate. The output energy of 46.3 J corresponds to 1.1 PW, considering the pulse duration of 30 fs and the grating efficiency of 69.3%, which have been measured with a single-shot SPIDER and a preliminary pulse compressor. UQBF construction is on schedule for the first petawatt experiments in 2010.

  20. 20 kHz main inverter unit. [for space station power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, S.

    1989-01-01

    A proof-of-concept main inverter unit has demonstrated the operation of a pulse-width-modulated parallel resonant power stage topology as a 20-kHz ac power source driver, showing simple output regulation, parallel operation, power sharing and short-circuit operation. The use of a two-stage dc input filter controls the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) characteristics of the dc power bus, and the use of an ac harmonic trap controls the EMC characteristics of the 20-kHz ac power bus.

  1. Near real-time response matrix calibration for 10 Hz GOFB

    SciTech Connect

    Liu C.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2012-05-20

    The 10 Hz global orbit feedback (GOFB), for damping the trajectory perturbation ({approx}10 Hz) due to the vibrations of the triplet quadrupoles, is operational. The correction algorithm uses transfer functions between the beam position monitors and correctors obtained from the online optics model and a correction algorithm based on singular value decomposition (SVD). Recently the calibration of the transfer functions was measured using beam position measurements acquired while modulating dedicated correctors. In this report, the feedback results with model matrix and measured matrix are compared.

  2. MD-1324 and MD-1324A 5kHz Modem Overview, Issues and Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Contactor providing TSN support on DMR , MD-1324 1 Mar 2011 "Sustaining the Tactical Edge through reliable C4ISR UHF SATCOM Support" Distribution...UHF SATCOM Antenna and an External HPA / Up Converter (like a UHF SATCOM AN/WSC-3, ARC-210, or DMR RFS). ▼ Supports 5kHz and 25kHz DAMA and Non...Low cost light weight comms to manpac radio users and low data rate reliable comms to disadvantaged users. ▼ Simultaneously supports two

  3. Microscopic cluster model of {alpha}+n, {alpha}+p, {alpha}+ {sup 3}He, and {alpha}+{alpha} elastic scattering from a realistic effective nuclear interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dohet-Eraly, J.; Baye, D.

    2011-07-15

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction adapted to cluster-model calculations of collisions is derived from the realistic Argonne potential AV18 with the unitary correlation operator method. The unitary correlation is determined from the {alpha}+{alpha} elastic phase shifts calculated in a cluster approach by the generator coordinate method coupled with the microscopic R-matrix method. With this interaction, the elastic phase shifts for the {alpha}+n, {alpha}+p, and {alpha}+{sup 3}He collisions are calculated within the same model. Without further adjustment, a good agreement with experimental data is obtained with a small model space.

  4. Alpha-particle microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Chouin, Nicolas; Bardies, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing availability of alpha emitters, targeted α-particle therapy has emerged as a solution of choice to treat haematological cancers and micrometastatic and minimal residual diseases. Alpha-particles are highly cytotoxic because of their high linear energy transfer (LET) and have a short range of a few cell diameters in tissue, assuring good treatment specificity. These radiologic features make conventional dosimetry less relevant for that context. Stochastic variations in the energy deposited in cell nuclei are important because of the microscopic target size, low number of α- particle traversals, and variation in LET along the α-particle track. Microdosimetry provides a conceptual framework that aims at a systematic analysis of the stochastic distribution of energy deposits in irradiated matter. The different quantities of microdosimetry and the different methods of microdosimetric calculations were described in the early eighties. Since then, numerous models have been published through the years and applied to analyse experimental data or to model realistic therapeutic situations. Major results have been an accurate description of the high toxicity of α-particles, and the description of the predominant effect of activity distribution at the cellular scale on toxicity or efficacy of potential targeted α-particle therapies. This last factor represents a major limitation to the use of microdosimetry in vivo because determination of the source - target distribution is complicated. The future contributions of microdosimetry in targeted α-particle therapy research will certainly depend on the ability to develop high-resolution detectors and on the implementation of pharmaco-kinetic models at the tumour microenvironment scale.

  5. FEF-Controlled Alpha Delay Activity Precedes Stimulus-Induced Gamma-Band Activity in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan; Kastner, Sabine; Jensen, Ole

    2017-04-12

    Recent findings in the visual system of nonhuman primates have demonstrated an important role of gamma-band activity (40-100 Hz) in the feedforward flow of sensory information, whereas feedback control appears to be established dynamically by oscillations in the alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta (13-18 Hz) bands (van Kerkoerle et al., 2014; Bastos et al., 2015). It is not clear, however, how alpha oscillations are controlled and how they interact with the flow of visual information mediated by gamma-band activity. Using noninvasive human MEG recordings in subjects performing a visuospatial attention task, we show that fluctuations in alpha power during a delay period in a spatial attention task preceded subsequent stimulus-driven gamma-band activity. Importantly, these interactions correlated with behavioral performance. Using Granger analysis, we further show that the right frontal-eye field (rFEF) exerted feedback control of the visual alpha oscillations. Our findings suggest that alpha oscillations controlled by the FEF route cortical information flow by modulating gamma-band activity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Visual perception relies on a feedforward flow of information from sensory regions, which is modulated by a feedback drive. We have identified the neuronal dynamics supporting integration of the feedforward and feedback information. Alpha oscillations in early visual regions reflect feedback control when spatial attention is allocated and this control is exercised by the right frontal eye field. Importantly, the alpha-band activity predicted both performance and activity in the gamma band. In particular, gamma activity was modulated by the phase of the alpha oscillations. These findings provide novel insight into how the brain operates as a network and suggest that the integration of feedforward and feedback information is implemented by cross-frequency interactions between slow and fast neuronal oscillations.

  6. DFT CONFORMATIONAL STUDIES OF ALPHA-MALTOTRIOSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent DFT optimization studies on alpha-maltose improved our understanding of the preferred conformations of alpha-maltose and the present study extends these studies to alpha-maltotriose with three alpha-D-glucopyranose residues linked by two alpha-[1-4] bridges, denoted herein as DP-3's. Combina...

  7. Prothymosin alpha in human blood.

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, C; Haritos, A A; Caldarella, J; Horecker, B L

    1987-01-01

    The major cross-reacting peptide in human plasma detected with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for thymosin alpha 1 was identified as prothymosin alpha, based on its elution properties in gel-filtration chromatography and its amino acid composition after purification by HPLC. A small quantity (less than 10%) of the total cross-reacting material was recovered in fractions corresponding to lower molecular weight thymosin alpha 1-like peptides. The total quantity of cross-reacting material detected in human blood, expressed as thymosin alpha 1 equivalents, was 11-14 pmol/ml (approximately 90% was recovered in the leukocyte fraction, approximately 10% was in the plasma fraction, and 1-2% was in the erythrocyte fraction). The peptide present in leukocytes was also identified as prothymosin alpha. After correction for the 5-times lower molar reactivity of prothymosin alpha in the thymosin alpha 1 RIA employed in these experiments, we estimate that the content of prothymosin alpha in human blood is 55-70 pmol/ml (0.6-0.8 microgram/ml). The relatively small quantities recovered in the erythrocyte and plasma fractions may be attributed to contamination of the former by leukocytes or to leakage from leukocytes into the plasma. PMID:3474615

  8. EEG Alpha Power and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doppelmayr, M.; Klimesch, W.; Stadler, W.; Pollhuber, D.; Heine, C.

    2002-01-01

    Tested whether alpha power in different sub-bands is selectively related to intelligence. For 74 Austrian subjects, the EEG was recorded during a resting session and 2 different intelligence tests were performed. Findings show a strong positive correlation between intelligence and alpha power. (SLD)

  9. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  10. The Human Neural Alpha Response to Speech is a Proxy of Attentional Control.

    PubMed

    Wöstmann, Malte; Lim, Sung-Joo; Obleser, Jonas

    2017-03-18

    Human alpha (~10 Hz) oscillatory power is a prominent neural marker of cognitive effort. When listeners attempt to process and retain acoustically degraded speech, alpha power enhances. It is unclear whether these alpha modulations reflect the degree of acoustic degradation per se or the degradation-driven demand to a listener's attentional control. Using an irrelevant-speech paradigm and measuring the electroencephalogram (EEG), the current experiment demonstrates that the neural alpha response to speech is a surprisingly clear proxy of top-down control, entirely driven by the listening goals of attending versus ignoring degraded speech. While (n = 23) listeners retained the serial order of 9 to-be-recalled digits, one to-be-ignored sentence was presented. Distractibility of the to-be-ignored sentence parametrically varied in acoustic detail (noise-vocoding), with more acoustic detail of distracting speech increasingly disrupting listeners' serial memory recall. Where previous studies had observed decreases in parietal and auditory alpha power with more acoustic detail (of target speech), alpha power here showed the opposite pattern and increased with more acoustic detail in the speech distractor. In sum, the neural alpha response reflects almost exclusively a listener's goal, which is decisive for whether more acoustic detail facilitates comprehension (of attended speech) or enhances distraction (of ignored speech).

  11. Suppressed Alpha Oscillations Predict Intelligibility of Speech and its Acoustic Details

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Modulations of human alpha oscillations (8–13 Hz) accompany many cognitive processes, but their functional role in auditory perception has proven elusive: Do oscillatory dynamics of alpha reflect acoustic details of the speech signal and are they indicative of comprehension success? Acoustically presented words were degraded in acoustic envelope and spectrum in an orthogonal design, and electroencephalogram responses in the frequency domain were analyzed in 24 participants, who rated word comprehensibility after each trial. First, the alpha power suppression during and after a degraded word depended monotonically on spectral and, to a lesser extent, envelope detail. The magnitude of this alpha suppression exhibited an additional and independent influence on later comprehension ratings. Second, source localization of alpha suppression yielded superior parietal, prefrontal, as well as anterior temporal brain areas. Third, multivariate classification of the time–frequency pattern across participants showed that patterns of late posterior alpha power allowed best for above-chance classification of word intelligibility. Results suggest that both magnitude and topography of late alpha suppression in response to single words can indicate a listener's sensitivity to acoustic features and the ability to comprehend speech under adverse listening conditions. PMID:22100354

  12. Flicker Regularity Is Crucial for Entrainment of Alpha Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Notbohm, Annika; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that alpha oscillations (8–13 Hz) in human electroencephalogram (EEG) modulate perception via phase-dependent inhibition. If entrained to an external driving force, inhibition maxima and minima of the oscillation appear more distinct in time and make potential phase-dependent perception predictable. There is an ongoing debate about whether visual stimulation is suitable to entrain alpha oscillations. On the one hand, it has been argued that a series of light flashes results in transient event-related responses (ERPs) superimposed on the ongoing EEG. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that alpha oscillations become entrained to a series of light flashes if they are presented at a certain temporal regularity. This raises the question under which circumstances a sequence of light flashes causes entrainment, i.e., whether an arrhythmic stream of light flashes would also result in entrainment. Here, we measured detection rates in response to visual targets at two opposing stimulation phases during rhythmic and arrhythmic light stimulation. We introduce a new measure called “behavioral modulation depth” to determine differences in perception. This measure is capable of correcting for inevitable artifacts that occur in visual detection tasks during visual stimulation. The physical concept of entrainment predicts that increased stimulation intensity should produce stronger entrainment. Thus, two experiments with medium (Experiment 1) and high (Experiment 2) stimulation intensity were performed. Data from the first experiment show that the behavioral modulation depth (alpha phase-dependent differences in detection threshold) increases with increasing entrainment of alpha oscillations. Furthermore, individual alpha phase delays of entrained alpha oscillations determine the behavioral modulation depth: the largest behavioral modulation depth can be found if targets presented during the minimum of the entrained oscillation are

  13. Flicker Regularity Is Crucial for Entrainment of Alpha Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Annika; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) in human electroencephalogram (EEG) modulate perception via phase-dependent inhibition. If entrained to an external driving force, inhibition maxima and minima of the oscillation appear more distinct in time and make potential phase-dependent perception predictable. There is an ongoing debate about whether visual stimulation is suitable to entrain alpha oscillations. On the one hand, it has been argued that a series of light flashes results in transient event-related responses (ERPs) superimposed on the ongoing EEG. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that alpha oscillations become entrained to a series of light flashes if they are presented at a certain temporal regularity. This raises the question under which circumstances a sequence of light flashes causes entrainment, i.e., whether an arrhythmic stream of light flashes would also result in entrainment. Here, we measured detection rates in response to visual targets at two opposing stimulation phases during rhythmic and arrhythmic light stimulation. We introduce a new measure called "behavioral modulation depth" to determine differences in perception. This measure is capable of correcting for inevitable artifacts that occur in visual detection tasks during visual stimulation. The physical concept of entrainment predicts that increased stimulation intensity should produce stronger entrainment. Thus, two experiments with medium (Experiment 1) and high (Experiment 2) stimulation intensity were performed. Data from the first experiment show that the behavioral modulation depth (alpha phase-dependent differences in detection threshold) increases with increasing entrainment of alpha oscillations. Furthermore, individual alpha phase delays of entrained alpha oscillations determine the behavioral modulation depth: the largest behavioral modulation depth can be found if targets presented during the minimum of the entrained oscillation are compared to

  14. Report on key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolska, D.; Kosterov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report for regional key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Two laboratories—Central Office of Measures (GUM)—the national metrology institute for Poland and the State Enterprise Scientific-Research Institute for Metrology of Measurement and Control Systems (DP NDI Systema)— the designated institute for acoustics in Ukraine took part in this comparison with the GUM as a pilot. One travelling type LS1P microphone was circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected. The results of the DP NDI Systema obtained in this comparison were linked to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison through the joint participation of the GUM. The degrees of equivalence were computed for DP NDI Systema with respect to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Final report on key comparison CCAUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avison, Janine; Barham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This document and the accompanying spreadsheets constitute the final report for key comparison CCAUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Twelve national measurement institutes took part in the key comparison and the National Physical Laboratory piloted the project. Two laboratory standard microphones IEC type LS1P were circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected throughout the project. One of the microphones was subsequently deemed to have compromised stability for the purpose of deriving a reference value. Consequently the key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been made based on the weighted mean results for sensitivity level and for sensitivity phase from just one of the microphones. Corresponding degrees of equivalence (DoEs) have also been calculated and are presented. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Brown-colored deposits on hair of female rats chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Miller, R.A.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-01-01

    An increased incidence and severity of a brownish coloration of hair has been observed around the nose and on the ears of female rats that were chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Microscopic examination of the colored areas revealed a red-brown globular deposit on hair shafts in affected areas without signs of physical injury.

  17. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  18. Observation of 20-400 kHz fluctuations in the U-3M torsatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M. B.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.; Sorokovoy, E. L.; Slavnyj, A. S.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Kulaga, A. E.; Zamanov, N. V.; Hirose, A.

    2016-02-01

    First observations of quasi-coherent fluctuations in the frequency range of 20-400 kHz in Alfvén-wave-heated plasmas of the U-3M torsatron are presented. The excitation conditions of these modes depend on the radio frequency antenna type and the plasma density, the appearance of the modes correlating with the presence of both suprathermal electrons and high-energy ions in the plasma, which supports our opinion that the modes are excited by energetic particles. Complicated evolution of the mode frequencies with abrupt changes at the instants of plasma confinement transitions is observed at the initial stage of each discharge. The frequencies become stable at the stage of the plasma current flattop. Raw estimates show that toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes could be responsible for the 150-400 kHz fluctuations. Low-frequency 20-70 kHz bursts are observed during plasma confinement transitions. The poloidal mode number of one of these bursts with the frequency of 20 kHz burst was determined to be m = 2. This mode rotated in the electron diamagnetic rotation direction with a frequency lower than the geodesic acoustic mode frequency and can be identified as a drift-sound-type mode.

  19. Twelve years of tracking 52-Hz whale calls from a unique source in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, William A.; Daher, Mary Ann; George, Joseph E.; Rodriguez, David

    2004-12-01

    A unique whale call with 50-52 Hz emphasis from a single source has been tracked over 12 years in the central and eastern North Pacific. These calls, referred to as 52-Hz calls, were monitored and analyzed from acoustic data recorded by hydrophones of the US Navy Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and other arrays. The calls were noticed first in 1989, and have been detected and tracked since 1992. No other calls with similar characteristics have been identified in the acoustic data from any hydrophone system in the North Pacific basin. Only one series of these 52-Hz calls has been recorded at a time, with no call overlap, suggesting that a single whale produced the calls. The calls were recorded from August to February with most in December and January. The species producing these calls is unknown. The tracks of the 52-Hz whale were different each year, and varied in length from 708 to 11,062 km with travel speeds ranging from 0.7 to 3.8 km/h. Tracks included (A) meandering over short ranges, (B) predominantly west-to-east movement, and (C) mostly north-to-south travel. These tracks consistently appeared to be unrelated to the presence or movement of other whale species (blue, fin and humpback) monitored year-round with the same hydrophones.

  20. An 18 bit 50 kHz ADC for low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    A fourth order incremental analog to digital converter (ADC) is proposed which performs 18 bit conversions at a 50 kHz rate on sampled and held data. A new self calibration scheme is presented which eases the matching requirements of capacitors, and the performance of the operational amplifiers in the ADC by changing coefficients in the digital postprocessing.

  1. Improvement of both dystonia and tics with 60 Hz pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hwynn, Nelson; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L; Limotai, Natlada; Zeilman, Pamela; Malaty, Irene A; Foote, Kelly D; Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized in both dystonia and in medication refractory Tourette syndrome. We present an interesting case of a patient with a mixture of disabling dystonia and Tourette syndrome whose coexistent dystonia and tics were successfully treated with 60 Hz-stimulation of the globus pallidus region.

  2. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  3. Statistical mechanics of neocortical interactions: Constraints on 40-Hz models of short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingber, Lester

    1995-10-01

    Calculations presented in L. Ingber and P.L. Nunez, Phys. Rev. E 51, 5074 (1995) detailed the evolution of short-term memory in the neocortex, supporting the empirical 7+/-2 rule of constraints on the capacity of neocortical processing. These results are given further support when other recent models of 40-Hz subcycles of low-frequency oscillations are considered.

  4. Coherent neocortical 40-Hz oscillations are not present during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Castro, Santiago; Falconi, Atilio; Chase, Michael H; Torterolo, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    During cognitive processes there are extensive interactions between various regions of the cerebral cortex. Oscillations in the gamma frequency band (≈40 Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) are involved in the binding of spatially separated but temporally correlated neural events, which results in a unified perceptual experience. The extent of these interactions can be examined by means of a mathematical algorithm called 'coherence', which reflects the 'strength' of functional interactions between cortical areas. The present study was conducted to analyse EEG coherence in the gamma frequency band of the cat during alert wakefulness (AW), quiet wakefulness (QW), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cats were implanted with electrodes in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices to monitor EEG activity. Coherence values within the gamma frequency (30-100 Hz) from pairs of EEG recordings were analysed. A large increase in coherence occurred between all cortical regions in the 30-45 Hz frequency band during AW compared with the other behavioral states. As the animal transitioned from AW to QW and from QW to NREM sleep, coherence decreased to a moderate level. Remarkably, there was practically no EEG coherence in the entire gamma band spectrum (30-100 Hz) during REM sleep. We conclude that functional interactions between cortical areas are radically different during sleep compared with wakefulness. The virtual absence of gamma frequency coherence during REM sleep may underlie the unique cognitive processing that occurs during dreams, which is principally a REM sleep-related phenomenon.

  5. Prevalence of -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) alleles in sickle cell trait and beta-thalassemia patients in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nava, María Paulina; Ibarra, Bertha; Magaña, María Teresa; de la Luz Chávez, María; Perea, F Javier

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alpha-globin gene mutations in three groups of Mexican unrelated individuals. The first two groups were normal and sickle cell trait individuals from the Costa Chica region, a place with a 12.8% frequency of HbS carriers, and the third group comprised of Mexican mestizo patients with beta-thalassemia. We searched for -alpha(3.7) and -alpha(4.2) alpha(+)-thalassemia deletion alleles, as well as the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication through long-gap PCR. The alleles -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) were found in the heterozygote state only; 19% of the normal subjects had the -alpha(3.7) allele, and 2% showed the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) allele. In individuals with the sickle cell trait, 17% had the -alpha(3.7) deletion, and the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication was observed in 3% of these individuals. We revealed that 16% of the subjects with beta-thalassemia showed the -alpha(3.7) deletion and 28% the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication. The -alpha(4.2) deletion was not detected in any individual. The frequency of the -alpha(3.7) allele was roughly the same in the three groups studied; this can be explained by the fact that the three groups have common genes from Africa and the Mediterranean, where a high prevalence of alpha(+)-thalassemia has been observed. To our knowledge, the frequency of alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication observed in the Mexican beta-thalassemia patients is the highest reported. As the -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) alleles are very common in our selected populations, we believe that there is a need to investigate systematically the alpha-globin gene mutations in all hemoglobinopathies in the Mexican population.

  6. Penta-cyclo-[9.3.1.1(2,6).1(4,8).1(9,13)]octa-deca-1(2),8(9)-diene.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Savvas; Moushi, Eleni

    2012-07-01

    The title compound, C(18)H(24), was the main product of thermolysis of noradamantene dimer (hepta-cyclo-[9.3.1.1(2,6).1(4,8).1(9,13).0(1,9).0(2,8)]octa-deca-ne). The crystal structure was determined to prove that the thermolysis product of noradamantene dimer is favored by stretch release due to ring opening of the four-membered ring. The bond length of the quaternary C atoms of the starting material was calculated as 1.6 Å, enlarged in comparison to other single bonds. After the rearrangement, the stretch release of the above carbons leads to an increase of the distance between them (2.824 Å) with respect to the crystallographic data.

  7. Performance of a small, graphite electrode, multistage depressed collector with a 500-W, continuous wave, 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Lesny, Gary G.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Peet, Shelly

    1988-01-01

    A small, isotropic graphite multistage depressed collector (MDC) and a short permanent magnet refocuser were designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W, continuous-wave (CW), 4.8 to 9.6 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT). A novel performance optimization system and technique were used to optimize the TWT-MDC performance for saturated broad-band operation. The MDC performance was evaluated in both four- and three-stage configurations. Average TWT overall and four-stage collector efficiencies of 43.8 and 82.6 percent, respectively, were obtained for saturated octave-bandwidth operation. The isotropic graphite electrode material performed well, and shows considerable promise. However, considerably more test experience is required before definitive conclusions on its suitability for space and airborne TWT's can be made.

  8. 4.8 Gbit/s 16-QAM-OFDM transmission based on compact 450-nm laser for underwater wireless optical communication.

    PubMed

    Oubei, Hassan M; Duran, Jose R; Janjua, Bilal; Wang, Huai-Yung; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Chi, Yu-Cheih; Ng, Tien Khee; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He, Jr-Hau; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Lin, Gong-Ru; Ooi, Boon S

    2015-09-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an underwater wireless optical communications (UWOC) employing 450-nm TO-9 packaged and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (LD) directly encoded with an orthogonal frequency division multiplexed quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM-OFDM) data. A record data rate of up to 4.8 Gbit/s over 5.4-m transmission distance is achieved. By encoding the full 1.2-GHz bandwidth of the 450-nm LD with a 16-QAM-OFDM data, an error vector magnitude (EVM) of 16.5%, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 15.63 dB and a bit error rate (BER) of 2.6 × 10(-3), well pass the forward error correction (FEC) criterion, were obtained.

  9. Fabrication of high-resolution 4,8(2) -type archimedean nanolattices composed of solution processable spin cross-over Fe(II) metallosupramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkataramudu, Uppari; Chandrasekhar, Naisa; Basak, Supratim; Prasad, Muvva D; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of two highly soluble Fe(II) metallosupramolecular polymers with two counter anions from a novel back-to-back coupled hybrid ligand. The spin cross-over (SCO) temperature of polymers with BF4 and ClO4 counter anions is T1/2 = 313 K and T1/2 = 326 K, respectively. By following the top-down approach, one of the polymers (with ClO4 counter anion) is successfully solution processed using a lithographically controlled wetting technique to create laser readable high-resolution Archimedean (4,8(2) ) nanolattices (consist of diamagnetic octagons and SCO squares). The thickness and top area of each SCO square are ≈75 nm and ≈2 × 2 μm(2) , respectively.

  10. t(4;8)(q27;q24) in Hodgkin lymphoma cells targets phosphodiesterase PDE5A and homeobox gene ZHX2.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Stefan; Schneider, Björn; Rosenwald, Andreas; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2011-12-01

    Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells represent the malignant fraction of infiltrated lymph nodes in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Although HRS cells display multiple chromosomal aberrations, few are recurrent and the targeted genes unknown. However, understanding the pathology of HL and developing rational therapies may well require identifying putative deregulated genes. Here, we analyzed the karyotype of the well-defined HL cell line L-1236 by spectral karyotyping and identified multiple abnormalities, therein, notably t(4;8)(q27;q24) which includes two breakpoint regions previously highlighted in HL. Target genes at 4q27 and 8q24 were shortlisted by high density genomic arrays and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Expression analysis of candidate target genes revealed conspicuous activation of phosphodiesterase PDE5A at 4q27 and inhibition of homeobox gene ZHX2 at 8q24. Treatment of L-1236 with PDE5A-inhibitor sildenafil or with siRNA directed against PDE5A and concomitant stimulation with cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) resulted in enhanced apoptosis, indicating PDE5A as an oncogene. Expression profiling of L-1236 cells following siRNA-mediated knockdown of ZHX2 showed inhibition of genes regulating differentiation and apoptosis, suggesting tumor suppressor activity of ZHX2. Downstream genes included STAT1 and several STAT1-target genes, indicating activation of STAT1-signaling by ZHX2 as analyzed by RQ-PCR and western blot. Taken together, we have identified a novel aberration with recurrent breakpoints in HL, t(4;8)(q27;q24), which activate PDE5A and repress ZHX2, deregulating apoptosis, differentiation, and STAT1-signaling in HL cells.

  11. The Evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function at z = 4-8: A Steepening Low-mass-end Slope with Increasing Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mimi; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Grazian, A.; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel S.; Dickinson, Mark; Duncan, K.; Faber, Sandy M.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Lee, Seong-Kook; Merlin, Emiliano; Willner, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at z = 4-8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of ˜4500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of ˜280 arcmin2 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS)/Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data to date and the relatively large volume allow us to place a better constraint at both the low- and high-mass ends of the GSMFs compared to previous space-based studies from pre-CANDELS observations. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500 Å ({M}{{UV}}) and logarithmic stellar mass ({log}{M}* ) that holds for galaxies with {log}({M}* /{M}⊙ )≲ 10. We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the {log}{M}* -M UV relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies with stacked photometry for faint galaxies. The resultant measured slopes do not significantly evolve over z = 4-8, while the normalization of the trend exhibits a weak evolution toward lower masses at higher redshift. We combine the {log}{M}* -M UV distribution with observed rest-frame UV luminosity functions at each redshift to derive the GSMFs, finding that the low-mass-end slope becomes steeper with increasing redshift from α =-{1.55}-0.07+0.08 at z = 4 to α =-{2.25}-0.35+0.72 at z = 8. The inferred stellar mass density, when integrated over {M}* ={10}8-1013 M ⊙, increases by a factor of {10}-2+30 between z = 7 and z = 4 and is in good agreement with the time integral of the cosmic star formation rate density.

  12. HZ Her: Stellar radius from X-ray eclipse observations, evolutionary state, and a new distance

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D. A.; Abdallah, M. H.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of HZ Her/Her X-1 by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) covering high state eclipses of the neutron star are analyzed here. Models of the eclipse are used to measure the radius and atmospheric scale height of HZ Her, the stellar companion to the neutron star. The radius is 2.58-3.01 × 10{sup 11} cm, depending on system inclination and mass ratio (q), with an accuracy of ∼1 part in 1000 for given inclination and q. We fit Kurucz model stellar atmosphere models to archival optical observations. The resulting effective temperature (T {sub eff}) of the unheated face of HZ Her is determined to be in the 2σ range of 7720 K-7865 K, and metallicity (log (Z/Z {sub ☉})) in the range of –0.27 to +.03. The model atmosphere surface flux and new radius yield a new distance to HZ Her/Her X-1, depending on system inclination and q: a best-fit value of 6.1 kpc with upper and lower limits of 5.7 kpc and 7.0 kpc. We calculate stellar evolution models for the range of allowed masses (from orbital parameters) and allowed metallicities (from optical spectrum fits). The stellar models agree with T {sub eff} and the radius of HZ Her for two narrow ranges of mass: 2.15-2.20 M {sub ☉} and 2.35-2.45 M {sub ☉}. This lower mass range implies a low neutron star mass (1.3 M {sub ☉}), whereas the higher mass range implies a high neutron star mass (1.5-1.7 M {sub ☉}).

  13. Phase-locking and amplitude modulations of EEG alpha: Two measures reflect different cognitive processes in a working memory task.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Senkowski, Daniel; Röttger, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in numerous experiments that oscillatory EEG responses in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) increase with memory load during the retention interval in working memory tasks. However, the findings diverge with respect to which measurement of alpha activity is influenced by memory processes. Here, we differentiate between evoked and total alpha activity in order to separate effects of phase-locking and amplitude modulation. We present data from a delayed-matching-to-sample task (S1-S2 paradigm) for which we compared EEG alpha responses between a perception and a memory condition. Increased total alpha activity was found in the retention interval for the memory as compared to the perception condition. Evoked alpha activity, however, did not differentiate between memory and perception conditions but, instead, was increased for the more complex condition of processing non-Kanizsa figures as compared to Kanizsa figures. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional differentiation between evoked and total alpha activity. While alpha phase locking seemed to be influenced mainly by task complexity, alpha amplitude clearly reflected memory demands in our paradigm.

  14. Top-down controlled alpha band activity in somatosensory areas determines behavioral performance in a discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Haegens, Saskia; Händel, Barbara F; Jensen, Ole

    2011-04-06

    The brain receives a rich flow of information which must be processed according to behavioral relevance. How is the state of the sensory system adjusted to up- or downregulate processing according to anticipation? We used magnetoencephalography to investigate whether prestimulus alpha band activity (8-14 Hz) reflects allocation of attentional resources in the human somatosensory system. Subjects performed a tactile discrimination task where a visual cue directed attention to their right or left hand. The strength of attentional modulation was controlled by varying the reliability of the cue in three experimental blocks (100%, 75%, or 50% valid cueing). While somatosensory prestimulus alpha power lateralized strongly with a fully predictive cue (100%), lateralization was decreased with lower cue reliability (75%) and virtually absent if the cue had no predictive value at all (50%). Importantly, alpha lateralization influenced the subjects' behavioral performance positively: both accuracy and speed of response improved with the degree of alpha lateralization. This study demonstrates that prestimulus alpha lateralization in the somatosensory system behaves similarly to posterior alpha activity observed in visual attention tasks. Our findings extend the notion that alpha band activity is involved in shaping the functional architecture of the working brain by determining both the engagement and disengagement of specific regions: the degree of anticipation modulates the alpha activity in sensory regions in a graded manner. Thus, the alpha activity is under top-down control and seems to play an important role for setting the state of sensory regions to optimize processing.

  15. Venus - Alpha Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The eastern edge of Alpha Regio is shown in this image centered at 30 degrees south latitude and 11.8 degrees east longitude (longitude on Venus is measured from 0 degrees to 360 degrees east). Seven circular, dome-like hills, averaging 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter with maximum heights of 750 meters (2,475 feet) dominate the scene. These features are interpreted as very thick lava flows that came from an opening on the relatively level ground, which allowed the lava to flow in an even pattern outward from the opening. The complex fractures on top of the domes suggest that if the domes were created by lava flows, a cooled outer layer formed and then further lava flowing in the interior stretched the surface. The domes may be similar to volcanic domes on Earth. Another interpretation is that the domes are the result of molten rock or magma in the interior that pushed the surface layer upward. The near-surface magma then withdrew to deeper levels, causing the collapse and fracturing of the dome surface. The bright margins possibly indicate the presence of rock debris on the slopes of the domes. Some of the fractures on the plains cut through the domes, while others appear to be covered by the domes. This indicates that active processes pre date and post date the dome-like hills. The prominent black area in the northeast corner of the image is a data gap. North is at the top of the image.

  16. Temporary threshold shifts and recovery in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) after octave-band noise at 4 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean; Olthuis, Juul

    2012-11-01

    Safety criteria for underwater sound produced during offshore pile driving are needed to protect marine mammals. A harbor porpoise was exposed to fatiguing noise at 18 sound pressure level (SPL) and duration combinations. Its temporary hearing threshold shift (TTS) and hearing recovery were quantified with a psychoacoustic technique. Octave-band white noise centered at 4 kHz was the fatiguing stimulus at three mean received SPLs (124, 136, and 148 dB re 1 μPa) and at six durations (7.5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min). Approximate received sound exposure levels (SELs) varied between 151 and 190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Hearing thresholds were determined for a narrow-band frequency-swept sine wave (3.9-4.1 kHz; 1 s) before exposure to the fatiguing noise, and at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, and 96 min after exposure. The lowest SEL (151 dB re 1 μPa(2) s) which caused a significant TTS(1-4) was due to exposure to an SPL of 124 dB re 1 μPa for 7.5 min. The maximum TTS(1-4), induced after a 240 min exposure to 148 dB re 1 μPa, was around 15 dB at a SEL of 190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Recovery time following TTS varied between 4 min and under 96 min, depending on the exposure level, duration, and the TTS induced.

  17. Synthesis of a precursor for the preparation of 9 alpha,11 alpha-tritiated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M.

    1984-03-01

    Starting from 11 beta-hydroxytestosterone, the synthesis of a strategic precursor, C-9 (11) unsaturated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide (9a), for the preparation of 9 alpha,11 alpha-tritiated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide has been achieved. The authors optimized the reaction conditions for catalytic reduction employing hydrogen and subsequent base hydrolysis followed by purification on Amberlite XAD-2 resin to obtain the saturated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide.

  18. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  19. Atmospheric Electric Field Measurements at 100 Hz and High Frequency Electric Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Ricardo; Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Matthews, James; Bennett, Alec; Chubb, John

    2016-04-01

    Spectral response of Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient (PG), symmetric to the Atmospheric Electric Field, gives important information about phenomena affecting these measurements with characteristic time-scales that appear in the spectra as specific periodicities. This is the case of urban pollution that has a clear weekly dependence and reveals itself on PG measurements by a ~7 day periodicity (Silva et al., 2014). While long-term time-scales (low frequencies) have been exhaustively explored in literature, short-term time-scales (high frequencies), above 1 Hz, have comparatively received much less attention (Anisimov et al., 1999). This is mainly because of the technical difficulties related with the storage of such a huge amount of data (for 100 Hz sampling two days of data uses a ~1 Gb file) and the response degradation of the field-meters at such frequencies. Nevertheless, important Electric Phenomena occurs for frequencies above 1 Hz that are worth pursuing, e.g. the Schumann Resonances have a signature of worldwide thunderstorm activity at frequencies that go from ~8 up to ~40 Hz. To that end the present work shows preliminary results on PG measurements at 100 Hz that took place on two clear-sky days (17th and 18th June 2015) on the South of Portugal, Évora (38.50° N, 7.91° W). The field-mill used is a JCI 131F installed in the University of Évora campus (at 2 m height) with a few trees and two buildings in its surroundings (~50 m away). This device was developed by John Chubb (Chubb, 2014) and manufactured by Chilworth (UK). It was calibrated in December 2013 and recent work by the author (who is honored in this study for his overwhelming contribution to atmospheric electricity) reveals basically a flat spectral response of the device up to frequencies of 100 Hz (Chubb, 2015). This makes this device suitable for the study of High Frequency Electric Phenomena. Anisimov, S.V., et al. (1999). On the generation and evolution of aeroelectric structures

  20. Study on sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment at frequency ranges of 0.5-3 kHz and 90-170 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng-qi; Liu, Bao-hua; Yu, Kai-ben; Kan, Guang-ming; Yang, Zhi-guo

    2017-03-01

    In order to study the properties of sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment, the sound speed was measured both at high frequency (90-170 kHz) and low frequency (0.5-3 kHz) in laboratory environments. At high frequency, a sampling measurement was conducted with boiled and uncooked sand samples collected from the bottom of a large water tank. The sound speed was directly obtained through transmission measurement using single source and single hydrophone. At low frequency, an in situ measurement was conducted in the water tank, where the sandy sediment had been homogeneously paved at the bottom for a long time. The sound speed was indirectly inverted according to the traveling time of signals received by three buried hydrophones in the sandy sediment and the geometry in experiment. The results show that the mean sound speed is approximate 1710-1713 m/s with a weak positive gradient in the sand sample after being boiled (as a method to eliminate bubbles as much as possible) at high frequency, which agrees well with the predictions of Biot theory, the effective density fluid model (EDFM) and Buckingham's theory. However, the sound speed in the uncooked sandy sediment obviously decreases (about 80%) both at high frequency and low frequency due to plenty of bubbles in existence. And the sound-speed dispersion performs a weak negative gradient at high frequency. Finally, a water-unsaturated Biot model is presented for trying to explain the decrease of sound speed in the sandy sediment with plenty of bubbles.

  1. A new naturally-occurring nanoporous copper sheet–silicate with 6{sup 4}8{sup 2} cages related to synthetic “CuSH” phases

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Mark D. Rumsey, Michael S.

    2013-07-01

    The structure of a new naturally-occurring nanoporous copper silicate of formula Na{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}·H{sub 2}O (disodium calcium dicopper octasilicate monohydrate) is reported and its relations to synthetic nanoporous “CuSH” compounds are discussed. The new phase is monoclinic C2/m with unit cell parameters a=12.2439(6) Å, b=15.7514(4) Å, c=10.6008(3) Å, β=125.623(2)°, and V=1661.87(10) Å{sup 3} (Z=4). The structure has been refined to R{sub 1}(all)=0.033, wR{sub 2}(all)=0.071, and GoF=1.090. In the double-sheet of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, 6{sup 4}8{sup 2} cages connect to form a chequer-board motif within which Na atoms and H{sub 2}O groups occupy channels. Each cage is occupied by 7-coordinated Na atom lying in a mirror plane. An intra-sheet corridor between the 6{sup 4}8{sup 2} cages is occupied by Na in 8-fold cuboidal coordination. The silicate skeleton is highly porous, with obvious channels and pathways for ion migration. The interlayer between double-sheets is occupied by CaO{sub 8}, CuO{sub 5} and NaO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O) polyhedra. CuO{sub 5} polyhedra occur as rows of edge-sharing Cu{sub 2}O{sub 9} pairs connected by NaO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O) octahedra and CaO{sub 8} square antiprisms. Both CuO{sub 5} and NaO{sub 5}(H{sub 2}O) polyhedra are features shared with closely-related synthetic “CuSH” phases of interest to the solid-state chemistry community as potential nanoporous catalysts. However, Na{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}·H{sub 2}O is the only natural representative of this group of structures, and the only one to contain essential Ca. The discovery of Na{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}·H{sub 2}O points to a new group of CuSH-type phases containing alkaline-earth elements. Its close natural association and structural affinity with wesselsite SrCuSi{sub 4}O{sub 10} suggest the possibility of transformation between CuSH and gillespite-type phases, and thereby a route to synthesising alkaline-earth CuSH derivatives

  2. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that ... alpha thalassemia , a reduction in the amount of hemoglobin prevents enough oxygen from reaching the body's tissues. ...

  4. Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone: presentation of a small molecule activator of mammalian alpha-amylase as an allosteric effector.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Larijani, Bagher; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2013-03-18

    Flavonoids and their precursor trans-chalcone have been reported as inhibitors of mammalian alpha-amylase. With regard to this background, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) effect was investigated toward porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA), and found to be an activator of the enzyme. The maximal activation (up to threefold) was found to occur at 4.8mM of NHDC, which could be considered to have a high activation profile, with regard to the alpha and beta parameters (alpha<1

  5. Low frequency geomagnetic fluctuations (.04 to 25 Hz) on land and on the floor of Monterey Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, G. R.; Homan, B. B.

    1980-06-01

    A coil antenna consisting of approximately 6000 turns of copper wire was used to measure the horizontal component of fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field on the floor of Monterey Bay in water depth of approximately 50 meters. The results indicate that the power spectral density of the fluctuations varies from 10(nT)-sq/Hz at 0.04 Hz to 0.000001(nT)-sq/Hz at 25 Hz, a monotonic decrease of about 6 dB/octave, except in the 8-20 Hz region where the Schuman resonances occur. While the sensitivity of the equipment was insufficient to measure the vertical component of the fluctuation we can put an upper limit of 0.001(nT)-sq/Hz at 1 Hz and 0.000001(nT)-sq/Hz) at 10 Hz on the magnitude of this component. The same sensor was also used to measure various components of the field fluctuations at a remote land site (Chew's Ridge). In the frequency range observed the general shape of the spectra was similar to those obtained at sea. However, a strong azimuthal variation at certain frequencies was noted in the land data. The possibility that these directional signals are of man made origin cannot be excluded at this time.

  6. Progesterone's 5 alpha-reduced metabolite, 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP, mediates lateral displacement of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A; Rhodes, Madeline E

    2005-03-15

    5 alpha-Pregnan-3 alpha-ol-20-one (3 alpha,5 alpha-THP), progesterone (P4)'s 5 alpha-reduced, 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreduced product, facilitates lordosis of rodents in part via agonist-like actions at GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complexes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Whether 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP influences another reproductively-relevant behavior, lateral displacement, of hamsters was investigated. Lateral displacement is the movement that female hamsters make with their perineum towards male-like tactile stimulation. This behavior facilitates, and is essential for, successful mating. Hamsters in behavioral estrus had greater lateral displacement responses when endogenous progestin levels were elevated compared to when progestin levels were lower. Administration of P4, a prohormone for 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP, dose-dependently (500 > 200 > 100, 50, or 0 microg) enhanced lateral displacement of ovariectomized hamsters that had been primed with SC estradiol benzoate (5 or 10 microg). Inhibiting P4's metabolism to 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP by co-administering finasteride, a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase inhibitor, either systemically or to the VTA, significantly decreased lateral displacement and midbrain progestin levels of naturally receptive or hormone-primed hamsters compared to controls. These data suggest that lateral displacement is progestin-sensitive and requires the formation of 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP in the midbrain VTA.

  7. Performance of a 30-kV, 1-kHz, nanosecond source

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, K.; Goerz, D.

    1992-06-01

    An existing pulser at LLNL was modified to increase its repetition rate to 1000 Hz. Spark gap recovery measurements were made for both the Marx and the Blumlein output switches. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were necessary to over-voltage the switch. The output of the pulser was used to drive a log-periodic-dipole-array. Measurements were made on the transmitted pulses in an anechoic chamber and yielded a center frequency of 80 MHz. This paper describes the modifications made on the pulse generator, discusses the spark gap recovery data, and summarizes the performance of the pulser at 1 kHz. In addition, a brief description of the antenna is given along with the field measurements that were made in the EMPEROR facility.

  8. Aberration-free three-dimensional multiphoton imaging of neuronal activity at kHz rates

    PubMed Central

    Botcherby, Edward J.; Smith, Christopher W.; Kohl, Michael M.; Débarre, Delphine; Booth, Martin J.; Juškaitis, Rimas; Paulsen, Ole; Wilson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience, promising to deliver important data on the spatiotemporal activity within individual neurons as well as in networks of neurons. A major limitation of current technologies is the relatively slow scan rates along the z direction compared to the kHz rates obtainable in the x and y directions. Here, we describe a custom-built microscope system based on an architecture that allows kHz scan rates over hundreds of microns in all three dimensions without introducing aberration. We further demonstrate how this high-speed 3D multiphoton imaging system can be used to study neuronal activity at millisecond resolution at the subcellular as well as the population level. PMID:22315405

  9. Magnetic field tomography of coherent thalamocortical 40-Hz oscillations in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Ribary, U.; Lado, F.; Mogilner, A.; Llinas, R. ); Ioannides, A.A.; Singh, K.D.; Hasson, R.; Bolton, J.P.R. )

    1991-12-15

    This paper introduces the use of magnetic field tomography (MFT), a noninvasive technique based on distributed source analysis of magnetoencephalography data, which makes possible three-dimensional reconstruction of dynamic brain activity in humans. MFT has a temporal resolution better than 1 msec and a spatial accuracy of 2-5 mm at the cortical level, which deteriorates to 1-3 cm at depths of 6 cm or more. MFT is used here to visualize the origin of a spatiotemporally organized pattern of coherent 40-Hz electrical activity. This coherence, initially observed during auditory input, was proposed to be generated by recurrent corticothalamic oscillation. In support of this hypothesis, the authors illustrate well-defined 40-Hz coherence between cortical-subcortical sites with a time shift that is consistent with thalamocortical conduction times. Studies on Alzheimer patients indicate that, while a similar activity pattern is present, the cortical component is reduced in these subjects.

  10. Orbit response matrix measurements for 10Hz global orbit feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Minty, M.

    2010-10-01

    The 10 Hz global orbit feedback system (gofb) was designed to correct the 10 Hz horizontal beam perturbations in both rings that are suspected to be caused by vibrations of the final focusing quadrupoles (triplets). The full system envisioned for Run-11 consists of 36 BPMs, corresponding to 2 per triplet in each of the 12 triplet locations and two in each of the 6 arcs, and 1 dipole corrector at each triplet location for a total of 12 correctors. Prototype testing was successfully carried out during RHIC Run-10 in store condition with 4 new dipole correctors (with independent power supplies) and 8 stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) per accelerator. An SVD-based algorithm was used to compute the applied corrections. For Run-10, the response matrix was provided by W. W. MacKay. The response matrix R relates corrector angles to beam displacements at BPMs.

  11. Implications of a 20-Hz Booster cycle-rate for Slip-stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-06-10

    We examine the potential impacts to slip-stacking from a change of the Booster cycle-rate from 15- to 20-Hz. We find that changing the Booster cycle-rate to 20-Hz would greatly increase the slip-stacking bucket area, while potentially requiring greater usage of the Recycler momentum aperture and additional power dissipation in the RF cavities. In particular, the losses from RF interference can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on Booster beam longitudinal parameters). We discuss the aspect ratio and beam emittance requirements for efficient slip-stacking in both cycle-rate cases. Using a different injection scheme can eliminate the need for greater momentum aperture in the Recycler.

  12. Zero-phonon-line pumped 100-kHz Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Nagisetty, Siva Sankar; Novák, Ondřej; Chyla, Michal; Severová, Patricie; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáś

    2014-02-01

    We are developing 100-kHz picosecond Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier with 500-W average power for medical and industrial applications. Especially in case of the next generation of semiconductor lithography, high average power solid-state laser with picosecond pulse duration as pre pulse source is a key element to realize 1-kW EUV lithography source. We compared the output characteristics of CW laser operation pumped at 940-nm and 969-nm, and measured the surface temperature of thin disk. We found that the surface temperature of thin disk pumped at 960-nm was much lower than that pumped at 940-nm. We obtained 83-W output from thin disk regenerative amplifier at the repetition rate of 100-kHz pumped at 969-nm. The measured pulse duration was 1.9-ps.

  13. Extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz). Usefulness in audiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Valiente, Antonio; Roldán Fidalgo, Amaya; Villarreal, Ithzel M; García Berrocal, José R

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate treatment of hearing loss are essential to minimise the consequences of hearing loss. In addition to conventional audiometry (125-8,000 Hz), extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz) is available. This type of audiometry may be useful in early diagnosis of hearing loss in certain conditions, such as the ototoxic effect of cisplatin-based treatment, noise exposure or oral misunderstanding, especially in noisy environments. Eleven examples are shown in which extended high-frequency audiometry has been useful in early detection of hearing loss, despite the subject having a normal conventional audiometry. The goal of the present paper was to highlight the importance of the extended high-frequency audiometry examination for it to become a standard tool in routine audiological examinations.

  14. Orbit compensation for the time-varying elliptically polarized wiggler with switching frequency at 100 hz

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.; Krinsky, S.

    1997-07-01

    In October 1996, the elliptically polarized wiggler, installed in the X13 straight section of the NSLS X-ray ring, was commissioned at an operating frequency of 100 hz. This wiggler generates circularly polarized photons in the energy range of 0.1 to 10 keV with AC modulation of polarization helicity. The vertical magnetic field is produced by a hybrid permanent magnet structure, and the horizontal magnetic field is generated by an electromagnet capable of switching at frequencies up to 100 hz. Here, the authors discuss the compensation of the residual vertical and horizontal orbit motion utilizing a time-domain algorithm employing a function generator to drive trim coils at the wiggler ends, and the wideband high precision orbit measurement system of the X-ray ring. The residual orbit motion has been reduced to a level below 1 micron, and the device has been run in regular operations with no negative effect on other users.

  15. 100 kHz thousand-frame burst-mode planar imaging in turbulent flames.

    PubMed

    Michael, James B; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R

    2014-02-15

    High-repetition-rate, burst-mode lasers can achieve higher energies per pulse compared with continuously pulsed systems, but the relatively few number of laser pulses in each burst has limited the temporal dynamic range of measurements in unsteady flames. A fivefold increase in the range of timescales that can be resolved by burst-mode laser-based imaging systems is reported in this work by extending a hybrid diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG-based amplifier system to nearly 1000 pulses at 100 kHz during a 10 ms burst. This enables an unprecedented burst-mode temporal dynamic range to capture turbulent fluctuations from 0.1 to 50 kHz in flames of practical interest. High pulse intensity enables efficient conversion to the ultraviolet for planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nascent formaldehyde and other potential flame radicals.

  16. The Role of Alpha Activity in Spatial and Feature-Based Attention

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Modulations in alpha oscillations (∼10 Hz) are typically studied in the context of anticipating upcoming stimuli. Alpha power decreases in sensory regions processing upcoming targets compared to regions processing distracting input, thereby likely facilitating processing of relevant information while suppressing irrelevant. In this electroencephalography study using healthy human volunteers, we examined whether modulations in alpha power also occur after the onset of a bilaterally presented target and distractor. Spatial attention was manipulated through spatial cues and feature-based attention through adjusting the color-similarity of distractors to the target. Consistent with previous studies, we found that informative spatial cues induced a relative decrease of pretarget alpha power at occipital electrodes contralateral to the expected target location. Interestingly, this pattern reemerged relatively late (300–750 ms) after stimulus onset, suggesting that lateralized alpha reflects not only preparatory attention, but also ongoing attentive stimulus processing. Uninformative cues (i.e., conveying no information about the spatial location of the target) resulted in an interaction between spatial attention and feature-based attention in post-target alpha lateralization. When the target was paired with a low-similarity distractor, post-target alpha was lateralized (500–900 ms). Crucially, the lateralization was absent when target selection was ambiguous because the distractor was highly similar to the target. Instead, during this condition, midfrontal theta was increased, indicative of reactive conflict resolution. Behaviorally, the degree of alpha lateralization was negatively correlated with the reaction time distraction cost induced by target–distractor similarity. These results suggest a pivotal role for poststimulus alpha lateralization in protecting sensory processing of target information. PMID:27822505

  17. Lateralization in Alpha-Band Oscillations Predicts the Locus and Spatial Distribution of Attention

    PubMed Central

    Ikkai, Akiko; Dandekar, Sangita; Curtis, Clayton E.

    2016-01-01

    Attending to a task-relevant location changes how neural activity oscillates in the alpha band (8–13Hz) in posterior visual cortical areas. However, a clear understanding of the relationships between top-down attention, changes in alpha oscillations in visual cortex, and attention performance are still poorly understood. Here, we tested the degree to which the posterior alpha power tracked the locus of attention, the distribution of attention, and how well the topography of alpha could predict the locus of attention. We recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data while subjects performed an attention demanding visual discrimination task that dissociated the direction of attention from the direction of a saccade to indicate choice. On some trials, an endogenous cue predicted the target’s location, while on others it contained no spatial information. When the target’s location was cued, alpha power decreased in sensors over occipital cortex contralateral to the attended visual field. When the cue did not predict the target’s location, alpha power again decreased in sensors over occipital cortex, but bilaterally, and increased in sensors over frontal cortex. Thus, the distribution and the topography of alpha reliably indicated the locus of covert attention. Together, these results suggest that alpha synchronization reflects changes in the excitability of populations of neurons whose receptive fields match the locus of attention. This is consistent with the hypothesis that alpha oscillations reflect the neural mechanisms by which top-down control of attention biases information processing and modulate the activity of neurons in visual cortex. PMID:27144717

  18. Time dependence of 50 Hz magnetic fields in apartment buildings with indoor transformer stations.

    PubMed

    Yitzhak, Nir-Mordechay; Hareuveny, Ronen; Kandel, Shaiela; Ruppin, Raphael

    2012-04-01

    Twenty-four hour measurements of 50 Hz magnetic fields (MFs) in apartment buildings containing transformer stations have been performed. The apartments were classified into four types, according to their location relative to the transformer room. Temporal correlation coefficients between the MF in various apartments, as well as between MF and transformer load curves, were calculated. It was found that, in addition to their high average MF, the apartments located right above the transformer room also exhibit unique temporal correlation properties.

  19. 115 kHz tuning repetition rate ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Oh, W Y; Yun, S H; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser using a polygon-based wavelength scanning filter. With a polygon rotational speed of 900 revolutions per second, a continuous wavelength tuning rate of 9200 nm/ms and a tuning repetition rate of 115 kHz were achieved. The wavelength tuning range of the laser was 80 nm centered at 1325 nm, and the average polarized output power was 23 mW.

  20. Status of 20 kHz space station power distribution technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1988-01-01

    Power Distribution on the NASA Space Station will be accomplished by a 20 kHz sinusoidal, 440 VRMS, single phase system. In order to minimize both system complexity and the total power coversion steps required, high frequency power will be distributed end-to-end in the system. To support the final design of flight power system hardware, advanced development and demonstrations have been made on key system technologies and components. The current status of this program is discussed.

  1. Characterization of the transcriptome of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 with the outstanding hydrocarbon-degrading ability.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yue-Hui; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Chou-Fei; Xiao, Xi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Xian-Xian; Zhou, Qian-Zhi; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2016-06-15

    Microbial remediation has become one of the most important strategies for eliminating petroleum pollutants. Revealing the transcript maps of microorganisms with the hydrocarbon-degrading ability contributes to enhance the degradation of hydrocarbons and further improve the effectiveness of bioremediation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of hydrocarbon-degrading Achromobacter sp. HZ01 after petroleum treatment for 16h. A total of 38,706,280 and 38,954,413 clean reads were obtained by RNA-seq for the petroleum-treated group and control, respectively. By an effective de novo assembly, 3597 unigenes were obtained, including 3485 annotated transcripts. Petroleum treatment had significantly influenced the transcriptional profile of strain HZ01, involving 742 differentially expressed genes. A part of genes were activated to exert specific physiological functions, whereas more genes were down-regulated including specific genes related to cell motility, genes associated with glycometabolism, and genes coding for ribosomal proteins. Identification of genes related to petroleum degradation revealed that the fatty acid metabolic pathway and a part of monooxygenases and dehydrogenases were activated, whereas the TCA cycle was inactive. Additionally, terminal oxidation might be a major aerobic pathway for the degradation of n-alkanes in strain HZ01. The newly obtained data contribute to better understand the gene expression profiles of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms after petroleum treatment, to further investigate the genetic characteristics of strain HZ01 and other related species and to develop cost-effective and eco-friendly strategies for remediation of crude oil-polluted environments.

  2. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  3. Swept source OCT imaging of human anterior segment at 200 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Karol; Gora, Michalina; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej; Huber, Robert; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2009-02-01

    We present applicability of the high speed swept-source optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging of the anterior segment of the human eye. Three dimensional imaging of the cornea with reduced motion artifacts is possible by using swept source with Fourier domain mode locking operating at 200kHz with 1300nm central wavelength. High imaging speeds allow for assessment of anterior and posterior corneal topography and generation of thickness and elevation maps.

  4. Discovery of a Neutron Star with Spin Frequency 530 Hz in A1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Swank, Jean H.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) of 530 Hz burst oscillations in a thermonuclear (Type I) burst from the transient X-ray source A1744-361. This is only the second burst ever observed from this source, and the first to be seen in any detail. Our results confirm that A1744-361 is a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system harboring a rapidly rotating neutron star. The oscillations are first detected along the rising edge of the burst, and show evidence for frequency evolution of a magnitude similar to that seen in other burst sources. The modulation amplitude and its increase with photon energy are also typical of burst oscillations. The lack of any strong indication of photospheric radius expansion during the burst suggests a 9 kpc upper limit of the source distance. We also find energy dependent dips, establishing A1744-361 as a high inclination, dipping LMXB. The timescale between the two episodes of observed dips suggests an orbital period of approx. 97 min. We have also detected a 2 - 4 Hz quasi-periodic-oscillation (QPO) for the first time from this source. This QPO appears consistent with approx. 1 Hz QPOs seen from other high inclination systems. We searched for kilohertz QPOs, and found a suggestive 2.3 sigma feature at 800 Hz in one observation. The frequency, strength and quality factor are consistent with that of a lower frequency kilohertz QPO, but the relatively low significance argues for caution, so we consider this a tentative detection requiring confirmation.

  5. Weighted SVD algorithm for close-orbit correction and 10 Hz feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu C.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    Measurements of the beam position along an accelerator are typically treated equally using standard SVD-based orbit correction algorithms so distributing the residual errors, modulo the local beta function, equally at the measurement locations. However, sometimes a more stable orbit at select locations is desirable. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm for weighting the beam position measurements to achieve a more stable local orbit. The results of its application to close-orbit correction and 10 Hz orbit feedback are presented.

  6. Determination of the dielectric constant of GaN in the kHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, M. J.; Uren, M. J.; Wallis, D. J.; Wright, P. J.; Soley, D. E. J.; Simons, A. J.; Martin, T.

    2011-08-01

    Capacitance techniques are used to show that the dielectric constant ɛ|| of GaN in the kHz frequency range is 10.6 ± 0.3. The data allow depth information to be accurately extracted using methods such as mercury probe capacitance profiling. The measurements complement the pre-existing data which are derived from infrared reflectivity and which give a value of 10.4 ± 0.3.

  7. Computer modeling and simulation of a 20kHz ac distribution system for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Fu-Sheng; Lee, Fred C.

    1987-01-01

    A computer model of a 20 kHz, ac distribution testbed for Space Station is presented. The system consists of six resonant inverters, a one-hundred-meter transmission line, and three load receivers: a dc receiver, a bidirectional receiver, and an ac receiver. A model library is generated characterizing all system components. The system's local and global behaviors are investigated using the EASY5 dynamic analysis program.

  8. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on specific humoral and cellular components of the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.E.; Phillips, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Humoral and cellular functions of the immune system of Swiss-Webster mice were evaluated after exposure to 60-Hz electric fields at 100 kV/m. No significant differences were observed in primary antibody response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (precipitating antibody levels) between exposed (30 or 60 days) and control mice, nor were there significant changes in mitogen-stimulation response of spleen cells from mice similarly exposed for 90 or 150 days when compared to sham-exposed animals.

  9. Potassium Model for Slow (2-3 Hz) In Vivo Neocortical Paroxysmal Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, M.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.; Sejnowski, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    In slow neocortical paroxysmal oscillations, the de- and hyperpolarizing envelopes in neocortical neurons are large compared with slow sleep oscillations. Increased local synchrony of membrane potential oscillations during seizure is reflected in larger electroencephalographic oscillations and the appearance of spike- or polyspike-wave complex recruitment at 2- to 3-Hz frequencies. The oscillatory mechanisms underlying this paroxysmal activity were investigated in computational models of cortical networks. The extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) was continuously computed based on neuronal K+ currents and K+ pumps as well as glial buffering. An increase of [K+]o triggered a transition from normal awake-like oscillations to 2- to 3-Hz seizure-like activity. In this mode, the cells fired periodic bursts and nearby neurons oscillated highly synchronously; in some cells depolarization led to spike inactivation lasting 50–100 ms. A [K+]o increase, sufficient to produce oscillations could result from excessive firing (e.g., induced by external stimulation) or inability of K+ regulatory system (e.g., when glial buffering was blocked). A combination of currents including high-threshold Ca2+, persistent Na+ and hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing (Ih) currents was sufficient to maintain 2- to 3-Hz activity. In a network model that included lateral K+ diffusion between cells, increase of [K+]o in a small region was generally sufficient to maintain paroxysmal oscillations in the whole network. Slow changes of [K+]o modulated the frequency of bursting and, in some case, led to fast oscillations in the 10- to 15-Hz frequency range, similar to the fast runs observed during seizures in vivo. These results suggest that modifications of the intrinsic currents mediated by increase of [K+]o can explain the range of neocortical paroxysmal oscillations in vivo. PMID:15056684

  10. A microrod-resonator Brillouin laser with 240 Hz absolute linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, William; Becker, Joe; Cole, Daniel C.; Coillet, Aurelien; Baynes, Fred N.; Papp, Scott B.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an ultralow-noise microrod-resonator based laser that oscillates on the gain supplied by the stimulated Brillouin scattering optical nonlinearity. Microresonator Brillouin lasers are known to offer an outstanding frequency noise floor, which is limited by fundamental thermal fluctuations. Here, we show experimental evidence that thermal effects also dominate the close-to-carrier frequency fluctuations. The 6 mm diameter microrod resonator used in our experiments has a large optical mode area of ˜100 μm2, and hence its 10 ms thermal time constant filters the close-to-carrier optical frequency noise. The result is an absolute laser linewidth of 240 Hz with a corresponding white-frequency noise floor of 0.1 Hz2 Hz-1. We explain the steady-state performance of this laser by measurements of its operation state and of its mode detuning and lineshape. Our results highlight a mechanism for noise that is common to many microresonator devices due to the inherent coupling between intracavity power and mode frequency. We demonstrate the ability to reduce this noise through a feedback loop that stabilizes the intracavity power.

  11. Dependence of kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies on accretion-related parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan; Çatmabacak, Önder

    2016-07-01

    To study the possible dependence of kHz QPO frequencies on the parameters such as the mass accretion rate, the surface magnetic field strength, mass, and radius of the neutron star, we consider the up-to-date distribution of neutron star LMXBs in the kHz QPO frequency versus X-ray luminosity plane. We confirm the absence of any correlation between QPO frequencies and luminosity in the ensemble of LMXBs. Searching for the dependence of QPO data on accretion-related parameters, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and the parameter combining mass accretion rate with magnetic field strength. The correlation cannot be adequately described by a simple power law due to observed scattering of individual source data in the ensemble of Z and atoll sources. Based on disk-magnetosphere boundary region, the model function for QPO frequency can delineate the correlation taking into account the scattering of individual sources. In addition to mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength, the model function also depends on the radial width of the boundary region near the magnetopause. Modelling the variation of the width with mass accretion rate, we also provide an explanation for the parallel tracks phenomenon observed in the case of individual sources.

  12. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-10-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The first project evaluated the potentially aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity that produces escape or avoidance responses. The second project estimated the threshold intensity for detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means was 6 to 16 kV/m. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. 131 refs., 87 figs., 123 tabs.

  13. Multiscale temporal variations of pulsating auroras: On-off pulsation and a few Hz modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hampton, Donald L.; Katoh, Yuto; Kataoka, Ryuho; Okano, Shoichi

    2014-05-01

    A statistical study on the cross-scale property on the temporal variations of pulsating aurora intensity was conducted on 53 events observed at the Poker Flat Research Range during the period from 1 December 2011 to 1 March 2012. The observed modulation frequency ranged from 1.5 to 3.3 Hz, and strong modulations were not seen in the frequency range higher than about 3 Hz. This suggests that the time of flight of electrons has a time-smoothing effect on the more rapid variations above 3 Hz. Furthermore, the frequency of modulation showed relatively strong correlation to auroral intensity (correlation coefficient of 0.58), and it can be explained with nonlinear wave growth theory, in which the modulation frequency increases with the wave amplitude of the whistler mode chorus. In contrast, the on-off pulsations showed no significant correlations with auroral intensity. This result probably implies that several different plasma processes with different time scales from nonlinear wave growth should be taken into account when determining the on-off periods. In particular, we suggest that long-term variations in the cold plasma density play a dominant role in controlling the conditions of wave-particle interactions that have temporal scale of the on-off pulsation periods.

  14. Toxic effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic field on memory consolidation in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Foroozandeh, Elham; Derakhshan-Barjoei, Pouya; Jadidi, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effect of exposure to an 8 mT, 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on memory consolidation of adult male and female mice was studied. For this purpose male and female mice were randomly distributed among six groups (n = 10 in each group). Using passive avoidance task, despite its natural tendency, mouse learns to stay on a small platform to avoidant electric shock. Immediately after the learning session, laboratory animals in the experimental groups were placed in an 8 mT, 50 Hz sinusoidal EMF for 4 h. The second male and female groups were sham exposed (exposure device off) and the third groups were considered as the controls. Twenty-four hours after the learning session, the animals were placed on small platform again and step-down latency was measured as the memory consolidation index. Significant (p < 0.05) decreases were determined among groups in memory function and results showed that exposure to an 8 mT, 50 Hz EMF for 4 h has devastating effects on memory consolidation in male and female mice.

  15. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences.

  16. Origins of electromagnetic hypersensitivity to 60 Hz magnetic fields: A provocation study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Jae Lim; Nam, Ki Chang; Yang, Dong In; Kwon, Min Kyung

    2012-05-01

    With increasing electrical device usage, social concerns about the possible effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on human health have increased. The number of people with self-attributed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) who complain of various subjective symptoms such as headache and insomnia has also increased. However, it is unclear whether EHS results from physiological or other origins. In this double-blinded study, we simultaneously investigated physiological changes (heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability), subjective symptoms, and perception of the magnetic field to assess origins of the subjective symptoms. Two volunteer groups of 15 self-reported EHS and 16 non-EHS individuals were tested with exposure to sham and real (60 Hz, 12.5 µT) magnetic fields for 30 min. Magnetic field exposure did not have any effects on physiological parameters or eight subjective symptoms in either group. There was also no evidence that the EHS group perceived the magnetic field better than the non-EHS group. In conclusion, the subjective symptoms did not result from the 60 Hz, 12.5 µT magnetic field exposures but from other non-physiological factors.

  17. Laser-induced incandescence measurements in a fired diesel engine at 3 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, I. G.; Heinold, O.; Geigle, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) was performed at 3 kHz in an optically accessible cylinder of a fired diesel engine using a commercially available diode-pumped solid-state laser and an intensified CMOS camera. The resulting images, acquired every 3° of crank angle, enabled the spatiotemporal tracking of soot structures during the expansion/exhaust stroke of the engine cycle. The image sequences demonstrate that soot tends to form in thin sheets that propagate and interact with the in-cylinder flow. These sheets tend to align parallel to the central axis of the cylinder and are frequently wrapped into conical spirals by aerodynamic swirl. Most of the soot is observed well away from the cylinder walls. Quantitative soot measurements were beyond the scope of this study but the results demonstrate the practical utility of using kHz-rate LII to acquire ensemble-averaged statistical data with high crank angle resolution over a complete engine cycle. Based on semi-quantitative measures of soot distribution, it was possible to identify soot dynamics related to incomplete charge exchange. This study shows that long-duration, multi-kHz acquisition rate LII measurements are viable in a fired diesel engine with currently available laser and camera technology, albeit only in the expansion and exhaust phase of the cycle at present. Furthermore, such measurements yield useful insight into soot dynamics and therefore constitute an important new tool for the development and optimization of diesel engine technology.

  18. Retinoic acid inhibits the cytoproliferative response to weak 50-Hz magnetic fields in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; MARTÍNEZ, MARÍA ANTONIA; CID, MARÍA ANTONIA; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that intermittent exposure to a 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) at 100 μT stimulates cell proliferation in the human neuroblastoma cell line NB69. The present study aimed to investigate whether the magnetic field-induced growth promotion also occurs at a lower magnetic flux density of 10 μT. To this purpose, NB69 cells were subjected for 42 h to intermittent exposure, 3 h on/3 h off, to a 50-Hz MF at a 10 or 100 μT magnetic flux density. The field exposure took place either in the presence or in the absence of the antiproliferative agent retinoic acid. At the end of the treatment and/or incubation period, the cell growth was estimated by hemocytometric counting and spectrophotometric analysis of total protein and DNA contents. Potential changes in DNA synthesis were also assessed through proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunolabeling. The results confirmed previously reported data that a 42-h exposure to a 50-Hz sine wave MF at 100 μT promotes cell growth in the NB69 cell line, and showed that 10 μT induces a similar proliferative response. This effect, which was significantly associated and linearly correlated with PCNA expression, was abolished by the presence of retinoic acid in the culture medium. PMID:23292364

  19. Prestimulus oscillatory phase at 7 Hz gates cortical information flow and visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Volberg, Gregor; Wimber, Maria; Dalal, Sarang S; Greenlee, Mark W

    2013-11-18

    Although we have the impression that visual information flows continuously from our sensory channels, recent studies indicate that this is likely not the case. Rather, we sample visual stimuli rhythmically, oscillating at 5-10 Hz. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies have demonstrated that this rhythmicity is reflected by the phase of ongoing brain oscillations in the same frequency. Theoretically, brain oscillations could underlie the rhythmic nature of perception by providing transient time windows for information exchange, but this question has not yet been systematically addressed. We recorded simultaneous EEG-fMRI while human participants performed a contour integration task and show that ongoing brain oscillations prior to stimulus onset predict functional connectivity between higher and lower level visual processing regions. Specifically, our results demonstrate that the phase of a 7 Hz oscillation prior to stimulus onset predicts perceptual performance and the bidirectional information flow between the left lateral occipital cortex and right intraparietal sulcus, as indicated by psychophysiological interaction and dynamic causal modeling. These findings suggest that human brain oscillations periodically gate visual perception at around 7 Hz by providing transient time windows for long-distance cortical information transfer. Such gating might be a general mechanism underlying the rhythmic nature of human perception.

  20. Measuring ground deformations with 1-Hz GPS data: the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (preliminary report)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, Meilano; Kimata, Fumiaki; Hirahara, Kazuro; Sagiya, Takeshi; Yamagiwa, Atsushi

    2004-03-01

    We analyzed 1-Hz GPS data observed at 14 stations of the GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) of the Geographical Survey Institute, Japan, associated with the 2003 M JMA 8.1 Tokachi-oki earthquake, which occurred at the Kurile Trench. The GPS stations are located 70-240 km away from the epicenter. GPS data clearly captured rapid co-seismic ground displacements. At a GPS station 70 km away from the epicenter, coseismic displacements started 15 seconds after the origin time, and after 40 seconds at the stations 240 km away. Observed displacement amplitude exceeded 20 cm at GPS sites 240 km away from the epicenter. Displacement amplitudes attenuate with time and distance from the epicenter, oscillating with periods of 40-60 seconds. We compared the 1-Hz GPS data and displacement seismogram integrated from strong ground motion data, which showed fairly good agreements. In spite of careful screening of 1-Hz GPS data during 30 minutes preceding the main shock, no significant preseismic deformation over 1 cm in the horizontal components was recorded. 30 second sampling GPS data at 14 sites during 20 hours preceding the main shock did not show any significant pre-seismic deformation, either. These results indicate that pre-seismic strain change, if any, was smaller than 0.5-1.0×10-7 before the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake.

  1. Development toxicology study in rats exposed to 60-Hz horizontal magnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1997-09-01

    A replicate study using large numbers of animals was conducted to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields would produce developmental toxicity in rats. Systems used previously for electric field exposures were retrofitted to provide magnetic field exposures to small laboratory animals. Large coils, separated from the rat cages, were energized by computer-controlled function generators providing a relatively pure, 1,000--{micro}T (10 G), 60-Hz, horizontal magnetic field for the high exposure group. Leakage fields to a second system provided a second exposure group with average exposures of 0.61 {micro}T (6.1 mG). Ambient fields within a third (control) system were 0.09 {micro}T (0.9 mG). Replicate experiments were conducted in which female rats were mated, and sperm-positive females were randomly distributed among the three exposure groups: (0.09, 0.61, and 1,000 {micro}T). Pregnant animals were exposed to 60 Hz horizontal magnetic fields for 20 hr/day from mating until very near term, 20 days later.

  2. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A 3.1-4.8 GHz transmitter with a high frequency divider in 0.18 μm CMOS for OFDM-UWB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renliang, Zheng; Junyan, Ren; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2009-12-01

    A fully integrated low power RF transmitter for a WiMedia 3.1-4.8 GHz multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing ultra-wideband system is presented. With a separate transconductance stage, the quadrature up-conversion modulator achieves high linearity with low supply voltage. The co-design of different resonant frequencies of the modulator and the differential to single (D2S) converter ensures in-band gain flatness. By means of a series inductor peaking technique, the D2S converter obtains 9 dB more gain without extra power consumption. A divided-by-2 divider is used for carrier signal generation. The measurement results show an output power between -10.7 and -3.1 dBm with 7.6 dB control range, an OIP3 up to 12 dBm, a sideband rejection of 35 dBc and a carrier rejection of 30 dBc. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in the Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process with an area of 1.74 mm2 and only consumes 32 mA current (at 1.8 V) including the test associated parts.

  3. 1,4,8-trimethylfuro[2,3-H]quinolin-2(1H)-one, a new furocoumarin bioisoster.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Cristina; Chilin, Adriana; Baccichetti, Francarosa; Bettio, Frazia; Guiotto, Adriano; Miolo, Giorgia; Bordin, Franco

    2004-05-01

    1,4,8-Trimethylfuro[2,3-h]quinolin-2(1H)-one (compound 5a) is the most interesting derivative among some new furoquinolinones prepared with the aim of moderating the strong toxic effects of 1,4,6,8-tetramethyl derivative (FQ), a powerful potential drug for photomedicine. Compound 5a showed a photobiological activity lower than FQ, but considerable higher than 8-MOP, the furocoumarin used in clinical photomedicine; contrary to classic furocoumarins, 5a induced a strong inhibition of protein synthesis in mammalian cells. Genotoxicity and skin erythema induction, the main side effects of both FQ and 8-MOP photosensitization, are virtually absent with 5a. This behavior seems to be connected to its particular reaction mechanism: differently from furocoumarin derivatives, 5a induced low levels of DNA-protein and no inter-strands cross-links, but formed covalent RNA-protein linkages, lesions not observed with known furocoumarins. Moreover, compound 5a generated reactive oxygen species to a considerable extent. For these features, compound 5a appears to be a new photosensitizing agent whose special activity deserves to be deeply investigated.

  4. A new cementless total hip arthroplasty with bioactive titanium porous-coating by alkaline and heat treatment: average 4.8-year results.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Keiichi; Ise, Kentaro; Goto, Koji; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nakamura, Takashi; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Sugimori, Tanzo; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2009-07-01

    A method has been developed for creating a bioactive coating on titanium by alkaline and heat treatment, and shown that it forms a thin layer of hydroxyapatite (HA) on the surface of implants when soaked in simulated body fluid. A series of 70 cementless primary total hip arthroplasties using this coating technique on a porous titanium surface was performed, and followed up the patients for a mean period of 4.8 years. There were no instances of loosening or revision, or formation of a reactive line on the porous coating. Although radiography just after operation showed a gap between the host bone and the socket in over 70% of cases, all the gaps disappeared within a year, indicating the good osteoconduction provided by the coating. Alkaline-heat treatment of titanium to provide a thin HA coating has several advantages over plasma-spraying, including no degeneration or absorption of the HA coating, simplicity of the manufacturing process, and cost effectiveness. In addition, this method allows homogeneous deposition of bone-like apatite within a porous implant. Although this was a relatively short-term study, treatment that creates a bioactive surface on titanium and titanium alloy implants has considerable promise for clinical application.

  5. Theoretical study of CO and O2 adsorption and CO oxidation on linear-shape gold molecules (LGMn) (n=2, 4, 8, 16, and 24)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Tetsuya; Kuramoto, Kei

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory is used to study the effect of increase of the number of Au atom in the adsorption of CO and O2 as well as CO oxidation on anionic, neutral, and cationic Linear-shape Gold Molecules (LGMn) (n=2, 4, 8, 16, and 24). The more the number of Au atom increases, the more the adsorption energies of CO lower and larger in the cationic and anionic LGMnCO complexes, respectively. In contrast, the adsorption energies of both CO and O2 on neutral LGMn exhibit approximately constant values. There are little differences of both adsorption energies and net charge of CO and O2 on the number of Au atom in LGM regardless of each charge state. This indicates that the charge state of LGM plays a less important role for the adsorption of CO and O2 with increase of the number of Au atom in LGM. The trend of the overall activation energies of reaction pathway is switched between LGM-14 and LGM-18 with increase of the number of Au atom in LGM, and OC-OO intermediate of the initial state in n-1LGM (n=8, 16, and 24) are unstable compared to the separated reactants (LGMn, CO, O2). These are caused by the values of charge of O2 of OC-OO intermediate.

  6. Oxidation of iodide and iodine on birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the pH range 4-8.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; von Gunten, Urs; Sahli, Elisabeth; Nicolau, Rudy; Gallard, Hervé

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation of iodide by synthetic birnessite (delta-MnO(2)) was studied in perchlorate media in the pH range 4-8. Iodine (I(2)) was detected as an oxidation product that was subsequently further oxidized to iodate (IO(3)(-)). The third order rate constants, second order on iodide and first order on manganese oxide, determined by extraction of iodine in benzene decreased with increasing pH (6.3-7.5) from 1790 to 3.1M(-2) s(-1). Both iodine and iodate were found to adsorb significantly on birnessite with an adsorption capacity of 12.7 microM/g for iodate at pH 5.7. The rate of iodine oxidation by birnessite decreased with increasing ionic strength, which resulted in a lower rate of iodate formation. The production of iodine in iodide-containing waters in contact with manganese oxides may result in the formation of undesired iodinated organic compounds (taste and odor, toxicity) in natural and technical systems. The probability of the formation of such compounds is highest in the pH range 5-7.5. For pH <5 iodine is quickly oxidized to iodate, a non-toxic and stable sink for iodine. At pH >7.5, iodide is not oxidized to a significant extent.

  7. Higher weight status of only and last-born children. Maternal feeding and child eating behaviors as underlying processes among 4-8 year olds.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Rana H; Lumeng, Julie C; Kaciroti, Niko; Peterson, Karen E; Rosenblum, Katherine; Baylin, Ana; Miller, Alison L

    2015-09-01

    Birth order has been associated with childhood obesity. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine maternal feeding and child eating behaviors as underlying processes for increased weight status of only children and youngest siblings. Participants included 274 low-income 4-8 year old children and their mothers. The dyads completed a videotaped laboratory mealtime observation. Mothers completed the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire and the Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Child weight and height were measured using standardized procedures. Path analysis was used to examine associations of birth order, maternal feeding behavior, child eating behavior, and child overweight/obese status. The association between only child status and greater likelihood of overweight/obesity was fully mediated by higher maternal Verbal Discouragement to eat and lower maternal Praise (all p values < 0.05). The association between youngest sibling status and greater likelihood of overweight/obesity was partially mediated by lower maternal Praise and lower child Food Fussiness (all p values < 0.05). Results provide support for our hypothesis that maternal control and support and child food acceptance are underlying pathways for the association between birth order and weight status. Future findings can help inform family-based programs by guiding family counseling and tailoring of recommendations for family mealtime interactions.

  8. Solvent effect on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin: determination of ground and excited state dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Gülseven Sıdır, Yadigar; Sıdır, Isa

    2013-02-01

    The ground state (μ(g)) and excited state (μ(e)) dipole moments of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin (abbreviated as 7ADDC) are estimated from solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra as a function of the dielectric constant (ε) and refractive index (n). While the ground state dipole moment is determined by using Bilot-Kawski method, the excited state dipole moment is calculated by using Bilot-Kawski, Lippert-Mataga, Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt correlation methods. Excited state dipole moment is observed as larger than the ground state dipole moment due to substantial π-electron density redistribution. The ground state and excited state dipole moments are observed as parallel to each other with angle of 0°. Solute-solvent interactions are analyzed by means of linear solvation free energy relationships (LSER) using dielectric constant function (f(ε)), refractive index function (f(n)) and Kamlet-Taft parameters (α and β). Atomic charges, electron densities and molecular orbitals are calculated in vacuum and with solvent effect by using both DFT and TDDFT methods. Solvent accessible surface, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and electrostatic potential (ESP) are visualized as a result of DFT calculations.

  9. Hydrogen-bonded ring closing and opening of protonated methanol clusters H(+)(CH3OH)(n) (n = 4-8) with the inert gas tagging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Cheng; Hamashima, Toru; Yamazaki, Ryoko; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Yuta; Mizuse, Kenta; Fujii, Asuka; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2015-09-14

    The preferential hydrogen bond (H-bond) structures of protonated methanol clusters, H(+)(MeOH)n, in the size range of n = 4-8, were studied by size-selective infrared (IR) spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. The IR spectra of bare clusters were compared with those with the inert gas tagging by Ar, Ne, and N2, and remarkable changes in the isomer distribution with the tagging were found for clusters with n≥ 5. The temperature dependence of the isomer distribution of the clusters was calculated by the quantum harmonic superposition approach. The observed spectral changes with the tagging were well interpreted by the fall of the cluster temperature with the tagging, which causes the transfer of the isomer distribution from the open and flexible H-bond network types to the closed and rigid ones. Anomalous isomer distribution with the tagging, which has been recently found for protonated water clusters, was also found for H(+)(MeOH)5. The origin of the anomaly was examined by the experiments on its carrier gas dependence.

  10. Solvent effect on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin: Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülseven Sıdır, Yadigar; Sıdır, İsa

    2013-02-01

    The ground state (μg) and excited state (μe) dipole moments of 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin (abbreviated as 7ADDC) are estimated from solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra as a function of the dielectric constant (ɛ) and refractive index (n). While the ground state dipole moment is determined by using Bilot-Kawski method, the excited state dipole moment is calculated by using Bilot-Kawski, Lippert-Mataga, Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt correlation methods. Excited state dipole moment is observed as larger than the ground state dipole moment due to substantial π-electron density redistribution. The ground state and excited state dipole moments are observed as parallel to each other with angle of 0°. Solute-solvent interactions are analyzed by means of linear solvation free energy relationships (LSER) using dielectric constant function (f(ɛ)), refractive index function (f(n)) and Kamlet-Taft parameters (α and β). Atomic charges, electron densities and molecular orbitals are calculated in vacuum and with solvent effect by using both DFT and TDDFT methods. Solvent accessible surface, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and electrostatic potential (ESP) are visualized as a result of DFT calculations.

  11. Children aged 4-8 years treated with parent training and child therapy because of conduct problems: generalisation effects to day-care and school settings.

    PubMed

    Drugli, May Britt; Larsson, Bo

    2006-10-01

    In this study, generalisation effects to day-care/school settings were examined in an outpatient clinic sample of 127 children aged 4-8 years treated because of oppositional conduct problems in the home with parent training (PT) and parent training combined with child therapy (CT) ("Incredible Years"). Before treatment all children scored above the 90th percentile on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) for home problems, and met criteria for a possible or a confirmed diagnosis of either an oppositional defiant (ODD) or a conduct (CD) disorder. Further, 83% of the children showed clinical levels of conduct problems both at home and in day-care/school before treatment. Although most children improved at home, the majority still showed clinical levels of conduct problems in day-care/school settings after treatment and 1-year later. Combined PT and CT produced the most powerful and significant generalisation effects across the treatment period, however these improvements were not maintained 1-year later for most areas. The results of the present study, therefore, underline the need to target conduct problems not only exhibited at home but also in day-care/school settings, and to develop strategies to maintain positive generalisation effects after treatment for this age and problem-group.

  12. The effect of mobile phone electromagnetic fields on the alpha rhythm of human electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Croft, R J; Hamblin, D L; Spong, J; Wood, A W; McKenzie, R J; Stough, C

    2008-01-01

    Mobile phones (MP) emit low-level electromagnetic fields that have been reported to affect neural function in humans; however, demonstrations of such effects have not been conclusive. The purpose of the present study was to test one of the strongest findings in the literature; that of increased "alpha" power in response to MP-type radiation. Healthy participants (N = 120) were tested using a double-blind counterbalanced crossover design, with each receiving a 30-min Active and a 30-min Sham Exposure 1 week apart, while electroencephalogram (EEG) data were recorded. Resting alpha power (8-12 Hz) was then derived as a function of time, for periods both during and following exposure. Non-parametric analyses were employed as data could not be normalized. Previous reports of an overall alpha power enhancement during the MP exposure were confirmed (relative to Sham), with this effect larger at ipsilateral than contralateral sites over posterior regions. No overall change to alpha power was observed following exposure cessation; however, there was less alpha power contralateral to the exposure source during this period (relative to ipsilateral). Employing a strong methodology, the current findings support previous research that has reported an effect of MP exposure on EEG alpha power.

  13. Alpha Reactivity to Complex Sounds Differs during REM Sleep and Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Perrine; Blochet, Camille; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Olivier; Morlet, Dominique; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    We aimed at better understanding the brain mechanisms involved in the processing of alerting meaningful sounds during sleep, investigating alpha activity. During EEG acquisition, subjects were presented with a passive auditory oddball paradigm including rare complex sounds called Novels (the own first name - OWN, and an unfamiliar first name - OTHER) while they were watching a silent movie in the evening or sleeping at night. During the experimental night, the subjects’ quality of sleep was generally preserved. During wakefulness, the decrease in alpha power (8–12 Hz) induced by Novels was significantly larger for OWN than for OTHER at parietal electrodes, between 600 and 900 ms after stimulus onset. Conversely, during REM sleep, Novels induced an increase in alpha power (from 0 to 1200 ms at all electrodes), significantly larger for OWN than for OTHER at several parietal electrodes between 700 and 1200 ms after stimulus onset. These results show that complex sounds have a different effect on the alpha power during wakefulness (decrease) and during REM sleep (increase) and that OWN induce a specific effect in these two states. The increased alpha power induced by Novels during REM sleep may 1) correspond to a short and transient increase in arousal; in this case, our study provides an objective measure of the greater arousing power of OWN over OTHER, 2) indicate a cortical inhibition associated with sleep protection. These results suggest that alpha modulation could participate in the selection of stimuli to be further processed during sleep. PMID:24260331

  14. The role of alpha-rhythm states in perceptual learning: insights from experiments and computational models

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Rodrigo; Haufe, Sebastian; Roy, Dipanjan; Dinse, Hubert R.; Ritter, Petra

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades growing evidence indicates that brain oscillations in the alpha band (~10 Hz) not only reflect an “idle” state of cortical activity, but also take a more active role in the generation of complex cognitive functions. A recent study shows that more than 60% of the observed inter-subject variability in perceptual learning can be ascribed to ongoing alpha activity. This evidence indicates a significant role of alpha oscillations for perceptual learning and hence motivates to explore the potential underlying mechanisms. Hence, it is the purpose of this review to highlight existent evidence that ascribes intrinsic alpha oscillations a role in shaping our ability to learn. In the review, we disentangle the alpha rhythm into different neural signatures that control information processing within individual functional building blocks of perceptual learning. We further highlight computational studies that shed light on potential mechanisms regarding how alpha oscillations may modulate information transfer and connectivity changes relevant for learning. To enable testing of those model based hypotheses, we emphasize the need for multidisciplinary approaches combining assessment of behavior and multi-scale neuronal activity, active modulation of ongoing brain states and computational modeling to reveal the mathematical principles of the complex neuronal interactions. In particular we highlight the relevance of multi-scale modeling frameworks such as the one currently being developed by “The Virtual Brain” project. PMID:24772077

  15. Decoding and Reconstructing the Focus of Spatial Attention from the Topography of Alpha-band Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Samaha, Jason; Sprague, Thomas C.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perception and cognition are supported by activity in neural populations that are tuned to different stimulus features (e.g., orientation, spatial location, color). Goal-directed behavior, such as sustained attention, requires a mechanism for the selective prioritization of contextually appropriate representations. A candidate mechanism of sustained spatial attention is neural activity in the alpha band (8–13 Hz), whose power in the human EEG covaries with the focus of covert attention. Here, we applied an inverted encoding model to assess whether spatially selective neural responses could be recovered from the topography of alpha-band oscillations during spatial attention. Participants were cued to covertly attend to one of six spatial locations arranged concentrically around fixation while EEG was recorded. A linear classifier applied to EEG data during sustained attention demonstrated successful classification of the attended location from the topography of alpha power, although not from other frequency bands. We next sought to reconstruct the focus of spatial attention over time by applying inverted encoding models to the topography of alpha power and phase. Alpha power, but not phase, allowed for robust reconstructions of the specific attended location beginning around 450 msec postcue, an onset earlier than previous reports. These results demonstrate that posterior alpha-band oscillations can be used to track activity in feature-selective neural populations with high temporal precision during the deployment of covert spatial attention. PMID:27003790

  16. EEG epoch selection: lack of alpha rhythm improves discrimination of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Francisco J; Oliveira, Eliezyer F; Kanda, Paulo A M

    2016-08-01

    In this work we propose a detailed EEG epoch selection method and compare epochs with rare and abundant alpha rhythm (AR) of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal controls. Epochs were classified as Dominant Alpha Scenario (DAS) and Rare Alpha Scenario (RAS) according to the AR percentage (energy within the 8-13 Hz bandwidth) in O1, O2 and Oz electrodes. Participants were divided into four groups: 17 DAS controls (N1), 15 DAS mild-AD patients (AD1), 12 RAS controls (N2) and 15 RAS mild-AD patients (AD2). We found out that scenario factor (DAS vs. RAS, two-way ANOVA) is significant over a great amount of electrode-bandwidth situations. Furthermore, one-way ANOVA showed significant differences between RAS AD and RAS controls in much more situations as compared to DAS. This is the first study using AD awake EEG reporting the decisive influence of alpha rhythm on epoch selection, where our results revealed that, contrary to what was initially expected, EEG epochs with poor alpha (RAS) discriminate mild AD much better than those presenting richer alpha content (DAS).

  17. Long-term depression in the sensorimotor cortex induced by repeated delivery of 10 Hz trains in vivo.

    PubMed

    Werk, C M; Klein, H S; Nesbitt, C E; Chapman, C A

    2006-06-19

    Memory consolidation in the neocortex is thought to be mediated in part by bi-directional modifications of synaptic strength. The sensorimotor cortex shows marked spontaneous activity near 10 Hz during both waking and sleep in the form of electroencephalographic spindle waves, and is also sensitive to electrical activation of inputs at 10 Hz. Induction of long-term synaptic depression in corpus callosum inputs to layer V of the sensorimotor cortex of the awake, adult rat requires repeated low-frequency stimulation over many days. To determine if 10 Hz stimulation may facilitate the induction of long-term depression, we compared the amounts of long-term depression induced by conventional 1 Hz trains, repeated delivery of 450 pairs of stimulation pulses using a 100 ms interpulse interval, and 45 short, 2 s, 10 Hz trains. Each pattern was delivered daily for 10 days and was matched for total duration and number of pulses. Changes in synaptic responses were assessed by monitoring field potentials evoked by stimulation of the corpus callosum. A facilitation of synaptic responses in layer V was observed during delivery of both paired-pulse trains and 10 Hz trains. There was no significant difference in long-term depression induced by 1 Hz stimulation and repeated paired-pulse stimulation, but 10 Hz trains induced significantly greater long-term depression than 1 Hz trains in both the early monosynaptic and late polysynaptic field potential components. The effectiveness of short 10 Hz trains for the induction of long-term depression suggests that synchronous population activity at frequencies near 10 Hz such as spindle waves may contribute to endogenous synaptic depression in sensorimotor cortex.

  18. The strain in the array is mainly in the plane (waves below ~1 Hz)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Pavlis, G.; Bodin, P.

    1999-01-01

    We compare geodetic and single-station methods of measuring dynamic deformations and characterize their causes in the frequency bands 0.5-1.0 Hz and 4.0-8.0 Hz. The geodetic approach utilizes data from small-aperture seismic arrays, applying techniques from geodesy. It requires relatively few assumptions and a priori information. The single-station method uses ground velocities recorded at isolated or single stations and assumes all the deformation is due to plane-wave propagation. It also requires knowledge of the azimuth and horizontal velocity of waves arriving at the recording station. Data employed come from a small-aperture, dense seismic array deployed in Geyokcha, Turkmenistan, and include seismograms recorded by broadband STS2 and short-period L28 sensors. Poor agreement between geodetic and single-station estimates in the 4.0-8.0 Hz passband indicates that the displacement field may vary nonlinearly with distance over distances of ~50 m. STS2 geodetic estimates provide a robust standard in the 0.5-1.0 Hz passband because they appear to be computationally stable and require fewer assumptions than single-station estimates. The agreement between STS2 geodetic estimates and single-station L28 estimates is surprisingly good for the S-wave and early surface waves, suggesting that the single-station analysis should be useful with commonly available data. These results indicate that, in the 0.5 to 1.0 Hz passband, the primary source of dynamic deformation is plane-wave propagation along great-circle source-receiver paths. For later arriving energy, the effects of scattering become important. The local structure beneath the array exerts a strong control on the geometry of the dynamic deformation, implying that it may be difficult to infer source characteristics of modern or paleoearthquakes from indicators of dynamic deformations. However, strong site control also suggests that the dynamic deformations may be predictable, which would be useful for engineering

  19. Simulating satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, M.; Hanuise, C.; Parrot, M.

    2010-10-01

    Relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds emit 100 kHz radio waves which illuminate the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. This contribution aims to clarify the physical processes which are relevant for the spatial spreading of the radio wave energy below and above the ionosphere and thereby enables simulating satellite observations of 100 kHz radio waves from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds. The simulation uses the DEMETER satellite which observes 100 kHz radio waves from fifty terrestrial Long Range Aid to Navigation (LORAN) transmitters. Their mean luminosity patch in the plasmasphere is a circular area with a radius of 300 km and a power density of 22 μW/Hz as observed at 660km height above the ground. The luminosity patches exhibit a southward displacement of 450 km with respect to the locations of the LORAN transmitters. The displacement is reduced to 150 km when an upward propagation of the radio waves along the geomagnetic field line is assumed. This residual displacement indicates that the radio waves undergo 150 km sub-ionospheric propagation prior to entering a magnetospheric duct and escaping into near-Earth space. The residual displacement at low (L<2.14) and high (L>2.14) geomagnetic latitudes ranges from 100 km to 200 km which suggests that the smaller inclination of the geomagnetic field lines at low latitudes helps to trap the radio waves and to keep them in the magnetospheric duct. Diffuse luminosity areas are observed northward of the magnetic conjugate locations of LORAN transmitters at extremely low geomagnetic latitudes (L<1.36) in Southeast Asia. This result suggests that the propagation along the geomagnetic field lines results in a spatial spreading of the radio wave energy over distances of 1 Mm. The summative assessment of the electric field intensities measured in space show that nadir observations of terrestrial 100 kHz radio waves, e.g., from relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds, are attenuated

  20. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  1. Mechanism of alpha-tocopheryl-phosphate (alpha-TP) transport across the cell membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that alpha-TP is synthesized and hydrolyzed in animal cells and tissues; it modulates also several cell functions (FRBM 39:970, and UBMB Life, 57:23, 2005). While it is similar to alpha-tocopherol (alpha-T), alpha-TP appears to be more potent than alpha-T in inhibiting cell prolifer...

  2. PULSE AMPLITUDE DEPENDS ON kHz QPO FREQUENCY IN THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND PULSAR SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2015-01-10

    We study the relation between the 300-700 Hz upper kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and the 401 Hz coherent pulsations across all outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the pulse amplitude systematically changes by a factor of ∼2 when the upper kHz QPO frequency passes through 401 Hz: it halves when the QPO moves to above the spin frequency and doubles again on the way back. This establishes for the first time the existence of a direct effect of kHz QPOs on the millisecond pulsations and provides a new clue to the origin of the upper kHz QPO. We discuss several scenarios and conclude that while more complex explanations can not formally be excluded, our result strongly suggests that the QPO is produced by azimuthal motion at the inner edge of the accretion disk, most likely orbital motion. Depending on whether this azimuthal motion is faster or slower than the spin, the plasma then interacts differently with the neutron-star magnetic field. The most straightforward interpretation involves magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow that sets in when the upper kHz QPO becomes slower than the spin.

  3. Probing the accretion disc structure by the twin kHz QPOs and spins of neutron stars in LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. H.; Zhang, C. M.; Lei, Y. J.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Zhi, Q. J.

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the relation between the emission radii of twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) and the co-rotation radii of the 12 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), which are simultaneously detected with the twin kHz QPOs and NS spins. We find that the average co-rotation radius of these sources is ∼ 32 km, and all the emission positions of twin kHz QPOs lie inside the co-rotation radii, indicating that the twin kHz QPOs are formed in the spin-up process. It is noticed that the upper frequency of twin kHz QPOs is higher than NS spin frequency by ≥10 per cent, which may account for a critical velocity difference between the Keplerian motion of accretion matter and NS spin that is corresponding to the production of twin kHz QPOs. In addition, we also find that ∼83 per cent of twin kHz QPOs cluster around the radius range of 15-20 km, which may be affected by the hard surface or the local strong magnetic field of the NS. As a special case, SAX J1808.4-3658 shows the larger emission radii of twin kHz QPOs of r ∼ 21-24 km, which may be due to its low accretion rate or small measured NS mass (<1.4 M⊙).

  4. Extinction law in the range 0.4-4.8 μm and the 8620 Å DIB towards the stellar cluster Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damineli, A.; Almeida, L. A.; Blum, R. D.; Damineli, D. S. C.; Navarete, F.; Rubinho, M. S.; Teodoro, M.

    2016-12-01

    The young stellar cluster Westerlund 1 (Wd 1: l = 339.6°, b = -0.4°) is one of the most massive in the local Universe, but accurate parameters are pending on better determination of its extinction and distance. Based on our photometry and data collected from other sources, we have derived a reddening law for the cluster line-of-sight representative of the Galactic plane (-5° < b <+5°) in the window 0.4-4.8 μm: The power-law exponent α = 2.13 ± 0.08 is much steeper than those published a decade ago (1.6-1.8) and our index RV = 2.50 ± 0.04 also differs from them, but in very good agreement with recent works based on deep surveys in the inner Galaxy. As a consequence, the total extinction AKs = 0.74 ± 0.08 (AV = 11.40 ± 2.40) is substantially smaller than previous results (0.91-1.13), part of which (AKs = 0.63 or AV = 9.66) is from the interstellar medium. The extinction in front of the cluster spans a range of ΔAV ˜8.7 with a gradient increasing from SW to NE across the cluster face, following the same general trend of warm dust distribution. The map of the J - Ks colour index also shows a trend of reddening in this direction. We measured the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 8620 Å (the `GAIA DIB') for Wd 1 cluster members and derived the relation AKs = 0.612 EW - 0.191 EW2. This extends the Munari et al. relation, valid for EB-V < 1, to the non-linear regime (AV > 4).

  5. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A monolithic 3.1-4.8 GHz MB-OFDM UWB transceiver in 0.18-μm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renliang, Zheng; Xudong, Jiang; Wang, Yao; Guang, Yang; Jiangwei, Yin; Jianqin, Zheng; Junyan, Ren; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2010-06-01

    A monolithic RF transceiver for an MB-OFDM UWB system in 3.1-4.8 GHz is presented. The transceiver adopts direct-conversion architecture and integrates all building blocks including a gain controllable wideband LNA, a I/Q merged quadrature mixer, a fifth-order Gm-C bi-quad Chebyshev LPF/VGA, a fast-settling frequency synthesizer with a poly-phase filter, a linear broadband up-conversion quadrature modulator, an active D2S converter and a variable-gain power amplifier. The ESD protected transceiver is fabricated in Jazz Semiconductor's 0.18-μm RF CMOS with an area of 6.1 mm2 and draws a total current of 221 mA from 1.8-V supply. The receiver achieves a maximum voltage gain of 68 dB with a control range of 42 dB in 6 dB/step, noise figures of 5.5-8.8 dB for three sub-bands, and an in-band/out-band IIP3 better than -4 dBm/+9 dBm. The transmitter achieves an output power ranging from -10.7 to -3 dBm with gain control, an output P1dB better than -7.7 dBm, a sideband rejection about 32.4 dBc, and LO suppression of 31.1 dBc. The hopping time among sub-bands is less than 2.05 ns.

  6. A Study on the Validity of a Computer-Based Game to Assess Cognitive Processes, Reward Mechanisms, and Time Perception in Children Aged 4-8 Years

    PubMed Central

    Hurks, Petra PM; Aldenkamp, Albert P; van der Spek, Erik D; Rauterberg, GWM; Vles, Johan SH; Hendriksen, Jos GM

    2016-01-01

    Background A computer-based game, named Timo’s Adventure, was developed to assess specific cognitive functions (eg, attention, planning, and working memory), time perception, and reward mechanisms in young school-aged children. The game consists of 6 mini-games embedded in a story line and includes fantasy elements to enhance motivation. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of Timo’s Adventure in normally developing children and in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods A total of 96 normally developing children aged 4-8 years and 40 children with ADHD were assessed using the game. Clinical validity was investigated by examining the effects of age on performances within the normally developing children, as well as performance differences between the healthy controls and the ADHD group. Results Our analyses in the normally developing children showed developmental effects; that is, older children made fewer inhibition mistakes (r=−.33, P=.001), had faster (and therefore better) reaction times (r=−.49, P<.001), and were able to produce time intervals more accurately than younger children (ρ=.35, P<.001). Discriminant analysis showed that Timo’s Adventure was accurate in most classifications whether a child belonged to the ADHD group or the normally developing group: 78% (76/97) of the children were correctly classified as having ADHD or as being in the normally developing group. The classification results showed that 72% (41/57) children in the control group were correctly classified, and 88% (35/40) of the children in the ADHD group were correctly classified as having ADHD. Sensitivity (0.89) and specificity (0.69) of Timo’s Adventure were satisfying. Conclusions Computer-based games seem to be a valid tool to assess specific strengths and weaknesses in young children with ADHD. PMID:27658428

  7. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  8. Immunodiagnosis of alpha chain disease.

    PubMed Central

    Doe, W F; Danon, F; Seligmann, M

    1979-01-01

    Since the early diagnosis of alpha chain disease (alphaCD)) is essential to successful treatment and to epidemiological studies, the available immunodiagnostic techniques were compared for their sensitivity, specificity and ease of performance on a panel of sixteen sera, comprising ten alphaCD sera and six control sera containing either IgA myeloma protein or high levels of polyclonal IgA. Immunoselection by immunoelectrophoresis into gel containing a specially developed anti-Fabalpha antiserum provided the most sensitive and specific detection system for alphaCD protein. The same technique using anti-light chain antiserum for immunoselection was also highly sensitive, but proved less specific, being prone to false positives with difficult IgA myeloma proteins. Somewhat less sensitive, but specific and simple to perform, was immunoelectrophoresis using an antiserum recognizing the conformational specificities of Fabalpha as well as those of the constant region of alpha chains. Immunoselection using the Ouchterlony or rocket techniques proved to be less sensitive and prone to false positives when some IgA myeloma sera were tested. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:113152

  9. 52 W kHz-linewidth low-noise linearly-polarized all-fiber single-frequency MOPA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changsheng; Xu, Shanhui; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhao, Qilai; Li, Can; Zhou, Kaijun; Feng, Zhouming; Gan, Jiulin; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    An all-fiber Yb-doped kHz-linewidth low-noise linearly polarized single-frequency master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) laser with a stable CW output power of >52 W is demonstrated. By suppressing the intensity noise of the DBR phosphate fiber oscillator, the linewidth of MOPA laser is not noticeably broadened, and an ultra-narrow linewidth of <3 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the low-noise behavior of MOPA lasers is investigated. A measured relative intensity noise of < -130 dB Hz-1 at frequencies of over 2 MHz, a phase noise above 1 kHz of <5 μrad/Hz1/2, and a signal-to-noise ratio of >63 dB are achieved.

  10. Thermally stable compositions including 2,4,8,10-tetranitro-5H-pyrido[3',2':4,5][1,2,3]triazolo[1,2-a]benzotriazo- l-6-ium, inner salt

    DOEpatents

    Hiskey, Michael A.; Huynh, My Hang

    2010-01-26

    An explosive formulation including 2,4,8,10-tetranitro-5H-pyrido[3',2':4,5][1,2,3]triazolo[1,2-a]benzotriazo- l-6-ium, inner salt and a high temperature binder is disclosed together with a process of preparing 2,4,8,10-tetranitro-5H-pyrido[3',2':4,5][1,2,3]triazolo[1,2-a]benzotriazo- l-6-ium, inner salt.

  11. Anticipatory alpha phase influences visual working memory performance.

    PubMed

    Zanto, Theodore P; Chadick, James Z; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-15

    Alpha band (8-12 Hz) phase dynamics in the visual cortex are thought to reflect fluctuations in cortical excitability that influences perceptual processing. As such, visual stimuli are better detected when their onset is concurrent with specific phases of the alpha cycle. However, it is unclear whether alpha phase differentially influences cognitive performance at specific times relative to stimulus onset (i.e., is the influence of phase maximal before, at, or after stimulus onset?). To address this, participants performed a delayed-recognition, working memory (WM) task for visual motion direction during two separate visits. The first visit utilized functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging to identify neural regions associated with task performance. Replicating previous studies, fMRI data showed engagement of visual cortical area V5, as well as a prefrontal cortical region, the inferior frontal junction (IFJ). During the second visit, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied separately to both the right IFJ and right V5 (with the vertex as a control region) while electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded. During each trial, a single pulse of TMS (spTMS) was applied at one of six time points (-200, -100, -50, 0, 80, 160 ms) relative to the encoded stimulus onset. Results demonstrated a relationship between the phase of the posterior alpha signal prior to stimulus encoding and subsequent response times to the memory probe two seconds later. Specifically, spTMS to V5, and not the IFJ or vertex, yielded faster response times, indicating improved WM performance, when delivered during the peak, compared to the trough, of the alpha cycle, but only when spTMS was applied 100 ms prior to stimulus onset. These faster responses to the probe correlated with decreased early event related potential (ERP) amplitudes (i.e., P1) to the probe stimuli. Moreover, participants that were least affected by spTMS exhibited greater functional connectivity

  12. Rodent ultrasonic communication: Male prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations elicit social approach behavior in female rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Willadsen, Maria; Seffer, Dominik; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Rats emit distinct types of ultrasonic vocalizations (USV), which serve as situation-dependent affective signals with important communicative functions. Low-frequency 22-kHz USV typically occur in aversive situations, such as social defeat, whereas high-frequency 50-kHz USV can be observed in appetitive situations, like rough-and-tumble-play in juveniles or mating in adults. The 2 main USV types serve distinct communicative functions and induce call-specific behavioral responses in the receiver. While 22-kHz USV probably serve as alarm calls, 50-kHz USV appear to serve a prosocial communicative function in the sexual and the nonsexual context. In the sexual context, however, this view has recently been challenged by playback studies where only very limited behavioral changes were observed in response to prosocial 50-kHz USV. The aim of the present study was therefore to test whether female rats display social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV by means of our established playback paradigm. To this aim, we exposed female rats to playback of the following 2 acoustic stimuli: (a) natural male 50-kHz USV and (b) time- and amplitude-matched white noise, with the latter serving as acoustic control for novelty-induced changes in behavior not linked to the communicative function of male prosocial 50-kHz USV. Our present findings show that female rats display high levels of social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV, but not time- and amplitude-matched white noise, supporting the conclusion that male prosocial 50-kHz USV are likely to play an important role in establishing social proximity and possibly regulate mating behavior.

  13. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as selective human alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Bavadekar, Supriya A; Hong, Seoung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ii; Miller, Duane D; Feller, Dennis R

    2008-08-20

    Phentolamine is known to act as a competitive, non-subtype-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. In an attempt to improve alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor selectivity and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtype-selectivity, two new chemical series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs were prepared and evaluated. These compounds were evaluated for binding affinities on alpha(1)- (alpha(1A)-, alpha(1B)-, alpha(1D)-) and alpha(2)- (alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)-, alpha(2C)-) adrenoceptor subtypes that had been stably expressed in human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, respectively. Methylation of the phenolic hydroxy group and replacement of the 4-methyl group of phentolamine with varying lipophilic substituents yielded bioisosteric analogs selective for the alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Within the alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, these analogs bound with higher affinity at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-subtypes as compared to the alpha(2B)-subtype. In particular, the t-butyl analog was found to be the most selective, its binding at the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor (Ki=3.6 nM) being 37- to 173-fold higher than that at the alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, and around 2- and 19-fold higher than at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2B)-adrenoceptors, respectively. Data from luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the functional antagonist activities of selected compounds from the bioisosteric series on human alpha(1A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Thus, the results with these bioisosteric analogs of phentolamine provide a lead to the rational design of potent and selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor ligands that may be useful in improving the therapeutic profile of this drug class for human disorders.

  14. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  15. The effect of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex on visual attention.

    PubMed

    Dombrowe, Isabel; Juravle, Georgiana; Alavash, Mohsen; Gießing, Carsten; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants' performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants' performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency rTMS during rest

  16. A novel 24-kHz resonant scanner for high-resolution laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Steffen; Kaufmann, Christian; Hahn, Ramon; Mehner, Jan; Doetzel, Wolfram; Gessner, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This contribution deals with design, fabrication and test of a micromachined resonant scanner usable for horizontal deflection of the laser beam in a projection display. The electrostatically driven plate is separated from the mirror in order to reduce air damping and electrostatic non linearity. The device consists of a circularly shaped mirror which is suspended by torsion beams in the center of an elastically suspended driving plate. A resonator with two rotational degrees of freedom is arranged in this way. The rotation axes of mirror and driving plate are the same. A suitable design of the properties of the two degrees of freedom resonator leads to a significant amplification of the oscillation of the mirror compared to the oscillation of the driving plate. The first resonant mode is a rotation of both plates with nearly the same magnitude at a frequency of approx. 5 kHz. The second mode with paraphase deflection at 24 kHz shows a deflection amplification by a ratio of 53 and is used for scanning operation. A supporting part made of glass carries two electrodes in the region of the driving plate and has a micro sandblasted hole beneath the mirror. Bulk micromachining KOH wet etching of the electrode gap size on the back side of the driving plate, reactive ion etching for contour shaping of the mirror, of the driving plate and of the torsion beams and anodic bonding have been used for fabrication of the mechanical structure. The mirror is evaporated by an aluminum layer. Applying a voltage of 380V results in a mechanical deflection of +/- 5.5 degrees at 24 kHz at atmosphere pressure. The device shows very small dynamic warp (<100nm) of the mirror plate even though the relatively large size of 2.2 mm diameter because of the thickness of 280 μm. The measured mechanical Q-factor is 5100.

  17. Variability, regularity and coupling measures distinguish PD tremor from voluntary 5Hz tremor.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S; Cortes, N; Newell, K M; Silburn, P A; Kerr, G

    2013-02-08

    A characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the development of tremor within the 4-6Hz range. One method used to better understand pathological tremor is to compare the responses to tremor-type actions generated intentionally in healthy adults. This study was designed to investigate the similarities and differences between voluntarily generated 4-6Hz tremor and PD tremor in regards to their amplitude, frequency and coupling characteristics. Tremor responses for 8 PD individuals (on- and off-medication) and 12 healthy adults were assessed under postural and resting conditions. Results showed that the voluntary and PD tremor were essentially identical with regards to the amplitude and peak frequency. However, differences between the groups were found for the variability (SD of peak frequency, proportional power) and regularity (Approximate Entropy, ApEn) of the tremor signal. Additionally, coherence analysis revealed strong inter-limb coupling during voluntary conditions while no bilateral coupling was seen for the PD persons. Overall, healthy participants were able to produce a 5Hz tremulous motion indistinguishable to that of PD patients in terms of peak frequency and amplitude. However, differences in the structure of variability and level of inter-limb coupling were found for the tremor responses of the PD and healthy adults. These differences were preserved irrespective of the medication state of the PD persons. The results illustrate the importance of assessing the pattern of signal structure/variability to discriminate between different tremor forms, especially where no differences emerge in standard measures of mean amplitude as traditionally defined.

  18. Ground-truthing 6. 5-kHz side scan sonographs: What are we really imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; Field, M.E.; Lee, H.; Edwards, B.E. ); Masson, D.G.; Kenyon, N. ); Kidd, R.B. )

    1991-04-10

    A 1,000-km{sup 2} area on the distal lobe of Monterey Fan shows a digitate pattern of juxtaposed high and low backscatter on GLORIA side scan sonographs. This area was investigated using stereo photography, high-resolution seismic profiles, and measurements of physical properties of cores to quantitatively evaluate the causes of backscatter from the 6.5-kHz side scan sonar. Stereo photography and bottom video were used to determine that the sediment-water interface typically has a bed roughness less than 10 cm over the entire ground truth area; consequently, bed roughness is not a significant contributor to the sonar backscatter. Vertical-incidence 3.5-kHz profiles reveal that high-backscatter areas allow less penetration and have slightly more relief than low-backscatter areas. Closely spaced measurements of {rho} wave velocity, density, and grain size made on transponder-navigated cores are used to investigate the geoacoustic properties of the sediment with the aid of a numerical model. The model results demonstrate that the sediment-water interface is, in most cases, acoustically transparent to the sonar energy and that most or all of the energy is refracted into the sediment to depths of at least a few meters rather than scattered from the surface. In this area, thick (up to 50 cm) sand deposits with thin interbeds of silty clay correlate with lower backscatter than do silty clay deposits with thin interbeds of sand. This suggests that volume inhomogeneities and complex constructive and destructive interferences caused by the subsurface volume inhomogeneities within the top few meters of the sediment ultimately modulate the intensity of backscatter. Although 6.5-kHz sonographs appear easy to interpret in a conventional and simplistic manner, caution should be used when interpreting lithofacies from backscatter intensities.

  19. The Effect of 10 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Posterior Parietal Cortex on Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowe, Isabel; Juravle, Georgiana; Alavash, Mohsen; Gießing, Carsten; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants’ performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants’ performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency rTMS during rest

  20. Lack of Teratological Effects in Rats Exposed to 20 or 60 kHz Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Izumi; Oshima, Atsushi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Negishi, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A risk assessment of magnetic field (MF) exposure conducted by the World Health Organization indicated the need for biological studies on primary hazard identification and quantitative risk evaluation of intermediate frequency (300 Hz–100 kHz) MFs. Because induction heating cookers generate such MFs for cooking, reproductive and developmental effects are a concern due to the close proximity of the fields' source to a cook's abdomen. METHODS: Pregnant Crl:CD(SD) rats (25/group) were exposed to a 20 kHz, 0.2 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.1 mT(rms) sinusoidal MF or sham-exposed for 22 hr/day during organogenesis, and their fetuses were examined for malformations on gestation day 20. All teratological evaluations were conducted in a blind fashion, and experiments were duplicated for each frequency to confirm consistency of experimental outcomes. RESULTS: No exposure-related changes were found in clinical signs, gross pathology, or number of implantation losses. The number of live fetuses and low-body-weight fetuses as well as the incidence of external, visceral, and skeletal malformations in the fetuses did not indicate significant differences between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups. Although some fetuses showed isolated changes in sex ratio and skeletal variation and ossification, such changes were neither reproduced in duplicate experiments nor were they common to specific field frequencies. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure of rats to MFs during organogenesis did not show significant reproducible teratogenicity under experimental conditions. Present findings do not support the hypothesis that intermediate frequency MF exposure after implantation carries a significant risk for developing mammalian fetuses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:469–477, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21770026

  1. Evaluation of potential health effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields: a rodent reproductive study.

    PubMed

    Dawson, B V; Robertson, I G; Wilson, W R; Zwi, L J; Boys, J T; Green, A W

    1998-01-01

    New technology involving the use of high-frequency inductive power distribution (HID) has recently been developed for use in materials handling and personnel transfer. Sinusoidal magnetic fields at a frequency of 10 kHz with field intensities of approximately 0.2 mT are generated directly between the current-carrying coils of this equipment. Effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields on cell division, migration, and differentiation have never been previously investigated. To evaluate potential effects on these parameters, a rodent reproductive study was undertaken using Wistar rats. Exposures were at 0.095, 0.24, and 0.95 mT with a background exposure of 5-10 microT. Three sets of parental rats were exposed continuously for 20-23.5 h/day to the fields: maternal rats during gestation, paternal rats for at least 45 days prior to mating and maternal rats 1 month prior to mating. Exposure phases thus covered spermatogenesis, maturation of the ovum and ovulation, fertilization, implantation, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and maturation of the fetus immediately prior to parturition. In all experiments pregnancy outcome was assessed. These studies failed to demonstrate any reproductive toxicity resulting from maternal or fetal exposure during gestation or following paternal or maternal exposure for several weeks prior to mating. No quantitative or qualitative effects on spermatogenesis occurred after exposure, and no effects on the estrous cycle or ovulation could be demonstrably linked to the 10 kHz magnetic field exposure at 0.095, 0.25, or 0.95 mT. Where possible, parental clinical chemistry and hematology were also examined. As in mouse toxicology studies previously reported, minor differences were observed between control and treated groups. These were regarded as statistically, but not biologically, significant and could not categorically be attributed to magnetic field exposure.

  2. Testing the interaction between dark energy and dark matter with H(z) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pan; Li, Li; Shuo, Cao; Na-na, Pan; Yi, Zhang; Zi-xuan, Hu

    2016-04-01

    With the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we constrain an interactive dark energy model by combing the up-to-date observational data of Hubble parameter H(z) with the 7-year baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data observed by the Planck satellite. Under the joint constraint of the three kinds of data, the best-fit values of the model parameters and their 1-σ errors are obtained as follows: the energy density Ωm =0.266-0.028+0.028 (1 σ) , the interaction factor γ =0.090-0.098+0.100 (1 σ) , the parameter of state equation of dark matter wX = -1.307-0.269+0.263 (1 σ) , and the Hubble Constant H0 =7420-4.56+4.66 (1 σ) , where the coupling parameter γ > 0 means that the energy is transferred from dark matter to dark energy, and the coincidence problem in the Lambda-Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model is slightly alleviated in the 1σ range. For comparisons, we constrain the same model with the BAO+CMB observations and H(z) data separately. The results are as follows: (1) The H(z) data could put stricter constraint on the parameter γ than the BAO+CMB observations. (2) The ΛCDM model is best fitted, and the coupling parameter γ is correlated with parameters Ωm and H0. (3) The inconsistency of the constraint results of H0 between the local distance ladder measurements and the Planck observations can be alleviated after taking account of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter.

  3. Neocortical 40 Hz oscillations during carbachol-induced rapid eye movement sleep and cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Castro-Zaballa, Santiago; Cavelli, Matías; Chase, Michael H; Falconi, Atilio

    2016-02-01

    Higher cognitive functions require the integration and coordination of large populations of neurons in cortical and subcortical regions. Oscillations in the gamma band (30-45 Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) have been involved in these cognitive functions. In previous studies, we analysed the extent of functional connectivity between cortical areas employing the 'mean squared coherence' analysis of the EEG gamma band. We demonstrated that gamma coherence is maximal during alert wakefulness and is almost absent during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) is critical for REM sleep generation. The NPO is considered to exert executive control over the initiation and maintenance of REM sleep. In the cat, depending on the previous state of the animal, a single microinjection of carbachol (a cholinergic agonist) into the NPO can produce either REM sleep [REM sleep induced by carbachol (REMc)] or a waking state with muscle atonia, i.e. cataplexy [cataplexy induced by carbachol (CA)]. In the present study, in cats that were implanted with electrodes in different cortical areas to record polysomnographic activity, we compared the degree of gamma (30-45 Hz) coherence during REMc, CA and naturally-occurring behavioural states. Gamma coherence was maximal during CA and alert wakefulness. In contrast, gamma coherence was almost absent during REMc as in naturally-occurring REM sleep. We conclude that, in spite of the presence of somatic muscle paralysis, there are remarkable differences in cortical activity between REMc and CA, which confirm that EEG gamma (≈40 Hz) coherence is a trait that differentiates wakefulness from REM sleep.

  4. A four kHz repetition rate compact TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yijun; Tan, Rongqing

    2013-09-01

    A compact transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition-rate was reported. The size of the laser is 380 mm×300 mm×200 mm, and the discharge volume is 12×103 mm3. The laser cavity has a length of 320mm and consists of a totally reflective concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 4 m (Cu metal substrate coated with Au) and a partially reflecting mirror. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable,the output energy can be as high as 28 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the width of the light pulse is 60ns.To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger is used in the system of the fast-gas flow cycle. When the wind speed is 100m/s, the repetition rate of the transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser is up to 2 kHz. On this basis, a dual modular structure with two sets of the gas discharge unit is adopted to obtain a higher pulse repetition frequency output. The dual discharge unit composed two sets of electrodes and two sets of turbo fan. Alternate trigger technology is used to make the two sets of discharge module work in turn with repetition frequency of 2 kHz, the discharge interval of two sets of the gas discharge unit can be adjusted continuously from 20 microseconds to 250 microseconds. Under the conditions of maintaining the other parameters constant, the repetition frequency of the laser pulse is up to 4 kHz. The total size of laser with dual modular structure is 380mm×520mm×200mm, and the discharge volume is 24×103 mm3 with the cavity length of 520mm.

  5. Beyond Quasi-Geostrophic Turbulence: Generalized Scale Invariance and (2+Hz)-Dimensional Vorticity Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D. J.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.; Tuck, A.

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the claim of Lindborg et al (2009) that the spectrum power law E(k)≈k-3 on scales ≥600 km obtained with the help of commercial jetliner trajectory deviations (GASP and Mozaic databases) could not be brought into question by Lovejoy et al (2009), because this spectrum corresponds to a “well known theory of quasi-geostrophic turbulence developed by Charney (1971)”. Lindborg, et al (2009) also argued that “earlier limitations [of this theory] would have been relaxed in many of the modern models of atmospheric turbulence”. We show that both these statements are irrelevant and that generalized scale invariance (GSI, Schertzer and Lovejoy 1985) is rather indispensable to go beyond the quasi-geostrophic limitations, to go in fact from scale analysis to scaling analysis. This enables us to derive dynamical equations for the vorticity in an embedding space of (fractional) dimension D=2+Hz (0≤ Hz ≤1, 1- Hz measures the scaling stratification of atmospheric turbulence). These equations correspond to an interesting dynamical alternative to quasi-geostrophic approximation and turbulence. References: Charney, J. G. (1971). "Geostrophic Turbulence." J. Atmos. Sci 28: 1087. Lindborg, E., K. K. Tung, G. D. Nastrom, J. Y. N. Cho and K. S. Gage (2009). "Comment on "Reinterpreting aircraft measurements in anisotropic scaling turbulence" by lovejoy et al. (2009)." Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. 9: 22331-22336. Lovejoy, S., A. F. Tuck, D. Schertzer and S. J. Hovde (2009). "Rinterpreting aircraft measurements in anisotropic scaling turbulence." Atmos. Chem. Phys. 9: 5007-5025. Schertzer, D. and S. Lovejoy (1985). "Generalised scale invariance in turbulent phenomena." Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics Journal 6: 623-635.

  6. 2.5-kHz magnetostrictive Tonpilz sonar transducer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Stephen C.

    2002-07-01

    Naval Undersea Warfare Center has fabricated and tested a 2.5 kHz magnetostrictive sonar transducer to validate various modeling techniques. The transducer selected is a longitudinal vibrator Tonpilz type consisting of Terfenol-D driver, tail mass, radiating head mass, and stress rod bolt with 21 MPa (3000 psi) prestress. The Terfenol-D drive rod is interlaced with three samarium cobalt magnets, one in the center and one on either end magnetically biasing the Terfenol to 60 kA/m (750 Oe). Both the Terfenol-D rods and magnets were laminated to reduce eddy currents. The magnetic circuit is comprised of pole piece discs on each end of the Terfenol-D magnet assembly and an external magnetic cylinder (return path) made of a high-permeability, high-resistivity, high-saturation powdered metal 'T2'. The transducer has a 25 cm (9.8in) diameter radiating face (piston), is 28 cm (11 in.) long, and weighs 15 kg (32 lb.) without the housing. It is 41 cm (16 in.) long and 25 kg (56 lb.) with the underwater housing. The measured results are compared to a finite element model using 'ATILA' and distributed plane wave element equivalent circuit model. The coupling coefficient, permeability and mechanical loss effects for different prestress loads were measured on a resonant Terfenol 'dumbbell' device. The in-water measured results indicate a mechanical Q of 2.5, an effective coupling coefficient of 0.36, an electro-acoustic efficiency of 60 percent, beam pattern directivity index of 6 dB, a maximum Source Level of 214.6 dB re 1uPa/m at 15 Amps AC drive and bandwidth of 2 kHz to 5.4 kHz +/- 1.5 dB.

  7. Theta-alpha EEG phase distributions in the frontal area for dissociation of visual and auditory working memory

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Masakazu; Tero, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is known to be associated with synchronization of the theta and alpha bands observed in electroencephalograms (EEGs). Although frontal-posterior global theta synchronization appears in modality-specific WM, local theta synchronization in frontal regions has been found in modality-independent WM. How frontal theta oscillations separately synchronize with task-relevant sensory brain areas remains an open question. Here, we focused on theta-alpha phase relationships in frontal areas using EEG, and then verified their functional roles with mathematical models. EEG data showed that the relationship between theta (6 Hz) and alpha (12 Hz) phases in the frontal areas was about 1:2 during both auditory and visual WM, and that the phase distributions between auditory and visual WM were different. Next, we used the differences in phase distributions to construct FitzHugh-Nagumo type mathematical models. The results replicated the modality-specific branching by orthogonally of the trigonometric functions for theta and alpha oscillations. Furthermore, mathematical and experimental results were consistent with regards to the phase relationships and amplitudes observed in frontal and sensory areas. These results indicate the important role that different phase distributions of theta and alpha oscillations have in modality-specific dissociation in the brain. PMID:28266595

  8. Theta-alpha EEG phase distributions in the frontal area for dissociation of visual and auditory working memory.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masakazu; Tero, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2017-03-07

    Working memory (WM) is known to be associated with synchronization of the theta and alpha bands observed in electroencephalograms (EEGs). Although frontal-posterior global theta synchronization appears in modality-specific WM, local theta synchronization in frontal regions has been found in modality-independent WM. How frontal theta oscillations separately synchronize with task-relevant sensory brain areas remains an open question. Here, we focused on theta-alpha phase relationships in frontal areas using EEG, and then verified their functional roles with mathematical models. EEG data showed that the relationship between theta (6 Hz) and alpha (12 Hz) phases in the frontal areas was about 1:2 during both auditory and visual WM, and that the phase distributions between auditory and visual WM were different. Next, we used the differences in phase distributions to construct FitzHugh-Nagumo type mathematical models. The results replicated the modality-specific branching by orthogonally of the trigonometric functions for theta and alpha oscillations. Furthermore, mathematical and experimental results were consistent with regards to the phase relationships and amplitudes observed in frontal and sensory areas. These results indicate the important role that different phase distributions of theta and alpha oscillations have in modality-specific dissociation in the brain.

  9. Alpha Oscillations in Response to Affective and Cigarette-Related Stimuli in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of cigarette-related cues has been associated with smoking relapse. These cues are believed to activate brain mechanisms underlying emotion, attention, and memory. Electroencephalography (EEG) alpha desynchronization (i.e., reduction in alpha power) has been suggested to index the engagement of these mechanisms. Analyzing EEG alpha desynchronization in response to affective and smoking cues might improve our understanding of how smokers process these cues, and the potential impact of this processing on relapse. Methods: Before the start of a medication-assisted cessation attempt, we recorded EEG from 179 smokers during the presentation of neutral, pleasant, unpleasant, and cigarette-related pictures. Wavelet analysis was used to extract EEG alpha oscillations (8–12 Hz) in response to these pictures. Alpha oscillations were analyzed as a function of picture valence and arousal dimensions. Results: Emotional and cigarette-related stimuli induced a higher level of alpha desynchronization (i.e., less power in the alpha frequency band) than neutral stimuli. In addition, the level of alpha desynchronization induced by cigarette-related stimuli was similar to that induced by highly arousing stimuli (i.e., erotica and mutilations). Conclusions: These results suggest that, for smokers, cigarette-related cues are motivationally significant stimuli that may engage emotional, attentional, and memory-related neural mechanisms at a level comparable to that seen in response to highly arousing stimuli. This finding suggests that activation of emotional, attentional, and memory-related brain mechanisms may be an important contributor to cue-induced smoking relapse. PMID:23060019

  10. Pre-stimulus alpha oscillations over somatosensory cortex predict tactile misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Matt; Poliakoff, Ellen; El-Deredy, Wael; Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Lloyd, Donna M

    2017-02-01

    Fluctuations of pre-stimulus oscillatory activity in the somatosensory alpha band (8-14Hz) observed using human EEG and MEG have been shown to influence the detection of supra- and peri-threshold somatosensory stimuli. However, some reports of touch occur even without a stimulus. We investigated the possibility that pre-stimulus alpha oscillations might also influence these false reports of touch - known as tactile misperceptions. We recorded EEG while participants performed the Somatic Signal Detection Task (SSDT), in which participants must detect brief, peri-threshold somatosensory targets. We found that pre-stimulus oscillatory power in the somatosensory alpha range exhibited a negative linear relationship with reporting of touch at electrode clusters over both contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory regions. As pre-stimulus alpha power increased, the probability of reporting a touch declined; as it decreased, the probability of reporting a touch increased. This relationship was stronger on trials without a somatosensory stimulus than on trials with a somatosensory stimulus, although was present for both trial types. Spatio-temporal cluster-based permutation analysis also found that pre-stimulus alpha was lower on trials when touch was reported - irrespective of whether it was present - over contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory cortices, as well as left frontocentral areas. We argue that alpha power may reflect changes in response criterion rather than sensitivity alone. Low alpha power relates to a low barrier to reporting a touch even when one is not present, while high alpha power is linked to less frequent reporting of touch overall.

  11. Impairments in Background and Event-Related Alpha-Band Oscillatory Activity in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Ilana Y.; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Studies show that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impaired responses to sensory stimuli, especially at the early stages of neural processing. In particular, patients’ alpha-band (8–14 Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) and visual P1 event-related potential (ERP) component tend to be significantly reduced, with P1 ERP deficits greater for visual stimuli biased towards the magnocellular system. In healthy controls, studies show that pre-stimulus alpha (background alpha) plays a pivotal role in sensory processing and behavior, largely by shaping the neural responses to incoming stimuli. Here, we address whether patients’ ERD and P1 deficits stem from impairments in pre-stimulus alpha mechanisms. To address this question we recorded electrophysiological activity in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls while they engaged in a visual discrimination task with low, medium, and high contrast stimuli. The results revealed a significant decrease in patients’ ERDs, which was largely driven by reductions in pre-stimulus alpha. These reductions were most prominent in right-hemispheric areas. We also observed a systematic relationship between pre-stimulus alpha and the P1 component across different contrast levels. However, this relationship was only observed in healthy controls. Taken together, these findings highlight a substantial anomaly in patients’ amplitude-based alpha background activity over visual areas. The results provide further support that pre-stimulus alpha activity plays an active role in perception by modulating the neural responses to incoming sensory inputs, a mechanism that seems to be compromised in schizophrenia. PMID:24646909

  12. Occipital alpha activity during stimulus processing gates the information flow to object-selective cortex.

    PubMed

    Zumer, Johanna M; Scheeringa, René; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Norris, David G; Jensen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Given the limited processing capabilities of the sensory system, it is essential that attended information is gated to downstream areas, whereas unattended information is blocked. While it has been proposed that alpha band (8-13 Hz) activity serves to route information to downstream regions by inhibiting neuronal processing in task-irrelevant regions, this hypothesis remains untested. Here we investigate how neuronal oscillations detected by electroencephalography in visual areas during working memory encoding serve to gate information reflected in the simultaneously recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging in downstream ventral regions. We used a paradigm in which 16 participants were presented with faces and landscapes in the right and left hemifields; one hemifield was attended and the other unattended. We observed that decreased alpha power contralateral to the attended object predicted the BOLD signal representing the attended object in ventral object-selective regions. Furthermore, increased alpha power ipsilateral to the attended object predicted a decrease in the BOLD signal representing the unattended object. We also found that the BOLD signal in the dorsal attention network inversely correlated with visual alpha power. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that oscillations in the alpha band are implicated in the gating of information from the visual cortex to the ventral stream, as reflected in the representationally specific BOLD signal. This link of sensory alpha to downstream activity provides a neurophysiological substrate for the mechanism of selective attention during stimulus processing, which not only boosts the attended information but also suppresses distraction. Although previous studies have shown a relation between the BOLD signal from the dorsal attention network and the alpha band at rest, we demonstrate such a relation during a visuospatial task, indicating

  13. In situ 24 kHz coherent imaging of morphology change in laser percussion drilling.

    PubMed

    Webster, Paul J L; Yu, Joe X Z; Leung, Ben Y C; Anderson, Mitchell D; Yang, Victor X D; Fraser, James M

    2010-03-01

    We observe sample morphology changes in real time (24 kHz) during and between percussion drilling pulses by integrating a low-coherence microscope into a laser micromachining platform. Nonuniform cut speed and sidewall evolution in stainless steel are observed to strongly depend on assist gas. Interpulse morphology relaxation such as hole refill is directly imaged, showing dramatic differences in the material removal process dependent on pulse duration/peak power (micros/0.1 kW, ps/20 MW) and material (steel, lead zirconate titanate PZT). Blind hole depth precision is improved by over 1 order of magnitude using in situ feedback from the imaging system.

  14. Upgrading a high-throughput spectrometer for high-frequency (<400 kHz) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Craig, D.

    2016-11-01

    The upgraded spectrometer used for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the Madison Symmetric Torus resolves emission fluctuations up to 400 kHz. The transimpedance amplifier's cutoff frequency was increased based upon simulations comparing the change in the measured photon counts for time-dynamic signals. We modeled each signal-processing stage of the diagnostic and scanned the filtering frequency to quantify the uncertainty in the photon counting rate. This modeling showed that uncertainties can be calculated based on assuming each amplification stage is a Poisson process and by calibrating the photon counting rate with a DC light source to address additional variation.

  15. Electrical conductivity of α-LiIO 3 acid type crystals at 1 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galez, C.; Rosso, C.; Teisseyre, Y.; Crettez, J. M.; Bourson, P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Righi, A.; Moreira, R. L.

    1995-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of α-LiIO 3 acid type crystals is studied. By applying a very low amplitude electric field at 1 kHz and performing a continuous sampling of measurements, differences, reproducible for all the investigated samples, appeared between the first and subsequent heatings The anomalies occurring during the first heating are attributed mainly to inclusions of mother liquor, HIO 3 and Li 1-xH xIO 3. The 'intrinsic' conductivity is measured after a first annealing at about 470 K; the activation energies are then calculated.

  16. 200 Deg C Demonstration Transformer Operates Efficiently at 50 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A compact, high temperature demonstration transformer was constructed, using a moly permalloy powder core and Teflon -insulated copper wire. At 50 kHz and 200 C, this 1:2 ratio transformer is capable of 98 percent efficiency when operating at a specific power of 6.1 kW/kg at 4 kW. This roughly 7 cm diameter transformer has a mass of 0.65 kg. Although Teflon is unstable above 200 C, about the same electrical performance was seen at 250 C. A plot of winding loss versus frequency illustrates the need to control these losses at high frequency.

  17. A 50 Hz dipole magnet for the TRIUMF KAON Factory booster ring

    SciTech Connect

    Otter, A.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The 3 GeV Booster synchrotron for TRIUMF's KAON Factory will need 24 dipole magnets each 3.0 m long operating with a resonant power system designed to give a 50 Hz ac field superimposed onto a dc field. The maximum and minimum field levels are 1.118 and 0.295 T respectively. In this paper the magnet design is presented and compared with measured results from a prototype which was constructed to evaluate fabrication procedures and to verify the ac loss calculations. The experiences gained from this fabrication are described.

  18. Bulk Current Injection Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques, 50 kHz to 400 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.; Singh, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated using bulk current injection (BCI) techniques with radiated fields from 50 kHz - 400 MHz. It is a follow up to the two-part paper series presented at the Asia Pacific EMC Conference that focused on TEM cell signal injection. This paper discusses the effects of cable types, shield connections, and chassis connections on cable noise. For each topic, well established theories are compared with data from a real-world physical system.

  19. The phonological function of vowels is maintained at fundamental frequencies up to 880 Hz.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Daniel; Maurer, Dieter; Dellwo, Volker

    2015-07-01

    In a between-subject perception task, listeners either identified full words or vowels isolated from these words at F0s between 220 and 880 Hz. They received two written words as response options (minimal pair with the stimulus vowel in contrastive position). Listeners' sensitivity (A') was extremely high in both conditions at all F0s, showing that the phonological function of vowels can also be maintained at high F0s. This indicates that vowel sounds may carry strong acoustic cues departing from common formant frequencies at high F0s and that listeners do not rely on consonantal context phenomena for their identification performance.

  20. Multifunctional 1050 nm Spectral Domain OCT System at 147 kHz for Posterior Eye Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anqi; Zhang, Qinqin; Huang, Yanping; Zhong, Zhiwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    We report a newly developed multifunctional 1050 nm spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system working at 147 kHz A-scan rate for posterior eye imaging. It is demonstrated through in-vivo experiments that this system delivers not only superior performance of posterior eye structural imaging but also detailed visualization of microcirculation network in retina. The choroid of the eye with either myopic or normal conditions can clearly be visualized through the entire scanning volume. These results indicate great potential in applying this new system for clinical studies. PMID:26623142

  1. SSVEP-BCI implementation for 37-40 Hz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sandra Mara Torres; Diez, Pablo F; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário; Mut, Vicente; Laciar, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP), using higher stimulus frequencies (>30 Hz). Using a statistical test and a decision tree, the real-time EEG registers of six volunteers are analyzed, with the classification result updated each second. The BCI developed does not need any kind of settings or adjustments, which makes it more general. Offline results are presented, which corresponds to a correct classification rate of up to 99% and a Information Transfer Rate (ITR) of up to 114.2 bits/min.

  2. Voltage Probe Antenna (VPA) Design 5 kHz to 500 MHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-01-01

    Y ~sao:itY objetoz G-,4tOpnPubliotica (AS AMD U~ 1975. or - Engineering Xepb~fth ’ *j-0 - ROBE ANTENA (p_. ISGkHz to 50 M ) /1 GrKeeth /U ALAMELE TO...WATER all. INSULATED /SPACER to DC POWER - SOURCE 󈧄’ Figure 4-2. Antena , Setup for Elevation Patterns/Gains. -4- - ’ _, _ . .CONTROL’ " . _________SHACK...34, . . ., ’ \\ . "- • , ~ ~ ~ 9 • .-. .,. . \\- , I’.,A J, ,.. .. ,, -. , i ’ "TURNTABLE FOR AZIMUTH AND CONIC PATTERNS Figure 4-3 . Antena Setup for Azimuth/Conic

  3. High-order harmonic generation at a repetition rate of 100 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Stremme, W.; Schaetzel, M. G.; Grasbon, F.; Paulus, G. G.; Walther, H.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2003-07-01

    We report high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases using a femtosecond laser system with a very high repetition rate (100 kHz) and low pulse energy (7 {mu}J). To our knowledge, this is the highest repetition rate reported to date for HHG. The tight focusing geometry required to reach sufficiently high intensities implies low efficiency of the process. Harmonics up to the 45th order are nevertheless generated and detected. We show evidence of clear separation and selection of quantum trajectories by moving the gas jet with respect to the focus, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of the semiclassical model of HHG.

  4. Noise magnetic fields abolish the gap junction intercellular communication suppression induced by 50 hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qunli; Ke, Xueqin; Gao, Xiangwei; Fu, Yiti; Lu, Deqiang; Chiang, Huai; Xu, Zhengping

    2006-05-01

    Previously, we have reported that exposure to 50 Hz coherent sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) for 24 h inhibits gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mammalian cells at an intensity of 0.4 mT and enhances the inhibition effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at 0.2 mT. In the present study, we further explored the effects of incoherent noise MF on MF-induced GJIC inhibition. GJIC was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. The rate of fluorescence recovery (R) at 10 min after photobleaching was adopted as the functional index of GJIC. The R-value of NIH3T3 cells exposed to 50 Hz sinusoidal MF at 0.4 mT for 24 h was 30.85 +/- 14.70%, while the cells in sham exposure group had an R-value of 46.36 +/- 20.68%, demonstrating that the GJIC of NIH3T3 cells was significantly inhibited by MF exposure (P < .05). However, there were no significant differences in the R-values of the sham exposure, MF-plus-noise MF exposure (R: 49.58 +/- 19.38%), and noise MF exposure groups (R: 46.74 +/- 21.14%) (P > .05), indicating that the superposition of a noise MF alleviated the suppression of GJIC induced by the 50 Hz MF. In addition, although MF at an intensity of 0.2 mT synergistically enhanced TPA-induced GJIC inhibition (R: 24.90 +/- 13.50% vs. 35.82 +/- 17.18%, P < .05), further imposition of a noise MF abolished the synergistic effect of coherent MF (R: 32.51 +/- 18.37%). Overall, the present data clearly showed that although noise MF itself had no effect on GJIC of NIH3T3 cells, its superposition onto a coherent sinusoidal MF at the same intensity abolished MF-induced GJIC suppression. This is the first report showing that noise MF neutralizes 50 Hz MF-induced biological effect by using a signaling component as the test endpoint.

  5. Chromatid damage in human lymphocytes is not affected by 50 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hone, P; Lloyd, D; Szłuińska, M; Edwards, A

    2006-01-01

    Cultured human blood lymphocytes were exposed during the S/G(2) phases of the cell cycle to continuous extremely low frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields of 0.23, 0.47 or 0.7 mT either alone or immediately after an acute exposure to 1.0 Gy of gamma rays. The ionising radiation, as expected, induced chromosomal aberrations of the chromatid-type observed at the next metaphase. The field applied alone did not induce chromosomal damage nor did it modify the frequency of aberrations caused by the gamma rays.

  6. Effects of 60-Hz fields, estradiol and xenoestrogens on human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Travis, C.; Garrett, S.; Henley, D.

    1996-10-01

    If exposure to xenoestrogens or electromagnetic fields (EMFs) such as 60 Hz contributes to the etiology of breast cancer, it is likely that they must stimulate the growth of breast cells, damage genetic material or enhance the effects of other mitogenic or mutagenic agents (co-promotion). Therefore, the ability of xenoestrogens or exposure to 60-Hz fields to stimulate the entry of growth-arrested human breast cancer cells into the cell cycle was determined using cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, synthesis of cyclin D1 and cdc2 activity. Exposure of estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 or T-47D cells to estrogen and xenoestrogens (DDT and Red No.3) increased Cdk2 and cyclin B1-cdc2 activity and cyclin D1 synthesis. Exposure of breast cancer cells to 12 mG or 1 or 9 G electromagnetic fields at 60 Hz failed to stimulate Cdk2 or cyclin B1-cdc2 activity or cyclin D1 synthesis. Simultaneous co-exposure of cells to 60-Hz fields and chemical promoters did not enhance Cdk2 activation above the levels produced by the chemical promoter alone. Estrogen and xenoestrogens also stimulated binding of the estrogen receptor to the estrogen receptor element but the EMF did not. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of p53 and pRb105 in MCF-7 cells, but EMF exposure had no effect. DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and Red Dye No. 3 were found to increase p53 site-specific DNA binding in breast cancer cells, but EMF exposure did not. These studies suggest that estrogen and xenoestrogens stimulate growth-arrested breast cancer cells to enter the growth cycle, but EMF exposure does not. Site-specific p53-DNA binding was increased in MCF-7 cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, but not by EMF exposure. EMF exposure does not appear to act as a promoter or DNA-damaging agent for human breast cancer cells in vitro. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  7. The effects of nonlinear loading upon the Space Station Freedom 20 kHz power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leskovich, R. Thomas; Hansen, Irving G.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom power distribution system, which consists of dual redundant 20-kHz, 440-V RMS, single-phase power systems, is discussed. The effect of a typical space station nonlinear load on the measurement of RMS current and voltage at various points in the space station power system has been investigated using the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). The load current distortion at the user interface, its effect on the distribution system, and its relationship to power factor have been studied. Modeling results are compared to test data. The differences under nonlinear loading are evaluated and presented as a measure of distribution voltage distortion and current measurement accuracy.

  8. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  9. High-energy, efficient, 30-Hz ultraviolet laser sources for airborne ozone-lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Khaled A; Chen, Songsheng; Petway, Larry B; Meadows, Byron L; Marsh, Waverly D; Edwards, William C; Barnes, James C; DeYoung, Russell J

    2002-05-20

    Two compact, high-pulse-energy, injection-seeded, 30-Hz frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-laser-pumped Ti: sapphire lasers were developed and operated at infrared wavelengths of 867 and 900 nm. Beams with laser pulse energy >30 mJ at ultraviolet wavelengths of 289 and 300 nm were generated through a tripling of the frequencies of these Ti:sapphire lasers. This work is directed at the replacement of dye lasers for use in an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar system. The ultraviolet pulse energy at 289 and 300 nm had 27% and 31% absolute optical energy conversion efficiencies from input pulse energies at 867 and 900 nm, respectively.

  10. 3D Measurements of Ignition Processes at 20 kHz in a Supersonic Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-05

    measurements obtained via PIV [2], though quantitative com- parison is difficult due to the 2D nature of previous results and the 3D nature of the current...1 3 DOI 10.1007/s00340-015-6066-4 Appl. Phys. B (2015) 119:313–318 3D measurements of ignition processes at 20 kHz in a supersonic combustor Lin Ma...image velocimetry (PIV) [2]. Results from these past efforts all reveal highly transient and 3D flow and flame structures during the ignition processes

  11. Wavelength tunable, 264 J laser diode array for 10 Hz/1ms Yb:YAG pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteloup, J.-C.; Albach, D.; Assémat, F.; Bahbah, S.; Bourdet, G.; Piatti, P.; Pluvinage, M.; Vincent, B.; LeTouzé, G.; Mattern, T.; Biesenbach, J.; Müntz, H.; Noeske, A.; Venohr, R.

    2008-05-01

    The Lucia [1,2] Laser program, under development at the LULI laboratory, aims at delivering a 1030 nm, 100J, 10 Hz, 10 ns pulse train. The two laser heads used in the amplification stage relies on water-cooled mm-thick Yb:YAG disks, each of them pumped by a 34×13 cm2 Laser Diode Array (LDA). For each LDA, the 88 QCW diodes stacks manufactured by DILAS GmbH will be tiled in an 8×11 arrangement. Fine wavelength tuning is performed through bias current adjustment, water temperature control and conductivity adjustment. Wavelength homogeneity experimental verification has been validated.

  12. 840-Hz Nd:YAG Laser Source of Sodium Resonance Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-11

    pass the amplifiers and obtain much better energy extraction. It currently appears that terbium gallium garnet would provide the best Faraday rotation... operated with a repetition rate of 840 Hz and pulse lengths of about 100 Ps. Sum radiation was resonant with the sodium D2 transition and generated with an...Noncritically phase-matched temperature tuning in an LiB 30 5 crystal with radiation directed along the 1.1-cm-long crystal X-axis. 23 21 Photograph of

  13. Complete synthetic seismograms up to 2 Hz for transversely isotropic spherically symmetric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kenji; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Geller, Robert J.

    2006-02-01

    We use the direct solution method (DSM) with optimally accurate numerical operators to calculate complete (including both body and surface waves) three-component synthetic seismograms for transversely isotropic (TI), spherically symmetric media, up to 2 Hz. We present examples of calculations for both deep (600 km) and shallow (5 km) sources. Such synthetics should be useful in forward and inverse studies of earth structure. In order to make these calculations accurately and efficiently the vertical grid spacing, maximum angular order, and cut-off depth must be carefully and systematically chosen.

  14. Integrated optics magnetic sensor from 2 kHz to 9 GHz.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao; Chen, Fushen; Chen, Kaixin

    2011-04-10

    A new type of integrated optical magnetic field sensor is presented in this paper. The proposed sensor consists of a Mach-Zehnder waveguide interferometer and a doubly loaded loop antenna. Such a structure can successfully avoid detection of the undesired electric field signal. The size of the sensor is 35 mm×6 mm×1 mm. The measurements show that the frequency response is from 2 kHz to 9 GHz, the dynamic range is 98 dB, and the minimum detectable magnetic field is 51.8 μA/m at 1 GHz. Therefore, this sensing system can be used in electromagnetic compatibility measurements.

  15. Cytohistological analysis of roots whose growth is affected by a 60-Hz electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Brulfert, A.; Miller, M.W.; Robertson, D.; Dooley, D.A.; Economou, P.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Pisum sativum were exposed for 48 h to 60-Hz electric fields of 430 V/m in an aqueous inorganic growth medium. The growth in length of the exposed roots was 44% of that for control roots. Root tips were analyzed for mitotic index and cell cycle duration. Mature, differentiated root sections from tissue produced after electrode energization were analyzed for cell lengths and number of files. The major reason for the observation that exposed roots are shorter than control roots is that cell elongation in the former is greatly diminished relative to controls. 15 references, 1 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Influence of Transducer Structure on Mechanical and Chemical Effects of 20 kHz Sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Khuyen Viet Bao; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we examined the influence of transducer structure on the mechanical and chemical effects of 20 kHz sonication, where the dissipated power measured by calorimetry was kept constant (5 W). The mechanical effects were evaluated from the degradation rate of poly(ethylene oxide) in aqueous solution, and the chemical effects were measured with potassium iodide solution. The mechanical effects for a bath-type apparatus with the transducers fixed at a node with a diameter of 50 mm are nearly equal to those for a horn-type apparatus. The former transducer showed the strongest chemical effects among the transducers investigated here.

  17. Ly{alpha} EMISSION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT SOURCES IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Mallery, Ryan P.; Mobasher, Bahram; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Capak, Peter; Kakazu, Yuko; Masters, Dan; Scoville, Nick; Scarlata, Claudia; Salvato, Mara; McCracken, Henry

    2012-12-01

    We investigate spectroscopically measured Ly{alpha} equivalent widths (EWs) and escape fractions of 244 sources of which 95 are Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 106 Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) at z {approx} 4.2, z {approx} 4.8, and z {approx} 5.6 selected from intermediate and narrowband observations. The sources were selected from the Cosmic Evolution Survey and observed with the DEIMOS spectrograph. We find that the distribution of EWs shows no evolution with redshift for both the LBG selected sources and the intermediate/narrowband LAEs. We also find that the Ly{alpha} escape fraction of intermediate/narrowband LAEs is on average higher and has a larger variation than the escape fraction of LBG selected sources. The escape fraction does not show a dependence with redshift. Similar to what has been found for LAEs at low redshifts, the sources with the highest extinctions show the lowest escape fractions. The range of escape fractions increases with decreasing extinction. This is evidence that the dust extinction is the most important factor affecting the escape of Ly{alpha} photons, but at low extinctions other factors, such as the H I covering fraction and gas kinematics, can be just as effective at inhibiting the escape of Ly{alpha} photons.

  18. NACA Physicist Studying Alpha Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    NACA Physicits studying Alpha Rays in a continuous cloud chamber. A cloud chamber is used by Lewis scientists to obtain information aimed at minimizing undesirable effects of radiation on nuclear-powered aircraft components. Here, alpha particles from a polonium source emit in a flower-like pattern at the cloud chamber's center. The particles are made visible by means of alcohol vapor diffusing from an area at room temperature to an area at minus -78 deg. Centigrade. Nuclear-powered aircraft were never developed and aircraft nuclear propulsion systems were canceled in the early 1960s.

  19. Bremsstrahlung in {alpha} Decay Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Jentschura, U. D.; Koeck, F.; Lauer, M.; Schwalm, D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of {approx}500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the {alpha} particle and the emitted photon.

  20. Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2014-07-16

    This Final Report for DE-FG02-06ER54851, Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines, was in fact submitted on April 9, 2010. Some confusion arose because it was submitted as an initial progress report on a related grant, Alpha Channeling in Open- System Magnetic Devices. The original text is reproduced below, except that the publication record is undated. Note that the articles published in 2009 and 2010 reflect work in fact done under DE-FG02-06ER54851.

  1. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  2. On-Going Frontal Alpha Rhythms Are Dominant in Passive State and Desynchronize in Active State in Adult Gray Mouse Lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anisur; Lamberty, Yves; Bordet, Regis; Richardson, Jill C.; Forloni, Gianluigi; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Lopez, Susanna; Aujard, Fabienne; Babiloni, Claudio; Pifferi, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is considered a useful primate model for translational research. In the framework of IMI PharmaCog project (Grant Agreement n°115009, www.pharmacog.org), we tested the hypothesis that spectral electroencephalographic (EEG) markers of motor and locomotor activity in gray mouse lemurs reflect typical movement-related desynchronization of alpha rhythms (about 8–12 Hz) in humans. To this aim, EEG (bipolar electrodes in frontal cortex) and electromyographic (EMG; bipolar electrodes sutured in neck muscles) data were recorded in 13 male adult (about 3 years) lemurs. Artifact-free EEG segments during active state (gross movements, exploratory movements or locomotor activity) and awake passive state (no sleep) were selected on the basis of instrumental measures of animal behavior, and were used as an input for EEG power density analysis. Results showed a clear peak of EEG power density at alpha range (7–9 Hz) during passive state. During active state, there was a reduction in alpha power density (8–12 Hz) and an increase of power density at slow frequencies (1–4 Hz). Relative EMG activity was related to EEG power density at 2–4 Hz (positive correlation) and at 8–12 Hz (negative correlation). These results suggest for the first time that the primate gray mouse lemurs and humans may share basic neurophysiologic mechanisms of synchronization of frontal alpha rhythms in awake passive state and their desynchronization during motor and locomotor activity. These EEG markers may be an ideal experimental model for translational basic (motor science) and applied (pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions) research in Neurophysiology. PMID:26618512

  3. Fluctuations between sleep and wakefulness: wake-like features indicated by increased EEG alpha power during different sleep stages in nightmare disorder.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára; Ujma, Péter P; Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert

    2013-12-01

    Although a growing body of research indicates that frequent nightmares are related to impaired sleep regulation, the pathophysiology of nightmare disorder is far from being fully understood. We examined the relative spectral power values for NREM and REM sleep separately in 19 individuals with nightmare disorder and 21 healthy controls, based on polysomnographic recordings of the second nights' laboratory sleep. Nightmare subjects compared to controls exhibited increased relative high alpha (10-14.5Hz) and fronto-central increases in high delta (3-4Hz) power during REM sleep, and a trend of increased fronto-central low alpha (7.75-9Hz) power in NREM sleep. These differences were independent of the confounding effects of waking emotional distress. High REM alpha and low NREM alpha powers were strongly related in nightmare but not in control subjects. The topographical distribution and spectral components of REM alpha activity suggest that nightmare disordered subjects are characterized by wake-like electroencephalographic features during REM sleep.

  4. UV-continuum slopes of >4000 z ∼ 4-8 galaxies from the HUDF/XDF, HUDF09, ERS, CANDELS-SOUTH, and CANDELS-NORTH fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Franx, M.; Smit, R.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P. A.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.

    2014-10-01

    We measure the UV-continuum slope β for over 4000 high-redshift galaxies over a wide range of redshifts z ∼ 4-8 and luminosities from the HST HUDF/XDF, HUDF09-1, HUDF09-2, ERS, CANDELS-N, and CANDELS-S data sets. Our new β results reach very faint levels at z ∼ 4 (–15.5 mag: 0.006 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}), z ∼ 5 (–16.5 mag: 0.014 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}), and z ∼ 6 and z ∼ 7 (–17 mag: 0.025 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}). Inconsistencies between previous studies led us to conduct a comprehensive review of systematic errors and develop a new technique for measuring β that is robust against biases that arise from the impact of noise. We demonstrate, by object-by-object comparisons, that all previous studies, including our own and those done on the latest HUDF12 data set, suffered from small systematic errors in β. We find that after correcting for the systematic errors (typically Δβ ∼ 0.1-0.2) all β results at z ∼ 7 from different groups are in excellent agreement. The mean β we measure for faint (–18 mag: 0.1 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}) z ∼ 4, z ∼ 5, z ∼ 6, and z ∼ 7 galaxies is –2.03 ± 0.03 ± 0.06 (random and systematic errors), –2.14 ± 0.06 ± 0.06, –2.24 ± 0.11 ± 0.08, and –2.30 ± 0.18 ± 0.13, respectively. Our new β values are redder than we have reported in the past, but bluer than other recent results. Our previously reported trend of bluer β's at lower luminosities is confirmed, as is the evolution to bluer β's at high redshifts. β appears to show only a mild luminosity dependence faintward of M {sub UV,AB} ∼ –19 mag, suggesting that the mean β asymptotes to ∼–2.2 to –2.4 for faint z ≥ 4 galaxies. At z ∼ 7, the observed β's suggest non-zero, but low dust extinction, and they agree well with values predicted in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.

  5. Analysis of nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) treated with Cu and Zn and after 4-, 8-, and 12-day depuration (post-treatment recovery).

    PubMed

    Stankevičiūtė, Milda; Butrimavičienė, Laura; Valskienė, Roberta; Greiciūnaitė, Janina; Baršienė, Janina; Vosylienė, Milda Zita; Svecevičius, Gintaras

    2016-02-01

    The induction of micronuclei (MN), nuclear buds (NB), bi-nucleated erythrocytes with nucleoplasmic bridge (BNb), vacuolated (VacNuc), blebbed (BL), 8-shaped nuclei, bi-nucleated (BN) and fragmented-apoptotic (FA) erythrocytes was analysed in the peripheral blood, cephalic kidney and liver of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after 4-day treatment with copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) mixture solutions and in 4-, 8- and 12-day depuration process. Fish (three treatment and one control group, N=40) were exposed to 0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 fractions of 96-h LC50, respectively under semi-static conditions. Exposure of O. mykiss to Cu and Zn induced significant increase of MN (in blood in all test groups; in liver 0.125, 0.25 and in kidney 0.25 groups, respectively), NB and BL (in blood and kidney 0.25 group), 8-shaped (in blood 0.25; in liver 0.125, 0.25 and in kidney all test groups, respectively) and VacNuc (in liver and kidney 0.0625 and 0.125 groups). After 4-day recovery, significantly elevated levels of MN (in blood 0.0625, 0.125; in liver and kidney 0.125 group, respectively) and 8-shaped (in kidney-0.0625 group) were observed in fish. Significant recovery was observed in 0.0625 group after 12-day depuration, estimating the formation of MN in erythrocytes of blood, of 8-shaped nuclei erythrocytes in liver and kidney (after 8-, 12-day and 8-day recovery, respectively). Significant decrease of MN in blood (after 8- and 12-day recovery), in liver (after 8-day recovery), of NB in blood and kidney (after 8-day recovery) and of 8-shaped nuclei erythrocytes in blood (after 8 and 12-day recovery), kidney and liver (after 8-day recovery) was determined in 0.25 group. Changes in gross morphometric indices and biological parameters were observed. The binary metal mixture did not induce FA erythrocytes in any tissue at any test concentration.

  6. The cyclic and fractal seismic series preceding an mb 4.8 earthquake on 1980 February 14 near the Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, D.J.; Bufe, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Seismic activity in the 10 months preceding the 1980 February 14, mb 4.8 earthquake in the Virgin Islands, reported on by Frankel in 1982, consisted of four principal cycles. Each cycle began with a relatively large event or series of closely spaced events, and the duration of the cycles progressively shortened by a factor of about 3/4. Had this regular shortening of the cycles been recognized prior to the earthquake, the time of the next episode of setsmicity (the main shock) might have been closely estimated 41 days in advance. That this event could be much larger than the previous events is indicated from time-to-failure analysis of the accelerating rise in released seismic energy, using a non-linear time- and slip-predictable foreshock model. Examination of the timing of all events in the sequence shows an even higher degree of order. Rates of seismicity, measured by consecutive interevent times, when plotted on an iteration diagram of a rate versus the succeeding rate, form a triangular circulating trajectory. The trajectory becomes an ascending helix if extended in a third dimension, time. This construction reveals additional and precise relations among the time intervals between times of relatively high or relatively low rates of seismic activity, including period halving and doubling. The set of 666 time intervals between all possible pairs of the 37 recorded events appears to be a fractal; the set of time points that define the intervals has a finite, non-integer correlation dimension of 0.70. In contrast, the average correlation dimension of 50 random sequences of 37 events is significantly higher, dose to 1.0. In a similar analysis, the set of distances between pairs of epicentres has a fractal correlation dimension of 1.52. Well-defined cycles, numerous precise ratios among time intervals, and a non-random temporal fractal dimension suggest that the seismic series is not a random process, but rather the product of a deterministic dynamic system.

  7. The alpha 4 integrin chain is a ligand for alpha 4 beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 1

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterodimeric alpha 4 integrins alpha 4 beta 7 lymphocyte Peyer's patch adhesion molecule ([LPAM]-1) and alpha 4 beta 1 (very late antigen-4) are cell surface adhesion molecules involved in lymphocyte trafficking and lymphocyte-cell and matrix interactions. Known cellular ligands include vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, which binds to alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 7, and the mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM)-1, which binds to alpha 4 beta 7. Here we show that the alpha 4 chain of these integrins can itself serve as a ligand. The alpha 4 chain, immunoaffinity purified and immobilized on glass slides, binds thymocytes and T lymphocytes. Binding exhibits divalent cation requirements and temperature sensitivity which are characteristic of integrin-mediated interactions, and is specifically inhibited by anti-alpha 4 integrin antibodies, which exert their effect at the cell surface. Cells expressing exclusively alpha 4 beta 7 (TK-1) or alpha 4 beta 1 (L1-2) both bound avidly, whereas alpha 4-negative cells did not. A soluble 34-kD alpha 4 chain fragment retained binding activity, and it inhibited lymphocyte adhesion to alpha 4 ligands. It has been shown that alpha 4 integrin binding to fibronectin involves an leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) motif in the HepII/IIICS region of fibronectin (CS-1 peptide), and homologous sequences are important in binding to VCAM-1 and MAdCAM-1. Three conserved LDV motifs occur in the extracellular sequence of alpha 4. A synthetic LDV-containing alpha 4- derived oligopeptide supports alpha 4-integrin-dependent lymphocyte adhesion and blocks binding to the 34-kD alpha 4 chain fragment. Our results suggest that alpha 4 beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins may be able to bind to the alpha 4 subunit on adjacent cells, providing a novel mechanism for alpha 4 integrin-mediated and activation-regulated lymphocyte interactions during immune responses. PMID:7629498

  8. Circularly polarized, sinusoidal, 50 Hz magnetic field exposure does not influence plasma testosterone levels of rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Honma, K; Shigemitsu, T; Shiga, Y

    1994-01-01

    We exposed rats to circularly polarized 50 Hz magnetic fields to determine if plasma testosterone concentration was affected. Previous experiments indicate that magnetic fields suppress the nighttime rise in melatonin, suggesting that other neuroendocrine changes might occur as well. Male Wistar-King rats were exposed almost continuously for 6 weeks to magnetic flux densities of 1, 5, or 50 microT. Blood samples were obtained by decapitation at 12:00 h and 24:00 h. Plasma testosterone concentration showed a significant day-night difference, with a higher level at 12:00 h when studied in July and December, but night difference, with a higher level at 12:00 h when studied in July and December, but the day-night difference disappeared when concentrations were studied in April. In three experiments, magnetic field exposure had no statistically significant effect on plasma testosterone levels compared with the sham-exposed groups. These findings indicate that 6 weeks of nearly continuous exposure to circularly polarized, 50 Hz magnetic fields did not change plasma testosterone concentration in rats.

  9. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators. PMID:26892438

  10. Nonuniform temporal weighting of interaural time differences in 500 Hz tones

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, G. Christopher; Bibee, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    The discrimination and lateralization of interaural time differences (ITD) in rapidly modulated high-frequency sounds is dominated by cues present in the initial portion of the sound (i.e., at sound onset). The importance of initial ITD at low frequencies is, however, less clear. Here, ITD discrimination thresholds were measured in 500 Hz pure tones with diotic envelopes and static or dynamic fine-structure ITD. Static-ITD thresholds improved as tone duration increased from 40 to 640 ms but by an amount less than expected from uniform temporal weighting of binaural information. Dynamic conditions eliminated ITD from either the beginning or end of the sound by presenting slightly different frequencies to the two ears. While overall thresholds were lower when ITD was available at sound onset than when it was not, listeners differed appreciably in that regard. The results demonstrate that weighting of ITD is not temporally uniform. Instead, for many listeners, ITD discrimination at 500 Hz appears dominated by ITD cues present in the initial part of the sound. To a variable degree, other listeners rely more equally on ITD cues occurring near sound onsets and offsets, although no listeners appear to utilize such cues uniformly throughout the sound's duration. PMID:24907817

  11. 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields do not affect human lymphocyte activation and proliferation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, Miriam; Mesirca, Pietro; Remondini, Daniel; Carosella, Simona; Pasi, Sara; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2004-12-01

    In the last 30 years, an increasing public concern about the possible harmful effects of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines and domestic appliances has pushed the scientific community to search for a correct and comprehensive answer to this problem. In this work the effects of exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields, with a magnetic flux density of 0.05 mT and 2.5 mT (peak values), were studied on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy young and elderly donors. Cell activation and proliferation were investigated by using flow cytometry techniques and 3H-TdR incorporation assays, respectively. The results obtained indicated that exposure to the fields altered neither DNA synthesis nor the capacity of lymphocytes to enter the activation phase and progress into the cell cycle. Thus, the conclusions are that two important functional phases of human lymphocytes, such as activation and proliferation, are not affected by exposures to 50 Hz magnetic fields similar to those found under power lines.

  12. Reduction of dopamine synaptic activity: degradation of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Ahrens, Allison M; Ma, Sean T; Kane, Jacqueline R; Windham, E Blake; Woodlee, Martin T; Schallert, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    Vocal deficits are prevalent and debilitating in Parkinson's disease. These deficits may be related to the initial pathology of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and resulting dopamine depletion, which contributes to dysfunction of fine motor control in multiple functions. Although vocalization in animals and humans may differ in many respects, we evaluated complex (50-kHz) ultrasonic mate calls in 2 rat models of Parkinson's disease, including unilateral infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine to the medial forebrain bundle and peripheral administration of a nonakinesia dose of the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. We examined the effects of these treatments on multiple aspects of the acoustic signal. The number of trill-like (frequency modulated) 50-kHz calls was significantly reduced, and appeared to be replaced by simpler (flat) calls. The bandwidth and maximum intensity of simple and frequency-modulated calls were significantly decreased, but call duration was not. Our findings suggest that the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway is involved to some extent in fine sensorimotor function that includes USV production and complexity.

  13. Harvesting Low-Frequency (<5 Hz) Irregular Mechanical Energy: A Possible Killer Application of Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Electromagnetic generators (EMGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are the two most powerful approaches for harvesting ambient mechanical energy, but the effectiveness of each depends on the triggering frequency. Here, after systematically comparing the performances of EMGs and TENGs under low-frequency motion (<5 Hz), we demonstrated that the output performance of EMGs is proportional to the square of the frequency, while that of TENGs is approximately in proportion to the frequency. Therefore, the TENG has a much better performance than that of the EMG at low frequency (typically 0.1-3 Hz). Importantly, the extremely small output voltage of the EMG at low frequency makes it almost inapplicable to drive any electronic unit that requires a certain threshold voltage (∼0.2-4 V), so that most of the harvested energy is wasted. In contrast, a TENG has an output voltage that is usually high enough (>10-100 V) and independent of frequency so that most of the generated power can be effectively used to power the devices. Furthermore, a TENG also has advantages of light weight, low cost, and easy scale up through advanced structure designs. All these merits verify the possible killer application of a TENG for harvesting energy at low frequency from motions such as human motions for powering small electronics and possibly ocean waves for large-scale blue energy.

  14. Acoustic emission spectra and sonochemical activity in a 36 kHz sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-01-01

    During ultrasound-induced cavitation in liquids, acoustic emissions at fundamental and harmonic frequencies can be detected. The effect of acoustic emissions at harmonic frequencies on the sonochemical and sonophysical activities has not been explored, especially in large-scale sonoreactors. In this study, the acoustic emissions in the range, 0-250 kHz in a 36 kHz sonoreactor with varying liquid heights were studied and compared with the sonochemical activities. The acoustic pressures at both fundamental and harmonics decreased drastically as the liquid height was increased due to the attenuation of sound energy. It was observed that the increase in input power resulted in only an increase in the acoustic emissions at derivative frequencies such as, harmonics and subharmonics. The sonochemical activity, evaluated in terms of sonochemiluminescence and H2O2 yield, was not significantly enhanced at higher input power levels. This suggests that at higher power levels, the "extra" acoustic energy is not effectively used to generate primary cavitation activity; rather it is converted to generate acoustic emissions at harmonic and subharmonic frequencies. This is an important observation for the design of energy efficiency large-scale sonochemical reactors.

  15. 1 Hz rTMS of the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) modifies sensorimotor timing

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Vanessa; Bashir, Shahid; Pollok, Bettina; Caipa, Anuhya; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the relevance of the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) for precise sensorimotor timing we applied 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left PPC, right PPC and visual cortex of healthy participants for ten minutes, respectively. The impact on sensorimotor timing of the right hand was assessed using a synchronization task that required subjects to synchronize their right index finger taps with respect to constant auditory, visual or auditory-visual pacing. Our results reveal reduced negative tap-to-pacer asynchronies following rTMS of the left PPC in all pacing conditions. This effect lasted for about 5 minutes after cessation of rTMS. Right PPC and visual cortex stimulation did not yield any significant behavioural effects. Since suppression of left PPC modified right-hand synchronization accuracy independent of the pacing signal’s modality, the present data support the significance of left PPC for anticipatory motor control over a primary role in multisensory integration. The present data suggest that 1 Hz rTMS might interrupt a matching process of anticipated and real sensorimotor feedback within PPC. Alternatively, downregulation of left PPC activity may affect M1 excitability via functional connections leading to a delay in motor output and, thus, smaller tap-to-pacer asynchronies. PMID:23103789

  16. Diurnal patterns in brain biogenic amines of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, B.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Lowery, C.I.; Adey, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Levels of brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites, as well as concentrations of enzymes associated with their synthesis and metabolism, fluctuate during the day in patterns defined as circadian. The present study examined these rhythms in albino rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Thirty-six animals were exposed to a 39 kV/m field for 4 weeks, 20 h/day, in a parallel-plate electrode system. A group of 36 sham animals was similarly handled and housed in a nonenergized exposure system. On the sampling day, animals were sacrificed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h day. Brains were removed, dissected, and kept frozen until chemically analyzed. The levels of biogenic amines and their acidic metabolites in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) methods. Repeated exposure to 60-Hz electric fields produced significant alterations in the diurnal rhythms of several biogenic amines: dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, the primary metabolite of dopamine in the rat) in the striatum, and norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA; serotonin metabolite) in the hypothalamus. Levels of serotonin in the striatum and hypothalamus showed clear circadian patterns that was not affected by the field. No diurnal or field-related changes were observed in the hippocampal amines.

  17. Quasi-periodic (~mHz) dayside auroral brightennings associated with high-speed solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that dayside auroral pulsations of a few mHz frequency can occur when variations of solar wind dynamic pressure at the same frequency appear. Magnetospheric compression/decompression is attributed to the auroral pulsations. Here we report another type of dayside auroral pulsations not associated with solar wind dynamic pressure changes by using global auroral images acquired from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite. From one periodic (~2 - 8 mHz) auroral event that occurred on February 8, 2000, it is found that the auroral enhancements covered most of the day (~05 - 16 MLT) sector and did not show a latitudinal dependence. Based on in situ particle data from DMSP SSJ/4, the brightennings were associated mainly with enhanced particle precipitations from the central plasma sheet (i.e., diffuse aurora). There was no geomagnetic pulsation on the ground and in the dawn sector of the magnetosheath as indicated by the Geotail measurements. While the auroral pulsations occurred during high solar wind speed (> 600 km/s), they commenced when the interplanetary magnetic field turned northward, suggesting the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability being a source of the pulsations. We will present detail analysis results and discuss other possible mechanisms in the context of current theories.

  18. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators.

  19. Spin axis orientation of Ajisai determined from Graz 2 kHz SLR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, D.; Otsubo, T.; Kirchner, G.; Koidl, F.

    2010-08-01

    The Graz 2 kHz Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements allow determination of the spin axis orientation of the geodetic satellite Ajisai. The high repetition rate of the laser makes it possible to determine the epoch time when the laser is pointing directly between two corner cube reflector (CCR) rings of the satellite. Identification of many such events during a few (up to 3) consecutive passes allows to state the satellite orientation in the celestial coordinate system. Six years of 2 kHz SLR data (October 2003-October 2009) delivered 331 orientation values which clearly show precession of the axis along a cone centered at 14 h56 m2.8 s in right ascension and 88.512° in declination (J2000.0 celestial reference frame) and with an half-aperture angle θ of 1.405°. The spin axis precesses with a period of 117 days, which is equal to the period of the right ascension of the ascending node of Ajisai's orbit. We present a model of the axis precession which allows prediction of the satellite orientation - necessary for the envisaged laser time transfer via Ajisai mirrors.

  20. Biologic effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats. 2: 50 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Margonato, V.; Cerretelli, P.; Nicolini, P.; Conti, R.; Zecca, L.; Veicsteinas, Z.

    1995-12-31

    To provide possible laboratory support to health risk evaluation associated with long-term, low-intensity magnetic field exposure, 256 male albino rats and an equal number of control animals (initial age 12 weeks) were exposed 22 h/day to a 50 Hz magnetic flux density of 5 {micro}T for 32 weeks (a total of about 5,000 h). Hematology was studied from blood samples before exposure to the field and at 12 week intervals. Morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, and testes as well as brain neurotransmitters were assessed at the end of the exposure period. In two identical sets of experiments, no significant differences in the investigated variables were found between exposed and sham-exposed animals. It is concluded that continuous exposure to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 5 {micro}T from week 12 to week 44, which makes up {approximately}70% of the life span of the rat before sacrifice, does not cause changes in growth rate, in the morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, and bone marrow, in hematology and hematochemistry, or in the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.

  1. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for (40)Ca(+) optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10(-15) frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled (40)Ca(+) ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10(-14)) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two (40)Ca(+) ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  2. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for 40Ca+ optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10-15 frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled 40Ca+ ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10-14) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two 40Ca+ ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  3. Tri-linear color multi-linescan sensor with 200 kHz line rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrey, Olaf; Brockherde, Werner; Nitta, Christian; Bechen, Benjamin; Bodenstorfer, Ernst; Brodersen, Jörg; Mayer, Konrad J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a newly developed linear CMOS high-speed line-scanning sensor realized in a 0.35 μm CMOS OPTO process for line-scan with 200 kHz true RGB and 600 kHz monochrome line rate, respectively. In total, 60 lines are integrated in the sensor allowing for electronic position adjustment. The lines are read out in rolling shutter manner. The high readout speed is achieved by a column-wise organization of the readout chain. At full speed, the sensor provides RGB color images with a spatial resolution down to 50 μm. This feature enables a variety of applications like quality assurance in print inspection, real-time surveillance of railroad tracks, in-line monitoring in flat panel fabrication lines and many more. The sensor has a fill-factor close to 100%, preventing aliasing and color artefacts. Hence the tri-linear technology is robust against aliasing ensuring better inspection quality and thus less waste in production lines.

  4. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  5. Sparse Coding for Alpha Matting.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jubin; Varnousfaderani, Ehsan Shahrian; Cholakkal, Hisham; Rajan, Deepu

    2016-07-01

    Existing color sampling-based alpha matting methods use the compositing equation to estimate alpha at a pixel from the pairs of foreground ( F ) and background ( B ) samples. The quality of the matte depends on the selected ( F,B ) pairs. In this paper, the matting problem is reinterpreted as a sparse coding of pixel features, wherein the sum of the codes gives the estimate of the alpha matte from a set of unpaired F and B samples. A non-parametric probabilistic segmentation provides a certainty measure on the pixel belonging to foreground or background, based on which a dictionary is formed for use in sparse coding. By removing the restriction to conform to ( F,B ) pairs, this method allows for better alpha estimation from multiple F and B samples. The same framework is extended to videos, where the requirement of temporal coherence is handled effectively. Here, the dictionary is formed by samples from multiple frames. A multi-frame graph model, as opposed to a single image as for image matting, is proposed that can be solved efficiently in closed form. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations on a benchmark dataset are provided to show that the proposed method outperforms the current stateoftheart in image and video matting.

  6. Sparse Coding for Alpha Matting.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jubin; Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Cholakkal, Hisham; Rajan, Deepu

    2016-04-21

    Existing color sampling based alpha matting methods use the compositing equation to estimate alpha at a pixel from pairs of foreground (F) and background (B) samples. The quality of the matte depends on the selected (F,B) pairs. In this paper, the matting problem is reinterpreted as a sparse coding of pixel features, wherein the sum of the codes gives the estimate of the alpha matte from a set of unpaired F and B samples. A non-parametric probabilistic segmentation provides a certainty measure on the pixel belonging to foreground or background, based on which a dictionary is formed for use in sparse coding. By removing the restriction to conform to (F,B) pairs, this method allows for better alpha estimation from multiple F and B samples. The same framework is extended to videos, where the requirement of temporal coherence is handled effectively. Here, the dictionary is formed by samples from multiple frames. A multi-frame graph model, as opposed to a single image as for image matting, is proposed that can be solved efficiently in closed form. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations on a benchmark dataset are provided to show that the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art in image and video matting.

  7. Alcoholism, Alpha Production, and Biofeedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Frances W.; Holmes, David S.

    1976-01-01

    Electroencephalograms of 20 alcoholics and 20 nonalcoholics were obtained. Data indicated that alcoholics produced less alpha than nonalcoholics. In one training condition subjects were given accurate biofeedback, whereas in the other condition subjects were given random (noncontingent) feedback. Accurate biofeedback did not result in greater…

  8. The effect of alpha-lipoic acid on temporary threshold shift in humans: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, N; Dicorato, A; Matera, V; D'Elia, A; Quaranta, A

    2012-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NHIL) is a significant source of hearing loss in industrialized countries. Recent research on the cellular bases of NIHL has led to new avenues for protection through prophylactic drugs. Although in experimental animal models several compounds have shown a protective effect in NIHL, limited data are available in humans. Many authors are focusing their attention on the role of antioxidant on hearing protection. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), an essential cofactor in mitochondrial enzymes, is a novel biological antioxidant and a potent free radical scavenger and, in animal models, it has been shown to protect from age-induced and cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid on temporary threshold shift measured 2 minutes after the end of exposure (TTS(2)) induced by a 3 kHz tone in young normally hearing subjects. Thirty young normal hearing volunteers served as control subjects. Individuals were randomly assigned to three groups. Group A (10 subjects) subjects were exposed to a 90 dB HL 3 kHz pure tone for 10 min. Group B (10 subjects) subjects were exposed to a 90 dB HL 3 kHz pure tone one hour after oral ingestion of 600 mg of ALA. Group C (10 subjects) were exposed to a 90 dB HL 3 kHz pure tone after 10 days of oral ingestion of 600 mg of ALA. Statistical analysis showed that prior to the exposure the hearing thresholds did not differ significantly among the three groups. TTS(2) of group C was significantly lower that TTS2 of Groups A and B at 6 kHz (p 0.03), and TEOAEs amplitude change after noise exposure was lower for group C compared to Groups A (p = 0.089) and B (p = 0.03). ALA is a powerful lipophilic antioxidant and free radical scavenger currently used in clinical practice. A single dose of 600 mg of dose ALA did not induce any protection on the TTS(2) induced by a 90 dB HL 3 kHz tone, while 10 days of therapeutic dosage assumption of ALA was associated with significant

  9. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  10. Pulsed Out of Awareness: EEG Alpha Oscillations Represent a Pulsed-Inhibition of Ongoing Cortical Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Kyle E.; Lleras, Alejandro; Beck, Diane M.; Fabiani, Monica; Ro, Tony; Gratton, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Alpha oscillations are ubiquitous in the brain, but their role in cortical processing remains a matter of debate. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate in support of a role for alpha oscillations in attention selection and control. Here we first review evidence that 8–12 Hz oscillations in the brain have a general inhibitory role in cognitive processing, with an emphasis on their role in visual processing. Then, we summarize the evidence in support of our recent proposal that alpha represents a pulsed-inhibition of ongoing neural activity. The phase of the ongoing electroencephalography can influence evoked activity and subsequent processing, and we propose that alpha exerts its inhibitory role through alternating microstates of inhibition and excitation. Finally, we discuss evidence that this pulsed-inhibition can be entrained to rhythmic stimuli in the environment, such that preferential processing occurs for stimuli at predictable moments. The entrainment of preferential phase may provide a mechanism for temporal attention in the brain. This pulsed inhibitory account of alpha has important implications for many common cognitive phenomena, such as the attentional blink, and seems to indicate that our visual experience may at least some times be coming through in waves. PMID:21779257

  11. Binaural beats increase interhemispheric alpha-band coherence between auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Marco; Mottaz, Anaïs; Guggisberg, Adrian G

    2016-02-01

    Binaural beats (BBs) are an auditory illusion occurring when two tones of slightly different frequency are presented separately to each ear. BBs have been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes through synchronization of the brain hemispheres. To test this, we recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) at rest and while participants listened to BBs or a monaural control condition during which both tones were presented to both ears. We calculated for each condition the interhemispheric coherence, which expressed the synchrony between neural oscillations of both hemispheres. Compared to monaural beats and resting state, BBs enhanced interhemispheric coherence between the auditory cortices. Beat frequencies in the alpha (10 Hz) and theta (4 Hz) frequency range both increased interhemispheric coherence selectively at alpha frequencies. In a second experiment, we evaluated whether this coherence increase has a behavioral aftereffect on binaural listening. No effects were observed in a dichotic digit task performed immediately after BBs presentation. Our results suggest that BBs enhance alpha-band oscillation synchrony between the auditory cortices during auditory stimulation. This effect seems to reflect binaural integration rather than entrainment.

  12. Upper Alpha Based Neurofeedback Training in Chronic Stroke: Brain Plasticity Processes and Cognitive Effects.

    PubMed

    Kober, Silvia Erika; Schweiger, Daniela; Reichert, Johanna Louise; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of upper alpha based neurofeedback (NF) training on electrical brain activity and cognitive functions in stroke survivors. Therefore, two single chronic stroke patients with memory deficits (subject A with a bilateral subarachnoid hemorrhage; subject B with an ischemic stroke in the left arteria cerebri media) and a healthy elderly control group (N = 24) received up to ten NF training sessions. To evaluate NF training effects, all participants performed multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) resting measurements and a neuropsychological test battery assessing different cognitive functions before and after NF training. Stroke patients showed improvements in memory functions after successful NF training compared to the pre-assessment. Subject B had a pathological delta (0.5-4 Hz) and upper alpha (10-12 Hz) power maximum over the unaffected hemisphere before NF training. After NF training, he showed a more bilateral and "normalized" topographical distribution of these EEG frequencies. Healthy participants as well as subject A did not show any abnormalities in EEG topography before the start of NF training. Consequently, no changes in the topographical distribution of EEG activity were observed in these participants when comparing the pre- and post-assessment. Hence, our results show that upper alpha based NF training had on the one hand positive effects on memory functions, and on the other hand led to cortical "normalization" in a stroke patient with pathological brain activation patterns, which underlines the potential usefulness of NF as neurological rehabilitation tool.

  13. Coexistence of {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n and {alpha}+t+t cluster structures in {sup 10}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Itagaki, N.; Ito, M.; Milin, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.

    2008-06-15

    The coexistence of the {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n and {alpha}+t+t cluster structures in the excited states of {sup 10}Be has been discussed. In the previous analysis, all the low-lying states of {sup 10}Be were found to be well described by the motion of the two valence neutrons around two {alpha} clusters. However, the {alpha}+t+t cluster structure was found to coexist with the {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n structure around E{sub x}=15 MeV, close to the corresponding threshold. We have introduced a microscopic model to solve the coupling effect between these two configurations. The K=0 and K=1 states are generated from the {alpha}+t+t configurations due to the spin coupling of two triton clusters. The present case of {sup 10}Be is one of the few examples in which completely different configurations of triton-type ({alpha}+t+t three-center) and {alpha}-type ({alpha}+{alpha}+n+n two-center) clusters coexist in a single nucleus in the same energy region.

  14. A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

  15. Posterior EEG alpha at rest and during task performance: Comparison of current source density and field potential measures

    PubMed Central

    Tenke, Craig E.; Kayser, Jürgen; Abraham, Karen; Alvarenga, Jorge E.; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2015-01-01

    Resting and task-related EEG alpha are used in studies of cognition and psychopathogy. Although Laplacian methods have been applied, apprehensions about loss of global activity dissuade researchers from greater use except as a supplement to reference-dependent measures. The unfortunate result has been continued reliance on reference strategies that differ across labs, and a systemic preference for a montage-dependent average reference over true reference-free measures. We addressed these concerns by comparing resting- and task-related EEG alpha using three EEG transformations: nose- (NR) and average-referenced (AR) EEG, and the corresponding CSD. Amplitude spectra of resting and prestimulus task-related EEG (novelty oddball) and event-related spectral perturbations were scaled to equate each transformation. Alpha measures quantified for 8-12 Hz bands were: 1) net amplitude (eyes-closed minus eyes-open) and 2) overall amplitude (eyes-closed plus eyes-open); 3) task amplitude (prestimulus baseline) and 4) task event-related desynchronization (ERD). Mean topographies unambiguously represented posterior alpha for overall, net and task, as well as poststimulus alpha ERD. Topographies were similar for the three transformations, but differed in dispersion, CSD being sharpest and NR most broadly distributed. Transformations also differed in scale, AR showing less attenuation or spurious secondary maxima at anterior sites, consistent with simulations of distributed posterior generators. Posterior task alpha and alpha ERD were positively correlated with overall alpha, but not with net alpha. CSD topographies consistently and appropriately represented posterior EEG alpha for all measures. PMID:26026372

  16. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" means it's ... parents to children through genes. Children who have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from ...

  17. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its related lung ... pulmonary disease). If you have symptoms related to AAT deficiency, your doctor may recommend: Medicines called inhaled ...

  18. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in rats exposed to intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E; Morris, J E; Miller, D L; Rafferty, C N; Ebi, K L; Sasser, L B

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats was utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz, 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following injection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the following objectives: (a) to replicate the previous study of continuous 60 Hz magnetic field exposures, but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (b) to determine if intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia. Rats were randomly assigned to four treatment groups (18/group) as follows: (1) 1 mT (10 G) continuous field, (2) 1 mT intermittent field (off/on at 3 min intervals), (3) ambient controls ( < 0.1 microT), and (4) positive control (5 Gy whole body irradiation from cobalt-60 four days prior to initiation of exposure). All rats were injected intraperitoneally with 2.2 x 10(6) fresh, viable LGL leukemic spleen cells at the beginning of the study. The fields were activated for 20 h per day, 7 days per week, and all exposure conditions were superimposed over the natural ambient magnetic field. The rats were weighed and palpated for splenomegaly weekly. Splenomegaly developed 9-11 weeks after transplantation of the leukemia cells. Hematological evaluations were performed at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 weeks of exposure. Peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and packed cell volume declined, and total white blood cells and LGL cells increased dramatically in all treatment groups after onset of leukemia. Although the positive control group showed different body weight curves and developed signs of leukemia earlier than other groups, differences were not detected between exposure groups and ambient controls. Furthermore, there were no

  19. 60 Hz electric field changes the membrane potential during burst phase in pancreatic β-cells: in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gesilda F; Silva, José R F; Moraes, Renato B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Tenorio, Bruno M; Nogueira, Romildo A

    2014-06-01

    The production, distribution and use of electricity can generate low frequency electric and magnetic fields (50-60 Hz). Considering that some studies showed adverse effects on pancreatic β-cells exposed to these fields; the present study aimed to analyze the effects of 60 Hz electric fields on membrane potential during the silent and burst phases in pancreatic β-cells using a mathematical model. Sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields with amplitude ranging from 0.5 to 4 mV were applied on pancreatic β-cells model. The sinusoidal electric field changed burst duration, inter-burst intervals (silent phase) and spike sizes. The parameters above presented dose-dependent response with the voltage amplitude applied. In conclusion, theoretical analyses showed that a 60 Hz electric field with low amplitudes changes the membrane potential in pancreatic β-cells.

  20. The ultraviolet spectra of Alpha Aquilae and Alpha Canis Minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.; Bruzual A., G.; Kurucz, R. L.; Spinrad, H.

    1977-01-01

    Scans of Alpha Aql (A7 IV, V) and Alpha CMi (F5 IV-V) obtained with the Copernicus satellite spectrometer over the wavelength range from 2100 to 3200 A are presented along with a spectrum of the integrated solar disk over the same range procured during a calibrated rocket flight. About 1500 fairly strong absorption lines in the Alpha CMi spectrum between 2400 and 2961 A are identified by comparison with a solar atlas and by using a theoretical spectrum synthesized from a blanketed LTE model with an effective temperature of 6500 K and a surface gravity of 10,000 cm/sec per sec. The Mg II resonance doublet at 2795.528 and 2802.704 A is found to be present in all three stars together with a discontinuity at 2635 A due to Fe II, Fe I, Cr I, and Mn II. It is concluded that the Mg II resonance lines and the 2635-A continuum break would be the best spectral features for estimating the redshift of a galaxy observed at low resolution provided the redshift is not less than about 0.75.