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Sample records for 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase

  1. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  2. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase and its signalling molecules as novel targets in lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, A M L; Gunby, R H; Tartari, C J; Scapozza, L; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Passoni, Lorena

    2005-06-01

    A crucial issue in the development of molecularly-targeted anticancer therapies is the identification of appropriate molecules whose targeting would result in tumour regression with a minimal level of systemic toxicity. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, normally expressed at low levels in the nervous system. As a consequence of chromosomal translocations involving the alk gene (2p23), ALK is also aberrantly expressed and constitutively activated in approximately 60% of CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs). Due to the selective overexpression of ALK in tumour cells, its direct involvement in the process of malignant transformation and its frequent expression in ALCL patients, the authors recognise ALK as a suitable candidate for the development of molecularly targeted strategies for the therapeutic treatment of ALK-positive lymphomas. Strategies targeting ALK directly or indirectly via the inhibition of the protein networks responsible for ALK oncogenic signalling are discussed. PMID:15948671

  3. Timely topic: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) spreads its influence.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, W; Chan, J K

    2001-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is normally not expressed in human tissues except selected sites in the nervous system. Its expression and constitutive activation as a result of a chromosomal translocation involving 2p23 plays a pivotal role in the genesis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. ALK expression has been instrumental in defining a homogeneous subset from the category of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, characterised by occurrence in young patients, primary systemic presentation, favorable prognosis, a broad morphological spectrum, nuclear and/or cytoplasmic immunostaining for ALK protein, and a number of possible fusion partner genes such as NPM, ATIC, TFG, TPM3 and CLTCL. Recently ALK has been implicated in the genesis of another tumour type, the inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours. The ALK-positive examples occur in children and young adults, involving a variety of sites, such as the abdomen, mesentery, liver, bladder, mediastinum, lung and bone. The partner genes identified in some cases are TPM3 (tropomyosin 3) and TPM4 (tropomyosin 4). These molecular findings also further support the neoplastic nature of at least a subset of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours.

  4. Differential expression of aurora-A kinase in T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Lehman, Norman L; O’Donnell, James P; Lim, Megan S; Schultz, Daniel S; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Inamdar, Kedar V

    2016-01-01

    Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase implicated in oncogenesis and is known to be overexpressed in B-cell lymphomas and plasma cell myeloma. The expression of Aurora-A kinase (henceforth referred to as Aurora-A) in T-cell lymphomas is not well characterized. In this study, we assessed Aurora-A expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 100 lymphomas encompassing a variety of T-cell lymphomas as categorized in the World Health Organization classification. Aurora-A expression was highest in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas and variably expressed in other types of T-cell lymphomas. In addition, the pattern of Aurora-A expression was predominantly cytoplasmic in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and was nuclear in ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and other T-cell lymphomas, suggesting altered biochemical mechanisms of Aurora-A nuclear transport in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that Aurora-A is more highly expressed in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma than in ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and is relatively lower in peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Using western blot analysis and the DEL cell line (derived from ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma), we showed that Aurora-A expression is decreased after treatment with either MYC or MEK inhibitors, consistent with the MYC and MAP kinase signaling pathways being involved in driving Aurora-A expression; the greatest decrease was observed after MYC inhibition. These findings provide insights into the possible importance of Aurora-A overexpression in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma pathogenesis, and also suggest that Aurora-A inhibition could be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. PMID:23411487

  5. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a patient with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Hee; Lee, Ji Hae; Kim, Miri; Cho, Baik Kee; Song, Chan Hee; Ock, Sun Myeong; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites is defined as the appearance of intense skin reactive lesions and systemic symptoms subsequent to mosquito bites. Most cases of hypersensitivity to mosquito bites reported thus far have been associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection or natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma. In this study, we describe the case of an 18-year-old Korean boy who had hypersensitivity to mosquito bites associated with primary systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. After a mosquito bite, the patient developed a progressive cutaneous nodule on his left lower leg and regional lymphadenopathy in the left inguinal area. The histopathological and immunohistochemical findings suggested anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the left T4 vertebrae, left external iliac lymph nodes, left inguinal lymph nodes, and lateral subcutaneous region of the left lower leg. According to the clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings, as well as the imaging data, the patient was diagnosed with primary systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Consequently, the patient received a total of 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisolone chemotherapy at 3-week intervals, after which the lesions regressed.

  6. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to screen for inhibitors of the oncogenic anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind Helen; Tartari, Carmen Julia; Porchia, Francesca; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Scapozza, Leonardo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2005-07-01

    The discovery of novel anti-cancer drugs targeting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, raises the need for in vitro assays suitable for screening compounds for ALK inhibition. To this aim we have developed and optimized an ALK-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that employs a novel ALK peptide substrate and purified ALK kinase domain. PMID:15996942

  7. The Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase controls cell shape and growth of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma through Cdc42 activation

    PubMed Central

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Voena, Claudia; Manazza, Andrea D.; Martinengo, Cinzia; Costa, Carlotta; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Hirsch, Emilio; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) is a Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) that originates from T cells and frequently expresses oncogenic fusion proteins derived from chromosomal translocations or inversions of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) gene. Proliferation and survival of ALCL cells are determined by the ALK activity. Here we show that the kinase activity of the Nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion regulated the shape of ALCL cells and F-actin filaments assembly in a pattern similar to T-Cell Receptor (TCR) stimulated cells. NPM-ALK formed a complex with the Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF) VAV1, enhancing its activation through phosphorylation. VAV1 increased Cdc42 activity and, in turn, Cdc42 regulated the shape and the migration of ALCL cells. In vitro knock-down of VAV1 or Cdc42 by sh-RNA, as well as pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 activity by secramine, resulted in a cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of ALCL cells. Importantly, the concomitant inhibition of Cdc42 and NPM-ALK kinase acted synergistically to induce apoptosis of ALCL cells. Finally, Cdc42 was necessary for the growth as well as for the maintenance of already established lymphomas in vivo. Thus, our data open perspectives for new therapeutic strategies by revealing a mechanism of regulation of ALCL cells growth through Cdc42. PMID:18974134

  8. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of hard palate as first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Narwal, Anjali; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Prakash, Sant; Gupta, Shally

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon disease, accounting for <5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of 48-year-old male who presented a clinically benign swelling in the right anterior palatal region since last 2 months. Radiographic evaluation showed no bone loss in palatal area. Histological and radiological examination was in favor of a peripheral reactive lesion like pyogenic granuloma or a benign salivary gland tumor. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative (ALK(−)) ALCL. Further laboratory tests ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 cell count was done which showed positivity for HIV. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case of ALK(−) ALCL in the hard palate presenting as the first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:27041916

  9. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of hard palate as first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Anjali; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Prakash, Sant; Gupta, Shally

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon disease, accounting for <5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of 48-year-old male who presented a clinically benign swelling in the right anterior palatal region since last 2 months. Radiographic evaluation showed no bone loss in palatal area. Histological and radiological examination was in favor of a peripheral reactive lesion like pyogenic granuloma or a benign salivary gland tumor. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative (ALK(-)) ALCL. Further laboratory tests ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 cell count was done which showed positivity for HIV. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case of ALK(-) ALCL in the hard palate presenting as the first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:27041916

  10. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma of hard palate as first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Anjali; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Prakash, Sant; Gupta, Shally

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an uncommon disease, accounting for <5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of 48-year-old male who presented a clinically benign swelling in the right anterior palatal region since last 2 months. Radiographic evaluation showed no bone loss in palatal area. Histological and radiological examination was in favor of a peripheral reactive lesion like pyogenic granuloma or a benign salivary gland tumor. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative (ALK(-)) ALCL. Further laboratory tests ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 cell count was done which showed positivity for HIV. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case of ALK(-) ALCL in the hard palate presenting as the first clinical manifestation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  11. The emerging normal and disease-related roles of anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Pulford, K; Lamant, L; Espinos, E; Jiang, Q; Xue, L; Turturro, F; Delsol, G; Morris, S W

    2004-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase, the normal role of which remains to be completely elucidated. Although work carried out in mammals suggests a function in neural development, results from studies in Drosophila indicate an additional role in visceral muscle differentiation. The aberrant expression of full-length ALK receptor proteins has been reported in neuroblastomas and glioblastomas, while the occurrence of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has resulted in the identification of the new tumor entity, ALK-positive ALCL. ALK represents one of few examples of a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in oncogenesis in both haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic tumors, given that ALK fusions also occur in the mesenchymal tumor known as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). The study of ALK fusion proteins, besides demonstrating their importance in tumor development, has also raised the possibility of new therapeutic treatments for patients with ALK-positive malignancies.

  12. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: role in cancer pathogenesis and small-molecule inhibitor development for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Thomas R; Slavish, Jake; George, Rani E; Look, A Thomas; Xue, Liquan; Jiang, Qin; Cui, Xiaoli; Rentrop, Walter B; Morris, Stephan W

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a receptor tyrosine kinase in the insulin receptor superfamily, was initially identified in constitutively activated oncogenic fusion forms – the most common being nucleophosmin-ALK – in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, and subsequent studies have identified ALK fusions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, systemic histiocytosis, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and non-small-cell lung carcinomas. More recently, genomic DNA amplification and protein overexpression, as well as activating point mutations, of ALK have been described in neuroblastomas. In addition to those cancers for which a causative role for aberrant ALK activity is well validated, more circumstantial links implicate the full-length, normal ALK receptor in the genesis of other malignancies – including glioblastoma and breast cancer – via a mechanism of receptor activation involving autocrine and/or paracrine growth loops with the reported ALK ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine. This review summarizes normal ALK biology, the confirmed and putative roles of ALK in the development of human cancers and efforts to target ALK using small-molecule kinase inhibitors. PMID:19275511

  13. Detection of an early adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma clone in lymph nodes with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma involvement.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masahito; Yoshida, Noriaki; Nakano, Nobuaki; Kubota, Ayumu; Takeuchi, Shogo; Takatsuka, Yoshifusa; Seto, Masao; Utsunomiya, Atae

    2016-04-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with systemic lymphadenopathy and was diagnosed with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) by lymph node biopsy. Although he was a human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) carrier, Southern blot analysis of the lymph node did not show monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 provirus deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). He achieved complete remission after chemotherapy and subsequently, autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) was performed. Fifteen months after the auto-PBSCT, abnormal lymphocytes in the peripheral blood gradually increased. Southern blot analysis revealed monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 provirus DNA and monoclonal rearrangement of TRB. He was diagnosed with chronic type adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which immediately progressed to the acute type. He died of tumor progression despite intensive chemotherapy. We analyzed genomic alterations of the ALCL and ATL cells using array comparative genomic hybridization. We found that the genomic alteration pattern differed between the two diseases. T-cell receptor clonality analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that the T-cell clone of the ATL was present in the lymph nodes with ALCL involvement, but not in peripheral blood. This finding suggests that lymph nodes can serve as a niche for ATL development.

  14. Characterization of some molecular mechanisms governing autoactivation of the catalytic domain of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Tartari, Carmen J; Gunby, Rosalind H; Coluccia, Addolorata M L; Sottocornola, Roberta; Cimbro, Barbara; Scapozza, Leonardo; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2008-02-15

    NPM/ALK is an oncogenic fusion protein expressed in approximately 50% of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases. It derives from the t(2;5)(p23;q35) chromosomal translocation that fuses the catalytic domain of the tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), with the dimerization domain of the ubiquitously expressed nucleophosmin (NPM) protein. Dimerization of the ALK kinase domain leads to its autophosphorylation and constitutive activation. Activated NPM/ALK stimulates downstream survival and proliferation signaling pathways leading to malignant transformation. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of autoactivation of the catalytic domain of ALK. Because kinases are typically regulated by autophosphorylation of their activation loops, we systematically mutated (Tyr --> Phe) three potential autophosphorylation sites contained in the "YXXXYY" motif of the ALK activation loop, and determined the effect of these mutations on the catalytic activity and biological function of NPM/ALK. We observed that mutation of both the second and third tyrosine residues (YFF mutant) did not affect the kinase activity or transforming ability of NPM/ALK. In contrast, mutation of the first and second (FFY), first and third (FYF), or all three (FFF) tyrosine residues impaired both kinase activity and transforming ability of NPM/ALK. Furthermore, a DFF mutant, in which the aspartic residue introduces a negative charge similar to a phosphorylated tyrosine, possessed catalytic activity similar to the YFF mutant. Together, our findings indicate that phosphorylation of the first tyrosine of the YXXXYY motif is necessary for the autoactivation of the ALK kinase domain and the transforming activity of NPM/ALK. PMID:18070884

  15. Transcription and translation are primary targets of Pim kinase inhibitor SGI-1776 in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingshan; Chen, Lisa S; Neelapu, Sattva S; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Gandhi, Varsha

    2012-10-25

    Proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (Pim) kinases are serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases and oncoproteins that promote tumor progression. Three isoforms of Pim kinases have been identified and are known to phosphorylate numerous substrates, with regulatory functions in transcription, translation, cell cycle, and survival pathways. These kinases are involved in production, proliferation, and survival of normal B cells and are overexpressed in B-cell malignancies such as mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). SGI-1776 is a small molecule and Pim kinase inhibitor with selectivity for Pim-1. We hypothesize that Pim kinase function can be inhibited by SGI-1776 in MCL and that inhibition of phosphorylation of downstream substrates will disrupt transcriptional, translational, and cell cycle processes and promote cell death. SGI-1776 treatment in 4 MCL cell lines resulted in apoptosis induction. Phosphorylation of transcription (c-Myc) and translation targets (4E-BP1), tested in Jeko-1 and Mino, was declined. Consistent with these data, Mcl-1 and cyclin D1 protein levels were decreased. Importantly, similar to cell line data, MCL primary cells but not normal cells showed similar inhibition of substrate phosphorylation and cytotoxicity from SGI-1776 treatment. Genetic knockdown of Pim-1/Pim-2 affected similar proteins in MCL cell lines. Collectively these data demonstrate Pim kinases as therapeutic targets in MCL. PMID:22955922

  16. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of ...

  17. Combination therapy with brentuximab vedotin and cisplatin/cytarabine in a patient with primarily refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Beer, Ambros J; Geissinger, Eva; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a common subtype of the heterogeneous group of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, which is characterized by large pleomorphic cells with strong expression of CD30. Translocations involving ALK, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene, are associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Such ALK-positive ALCLs are usually responsive to a multidrug chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). However, there is no general consensus on the optimal therapy for relapsed or refractory ALCL. We report the case of a 24-year-old male suffering from ALK-positive ALCL with an uncommon manifestation of only extranodal disease in the gastric cardia region that showed primary refractoriness to standard CHOP chemotherapy. A combination therapy consisting of the anti-CD30 drug conjugate, brentuximab vedotin, and classical lymphoma salvage regimen DHAP (cisplatin, high-dose cytarabine and dexamethasone) was administered. Following two treatment cycles in 21-day intervals, the lymphoma showed considerable regression based on imaging diagnostics and no evidence of vital lymphoma in a subsequent biopsy. We did not observe any increase in toxicity; in particular, polyneuropathy and febrile neutropenia were not observed. In summary, we report that the antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin and a classical regimen used for aggressive lymphoma, DHAP, could be combined as salvage therapy in a case of refractory ALK-positive ALCL. Phase I/II studies will be required for safety and efficacy analysis.

  18. Activation and inhibition of anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor tyrosine kinase by monoclonal antibodies and absence of agonist activity of pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Moog-Lutz, Christel; Degoutin, Joffrey; Gouzi, Jean Y; Frobert, Yvelyne; Brunet-de Carvalho, Nicole; Bureau, Jocelyne; Créminon, Christophe; Vigny, Marc

    2005-07-15

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is transiently expressed in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems, suggesting a role in its normal development and function. The nature of the cognate ligands of ALK in vertebrate is still a matter of debate. We produced a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the extracellular domain of the human receptor. Two major species of ALK (220 and 140 kDa) were identified in transfected cells, and the use of our mAbs established that the 140-kDa species results from a cleavage of the 220-kDa form. Two mAbs, in the nm range, induced the differentiation of PC12 cells transiently transfected with ALK. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing ALK, these two mAbs strongly activated the receptor and subsequently the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. We further showed for the first time that activation of ALK also resulted in a specific activation of STAT3. In contrast, other mAbs presented the characteristics of blocking antibodies. Finally, in these cell systems, a mitogenic form of pleiotrophin, a proposed ligand of ALK, failed to activate this receptor. Thus, in the absence of clearly established ligand(s) in vertebrates, the availability of mAbs allowing the activation or the inhibition of the receptor will be essential for a better understanding of the biological roles of ALK.

  19. Molecular characterization of WDCP, a novel fusion partner for the anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase ALK

    PubMed Central

    YOKOYAMA, NORIKO; MILLER, W. TODD

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily. The ALK gene is a site of frequent mutation and chromosomal rearrangement in various types of human cancers. A novel chromosomal translocation was recently identified in human colorectal cancer between the ALK gene and chromosome 2, open reading frame 44 (C2orf44), a gene of unknown function. As a first step in understanding the oncogenic properties of this fusion protein, C2orf44 cDNA was cloned and the encoded protein was characterized, which was designated as WD repeat and coiled coil containing protein (WDCP). A C-terminal proline-rich segment in WDCP was shown to mediate binding to the Src homology 3 domain of the Src family kinase hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck). Co-expression with Hck lead to tyrosine phosphorylation of WDCP. Chromatographic fractionation of WDCP-containing lysates indicates that the protein exists as an oligomer in mammalian cells. These results suggest that, in the context of the ALK-C2orf44 gene fusion, WDCP imposes an oligomeric structure on ALK that results in constitutive kinase activation and signaling. PMID:25469238

  20. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Acts in the Drosophila Mushroom Body to Negatively Regulate Sleep.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lei; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-11-01

    Though evidence is mounting that a major function of sleep is to maintain brain plasticity and consolidate memory, little is known about the molecular pathways by which learning and sleep processes intercept. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), the gene encoding a tyrosine receptor kinase whose inadvertent activation is the cause of many cancers, is implicated in synapse formation and cognitive functions. In particular, Alk genetically interacts with Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) to regulate growth and associative learning in flies. We show that Alk mutants have increased sleep. Using a targeted RNAi screen we localized the negative effects of Alk on sleep to the mushroom body, a structure important for both sleep and memory. We also report that mutations in Nf1 produce a sexually dimorphic short sleep phenotype, and suppress the long sleep phenotype of Alk. Thus Alk and Nf1 interact in both learning and sleep regulation, highlighting a common pathway in these two processes. PMID:26536237

  1. Anti-apoptotic signaling of pleiotrophin through its receptor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Emma T; Stoica, Gerald E; Wellstein, Anton

    2002-09-27

    The secreted growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN) can induce mitogenesis in cells that express the receptor for this growth factor, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Here we examine the ability of PTN to produce anti-apoptotic signals. We demonstrate that PTN is a survival factor for SW-13 epithelial cells and show that ribozyme-mediated depletion of ALK from SW-13 cells abolishes this effect of PTN. Furthermore, in serum-starved NIH3T3 fibroblasts PTN prevents apoptosis (measured by annexin V staining) with an EC(50) of 0.2 ng/ml and induces cell growth at higher concentrations of PTN. A polyclonal antibody against the PTN ligand-binding domain of the ALK receptor (alpha-LBD) was a partial agonist for ALK in NIH3T3 cells. This alpha-LBD antibody showed high agonist activity for anti-apoptosis (56 +/- 9% relative to PTN), low agonist activity for cell growth (21 +/- 1% relative to PTN), and was an antagonist of PTN-induced cell growth (61 +/- 2% inhibition). Both MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase cascades in NIH3T3 cells were activated by PTN, and this effect persisted for up to 3 h. Surprisingly, the anti-apoptotic effect of PTN was completely blocked by the MAP kinase inhibitor UO126, but was not affected by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. In contrast, PTN-dependent cell growth required both MAPK and PI 3-kinase activity. We conclude that anti-apoptotic signaling of PTN through ALK in NIH3T3 fibroblasts is via the MAP kinase pathway.

  2. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation. PMID:21796626

  3. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  4. Antibody targeting of anaplastic lymphoma kinase induces cytotoxicity of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E L; Haglund, E A; Mace, E M; Deng, D; Martinez, D; Wood, A C; Chow, A K; Weiser, D A; Belcastro, L T; Winter, C; Bresler, S C; Vigny, M; Mazot, P; Asgharzadeh, S; Seeger, R C; Zhao, H; Guo, R; Christensen, J G; Orange, J S; Pawel, B R; Lemmon, M A; Mossé, Y P

    2012-11-15

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase aberrantly expressed in neuroblastoma, a devastating pediatric cancer of the sympathetic nervous system. Germline and somatically acquired ALK aberrations induce increased autophosphorylation, constitutive ALK activation and increased downstream signaling. Thus, ALK is a tractable therapeutic target in neuroblastoma, likely to be susceptible to both small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and therapeutic antibodies-as has been shown for other receptor tyrosine kinases in malignancies such as breast and lung cancer. Small-molecule inhibitors of ALK are currently being studied in the clinic, but common ALK mutations in neuroblastoma appear to show de novo insensitivity, arguing that complementary therapeutic approaches must be developed. We therefore hypothesized that antibody targeting of ALK may be a relevant strategy for the majority of neuroblastoma patients likely to have ALK-positive tumors. We show here that an antagonistic ALK antibody inhibits cell growth and induces in vitro antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of human neuroblastoma-derived cell lines. Cytotoxicity was induced in cell lines harboring either wild type or mutated forms of ALK. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with the dual Met/ALK inhibitor crizotinib sensitized cells to antibody-induced growth inhibition by promoting cell surface accumulation of ALK and thus increasing the accessibility of antigen for antibody binding. These data support the concept of ALK-targeted immunotherapy as a highly promising therapeutic strategy for neuroblastomas with mutated or wild-type ALK.

  5. Pleiotrophin signaling through anaplastic lymphoma kinase is rate-limiting for glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Powers, Ciaran; Aigner, Achim; Stoica, Gerald E; McDonnell, Kevin; Wellstein, Anton

    2002-04-19

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common highly aggressive human brain cancer, and receptor tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the progression of this malignancy. We have recently identified anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) as a tyrosine kinase receptor for pleiotrophin, a secreted growth factor that is highly expressed during embryonic brain development and in tumors of the central nervous system. Here we report on the contribution of pleiotrophin-ALK signaling to glioblastoma growth. We found ALK overexpressed in human glioblastoma relative to normal brain and detected ALK mRNA in glioblastoma cell lines. We reduced the endogenous ALK in glioblastoma cells by ribozyme targeting and demonstrated that this prevents pleiotrophin-stimulated phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Akt. Furthermore, this depletion of ALK reduced tumor growth of xenografts in athymic nude mice and prolonged survival of the animals because of increased apoptosis in the tumors. These findings directly implicate ALK signaling as a rate-limiting factor in the growth of glioblastoma multiforme and suggest potential utility of therapeutic targeting of ALK.

  6. FAM150A and FAM150B are activating ligands for anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jikui; Umapathy, Ganesh; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Wolfstetter, Georg; Mendoza, Patricia; Pfeifer, Kathrin; Mohammed, Ateequrrahman; Hugosson, Fredrik; Zhang, Hongbing; Hsu, Amy W; Halenbeck, Robert; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been described in a range of human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma (Hallberg and Palmer, 2013). Vertebrate ALK has been considered to be an orphan receptor and the identity of the ALK ligand(s) is a critical issue. Here we show that FAM150A and FAM150B are potent ligands for human ALK that bind to the extracellular domain of ALK and in addition to activation of wild-type ALK are able to drive 'superactivation' of activated ALK mutants from neuroblastoma. In conclusion, our data show that ALK is robustly activated by the FAM150A/B ligands and provide an opportunity to develop ALK-targeted therapies in situations where ALK is overexpressed/activated or mutated in the context of the full length receptor.

  7. Involvement of Grb2 adaptor protein in nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-mediated signaling and anaplastic large cell lymphoma growth.

    PubMed

    Riera, Ludovica; Lasorsa, Elena; Ambrogio, Chiara; Surrenti, Nadia; Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2010-08-20

    Most anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) express oncogenic fusion proteins derived from chromosomal translocations or inversions of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. Frequently ALCL carry the t(2;5) translocation, which fuses the ALK gene to the nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene. The transforming activity mediated by NPM-ALK fusion induces different pathways that control proliferation and survival of lymphoma cells. Grb2 is an adaptor protein thought to play an important role in ALK-mediated transformation, but its interaction with NPM-ALK, as well as its function in regulating ALCL signaling pathways and cell growth, has never been elucidated. Here we show that active NPM-ALK, but not a kinase-dead mutant, bound and induced Grb2 phosphorylation in tyrosine 160. An intact SH3 domain at the C terminus of Grb2 was required for Tyr(160) phosphorylation. Furthermore, Grb2 did not bind to a single region but rather to different regions of NPM-ALK, mainly Tyr(152-156), Tyr(567), and a proline-rich region, Pro(415-417). Finally, shRNA knockdown experiments showed that Grb2 regulates primarily the NPM-ALK-mediated phosphorylation of SHP2 and plays a key role in ALCL cell growth.

  8. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1-/- mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB.

  9. Ethanol activates midkine and anaplastic lymphoma kinase signaling in neuroblastoma cells and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Donghong; Chen, Hu; Muramatsu, Hisako; Lasek, Amy W

    2015-11-01

    Alcohol engages signaling pathways in the brain. Midkine (MDK) is a neurotrophic factor that is over-expressed in the prefrontal cortex of alcoholics. MDK and one of its receptors, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), also regulate behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether MDK and ALK expression and signaling are activated by ethanol. We found that ethanol treatment of neuroblastoma cells increased MDK and ALK expression. We also assessed activation of ALK by ethanol in cells and found that ALK and ALK-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation increased rapidly with ethanol exposure. Similarly, treatment of cells with recombinant MDK protein increased ALK, ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting that ethanol may utilize MDK to activate ALK signaling. In support of this, transfection of cells with MDK siRNAs attenuated ALK signaling in response to ethanol. Ethanol also activates ERK signaling in the brain. We found that inhibition of ALK or knockout of MDK attenuated ethanol-induced ERK phosphorylation in mouse amygdala. These results demonstrate that ethanol engages MDK and ALK signaling, which has important consequences for alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and the regulation of behaviors related to alcohol abuse.

  10. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  11. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1-/- mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  12. Phase II Intergroup Trial of Alisertib in Relapsed and Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma and Transformed Mycosis Fungoides: SWOG 1108

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Paul M.; Li, Hongli; Spier, Catherine; Mahadevan, Daruka; LeBlanc, Michael; Ul Haq, Mansoor; Huber, Bryan D.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.; Horwitz, Steven M.; Fisher, Richard I.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Smith, Sonali M.; Kahl, Brad S.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is upregulated in highly proliferative lymphomas, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Alisertib is a novel oral AAK inhibitor without adverse safety signals in early-phase studies that demonstrated preliminary activity in T-cell lymphoma. This phase II study was conducted to further investigate the efficacy of alisertib in relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTCL). Patients and Methods Eligible patients with histologically confirmed relapsed/refractory PTCL or transformed Mycosis fungoides (tMF) received alisertib 50 mg twice a day for 7 days on 21-day cycles. Results Of 37 eligible patients, the histologic subtypes enrolled included PTCL not otherwise specified (n = 13), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (n = 9), tMF (n = 7), adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (n = 4), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (n = 2), and extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (n = 2). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events in ≥ 5% of patients included neutropenia (32%), anemia (30%), thrombocytopenia (24%), febrile neutropenia (14%), mucositis (11%), and rash (5%). Treatment was discontinued most commonly for disease progression. Among the PTCL subtypes, the overall response rate was 30%, whereas no responses were observed in tMF. Aurora B kinase was more commonly overexpressed than AAK in tumor specimens. Analysis of AAK, Aurora B kinase, MYC, BCL-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ, and Notch1 expression revealed no association with response. Conclusion Alisertib has antitumor activity in PTCL, including heavily pretreated patients. These promising results are being further investigated in an ongoing international, randomized phase III trial comparing alisertib with investigator's choice in PTCL. PMID:26077240

  13. Identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase as a receptor for the growth factor pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Stoica, G E; Kuo, A; Aigner, A; Sunitha, I; Souttou, B; Malerczyk, C; Caughey, D J; Wen, D; Karavanov, A; Riegel, A T; Wellstein, A

    2001-05-18

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted growth factor that induces neurite outgrowth and is mitogenic for fibroblasts, epithelial, and endothelial cells. During tumor growth PTN can serve as an angiogenic factor and drive tumor invasion and metastasis. To identify a receptor for PTN, we panned a phage display human cDNA library against immobilized PTN protein as a bait. From this we isolated a phage insert that was homologous to an amino acid sequence stretch in the extracellular domain (ECD) of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). In parallel with PTN, ALK is highly expressed during perinatal development of the nervous system and down-modulated in the adult. Here we show in cell-free assays as well as in radioligand receptor binding studies in intact cells that PTN binds to the ALK ECD with an apparent Kd of 32 +/- 9 pm. This receptor binding is inhibited by an excess of PTN, by the ALK ECD, and by anti-PTN and anti-ECD antibodies. PTN added to ALK-expressing cells induces phosphorylation of both ALK and of the downstream effector molecules IRS-1, Shc, phospholipase C-gamma, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the growth stimulatory effect of PTN on different cell lines in culture coincides with the endogenous expression of ALK mRNA, and the effect of PTN is enhanced by ALK overexpression. From this we conclude that ALK is a receptor that transduces PTN-mediated signals and propose that the PTN-ALK axis can play a significant role during development and during disease processes.

  14. Poor response to gefitinib in lung adenocarcinoma with concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianya; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Sheng, Yihong; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Jianying

    2015-03-01

    A patient presenting with concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation is rare. We report a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient with concomitant ALK rearrangement and exon 19 (E746-A750del) EGFR mutation. The ALK rearrangement was confirmed not only in the primary tumor biopsy specimen, but also in the pleural effusion cell block by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Ventana ALK immunohistochemistry assay, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. No clinical benefit using chemotherapy or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib was obtained in this case.

  15. NPM-ALK oncogenic tyrosine kinase controls T-cell identity by transcriptional regulation and epigenetic silencing in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Martinengo, Cinzia; Voena, Claudia; Tondat, Fabrizio; Riera, Ludovica; di Celle, Paola Francia; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2009-11-15

    Transformed cells in lymphomas usually maintain the phenotype of the postulated normal lymphocyte from which they arise. By contrast, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a T-cell lymphoma with aberrant phenotype because of the defective expression of the T-cell receptor and other T-cell-specific molecules for still undetermined mechanisms. The majority of ALCL carries the translocation t(2;5) that encodes for the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK, fundamental for survival, proliferation, and migration of transformed T cells. Here, we show that loss of T-cell-specific molecules in ALCL cases is broader than reported previously and involves most T-cell receptor-related signaling molecules, including CD3epsilon, ZAP70, LAT, and SLP76. We further show that NPM-ALK, but not the kinase-dead NPM-ALK(K210R), downregulated the expression of these molecules by a STAT3-mediated gene transcription regulation and/or epigenetic silencing because this downregulation was reverted by treating ALCL cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine or by knocking down STAT3 through short hairpin RNA. Finally, NPM-ALK increased the methylation of ZAP70 intron 1-exon 2 boundary region, and both NPM-ALK and STAT3 regulated the expression levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 in transformed T cells. Thus, our data reveal that oncogene-deregulated tyrosine kinase activity controls the expression of molecules that determine T-cell identity and signaling.

  16. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Lei; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Shan, Ling; Zhou, Haitao; Zhao, Dongbing; Wang, Jian; Liang, Jianwei; Zhao, Jianjun; Jiao, Yuchen; Lu, Ning; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients. Patients and Methods Tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner. Results Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44%) CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4–ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1). One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing. Conclusions The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy. PMID:26678488

  17. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting in nasal cavity: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Feng, Xiaoli; Dong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) with distinct morphologic and immunohistochemical features. We reported a 57-year-old female with ALK-positive DLBCL in her left nasal cavity. Histologically, the tumor cells were characterized by plasmablastic morphology and tested positive for ALK in a cytoplasmic granular staining pattern. The neoplastic cells were positive for CD38, CD4, MUM1, CD138 and Vimentin. However, they failed to express CD56, CD30, as well as mature B cells markers, such as CD79a, CD20 and T cells markers such as CD2, CD3, CD5, CD7 and CD8. The patient achieved complete response after four cycles of CHOEP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide) treatment. Then she received radiotherapy of the originally involved area. This case represented a rare ALK-positive DLBCL in the nasal region. PMID:25973114

  18. An unusual case of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma in an elderly patient: A case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    XIONG, HANZHEN; LIU, SHAO-YAN; YANG, YUE-XIN; TAN, XUE-XIAN; LUO, QIU-PING; PENG, JUAN; XIONG, ZHONG-TANG; CHEN, HUI; CHEN, JUAN; LI, ZHI; JIANG, QING-PING

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive large B-cell lymphoma, with rapid clinical progression, which occurred in a 90-year-old male patient. The patient presented with numerous enlarged lymph nodes in the neck and mediastinum. Histopathological analysis of a single lymph node detected diffuse large immunoblastic- or plasmablastic-like tumor cells, which were strongly immunoreactive for ALK in a granular cytoplasmic distribution, but negative for the expression of CD20 and CD79a. In addition, polymerase chain reaction assays were unable to detect clonal rearrangements of the T cell receptor-γ and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the tumor lesion, and in situ hybridization tested negative for infection with Epstein-Barr virus. The patient underwent a single cycle of chemotherapy using the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide (E-CHOP) regimen; however, the patient developed pleural effusions with respiratory distress, associated with clinical deterioration. The patient succumbed to the disease within 4 months of initial presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the eldest patient with this type of lymphoma to be reported in the literature. PMID:27168806

  19. Molecular dissection of mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase locus in mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, M L; Moore, M M; Broder, C B; Burrell, A; Juhn, G; Kasweck, K L; Lin, P F; Wadhams, A; Hozier, J C

    1990-01-01

    The mouse lymphoma L5178Y TK+/- 3.7.2C cell line allows quantitation of induced TK(+/-)----TK-/- mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase (Tk) locus. TK-/- mutant colonies show a bimodal size distribution, reflecting a difference in the growth rates of the two size classes that is hypothesized to result from different degrees of genetic damage. The two homologous chromosomes 11 containing the alleles of the Tk gene in L5178Y 3.7.2C TK+/- cells are distinguishable at the cytogenetic level. We find, in addition, that the two alleles are distinguishable at the molecular level because of an Nco I restriction fragment length polymorphism at the 3' end of the gene. In a set of 51 large-colony and 48 small-colony TK-/- mutants induced by ionizing radiation or by chemical mutagens, we find that 78, including all except one of the small-colony mutants, have lost the Tk+ allele and that some of these have two to four copies of the remaining Tk- allele. Nineteen of the large-colony TK-/- mutants that do not show Tk+ allele loss show no other structural changes detectable at the level of Southern blot analysis. One shows a partial deletion. The variety of mutagenic lesions recorded at the heterozygous Tk locus may be representative of events observed in human malignancy and may include a wider range of mutagenic events than can be observed at hemizygous test loci. Images PMID:1967496

  20. Mutation-Independent Activation of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Regairaz, Marie; Munier, Fabienne; Sartelet, Hervé; Castaing, Marine; Marty, Virginie; Renauleaud, Céline; Doux, Camille; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Fabre, Monique; Ohta, Shigeru; Viehl, Philippe; Michiels, Stefan; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    Activating mutations of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as important players in neuroblastoma development. Our goal was to evaluate the significance of overall ALK activation in neuroblastoma. Expression of phosphorylated ALK, ALK, and its putative ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine, was screened in 289 neuroblastomas and 56 paired normal tissues. ALK was expressed in 99% of tumors and phosphorylated in 48% of cases. Pleiotrophin and midkine were expressed in 58% and 79% of tumors, respectively. ALK activation was significantly higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues, together with ALK and midkine expression. ALK activation was largely independent of mutations and correlated with midkine expression in tumors. ALK activation in tumors was associated with favorable features, including a younger age at diagnosis, hyperdiploidy, and detection by mass screening. Antitumor activity of the ALK inhibitor TAE684 was evaluated in wild-type or mutated ALK neuroblastoma cell lines and xenografts. TAE684 was cytotoxic in vitro in all cell lines, especially those harboring an ALK mutation. TAE684 efficiently inhibited ALK phosphorylation in vivo in both F1174I and R1275Q xenografts but demonstrated antitumor activity only against the R1275Q xenograft. In conclusion, ALK activation occurs frequently during neuroblastoma oncogenesis, mainly through mutation-independent mechanisms. However, ALK activation is not associated with a poor outcome and is not always a driver of cell proliferation and/or survival in neuroblastoma. PMID:26687816

  1. Phase II Study of Alisertib, a Selective Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor, in Relapsed and Refractory Aggressive B- and T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Cebula, Erin; Persky, Daniel; Lossos, Izidore; Agarwal, Amit B.; Jung, JungAh; Burack, Richard; Zhou, Xiaofei; Leonard, E. Jane; Fingert, Howard; Danaee, Hadi; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is overexpressed in aggressive lymphomas and can correlate with more histologically aggressive forms of disease. We therefore designed a phase II study of alisertib, a selective AAK inhibitor, in patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Patients and Methods Patients age ≥ 18 years were eligible if they had relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), transformed follicular lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, or noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Alisertib was administered orally at 50 mg twice daily for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Results We enrolled 48 patients. Histologies included DLBCL (n = 21), MCL (n = 13), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (n = 8), transformed follicular lymphoma (n = 5), and Burkitt's (n = 1). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were neutropenia (63%), leukopenia (54%), anemia (35%), thrombocytopenia (33%), stomatitis (15%), febrile neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (6%). Four deaths during the study were attributed to progressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), treatment-related sepsis (n = 1), and unknown cause (n = 1). The overall response rate was 27%, including responses in three of 21 patients with DLBCL, three of 13 with MCL, one of one with Burkitt's lymphoma, two of five with transformed follicular lymphoma, and four of eight with noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The alisertib steady-state trough concentration (n = 25) revealed the expected pharmacokinetic variability, with a trend for higher incidence of adverse event–related dose reductions at higher trough concentrations. Analysis for AAK gene amplification and total AAK protein revealed no differences between histologies or correlation with clinical response. Conclusion The novel AAK inhibitor alisertib seems clinically active in both B- and T-cell aggressive lymphomas. On the basis of these results, confirmatory single-agent and combination studies have been initiated. PMID:24043741

  2. ALK kinase domain mutations in primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma: consequences on NPM-ALK activity and sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lovisa, Federica; Cozza, Giorgio; Cristiani, Andrea; Cuzzolin, Alberto; Albiero, Alessandro; Mussolin, Lara; Pillon, Marta; Moro, Stefano; Basso, Giuseppe; Rosolen, Angelo; Bonvini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    ALK inhibitor crizotinib has shown potent antitumor activity in children with refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) and the opportunity to include ALK inhibitors in first-line therapies is oncoming. However, recent studies suggest that crizotinib-resistance mutations may emerge in ALCL patients. In the present study, we analyzed ALK kinase domain mutational status of 36 paediatric ALCL patients at diagnosis to identify point mutations and gene aberrations that could impact on NPM-ALK gene expression, activity and sensitivity to small-molecule inhibitors. Amplicon ultra-deep sequencing of ALK kinase domain detected 2 single point mutations, R335Q and R291Q, in 2 cases, 2 common deletions of exon 23 and 25 in all the patients, and 7 splicing-related INDELs in a variable number of them. The functional impact of missense mutations and INDELs was evaluated. Point mutations were shown to affect protein kinase activity, signalling output and drug sensitivity. INDELs, instead, generated kinase-dead variants with dominant negative effect on NPM-ALK kinase, in virtue of their capacity of forming non-functional heterocomplexes. Consistently, when co-expressed, INDELs increased crizotinib inhibitory activity on NPM-ALK signal processing, as demonstrated by the significant reduction of STAT3 phosphorylation. Functional changes in ALK kinase activity induced by both point mutations and structural rearrangements were resolved by molecular modelling and dynamic simulation analysis, providing novel insights into ALK kinase domain folding and regulation. Therefore, these data suggest that NPM-ALK pre-therapeutic mutations may be found at low frequency in ALCL patients. These mutations occur randomly within the ALK kinase domain and affect protein activity, while preserving responsiveness to crizotinib.

  3. Deltex1 promotes protein kinase Cθ degradation and sustains Casitas B-lineage lymphoma expression.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Sheng; Hsiao, Huey-Wen; Wu, Pei-Jung; Liu, Wen-Hsien; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2014-08-15

    The generation of T cell anergy is associated with upregulation of ubiquitin E3 ligases including Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl-b), Itch, gene related to anergy in lymphocyte, and deltex1 (DTX1). These E3 ligases attenuate T cell activation by targeting to signaling molecules. For example, Cbl-b and Itch promote the degradation of protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ) and phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) in anergic Th1 cells. How these anergy-associated E3 ligases coordinate during T cell anergy remains largely unknown. In the current study, we found that PKCθ and PLC-γ1 are also downregulated by DTX1. DTX1 interacted with PKCθ and PLC-γ1 and stimulated the degradation of PKCθ and PLC-γ1. T cell anergy-induced proteolysis of PKCθ was prevented in Dtx1(-/-) T cells, supporting the essential role of DTX1 in PKCθ downregulation. Similar to Cbl-b and Itch, DTX1 promoted monoubiquitination of PKCθ. Proteasome inhibitor did not inhibit DTX1-directed PKCθ degradation, but instead DTX1 directed the relocalization of PKCθ into the lysosomal pathway. In addition, DTX1 interacted with Cbl-b and increased the protein levels of Cbl-b. We further demonstrated the possibility that, through the downregulation of PKCθ, DTX1 prevented PKCθ-induced Cbl-b degradation and increased Cbl-b protein stability. Our results suggest the coordination between E3 ligases during T cell anergy; DTX1 acts with Cbl-b to assure a more extensive silencing of PKCθ, whereas DTX1-mediated PKCθ degradation further stabilizes Cbl-b.

  4. Changes in Immunohistochemical Protein Levels in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Lung Adenocarcinoma Possibly due to Chemo-radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Takaya; Soda, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Yuichi; Kitazaki, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    To detect the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene in non-small cell lung cancer, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are the standard methods. However, there are discrepancies between them. We herein report a 40-year-old woman with ALK fusion-positive adenocarcinoma that changed from positive to negative in IHC due to chemo-radiotherapy. Recurrence of the disease restored the IHC expression, whereas FISH was positive throughout the entire clinical course. Our experience suggests that we should therefore carefully evaluate samples after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:27374682

  5. Unique substrate specificity of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK): development of phosphoacceptor peptides for the assay of ALK activity.

    PubMed

    Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Cesaro, Luca; Gunby, Rosalind H; Ferrarese, Anna; Coluccia, Addolorata M L; Tartari, Carmen J; Mologni, Luca; Scapozza, Leonardo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2005-06-14

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), whose constitutively active fusion proteins are responsible for 5-10% of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, shares with the other members of the insulin receptor kinase (IRK) subfamily an activation loop (A-loop) with the triple tyrosine motif Y-x-x-x-Y-Y. However, the amino acid sequence of the ALK A-loop differs significantly from the sequences of both the IRK A-loop and the consensus A-loop for this kinase subfamily. A major difference is the presence of a unique "RAS" triplet between the first and second tyrosines of the ALK A-loop, which in IRK is replaced by "ETD". Here we show that a peptide reproducing the A-loop of ALK is readily phosphorylated by ALK, while a homologous IRK A-loop peptide is not unless its "ETD" triplet is substituted by "RAS". Phosphorylation occurs almost exclusively at the first tyrosine of the Y-x-x-x-Y-Y motif, as judged by Edman analysis of the phosphoradiolabeled product. Consequently, a peptide in which the first tyrosine had been replaced by phenylalanine (FYY) was almost unaffected by ALK. In contrast, a peptide in which the second and third tyrosines had been replaced by phenylalanine (YFF) was phosphorylated more rapidly than the parent peptide (YYY). A number of substitutions in the YFF peptide outlined the importance of Ile and Arg at positions n - 1 and n + 6 in addition to the central triplet, to ensure efficient phosphorylation by ALK. Such a peculiar substrate specificity allows the specific monitoring of ALK activity in crude extracts of NPM-ALK positive cells, using the YFF peptide, which is only marginally phosphorylated by a number of other tyrosine kinases. PMID:15938644

  6. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase is Dynamically Expressed on Subsets of Motor Neurons and in the Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Shawn P.; Clary, Douglas O.; Copié, Valérie; Lefcort, Frances

    2008-01-01

    During embryonic development, complex events such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, survival, and guidance of axons are orchestrated and regulated by a variety of extracellular signals. Receptor tyrosine kinases mediate many of these events with several playing critical roles in neuronal survival and axonal guidance. It is evident that not all the receptor tyrosine kinases that play key roles in regulating neuronal development have been identified. In this study, we have characterized the spatial-temporal expression profile of a recently identified receptor tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), in embryonic chick by means of whole mount in situ hybridization in conjunction with immunohistochemistry. Our findings reveal that Alk is expressed in sympathetic and dorsal root ganglia as early as stage 19. In addition, mRNA is expressed from stage 23/24 (E4) until stage 39 (E13) in discrete motor neuron subsets of chick spinal cord along with a select group of muscles that are innervated by one of these particular motor neuron clusters. Interestingly, expression within the spinal cord is coincident with the onset and duration of motor neuron programmed cell death and during the period of musculature innervation and synapse formation. Hence, the data presented here identify ALK as a novel candidate receptor for regulating critical events in the development of neurons in both the central and peripheral nervous system. PMID:16435287

  7. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called primary cutaneous ALCL and follows a less aggressive course. In almost all cases of primary cutaneous ... kinase (ALK). While both lymphomas are treated as aggressive lymphomas, the prognosis for ALCL depends on whether ...

  8. Analysis of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses in children with NPM-ALK(+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    K Singh, V; Werner, S; Hackstein, H; Lennerz, V; Reiter, A; Wölfel, T; Damm-Welk, C; Woessmann, W

    2016-10-01

    Cellular immune responses against the oncoantigen anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in patients with ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been detected using peptide-based approaches in individuals preselected for human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. In this study, we aimed to evaluate nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in ALCL patients ensuring endogenous peptide processing of ALK antigens and avoiding HLA preselection. We also examined the HLA class I restriction of ALK-specific CD8(+) T cells. Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with in-vitro-transcribed RNA (IVT-RNA) encoding NPM-ALK were used as antigen-presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Responder T lymphocytes were tested in interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays with NPM-ALK-transfected autologous DCs as well as CV-1 in Origin with SV40 genes (COS-7) cells co-transfected with genes encoding the patients' HLA class I alleles and with NPM-ALK encoding cDNA to verify responses and define the HLA restrictions of specific T cell responses. NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were detected in three of five ALK-positive ALCL patients tested between 1 and 13 years after diagnosis. The three patients had also maintained anti-ALK antibody responses. No reactivity was detected in samples from five healthy donors. The NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were restricted by HLA-C-alleles (C*06:02 and C*12:02) in all three cases. This approach allowed for the detection of NPM-ALK-reactive T cells, irrespective of the individual HLA status, up to 9 years after ALCL diagnosis.

  9. Brigatinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, abrogates activity and growth in ALK-positive neuroblastoma cells, Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Rivera, Victor M.; Guan, Jikui; Palmer, Ruth H.; Hallberg, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor which has been implicated in numerous solid and hematologic cancers. ALK mutations are reported in about 5-7% of neuroblastoma cases but the ALK-positive percentage increases significantly in the relapsed patient population. Crizotinib, the first clinically approved ALK inhibitor for the treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer has had less dramatic responses in neuroblastoma. Here we investigate the efficacy of a second-generation ALK inhibitor, brigatinib, in a neuroblastoma setting. Employing neuroblastoma cell lines, mouse xenograft and Drosophila melanogaster model systems expressing different constitutively active ALK variants, we show clear and efficient inhibition of ALK activity by brigatinib. Similar abrogation of ALK activity was observed in vitro employing a set of different constitutively active ALK variants in biochemical assays. These results suggest that brigatinib is an effective inhibitor of ALK kinase activity in ALK addicted neuroblastoma that should be considered as a potential future therapeutic option for ALK-positive neuroblastoma patients alone or in combination with other treatments. PMID:27049722

  10. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lung adenocarcinoma patient with development of sick sinus syndrome while on targeted treatment with crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Li, Mei-Mei; Jin, Shu-Xian

    2015-03-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are younger and have never smoked, while pathologically are predominately adenocarcinomas. Crizotinib as an ALK inhibitor has been used in treating ALK positive NSCLC patients for several years and some adverse effects should be paid attention to. We now describe a case of ALK positive NSCLC patient with development of sick sinus syndrome (SSS) while on targeted treatment with crizotinib. A 46-year-old non-smoking woman with right hilar mass and underwent transesophageal endoscopic ultrasonography lymph node biopsy showed low differentiation adenocarcinoma, immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tumor samples revealed the ALK overexpression. The severe sinus bradycardia and RR interval prolongation were detected 3 months after crizotinib treatment, she underwent pacemaker implantation. Although the severe sinus bradycardia and RR interval prolongation were unusual adverse effects, physicians should be aware of these side effects when using crizotinib.

  11. Alectinib-Induced Alopecia in a Patient with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Fukushima, Toshirou; Gomi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Mamiya, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Alectinib, a novel alternative anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, is highly effective against ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is well tolerated. Molecular targeted agents generally have little contribution to alopecia. We encountered a case of alopecia that developed gradually over 2 months after initiation of alectinib administration for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. The patient had no history of alopecia in previous treatments of cisplatin + pemetrexed and crizotinib. The present case indicates that alopecia should be taken into consideration as toxicity during alectinib treatment, which could adversely affect the psychological and emotional condition and quality of life even in patients treated with specific molecular targeted agents. PMID:27194980

  12. IGF-IR tyrosine kinase interacts with NPM-ALK oncogene to induce survival of T-cell ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Lai, Raymond; Lin, Quan; Iqbal, Abid S; Young, Leah C; Kwak, Larry W; Ford, Richard J; Amin, Hesham M

    2009-07-01

    Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the pathogenesis of several malignancies. Although it promotes the growth of stimulated hematopoietic cells, a direct role of IGF-IR in malignant lymphoma has not been identified. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALK(+) ALCL) is a unique type of T-cell lymphoma. Approximately 85% of ALK(+) ALCL cases harbor the translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35), which generates the chimeric oncogene NPM-ALK. In the present study, we explored a possible role of IGF-IR in ALK(+) ALCL. Our results demonstrate that IGF-IR and IGF-I are widely expressed in ALK(+) ALCL cell lines and primary tumors. Importantly, we identified novel reciprocal functional interactions between IGF-IR and NPM-ALK. Antagonism of IGF-IR decreased the viability, induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest, and decreased proliferation and colony formation of ALK(+) ALCL cell lines. These effects could be explained by alterations of cell survival regulatory proteins downstream of IGF-IR signaling. Our findings improve current understanding of the biology of IGF-IR and NPM-ALK and have significant therapeutic implications as they identify IGF-IR signaling as a potential therapeutic target in ALK(+) ALCL and possibly other types of malignant lymphoma.

  13. IGF-IR tyrosine kinase interacts with NPM-ALK oncogene to induce survival of T-cell ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ping; Lai, Raymond; Lin, Quan; Iqbal, Abid S.; Young, Leah C.; Kwak, Larry W.; Ford, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the pathogenesis of several malignancies. Although it promotes the growth of stimulated hematopoietic cells, a direct role of IGF-IR in malignant lymphoma has not been identified. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) is a unique type of T-cell lymphoma. Approximately 85% of ALK+ ALCL cases harbor the translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35), which generates the chimeric oncogene NPM-ALK. In the present study, we explored a possible role of IGF-IR in ALK+ ALCL. Our results demonstrate that IGF-IR and IGF-I are widely expressed in ALK+ ALCL cell lines and primary tumors. Importantly, we identified novel reciprocal functional interactions between IGF-IR and NPM-ALK. Antagonism of IGF-IR decreased the viability, induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest, and decreased proliferation and colony formation of ALK+ ALCL cell lines. These effects could be explained by alterations of cell survival regulatory proteins downstream of IGF-IR signaling. Our findings improve current understanding of the biology of IGF-IR and NPM-ALK and have significant therapeutic implications as they identify IGF-IR signaling as a potential therapeutic target in ALK+ ALCL and possibly other types of malignant lymphoma. PMID:19423729

  14. CK1δ in lymphoma: gene expression and mutation analyses and validation of CK1δ kinase activity for therapeutic application

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, B. Sophia; Oltmer, Franziska; Richter, Julia; Bischof, Joachim; Xu, Pengfei; Burster, Timo; Leithäuser, Frank; Knippschild, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of lymphoid neoplasms has improved considerably during the last decades. However, treatment response for some lymphoid neoplasms is still poor, indicating the need for new therapeutic approaches. One promising new strategy is the inhibition of kinases regulating key signal transduction pathways, which are of central importance in tumorigenesis. Kinases of the CK1 family may represent an attractive drug target since CK1 expression and/or activity are associated with the pathogenesis of malignant diseases. Over the last years efforts were taken to develop highly potent and selective CK1-specific inhibitor compounds and their therapeutic potential has now to be proved in pre-clinical trials. Therefore, we analyzed expression and mutational status of CK1δ in several cell lines representing established lymphoma entities, and also measured the mRNA expression level in primary lymphoma tissue as well as in non-neoplastic blood cells. For a selection of lymphoma cell lines we furthermore determined CK1δ kinase activity and demonstrated therapeutic potential of CK1-specific inhibitors as a putative therapeutic option in the treatment of lymphoid neoplasms. PMID:25750912

  15. Resistance to gemcitabine in a human follicular lymphoma cell line is due to partial deletion of the deoxycytidine kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    Galmarini, Carlos María; Clarke, Marilyn L; Jordheim, Lars; Santos, Cheryl L; Cros, Emeline; Mackey, John R; Dumontet, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine is an analogue of deoxycytidine with activity against several solid tumors. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which tumor cells become resistant to gemcitabine, we developed the resistant subline RL-G from the human follicular lymphoma cell line RL-7 by prolonged exposure of parental cells to increasing concentrations of gemcitabine. Results In vitro, the IC50 increased from 0.015 μM in parental RL-7 cells to 25 μM in the resistant variant, RL-G. Xenografts of both cell lines developed in nude mice were treated with repeated injections of gemcitabine. Under conditions of gemcitabine treatment which totally inhibited the development of RL-7 tumors, RL-G derived tumors grew similarly to those of untreated animals, demonstrating the in vivo resistance of RL-G cells to gemcitabine. HPLC experiments showed that RL-G cells accumulated and incorporated less gemcitabine metabolites into DNA and RNA than RL-7 cells. Gemcitabine induced an S-phase arrest in RL-7 cells but not in RL-G cells. Exposure to gemcitabine induced a higher degree of apoptosis in RL-7 than in RL-G cells, with poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in RL-7 cells. No modifications of Bcl-2 nor of Bax expression were observed in RL-7 or RL-G cells exposed to gemcitabine. These alterations were associated with the absence of the deoxycytidine kinase mRNA expression observed by quantitative RT-PCR in RL-G cells. PCR amplification of désoxycytidine kinase gene exons showed a partial deletion of the dCK gene in RL-G cells. Conclusions These results suggest that partial deletion of the dCK gene observed after selection in the presence of gemcitabine is involved with resistance to this agent both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15157282

  16. Protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin selectively inhibits the growth of CD79 mutant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Tara L; Tang, Huaping; Ratsch, Boris A; Enns, Andreas; Loo, Alice; Chen, Liqing; Lenz, Peter; Waters, Nigel J; Schuler, Walter; Dörken, Bernd; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Lenz, Georg; Stegmeier, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The ABC subtype of DLBCL is associated with constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, and oncogenic lesions have been identified in its regulators, including CARD11/CARMA1 (caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11), A20/TNFAIP3, and CD79A/B. In this study, we offer evidence of therapeutic potential for the selective PKC (protein kinase C) inhibitor sotrastaurin (STN) in preclinical models of DLBCL. A significant fraction of ABC DLBCL cell lines exhibited strong sensitivity to STN, and we found that the molecular nature of NF-κB pathway lesions predicted responsiveness. CD79A/B mutations correlated with STN sensitivity, whereas CARD11 mutations rendered ABC DLBCL cell lines insensitive. Growth inhibitory effects of PKC inhibition correlated with NF-κB pathway inhibition and were mediated by induction of G₁-phase cell-cycle arrest and/or cell death. We found that STN produced significant antitumor effects in a mouse xenograft model of CD79A/B-mutated DLBCL. Collectively, our findings offer a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of STN in ABC DLBCL patients who harbor CD79 mutations also illustrating the necessity to stratify DLBCL patients according to their genetic abnormalities.

  17. Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors: a promising novel targeted treatment for B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Aalipour, Amin; Advani, Ranjana H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Constitutive or aberrant signalling of the B cell receptor signalling cascade has been implicated in the propagation and maintenance of a variety of B cell malignancies. Small molecule inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a protein early in this cascade and specifically expressed in B cells, have emerged as a new class of targeted agents. There are several BTK inhibitors, including ONO-WG-307, LFM-A13, dasatinib, CC-292, and PCI-32765 (ibrutinib), in preclinical and/or clinical development of which ibrutinib is currently in phase III trials. Recent clinical data suggest significant activity of ibrutinib as a first in class oral inhibitor of BTK. This review provides an overview of ongoing clinical studies of BTK inhibitors. PMID:24111579

  18. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  19. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  20. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Gregory N.; Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  1. Successful Management of Crizotinib-Induced Neutropenia in a Patient with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Osugi, Jun; Owada, Yuki; Yamaura, Takumi; Muto, Satoshi; Okabe, Naoyuki; Matsumura, Yuki; Higuchi, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib, the first clinically available inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement, is generally well tolerated. In contrast, neutropenia induced by crizotinib is a commonly reported grade 3 or 4 adverse event. In such cases, interruption and dose reduction of crizotinib might be necessary for some patients with severe neutropenia. However, information concerning clinical experience and management of severe neutropenia is currently limited. In this report, the successful management of crizotinib-induced neutropenia by dose reduction of crizotinib in a patient with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer is described. PMID:26933419

  2. Dual inhibition of histone deacetylases and phosphoinositide 3-kinases: effects on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Carolina dos Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, Jose Andres; Ridley, Anne J; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2016-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is characterized by MYC deregulation. Recently, the PI3K pathway has emerged as a cooperative prosurvival mechanism in Burkitt lymphoma. Despite the highly successful results of treatment that use high-dose chemotherapy regimens in pediatric Burkitt lymphoma patients, the survival rate of pediatric patients with progressive or recurrent disease is low. PI3Ks are also known to regulate cell migration, and abnormal cell migration may contribute to cancer progression and dissemination in Burkitt lymphoma. Little is known about Burkitt lymphoma cell migration, but the cooperation between MYC and PI3K in Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis suggests that a drug combination could be used to target the different steps involved in Burkitt lymphoma cell dissemination and disease progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid combined with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration. The combination enhanced the cell growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest induced by the PI3K inhibitor or histone deacetylase inhibitor individually. Moreover, histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3K inhibitor cotreatment suppressed Burkitt lymphoma cell migration and decreased cell polarization, Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and leads to RhoB induction. In summary, the histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3Ki combination inhibits cell proliferation and migration via alterations in PI3K signaling and histone deacetylase activity, which is involved in the acetylation of α-tubulin and the regulation of RhoB expression. PMID:26561567

  3. Protein kinase CK2 is widely expressed in follicular, Burkitt and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and propels malignant B-cell growth.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Piazza, Francesco; Agostinelli, Claudio; Fuligni, Fabio; Benvenuti, Pietro; Mandato, Elisa; Casellato, Alessandro; Rugge, Massimo; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Pileri, Stefano A

    2015-03-30

    Serine-threonine kinase CK2 is highly expressed and pivotal for survival and proliferation in multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we investigated the expression of α catalytic and β regulatory CK2 subunits by immunohistochemistry in 57 follicular (FL), 18 Burkitt (BL), 52 diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and in normal reactive follicles. In silico evaluation of available Gene Expression Profile (GEP) data sets from patients and Western blot (WB) analysis in NHL cell-lines were also performed. Moreover, the novel, clinical-grade, ATP-competitive CK2-inhibitor CX-4945 (Silmitasertib) was assayed on lymphoma cells. CK2 was detected in 98.4% of cases with a trend towards a stronger CK2α immunostain in BL compared to FL and DLBCL. No significant differences were observed between Germinal Center B (GCB) and non-GCB DLBCL types. GEP data and WB confirmed elevated CK2 mRNA and protein levels as well as active phosphorylation of specific targets in NHL cells. CX-4945 caused a dose-dependent growth-arresting effect on GCB, non-GCB DLBCL and BL cell-lines and it efficiently shut off phosphorylation of NF-κB RelA and CDC37 on CK2 target sites. Thus, CK2 is highly expressed and could represent a suitable therapeutic target in BL, FL and DLBCL NHL.

  4. Structural insights into the ATP binding pocket of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase by site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor binding analysis, and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind H; Ahmed, Shaheen; Sottocornola, Roberta; Gasser, Marc; Redaelli, Sara; Mologni, Luca; Tartari, Carmen J; Belloni, Valentina; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2006-09-21

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a valid target for anticancer therapy; however, potent ALK inhibitors suitable for clinical use are lacking. Because the majority of described kinase inhibitors bind in the ATP pocket of the kinase domain, we have characterized this pocket in ALK using site-directed mutagenesis, inhibition studies, and molecular modeling. Mutation of the gatekeeper residue, a key structural determinant influencing inhibitor binding, rendered the fusion protein, NPM/ALK, sensitive to inhibition by SKI-606 in the nanomolar range, while PD173955 inhibited the NPM/ALK mutant at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, both wild type and mutant NPM/ALK were insensitive to imatinib. Computer modeling indicated that docking solutions obtained with a homology model representing the intermediate conformation of the ALK kinase domain reflected closely experimental data. The good agreement between experimental and virtual results indicate that the ALK molecular models described here are useful tools for the rational design of ALK selective inhibitors. In addition, 4-phenylamino-quinoline compounds may have potential as templates for ALK inhibitors. PMID:16970400

  5. Src kinase and Syk activation initiate PI3K signaling by a chimeric latent membrane protein 1 in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Olivia; Lambert, Stacie L; Krams, Sheri M; Martinez, Olivia M

    2012-01-01

    The B lymphotrophic γ-herpesvirus EBV is associated with a variety of lymphoid- and epithelial-derived malignancies, including B cell lymphomas in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals. The primary oncogene of EBV, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), activates the PI3K/Akt pathway to induce the autocrine growth factor, IL-10, in EBV-infected B cells, but the mechanisms underlying PI3K activation remain incompletely understood. Using small molecule inhibition and siRNA strategies in human B cell lines expressing a chimeric, signaling-inducible LMP1 protein, nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR)-LMP1, we show that NGFR-LMP1 utilizes Syk to activate PI3K/Akt signaling and induce IL-10 production. NGFR-LMP1 signaling induces phosphorylation of BLNK, a marker of Syk activation. Whereas Src kinases are often required for Syk activation, we show here that PI3K/Akt activation and autocrine IL-10 production by NGFR-LMP1 involves the Src family kinase Fyn. Finally, we demonstrate that NGFR-LMP1 induces phosphorylation of c-Cbl in a Syk- and Fyn-dependent fashion. Our results indicate that the EBV protein LMP1, which lacks the canonical ITAM required for Syk activation, can nevertheless activate Syk, and the Src kinase Fyn, resulting in downstream c-Cbl and PI3K/Akt activation. Fyn, Syk, and PI3K/Akt antagonists thus may present potential new therapeutic strategies that target the oncogene LMP1 for treatment of EBV+ B cell lymphomas.

  6. MUTANT FREQUENCIES AND LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA (ENU) IN THE THYMIDINE KINASE (TK) GENE OF L5178YTK+/-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MUTANT FREQUENCIES AND LOSS HETEROZYGOSITY INDUCED BY N-ETHYK-N-NITROSOUREA (ENU) IN THE THYMIDINE KINASE (tk) GENE IF l5178Y/TK+/-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is a potent monofunctional-ethylating agent that has been found to be mutagenic in a w...

  7. Mechanisms of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A- and glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis using S49 lymphoma cells as a model system

    PubMed Central

    Keshwani, Malik M.; Kanter, Joan R.; Ma, Yuliang; Wilderman, Andrea; Darshi, Manjula; Insel, Paul A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) and glucocorticoids promote the death of many cell types, including cells of hematopoietic origin. In wild-type (WT) S49 T-lymphoma cells, signaling by cAMP and glucocorticoids converges on the induction of the proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma-family protein Bim to produce mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Kin–, a clonal variant of WT S49 cells, lacks PKA catalytic (PKA-Cα) activity and is resistant to cAMP-mediated apoptosis. Using sorbitol density gradient fractionation, we show here that in kin– S49 cells PKA-Cα is not only depleted but the residual PKA-Cα mislocalizes to heavier cell fractions and is not phosphorylated at two conserved residues (Ser338 or Thr197). In WT S49 cells, PKA-regulatory subunit I (RI) and Bim coimmunoprecipitate upon treatment with cAMP analogs and forskolin (which increases endogenous cAMP concentrations). By contrast, in kin– cells, expression of PKA-RIα and Bim is prominently decreased, and increases in cAMP do not increase Bim expression. Even so, kin– cells undergo apoptosis in response to treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex). In WT cells, glucorticoid-mediated apoptosis involves an increase in Bim, but in kin– cells, Dex-promoted cell death appears to occur by a caspase 3-independent apoptosis-inducing factor pathway. Thus, although cAMP/PKA-Cα and PKA-R1α/Bim mediate apoptotic cell death in WT S49 cells, kin– cells resist this response because of lower levels of PKA-Cα and PKA-RIα subunits as well as Bim. The findings for Dex-promoted apoptosis imply that these lymphoma cells have adapted to selective pressure that promotes cell death by altering canonical signaling pathways. PMID:26417071

  8. Small molecule inhibitors of IkappaB kinase are selectively toxic for subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma defined by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lloyd T; Davis, R Eric; Pierce, Jackie; Hepperle, Michael; Xu, Yajun; Hottelet, Maria; Nong, Yuhua; Wen, Danyi; Adams, Julian; Dang, Lenny; Staudt, Louis M

    2005-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the NF-kappaB pathway is required for survival of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here we show that a small molecule IkappaB kinase (IKK) inhibitor, PS-1145, and related compounds are toxic for ABC DLBCL cell lines but not for cell lines derived from the other prevalent form of DLBCL, germinal center B cell-like DLBCL. Treatment of ABC lines with these inhibitors rapidly induced a series of gene expression changes that were attributable to cessation of constitutive IKK activity, similar to changes induced by acute expression of genetic inhibitors of NF-kappaB, confirming the effectiveness and specificity of this compound. Before cell death, inhibition of IKK also induced features of apoptosis and an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. To test further the specificity of this toxicity, an inducible form of NF-kappaB was created by fusing the p65 NF-kappaB subunit with the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (p65-ERD). In the presence of tamoxifen, p65-ERD reversed the toxicity of IKK inhibition and restored expression of many NF-kappaB target genes. Another subgroup of DLBCL, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), also expresses NF-kappaB target genes, and treatment of a PMBL cell line with an IKK inhibitor was toxic and induced gene expression changes of a distinct group of NF-kappaB target genes. These studies validate the NF-kappaB pathway as a promising therapeutic target in ABC DLBCL, PMBL, and other lymphomas that depend on the activity of NF-kappaB for survival and proliferation. PMID:15671525

  9. Identification of a novel crosstalk between casein kinase 2α and NPM-ALK in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Armanious, Hanan; Gelebart, Pascal; Anand, Mona; Lai, Raymond

    2013-02-01

    It was previously reported that β-catenin contributes to the tumorigenesis of ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK(+)ALCL), and the oncogenic effects of β-catenin in these tumors are promoted by NPM-ALK, an abnormal fusion protein characteristic of ALK(+)ALCL. In this study, we hypothesized that NPM-ALK promotes the oncogenic activity of β-catenin via its functional interactions with the Wnt canonical pathway (WCP). To test this hypothesis, we examined if NPM-ALK modulates the gene expression of various members in the WCP. Using a Wnt pathway-specific oligonucleotide array and Western blots, we found that the expression of casein kinase 2α (CK2α) was substantially downregulated in ALK(+)ALCL cells in response to siRNA knockdown of NPM-ALK. CK2α is biologically important in ALK(+)ALCL, as its inhibition using 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole or siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell growth and a substantial decrease in the β-catenin protein level. Furthermore, CK2α co-immunoprecipitated with NPM-ALK and regulated its level of serine phosphorylation, a feature previously shown to correlate with the oncogenic potential of this fusion protein. To conclude, this study has revealed a novel crosstalk between NPM-ALK and CK2α, and our data supports the model that these two molecules work synergistically to promote the tumorigenicity of these lymphomas.

  10. NPM-ALK oncogenic kinase promotes cell-cycle progression through activation of JNK/cJun signaling in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Leventaki, Vasiliki; Drakos, Elias; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S; Claret, Francois X; Rassidakis, George Z

    2007-09-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) frequently carries the t(2;5)(p23;q35), resulting in aberrant expression of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK). We show that in 293T and Jurkat cells, forced expression of active NPM-ALK, but not kinase-dead mutant NPM-ALK (210K>R), induced JNK and cJun phosphorylation, and this was linked to a dramatic increase in AP-1 transcriptional activity. Conversely, inhibition of ALK activity in NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells resulted in a concentration-dependent dephosphorylation of JNK and cJun and decreased AP-1 DNA-binding. In addition, JNK physically binds NPM-ALK and is highly activated in cultured and primary NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells. cJun phosphorylation in NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells is mediated by JNKs, as shown by selective knocking down of JNK1 and JNK2 genes using siRNA. Inhibition of JNK activity using SP600125 decreased cJun phosphorylation and AP-1 transcriptional activity and this was associated with decreased cell proliferation and G2/M cell-cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Silencing of the cJun gene by siRNA led to a decreased S-phase cell-cycle fraction associated with upregulation of p21 and downregulation of cyclin D3 and cyclin A. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function of NPM-ALK, phosphorylation and activation of JNK and cJun, which may contribute to uncontrolled cell-cycle progression and oncogenesis.

  11. Successful oral desensitization against skin rash induced by alectinib in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lung adenocarcinoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Masayuki; Kubotaa, Masaru; Harada, Shinya; Niwa, Hideyuki; Kusuhara, Seiichiro; Kasajima, Masashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Mikiko; Igawa, Satoshi; Masuda, Noriyuki

    2016-09-01

    Alectinib has been approved for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer. In terms of adverse effects, the occurrence of a severe skin rash induced by alectinib is reportedly rare, compared with the occurrence of skin rash induced by epithelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). In the present case report, a 76-year-old woman with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma experienced disease progression after undergoing first-line chemotherapy. Subsequently, alectinib was administered as a second-line therapy. However, she discontinued alectinib therapy after 11days because of the occurrence of an alectinib-induced skin rash. Since the skin rash improved within one week, we attempted to perform oral desensitization to alectinib. The patient has not shown any recurrence of the rash or disease progression for 7 months since the successful oral desensitization to alectinib. Here, we describe the first case of successful oral desensitization against a skin rash induced by alectinib in a patient with ALK-positive lung adenocarcinoma. Desensitization to overcome adverse effects and to enable sustained treatment with alectinib should be considered in patients who develop alectinib sensitivities. PMID:27565916

  12. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  13. Blockade of oncogenic IκB kinase activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by bromodomain and extraterminal domain protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceribelli, Michele; Kelly, Priscilla N; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George W; Xiao, Wenming; Yang, Yibin; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Patel, Paresma R; Ferrer, Marc; Joshi, Shivangi; Nerle, Sujata; Sandy, Peter; Normant, Emmanuel; Thomas, Craig J; Staudt, Louis M

    2014-08-01

    In the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), NF-κB activity is essential for viability of the malignant cells and is sustained by constitutive activity of IκB kinase (IKK) in the cytoplasm. Here, we report an unexpected role for the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) proteins BRD2 and BRD4 in maintaining oncogenic IKK activity in ABC DLBCL. IKK activity was reduced by small molecules targeting BET proteins as well as by genetic knockdown of BRD2 and BRD4 expression, thereby inhibiting downstream NF-κB-driven transcriptional programs and killing ABC DLBCL cells. Using a high-throughput platform to screen for drug-drug synergy, we observed that the BET inhibitor JQ1 combined favorably with multiple drugs targeting B-cell receptor signaling, one pathway that activates IKK in ABC DLBCL. The BTK kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which is in clinical development for the treatment of ABC DLBCL, synergized strongly with BET inhibitors in killing ABC DLBCL cells in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of BET protein inhibitors in ABC DLBCL, particularly in combination with other modulators of oncogenic IKK signaling.

  14. Regulation of expression of ABCB1 and LRP genes by mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and its role in generation of side population cells in canine lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Manabu; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Sugano, Sumio; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2013-06-01

    The concept of the cancer stem cell (CSC) has been recognized as key for elucidation of the mechanisms that confer the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype to tumor cells, and the side population (SP) fraction has been shown to be enriched by cells with the CSC phenotype. The purpose of the present study was to identify the mechanism that induces a difference of phenotype between the SP and the remaining major population (MP) using two canine lymphoma cell lines. Expression levels of ABCB1 and LRP genes, which encode efflux pumps, were significantly higher in the SP than in the MP. Microarray analysis revealed up-regulation of the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type II receptor in SP compared with MP, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway was more up-regulated in the SP than in the MP. Stimulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway significantly increased the mRNA expression of both ABCB1 and LRP genes. These results indicate increased expression of the efflux pumps through the MAPK/ERK pathway in SP cells.

  15. Retrospective analysis of protein kinase C-beta (PKC-β) expression in lymphoid malignancies and its association with survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuyu; Phong, Mark; Lahn, Michael; Brail, Leslie; Sutton, Susan; Lin, Boris K; Thornton, Donald; Liao, Birong

    2007-01-01

    Background Both mechanistic features and recent correlative findings suggest a potential role for protein kinase C-beta (PKC-β) in tumor pathogenesis, particularly in B-cell malignancies. To evaluate the role of this gene in lymphoid malignancies, we analyzed global gene expression data to quantify PKC-β expression across diagnostic groups and, when possible, determined correlations between PKC-β expression and survival. Results Our analysis showed that the level of PKC-β expression was highest in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and follicular lymphoma. Within diffuse large-B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), PKC-β expression was significantly higher in activated B-cell- like subtype than germinal center B-cell- like subtype (P < 0.0001). Elevated PKC-β appeared to be associated with worse survival in both of these subtypes. When analyzed within clinically defined risk groups established by the International Prognostic Index (IPI), PKC-β expression was lowest in patients with low IPI scores (0–1). Within intermediate- and high-risk IPI groups, elevated PKC-β expression was associated with worse survival, suggesting that PKC-β may expand the prognostic value of the IPI. Results of global gene expression analyses of DLBCL samples corroborate previous observations that anti-apoptosis, cell proliferation, and B-cell proliferation signaling pathways are functionally related to PKC-β. Conclusion We present a first detailed pharmacogenomics report comparing PKC-β mRNA expression across different lymphoid malignancies and evaluating it as an outcome predictor. Our findings suggest that DLBCL patients with elevated PKC-β have a worse prognosis, indicating that further evaluation of PKC-β as a chemotherapeutic target for lymphoid malignancies is warranted. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Pierre Pontarotti, Dr. Kateryna Makova, and Dr. Matthew Coleman (nominated by Dr. Sandrine Dudoit). PMID:17313671

  16. IL-2R common gamma-chain is epigenetically silenced by nucleophosphin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) and acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting NPM-ALK.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Bhutani, Gauri; Kantekure, Kanchan; Wasik, Mariusz

    2011-07-19

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), physiologically expressed only by certain neural cells, becomes highly oncogenic, when aberrantly expressed in nonneural tissues as a fusion protein with nucleophosphin (NPM) and other partners. The reason why NPM-ALK succeeds in transforming specifically CD4(+) T lymphocytes remains unknown. The IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγ) is shared by receptors for several cytokines that play key roles in the maturation and growth of normal CD4(+) T lymphocytes and other immune cells. We show that IL-2Rγ expression is inhibited in T-cell lymphoma cells expressing NPM-ALK kinase as a result of DNA methylation of the IL-2Rγ gene promoter. IL-2Rγ promoter methylation is induced in malignant T cells by NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK acts through STAT3, a transcription factor that binds to the IL-2Rγ gene promoter and enhances binding of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) to the promoter. In addition, STAT3 suppresses expression of miR-21, which selectively inhibits DNMT1 mRNA expression. Reconstitution of IL-2Rγ expression leads to loss of the NPM-ALK protein and, consequently, apoptotic cell death of the lymphoma cells. These results demonstrate that the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces epigenetic silencing of the IL-2Rγ gene and that IL-2Rγ acts as a tumor suppressor by reciprocally inhibiting expression of NPM-ALK.

  17. The tyrosine 343 residue of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is important for its interaction with SHP1, a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase with tumor suppressor functions.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Samar A; Wang, Peng; Anand, Mona; Ingham, Robert J; Gelebart, Pascal; Lai, Raymond

    2010-06-25

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 has been shown to inhibit the oncogenic fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and loss of SHP1 contributes to NPM-ALK-mediated tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to further understand how SHP1 interacts and regulates NPM-ALK. We employed an in vitro model in which GP293 cells were transfected with various combinations of NPM-ALK (or mutants) and SHP1 (or mutants) expression vectors. We found that SHP1 co-immunoprecipitated with NPM-ALK, but not the enzymatically inactive NPM-ALK(K210R) mutant, or the mutant in which all three functionally important tyrosine residues (namely, Tyr(338), Tyr(342), and Tyr(343)) in the kinase activation loop (KAL) of ALK were mutated. Interestingly, whereas mutation of Tyr(338) or Tyr(342) did not result in any substantial change in the NPM-ALK/SHP1 binding (assessed by co-immunoprecipitation), mutation of Tyr(343) abrogated this interaction. Furthermore, the NPM-ALK/SHP1 binding was readily detectable when each of the remaining 8 tyrosine residues known to be phosphorylated were mutated. Although the expression of SHP1 effectively reduced the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, it did not affect that of the NPM-ALK(Y343F) mutant. In soft agar clonogenic assay, SHP1 expression significantly reduced the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK but not that of NPM-ALK(Y343F). In conclusion, we identified Tyr(343) of NPM-ALK as the crucial site for mediating the NPM-ALK/SHP1 interaction. Our results also support the notion that the tumor suppressor effects of SHP1 on NPM-ALK are dependent on its ability to bind to this oncogenic protein.

  18. Reversion of apoptotic resistance of TP53-mutated Burkitt lymphoma B-cells to spindle poisons by exogenous activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, M; Poissonnier, A; Hamze, A; Ouk-Martin, C; Brion, J-D; Alami, M; Feuillard, J; Jayat-Vignoles, C

    2014-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis are frequently the cause of cancer emergence, as well as cellular resistance to chemotherapy. These phenotypes may be due to mutations of the tumor suppressor TP53 gene. In this study, we examined the effect of various mitotic spindle poisons, including the new isocombretastatin derivative isoNH2CA-4 (a tubulin-destabilizing molecule, considered to bind to the colchicine site by analogy with combretastatin A-4), on BL (Burkitt lymphoma) cells. We found that resistance to spindle poison-induced apoptosis could be reverted in tumor protein p53 (TP53)-mutated cells by EBV (Epstein Barr virus) infection. This reversion was due to restoration of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, as assessed by relocation of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bax to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial integrity and activation of the caspase cascade with PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) cleavage. EBV sensitized TP53-mutated BL cells to all spindle poisons tested, including vincristine and taxol, an effect that was systematically downmodulated by pretreatment of cells with inhibitors of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Exogenous activation of p38 and JNK pathways by dihydrosphingosine reverted resistance of TP53-mutated BL cells to spindle poisons. Dihydrosphingosine treatment of TP53-deficient Jurkat and K562 cell lines was also able to induce cell death. We conclude that activation of p38 and JNK pathways may revert resistance of TP53-mutated cells to spindle poisons. This opens new perspectives for developing alternative therapeutic strategies when the TP53 gene is inactivated. PMID:24787013

  19. Expression of p63 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma but not in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-10-01

    Immunohistochemical determination of p63 protein is frequently used in the pathologic diagnosis of nonhematological solid tumors. In malignant hematological disease, p63 expression has been reported in 22% of follicular lymphoma, about 35% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 23% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in some cases of blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare disease that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There is little information concerning p63 expression in this specific type of lymphoma. In some cases, the morphological and phenotypic features between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma are similar, making this differential diagnosis challenging. We studied p63 expression using a tissue microarray approach in 154 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including 38% anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 62% anaplastic large cell kinase negative, and 58 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Sixty-eight cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (44%) showed p63 nuclear positivity (41% of anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 47% of anaplastic large cell kinase negative). Of 130 cases of systemic-anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 42% showed p63 positivity. The neoplastic cells expressed p63 in 38% of the cases of CD45-negative/anaplastic large cell kinase-negative null cell-type anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a subgroup that offers the most difficulties in the differential diagnosis with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. In contrast, none of the cases of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma demonstrated any p63 expression. These results demonstrate that p63 protein expression is frequently expressed in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases and may be used as a potential tool in the differential diagnosis between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  20. STAT1 is phosphorylated and downregulated by the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengsheng; Molavi, Ommoleila; Zhang, Haifeng; Gupta, Nidhi; Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Bone, Kathleen M; Gopal, Keshav; Wu, Fang; Lewis, Jamie T; Douglas, Donna N; Kneteman, Norman M; Lai, Raymond

    2015-07-16

    The tumorigenicity of most cases of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) is driven by the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK in a STAT3-dependent manner. Because it has been shown that STAT3 can be inhibited by STAT1 in some experimental models, we hypothesized that the STAT1 signaling pathway is defective in ALK+ ALCL, thereby leaving the STAT3 signaling unchecked. Compared with normal T cells, ALK+ ALCL tumors consistently expressed a low level of STAT1. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway appreciably increased STAT1 expression in ALK+ ALCL cells. Furthermore, we found evidence that NPM-ALK binds to and phosphorylates STAT1, thereby promoting its proteasomal degradation in a STAT3-dependent manner. If restored, STAT1 is functionally intact in ALK+ ALCL cells, because it effectively upregulated interferon-γ, induced apoptosis/cell-cycle arrest, potentiated the inhibitory effects of doxorubicin, and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. STAT1 interfered with the STAT3 signaling by decreasing STAT3 transcriptional activity/DNA binding and its homodimerization. The importance of the STAT1/STAT3 functional interaction was further highlighted by the observation that short interfering RNA knockdown of STAT1 significantly decreased apoptosis induced by STAT3 inhibition. Thus, STAT1 is a tumor suppressor in ALK+ ALCL. Phosphorylation and downregulation of STAT1 by NPM-ALK represent other mechanisms by which this oncogenic tyrosine kinase promotes tumorigenesis.

  1. OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative, mediates cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Burkitt lymphoma through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Ma, Yihui; Kulp, Samuel K.; Wang, Shu-Huei; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Frissora, Frank; Mani, Rajeswaran; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance and associated immune deregulation limit use of current therapies in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), thus warranting alternative therapy development. Herein we demonstrate that OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative targeting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), mediates cytotoxicity in lymphocytic cell lines representing CLL (MEC-1), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (697 cells), Burkitt lymphoma (Raji and Ramos) and primary B cells from CLL patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is dependent on caspase activation, as evidenced by induction of caspase-3 activation and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and rescue of cytotoxicity by Z-VAD-FMK. Interestingly, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is mediated through activation of p38 MAPK, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downstream target protein MAPKAPK2. Pretreatment of B-CLL cells with SB202190, a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, results in decreased MAPKAPK2 protein level with concomitant rescue of the cells from OSU-DY7-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is associated with down regulation of p38 MAPK target BIRC5, that is rescued at protein and mRNA levels by SB202190. This study provides evidence for a role of OSU-DY7 in p38 MAPK activation and BIRC5 down regulation associated with apoptosis in B lymphocytic cells, thus warranting development of this alternative therapy for lymphoid malignancies. PMID:21470196

  2. Severe acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with alectinib.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuzo; Okamoto, Isamu; Otsubo, Kohei; Iwama, Eiji; Hamada, Naoki; Harada, Taishi; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Alectinib, the second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, has significant potency in patients with ALK rearrangement positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and its toxicity is generally well tolerable. We report a patient who developed severe acute interstitial lung disease after alectinib treatment. An 86-year-old woman with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma positive for rearrangement of ALK gene was treated with alectinib. On the 215th day after initiation of alectinib administration, she was admitted to our hospital with the symptom of progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations in both lungs, and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed pronounced lymphocytosis. There was no evidence of infection or other specific causes of her condition, and she was therefore diagnosed with interstitial lung disease induced by alectinib. Her CT findings and respiratory condition improved after steroid pulse therapy. As far as we are aware, this is the first reported case of alectinib-induced severe interstitial lung disease (ILD). We should be aware of the possibility of such a severe adverse event and should therefore carefully monitor patients treated with this drug.

  3. Functional characterization of the kinase activation loop in nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) using tandem affinity purification and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of >or=1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK.

  4. Functional Characterization of the Kinase Activation Loop in Nucleophosmin (NPM)-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Using Tandem Affinity Purification and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of ≥1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK. PMID:19887368

  5. P276-00, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, modulates cell cycle and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in mantle cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a well-defined aggressive lymphoid neoplasm characterized by proliferation of mature B-lymphocytes that have a remarkable tendency to disseminate. This tumor is considered as one of the most aggressive lymphoid neoplasms with poor responses to conventional chemotherapy and relatively short survival. Since cyclin D1 and cell cycle control appears as a natural target, small-molecule inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and cyclins may play important role in the therapy of this disorder. We explored P276-00, a novel selective potent Cdk4-D1, Cdk1-B and Cdk9-T1 inhibitor discovered by us against MCL and elucidated its potential mechanism of action. Methods The cytotoxic effect of P276-00 in three human MCL cell lines was evaluated in vitro. The effect of P276-00 on the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis and transcription was assessed, which are implied in the pathogenesis of MCL. Flow cytometry, western blot, immunoflourescence and siRNA studies were performed. The in vivo efficacy and effect on survival of P276-00 was evaluated in a Jeko-1 xenograft model developed in SCID mice. PK/PD analysis of tumors were performed using LC-MS and western blot analysis. Results P276-00 showed a potent cytotoxic effect against MCL cell lines. Mechanistic studies confirmed down regulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins with apoptosis. P276-00 causes time and dose dependent increase in the sub G1 population as early as from 24 h. Reverse transcription PCR studies provide evidence that P276-00 treatment down regulated transcription of antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 which is a potential pathogenic protein for MCL. Most importantly, in vivo studies have revealed significant efficacy as a single agent with increased survival period compared to vehicle treated. Further, preliminary combination studies of P276-00 with doxorubicin and bortezomib showed in vitro synergism. Conclusion Our studies thus provide evidence and rational that P276

  6. Efficacy of bronchoscopic biopsy for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pei; Pan, Qingqing; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background To explore the efficacy of bronchoscopic biopsy for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma. Methods All patients with bronchoscopic biopsy-proven lung adenocarcinoma at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to November 2011 were enrolled. Scorpion amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) was used to detect EGFR gene mutations and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect ALK rearrangement. The correlation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) results with standard methods for EGFR mutation status and ALK rearrangement were checked. Results Bronchoscopic specimens were successfully used to detect EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement with success rates of 85.2% and 71.3%, respectively, in non-small cell lung cancer patients. EGFR analysis by ARMS yielded a positive result in 35.8% (33/92) and positive ALK rearrangement was detected by FISH in 7.8% (6/77) of cases. It was more likely to be unsuccessful in patients with tumor cells less than 100/high power field and the ratio tumor numbers in 0–10%. In EGFR-IHC, the sensitivity and specificity of E746-A750 deletions were 73.3% (11/15) and 93.3% (70/75), respectively, and those of L858R were 93.3% (14/15) and 93.2% (69/74), respectively. In ALK-IHC, the sensitivity and specificity were 50% (3/6) and 100% (71/71), respectively. Conclusions Small bronchoscopic specimens could achieve higher successful detection rates via EGFR mutation and ALK gene rearrangement. PMID:26557908

  7. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. PMID:26203188

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic issues for patients with advanced non‑small cell lung cancer harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement: European vs. US perspective (review).

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Massimo; De Marinis, Filippo; Hirsch, Fred R; Gridelli, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    The recent availability of crizotinib in clinical practice, for the treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) selected by the presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement, has relevant implications for both the diagnostic phase and the treatment choices. In the United States, crizotinib was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 for patients with ALK positivity detected by FDA-approved companion diagnostic test. As of January, 2014, the only FDA-approved diagnostic test is Vysis ALK Break-Apart FISH Probe Kit. In Europe, European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved crizotinib for ALK-positive patients in 2012, without specifying the type of test used for determining the positivity. FISH remains the reference technique for ALK determination, but, if fully validated, immunohistochemistry could challenge the current ALK screening practice. Given the robust evidence of activity of crizotinib in ALK-positive patients both pretreated and chemotherapy-naïve, and the favourable tolerability profile of the drug, many oncologists would prefer to administer the drug as early as possible. This is technically feasible in the United States, where crizotinib was approved well before the availability of the results of the randomized phase III trial comparing the drug with standard second-line chemotherapy, and the use of crizotinib in ALK-positive patients is not restricted to a specific line of treatment. On the contrary, in Europe, differently from the FDA decision, crizotinib cannot be used in chemotherapy-naïve patients. In both realities, a deeper knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, the role of repeated biopsies, the treatment strategy for patients experiencing disease progression with crizotinib, the choice of the best chemotherapy regimen are challenging topics for the management of ALK-positive patients in clinical practice.

  9. Concordance of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements between circulating tumor cells and tumor in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chye Ling; Lim, Tse Hui; Lim, Tony Kh; Tan, Daniel Shao-Weng; Chua, Yong Wei; Ang, Mei Kim; Pang, Brendan; Lim, Chwee Teck; Takano, Angela; Lim, Alvin Soon-Tiong; Leong, Man Chun; Lim, Wan-Teck

    2016-04-26

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is routinely evaluated by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) testing on biopsy tissues. Testing can be challenging however, when suitable tissue samples are unavailable. We examined the relevance of circulating tumor cells (CTC) as a surrogate for biopsy-based FISH testing. We assessed paired tumor and CTC samples from patients with ALK rearranged lung cancer (n = 14), ALK-negative lung cancer (n = 12), and healthy controls (n = 5) to derive discriminant CTC counts, and to compare ALK rearrangement patterns. Blood samples were enriched for CTCs to be used for ALK FISH testing. ALK-positive CTCs counts were higher in ALK-positive NSCLC patients (3-15 cells/1.88 mL of blood) compared with ALK-negative NSCLC patients and healthy donors (0-2 cells/1.88 mL of blood). The latter range was validated as the 'false positive' cutoff for ALK FISH testing of CTCs. ALK FISH signal patterns observed on tumor biopsies were recapitulated in CTCs in all cases. Sequential CTC counts in an index case of lung cancer with no evaluable tumor tissue treated with crizotinib showed six, three and eleven ALK-positive CTCs per 1.88 mL blood at baseline, partial response and post-progression time points, respectively. Furthermore, ALK FISH rearrangement suggestive of gene copy number increase was observed in CTCs following progression. Recapitulation of ALK rearrangement patterns in the tumor on CTCs, suggested that CTCs might be used to complement tissue-based ALK testing in NSCLC to guide ALK-targeted therapy when suitable tissue biopsy samples are unavailable for testing. PMID:26993609

  10. Destaining of Diff-Quik stained cytologic smears is not necessary for the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weisheng; Khurana, Kamal K; Tull, Jamie; Maciak, Charlene; Zhang, Shengle

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is one of the standard molecular tests for targeted therapy of lung adenocarcinoma. However, insufficient cell block cellularity may impede molecular testing. A recent study showed that Diff-Quik (DQ) stained cytology smear is suitable for ALK by FISH. Aims: The aim of our study was to observe the impact of destaining intervals on the quality of FISH signals and determine if DQ smears without destaining would allow FISH analysis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five DQ smears from 27 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed for ALK gene rearrangement by FISH. Twenty three DQ smears were destained for different intervals, including 30 s (13 cases), 1 min (6 cases), or 2 min (4 cases). Twelve DQ smears were not subjected to destaining. For further validation, FISH signals in 8 smears and 6 cell blocks were compared with the paired destained DQ smears. The signal quality was semi-quantified and analyzed with Chi-squared test. Results: Of the total 27 selected cases, three (11%) were positive for ALK gene rearrangement, whereas 24 (89%) were negative. FISH signal was satisfactory in all DQ smears. There was no significant difference in the quality of signal among smears with different destaining intervals (P = 0.55) or between smears with and without destaining (P = 0.41). DQ smears without destaining showed identical FISH results and similar or better signals as compared with paired destained smears and cell blocks in all cases. Conclusions: Duration of destaining intervals does not impact the quality of FISH signal on DQ smears. Destaining of DQ smears is not necessary for ALK by FISH. PMID:27756989

  11. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses.

  12. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N.; Taylor, Susan S.; Insel, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin− (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin− S49 cells. WT, but not kin−, S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin− cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin− cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin− S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin− cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. PMID:26203188

  13. Concordance of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements between circulating tumor cells and tumor in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tony KH; Tan, Daniel Shao-Weng; Chua, Yong Wei; Ang, Mei Kim; Pang, Brendan; Lim, Chwee Teck; Takano, Angela; Lim, Alvin Soon-Tiong; Leong, Man Chun; Lim, Wan-Teck

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is routinely evaluated by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) testing on biopsy tissues. Testing can be challenging however, when suitable tissue samples are unavailable. We examined the relevance of circulating tumor cells (CTC) as a surrogate for biopsy-based FISH testing. We assessed paired tumor and CTC samples from patients with ALK rearranged lung cancer (n = 14), ALK-negative lung cancer (n = 12), and healthy controls (n = 5) to derive discriminant CTC counts, and to compare ALK rearrangement patterns. Blood samples were enriched for CTCs to be used for ALK FISH testing. ALK-positive CTCs counts were higher in ALK-positive NSCLC patients (3–15 cells/1.88 mL of blood) compared with ALK-negative NSCLC patients and healthy donors (0–2 cells/1.88 mL of blood). The latter range was validated as the ‘false positive’ cutoff for ALK FISH testing of CTCs. ALK FISH signal patterns observed on tumor biopsies were recapitulated in CTCs in all cases. Sequential CTC counts in an index case of lung cancer with no evaluable tumor tissue treated with crizotinib showed six, three and eleven ALK-positive CTCs per 1.88 mL blood at baseline, partial response and post-progression time points, respectively. Furthermore, ALK FISH rearrangement suggestive of gene copy number increase was observed in CTCs following progression. Recapitulation of ALK rearrangement patterns in the tumor on CTCs, suggested that CTCs might be used to complement tissue-based ALK testing in NSCLC to guide ALK-targeted therapy when suitable tissue biopsy samples are unavailable for testing. PMID:26993609

  14. [Mediastinal lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Rauthe, S; Rosenwald, A

    2016-09-01

    Lymphomas infiltrating the mediastinum are a challenge for the treating physician as well as for the pathological diagnostics. The clinical scenario is often an emergency situation, while the pathologist is usually confronted only with small biopsy samples. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is by far the most frequently occurring lymphoma in the mediastinum and predominantly the nodular sclerosis subtype. In small and very sclerotic specimens it can be difficult to morphologically detect Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and to identify the characteristic phenotype by immunohistochemistry. Primary mediastinal large B‑cell lymphomas should be distinguished from classical Hodgkin's lymphomas as the treatment is different. This is characterized by the detection of sheets of blast cells, which immunohistochemically show a strong B‑cell phenotype (positivity for CD20 and CD79a), while CD30 can also often be expressed. The intimate biological relationship between classical Hodgkin's lymphomas and mediastinal large B‑cell lymphomas is illustrated by the existence of B‑cell lymphomas with intermediate features (so-called mediastinal grey zone lymphomas). It is important to recognize and diagnose these lymphomas as they are associated with a slightly inferior prognosis. Extranodal thymic marginal zone lymphomas of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type are a rare form of lymphoma encountered in the mediastinum, which can be associated with autoimmune diseases. T‑lymphoblastic lymphomas and leukemia, which occur predominantly in children and young adults, represent a rapidly growing precursor cell neoplasia and must be distinguished from thymomas in the differential diagnostics as well as from normal and hyperplastic thymus glands. PMID:27507160

  15. Cerdulatinib, a novel dual SYK/JAK kinase inhibitor, has broad anti-tumor activity in both ABC and GCB types of diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiao; Xing, Wei; Coffey, Greg; Dresser, Karen; Lu, Kellie; Guo, Ailin; Raca, Gordana; Pandey, Anjali; Conley, Pamela; Yu, Hongbo; Wang, Y. Lynn

    2015-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) and JAK/STAT pathways play critical roles in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Herein, we investigated the anti-lymphoma activity of cerdulatinib, a novel compound that dually targets SYK and JAK/STAT pathways. On a tissue microarray of 62 primary DLBCL tumors, 58% expressed either phosphorylated SYK or STAT3 or both. SYK and STAT3 are also phosphorylated in a panel of eleven DLBCL cell lines although ABC and GCB subtypes exhibited different JAK/STAT and BCR signaling profiles. In both ABC and GCB cell lines, cerdulatinib induced apoptosis that was associated with caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. The compound also blocked G1/S transition and caused cell cycle arrest, accompanied by inhibition of RB phosphorylation and down-regulation of cyclin E. Phosphorylation of BCR components and STAT3 was sensitive to cerdulatinib in both ABC and GCB cell lines under stimulated conditions. Importantly, JAK/STAT and BCR signaling can be blocked by cerdulatinib in primary GCB and non-GCB DLBCL tumor cells that were accompanied by cell death. Our work provides mechanistic insights into the actions of cerdulatinib, suggesting that the drug has a broad anti-tumor activity in both ABC and GCB DLBCL, at least in part by inhibiting SYK and JAK pathways. PMID:26575169

  16. First-in-human phase I study of copanlisib (BAY 80-6946), an intravenous pan-class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, A.; Appleman, L. J.; Tolcher, A. W.; Papadopoulos, K. P.; Beeram, M.; Rasco, D. W.; Weiss, G. J.; Sachdev, J. C.; Chadha, M.; Fulk, M.; Ejadi, S.; Mountz, J. M.; Lotze, M. T.; Toledo, F. G. S.; Chu, E.; Jeffers, M.; Peña, C.; Xia, C.; Reif, S.; Genvresse, I.; Ramanathan, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of copanlisib, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods Phase I dose-escalation study including patients with advanced solid tumors or NHL, and a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients received three weekly intravenous infusions of copanlisib per 28-day cycle over the dose range 0.1–1.2 mg/kg. Plasma copanlisib levels were analyzed for pharmacokinetics. Biomarker analysis included PIK3CA, KRAS, BRAF, and PTEN mutational status and PTEN immunohistochemistry. Whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) was carried out at baseline and following the first dose to assess early pharmacodynamic effects. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were evaluated serially. Results Fifty-seven patients received treatment. The MTD was 0.8 mg/kg copanlisib. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were nausea and transient hyperglycemia. Copanlisib exposure was dose-proportional with no accumulation; peak exposure positively correlated with transient hyperglycemia post-infusion. Sixteen of 20 patients treated at the MTD had reduced 18FDG-PET uptake; 7 (33%) had a reduction >25%. One patient achieved a complete response (CR; endometrial carcinoma exhibiting both PIK3CA and PTEN mutations and complete PTEN loss) and two had a partial response (PR; both metastatic breast cancer). Among the nine NHL patients, all six with follicular lymphoma (FL) responded (one CR and five PRs) and one patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma had a PR by investigator assessment; two patients with FL who achieved CR (per post hoc independent radiologic review) were on treatment >3 years. Conclusion Copanlisib, dosed intermittently on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle, was well tolerated and the MTD was determined to be 0.8 mg/kg. Copanlisib

  17. First-in-human phase I study of copanlisib (BAY 80-6946), an intravenous pan-class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, A.; Appleman, L. J.; Tolcher, A. W.; Papadopoulos, K. P.; Beeram, M.; Rasco, D. W.; Weiss, G. J.; Sachdev, J. C.; Chadha, M.; Fulk, M.; Ejadi, S.; Mountz, J. M.; Lotze, M. T.; Toledo, F. G. S.; Chu, E.; Jeffers, M.; Peña, C.; Xia, C.; Reif, S.; Genvresse, I.; Ramanathan, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of copanlisib, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods Phase I dose-escalation study including patients with advanced solid tumors or NHL, and a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients received three weekly intravenous infusions of copanlisib per 28-day cycle over the dose range 0.1–1.2 mg/kg. Plasma copanlisib levels were analyzed for pharmacokinetics. Biomarker analysis included PIK3CA, KRAS, BRAF, and PTEN mutational status and PTEN immunohistochemistry. Whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) was carried out at baseline and following the first dose to assess early pharmacodynamic effects. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were evaluated serially. Results Fifty-seven patients received treatment. The MTD was 0.8 mg/kg copanlisib. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were nausea and transient hyperglycemia. Copanlisib exposure was dose-proportional with no accumulation; peak exposure positively correlated with transient hyperglycemia post-infusion. Sixteen of 20 patients treated at the MTD had reduced 18FDG-PET uptake; 7 (33%) had a reduction >25%. One patient achieved a complete response (CR; endometrial carcinoma exhibiting both PIK3CA and PTEN mutations and complete PTEN loss) and two had a partial response (PR; both metastatic breast cancer). Among the nine NHL patients, all six with follicular lymphoma (FL) responded (one CR and five PRs) and one patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma had a PR by investigator assessment; two patients with FL who achieved CR (per post hoc independent radiologic review) were on treatment >3 years. Conclusion Copanlisib, dosed intermittently on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle, was well tolerated and the MTD was determined to be 0.8 mg/kg. Copanlisib

  18. Structure Based Drug Design of Crizotinib (PF-02341066), a Potent and Selective Dual Inhibitor of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition Factor (c-MET) Kinase and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J Jean; Tran-Dube,; #769; Michelle,; Shen, Hong; Nambu, Mitchell; Kung, Pei-Pei; Pairish, Mason; Jia, Lei; Meng, Jerry; Funk, Lee; Botrous, Iriny; McTigue, Michele; Grodsky, Neil; Ryan, Kevin; Padrique, Ellen; Alton, Gordon; Timofeevski, Sergei; Yamazaki, Shinji; Li, Qiuhua; Zou, Helen; Christensen, James; Mroczkowski, Barbara; Bender, Steve; Kania, Robert S; Edwards, Martin P

    2011-08-03

    Because of the critical roles of aberrant signaling in cancer, both c-MET and ALK receptor tyrosine kinases are attractive oncology targets for therapeutic intervention. The cocrystal structure of 3 (PHA-665752), bound to c-MET kinase domain, revealed a novel ATP site environment, which served as the target to guide parallel, multiattribute drug design. A novel 2-amino-5-aryl-3-benzyloxypyridine series was created to more effectively make the key interactions achieved with 3. In the novel series, the 2-aminopyridine core allowed a 3-benzyloxy group to reach into the same pocket as the 2,6-dichlorophenyl group of 3 via a more direct vector and thus with a better ligand efficiency (LE). Further optimization of the lead series generated the clinical candidate crizotinib (PF-02341066), which demonstrated potent in vitro and in vivo c-MET kinase and ALK inhibition, effective tumor growth inhibition, and good pharmaceutical properties.

  19. AIDS lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Middleton, G W; Lau, R K

    1992-01-01

    Chronically immunosuppressed individuals are susceptible to lymphoreticular tumors. Up to 15% of patients with congenital deficiencies such as ataxia=telangiectasia may develop malignancies, mainly high-grade B cell non=Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). AIDS lymphomas are comprised of NHLs including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and primary cerebral lymphomas (PCLs). Almost 3% of all AIDS patients (2824 of 97,258 cases) developed NHL. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a co-factor in AIDS lymphomagenesis has been studied: in 12 cases of 24 AIDS lymphomas EBV by DNA in situ hybridization was found. In an analysis of 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, .5 were positive for EBV DNA by Southern blotting. In Burkitt's lymphoma the characteristic genetic alteration affects the c-myc oncogene. In 1/3 of BL p53 mutations were found but none in the 43 NHLs suggesting that p53 mutations and c-myc activation act synergistically in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Cytotoxic agents dideoxyinosine, dideoxycytosine, and zidovudine may cause secondary neoplasia. 8 of 55 AIDS patients under zidovudine treatment developed high-grade lymphoma 23.8 months subsequently; recently doses were reduced. PCL was found in 21 of 90 patients. A 5.2 months survival was associated with combined treatment with cyclophosphamide, Oncovin (vincristine), methotrexate, etoposide, and cytosine arabinoside compared with 11.3 months with chemotherapy. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) alleviate drug-induced myelotoxicity and zidovudine-induced neutropenia, however, l8 of 11 patients receiving granulocyte-macrophage CSF developed hematological toxicity. Interleukine-2 produced by T-helper cells enhancing tumor cells cytotoxicity has been used in AIDS-associated cryptosporidial diarrhea and in 4 patients with AIDS lymphoma with modest response, but its stimulation of the HIV-infected substrate may increase viral proliferation.

  20. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  1. Apoptosis of HL-60 human leukemia cells induced by Asiatic acid through modulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuling; Lv, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Wen, Lu; Zhang, Junli; Jiang, Xudong; Liu, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The toxicities of conventional chemotherapeutic agents to normal cells restrict their dosage and clinical efficacy in acute leukemia; therefore, it is important to develop novel chemotherapeutics, including natural products, which selectively target cancer-specific pathways. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the chemopreventive agent asiatic acid (AA) on the proliferation and apoptotic rate of the leukemia cell line HL-60 and investigated the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor activity. The effect of AA on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis as well as Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. Furthermore, changes of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 expressions were detected by western blot analysis. AA blocked the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50-value of AA on HL-60 cells was 46.67 ± 5.08 µmol/l for 24 h. AA induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited in the presence of Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase. The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and survivin were downregulated by AA in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, AA inhibited ERK and p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the p38 and ERK pathways, as well as modulation of Bcl-2 family and survivin proteins were key regulators of apoptosis induced in HL-60 cells in response to AA.

  2. Proviral insertion in murine lymphomas 2 (PIM2) oncogene phosphorylates pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) and promotes glycolysis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhai; Zhao, Xiaoping; Huang, Liangqian; Zhang, Teng; Yang, Fajun; Xie, Lei; Song, Shaoli; Miao, Ping; Zhao, Li; Sun, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Gang

    2013-12-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key player in the Warburg effect of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of regulating PKM2 are not fully elucidated. Here, we identified the protein-serine/threonine kinase PIM2, a known oncogene, as a novel binding partner of PKM2. The interaction between PIM2 and PKM2 was confirmed by multiple biochemical approaches in vitro and in cultured cells. Importantly, we found that PIM2 could directly phosphorylate PKM2 on the Thr-454 residue, resulting in an increase of PKM2 protein levels. Compared with wild type, PKM2 with the phosphorylation-defective mutation displayed a reduced effect on glycolysis, co-activating HIF-1α and β-catenin, and cell proliferation, while enhancing mitochondrial respiration of cancer cells. These findings demonstrate that PIM2-dependent phosphorylation of PKM2 is critical for regulating the Warburg effect in cancer, highlighting PIM2 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24142698

  3. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alice T; Hsu, Peggy P; Awad, Mark M; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as 'druggable' targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours.

  4. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  5. Inhibition of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase by picropodophyllin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Fang, Zhijia; Zhen, Hong; Zhou, Li; Amin, Hesham M.; Shi, Ping

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently shown that IGF-IR contributes significantly to the survival of T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-LBL) cells, and it was therefore suggested that IGF-IR could represent a legitimate therapeutic target in this aggressive disease. Picropodphyllin (PPP) is a potent, selective inhibitor of IGF-IR that is currently used with notable success in clinical trials that include patients with aggressive types of epithelial tumors. In the present study, we tested the effects of PPP on Jurkat and Molt-3 cells; two prototype T-LBL cell lines. Our results demonstrate that PPP efficiently induced apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest of these two cells. These effects were attributable to alterations of downstream target proteins. By using proteomic analysis, 7 different proteins were found to be affected by PPP treatment of Jurkat cells. These proteins are involved in various aspects of cellular metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, and signal transduction pathways. The results suggest that PPP affects multiple signaling molecules and inhibits fundamental pathways that control cell growth and survival. Our study also provides novel evidence that PPP could be potentially utilized for the treatment of the aggressive T-LBL. PMID:24206093

  6. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Primary nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas: diagnosis and therapeutic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Luis Alberto de Pádua Covas; Cabral, Tamara Carvalho dos Santos; Costa, Renata de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Marianne de Castro; Levy, Debora; Zerbini, Maria Cláudia Nogueira; Pereira, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a rare group of neoplasms derived from post-thymic and activated T lymphocytes. A review of scientific articles listed in PubMed, Lilacs, and the Cochrane Library databases was performed using the term “peripheral T-cell lymphomas”. According to the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic tissue tumors, this group of neoplasms consists of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALCL-ALK+), and a provisional entity called anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative (ALCL-ALK−). Because the treatment and prognoses of these neoplasms involve different principles, it is essential to distinguish each one by its clinical, immunophenotypic, genetic, and molecular features. Except for anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive, which has no adverse international prognostic index, the prognosis of nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas is worse than that of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Chemotherapy based on anthracyclines provides poor outcomes because these neoplasms frequently have multidrug-resistant phenotypes. Based on this, the current tendency is to use intensified cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone (CHOP) regimens with the addition of new drugs, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This paper describes the clinical features and diagnostic methods, and proposes a therapeutic algorithm for nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients. PMID:26190436

  8. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 8,500 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 193,545 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  9. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  10. Crizotinib resistance in acute myeloid leukemia with inv(2)(p23q13)/RAN binding protein 2 (RANBP2) anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion and monosomy 7.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Kayo; Okumura, Atsuko; Maesako, Yoshitomo; Akasaka, Takashi; Ohno, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    This is the first report on the development of a p.G1269A mutation within the kinase domain (KD) of ALK after crizotinib treatment in RANBP2-ALK acute myeloid leukemia (AML). An elderly woman with AML with an inv(2)(p23q13)/RANBP2-ALK and monosomy 7 was treated with crizotinib. After a short-term hematological response and the restoration of normal hematopoiesis, she experienced a relapse of AML. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using the ALK break-apart probe confirmed the inv(2)(p23q13), while G-banded karyotyping revealed the deletion of a segment of the short arm of chromosome 1 [del(1)(p13p22)] after crizotinib therapy. The ALK gene carried a heterozygous mutation at the nucleotide position g.716751G>C within exon 25, causing the p.G1269A amino acid substitution within the ALK-KD. Reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the mutated ALK allele was selectively transcribed and the mutation occurred in the ALK allele rearranged with RANBP2. As both the del(1)(p13p22) at the cytogenetic level and p.G1269A at the nucleotide level newly appeared after crizotinib treatment, it is likely that they were secondarily acquired alterations involved in crizotinib resistance. Although secondary genetic abnormalities in ALK are most frequently described in non-small cell lung cancers harboring an ALK alteration, this report suggests that an ALK-KD mutation can occur independently of the tumor cell type or fusion partner after crizotinib treatment.

  11. Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Seymour, John F; Wang, Michael L

    2016-04-10

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma previously considered to have a poor prognosis. Large gains were made in the first decade of the new century when clinical trials established the importance of high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell rescue and high-dose cytarabine in younger patients and the benefits of maintenance rituximab and bendamustine in older patients. In particular, greater depth of understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of MCL has resulted in an explosion of specifically targeted new efficacious agents. In particular, agents recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration include the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, immunomodulator lenalidomide, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. We review recent advances in the understanding of MCL biology and outline our recommended approach to therapy, including choice of chemoimmunotherapy, the role of stem-cell transplantation, and mechanism-based targeted therapies, on the basis of a synthesis of the data from published clinical trials. PMID:26755518

  12. Classification of distinct subtypes of peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified, identified by chemokine and chemokine receptor expression: Analysis of prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi; Karube, Kennosuke; Kawano, Riko; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Kikuchii, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    WHO classification for malignant lymphoma was recently proposed. However, PTCL is heterogeneous. Chemokines and its receptors are closely associated with the T-cell subtypes. To clarify the T-cell subtype in PTCL, we conducted DNA chips of chemokine, its receptor (R) and cytokines. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILD, n=4), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, n=4), adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL, n=7), NK-cell lymphoma (NKL, n=2) and PTCL, unspecified (PTCL-U, n=6) were analyzed using DNA chips. In addition, immunological stainings were performed in 280 cases. In DNA chip, AILD, ALCL, NKL and ATLL showed a tendency for respective clusters, otherwise, PTCL-U clustered with AILD, ALCL and ATLL. From the gene expression profiling, CCR4, CCR3, MIG, CXCR3 and BLC were selected for immunohistochemistry. ATLL (n=48) expressed CCR4. ALCL (n=26) expressed CCR3, NKL (n=20) expressed MIG, and AILD (n=29) expressed CXCR3 and/or BLC. From the expression patterns, PTCL-U (n=134) were classified into three groups; CCR4 type (CCR4(+), n=42), CCR3 type (CCR3(+), n=31) and CXCR3 type (CXCR3(+) BLC(+/-), n=54). The prognosis was poor for ATLL, intermediate for AILD and favorable for ALCL (P=0.0014). Among PTCL-U, CCR4 type, CXCR3 type and CCR3 type had prognoses equivalent to ATLL, AILD and ALCL, respectively (P<0.0001).

  13. [Malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Asano, Naoko; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2014-06-01

    The WHO classification, considered as a bible for lymphoma diagnosis, is a list of disease units. It is expected that it will fully classify all diseases based on indicators with objectivity of constants, even in the present state, in which it cannot be said that the source, causes, and tumorigenesis mechanisms have been identified for all neoplasms. The indicators are the histology, phenotype, genotype, and clinical picture. In the current WHO classification, these indicators are described for each diseases unit, and considered as diagnostic items. While the importance of items which serve as indicators differ depending on each illness, the pathologic centering on a morphological finding does not change for lymphoma diagnosis in accordance with this WHO classification. An indispensable factor in order to evaluate this objective of pathologic diagnosis is phenotypic and genotype assessment. A phenotype is analyzed by immunohistochemistry techniques, and a genotype is clarified by various gene chromosome tests. Diagnostic applications using these test results are developed as follows: 1. Histological diagnosis based on the immunohistochemical features of lymphoma cells, 2. Identification of oncogene products, 3. Evaluation of biological prognostic factors, 4. Analysis of the inflammatory microenvironment of tumor cells. This paper describes all items. PMID:25151780

  14. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored.

  15. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  16. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  17. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22449071

  18. Therapeutic options in peripheral T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hong; Li, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a rare and heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas with a very poor prognosis. The standard first-line treatments have resulted in unsatisfactory patient outcomes. With the exception of low-risk anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the majority of patients relapse rapidly; the current 5-year overall survival rates are only 10-30%. Novel targeted therapies and combination chemotherapies are required for the treatment of patients with PTCL. In recent years, some retrospective and prospective studies have been performed concerning PTCL. Consequently, a number of novel agents and their relevant combination therapies have been identified, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, immunoconjugates, antifolates, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulatory agents, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, bendamustine, L-asparaginase, and other targeted agents. It is hoped that these innovative approaches will finally improve outcomes in patients with PTCL. This review summarizes the currently available approaches for the treatment of PTCL with an emphasis on potential new agents, including the role of stem cell transplantation. PMID:27071634

  19. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Association with Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Aneesh; Padhi, Somanath; Nagarajan, Ramesh; Boopathy, Vinoth; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Iqbal, Nayyar

    2014-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has a well known association with lymphomas, especially of T cell origin. Prognosis of lymphoma associated HLH is very poor, especially in T cell lymphomas; and, therefore, early diagnosis might alter the outcome. Though association of HLH with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is known, its occurrence in primary cutaneous ALCL (C-ALCL) is distinctly rare. We aim to describe a case of C-ALCL (anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)−) in an elderly male who succumbed to the complication of associated HLH, which was possibly triggered by coexistent virus infection. We briefly present the literatures on lymphoma associated HLH and discuss the histopathological differentials of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. We do suggest that HLH may pose diagnostic challenges in the evaluation of an underlying lymphoma and hence warrants proper evaluation for the underlying etiologies and/or triggering factors. PMID:25405042

  20. The lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L

    1996-09-01

    Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas are, by all available evidence, eminently curable neoplasms. The debates, therefore, on how best the largest numbers of individuals in any community can receive appropriate treatment and this implies their ready access to an experienced multi disciplinary combined clinic. It is important that proper perspective be retained in the African context so that preventive medicine can be employed where appropriate but, based on current understanding, those with lymphoreticular malignancy become immediate beneficiaries of whatever diagnostic and therapeutic resources need to be expended in ensuring optimal outcome. The last word is far from written on how we, as inhabitants of the African continent, will achieve this goal and so measure up to our obligation. However, as resources continue to contract, three observations justify reiteration. Firstly, diagnostic skills need to be honed by experienced pathologists together reviewing all biopsy material and, wherever possible, participating in national or international study groups. Secondly, the silly distinction propagated by some self serving individuals who fantasize that state hospitals and private clinics somehow differ, must be replaced by a more responsible attitude in which resources are pooled in the common quest for maintaining academic standards. Thirdly, given acceptance of the above common sense proposals, a mechanism will exist for the establishment and constant upgrading of national guidelines for management on agreed and achievable protocols. Whilst the theme remains that of tested conventional treatment, flexibility must exist, where appropriate, for palliative care on the one hand with scientific growth and exploration of innovative options on the other. One might conclude by observing that Africa is most certainly unique and this extends to the frequency with which some of these tumours occur; a classical example would be Burkitt's Lymphoma. This places an

  1. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Report: workshop on mediastinal grey zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Poppema, Sibrand; Kluiver, Joost L; Atayar, Cigdem; van den Berg, Anke; Rosenwald, Andreas; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Lammert, Hetty; Stein, Harald; Joos, Stephan; Barth, Thomas; Dyer, Martin; Lichter, Peter; Klein, Uwe; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Gloghini, Annunziata; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A; Califano, Andrea; Carbone, Antonino; Dalla-Favera, Ricardo; Melzner, Ingo; Bucur, Alexandra J; Brüderlein, Silke; Dorsch, Karola; Hasel, Cornelia; Barth, Thomas F E; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter

    2005-07-01

    There are several indications that classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and at least a proportion of cases of Primary Mediastinal B cell Lymphoma (PMBL) are derived from B cells at similar stages of differentiation and share common pathogenic mechanisms. The first indication was the existence of mediastinal grey zone lymphomas as identified in the 4th International Symposium on HL, with clinical, histological and immunohistochemical features intermediate between cHL and PMBL. Second, both tumor types resemble a cell that is developmentally situated in-between the germinal center reaction and a plasma cell. Third, cHL and PMBL were found to have similar gene expression profiles, including the lack of immunoglobulin expression and low levels of B cell receptor signalling molecules, and the secretion of molecules like the chemokine TARC and the prominent expression of IL-13 receptors. Fourth, both entities were found to have common genomic aberrancies, notably in 2p15 and 9p24, the sites of the REL oncogene and the tyrosine kinase gene JAK2, respectively. Further comparison of both lymphoma types may provide further insight in the pathogenic mechanisms and allow the design of diagnostic algorithms to sort out the small number of so-called mediastinal grey zone lymphomas, that appear to be intermediate between PMBL and cHL. PMID:16007868

  3. Intraocular Lymphoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, Mary E.; Shen, Defen; Hochman, Jacob; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is a subtype of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), a high-grade, extranodal, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, predominantly of B-cell origin. PVRL is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. Human studies are not ideally suited for the study of intraocular lymphoma pathogenesis or treatment strategies due to the rare nature of the disease, its variable presentation, limited volume of available ocular fluids, and fragility of sampled lymphoma cells. Animal models have been critical in making progress in understanding intraocular lymphoma pathogenesis and investigating potential therapeutic strategies. Early murine models for intraocular lymphoma used intraperitoneal injection of mouse T-cell lymphomas. This was followed by intravitreal T-cell murine models. More recent murine models have used B-cell lymphomas to more closely mimic human disease. The most current B-cell lymphoma models employ a combined approach of inoculating both the mouse vitreous cavity and brain. The challenge in murine models for intraocular lymphoma lies in recreating the clinical features, disease behavior, molecular profile, systemic immunity, and the microenvironment observed in human disease. In the future, animal models will continue to be central to furthering our understanding of the disease and in the investigation of potential treatment targets. PMID:27171354

  4. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  5. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  6. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression.

  7. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  8. Membrane-associated signaling in human B-lymphoma lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tauzin, Sebastien; Ding, Heidrun; Burdevet, Dimitri; Borisch, Bettina; Hoessli, Daniel C.

    2011-01-15

    In B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Lyn and Cbp/PAG constitute the core of an oncogenic signalosome that captures the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, the Spleen tyrosine kinase and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 to generate pro-survival and proliferative signals. Lymphoma lines corresponding to follicular, mantle-cell and Burkitt-derived lymphomas display type-specific signalosome organizations that differentially activate PI3K, Syk and STAT3. In the follicular lymphoma line, PI3K, Syk and STAT3 were optimally activated upon association with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome, while in the Burkitt lymphoma-derived line, the association with Cbp/PAG and activation of PI3K were interfered with by the latent membrane proteins encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus. In the Jeko-1 mantle-cell line, a weak association of Syk with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome resulted in poor activation of Syk, but in those cells, as in the follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, efficient apoptosis induction by the Syk inhibitor R406 indicated that Syk is nonetheless an important prosurvival element and therefore a valuable therapeutic target. In all configurations described herein is the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome independent of external signals and provides efficient means of activation for its associated lipid and protein kinases. In follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, Syk appears to be activated following binding to Cbp/PAG and no longer requires B-cell receptor-associated activation motifs for activation. Assessment of the different modalities of Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome organization could help in selecting the appropriate combination of kinase inhibitors to eliminate a particular type of lymphoma cells.

  9. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies.

  10. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  11. [Radiotherapy of lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Barillot, I; Mahé, M A; Antoni, D; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma has evolved over time but retains a dominant position in the treatment of early stage tumours. Its indications are more limited for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, but the techniques follow the same principles whatever the histological type. This review presents the French recommendations in terms of preparation and choice of irradiation techniques. PMID:27521031

  12. Sarcoidosis Occurring After Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    London, Jonathan; Grados, Aurélie; Fermé, Christophe; Charmillon, Alexandre; Maurier, François; Deau, Bénédicte; Crickx, Etienne; Brice, Pauline; Chapelon-Abric, Catherine; Haioun, Corinne; Burroni, Barbara; Alifano, Marco; Le Jeunne, Claire; Guillevin, Loïc; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Mouthon, Luc; Terrier, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease that most frequently affects the lungs with pulmonary infiltrates and/or bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. An association of sarcoidosis and lymphoproliferative disease has previously been reported as the sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome. Although this syndrome is characterized by sarcoidosis preceding lymphoma, very few cases of sarcoidosis following lymphoma have been reported. We describe the clinical, biological, and radiological characteristics and outcome of 39 patients presenting with sarcoidosis following lymphoproliferative disease, including 14 previously unreported cases and 25 additional patients, after performing a literature review. Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were equally represented. The median delay between lymphoma and sarcoidosis was 18 months. Only 16 patients (41%) required treatment. Sarcoidosis was of mild intensity or self-healing in most cases, and overall clinical response to sarcoidosis was excellent with complete clinical response in 91% of patients. Sarcoidosis was identified after a follow-up computerized tomography scan (CT-scan) or 18fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) evaluation in 18/34 patients (53%). Sarcoidosis is therefore a differential diagnosis to consider when lymphoma relapse is suspected on a CT-scan or 18FDG-PET/CT, emphasizing the necessity to rely on histological confirmation of lymphoma relapse. PMID:25380084

  13. Inflammatory myopathies and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2016-10-15

    The inflammatory myopathies comprise a group of immune-mediated muscle diseases. Lymphoma is a term for a variety of lymphatic system malignancies. Autoimmune diseases and lymphoproliferative malignancies share a complex bidirectional relationship. A causal relationship between inflammatory mypathies and lymphoma has not been established. The diagnosis/treatment of inflammatory myopathy usually precedes the detection/diagnosis of lymphoma. Immune system dysregulation presumably underlies the evolution of lymphoma in patients with inflammatory myopathies. Inflammatory activity with chronic B-cell activation and/or antigen stimulation is deemed the major risk factor for lymphoma in patients with autoimmunity. A "paraneoplastic" phenomenon or the effects of immunosuppressive therapy may be alternative immune-based mechanisms. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia immune system disturbance rarely results in non-hematological autoimmune disease, including inflammatory myopathies. PMID:27653927

  14. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  15. Ovarian Lymphoma and Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Luca; Angeloni, Moira; Gogna, Paolo; Intersimone, Donatella; Fedeli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ovarian lymphoma is a rare entity, and hydronephrosis from lymphoma is even rarer. Most reports describe a laparoscopic approach to the disease, but we report a case of hydroureteronephrosis associated with ovarian lymphoma managed completely by mini-invasive techniques. Case Report: A 51-year-old woman was referred to us for back pain and renal colic and computed tomography scan findings of right hydroureteronephrosis and a mass in the right mesorectum and uterosacral ligament. After magnetic resonance imaging was performed, the patient underwent laparoscopic adnexectomy and ureterolysis after ureteroscopy and stenting. Histology results showed diffuse B-cell lymphoma of the ovary occluding the ureter without infiltration. The patient has undergone 6 cycles of chemotherapy. Discussion: This is the first report to describe ovarian lymphoma and hydroureteronephrosis managed completely by laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy. Frequency in clinical practice, differential diagnosis, and endoscopic approach are discussed. The advantages of a multidisciplinary endoscopic team are underlined. PMID:24398216

  16. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  17. Challenging perspectives on the cellular origins of lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tim I. M.; Hodson, Daniel J.; Macintyre, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Both B and T lymphocytes have signature traits that set them apart from other cell types. They actively and repeatedly rearrange their DNA in order to produce a unique and functional antigen receptor, they have potential for massive clonal expansion upon encountering antigen via this receptor or its precursor, and they have the capacity to be extremely long lived as ‘memory’ cells. All three of these traits are fundamental to their ability to function as the adaptive immune response to infectious agents, but concurrently render these cells vulnerable to transformation. Thus, it is classically considered that lymphomas arise at a relatively late stage in a lymphocyte's development during the process of modifying diversity within antigen receptors, and when the cell is capable of responding to stimulus via its receptor. Attempts to understand the aetiology of lymphoma have reinforced this notion, as the most notable advances to date have shown chronic stimulation of the antigen receptor by infectious agents or self-antigens to be key drivers of these diseases. Despite this, there is still uncertainty about the cell of origin in some lymphomas, and increasing evidence that a subset arises in a more immature cell. Specifically, a recent study indicates that T-cell lymphoma, in particular nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-driven anaplastic large cell lymphoma, may originate in T-cell progenitors in the thymus. PMID:27683157

  18. Primary gastrointestinal lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D L; Doria, R; Salloum, E

    1996-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a significant proportion of primary gastrointestinal lymphomas are driven by exogenous agents/antigens. In the stomach, Helicobacter pylori appears to be responsible for most cases of low-grade lymphomas (MALToma), whereas an infectious etiology is suspected in immunoproliferative small intestine disease (IPSID). Similarly, enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas appear to result from a disordered response to gluten, although this profile remains controversial. Accordingly, although traditional antineoplastic treatments, such as surgery and radiation, are still important for the treatment of primary GI lymphomas, antibiotics may be the first line of therapy for low-grade gastric MALToma, and they are often used alone or in combination with chemotherapy for IPSID. In patients with celiac sprue, a gluten-free diet appears to markedly reduce the risk for lymphoma. An important caveat for the treatment of gastric lymphomas is that only low-grade gastric MALTomas have consistently responded to antibiotics. Treatment of high-grade gastric lymphoma is evolving. Although surgery was once considered central to diagnosis, staging, and treatment of gastric lymphoma, most patients can now have a diagnosis established by endoscopic biopsy and are candidates for chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation. The risks of fatal hemorrhage and perforation have probably been vastly overestimated and appear to be equal or less than the mortality associated with surgery. In addition, the long-term effects of gastric resection on quality of life have been almost completely ignored. Systemic lymphomas involve the GI tract far more often than is clinically apparent. In most cases, treatment should not be affected.

  19. Inhibition of Rac controls NPM-ALK-dependent lymphoma development and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Colomba, A; Giuriato, S; Dejean, E; Thornber, K; Delsol, G; Tronchère, H; Meggetto, F; Payrastre, B; Gaits-Iacovoni, F

    2011-06-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) is a tyrosine kinase oncogene responsible for the pathogenesis of the majority of human ALK-positive lymphomas. We recently reported that it activated the Rac1 GTPase in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL), leading to Rac-dependent formation of active invadopodia required for invasiveness. Herein, we went further into the study of this pathway and used the inhibitor of Rac, NSC23766, to validate its potential as a molecular target in ALCL in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model and in a conditional model of NPM-ALK transgenic mice. Our data demonstrate that Rac regulates important effectors of NPM-ALK-induced transformation such as Erk1/2, p38 and Akt. Moreover, inhibition of Rac signaling abrogates NPM-ALK-elicited disease progression and metastasis in mice, highlighting the potential of small GTPases and their regulators as additional therapic targets in lymphomas.

  20. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following treatment. Occasionally, cancer may return, and follow-up appointments with your cancer specialist can help you catch it early if it does. Your doctor will also watch for any late side effects of your treatment. After Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  1. Primary Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Chen, Yanzhu; Chen, Shaojie; Wu, Lili; Xu, Lishu; Lian, Guoda; Yang, Kege; Li, Yaqing; Zeng, Linjuan; Huang, Kaihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma (PGIL) is a rare malignant tumor without standard diagnosis and treatment methods. This study is aimed to systematically analyze its clinical characteristics and draw out an appropriate flow chart of diagnosis and treatment process for PGIL in China. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics, diagnostic approaches, prognostic factors, and therapeutic modalities in 415 cases of PGIL in Chinese province of Guangdong. A systematic review was conducted in 118 studies containing 5075 patients to further identify clinical manifestations and mortalities of therapeutic modalities. The most common clinical presentations were abdominal pain and bloody stools. Endoscopic biopsy was an important diagnostic means, and usually more than once to make a definite diagnosis. Retrospective multicenter clinical study showed that younger onset age (<60 years), female, one region involved, one lesion, early stage, International Prognostic Index (IPI ≤1), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), normal albumin, and nonemergency operation were significant prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; non-B symptom, tumor restricted to gastric or ileocecal region, one lesion, performance status (PS ≤1), normal LDH, and nonsurgery alone were significant prognostic factors for T-cell lymphoma. Site of origin and IPI were independent prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; PS was the independent prognostic factor for T-cell lymphoma. And T-cell lymphoma had worse overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than B-cell lymphoma. Among different therapeutic modalities, chemotherapy alone or combined with surgery showed better OS and PFS than surgery alone for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of stage I/II E and T-cell lymphoma. For DLBCL of stage III E/IV and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, OS and PFS did not differ among different therapeutic groups. In meta-analysis, surgery plus chemotherapy

  2. Investigation of the cytotoxic effect of flavopiridol in canine lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ema, Y; Igase, M; Takeda, Y; Yanase, T; Umeki, S; Hiraoka, H; Okuda, M; Mizuno, T

    2016-08-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, flavopiridol, was tested as a potential new cancer therapeutic agent to treat canine lymphoma by examining its effect on cell growth of canine lymphoma cell lines in vitro. Flavopiridol induced profound cell death in all eight lymphoma cell lines at 400 nM, and in all cases cell death was due to apoptosis. Apoptosis was inhibited by caspase inhibitor, despite the variable sensitivities between cell lines. Analysis of the mechanism of flavopiridol-induced apoptosis showed that Rb phosphorylation was inhibited, possibly due to CDK4 or CDK6 inhibition. There was also decreased expression of Rb protein and anti-apoptotic proteins, Mcl-1 and XIAP, possibly through transcriptional regulation by inhibition of CDK7 or CDK9 activation. Canine lymphoma cell line-xenotransplanted mice were then treated with flavopiridol and profound tumour shrinkage was observed. This study describes a new therapeutic approach using flavopiridol for canine lymphoma treatment. PMID:25623777

  3. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  4. Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  5. Lymphomas of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M J; Bennett, M H; Cawson, R A

    1986-08-01

    Primary lymphomas arising in salivary glands are very uncommon. The histologic classification of 40 cases of lymphomas in salivary gland tissue submitted to the British Salivary Gland Tumour Panel is reported, and, for 30 of the patients for whom adequate information was available, the clinical presentation, management, and outcome have been analyzed. Lymphomas in salivary glands represented 1.7% of all reported salivary neoplasms. The majority developed in the parotid glands of patients aged between 50 and 70 years. Only four cases gave a premorbid history compatible with sicca syndrome. In this series, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas predominated; 23 were Grade I, and 13 were Grade II. Treatment regimens were not uniform, but are outlined. Survival ranged from 5 to 111 months. Median survival for the group was 49 months. Prognosis was not influenced by the clinical stage of disease at presentation. Four cases of lymphoma arising in benign lymphoepithelial lesions are included. None had clinical symptoms of sicca complex. Prognosis for this group was found to be as favorable as the others.

  6. MicroRNA 25, microRNA 145, and microRNA 210 as biomarkers for predicting the efficacy of maintenance treatment with pemetrexed in lung adenocarcinoma patients who are negative for epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sheng-Bin; Wang, Meng; Tian, Jing; Li, Rui; Chang, Chun-Xiao; Qi, Jie-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers for use in predicting the efficacy of maintenance therapy with pemetrexed in patients with stage IIIb or IV lung adenocarcinoma and who had already received first-line treatment with pemetrexed plus platinum. Patients who were negative for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations were assigned to a pemetrexed group and an observation group. Patients in the pemetrexed group (n = 76) received maintenance treatment with pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2), once every 21 days) plus best supportive care. Patients in the observation group (n = 72) agreed to receive only best supportive care until disease progression. Blood samples were collected from all patients in both groups before treatment and were used to detect expression levels of various miRNAs in serum by the Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) method. The expression levels of miR-25, miR-145, and miR-210 were significantly different in the 2 groups of patients. Furthermore, the median progression-free survival (PFS) times for patients in the pemetrexed and observation groups were 4.5 and 2.9 months, respectively. The PFS times among patients in the pemetrexed group varied significantly and were related to patient expression levels of miR-25, miR-145, and miR-210, whereas patients in the observation group showed no differences in PFS time. Our data suggest miR-25, miR-145, and miR-210 as predictors for the efficacy of maintenance treatment with pemetrexed in lung adenocarcinoma patients who were negative for EGFR mutations or ALK translocations.

  7. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    With a lifetime risk of 1% and 700 new cases per year, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the seventh most frequent type of cancer in Denmark. The incidence of NHL has increased considerably in Western countries over the last decades; consequently, NHL is an increasing clinical problem. Ophthalmic lymphoma, (lymphoma localized in the ocular region, i.e. eyelid, conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, lacrimal gland, orbit, or intraocularly) is relatively uncommon, accounting for 5%-10% of all extranodal lymphomas. It is, however, the most common orbital malignancy. The purpose of this thesis was to review specimens from all Danish patients with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980-2005, in order to determine the distribution of lymphoma subtypes, and the incidence- and time trends in incidence for ophthalmic lymphoma. Furthermore, an extended analysis of the most frequent subtype, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma), was done to analyse clinical factors and cytogenetic changes with influence on prognosis. A total of 228 Danish patients with a biopsy-reviewed verified diagnosis of ocular adnexal-, orbital-, or intraocular lymphoma were identified. We found that more than 50% of orbital- and ocular adnexal lymphomas were of the MALT lymphoma subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) predominated intraocularly (Sjo et al. 2008a). Furthermore, lymphoma arising in the lacrimal sac was surprisingly predominantly DLBCL (Sjo et al. 2006). Incidence rates were highly dependent on patient age. There was an increase in incidence rates for the whole population from 1980 to 2005, corresponding to an annual average increase of 3.4% (Sjo et al. 2008a). MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region was found in 116 patients (Sjo et al. 2008b). One third of patients had a relapse or progression of disease after initial therapy and relapses were frequently found at extra-ocular sites. Overall survival, however, was not significantly poorer for patients

  8. Update on gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is an uncommon entity that can often present like classic adenocarcinoma. The most common organ site involved is the stomach. Important prognostic indicators include location of lymph node involvement, histologic subtype, lymphocyte lineage, gross size, and location of the tumor. Surgical resection is the mainstay of curative therapy. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have a role either separately or as part of a multimodality treatment program. Clinicians are encouraged to enter patients with primary gastric lymphoma into multi-institutional, cooperative group clinical trials to more clearly define the best treatment strategy. PMID:1956083

  9. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  10. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. [Lymphomas in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Brugières, Laurence; Minard, Véronique; Patte, Catherine

    2012-04-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphomas in the pediatric population are a heterogeneous group of tumors with distinct pathologic, immunologic and clinical characteristics. Over the past three decades, significant advancements have been made in the molecular characterization of these disorders. More than 90% of pediatric childhood non Hodgkin lymphomas are high grade lymphomas belonging to four major histologic subtypes, Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. With the use of intensive multiagent chemotherapy, most patients can now be cured and long-term event free survival is above 80% in most histologic subtypes. The identification of molecular events associated with carcinogenesis leads to the identification of novel targeted therapy which should allow a further improvement of treatment including a reduction of treatment burden in early stages and improvement of survival in advanced stages. PMID:22641877

  12. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 72,580 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 20,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 569,536 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  13. Centrofacial angiocentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Peral-Cagigal, Beatriz; Galdeano-Arenas, María; Crespo-Pinilla, Juan Ignacio; García-Cantera, José Miguel; Sánchez-Cuéllar, Luis Antonio; Verrier-Hernández, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The centrofacial angiocentric lymphoma is a rare lymphoid neoplasm, with an often-difficult diagnosis due to the non-specific clinical picture. On many occasions it is necessary to perform various biopsies to reach the correct diagnosis. This lymphoma is an aggressive Non-Hodgkin's (NHL) type, which is normally found in the upper respiratory tract (predominantly in the nasal cavity), and has an ominous prognosis, as the average survival rate is between 12 and 18 months (1). It is predominantly found in subjects of oriental and South American extraction, who are between the ages of 50 and 60 years and with a slight tendency towards males (2:1). This is the case study of a female Ecuadorian patient who was referred to our department with a hemifacial edema, chocolate- like rhinorrhea and nasal respiratory obstruction, which had been treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories for a month without success. After performing a number of diagnostic tests, it was found histologically that the patient had an extranodal T-cell lymphoma of the nasal type (also known as T-cell angiocentric lymphoma).

  14. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  15. Second-generation inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Liu, Christina; Tsui, Stella T; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a critical effector molecule for B cell development and plays a major role in lymphoma genesis. Ibrutinib is the first-generation BTK inhibitor. Ibrutinib has off-target effects on EGFR, ITK, and Tec family kinases, which explains the untoward effects of ibrutinib. Resistance to ibrutinib was also reported. The C481S mutation in the BTK kinase domain was reported to be a major mechanism of resistance to ibrutinib. This review summarizes the clinical development of novel BTK inhibitors, ACP-196 (acalabrutinib), ONO/GS-4059, and BGB-3111. PMID:27590878

  16. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  17. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Adcetris ( ...

  19. A three-signal model of T-cell lymphoma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-01-01

    T-cell lymphoma pathogenesis and classification have, until recently, remained enigmatic. Recently performed whole-exome sequencing and gene-expression profiling studies have significant implications for their classification and treatment. Recurrent genetic modifications in antigen ("signal 1"), costimulatory ("signal 2"), or cytokine receptors ("signal 3"), and the tyrosine kinases and other signaling proteins they activate, have emerged as important therapeutic targets in these lymphomas. Many of these genetic modifications do not function in a cell-autonomous manner, but require the provision of ligand(s) by constituents of the tumor microenvironment, further supporting the long-appreciated view that these lymphomas are dependent upon and driven by their microenvironment. Therefore, the seemingly disparate fields of genomics and immunology are converging. A unifying "3 signal model" for T-cell lymphoma pathogenesis that integrates these findings will be presented, and its therapeutic implications briefly reviewed. PMID:26408334

  20. Marginal zone lymphoma: old, new, targeted, and epigenetic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Monika; Sheikh, Hassan; Abbi, Kamal; Long, Sarah; Sharma, Kamal; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) is an indolent B-cell lymphoma arising from marginal zone B-cells present in lymph nodes and extranodal tissues. MZL comprises 5–17% of all non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in adults. The World Health Organization categorizes MZL into three distinct types based on their site of impact: (1) splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL); (2) nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL); (3) extranodal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, which can be subdivided into gastric and nongastric. The subgroups of MZL share some common features but are different in their biology and behavior. Owing to the rarity of MZL there are few randomized trials available comparing various treatment options and therefore treatment is controversial, lacking standard guidelines. Treatment should be patient tailored and can range from a ‘watchful waiting’ approach for asymptomatic patients without cytopenias to surgery or localized radiation therapy. Rituximab in combination with chemotherapy has resulted in longer failure-free survival than chemotherapy alone in patients with SMZL. Helicobacter pylori positive gastric MALT shows a good response rate to triple antibiotic therapy. Newer therapies such as bendamustine, everolimus, lenalidomide, vorinostat and phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors are in clinical trials for patients with relapsed or refractory MZL and have shown promising results. We are presently conducting clinical trials testing the efficacy of the epigenetic activity of cladribine as a hypomethylating agent in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) vorinostat and rituximab in patients with MZL. Further studies with the newer agents should be done both in newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory MZL to streamline the care and to avoid the use of toxic chemotherapies as initial treatment. PMID:23616915

  1. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  2. Ixazomib Citrate and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  4. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed.

  5. [Blood test for malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Junya; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-03-01

    Malignant lymphoma is a neoplastic disease that develops in the lymph system, which consists of various different subtypes. In addition, the differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma includes infections, autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, endocrine disorders, and so on. Therefore accurate diagnosis is very important to decide therapeutic strategy. Blood test is the most common examination in clinical practice and used extensively for evaluating etiology, pathology, disease state, efficacy of treatment and disease prognosis of lymphoma. We are required to understand the characteristics of blood examinations correctly and use them appropriately in daily medical practice. Here, we introduce some blood examinations used for treatment of lymphoma.

  6. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed. PMID:27265606

  7. Multifocal extranodal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Li, Lin; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jin-Song; Gao, Ting; Xu, Yan; Li, Wen-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We report an unusual and interesting case of non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving 7 extranodal sites. In this case, a 43-year-old woman with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, including stomach, breasts, pancreas, adrenal glands, ovary and bones, was confirmed by biopsy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan. The patient achieved a complete response after 2 cycles of chemotherapy with combined rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, but subsequently developed central nervous system involvement. Conclusion: This case illustrated the usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis, disease staging, and assessment of response to therapy. Selection of the optimal treatment regimen is challenging and needs further research. PMID:27749564

  8. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Real-world data on prognostic factors and treatment in peripheral T-cell lymphomas: a study from the Swedish Lymphoma Registry.

    PubMed

    Ellin, Fredrik; Landström, Jenny; Jerkeman, Mats; Relander, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are rare lymphomas with mostly poor outcome with current treatment. The addition of etoposide to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) and upfront consolidation with autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) have shown promising results but have never been tested in randomized trials. As a complement to retrospective analyses of clinical trials, we aimed at analyzing prognostic factors and outcome in an unselected, population-based cohort. Through the Swedish Lymphoma Registry, we identified 755 PTCL patients diagnosed during a 10-year period. In addition to International Prognostic Index factors, male gender was associated with an adverse overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR], 1.28; P = .011) and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR, 1.26; P = .014). In an intention-to-treat analysis in 252 nodal PTCL and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma patients (excluding anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), upfront auto-SCT was associated with a superior OS (HR, 0.58; P = .004) and PFS (HR, 0.56; P = .002) compared with patients treated without auto-SCT. The addition of etoposide to CHOP resulted in superior PFS in patients ≤60 years (HR, 0.49; P = .008). This study is the largest population-based PTCL cohort reported so far and provides important information on outcome in PTCL outside the setting of clinical trials.

  11. Pathobiology of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Gazzola, Anna; Tripodo, Claudio; Bacci, Francesco; Sabattini, Elena; Sista, Maria Teresa; Mannu, Claudia; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Sagramoso-Sacchetti, Carlo A.; Righi, Simona; Pileri, Stefano A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its well-known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics, histogenesis, and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. There is complete consensus on the B-cell derivation of the tumor in most cases, and on the relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection and defective cytokinesis in at least a proportion of patients. The REAL/WHO classification recognizes a basic distinction between lymphocyte predominance HL (LP-HL) and classic HL (cHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation and behavior, morphology, phenotype, and molecular features. cHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, with mixed cellularity, and lymphocyte depleted. The borders between cHL and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma have become sharper, whereas those between LP-HL and T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma remain ill defined. Treatments adjusted to the pathobiological characteristics of the tumor in at-risk patients have been proposed and are on the way to being applied. PMID:21253495

  12. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  13. Targeting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Ottmann, Oliver G.; Deininger, Michael; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway represents an important anticancer target because it has been implicated in cancer cell growth, survival, and motility. Recent studies show that PI3K may also play a role in the development of resistance to currently available therapies. In a broad range of cancers, various components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling axis are genetically modified, and the pathway can be activated through many different mechanisms. The frequency of genetic alterations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway, coupled with the impact in oncogenesis and disease progression, make this signaling axis an attractive target in anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the critical function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway in leukemias and lymphomas has led to the clinical evaluation of novel rationally designed inhibitors in this setting. Three main categories of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors have been developed so far: agents that target phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (dual inhibitors), pan-phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors that target all class I isoforms, and isoform-specific inhibitors that selectively target the α, -β, -γ, or -δ isoforms. Emerging data highlight the promise of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in combination with other therapies for the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. Further evaluation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in first-line or subsequent regimens may improve clinical outcomes. This article reviews the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in hematologic malignancies and the potential clinical utility of inhibitors that target this pathway. PMID:24425689

  14. [Diagnostics and treatment of choroidal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Doycheva, D; Zierhut, M; Süsskind, D; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Deuter, C

    2015-03-01

    Choroidal lymphoma is a rare disease and can be classified into primary and secondary choroidal lymphomas. Primary choroidal lymphoma is a low-grade extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma and secondary choroidal lymphomas present ocular manifestations of disseminated systemic lymphomas. Typical clinical features of choroidal lymphoma are multifocal, yellow-whitish choroidal infiltrates. The vitreous body is usually clear and cell-free. Choroidal lymphoma has a tendency to extend through the sclera. In contrast to primary choroidal lymphoma, which is more often unilateral, does not show signs of anterior segment involvement and has a slow progression, secondary choroidal lymphoma is more often bilateral, has a rapidly progressive course with anterior segment and vitreous involvement and belongs to the high-grade lymphomas. The definitive diagnosis of choroidal lymphoma can only be confirmed by histopathological examination of biopsy tissue. The choroidal biopsy is the gold standard in the diagnostics of choroidal lymphoma. To date, no standardized treatment for choroidal lymphoma has been established. The treatment modalities include external beam radiotherapy, immunotherapy with rituximab and chemotherapy. The prognosis for survival of primary choroidal lymphoma is usually good. The prognosis of secondary choroidal lymphoma depends on the malignancy grade of systemic lymphoma.

  15. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  16. Can Burkitt's Lymphoma and Hodgkin's Lymphoma occur in siblings simultaneously?

    PubMed

    Kaymak Cihan, Meriç; Kandemir, Olcay; Dalva, Klara; Sarı, Neriman; Kurucu, Nilgün; Ergürhan İlhan, İnci

    2015-01-01

    Familial clustering of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and increased risk of developing disease among the siblings has been reported earlier. Usually familial lymphoma in sibling pairs occurs in the pairs of either non-Hodgkin lymphoma or HL. In the familial HL, same type of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is responsible in the affected family members. There are also some studies stating "Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor (KIR)" genotypes can be important in the etiology of familial HL. Here we report two siblings; one with Non-Hodgkin and the other with Hodgkin lymphoma which showed Epstein-Barr virus encoded small RNAs positivity in the tumor tissues. We have also found that their HLA genotypes are same with each other. In addition, we have discussed familial lymphoma pathogenesis and HLA haplotypes. PMID:27411427

  17. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  18. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-19

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  19. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  20. Role of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Indolent and Other Mature B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kutsch, Nadine; Marks, Reinhard; Ratei, Richard; Held, Thomas K; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tyrosine kinases represents a highly specific treatment approach for different malignancies. This also includes non-Hodgkin lymphoma since it is well known that these enzymes are frequently involved in the lymphomagenesis. Hereby, tyrosine kinases might either be dysregulated intrinsically or be activated within signal transduction pathways leading to tumor survival and growth. Among others, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is of particular interest as a potential therapeutic target. Btk is stimulated by B-cell receptor signaling and activates different transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB. The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma recently. Numerous clinical trials evaluating this agent in different combinations (eg, with rituximab or classical chemotherapeutic agents) as a treatment option for aggressive and indolent lymphoma are under way. Here, we summarize the role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of indolent and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, mantle-cell lymphoma). PMID:26327780

  1. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  2. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas, Version 4.2014

    PubMed Central

    Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Gordon, Leo I.; Wierda, William G.; Abramson, Jeremy S.; Advani, Ranjana H.; Andreadis, C. Babis; Bartlett, Nancy; Byrd, John C.; Czuczman, Myron S.; Fayad, Luis E.; Fisher, Richard I.; Glenn, Martha J.; Harris, Nancy Lee; Hoppe, Richard T.; Horwitz, Steven M.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Kim, Youn H.; Krivacic, Susan; LaCasce, Ann S.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Porcu, Pierluigi; Press, Oliver; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Reddy, Nishitha; Reid, Erin; Saad, Ayman A.; Sokol, Lubomir; Swinnen, Lode J.; Tsien, Christina; Vose, Julie M.; Yahalom, Joachim; Zafar, Nadeem; Dwyer, Mary; Sundar, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders originating in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or natural killer cells. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) accounts for approximately 6% of all newly diagnosed NHL cases. Radiation therapy with or without systemic therapy is a reasonable approach for the few patients who present with early-stage disease. Rituximab-based chemoimmunotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell rescue (HDT/ASCR) is recommended for patients presenting with advanced-stage disease. Induction therapy followed by rituximab maintenance may provide extended disease control for those who are not candidates for HDT/ASCR. Ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was recently approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for NHL regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with MCL. PMID:25190696

  3. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in paediatric and young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Lamant, Laurence; Kenner, Lukas; Brugières, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a heterogeneous disease of debateable origin that, in children, is largely anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive with aberrant ALK activity induced following the formation of chromosomal translocations. Whilst the survival rates for this disease are relatively high, a significant proportion (20-40%) of patients suffer disease relapse, in some cases on multiple occasions and therefore suffer the toxic side-effects of combination chemotherapy. Traditionally, patients are treated with a combination of agents although recent data from relapse patients have suggested that low risk patients might benefit from single agent vinblastine and, going forward, the addition of ALK inhibitors to the therapeutic regimen may have beneficial consequences. There are also a plethora of other drugs that might be advantageous to patients with ALCL and many of these have been identified through laboratory research although the decision as to which drugs to implement in trials will not be trivial. PMID:26913827

  4. Inhibition of Syk with fostamatinib disodium has significant clinical activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Jeff; Sweetenham, John; Johnston, Patrick B.; Vose, Julie M.; LaCasce, Ann; Schaefer-Cutillo, Julia; De Vos, Sven; Sinha, Rajni; Leonard, John P.; Cripe, Larry D.; Gregory, Stephanie A.; Sterba, Michael P.; Lowe, Ann M.; Levy, Ronald; Shipp, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    Certain malignant B cells rely on B-cell receptor (BCR)–mediated survival signals. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) initiates and amplifies the BCR signal. In in vivo analyses of B-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary tumors, Syk inhibition induces apoptosis. These data prompted a phase 1/2 clinical trial of fostamatinib disodium, the first clinically available oral Syk inhibitor, in patients with recurrent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Dose-limiting toxicity in the phase 1 portion was neutropenia, diarrhea, and thrombocytopenia, and 200 mg twice daily was chosen for phase 2 testing. Sixty-eight patients with recurrent B-NHL were then enrolled in 3 cohorts: (1) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), (2) follicular lymphoma (FL), and (3) other NHL, including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas, and small lymphocytic leukemia/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL). Common toxicities included diarrhea, fatigue, cytopenias, hypertension, and nausea. Objective response rates were 22% (5 of 23) for DLBCL, 10% (2 of 21) for FL, 55% (6 of 11) for SLL/CLL, and 11% (1/9) for MCL. Median progression-free survival was 4.2 months. Disrupting BCR-induced signaling by inhibiting Syk represents a novel and active therapeutic approach for NHL and SLL/CLL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00446095. PMID:19965662

  5. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. Discovery of a BTK/MNK dual inhibitor for lymphoma and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Hu, C; Wang, A; Weisberg, E L; Chen, Y; Yun, C-H; Wang, W; Liu, Y; Liu, X; Tian, B; Wang, J; Zhao, Z; Liang, Y; Li, B; Wang, L; Wang, B; Chen, C; Buhrlage, S J; Qi, Z; Zou, F; Nonami, A; Li, Y; Fernandes, S M; Adamia, S; Stone, R M; Galinsky, I A; Wang, X; Yang, G; Griffin, J D; Brown, J R; Eck, M J; Liu, J; Gray, N S; Liu, Q

    2016-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) kinase is a member of the TEC kinase family and is a key regulator of the B-cell receptor (BCR)-mediated signaling pathway. It is important for B-cell maturation, proliferation, survival and metastasis. Pharmacological inhibition of BTK is clinically effective against a variety of B-cell malignances, such as mantle cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and activated B-cell-diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. MNK kinase is one of the key downstream regulators in the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway and controls protein synthesis via regulating the activity of eIF4E. Inhibition of MNK activity has been observed to moderately inhibit the proliferation of AML cells. Through a structure-based drug-design approach, we have discovered a selective and potent BTK/MNK dual kinase inhibitor (QL-X-138), which exhibits covalent binding to BTK and noncovalent binding to MNK. Compared with the BTK kinase inhibitor (PCI-32765) and the MNK kinase inhibitor (cercosporamide), QL-X-138 enhanced the antiproliferative efficacies in vitro against a variety of B-cell cancer cell lines, as well as AML and CLL primary patient cells, which respond moderately to BTK inhibitor in vitro. The agent can effectively arrest the growth of lymphoma and leukemia cells at the G0-G1 stage and can induce strong apoptotic cell death. These primary results demonstrate that simultaneous inhibition of BTK and MNK kinase activity might be a new therapeutic strategy for B-cell malignances.

  7. Gray zone lymphoma: better treated like hodgkin lymphoma or mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Kieron; Grant, Cliona; Eberle, Franziska C; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S; Wilson, Wyndham H

    2012-09-01

    Although primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and classic Hodgkin lymphoma of the nodular sclerosis type (CHL-NS) are distinct diseases, they share several clinical characteristics and biologic features. Given that, it is not surprising that there exist mediastinal lymphomas that do not fit well into either category but have clinical and morphologic features overlapping and transitional between PMBL and CHL-NS. The term mediastinal gray zone lymphoma (MGZL) has been used for these tumors, which are included in the World Health Organization classification as "B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classic Hodgkin lymphoma." Although several studies have evaluated different therapeutic strategies in PMBL and CHL-NS, there is a paucity of prospective experience treating MGZL, given its rarity and relatively recent recognition. Historically, diseases that today would be categorized as MGZL were probably called "anaplastic large-cell lymphoma Hodgkin-like," and their outcome with standard approaches was poor, with short overall survivals. In this review-following a discussion of the biology and clinical features of MGZL, and how they compare to PMBL and CHL-NS-we outline how the treatment of PMBL and CHL-NS has evolved in recent years, and how we believe MGZL should be approached therapeutically. PMID:22833351

  8. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinaemia; Lymphoma,T-cell Cutaneous; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral

  10. Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    HIV Infection; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  12. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  13. Hodgkin Lymphoma: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare B-cell malignant neoplasm affecting approximately 9000 new patients annually. This disease represents approximately 11% of all lymphomas seen in the United States and comprises 2 discrete disease entities--classical Hodgkin lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Within the subcategorization of classical Hodgkin lymphoma are defined subgroups: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte depletion, and lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma. Staging of this disease is essential for the choice of optimal therapy. Prognostic models to identify patients at high or low risk for recurrence have been developed, and these models, along with positron emission tomography, are used to provide optimal therapy. The initial treatment for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma is based on the histologic characteristics of the disease, the stage at presentation, and the presence or absence of prognostic factors associated with poor outcome. Patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma commonly receive combined-modality therapies that include abbreviated courses of chemotherapy followed by involved-field radiation treatment. In contrast, patients with advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma commonly receive a more prolonged course of combination chemotherapy, with radiation therapy used only in selected cases. For patients with relapse or refractory disease, salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose treatment and an autologous stem cell transplant is the standard of care. For patients who are ineligible for this therapy or those in whom high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant have failed, treatment with brentuximab vedotin is a standard approach. Additional options include palliative chemotherapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant, or participation in a clinical trial testing novel agents. PMID:26541251

  14. Pathobiology of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Agostinelli, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a lymphoid tumour that represents about 1% of all de novo neoplasms occurring every year worldwide. Its diagnosis is based on the identification of characteristic neoplastic cells within an inflammatory milieu. Molecular studies have shown that most, if not all cases, belong to the same clonal population, which is derived from peripheral B-cells. The relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection at least in a proportion of patients was also demonstrated. The REAL/WHO classification recognizes a basic distinction between nodular lymphocyte predominance HL (NLPHL) and classic HL (CHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation, behavior, morphology, phenotype, molecular features as well as in the composition of their cellular background. CHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity and lymphocyte depleted. Despite its well known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. PMID:24959337

  15. Computed tomography of gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Buy, J N; Moss, A A

    1982-05-01

    The CT features in 12 patients with gastric lymphoma, four primary and eight secondary, were analyzed, correlated with other diagnostic studies, surgery, and pathologic features, and compared with the CT findings in 22 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. An abnormally thickened gastric wall (mean, 4.0 cm) was found in all patients with gastric lymphoma. Lymphomas of the stomach often involved more than one region of the stomach (83%). The contour of the outer gastric wall was smooth or lobulated in 42%, perigastric lymph adenopathy was common (58%), extension into adjacent organs was found in 42%, and 42% had lymphadenopathy at or below the renal pedicle.

  16. Idelalisib for the treatment of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a review of its clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Jacqueline C

    2016-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class, oral, selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ inhibitor that offers a chemotherapy-free option for patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (iNHL). Clinical trials in iNHL have evaluated idelalisib as monotherapy and as combination therapy with rituximab, bendamustine, and rituximab + bendamustine. When administered to heavily pretreated patients with R/R iNHL, idelalisib monotherapy or combination therapy showed durable antitumor activity accompanied by sustained or improved quality-of-life outcomes. Idelalisib has an acceptable safety profile; however, serious or fatal diarrhea/colitis, hepatoxicity, pneumonitis, and intestinal perforation have occurred in treated patients. Selective inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ with idelalisib is a valuable addition to available treatment options for patients with iNHL, many of whom do not respond to or cannot tolerate chemoimmunotherapy. Two Phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of idelalisib as combination therapy with rituximab or bendamustine + rituximab and a Phase I trial of idelalisib in combination with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ONO/GS-4059 in R/R B-cell malignancies are currently ongoing. A Phase III monotherapy trial in previously treated follicular lymphoma or small lymphocytic lymphoma is planned. The development of other kinase inhibitors for the treatment of iNHL raises the potential for new treatment combinations. Additional research is needed to determine optimal therapy (monotherapy vs combination regimens), treatment sequencing, and long-term management.

  17. Idelalisib for the treatment of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a review of its clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Jacqueline C

    2016-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class, oral, selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ inhibitor that offers a chemotherapy-free option for patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (iNHL). Clinical trials in iNHL have evaluated idelalisib as monotherapy and as combination therapy with rituximab, bendamustine, and rituximab + bendamustine. When administered to heavily pretreated patients with R/R iNHL, idelalisib monotherapy or combination therapy showed durable antitumor activity accompanied by sustained or improved quality-of-life outcomes. Idelalisib has an acceptable safety profile; however, serious or fatal diarrhea/colitis, hepatoxicity, pneumonitis, and intestinal perforation have occurred in treated patients. Selective inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ with idelalisib is a valuable addition to available treatment options for patients with iNHL, many of whom do not respond to or cannot tolerate chemoimmunotherapy. Two Phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of idelalisib as combination therapy with rituximab or bendamustine + rituximab and a Phase I trial of idelalisib in combination with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ONO/GS-4059 in R/R B-cell malignancies are currently ongoing. A Phase III monotherapy trial in previously treated follicular lymphoma or small lymphocytic lymphoma is planned. The development of other kinase inhibitors for the treatment of iNHL raises the potential for new treatment combinations. Additional research is needed to determine optimal therapy (monotherapy vs combination regimens), treatment sequencing, and long-term management. PMID:27274288

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Angela M; Hurley, M Yadira

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which are broadly divided into cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. These classifications include numerous distinct entities, all with varying clinical presentations and disease courses. Herein, we will review the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including Mycosis Fungoides, Sézary syndrome, CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as other less common entities. Cutaneous B-cell lymphomas will also be discussed, including primary cutaneous marginal zoned lymphoma, cutaneous follicle-center lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type, as well as other less common entities. Accurate and early diagnosis is key, as the treatment and prognosis varies significantly between conditions. PMID:26455060

  19. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  20. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  1. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  2. Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  3. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  4. Epitheliotropic lymphoma in a dog.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, H

    2000-01-01

    Despite treatment with steroids, nodular areas of alopecia and erythematous skin lesions persisted in a 9-year-old Irish water spaniel with discoid lupus. Epitheliotropic lymphoma was diagnosed by skin biopsy. PMID:10945129

  5. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Bonnie K; Gardner, Heather L; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C; Russell, Duncan S; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K; London, Cheryl A; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J; Kisseberth, William C

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  7. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C.; Russell, Duncan S.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K.; London, Cheryl A.; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.; Kisseberth, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  8. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  12. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de Los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-06-28

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  13. Management of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma: still a treatment challenge.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jia; Coleman, Morton; Leonard, John P

    2009-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a distinct subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that remains incurable, and is associated with a median survival of approximately 5 years. Management of patients with relapsed or refractory disease is challenging. The major therapeutic goal in MCL management is to improve survival and quality of life whenever possible. Progress has been made in MCL therapy in the past decade based on clinical experimentation with novel agents and combinations. There is a growing list of conventional and novel agents in our armamentarium, consisting of not only additional chemotherapy combinations including high-dose approaches, but also biologically targeted reagents such as the monoclonal antibody rituximab, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus, immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic agents including thalidomide and lenalidomide, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, as well as a renewed interest in older compounds such as bendamustine and metronomic regimens. Efficacy evaluations for individual agents and rational combinations are in various stages of development, while treatment selection based on molecular and clinical prognostic scores is yet to be tested. In the absence of evidence demonstrating relative survival advantages of various second-line options, management of relapsed and refractory disease should be individualized. Involvement of a lymphoma center participating in clinical trials of novel MCL treatments is encouraged.

  14. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (1): angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified and anaplastic large cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T/NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of the histological subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. It will be published in two parts : the first is focused on the three more frequent entities, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second (which will appear in the november issue) will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. T or NK cell lymphoproliferative disorders with leukemic presentation, primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and very rare subtypes of PTCL whose prevalence is less than 5% (hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma) will not be discussed herein. PMID:26481023

  15. Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  17. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma limited to the skin: clinical, histopathological and molecular analysis of 6 pediatric cases. A report from the ALCL99 study.

    PubMed

    Oschlies, Ilske; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Lamant, Laurence; Nakazawa, Atsuko; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Hansson, Ulrika; Hebeda, Konnie; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Maldyk, Jadwiga; Müllauer, Leonhard; Tinguely, Marianne; Stücker, Markus; Ledeley, Marie-Cecile; Siebert, Reiner; Reiter, Alfred; Brugières, Laurence; Klapper, Wolfram; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas are peripheral T-cell lymphomas that are characterized by a proliferation of large anaplastic blasts expressing CD30. In children, systemic anaplastic large cell lymphomas often present at advanced clinical stage and harbor translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene leading to the expression of chimeric anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-fusion proteins. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is regarded as an ALK-negative variant confined to the skin and is part of the spectrum of primary cutaneous CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Thirty-three of 487 pediatric patients registered within the Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma-99 trial (1999 to 2006) presented with a skin limited CD30-positive lympho-proliferative disorder. In 23 of the 33 patients, material for international histopathological review was available, and the cases were studied for histopathological, immunophenotypical and clinical features as well as for breaks within the ALK gene. Five of 23 cases and one additional case (identified after closure of the trial) expressed ALK-protein. Complete staging excluded any other organ involvement in all children. Expression of ALK proteins was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in all cases and the presence of breaks of the ALK gene was genetically confirmed in 5 evaluable cases. The histopathological and clinical picture of these skin-restricted ALK-positive lymphomas was indistinguishable from that of cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Five children presented with a single skin lesion that was completely resected in 4 and incompletely resected in one. Three of these patients received no further therapy, 2 additional local radiotherapy, and one chemotherapy. All children remain in complete remission with a median follow up of seven years (range 1-8 years). We present 6 pediatric cases of ALK-positive primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphomas. After thorough

  1. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  2. Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Intraocular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Retinal Lymphoma

  3. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Small-molecule inhibitors of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Miduturu, Chandra V; Kanda, Shigeru; Zhang, Jianming; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Salah, Eidarus; Deng, Xianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Knapp, Stefan; Gray, Nathanael S; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-04-20

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here, we report the identification of types I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.

  7. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  8. The Current State of Clinical Application of Serum Biomarkers for Canine Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Serum biomarkers of canine lymphoma activity for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy monitoring have been of clinical interest for more than a decade. Tumor products, biochemical enzymes, cytokines, metabolic profiling, leakage enzymes, as well as serum proteins have been studied as biomarkers for lymphoma. Multiple biomarkers combined have been shown to be most sensitive and specific. C-reactive protein, thymidine kinase 1, and haptoglobin have been most extensively studied and commercialized in diagnostic tests, the TK Canine Cancer Panel and the Canine Lymphoma Blood Test. These tests have been evaluated either in cohorts of diseased and healthy dogs or in prospective studies of ill dogs, respectively, for application to clinical decision-making. Some evidence exists for application of these tests, but large-scale studies are lacking in a broad range of lymphoma forms. These biomarkers are commonly elevated at diagnosis and at relapse. Further study is necessary to determine if early intervention guided by biomarker elevation will improve quantity or quality of life for dogs with lymphoma. PMID:27747218

  9. Recurrent mutations of the STAT6 DNA binding domain in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Olga; Guiter, Chrystelle; Castellano, Flavia; Dorsch, Karola; Melzner, Julia; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Dubois, Gwendoline; Gaulard, Philippe; Möller, Peter; Leroy, Karen

    2009-08-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a separate entity of aggressive B-cell lymphoma, characterized by a constitutive activation of janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, also observed in Hodgkin lymphoma. Although many cancers exhibit constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation, mutations of STAT genes have not been reported in neoplasms. Here, we show that MedB-1 PMBL-derived and L1236 Hodgkin-derived cell lines and 20 of 55 (36%) PMBL cases harbor heterozygous missense mutations in STAT6 DNA binding domain, whereas no mutation was found in 25 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. In 3 cases, somatic origin was indicated by the absence of the mutations in the nontumoral tissue. The pattern of STAT6 mutations was different from the classical features of somatic hypermutations. The mutant STAT6 proteins showed a decreased DNA binding ability in transfected HEK cells, but no decrease in expression of STAT6 canonical target genes was observed in PMBL cases with a mutated STAT6 gene. Although the oncogenic properties of STAT6 mutant proteins remain to be determined, their recurrent selection in PMBL strongly argues for their involvement in the pathogenesis of this aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:19423726

  10. Characterization of the novel indolylmaleimides' PDA-66 and PDA-377 effect on canine lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura C.; Roolf, Catrin; Pews-Davtyan, Anahit; Rütgen, Barbara C.; Hammer, Sabine; Willenbrock, Saskia; Sekora, Anett; Rolfs, Arndt; Beller, Matthias; Brenig, Bertram; Nolte, Ingo; Junghanss, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors are widely used in chemotherapeutic cancer regimens. Maleimide derivatives such as SB-216763 act as GSK-3 inhibitor targeting cell proliferation, cell death and cell cycle progression. Herein, the two arylindolylmaleimide derivatives PDA-66 and PDA-377 were evaluated as potential chemotherapeutic agents on canine B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Canine lymphoma represents a naturally occurring model closely resembling the human high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). PDA-66 showed more pronounced effects on both cell lines. Application of 2.5μM PDA-66 resulted in a significant induction of apoptosis (approx. 11 %), decrease of the metabolic activity (approx. 95 %), anti-proliferative effect (approx. 85 %) and cell death within 48h. Agent induced mode of action was characterized by whole transcriptome sequencing, 12 h and 24 h post-agent exposure. Key PDA-66-modulated pathways identified were cell cycle, DNA replication and p53 signaling. Expression analyses indicated that the drug acting mechanism is mediated through DNA replication and cycle arrest involving the spindle assembly checkpoint. In conclusion, both PDA derivatives displayed strong anti-proliferation activity in canine B-cell lymphoma cells. The cell and molecular PDA-induced effect characterization and the molecular characterization of the agent acting mechanism provides the basis for further evaluation of a potential drug for canine lymphoma serving as model for human NHL. PMID:27177088

  11. PDGFR blockade is a rational and effective therapy for NPM-ALK-driven lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Daniela; Dolznig, Helmut; Kollmann, Karoline; Vesely, Paul W; Schlederer, Michaela; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Hassler, Melanie R; Heider, Susi; Amenitsch, Lena; Thallinger, Christiane; Staber, Philipp B; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Artaker, Matthias; Lagger, Sabine; Turner, Suzanne D; Pileri, Stefano; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Valent, Peter; Messana, Katia; Landra, Indira; Weichhart, Thomas; Knapp, Sylvia; Shehata, Medhat; Todaro, Maria; Sexl, Veronika; Höfler, Gerald; Piva, Roberto; Medico, Enzo; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Cheng, Mangeng; Eferl, Robert; Egger, Gerda; Penninger, Josef M; Jaeger, Ulrich; Moriggl, Richard; Inghirami, Giorgio; Kenner, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma found in children and young adults. ALCLs frequently carry a chromosomal translocation that results in expression of the oncoprotein nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK). The key molecular downstream events required for NPM-ALK-triggered lymphoma growth have been only partly unveiled. Here we show that the activator protein 1 family members JUN and JUNB promote lymphoma development and tumor dissemination through transcriptional regulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRB) in a mouse model of NPM-ALK-triggered lymphomagenesis. Therapeutic inhibition of PDGFRB markedly prolonged survival of NPM-ALK transgenic mice and increased the efficacy of an ALK-specific inhibitor in transplanted NPM-ALK tumors. Notably, inhibition of PDGFRA and PDGFRB in a patient with refractory late-stage NPM-ALK(+) ALCL resulted in rapid, complete and sustained remission. Together, our data identify PDGFRB as a previously unknown JUN and JUNB target that could be a highly effective therapy for ALCL.

  12. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Conditional TPM3-ALK and NPM-ALK transgenic mice develop reversible ALK-positive early B-cell lymphoma/leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giuriato, Sylvie; Foisseau, Marianne; Dejean, Emilie; Felsher, Dean W; Al Saati, Talal; Demur, Cécile; Ragab, Ashraf; Kruczynski, Anna; Schiff, Claudine; Delsol, Georges; Meggetto, Fabienne

    2010-05-20

    NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase) and TPM3-ALK (nonmuscular tropomyosin 3-anaplastic lymphoma kinase) are oncogenic tyrosine kinases implicated in the pathogenesis of human ALK-positive lymphoma. We report here the development of novel conditional mouse models for ALK-induced lymphomagenesis, with the use of the tetracycline regulatory system under the control of the EmuSRalpha enhancer/promoter. The expression of either oncogene resulted in the arrest of the differentiation of early B cells and lymphomagenesis. We also observed the development of skin keratoacanthoma lesions, probably because of aberrant ALK expression in keratinocytes. The inactivation of the ALK oncogene on doxycycline treatment was sufficient to induce sustained regression of both hematopoietic tumors and skin disease. Importantly, treatment with the specific ALK inhibitor (PF-2341066) also reversed the pathologic states, showing the value of these mouse models for the validation of ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Thus, our results show (1) that NPM-ALK and TPM3-ALK oncogenes are sufficient for lymphoma/leukemia development and required for tumor maintenance, hence validating ALK as potentially effective therapeutic target; and (2) for the first time, in vivo, the equal tumorigenic potential of the NPM-ALK and TPM3-ALK oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Our models offer a new tool to investigate in vivo the molecular mechanisms associated with ALK-induced lymphoproliferative disorders.

  14. Cure of incurable lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-10-01

    The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

  15. Induction of autophagy by valproic acid enhanced lymphoma cell chemosensitivity through HDAC-independent and IP3-mediated PRKAA activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meng-Meng; Wang, Li; Zhan, Qin; Xue, Wen; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Xia; Xu, Peng-Peng; Shen, Yang; Liu, Han; Janin, Anne; Cheng, Shu; Zhao, Wei-Li

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is closely related to tumor cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. The HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) interacted synergistically with chemotherapeutic agents to trigger lymphoma cell autophagy, which resulted from activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and inhibition of downstream MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin [serine/threonine kinase]) signaling. In an HDAC-independent manner, VPA potentiated the effect of doxorubicin on lymphoma cell autophagy via reduction of cellular inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3), blockade of calcium into mitochondria and modulation of PRKAA1/2-MTOR cascade. In murine xenograft models established with subcutaneous injection of lymphoma cells, dual treatment of VPA and doxorubicin initiated IP3-mediated calcium depletion and PRKAA1/2 activation, induced in situ autophagy and efficiently retarded tumor growth. Aberrant genes involving mitochondrial calcium transfer were frequently observed in primary tumors of lymphoma patients. Collectively, these findings suggested an HDAC-independent chemosensitizing activity of VPA and provided an insight into the clinical application of targeting autophagy in the treatment of lymphoma.

  16. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  17. Malignant lymphoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zapater, E; Bagán, J V; Carbonell, F; Basterra, J

    2010-03-01

    Malignant lymphomas represent approximately 5% of all malignant neoplasms of the head and neck area. They are classically divided into two subgroups, Hodgkin's lymphomas (HLs) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). We describe the clinical characteristics of head and neck lymphomas and the methods to establish the diagnosis. The World Health Organization classification of lymphoid tissues describes more than 50 different histological types, and we analyse the most common staging system for lymphomas, the Ann Arbor staging system. Finally, the different therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:20374502

  18. Lymphoma Secondary to Congenital and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes at a Turkish Pediatric Oncology Center.

    PubMed

    Tanyildiz, Hikmet G; Dincaslan, Handan; Yavuz, Gulsan; Unal, Emel; Ikinciogulları, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Tacyildiz, Nurdan

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of lymphoma in primary immunodeficiency cases and autoimmune diseases, as well as on a background of immunodeficiency following organ transplants, is increasing. The lymphoma treatment success rate is known to be a low prognosis. Our study aimed to emphasize the low survival rates in immunodeficient vs. immunocompetent lymphoma patients and also to investigate the effect of rituximab in patients with ataxia telangiectasia and other immunodeficiencies. We summarized the clinical characteristics and treatment results of 17 cases with primary immunodeficiency that developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) retrospectively. Seven patients were diagnosed with ataxia-telangiectasia, two with common variable immunodeficiency, two with selective IgA deficiency, one with X-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, one with Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) deficiency, and one with lymphoma developing after autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). One patient underwent a renal transplant. Of the nine males and eight females (aged 3-12 years, median = 7) that developed lymphoma, seven were diagnosed with HL and ten with NHL (seven B-cell, three T-cell). The NHL patients were started on the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster, POG9317, LMB-96, or R-CHOP treatment protocols with reduced chemotherapy dosages. HL cases were started on the doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and/or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) protocol, also with modified dosages. Importantly, all seven cases of HL are alive and in remission, while six of the ten NHL patients have died. Primary immunodeficiency is a strong predisposing factor for developing lymphoma. Low treatment success rates relative to other lymphomas and difficulties encountered during treatment indicate that new treatment agents are needed

  19. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Gastric lymphoma: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Savio, Antonella

    2011-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma is frequently difficult for the general histopathologist. During recent years there have been relevant changes in the therapeutic approach to gastric MALT lymphoma and our knowledge about its pathogenesis has greatly improved. The management of this disease actually requires a close cooperation between the histopathologist and the clinicians. The histology report of biopsies of a newly diagnosed or of an already treated case implies information of clinical and therapeutical relevance. This paper aims at giving the histopathologist a general knowledge about the state of art of this disease and its management. The diagnostic process leading to a complete and competent report is then described step by step.

  5. [Cutaneous lymphomas: new entities and rare variants].

    PubMed

    Kempf, W; Mitteldorf, C

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are the second most common group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Recently several new variants and entities have been described but have not yet become part of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. These forms include the granulomatous form of mycosis fungoides, which is associated with a poorer prognosis, as well as indolent CD8+ lymphoproliferations on the head and at acral localizations. Within the group of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, new histological types of lymphomatoid papulosis have been identified, such as type D (CD8+ epidermotropic) and type E (angioinvasive) which simulate aggressive lymphomas. Cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a prognostically heterogeneous group of cutaneous lymphomas. The cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma are very aggressive neoplasms, whereas cutaneous CD4+ small to medium-sized T-cell lymphoma in its solitary or localized form represents an indolent lymphoproliferation: the terminology, histogenesis and differentiation from nodular T-cell pseudolymphoma are still a matter of debate. Among B-cell lymphomas, disorders associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed focusing on EBV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly and EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer. This review describes the clinical, histological and immunophenotypic features of new and rare entities and variants of cutaneous lymphomas and highlights the impact of the clinicopathological correlation in the diagnostic process.

  6. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  7. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  8. Whole exome sequencing in families at high risk for Hodgkin lymphoma: identification of a predisposing mutation in the KDR gene

    PubMed Central

    Rotunno, Melissa; McMaster, Mary L.; Boland, Joseph; Bass, Sara; Zhang, Xijun; Burdett, Laurie; Hicks, Belynda; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Yeager, Meredith; Fontaine, Laura; Hyland, Paula L.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Goldin, Lynn R.

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma shows strong familial aggregation but no major susceptibility genes have been identified to date. The goal of this study was to identify high-penetrance variants using whole exome sequencing in 17 Hodgkin lymphoma prone families with three or more affected cases or obligate carriers (69 individuals), followed by targeted sequencing in an additional 48 smaller HL families (80 individuals). Alignment and variant calling were performed using standard methods. Dominantly segregating, rare, coding or potentially functional variants were further prioritized based on predicted deleteriousness, conservation, and potential importance in lymphoid malignancy pathways. We selected 23 genes for targeted sequencing. Only the p.A1065T variant in KDR (kinase insert domain receptor) also known as VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) was replicated in two independent Hodgkin lymphoma families. KDR is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, the main mediator of vascular endothelial growth factor induced proliferation, survival, and migration. Its activity is associated with several diseases including lymphoma. Functional experiments have shown that p.A1065T, located in the activation loop, can promote constitutive autophosphorylation on tyrosine in the absence of vascular endothelial growth factor and that the kinase activity was abrogated after exposure to kinase inhibitors. A few other promising mutations were identified but appear to be “private”. In conclusion, in the largest sequenced cohort of Hodgkin lymphoma families to date, we identified a causal mutation in the KDR gene. While independent validation is needed, this mutation may increase downstream tumor cell proliferation activity and might be a candidate for targeted therapy. PMID:27365461

  9. Whole exome sequencing in families at high risk for Hodgkin lymphoma: identification of a predisposing mutation in the KDR gene.

    PubMed

    Rotunno, Melissa; McMaster, Mary L; Boland, Joseph; Bass, Sara; Zhang, Xijun; Burdett, Laurie; Hicks, Belynda; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T; Yeager, Meredith; Fontaine, Laura; Hyland, Paula L; Goldstein, Alisa M; Chanock, Stephen J; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret A; Goldin, Lynn R

    2016-07-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma shows strong familial aggregation but no major susceptibility genes have been identified to date. The goal of this study was to identify high-penetrance variants using whole exome sequencing in 17 Hodgkin lymphoma prone families with three or more affected cases or obligate carriers (69 individuals), followed by targeted sequencing in an additional 48 smaller HL families (80 individuals). Alignment and variant calling were performed using standard methods. Dominantly segregating, rare, coding or potentially functional variants were further prioritized based on predicted deleteriousness, conservation, and potential importance in lymphoid malignancy pathways. We selected 23 genes for targeted sequencing. Only the p.A1065T variant in KDR (kinase insert domain receptor) also known as VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) was replicated in two independent Hodgkin lymphoma families. KDR is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, the main mediator of vascular endothelial growth factor induced proliferation, survival, and migration. Its activity is associated with several diseases including lymphoma. Functional experiments have shown that p.A1065T, located in the activation loop, can promote constitutive autophosphorylation on tyrosine in the absence of vascular endothelial growth factor and that the kinase activity was abrogated after exposure to kinase inhibitors. A few other promising mutations were identified but appear to be "private". In conclusion, in the largest sequenced cohort of Hodgkin lymphoma families to date, we identified a causal mutation in the KDR gene. While independent validation is needed, this mutation may increase downstream tumor cell proliferation activity and might be a candidate for targeted therapy. PMID:27365461

  10. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-05

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  14. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage

  15. Computational diagnosis of canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkes, E. M.; Alexandrakis, I.; Slater, K.; Tuli, R.; Gorban, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    One out of four dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime and 20% of those will be lymphoma cases. PetScreen developed a lymphoma blood test using serum samples collected from several veterinary practices. The samples were fractionated and analysed by mass spectrometry. Two protein peaks, with the highest diagnostic power, were selected and further identified as acute phase proteins, C-Reactive Protein and Haptoglobin. Data mining methods were then applied to the collected data for the development of an online computer-assisted veterinary diagnostic tool. The generated software can be used as a diagnostic, monitoring and screening tool. Initially, the diagnosis of lymphoma was formulated as a classification problem and then later refined as a lymphoma risk estimation. Three methods, decision trees, kNN and probability density evaluation, were used for classification and risk estimation and several preprocessing approaches were implemented to create the diagnostic system. For the differential diagnosis the best solution gave a sensitivity and specificity of 83.5% and 77%, respectively (using three input features, CRP, Haptoglobin and standard clinical symptom). For the screening task, the decision tree method provided the best result, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.4% and >99%, respectively (using the same input features). Furthermore, the development and application of new techniques for the generation of risk maps allowed their user-friendly visualization.

  16. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Gene Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; HIV Infection; AIDS Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  19. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  20. Computational Study of the Structure, the Flexibility, and the Electronic Circular Dichroism of Staurosporine - a Powerful Protein Kinase Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana G.; Singh, Warispreet; Christov, Christo Z.

    2014-07-01

    Staurosporine (STU) is a microbial alkaloid which is an universal kinase inhibitor. In order to understand its mechanism of action it is important to explore its structure-properties relationships. In this paper we provide the results of a computational study of the structure, the chiroptical properties, the conformational flexibility of STU as well as the correlation between the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra and the structure of its complex with anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

  1. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic

  2. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  3. Pathobiology of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pileri, Stefano A; Zinzani, Pier L; Gaidano, Gianluca; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Rossi, Maura; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Controversy still exists over the response to therapy and prognosis of patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). Recent data from the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group (IELSG) suggest that a MACOP-B (methotrexate, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, bleomycin) chemotherapy regimen followed by radiotherapy may be a better induction strategy than other previously used treatments. Although the pathobiology of PMBL has been widely studied, its precise histology, phenotype, and molecular characteristics are still not clear. To date, phenotypic analysis has revealed the following phenotype: positivity for CD45 and CD20, but negativity for CD3, CD10, CD21, Class I/II major histocompatibility antigens, and a variety of other immunohistochemical markers. CD79a is generally detected, despite an absence of surface immunoglobulins (Igs). CD30 staining is observed in most cases, but is weaker and less homogeneous than in classic Hodgkin's lymphoma or anaplastic large cell lymphoma. BCL-2 protein is usually expressed but there are few data describing the expression of MUM1/IRF4, PAX5/BSAP, BCL-6, or the B-cell transcription factors BOB.1, Oct-2, and PU.1. Cytogenetic studies reveal gains in segments of chromosome 9p, including amplification of the REL proto-oncogene and the tyrosine kinase gene JAK2. Other molecular findings include: C-myc mutations or rearrangements, p53 mutations, IgV(H), gene mutations, and bcl-2 and mal over-expression. bcl-6 mutations and bcl-2 gene rearrangements are generally absent, suggesting that PMBL is of pre-germinal center (GC) origin. However, two recent reports show isotype-switched Ig genes with a high frequency of somatic hypermutations as well as variants in the 5' noncoding region of the bcl-6 gene. The IELSG collected 137 PMBL cases for extensive pathologic review. Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with sclerosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation. It

  4. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T cell lymphoma (2): extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T /NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of histologic subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. The first part published in the October issue was focused on the three more frequent entities, i.e. angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second part presented herein will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26576610

  5. [Malignant Lymphoma of the Brain, and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    A differential diagnosis of acute and subacute progressive dementias includes malignant lymphoma of the brain. We reviewed primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL), lymphomatosis cerebri, and the relapse and invasion of systemic lymphomas. PCNSL is confined to the central nervous system; the infiltration and compression by the lymphoma result in adverse neurological symptoms. IVL is a rare form of malignant lymphoma that is characterized by the proliferation of primarily B-cell type lymphoma cells within the blood vessels of various organs. This causes ischemia and results in the associated neurological symptoms. Medical history and neuroimaging studies provide crucial informations to distinguish the lymphomas from other diseases that cause dementia, such an Alzheimer's disease. MRI imaging of the brain using contrast agent, and the biopsy of diseased tissues are essential for the diagnosis of the lymphomas. A histopathological examination is the most effective way to diagnose malignant lymphomas of the brain. Presently, the treatment of choice for PCNSL is the intravenous administration of high dose methotrexate with and without radiation therapy. Futhermore, Rituximab-containing chemotherapy has proved to greatly improve the prognosis of IVL. A better outcome can be achieved with the earlier diagnosis and treatment of the malignant lymphoma of the brain.

  6. Discovery of a BTK/MNK Dual Inhibitor for Lymphoma and Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Hu, Chen; Wang, Aoli; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Chen, Yongfei; Yun, Cai-Hong; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Yan; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bei; Wang, Jinhua; Zhao, Zheng; Liang, Yanke; Li, Binhua; Wang, Li; Wang, Beilei; Chen, Cheng; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Nonami, Atsushi; Li, Yuyang; Fernandes, Stacey M.; Adamia, Sophia; Stone, Richard M.; Galinsky, Ilene A.; Wang, Xianhuo; Yang, Guang; Griffin, James D.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Eck, Michael J.; Liu, Jing; Gray, Nathanael S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    BTK kinase is a member of the TEC kinase family and is a key regulator of the B-cell Receptor (BCR)-mediated signaling pathway. It is important for B-cell maturation, proliferation, survival and metastasis. Pharmacological inhibition of BTK is clinically effective against a variety of B-cell malignances, such as MCL, CLL and AML. MNK kinase is one of the key downstream regulators in the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway and controls protein synthesis via regulating the activity of eIF4E. Inhibition of MNK activity has shown moderate efficacy for AML cell lines proliferation. Through a structure-based drug design approach, we have discovered a selective and potent BTK/MNK dual kinase inhibitor (QL-X-138), which exhibits covalent binding to BTK and non-covalent binding to MNK. Compared to the BTK kinase inhibitor (PCI-32765) and the MNK kinase inhibitor (cercosporamide), QL-X-138 displays a stronger anti-proliferative effect against a variety of B-cell cancer cell lines, as well as AML and CLL primary patient cells. The agent can effectively arrest the growth of lymphoma and leukemia cells at the G0–G1 stage and can induce strong apoptotic cell death. These results demonstrated that simultaneous inhibition of BTK and MNK kinase activity might be a new therapeutic strategy for B-cell malignances. PMID:26165234

  7. Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

  8. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  9. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  10. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  11. Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  12. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  13. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  14. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  15. Prokaryotic Diacylglycerol Kinase and Undecaprenol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) and undecaprenol kinase (UDPK) are the lone members of a family of multispan membrane enzymes that are very small, lack relationships to any other family of proteins—including water soluble kinases, and that exhibit an unusual structure and active site architecture. Escherichia coli DAGK plays an important role in recycling diacylglycerol produced as a byproduct of biosynthesis of molecules located in the periplasmic space. UDPK seems to play an analogous role in Gram-positive bacteria, where its importance is evident by the fact that UDPK is essential for biofilm formation by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. DAGK has also long served as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, folding, stability, and structure. This review explores our current understanding of the microbial physiology, enzymology, structural biology, and folding of the prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase family, which is based on over 40 years of studies. PMID:22224599

  16. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Primary Gastric Burkitt’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Swarupa; Mehta, Anurag; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Anila; Louis, A. Robert; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Saxena, Upasna; Simson, David K.; Dewan, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    The primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, although rare, is among the most common extra-nodal lymphomas, considering that gastric lymphomas are more common than intestinal lymphomas. Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is typically endemic in Africa, while non-endemic cases are found in the rest of the world. Primary gastric BL is extremely rare and only around 50 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we present the case of a young HIV-negative male, who was referred to our department with a stage IV gastric BL. He was planned for palliative chemotherapy, but after the first cycle of chemotherapy he succumbed to the progression of the disease. PMID:25568743

  18. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  19. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  20. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  1. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  2. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Melissa A; Riddle, Christy C; Triana, Emily M; Jones, Dan; Duvic, Madeleine

    2005-09-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas include extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma, and, rarely, mantle cell lymphoma. Our purpose in conducting this review was to determine the clinical and behavioral characteristics of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, their relationship to infectious triggers, and therapeutic response. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 23 adult patients presenting to the dermatology clinic at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma between January 1999 and May 2003. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas generally present on the head and neck, with the trunk and extremities afflicted to a lesser extent. Patients were found to have serologic evidence of prior infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (n = 10), Helicobacter pylori (n = 5), and Epstein-Barr virus (n = 6). Overall, treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma should involve multiple modalities; however, specific treatment aimed at concurrent or suspected infection, particularly B burgdorferi, is a helpful adjunct and may achieve complete remission in a small subset of patients.

  3. Primary bony Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Mirjalili, Mohammad Reza; Akhavan, Ali; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma most commonly presents with progressive painless enlargement of peripheral lymph nodes, especially around the cervical region. At the time of diagnosis osseous involvement is uncommon and even in the late stages only 9–35% of cases have any bony involvement. Rarely Hodgkin’s lymphoma presents as an osseous lesion without involvement of lymph nodes, therefore the histological diagnosis of osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma can be problematic. Here, the authors present a rare case of primary osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a review of the literature. PMID:22787180

  4. Primary splenic lymphoma with filiform ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, U R; Eyden, B P; Banerjee, S S; Reeve, N L

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary large cell splenic lymphoma of B lineage exhibiting filiform cell appearance is reported. The patient presented with massive splenomegaly, and following spontaneous splenic rupture, died of adult respiratory distress syndrome. The clinical aspects of the case, notably a lymphoma arising as a primary tumour in the spleen, with spontaneous spleen rupture and rapid fatal outcome, in combination with the filiform appearance of the lymphoma on electron microscopic examination, constitute an unusual combination of features. As far as is known, this B cell neoplasm is only the second primary splenic lymphoma of filiform type to be recorded. Images PMID:8331186

  5. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Primary anaplastic large-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants

    PubMed Central

    Popplewell, Leslie; Thomas, Sandra H.; Huang, Qin; Chang, Karen L.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Primary T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the breast is a rare entity, which has been reported in association with breast implants. In a retrospective analysis of the City of Hope pathology database, we uncovered nine such patients, eight of whom had breast implants proximal to primary ALCL. The diagnosis of ALCL in the implant capsule occurred at a median of 7 years (range 5–30) following implant surgery, and median patient age was 45.5 years (range 32–62). Malignancy was effusion-associated in 2 cases and tissue-associated in 6. Seven patients were negative for anaplastic large-cell kinase (ALK) and one patient was positive. Treatment and follow-up data were available for four patients, all tissue-associated cases: two patients were lost to follow-up after failing to mobilize stem cells and two patients were in remission, 6 years and 7.5 years post autologous transplant. These cases represent 24% of reported primary ALCL cases associated with breast implants. Our review of these cases and the literature suggest that 1) there is a strong skew in primary breast lymphomas associated with implant capsules toward T-cell, ALCL ALK-, and 2) the disease course for tissue-associated cases is not always indolent, with four patients requiring multiple treatment regimens PMID:21699454

  7. Novel Therapeutics for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Fisher, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    Application of advances in genomic and proteomic technologies has provided molecular insights into distinct types of aggressive B- and T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). This has led to the validation of novel biomarkers of classification, risk-stratification, and druggable targets. The promise of novel treatments from genomic research has been slow to materialize because of the lack of a therapeutic signature for the distinct NHL subtypes. Patients with lymphoma with aggressive disease urgently require the development of novel therapies on the basis of investigation of dysregulated intracellular oncogenic processes that arise during lymphomagenesis. Although monoclonal antibodies have made significant contributions to the armamentarium of B-cell NHL therapy (eg, anti-CD20), parallel development of small-molecule inhibitors (SMIs) to intracellular targets has lagged behind. Despite these deficiencies, several promising anti-NHL therapies are in development that target immune kinases of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, mammalian target of rapamycin complex, proteasome, DNA/histone epigenetic complex, antiapoptosis, neoangiogenesis, and immune modulation. This review focuses on novel SMI therapeutic strategies that target overlapping core oncogenic pathways in the context of the 10 hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, we have developed the concept of a therapeutic signature using the 10 hallmarks of cancer, which may be incorporated into novel phase I/II drug development programs. PMID:21483007

  8. Molecular genetics of cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S

    2001-09-01

    The underlying molecular basis of primary cutaneous lymphomas has not yet been clarified. However, abnormalities of cell cycle control genes and well-defined tumor suppressor genes such as p53 are common and may contribute to disease progression and treatment resistance. Biallelic inactivation of tumor suppressor genes usually occurs by a combination of deletion, point mutation, and/or promotor hypermethylation. The detection of UVB-specific mutations of p53 requires confirmation but may have important implications for the management of patients with mycosis fungoides. Molecular cytogenetic studies have identified common regions of chromosomal deletion and amplification, which suggests the presence and location of genes that are of critical importance in the pathogenesis of cutaneous lymphoma.

  9. Molecular Profiling of Aggressive Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Gazzola, Anna; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Pileri, Stefano A.; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, several studies of molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas were performed. In particular, it was shown that DLBCL can be distinguished in two different entities according to GEP. Specifically, ABC and GCB subtypes were characterized by having different pathogenetic and clinical features. In addition, it was demonstrated that DLBCLs are distinct from BL. Indeed, the latter is a unique molecular entity. However, relevant pathological differences emerged among the clinical subtypes. More recently, microRNA profiling provided further information concerning BL-DLBCL distinction as well as for their subclassification. In this paper, the authors based on their own experience and the most updated literature review, the main concept on molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas. PMID:22190944

  10. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

  11. A novel Patient Derived Tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma translocation

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Francesco; Todaro, Maria; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Boi, Michela; Landra, Indira; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Tabbo’, Fabrizio; Messana, Katia; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Gaudiano, Marcello; Aliberti, Sabrina; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Tousseyn, Thomas; Lasorsa, Elena; Crescenzo, Ramona; Bessone, Luca; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Rinaldi, Andrea; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Pera-Gresely, Benet; Cerchietti, Leandro; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kwee, Ivo; Piva, Roberto; Wlodarska, Iwona; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Although Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) carrying Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human Patient Derived Tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and of NFkB pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells lacking PRDM1/Blimp-1 and with c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to down-regulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Moreover, a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, but the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and are helpful tools for the implementation of patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  12. Anti-cancer activity of withaferin A in B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    McKenna, M K; Gachuki, B W; Alhakeem, S S; Oben, K N; Rangnekar, V M; Gupta, R C; Bondada, S

    2015-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a withanolide from the plant, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) used in Ayurvedic medicine, has been found to be valuable in the treatment of several medical ailments. WA has been found to have anticancer activity against various solid tumors, but its effects on hematological malignancies have not been studied in detail. WA strongly inhibited the survival of several human and murine B cell lymphoma cell lines. Additionally, in vivo studies with syngeneic-graft lymphoma cells suggest that WA inhibits the growth of tumor but does not affect other proliferative tissues. We demonstrate that WA inhibits the efficiency of NF-κB nuclear translocation in diffuse large B cell lymphomas and found that WA treatment resulted in a significant decrease in protein levels involved in B cell receptor signaling and cell cycle regulation. WA inhibited the activity of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 as reflected by a sharp increase in Hsp70 expression levels. Hence, we propose that the anti-cancer effects of WA in lymphomas are likely due to its ability to inhibit Hsp90 function and subsequent reduction of critical kinases and cell cycle regulators that are clients of Hsp90. PMID:26020511

  13. Biological characterization of adult MYC-translocation-positive mature B-cell lymphomas other than molecular Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Sietse M; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Rosolowski, Maciej; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Küppers, Ralf; Lenze, Dido; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Rosenwald, Andreas; Szczepanowski, Monika; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trautmann, Heiko; Wessendorf, Swen; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Kluin, Philip M; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations affecting the MYC oncogene are the biological hallmark of Burkitt lymphomas but also occur in a subset of other mature B-cell lymphomas. If accompanied by a chromosomal break targeting the BCL2 and/or BCL6 oncogene these MYC translocation-positive (MYC(+)) lymphomas are called double-hit lymphomas, otherwise the term single-hit lymphomas is applied. In order to characterize the biological features of these MYC(+) lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma we explored, after exclusion of molecular Burkitt lymphoma as defined by gene expression profiling, the molecular, pathological and clinical aspects of 80 MYC-translocation-positive lymphomas (31 single-hit, 46 double-hit and 3 MYC(+)-lymphomas with unknown BCL6 status). Comparison of single-hit and double-hit lymphomas revealed no difference in MYC partner (IG/non-IG), genomic complexity, MYC expression or gene expression profile. Double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-cell-like gene expression profile and had higher IGH and MYC mutation frequencies. Gene expression profiling revealed 130 differentially expressed genes between BCL6(+)/MYC(+) and BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas. BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-like gene expression profile. Analysis of all lymphomas according to MYC partner (IG/non-IG) revealed no substantial differences. In this series of lymphomas, in which immunochemotherapy was administered in only a minority of cases, single-hit and double-hit lymphomas had a similar poor outcome in contrast to the outcome of molecular Burkitt lymphoma and lymphomas without the MYC break. Our data suggest that, after excluding molecular Burkitt lymphoma and pediatric cases, MYC(+) lymphomas are biologically quite homogeneous with single-hit and double-hit lymphomas as well as IG-MYC and non-IG-MYC(+) lymphomas sharing various molecular characteristics.

  14. The Secretory Pathway Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Kinch, Lisa N.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a nearly universal post-translation modification involved in a plethora of cellular events. Even though phosphorylation of extracellular proteins had been observed, the identity of the kinases that phosphorylate secreted proteins remained a mystery until recently. Advances in genome sequencing and genetic studies have paved the way for the discovery of a new class of kinases that localize within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the extracellular space. These novel kinases phosphorylate proteins and proteoglycans in the secretory pathway and appear to regulate various extracellular processes. Mutations in these kinases cause human disease, thus underscoring the biological importance of phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. PMID:25862977

  15. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Vose, Julie M; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rosen, Steven T; Tobinai, Kensei

    2011-06-23

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of clinically aggressive diseases associated with poor outcome. Studies that focus specifically on PTCL are emerging, with the ultimate goal of improved understanding of disease biology and the development of more effective therapies. However, one of the difficulties in classifying and studying treatment options in clinical trials is the rarity of these subtypes. Various groups have developed lymphoma classifications over the years, including the World Health Organization, which updated its classification in 2008. This article briefly reviews the major lymphoma classification schema, highlights contributions made by the collaborative International PTCL Project, discusses prognostic issues and gene expression profiling, and outlines therapeutic approaches to PTCL. These include the standard chemotherapeutic regimens and other modalities incorporating antifolates, conjugates, histone deacetylase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, and signaling inhibitors. As this review emphasizes, the problem has now evolved into an abundance of drugs and too few patients available to test them. Collaborative groups will aid in future efforts to find the best treatment strategies to improve the outcome for patients with PTCL.

  16. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  17. Hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Mori, Minako; Inoue, Daichi; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Togami, Katsuhiro; Tabata, Sumie; Kurata, Masayuki; Imai, Yukihiro; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-04-01

    A 32-year-old male with chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a hospital with cellulitis in the right leg in September 2006. Pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and systemic superficial lymph node swelling were noted, and he was referred to our hospital. He developed fever and liver dysfunction in June 2007 and underwent a splenectomy. His pancytopenia subsequently improved. A pathologic diagnosis of hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma was made by examining spleen tissue and biopsy specimens of the liver and mesenteric lymph node. He had stage IVB disease because neoplastic T cells were noted in the bone marrow. The response of the lymphoma to conventional chemotherapy including the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) and DeVIC (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifoshamide, carboplatin) regimens was poor and transient. A partial remission was obtained with an ESHAP (etoposide, cisplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) regimen. Therefore, we planned a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an HLA-haploidentical sibling donor. He was moved to the Department of Hematology, Hyogo Medical College, to receive this BMT as part of a clinical trial. During the conditioning procedure for the transplantation, however, he died of septicemia. Since hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma is very rare with only 23 reported cases to date, herein we report this case and discuss the therapeutic strategy. PMID:20217452

  18. New Molecular Targets in Mantle Cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Samir; Weniger, Marc A.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a malignancy of mature B cells characterized by aberrant expression of cyclin D1 due to the translocation t(11;14). Epigenomic and genomic lesions in pathways regulating B-cell activation, cell cycle progression, protein homeostasis, DNA damage response, cell proliferation and apoptosis contribute to its pathogenesis. While patients typically respond to first-line chemotherapy, relapse is the rule resulting in a median survival of 5–7 years. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR appears as a key pathway in the pathogenesis and can be targeted with small molecules. Most experience is with mTOR inhibitors of the rapamycin class. Second-generation mTOR inhibitors and the PI3K inhibitor CAL-101 are novel options to more effectively target this pathway. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibition by PCI-32765 has promising activity and indicates immunoreceptor signaling as a novel therapeutic target. Up to 50% of relapsed patients respond to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib suggesting that MCL may be particularly sensitive to disruption of protein homeostasis and/or induction of oxidative stress. Recent work has focused on elucidating the mechanism of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors. DNA hypomethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors effect epigenetic de-repression of aberrantly silenced genes. These epigenetic pharmaceuticals and HSP90 inhibitors can synergize with proteasome inhibitors. Finally, BH3 mimetics are emerging as tools to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy. Participation in clinical trials offers patients a chance to benefit from these advances and is essential to maintain the momentum of progress. Innovative trial designs may be needed to expedite the clinical development of these targeted agents. PMID:21945517

  19. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic

  20. Adolescent non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Jessica; Waxman, Ian M; Kelly, Kara M; Morris, Erin; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2009-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common malignancy among adolescents, accounting for >25% of newly diagnosed cancers in the 15-19 year age group. Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) accounts for the majority (two-thirds) of cases, while the remainder of patients have one of four subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) including primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), Burkitt lymphoma (BL), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) or anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Epidemiology, histology, treatment and outcome differ between HL and NHL, as well as among the various subtypes of NHL. Adolescent lymphoma is particularly interesting because it often shares features with both childhood and adult lymphoma. As medical oncologists and paediatric oncologists often follow divergent treatment plans, disagreements may arise between practitioners as to how best treat the adolescent group. Additional complicating factors associated with the adolescent years, such as lack of insurance, issues pertaining to body image, and concerns about fertility, can also hinder prompt, appropriate medical management. This review details the complexities associated with the diagnosis and treatment of adolescent lymphoma and updates the state of the science, with particular emphasis on epidemiology, diagnosis, and proper management of HL and the various subtypes of NHL. PMID:19087093

  1. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous

  2. Composite lymphoma: EBV-positive classic Hodgkin lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Van Den Berg, Anke; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-01-01

    Composite lymphomas are rare and defined as hematopoietic neoplasms with more than 1 malignant lymphomatous clone showing different phenotypic features. Of all possible combinations between non-Hodgkin lymphomas, B cell or T cell, and Hodgkin lymphoma, the least frequent are the ones combining T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and classic Hodgkin lymphoma. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman with cervical and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, fever, weight loss, and night sweats. A cervical lymph node biopsy revealed a composite lymphoma with classic Hodgkin lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma components. The bone marrow was not involved. The patient refused treatment and died of disease progression 2 months after diagnosis. The biopsied lymph node showed 2 distinct populations, one composed of large cells including typical Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants, with expression of CD30, CD15, PAX5, and LMP-1. The other component was more abundant and comprised polymorphic medium-sized cells with convoluted nuclei; CD3, CD5, CD2, and CD4 expression; and negativity for CD30, cytotoxic granules, and B-cell markers. Epstein-Barr virus DNA of subtype A was identified only in the Hodgkin cells. Clonal T-cell receptor gamma and beta gene rearrangements were detected in the T-cell component, whereas monoclonal immunoglobulin H gene rearrangement was found in the Hodgkin cells.

  3. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  4. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  5. The tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 interacts with NPM-ALK and regulates anaplastic lymphoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Conte, Chiara; Ambrogio, Chiara; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Boccalatte, Francesco; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jensen, Ole N; Palestro, Giorgio; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2007-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) are mainly characterized by the reciprocal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that involves the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene and generates the fusion protein NPM-ALK with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. NPM-ALK triggers several signaling cascades, leading to increased cell growth, resistance to apoptosis, and changes in morphology and migration of transformed cells. To search for new NPM-ALK interacting molecules, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach in HEK293 cells expressing an inducible NPM-ALK and identified the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 as a candidate substrate. We found that NPM-ALK was able to bind Shp2 in coprecipitation experiments and to induce its phosphorylation in the tyrosine residues Y542 and Y580 both in HEK293 cells and ALCL cell lines. In primary lymphomas, antibodies against the phosphorylated tyrosine Y542 of Shp2 mainly stained ALK-positive cells. In ALCL cell lines, Shp2-constitutive phosphorylation was dependent on NPM-ALK, as it significantly decreased after short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated NPM-ALK knock down. In addition, only the constitutively active NPM-ALK, but not the kinase dead NPM-ALK(K210R), formed a complex with Shp2, Gab2, and growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), where Grb2 bound to the phosphorylated Shp2 through its SH2 domain. Shp2 knock down by specific shRNA decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and of the tyrosine residue Y416 in the activation loop of Src, resulting in impaired ALCL cell proliferation and growth disadvantage. Finally, migration of ALCL cells was reduced by Shp2 shRNA. These findings show a direct involvement of Shp2 in NPM-ALK lymphomagenesis, highlighting its critical role in lymphoma cell proliferation and migration.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and lipoxygenases regulate the oncogenicity of NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Thornber, K; Colomba, A; Ceccato, L; Delsol, G; Payrastre, B; Gaits-Iacovoni, F

    2009-07-23

    The chimera nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), the tyrosine kinase activity of which is constitutively upregulated, is the causative agent of 75% of the anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs). We have demonstrated that NPM-ALK induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a pathway involving the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzymes of the lipoxygenase (LOX) family. The use of the LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and of the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) demonstrated that ROS are important in maintaining the ALK kinase active. Consistent with this, NDGA treatment resulted in the inhibition of key pathways, such as Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which are involved in NPM-ALK antiapoptotic and pro-mitogenic functions. Conversely, the stress-activated kinase p38, described in some instances as a mediator of apoptosis, was activated. Interestingly, 5-LOX, an isoform involved in many cancers, was found to be activated in NPM-ALK(+) cells. Functional studies have shown that transforming properties, namely proliferation and resistance to apoptosis, were abrogated by treatment with either NDGA or the 5-LOX inhibitor (N-(3-phenoxycinnamyl)-acetohydroxamic acid) (BW A4C). Together, these data point to the ROS/LOX pathway as a potential new target for therapy in NPM-ALK-positive tumors.

  7. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  8. An update on ocular adnexal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2016-05-01

    Ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL) is a relatively common lesion in the practice of ophthalmic oncology. Although OALs are usually primary tumors, secondary involvement of the ocular adnexae by systemic lymphoma is also possible. The clinical and radiological features of OAL are non-specific. Thorough morphological evaluation, aided by immunostaining, cytogenetic studies and molecular testing, are necessary for accurate diagnosis. PMID:26972223

  9. Cerebral lymphoma presenting as a leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso-Peralta, L; Orti-Pareja, M; Zurdo-Hernandez, M; Jimenez-Jimenez, F; Tejeiro-Martinez, J; Ricoy, J; de la Lama, A; Bernardo, A

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral lymphoma is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. This tumour usually appears on CT and MRI as a single lesion or as multiple lesions with mass effect and homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A patient is described with a cerebral lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological examination, who presented as a progressive leukoencephalopathy.

 PMID:11459903

  10. Status of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Westin, Jason R

    2014-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is well known to regulate a wide variety of essential cellular functions, including glucose metabolism, translational regulation of protein synthesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and survival. Aberrations in the PI3K pathway are among the most frequently observed in cancer, and include amplifications, rearrangements, mutations, and loss of regulators. As a net result of these anomalies, the PI3K pathway is activated in many malignancies, including in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and yields a competitive growth and survival advantage, increased metastatic ability, and resistance to conventional therapy. Numerous inhibitors targeting various nodes in the PI3K pathway are undergoing clinical development, and their current status in lymphoma will be the focus of this review.

  11. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Version 1.2015

    PubMed Central

    Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Gordon, Leo I.; Wierda, William G.; Abramson, Jeremy S.; Advani, Ranjana H.; Andreadis, C. Babis; Bartlett, Nancy; Byrd, John C.; Czuczman, Myron S.; Fayad, Luis E.; Fisher, Richard I.; Glenn, Martha J.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Harris, Nancy Lee; Hoppe, Richard T.; Horwitz, Steven M.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Kim, Youn H.; Krivacic, Susan; LaCasce, Ann S.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Porcu, Pierluigi; Press, Oliver; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Reddy, Nishitha; Reid, Erin; Saad, Ayman A.; Sokol, Lubomir; Swinnen, Lode J.; Tsien, Christina; Vose, Julie M.; Wilson, Lynn; Yahalom, Joachim; Zafar, Nadeem; Dwyer, Mary; Sundar, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are different manifestations of the same disease, which are managed in the same way. The advent of novel monoclonal antibodies (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab) led to the development of effective chemoimmunotherapy regimens. The recently approved small molecule kinase inhibitors (ibrutinib and idelalisib) are effective treatment options for CLL in elderly patients with decreased tolerance for aggressive regimens and in patients with poor prognostic features who do not benefit from conventional chemoimmunotherapy regimens. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas describes the recent specific to the incorporation of recently approved targeted therapies for the management of patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed or refractory CLL/SLL. PMID:25736010

  12. Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-10

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Detection of t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization in CD30-positive primary cutaneous lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis.

    PubMed Central

    Beylot-Barry, M.; Lamant, L.; Vergier, B.; de Muret, A.; Fraitag, S.; Delord, B.; Dubus, P.; Vaillant, L.; Delaunay, M.; MacGrogan, G.; Beylot, C.; de Mascarel, A.; Delsol, G.; Merlio, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The t(2;5) generates a chimeric NPM-ALK transcript encoded by the nucleophosmin NPM gene fused to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene ALK. Using a reverse transcriptase nested polymerase chain reaction assay we have detected NPM-ALK transcripts within CD30+ primary cutaneous lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis (LP). The t(2;5) was identified in 4 out of 9 CD30+ anaplastic lymphomas and in 1 out of 4 CD30+ pleomorphic lymphomas. Moreover, the t(2;5) was detected in 3 out of 10 LPs. All NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas and 1 NPM-ALK-positive LP exhibited a clonal rearrangement of the T cell receptor gamma-chain gene. The t(2;5) was detected in 2 cases of LP without other evidence for a clonal lymphoid population. To identify cells carrying the t(2;5) translocation, we used immunohistochemistry to detect the ALK-encoded p80 protein and in situ hybridization for the specific detection of NPM-ALK transcripts. Both p80 protein and NPM-ALK transcripts were expressed by anaplastic or large CD30+ lymphoma cells with positive NPM-ALK amplification. The presence of t(2;5) in a subset of CD30+ cutaneous lymphoma and LP may indicate a common pathogenesis with a subset of anaplastic nodal lymphoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8701987

  15. Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  16. Study of Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Patients With Relapsed Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Initial cutaneous manifestation of lymphomas in children.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria Christina Lopes Araujo de; Pereira, Luciana Baptista; Rodrigues, Priscila Cezarino; Sampaio, Keyla Cunha; Oliveira, Benigna Maria de; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders with skin involvement and are classified as a subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. From 1981 to 2007, 100 children with non-Hodgkin lymphomas were admitted to the Hematology Unit of the Federal University of Minas Gerais Teaching Hospital. In nine of these children, the skin was involved at the onset of the disease. Three patients were classified as having primary cutaneous lymphoma, while in six the disease was systemic with cutaneous involvement. In seven patients, the immunophenotype was T-cell, in one it was B-cell, and in the remaining case the immunophenotype was indefinable. No deaths occurred in any of the children with primary cutaneous lymphoma. PMID:21987155

  19. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  20. Rare Case of Primary Gastric Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Chul; Hwang, Jung Won; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Pyoung Han

    2016-08-25

    Primary gastric tumors are very rare in children. Burkitt lymphoma is a common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and gastric Burkitt lymphoma usually occurs in the aged. When involving the gastrointestinal tract, primary gastric Burkitt lymphoma is very rare in younger childhood. Many gastric lymphomas including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection or acute bleeding symptom. We report a seven-year-old boy who presented with only some vomiting and postprandial pain. His upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy revealed a large primary Burkitt lymphoma with no acute bleeding and no evidence of H. pylori infection. After chemotherapy, he remains in remission. PMID:27554215

  1. Gastrointestinal lymphomas: Morphology, immunophenotype and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Quach, Marnelli A.; Ake, Christopher D.; Chen, Mingyi

    2012-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma comprises 10-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and encompasses 30-40% of the total extranodal lymphomas. Approximately 60-75% of cases occur in the stomach, and then the small bowel, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum. Lymphoid neoplasms may consist of mature B, T and less commonly extranodal NK/T cells. Of these, the two most frequently encountered histologic subtypes are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), where Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in a number of cases, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Several B cell lymphomas are associated with chromosomal aberrations. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, type I in particular, usually arises in a background of celiac disease. T cell gene rearrangement confirms clonality. NK/T cell neoplasms are invariably associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and are often aggressive; thus, differentiation from a benign NK-cell enteropathy is paramount. Although incidence of other hematopoietic malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract such as plasma cell myeloma associated with amyloidosis, plasmablastic lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, histiocytic sarcoma and mast cell sarcoma is extremely rare, these entities have been documented, with the latter two demonstrating aggressive clinical behavior. Endoscopic ultrasonography is an important adjunct in disease staging and follow-up. Conservative antibiotic treatment of stage I MALT lymphomas with associated Helicobacter pylori infection achieves good clinical outcome with high remission rate. Chemotherapy, radiation and rarely surgery are reserved for advanced diseases or cases resistant to conservative therapy and those not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:22943012

  2. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  3. TKI sensitivity patterns of novel kinase-domain mutations suggest therapeutic opportunities for patients with resistant ALK+ tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Soumya S.; Gokhale, Vijay; Groysman, Matthew J.; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Tapia, Edgar O.; Wang, Mengdie; Schatz, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein drives tumorigenesis in subsets of several tumors through chromosomal rearrangements that express and activate its C-terminal kinase domain. In addition, germline predisposition alleles and acquired mutations are found in the full-length protein in the pediatric tumor neuroblastoma. ALK-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become important new drugs for ALK-driven lung cancer, but acquired resistance via multiple mechanisms including kinase-domain mutations eventually develops, limiting median progression-free survival to less than a year. Here we assess the impact of several kinase-domain mutations that arose during TKI resistance selections of ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines. These include novel variants with respect to ALK-fusion cancers, R1192P and T1151M, and with respect to ALCL, F1174L and I1171S. We assess the effects of these mutations on the activity of six clinical inhibitors in independent systems engineered to depend on either the ALCL fusion kinase NPM-ALK or the lung-cancer fusion kinase EML4-ALK. Our results inform treatment strategies with a likelihood of bypassing mutations when detected in resistant patient samples and highlight differences between the effects of particular mutations on the two ALK fusions. PMID:27009859

  4. Individualized management of follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Huang, Hui-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent non-hodgkin lymphoma. Most patients with FL are diagnosed with advanced disease and are considered incurable. The classical prognostic index in FL is the FL international prognostic index (FLIPI). The management of FL is mainly determined by histologic grading, clinical stage, and tumor burden. For patients with stage I and II disease, an involved-site radiation therapy (ISRT) is recommended and may be potentially curative approach with 60% to 80% of 10-year overall survival (OS) rates, while patients with stage III and IV should be treated with systemic therapy. The watchful waiting is still an option for patients without symptoms or/and low tumor burden. Induction of immuno-chemotherapy combined with consolidation of rituximab maintenance (MR) is standard care for patients with symptomatic disease or with high tumor burden when treatment indicated. The major indication for systemic therapy is including candidate for clinical trials, threatened end organ function, cytopenia secondary to lymphoma bulky disease and steady progress etc. at present time. Routine baseline and regular hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) testing is strongly recommended for all patients before the initiation of immuno-chemotherapy in order to minimize the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation which has been observed approximately 20% to 50% of patients with positive HBsAg and 3% to 45% of patients with positive HBcAb. Prophylactic antiviral treatment in patients who are HBsAg-positive or HBcAb-positive is indicated before immuno-chemotherapy. The management for elderly patients should be carefully selected to avoid overtreatment and severe toxicities. Individualized dose adjustment for chemotherapy and an adequate supportive treatment are essential for this special population. Novel agents such as lenalidomide, ibrutinib and idelalisib are promising. In conclusion, individualized management

  5. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  6. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. A study of the mutational landscape of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric nodal marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Michael G; Bhaduri, Aparna; Chisholm, Karen M; Baker, Steven A; Ma, Lisa; Zehnder, James L; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Link, Michael P; Merker, Jason D; Arber, Daniel A; Ohgami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma are two of the rarest B-cell lymphomas. These lymphomas occur predominantly in the pediatric population and show features distinct from their more common counterparts in adults: adult-type follicular lymphoma and adult-type nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Here we report a detailed whole-exome deep sequencing analysis of a cohort of pediatric-type follicular lymphomas and pediatric marginal zone lymphomas. This analysis revealed a recurrent somatic variant encoding p.Lys66Arg in the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) in 3 of 6 cases (50%) of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma. This specific point mutation was not detected in pediatric marginal zone lymphoma or in adult-type follicular lymphoma. Additional somatic point mutations in pediatric-type follicular lymphoma were observed in genes involved in transcription, intracellular signaling, and cell proliferation. In pediatric marginal zone lymphoma, no recurrent mutation was identified; however, somatic point mutations were observed in genes involved in cellular adhesion, cytokine regulatory elements, and cellular proliferation. A somatic variant in AMOTL1, a recurrently mutated gene in splenic marginal zone lymphoma, was also identified in a case of pediatric marginal zone lymphoma. The overall non-synonymous mutational burden was low in both pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma (4.6 mutations per exome). Altogether, these findings support a distinctive genetic basis for pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma when compared with adult subtypes and to one another. Moreover, identification of a recurrent point mutation in IRF8 provides insight into a potential driver mutation in the pathogenesis of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma with implications for novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies. PMID:27338637

  8. Ibrutinib: a first in class covalent inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Davids, Matthew S; Brown, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib (formerly PCI-32765) is a potent, covalent inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, a kinase downstream of the B-cell receptor that is critical for B-cell survival and proliferation. In preclinical studies, ibrutinib bound to Bruton’s tyrosine kinase with high affinity, leading to inhibition of B-cell receptor signaling, decreased B-cell activation and induction of apoptosis. In clinical studies, ibrutinib has been well-tolerated and has demonstrated profound anti-tumor activity in a variety of hematologic malignancies, most notably chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), leading to US FDA approval for relapsed CLL and MCL. Ongoing studies are evaluating ibrutinib in other types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Waldenström’s macrogobulinemia, in larger Phase III studies in CLL and MCL, and in combination studies with monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy. Future studies will combine ibrutinib with other promising novel agents currently in development in hematologic malignancies. PMID:24941982

  9. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Double-hit and double-protein-expression lymphomas: aggressive and refractory lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) is a subgroup of aggressive lymphomas with both MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements, characterised by a rapidly progressing clinical course that is refractory to aggressive treatment and short survival. Over time, the definition was modified and now includes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with MYC translocation combined with an additional translocation involving BCL2 or BCL6. Some cases that have a similar clinical course with concomitant overexpression of MYC or BCL2 proteins were recently characterised as immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas (ie, double-protein-expression lymphomas [DPLs]). The clinical course of these DPLs is worse than so-called standard DLBCL but suggested by some studies to be slightly better than DHL, although there is overlap between the two categories. Present treatment does not allow cure or long-term survival in patients with genetic or immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas, but several new drugs are being developed. PMID:26545844

  11. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Primary malignant lymphomas of the breast.

    PubMed

    Mambo, N C; Burke, J S; Butler, J J

    1977-05-01

    Fourteen cases of primary malignant lymphomas of the breast were found in the pathology files of the M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute from 1944 to 1975. The lymphomas represented only 0.12% of 11,277 primary malignant breast tumors seen during the same period. There were no definite clinical features to distinguish the patients with lymphoma from those with breast carcinoma. All of the lymphomas had a diffuse pattern. Eight cases were classified as undifferentiated lymphoma, five as histiocytic, and one as poorly differentiated lymphocytic, convoluted cell type. Four patients had mastectomies and the remainder biopsies as their sole surgical procedure. Eight patients received post-surgical radiotherapy and all eventually had chemotherapy. The five-year survival rate for the 13 patients with follow-up was 49%. Patients with histiocytic lymphoma appeared to have a more favorable prognosis than those with the undifferentiated type. Six of the latter patients are dead with a median survival of seven months, comparable to the reported survival of patients with American Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient with the convoluted cell type has developed acute blastic leukemia and is currently under therapy.

  13. Gastric MALT lymphoma: old and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Repici, Alessandro; Manta, Raffaele; Andriani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The stomach is the most frequent site of extranodal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originating from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is typically a low-grade, B-cell neoplasia strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Only certain H. pylori strains in some predisposed patients determine lymphoma development in the stomach, according to a strain-host-organ specific process. The clinical presentation is poorly specific, symptoms ranging from vague dyspepsia to alarm symptoms. Similarly, different endoscopy patterns have been described for gastric lymphoma. H. pylori eradication is advised as first-line therapy in early stage disease, and complete lymphoma remission is achieved in 75% of cases. Neoplasia stage, depth of infiltration in the gastric wall, presence of the API2-MALT1 translocation, localization in the stomach, and patient ethnicity have been identified as predictors of remission. Recent data suggests that H. pylori eradication therapy may be successful for gastric lymphoma treatment also in a small subgroup (15%) of H. pylori-negative patients. The overall 5-year survival and disease-free survival rates are as high as 90% and 75%, respectively. Management of patients who failed to achieve lymphoma remission following H. pylori eradication include radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, in selected cases, surgery. PMID:24714739

  14. t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) is recurrent in marginal zone lymphoma and up-regulates GPR34

    PubMed Central

    Baens, Mathijs; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Tousseyn, Thomas; Urbankova, Helena; Michaux, Lucienne; de Leval, Laurence; Dierickx, Daan; Wolter, Pascal; Sagaert, Xavier; Vandenberghe, Peter; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Wlodarska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Genetic events underlying pathogenesis of nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma are not completely understood. We report here a novel t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) identified in 4 lymphoma cases: 2 with a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, one with a nodal marginal zone lymphoma and one with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In all cases, lymphoma evolved from a previous auto-immune disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies showed that t(X;14), which is mediated by immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, targets the GPR34 gene at Xp11.4. Upregulation of GPR34 mRNA and aberrant expression of GPR34 protein has been demonstrated in 3 presented cases by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. GPR34 belongs to the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transmission that play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. Although functional consequences of t(X;14) have not been identified, our studies suggest that up-regulated GPR34 activate neither nuclear factor-κB nor ELK-related tyrosine kinase. PMID:22058210

  15. t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) is recurrent in marginal zone lymphoma and up-regulates GPR34.

    PubMed

    Baens, Mathijs; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Tousseyn, Thomas; Urbankova, Helena; Michaux, Lucienne; de Leval, Laurence; Dierickx, Daan; Wolter, Pascal; Sagaert, Xavier; Vandenberghe, Peter; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Wlodarska, Iwona

    2012-02-01

    Genetic events underlying pathogenesis of nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma are not completely understood. We report here a novel t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) identified in 4 lymphoma cases: 2 with a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, one with a nodal marginal zone lymphoma and one with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In all cases, lymphoma evolved from a previous auto-immune disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies showed that t(X;14), which is mediated by immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, targets the GPR34 gene at Xp11.4. Upregulation of GPR34 mRNA and aberrant expression of GPR34 protein has been demonstrated in 3 presented cases by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. GPR34 belongs to the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transmission that play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. Although functional consequences of t(X;14) have not been identified, our studies suggest that up-regulated GPR34 activate neither nuclear factor-κB nor ELK-related tyrosine kinase. PMID:22058210

  16. Lymphoma in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Brugières, Laurence; Brice, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are one of the commonest malignancies in adolescents and young adults (AYA) accounting respectively for 22% of all cancers in patients aged 15-24 years (16% for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and 6% for non-HL (NHL)). The distribution of NHL subtypes in this age group differs strikingly from the distribution in children and in older adults with 4 main subtypes accounting for the majority of the cases: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) including primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma or anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Age-related differences in tumor biology have been demonstrated mainly in DLBCL but there is still a need for biological studies to better understand age-related differences in this age group. AYA patients currently diagnosed with HL and NHL have 5-year survival expectations exceeding 90 and 75%, respectively. Different therapeutic strategies are often used in children and adult lymphoma and the dispersion of lymphoma care between adult and pediatric hematologist-oncologists results in heterogeneous strategies for each subgroup according to age. The impact of these different strategies on outcomes is not easy to evaluate given the paucity of population-based data focused on this age group, taking into account tumor biology and the lack of a uniform staging system. Given the excellent results obtained with current therapies, the challenge now is to develop strategies aimed at reducing acute and long-term toxicity in most patients while maintaining high cure rates and to identify patients at high risk of failure requiring new strategies including more selective targeted therapies. PMID:27595360

  17. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Malignant Neoplasm; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Hodgkin lymphoma: Pathology and biology.

    PubMed

    Mathas, Stephan; Hartmann, Sylvia; Küppers, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) tumor cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), as well as the lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells of nodular lymphocyte predominant HL (NLPHL), are derived from mature B cells. However, HRS cells have largely lost their B-cell phenotype and show a very unusual expression of many markers of other hematopoietic cell lineages, which aids in the differential diagnosis between classical HL (cHL) and NLPHL and distinguishes cHL from all other hematopoietic malignancies. The bi- or multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells most likely derive from the mononuclear Hodgkin cells through a process of incomplete cytokinesis. HRS cells show a deregulated activation of numerous signaling pathways, which is partly mediated by cellular interactions in the lymphoma microenvironment and partly by genetic lesions. In a fraction of cases, Epstein-Barr virus contributes to the pathogenesis of cHL. Recurrent genetic lesions in HRS cells identified so far often involve members of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and JAK/STAT pathways and genes involved in major histocompatibility complex expression. However, further lead transforming events likely remain to be identified. We here discuss the current knowledge on HL pathology and biology. PMID:27496304

  19. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  1. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  2. Romidepsin for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Prince, H Miles; Dickinson, Michael; Khot, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are relatively rare lymphomas and the most common form is mycosis fungoides. Its rare leukemic variant is Sezary syndrome. Advanced-stage disease is typically treated with bexarotene (a retinoid), IFN-α or conventional chemotherapeutic agents, but relapses are inevitable. Histone deacetylase inhibitors that modify the epigenome are an attractive addition to the armamentarium. Based on two large Phase II studies, the US FDA approved intravenous romidepsin for patients with relapsed/refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Romidepsin provides a subset of patients with an opportunity for prolonged clinical responses with a tolerable side-effect profile.

  3. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  4. Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Colby, T V; Dorfman, R F

    1979-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands are probably more common than has been previously recognized. They must be differentiated from the benign lymphoepithelial lesion, although there may be an association between the two. The entire histologic spectrum of malignant lymphomas found at other sites can be seen in the salivary gland. In this study of 59 patients with lymphoma affecting the salivary gland, a large percentage were found to have disseminated disease. We recommend the same rigorous clinical evaluation and staging procedures as used in patients who present with primary lymph node involvement.

  5. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

  6. Integrated phosphoproteomic and metabolomic profiling reveals NPM-ALK-mediated phosphorylation of PKM2 and metabolic reprogramming in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Scott R P; Hwang, Steven R; Rolland, Delphine; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Basrur, Venkatesha; Conlon, Kevin P; Fermin, Damian; Wolfe, Thomas; Raskind, Alexander; Ruan, Chunhai; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J; Hogaboam, Cory M; Burant, Charles F; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Lim, Megan S

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of the constitutively active tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) expressing anaplastic large cell lymphoma are not completely understood. Here we show using an integrated phosphoproteomic and metabolomic strategy that NPM-ALK induces a metabolic shift toward aerobic glycolysis, increased lactate production, and biomass production. The metabolic shift is mediated through the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) phosphorylation of the tumor-specific isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) at Y105, resulting in decreased enzymatic activity. Small molecule activation of PKM2 or expression of Y105F PKM2 mutant leads to reversal of the metabolic switch with increased oxidative phosphorylation and reduced lactate production coincident with increased cell death, decreased colony formation, and reduced tumor growth in an in vivo xenograft model. This study provides comprehensive profiling of the phosphoproteomic and metabolomic consequences of NPM-ALK expression and reveals a novel role of ALK in the regulation of multiple components of cellular metabolism. Our studies show that PKM2 is a novel substrate of ALK and plays a critical role in mediating the metabolic shift toward biomass production and tumorigenesis.

  7. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  8. Cutaneous Lymphoma in Korea: A Nationwide Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Suh, Kee Suck; Lee, Dong-Youn; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Soo-Chan; Lee, Seok-Jong; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Young; Won, Young Ho; Kim, You Chan

    2016-05-01

    The epidemiological and clinicopathological features of cutaneous lymphoma may vary by geographical area. However, only a few large-scale epidemiological studies of cutaneous lymphoma have been performed, mainly in the USA and Europe. This aim of this study was to determine the recent characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma in Korea according to the WHO/EORTC classification. A total of 422 patients with newly diagnosed cutaneous lymphoma from January 2009 to December 2013 comprising 293 cases of mature T-cell and natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoma and 39 cases of mature B-cell lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence of mature B-cell lymphoma was lower in Korea than in Europe and the USA. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was more prevalent in Korea than in Western countries. The incidence of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type was higher in Korea than in Western countries and Japan. PMID:26560051

  9. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  10. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  11. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  12. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of the NPM-ALK Signalling Network Reveals Important Pathways for Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; O’Hare, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients harbour a somatic aberration in which anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is fused to nucleophosmin (NPM) resulting in a constitutively active signalling fusion protein, NPM-ALK. We computationally simulated the signalling network which mediates pathological cell survival and proliferation through NPM-ALK to identify therapeutically targetable nodes through which it may be possible to regain control of the tumourigenic process. The simulations reveal the predominant role of the VAV1-CDC42 (cell division control protein 42) pathway in NPM-ALK-driven cellular proliferation and of the Ras / mitogen-activated ERK kinase (MEK) / extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in controlling cell survival. Our results also highlight the importance of a group of interleukins together with the Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) / signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in the development of NPM-ALK derived ALCL. Depending on the activity of JAK3 and STAT3, the system may also be sensitive to activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP1), which has an inhibitory effect on cell survival and proliferation. The identification of signalling pathways active in tumourigenic processes is of fundamental importance for effective therapies. The prediction of alternative pathways that circumvent classical therapeutic targets opens the way to preventive approaches for countering the emergence of cancer resistance. PMID:27669408

  14. Analysis of gene expression profile of TPM3-ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma reveals overlapping and unique patterns with that of NPM-ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Sandra D; Jenson, Stephen D; Crockett, David K; Schumacher, Jonathan A; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Lim, Megan S

    2008-03-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) comprises a group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas characterized by the expression of the CD30/Ki-1 antigen. A subset of ALCL is characterized by chromosomal translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene on chromosome 2. While the most common translocation is the t(2;5)(p23;q35) involving the nucleophosmin (NPM) gene on chromosome 5, up to 12 other translocations partners of the ALK gene have been identified. One of these is the t(1;2)(q25;p23) which results in the formation of the chimeric protein TPM3-ALK. While several of the signaling pathways induced by NPM-ALK have been elucidated, those involved in ALCLs harboring TPM3-ALK are largely unknown. In order to investigate the expression profiles of ALCLs carrying the NPM-ALK and TPM3-ALK fusions, we carried out cDNA microarray analysis of two ALCL tissue samples, one expressing the NPM-ALK fusion protein and the other the TPM3-ALK fusion protein. RNA was extracted from snap-frozen tissues, labeled with fluorescent dyes and analyzed using cDNAs microarray containing approximately 9,200 genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Quantitative fluorescence RT-PCR was performed to validate the cDNA microarray data on nine selected gene targets. Our results show a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the NPM-ALK and TPM-ALK positive lymphomas. These deregulated genes are involved in diverse cellular functions, such as cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and adhesion. Interestingly, a subset of the genes was distinct in their expression pattern in the two types of lymphomas. More importantly, many genes that were not previously associated with ALK positive lymphomas were identified. Our results demonstrate the overlapping and unique transcriptional patterns associated with the NPM-ALK and TPM3-ALK fusions in ALCL.

  15. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  16. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-17

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  17. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  18. Treatment of T cell lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Antony S

    2016-09-17

    Overall, canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive cancers in the dog. In addition to the stage and the substage of disease, T cell phenotype is the most consistently important prognostic factor. T cell lymphoma (TCL) in dogs is a heterogeneous disease; dogs with a separate entity of indolent TCL can have a considerably better prognosis than dogs with other forms of lymphoma, and indolent TCL may not always require immediate treatment. In contrast, high-grade TCL is an aggressive disease, and when treated with CHOP-based protocols, dogs with this high-grade TCL have a complete remission rate as low as 40 per cent, relapse earlier and have shorter survival time than dogs with a comparable stage, high-grade B cell lymphoma. This review describes the different disease entities that comprise canine TCL, discusses prognosis for each and treatment options that appear to give the best outcomes. PMID:27634860

  19. Large cell lymphoma stage IA/IAE.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, H; Koo, C; Kagan, A R; Rao, A; Ryoo, M C

    1991-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with large cell lymphoma stage IA/IAE were retrospectively reviewed for the purpose of evaluation of treatment methods. All pathology slides were reviewed by one pathologist with a special interest in lymphoma. There were 24 patients at stage IA and 28 at stage IAE. Twenty-six patients were treated with radiation alone (10 IA, 16 IAE) and 26 patients were treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy (13 IA, 13 IAE). Patients treated with radiation therapy alone and those with combined modality therapy (CMT) have similar survival curves with p values greater than 0.05. Recurrence patterns are similar for either method of treatment. While the majority of the literature recommends CMT for large cell lymphoma, our study of 52 patients reveals no difference in survival or recurrence patterns for these patients by either method of treatment. We recommend radiation therapy alone for stage IA/IAE large cell lymphoma, with chemotherapy held in reserve for failure.

  20. Primary lymphoma of the upper small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Khosrow; Haghighi, Parviz; Bakhshandeh, Kiumars; Haghshenas, Mansour

    1970-01-01

    Seven patients with primary lymphoma involving the upper small intestine and presenting with diarrhoea, non-specific abdominal pain, and clubbing are reported. The disease appears to be more prevalent in young women, and clinical and radiological findings can provide an excellent preliminary diagnosis which is usually confirmed by peroral biopsy of the small intestine. This type of lymphoma is found to be clinically distinguishable both from the primary intestinal lymphomas reported from western countries and also from gastrointestinal involvement as part of a more systemic disease. It appears to be prevalent in the Middle East, and because of clear clinical, radiological, and histological features, it can be singled out from other primary intestinal lymphomas and considered as a distinct clinical entity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4919259

  1. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  2. [Malignant Lymphomas - Past, Present and Future].

    PubMed

    Trněný, M; Klener, P; Pytlík, R

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the key steps on the way to understanding lymphoma biology and management. The history of lymphomas started in 1832 when Thomas Hodgkin first presented lymphomas. Classification of lymphoproliferative tumors has changed almost every 10 years as a reflection of deeper knowledge of this disease. Systemic therapy has developed in several steps starting by monotherapy with different chemotherapeutic agents, followed by the era of combination chemotherapy and by the rituximab era, which significantly changed the treatment paradigm. Several years ago, we entered into the fourth era characterized by many different targeted treatments. Radiotherapy remains an important part of lymphoma management. Lymphoproliferative tumors incidence is growing but mortality has started to decline starting in the year 2000 as the reflection of targeted therapy based on biology and pathogenesis.

  3. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  4. Treatment of T cell lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Antony S

    2016-09-17

    Overall, canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive cancers in the dog. In addition to the stage and the substage of disease, T cell phenotype is the most consistently important prognostic factor. T cell lymphoma (TCL) in dogs is a heterogeneous disease; dogs with a separate entity of indolent TCL can have a considerably better prognosis than dogs with other forms of lymphoma, and indolent TCL may not always require immediate treatment. In contrast, high-grade TCL is an aggressive disease, and when treated with CHOP-based protocols, dogs with this high-grade TCL have a complete remission rate as low as 40 per cent, relapse earlier and have shorter survival time than dogs with a comparable stage, high-grade B cell lymphoma. This review describes the different disease entities that comprise canine TCL, discusses prognosis for each and treatment options that appear to give the best outcomes.

  5. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  6. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  7. Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma. And those pretreated with more aggressive chemotherapy did even better, researchers report. "It's a ... trial, a group of 20 patients who received aggressive two-drug chemotherapy responded very well to the ...

  8. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  9. [Intravascular lymphoma: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Young, Pablo; Massa, María; Finn, Bárbara C; Fleire, Gonzalo; Stemmelin, Germán R; Ruades, Amanda; Sutovsky, Daniel; Casas, José G; Dezanzo, Pablo; Vigovich, Félix; Bruetman, Julio E

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular lymphoma is a rare subtype of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma characterized by clonal proliferation of lymphocytes inside of small and medium caliber vessels. Its incidence is estimated at one case per million. The clinical picture is very variable, but frequently has skin and central nervous system involvement. It is diagnosed by demonstrating pathological blood vessel infiltration by lymphoma cells. We report a 44 years old male presenting with fever, malaise and erythematous lesions in the abdominal wall. An abdominal wall biopsy showed dilated vascular vessels with atypical cells in their lumen, compatible with large B-cell intravascular lymphoma. He was treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone and an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, achieving a complete remission that has lasted two years. PMID:26436939

  10. Clinical Management Updates in Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert; Sanchez, James; Rosen, Steven T

    2016-04-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is often considered incurable. Different clinical and biological biomarkers can be utilized to categorize this lymphoma into various risk levels. Several randomized trials reported in 2015 shed light on the optimal induction therapy. Recent advances include: (1) identification of new pathways to target, (2) novel therapeutics to treat patients with relapsed/refractory disease, and (3) monitoring of minimal residual disease and adoption of a maintenance therapy approach to prevent relapses post induction or post stem cell transplantation. Due to the efforts of translational/clinical research, the overall survival of patients with mantle cell lymphoma has increased and should continue to improve. PMID:27083466

  11. Study Identifies New Lymphoma Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    NCI researchers have identified new therapeutic targets for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs that hit these targets are under clinical development and the researchers hope to begin testing them in clinical trials of patients with DLBCL.

  12. B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 183. Bierman PJ, Armitage JO. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ... cytometry in oncologic diagnosis. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's ...

  13. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the chest a computerized tomography (CT or CAT) scan , which rotates around the patient and creates ... ray (Video) Getting an MRI (Video) Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Chemotherapy Hodgkin Lymphoma Stem Cell Transplants ...

  14. Burkitt lymphoma involving jejunum in children

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Feng, Jiexiong; Sun, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with 3-month bloody stool from unknown origin and progressive anemia. In this case report, we review the incidence, diagnosis, pathology, treatment and prognosis of Burkitt Lymphoma. PMID:25568790

  15. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Mottok, Anja; Fanale, Michelle

    2016-07-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma with distinct clinicopathologic features. It is typified by the presence of lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells, which are CD20(+) but CD15(-) and CD30(-) and are found scattered amongst small B lymphocytes arranged in a nodular pattern. Despite frequent and often late or multiple relapses, the prognosis of NLPHL is very favorable. There is an inherent risk of secondary aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and studies support that risk is highest in those with splenic involvement at presentation. Given disease rarity, the optimal management is unclear and opinions differ as to whether treatment paradigms should be similar to or differ from those for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). This review provides an overview of the existing literature describing pathological subtypes, outcome and treatment approaches for NLPHL. PMID:27496311

  16. Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Staging of Cutaneous Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Elise A

    2015-10-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that manifest in the skin. Their diagnosis is complex and based on clinical lesion type and evaluation of findings on light microscopic examination, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis of representative skin biopsies. The evaluation, classification, and staging system is unique for mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the most common subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) versus the other subtypes of Non-MF/Non-SS CTCL and the subtypes of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Since current treatment is stage-based, it is particularly important that the correct diagnosis and stage be ascertained initially. The purpose of this article is to review the current evaluation, diagnosis, classification, staging, assessment techniques, and response criteria for the various types of both T-cell and B-cell PCLs. PMID:26433839

  17. Lenalidomide And Rituximab as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent

  18. Transmission of Naturally Occurring Lymphoma in Macaque Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronald D.; Blake, Beverly J.; Chalifoux, Laura V.; Sehgal, Prabhat K.; King, Norval W.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1983-08-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys.

  19. Composite lymphoma arising in the parotid gland: a case report.

    PubMed

    Urano, Makoto; Mizoguchi, Yoshikazu; Nishio, Tomoko; Abe, Masato; Kuroda, Makoto; Saito, Shoji; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2004-03-01

    A case of composite lymphoma (CL) arisen in the parotid gland in a 58-year-old male is reported. Histologically, most of the tumor region was follicular lymphoma (FL), grade 2. However complicating classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) was noted inside the lesion. There have been a few reports of composite lymphoma, complicated by multiple histologic types in the same organ. Extra-nodal cases are particularly rare. This is a very significant case with regard to differences between B cell-derived non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and its histological origin. PMID:15041061

  20. Bryostatin 1 Plus Vincristine in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma After Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  1. FilGAP, a Rac-specific Rho GTPase-activating protein, is a novel prognostic factor for follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hashimura, Miki; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Ohta, Yasutaka; Saegusa, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    FilGAP, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP), acts as a mediator of Rho/ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase)-dependent amoeboid movement, and its knockdown results in Rac-driven mesenchymal morphology. Herein, we focus on the possible roles of FilGAP expression in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Eighty-three cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), 84 of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and 25 of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), as well as 10 of normal lymph nodes, were immunohistochemically investigated. In normal lymph nodes, FilGAP immunoreactivity was significantly higher in lymphocytes in the mantle zone as compared to those in the germinal center and paracortical areas. In contrast, the expression levels of both cytoplasmic and perinuclear Rac1 were significantly lower in the germinal center as compared to paracortical regions, suggesting that changes in the FilGAP/Rac axis may occur in B-cell lineages. In malignant lymphomas, FilGAP expression was significantly higher in B-cell lymphomas than PTCL, and the immunohistochemical scores were positively correlated with cytoplasmic Rac1 scores in FL and DLBCL, but not in PTCL. Patients with FL and germinal center B-cell-like (GCB)-type DLBCL showing high FilGAP scores had poor overall survival rates as compared to the low-score patients. Moreover, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that a high FilGAP score was a significant and independent unfavorable prognostic factor in FL, but not in DLBCL. In conclusion, FilGAP may contribute to change in cell motility of B-lymphocytes. In addition, its expression appears to be useful for predicting the behavior of B-cell lymphoma, in particular FL. PMID:25641953

  2. PXD101 and 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV

  3. CPI-613, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-12

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. WHO-EORTC classification for cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Willemze, Rein; Jaffe, Elaine S; Burg, Günter; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Berti, Emilio; Swerdlow, Steven H; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Chimenti, Sergio; Diaz-Perez, José L; Duncan, Lyn M; Grange, Florent; Harris, Nancy Lee; Kempf, Werner; Kerl, Helmut; Kurrer, Michael; Knobler, Robert; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Sander, Christian; Santucci, Marco; Sterry, Wolfram; Vermeer, Maarten H; Wechsler, Janine; Whittaker, Sean; Meijer, Chris J L M

    2005-05-15

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are currently classified by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification or the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, but both systems have shortcomings. In particular, differences in the classification of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides, Sezary syndrome, and the group of primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders and the classification and terminology of different types of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas have resulted in considerable debate and confusion. During recent consensus meetings representatives of both systems reached agreement on a new classification, which is now called the WHO-EORTC classification. In this paper we describe the characteristic features of the different primary cutaneous lymphomas and other hematologic neoplasms frequently presenting in the skin, and discuss differences with the previous classification schemes. In addition, the relative frequency and survival data of 1905 patients with primary cutaneous lymphomas derived from Dutch and Austrian registries for primary cutaneous lymphomas are presented to illustrate the clinical significance of this new classification.

  6. Biomimetic, synthetic HDL nanostructures for lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Damiano, Marina G.; Zhang, Heng; Tripathy, Sushant; Luthi, Andrea J.; Rink, Jonathan S.; Ugolkov, Andrey V.; T. K. Singh, Amareshwar; Dave, Sandeep S.; Gordon, Leo I.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2013-01-01

    New therapies that challenge existing paradigms are needed for the treatment of cancer. We report a nanoparticle-enabled therapeutic approach to B-cell lymphoma using synthetic high density lipoprotein nanoparticles (HDL-NPs). HDL-NPs are synthesized using a gold nanoparticle template to control conjugate size and ensure a spherical shape. Like natural HDLs, biomimetic HDL-NPs target scavenger receptor type B-1, a high-affinity HDL receptor expressed by lymphoma cells. Functionally, compared with natural HDL, the gold NP template enables differential manipulation of cellular cholesterol flux in lymphoma cells, promoting cellular cholesterol efflux and limiting cholesterol delivery. This combination of scavenger receptor type B-1 binding and relative cholesterol starvation selectively induces apoptosis. HDL-NP treatment of mice bearing B-cell lymphoma xenografts selectively inhibits B-cell lymphoma growth. As such, HDL-NPs are biofunctional therapeutic agents, whose mechanism of action is enabled by the presence of a synthetic nanotemplate. HDL-NPs are active in B-cell lymphomas and potentially, other malignancies or diseases of pathologic cholesterol accumulation. PMID:23345442

  7. Vaccines for lymphomas: idiotype vaccines and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Levy, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for lymphomas have been developed to induce active and long-lasting immune responses against lymphoma capable of eradicating the tumor. Most of these vaccines use the tumor B cell idiotype (the unique variable region of the surface immunoglobulin) as a tumor-specific antigen. The first human clinical trial for lymphoma vaccine was initiated 20 years ago. Along with several other phase I/II trials, it showed encouraging results which supported the initiation of three phase III trials. The results of these trials have recently been released (although not published yet) which failed to demonstrate a prolongation in progression-free survival following chemotherapy. Despite this disappointing result, a number of observations have accumulated over the years that suggest some clinical efficacy of lymphoma vaccines. Several strategies are being developed to improve these results that include optimization of antigen delivery and presentation as well as enhancement of anti-tumor T cell function. This review describes the clinical development of lymphoma vaccines and delineates advances, problems and prospects towards integration of this strategy in the therapeutic armamentarium for lymphoma. PMID:18951668

  8. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  9. New drugs for follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sorigue, Marc; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Motlló, Cristina; Sancho, Juan-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the improvement in prognosis since the advent of rituximab, follicular lymphoma is still incurable and remains the cause of death of most afflicted patients. With the expanding knowledge of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies, in the last few years a plethora of new therapies acting through a variety of mechanisms have shown promising results. This review attempts to analyze the evidence available on these new drugs, which include new monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates, the anti-angiogenic and immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, inhibitors of B-cell receptor pathway enzymes, such as ibrutinib, idelalisib, duvelisib and entospletinib, BCL2 inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors. We conclude that despite the high expectations around the new therapeutic options for patients with refractory disease, these new drugs have side effects that require caution with their use, particularly in light of the still short follow up and the lack of both randomized trials and data on combination regimens.

  10. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma That is Resistant or Refractory to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-27

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment of marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma).

    PubMed

    Raderer, Markus; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) accounts for 7% to 8% of newly diagnosed lymphomas. Because of its association with infectious causes, such as Helicobacter pylori (HP) or Chlamydophila psittaci (CP), and autoimmune diseases, it has become the paradigm of an antigen-driven malignancy. MALT lymphoma usually displays an indolent course, and watch-and-wait strategies are justified initially in a certain percentage of patients. In patients with gastric MALT lymphoma or ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma, antibiotic therapy against HP or CP, respectively, is the first-line management of choice, resulting in lymphoma response rates from 75% to 80% after HP eradication and from 33% to 65% after antibiotic therapy for CP. In patients who have localized disease that is refractory to antibiotics, radiation is widely applied in various centers with excellent local control, whereas systemic therapies are increasingly being applied, at least in Europe, because of the potentially systemic nature of the disease. Therefore, the objective of this review is to briefly summarize the clinicopathologic characteristics of this distinct type of lymphoma along with current data on management strategies. PMID:26773441

  12. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity: a rapidly progressive lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Riedel, David J; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Zhao, X Frank; Redfield, Robert R; Gilliam, Bruce L

    2008-04-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity is a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and was first described in 1997. We describe a case of plasmablastic lymphoma in an HIV-infected patient who presented with an expanding oral lesion and symptoms of a toothache. We review all cases of plasmablastic lymphoma that have been reported in the literature. Plasmablastic lymphoma is strongly associated with immunodeficiency, and most particularly, with HIV infection. The pathophysiological origin of plasmablastic lymphoma has not been fully characterised, but the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has often been documented in biopsy specimens, supporting a role for EBV in the pathogenesis of this lymphoma. The differential diagnosis for an expanding oral lesion includes both infectious and malignant processes. Biopsy is essential for making a correct and prompt diagnosis. Treatment usually involves chemotherapy, but antiretroviral therapy may also have an important role. Infectious disease clinicians should be aware of this newly described and increasingly encountered lymphoma, since it is prominently associated with immunosuppression and may be mistaken for other entities. PMID:18353267

  13. PIM serine/threonine kinases in the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Laurent; Gasser, Christelle; Bracher, Franz; Huber, Kilian; Knapp, Stefan; Schwaller, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The identification as cooperating targets of Proviral Integrations of Moloney virus in murine lymphomas suggested early on that PIM serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cancer biology. Whereas elevated levels of PIM1 and PIM2 were mostly found in hematologic malignancies and prostate cancer, increased PIM3 expression was observed in different solid tumors. PIM kinases are constitutively active and their activity supports in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth and survival through modification of an increasing number of common as well as isoform-specific substrates including several cell cycle regulators and apoptosis mediators. PIM1 but not PIM2 seems also to mediate homing and migration of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells by regulating chemokine receptor surface expression. Knockdown experiments by RNA interference or dominant-negative acting mutants suggested that PIM kinases are important for maintenance of a transformed phenotype and therefore potential therapeutic targets. Determination of the protein structure facilitated identification of an increasing number of potent small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors with in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. Ongoing efforts aim to identify isoform-specific PIM inhibitors that would not only help to dissect the kinase function but hopefully also provide targeted therapeutics. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of PIM serine/threonine kinases for the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers, and we highlight structural principles and recent progress on small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors that are on their way into first clinical trials. PMID:20145274

  14. Detection of protein kinase activity by renaturation in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels

    SciTech Connect

    Anostario, M. Jr.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have developed a procedure for identifying protein kinase activity in protein samples following electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins are allowed to renature directly in the gel by removal of detergent. The gel is then incubated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP to allow renatured protein kinases to autophosphorylate or to phosphorylate various substrates which can be incorporated into the gel. The positions of the radiolabeled proteins can then be detected by autoradiography. With this technique, using purified catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, enzyme concentrations as low as 0.01 ..mu..g can be detected on gels containing 1.0 mg/ml casein. The procedure is also applicable for the determination of active subunits of multisubunit protein kinases. For example, when the two subunits of casein kinase II are separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and allowed to renature, only the larger ..cap alpha.. subunit shows activity. This procedure can also be used to detect and distinguish kinases present in heterogeneous mixtures. Starting with a particulate fraction from LSTRA, a murine T cell lymphoma, several distinct enzymes were detected, including a 30,000 Dalton protein with protein-tyrosine kinase activity. This same enzyme has also been detected in T lymphocytes and other T lymphoid cell lines.

  15. Brain metastasis of ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma after a long-term disease free survival in an old adult

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Hai; Li, Jie; Ma, Heng-Hui; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Qun-Li

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma composed of CD30-positive cells and now recognized as three different entities: primary cutaneous ALCL, primary systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive (ALK+) ALCL and primary ALK-negative (ALK-) ALCL. ALK+ ALCL is supposed to have a better prognosis than ALK- ALCL. It is rarely metastasized to other sites, especially to the central nervous system (CNS). Herein, we present a rare case of systemic ALK+ ALCL which metastasized to the brain after a long-term disease free survival in an adult. Neuroimaging revealed a well-enhanced mass in the left frontal lobe. And it was completely resected. The results of the pathological and immunohistochemical studies were consistent with the metastasized ALK+ ALCL. The clinical findings, pathologic characteristics and treatment are described. PMID:24696735

  16. STK38 is a Critical Upstream Regulator of MYC’s Oncogenic Activity in Human B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisikirska, Brygida C.; Adam, Stacey J.; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Rajbhandari, Presha; Cox, Rachel; Lefebvre, Celine; Wang, Kai; Rieckhof, Gabrielle E.; Felsher, Dean W.; Califano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The MYC proto-oncogene is associated with the pathogenesis of most human neoplasia. Conversely, its experimental inactivation elicits oncogene addiction. While MYC constitutes a formidable therapeutic target, it also plays an essential role in normal physiology, thus creating the need for context--specific targeting strategies. The analysis of post-translational MYC activity modulation yields novel targets for MYC inactivation. Specifically, following regulatory network analysis in human B cells, we identify a novel role of the STK38 kinase as a regulator of MYC activity and a candidate target for abrogating tumorigenesis in MYC addicted lymphoma. We found that STK38 regulates MYC protein stability and turnover in a kinase-activity-dependent manner. STK38 kinase inactivation abrogates apoptosis following B-cell receptor (BCR) activation, while its silencing significantly decreases MYC levels and increases apoptosis. Moreover, STK38 knockdown suppresses growth of MYC addicted tumors in vivo thus providing a novel viable target for treating these malignancies. PMID:23178486

  17. Using biologic predictive factors to direct therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Cliona; Wilson, Wyndham H.

    2013-01-01

    While diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was once considered to be a single disease entity, recent biological insights have demonstrated that it can be divided up into at least three molecular subtypes. Gene expression profiling has revealed that DLBCL consists of a germinal center B-cell like subtype (GCB), an activated B-cell like subtype (ABC) and a primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma subtype (PMBL). These three entities arise from different stages of B-cell differentiation and are characterized by distinct mechanisms of oncogenic activation. In GCB DLBCL, the BCL6 transcription factor may play an important role in tumor survival and treatment resistance and strategies that target this are under investigation. ABC DLBCL is characterized by high expression of target genes of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/Rel family of transcription factors and strategies that target NF-κB are in clinical trials. PMBL is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that shares many molecular features with nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and may benefit from dose intensity approaches and inhibition of the Janus kinases. Other biologic predictive factors such as MYC and BCL2 may be overexpressed in both the GCB and ABC subtypes and strategies that target these complexes are also being tested. PMID:23610613

  18. Clinical features and treatment results in children with anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Erman; Kutluk, M Tezer; Akyüz, Canan; Kale, Gülsev; Varan, Ali; Yalçın, Bilgehan; Aydın, Burça; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) tends to have frequent relapse and good response to salvage chemotherapy. The frequency of ALCL among 1486 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cases followed-up since 1972 was 1.5%, however, the percentage was 9.3% in cases diagnosed after 2000. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for 23 children were 32.2% and 72.8% at 3 years, respectively. Disseminated diseases, no response to first line treatment, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) negativity were found as significant predictors on survival of ALCL. The proper diagnosis and early referral is essential in these children for a better survival rate. The children with ALK negative status should be monitored carefully because of the poor prognostic factors, and treated differently. The survival rates in this study are need of further improvement since the survival rates with current protocols are achievable at a level more than 80%. This is mainly related with late referral of those children with advanced disease. PMID:27411412

  19. Using biologic predictive factors to direct therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Kieron; Grant, Cliona; Wilson, Wyndham H

    2013-02-01

    While diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was once considered to be a single disease entity, recent biological insights have demonstrated that it can be divided up into at least three molecular subtypes. Gene expression profiling has revealed that DLBCL consists of a germinal center B-cell like subtype (GCB), an activated B-cell like subtype (ABC) and a primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma subtype (PMBL). These three entities arise from different stages of B-cell differentiation and are characterized by distinct mechanisms of oncogenic activation. In GCB DLBCL, the BCL6 transcription factor may play an important role in tumor survival and treatment resistance and strategies that target this are under investigation. ABC DLBCL is characterized by high expression of target genes of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/Rel family of transcription factors and strategies that target NF-κB are in clinical trials. PMBL is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that shares many molecular features with nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and may benefit from dose intensity approaches and inhibition of the Janus kinases. Other biologic predictive factors such as MYC and BCL2 may be overexpressed in both the GCB and ABC subtypes and strategies that target these complexes are also being tested. PMID:23610613

  20. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in Saskatchewan: a clinicopathologic study

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Thomas; Skinnider, Leo F.; Wright, Joanne L.; Komjathy, Gabriel

    1978-01-01

    In a retrospective clinical study of 208 previously untreated persons with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas the disorders were classified and staged according to the histopathologic criteria of Rappaport, Winter and Hicks and the Ann Arbor clinical staging classification. Nodular types constituted 22% and diffuse types 78% of the lymphomas. The nodular lymphomas were slightly more common in females and were clustered in the age range 30 to 90 years. The diffuse lymphomas were slightly more common in males; the age distribution was bimodal, with one peak in the age range 10 to 19 years and the other in the age range 60 to 69 years, but when the age distribution of the general population in which the lymphomas occurred was taken into account, the incidence of these lymphomas was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.001) in persons more than 69 years of age than in those 40 to 69 years of age. Survival correlated with histopathologic type: persons with nodular (follicular) lymphomas and diffuse lymphocytic well differentiated lymphomas had a significantly greater survival (P < 0.05) than those with other diffuse lymphomas. No significant difference in survival was noticed between persons with nodal and extranodal lymphomas. While Rappaport and colleagues' criteria are still very useful, it is important to recognize the nodular lymphoma as a specific entity requiring generally different management from diffuse lymphomas. Appreciation of the different biologic behaviour of the various lymphomas is important to clinicians planning therapy. PMID:356951

  1. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  2. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Malignant lymphomas of the skin: their differentiation from lymphoid and nonlymphoid cutaneous infiltrates that simulate lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Burke, J S

    1985-08-01

    Malignant lymphomas of the skin, excluding mycosis fungoides, are pathologically, immunologically, and clinically heterogeneous. Varying patterns and degrees of cutaneous infiltration are encountered in all histologic subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Immunologic studies have shown relatively equal numbers of cases with B and T cell phenotypes, but true histiocytic lymphomas of the skin also occur. Patients may be of any age, and they may have lymphoma in any clinical stage. A low clinical stage and a low-grade histologic subtype are significant factors for long survival. The differential diagnosis includes a variety of lymphoid infiltrates that are referred to as a group as cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia; it also includes lymphomatoid papulosis as well as nonlymphoid cutaneous infiltrates such as myeloid leukemias, histiocytosis X, malignant histiocytosis, regressing atypical histiocytosis, and neuroendocrine (Merkel) cell carcinoma. Distinction of cutaneous lymphomas from these entities requires comprehension of multiple variables, including immunologic as well as morphologic and clinical factors.

  5. Evidence Suggesting That Discontinuous Dosing of ALK Kinase Inhibitors May Prolong Control of ALK+ Tumors.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Rajan, Soumya S; Liang, Winnie S; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Groysman, Matthew J; Tapia, Edgar O; Peters, Tara L; Cuyugan, Lori; Adkins, Jonathan; Rimsza, Lisa M; Lussier, Yves A; Puvvada, Soham D; Schatz, Jonathan H

    2015-07-15

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is chromosomally rearranged in a subset of certain cancers, including 2% to 7% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and ∼70% of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). The ALK kinase inhibitors crizotinib and ceritinib are approved for relapsed ALK(+) NSCLC, but acquired resistance to these drugs limits median progression-free survival on average to ∼10 months. Kinase domain mutations are detectable in 25% to 37% of resistant NSCLC samples, with activation of bypass signaling pathways detected frequently with or without concurrent ALK mutations. Here we report that, in contrast to NSCLC cells, drug-resistant ALCL cells show no evidence of bypassing ALK by activating alternate signaling pathways. Instead, drug resistance selected in this setting reflects upregulation of ALK itself. Notably, in the absence of crizotinib or ceritinib, we found that increased ALK signaling rapidly arrested or killed cells, allowing a prolonged control of drug-resistant tumors in vivo with the administration of discontinuous rather than continuous regimens of drug dosing. Furthermore, even when drug resistance mutations were detected in the kinase domain, overexpression of the mutant ALK was toxic to tumor cells. We confirmed these findings derived from human ALCL cells in murine pro-B cells that were transformed to cytokine independence by ectopic expression of an activated NPM-ALK fusion oncoprotein. In summary, our results show how ALK activation functions as a double-edged sword for tumor cell viability, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26018086

  6. Evidence Suggesting that Discontinuous Dosing of ALK Kinase Inhibitors May Prolong Control of ALK+ Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Rajan, Soumya S.; Liang, Winnie S.; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Groysman, Matthew J.; Tapia, Edgar O.; Peters, Tara L.; Cuyugan, Lori; Adkins, Jonathan; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Lussier, Yves A.; Puvvada, Soham D.; Schatz, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase ALK is chromosomally rearranged in a subset of certain cancers, including 2–7% non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and ~70% of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). The ALK kinase inhibitors crizotinib and ceritinib are approved for relapsed ALK+ NSCLC, but acquired resistance to these drugs limits median progression-free survival on average to ~10 months. Kinase domain mutations are detectable in 25–37% of resistant NSCLC samples, with activation of bypass signaling pathways detected frequently with or without concurrent ALK mutations. Here we report that, in contrast to NSCLC cells, drug resistant ALCL cells show no evidence of bypassing ALK by activating alternate signaling pathways. Instead, drug resistance selected in this setting reflects upregulation of ALK itself. Notably, in the absence of crizotinib or ceritinib, we found that increased ALK signaling rapidly arrested or killed cells, allowing a prolonged control of drug-resistant tumors in vivo with the administration of discontinuous rather than continuous regimens of drug dosing. Furthermore, even when drug resistance mutations were detected in the kinase domain, overexpression of the mutant ALK was toxic to tumor cells. We confirmed these findings derived from human ALCL cells in murine pro-B cells that were transformed to cytokine independence by ectopic expression of an activated NPM-ALK fusion oncoprotein. In summary, our results show how ALK activation functions as a double-edged sword for tumor cell viability, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26018086

  7. Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Follicular Variant Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  8. Mechanisms of Idelalisib-Associated Diarrhea in Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Indolent Non-hodgkin Lymphoma, or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Absence of Signs or Symptoms; B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Digestive System Signs and Symptoms; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  10. The spectrum of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a description of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-05-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization (WHO) 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this study, we present 10 cases of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma and have organized the criteria described by the WHO into four patterns along with detailed clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic characterization and outcome data. Our findings show a male preponderance, median age of 37 years and a mediastinal presentation in 80% of cases. All cases expressed at least two markers associated with B-cell lineage and good response to combination chemotherapy currently employed for non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  11. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  12. Patients With Celiac Disease and B-Cell Lymphoma Have a Better Prognosis Than Those With T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Rubio–Tapia, Alberto; Ristow, Kay M.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Murray, Joseph A.; Inwards, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Celiac disease (CD) is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma. However, relatively few studies have assessed the outcome of patients diagnosed with both CD and lymphoma. We evaluated the temporal association between lymphoma and CD, along with clinical presentation, response to therapy, and prognosis. Methods Patients diagnosed with both CD and lymphoma were identified retrospectively in a tertiary referral center. Clinical characteristics and survival were analyzed. Results Sixty-three patients (36 men) were identified who had been diagnosed with lymphoma and CD. Thirty-six (57%) were diagnosed with CD before they were diagnosed with lymphoma. The most common histologic entity was diffuse, large, B-cell lymphoma, which affected 18 (29%) patients. Complete information for staging was available in 59 patients; 24 (38%) had stage IV disease. Only chemotherapy or only radiation therapy was used for 43 (68%) and 11 (17%) patients, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cumulative survival rates for the entire cohort were 58% and 39%, respectively. Survival of patients with T-cell lymphoma was shorter than for all other lymphomas (119.4 vs 22.8 mo; P = .02). Conclusions CD is associated with B- and T-cell lymphomas. Patients with B-cell lymphomas had a better prognosis than those with T-cell lymphoma. Therapy is unsatisfactory for enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20851210

  13. Analysis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus in CD25+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma in children.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Weiss, Lawrence M; Harrington, William J; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-07-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is recognized as 2 distinct diseases: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)+ ALCL and ALK- ALCL. ALK+ ALCL occurs in younger patients and has a better prognosis. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), which frequently expresses CD25. CD25 is significantly expressed in childhood ALCL. In Brazil, HTLV-1 infection is endemic, and vertical transmission is responsible for spread to children. Of HTLV-1 carriers, 90% or more remain asymptomatic. Some cases of adult HTLV-1-related lymphomas have characteristics of ALCL but are considered CD30+ ATLL subtypes. No similar cases have been described in children. We analyzed 33 cases of pediatric ALCL, CD25+ and CD25-, for proviral HTLV-1 DNA. All cases corresponded to the common histologic ALCL type and were CD30+ in virtually all neoplastic cells. ALK expression was observed in 31 (94%) of 33 cases; CD25 was positive in 27 (82%), including 1 ALK- ALCL case. There was a strong positive correlation between ALK and CD25 expression. None of the cases showed proviral HTLV-1 DNA. ALCL in children has no relationship with HTLV-1; the frequent CD25 expression must be explained by a mechanism different from that in ATLL.

  14. General Information about Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. General Information about Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. This is an exciting time in the treatment of lymphoma.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma "This is an exciting time in the treatment of lymphoma." Past Issues / Summer ... best medication for each patient, indicates the best time for treatments, and sheds light on the patient's ...

  17. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. ...

  18. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  19. Microbial Protein-tyrosine Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Joseph D.; Wong, Dennis; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Microbial ester kinases identified in the past 3 decades came as a surprise, as protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr amino acids was thought to be unique to eukaryotes. Current analysis of available microbial genomes reveals that “eukaryote-like” protein kinases are prevalent in prokaryotes and can converge in the same signaling pathway with the classical microbial “two-component” systems. Most microbial tyrosine kinases lack the “eukaryotic” Hanks domain signature and are designated tyrosine kinases based upon their biochemical activity. These include the tyrosine kinases termed bacterial tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), which are responsible for the majority of known bacterial tyrosine phosphorylation events. Although termed generally as bacterial tyrosine kinases, BY-kinases can be considered as one family belonging to the superfamily of prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases in bacteria. Other members of this superfamily include atypical “odd” tyrosine kinases with diverse mechanisms of protein phosphorylation and the “eukaryote-like” Hanks-type tyrosine kinases. Here, we discuss the distribution, phylogeny, and function of the various prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases, focusing on the recently discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtkA and its relationship with other members of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:24554699

  20. Primary Uterine Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xuefeng; Yang, Panpan; Wang, Li; Jing, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary uterine non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is extremely rare accounting for <1% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Imaging findings of primary uterine lymphoma have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in a patient with primary uterine peripheral T-cell lymphoma. A 27-year-old female presented with intermittent fever with neutropenia for 7 months. MRI showed an ill-defined mass involved both the uterine corpus and cervix, resulting in diffuse enlargement of the uterus. This mass showed inhomogeneous hypointensity on unenhanced T1-weighted images, hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted imaging, relative hypointensity compared to the surrounding myometrium on T2-weighted images and lower enhancement than the surrounding myometrium on enhanced T1-weighted images. FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake in the thickened wall of the uterine corpus and cervix with SUVmax of 26.9. There were multiple hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the pelvis and retroperitoneum. Uterine curettage and CT-guided biopsy of the uterine mass revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Bone marrow biopsy revealed no evidence of lymphomatous involvement. The imaging and pathologic findings were consistent with primary uterine lymphoma. After 3 circles of chemotherapy, follow-up enhanced MRI showed decreased thickness of the uterine wall. Despite its rarity, primary uterine non-Hodgkin's lymphoma should be taken into consideration when a uterine tumor shows large size, relative hypointesity on both T2-weighted images and enhanced T1-weighted images compared to the surrounding myometrium, and intense FDG uptake on PET/CT. MRI may be helpful for describing the relationship between the tumor and adjacent structures. FDG PET/CT may be useful for tumor detection and staging. PMID:27124063

  1. Rituximab, Romidepsin, and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. NPM-ALK and the JunB transcription factor regulate the expression of cytotoxic molecules in ALK-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joel D; Lee, Jason K H; Bacani, Julinor T C; Lai, Raymond; Ingham, Robert J

    2011-01-30

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma of T/null immunophenotype that is most prevalent in children and young adults. The normal cellular counterpart of this malignancy is presumed to be the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and this presumption is partly based on the observation that these tumour cells often express cytotoxic granules containing Granzyme B (GzB) and Perforin. Chromosomal translocations involving the gene encoding for the ALK tyrosine kinase are also characteristic of ALK+ ALCL, and the resulting fusion proteins (e.g. NPM-ALK) initiate signalling events important in ALK+ ALCL pathogenesis. These events include the elevated expression of JunB; an AP-1 family transcription factor that promotes ALK+ ALCL proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that JunB is a direct transcriptional activator of GzB and that GzB transcription is also promoted by NPM-ALK. We found that Perforin expression was not regulated by JunB, but was promoted by NPM-ALK in some cell lines and inhibited by it in others. In conclusion, our study makes the novel observation that signalling through NPM-ALK and JunB affect the expression of cytotoxic molecules in ALK+ ALCL. Moreover, these findings demonstrate the expression of GzB and Perforin in this lymphoma is not solely due its presumed CTL origin, but that oncogenic signalling is actively influencing the expression of these proteins.

  3. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: current knowledge and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Majchrzak, Agata; Witkowska, Magdalena; Smolewski, Piotr

    2014-09-11

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the most common non-Hodgkin lymphomas in adults. The disease is very heterogeneous in its presentation, that is DLBCL patients may differ from each other not only in regard to histology of tissue infiltration, clinical course or response to treatment, but also in respect to diversity in gene expression profiling. A growing body of knowledge on the biology of DLBCL, including abnormalities in intracellular signaling, has allowed the development of new treatment strategies, specifically directed against lymphoma cells. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays an important role in controlling proliferation and survival of tumor cells in various types of malignancies, including DLBCL, and therefore it may be a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Currently, novel anticancer drugs are undergoing assessment in different phases of clinical trials in aggressive lymphomas, with promising outcomes. In this review we present a state of art review on various classes of small molecule inhibitors selectively involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and their clinical potential in this disease.

  4. Natural killer cell lymphoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Tohmiya, Yasuo; Matsuura, Kazuto; Takahashi, Etsu; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2003-01-01

    The majority of all parotid lymphomas are of the non-Hodgkin type and of B-cell origin. Primary natural killer cell lymphomas of the parotid gland are extremely rare. We present a case of natural killer cell lymphoma in a 34-year-old woman. The disease was refractory to chemotherapy, and the patient eventually succumbed due to lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:14564097

  5. Therapeutic potential and functional interaction of carfilzomib and vorinostat in T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Chen, Gege; Wang, Houcai; Xie, Bingqian; Hu, Liangning; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Tao, Yi; Han, Ying; Wu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Yiwen; Dai, Bojie; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) vorinostat cooperated to induce cell apoptosis in one T-cell leukemia cell line in vitro, implying the possibility of the combination treatment of carfilzomib and vorinostat as a potential therapeutic strategy in human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Here we report that combination treatment of carfilzomib and vorinostat enhanced cell apoptosis and induced a marked increase in G2-M arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and activated the members of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) family, including the stress-activated kinases JNK, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2. Carfilzomib/vorinostat-mediated apoptosis was blocked by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 but not the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly attenuated carfilzomib/vorinostat-induced apoptosis, suggesting that p38MAPK and JNK activation contribute to carfilzomib and vorinostat-induced apoptosis. This was further confirmed via short hairpin (shRNA) RNA knockdown of p38MAPK and JNK. Interestingly, the ROS scavenger NAC attenuated carfilzomib/vorinostat-mediated activation of p38MAPK and JNK. However, p38MAPK shRNA but not JNK shRNA diminished carfilzomib/vorinostat-mediated ROS generation. In contrast, overexpression of p38MAPK significantly increased carfilzomib/vorinostat-mediated ROS generation, suggesting that an amplification loop exists between ROS and p38MAPK pathway. Combination treatment of carfilzomib and vorinostat enhanced their individual antitumor activity in both a human xenograft model as well as human primary T-cell leukemia/lymphoma cells. These data suggest the potential clinical benefit and underlying molecular mechanism of combining carfilzomib with vorinostat in the treatment of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. PMID:27074555

  6. Detailed Functional and Proteomic Characterization of Fludarabine Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorkova, Lucie; Scigelova, Michaela; Arrey, Tabiwang Ndipanquang; Vit, Ondrej; Pospisilova, Jana; Doktorova, Eliska; Klanova, Magdalena; Alam, Mahmudul; Vockova, Petra; Maswabi, Bokang

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a chronically relapsing aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma considered incurable by currently used treatment approaches. Fludarabine is a purine analog clinically still widely used in the therapy of relapsed MCL. Molecular mechanisms of fludarabine resistance have not, however, been studied in the setting of MCL so far. We therefore derived fludarabine-resistant MCL cells (Mino/FR) and performed their detailed functional and proteomic characterization compared to the original fludarabine sensitive cells (Mino). We demonstrated that Mino/FR were highly cross-resistant to other antinucleosides (cytarabine, cladribine, gemcitabine) and to an inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) ibrutinib. Sensitivity to other types of anti-lymphoma agents was altered only mildly (methotrexate, doxorubicin, bortezomib) or remained unaffacted (cisplatin, bendamustine). The detailed proteomic analysis of Mino/FR compared to Mino cells unveiled over 300 differentially expressed proteins. Mino/FR were characterized by the marked downregulation of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and BTK (thus explaining the observed crossresistance to antinucleosides and ibrutinib), but also by the upregulation of several enzymes of de novo nucleotide synthesis, as well as the up-regulation of the numerous proteins of DNA repair and replication. The significant upregulation of the key antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Mino/FR cells was associated with the markedly increased sensitivity of the fludarabine-resistant MCL cells to Bcl-2-specific inhibitor ABT199 compared to fludarabine-sensitive cells. Our data thus demonstrate that a detailed molecular analysis of drug-resistant tumor cells can indeed open a way to personalized therapy of resistant malignancies. PMID:26285204

  7. Rituximab, Combination Chemotherapy, and 90-Yttrium Ibritumomab Tiuxetan for Patients With Stage I or II Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-17

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Ofatumumab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  9. Obatoclax Mesylate, Rituximab, and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  10. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  11. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. microRNA expression profiling identifies molecular signatures associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiling; Iqbal, Javeed; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Shen, Yulei; Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkaer, Karen; Lim, Megan S.; Piva, Roberto; Barreca, Antonella; Pellegrino, Elisa; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Kucuk, Can; Jiang, Chun-Sun; Hu, Xiaozhou; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Aoun, Patricia; Perkins, Sherrie L.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) encompass at least 2 systemic diseases distinguished by the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) profiling on 33 ALK-positive (ALK[+]) ALCLs, 25 ALK-negative (ALK[−]) ALCLs, 9 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 11 peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified (PTCLNOS), and normal T cells, and demonstrated that ALCLs express many of the miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal T cells with the prominent exception of miR-146a. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated distinct clustering of ALCL, PTCL-NOS, and the AITL subtype of PTCL. Cases of ALK(+) ALCL and ALK(–) ALCL were interspersed in unsupervised analysis, suggesting a close relationship at the molecular level. We identified an miRNA signature of 7 miRNAs (5 upregulated: miR-512-3p, miR-886-5p, miR-886-3p, miR-708, miR-135b; 2 downregulated: miR-146a, miR-155) significantly associated with ALK(+) ALCL cases. In addition, we derived an 11-miRNA signature (4 upregulated: miR-210, miR-197, miR-191, miR-512-3p; 7 downregulated: miR-451, miR-146a, miR-22, miR-455-3p, miR-455-5p, miR-143, miR-494) that differentiates ALK(–) ALCL from other PTCLs. Our in vitro studies identified a set of 32 miRNAs associated with ALK expression. Of these, the miR-17∼92 cluster and its paralogues were also highly expressed in ALK(+) ALCL and may represent important downstream effectors of the ALK oncogenic pathway. PMID:23801630

  13. Constitutive STAT6 activation in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guiter, Chrystelle; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Gaulard, Philippe; Leroy, Karen; Castellano, Flavia

    2004-07-15

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), currently recognized as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) subtype, shows increased expression of interleukin 4 (IL-4)/IL-13 signaling effectors and targets, suggesting constitutive activation of these pathways. We therefore investigated the functional state of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6), mediating IL-4/IL-13 transcriptional effects. Constitutive STAT6 phosphorylation and DNA-binding activity were detected in PMBL cell lines but not DLBCL cell lines. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed nuclear phosphorylated STAT6 (P-STAT6) in 8 of 11 PMBL, compared with 1 of 10 DLBCL primary tumors (P =.01). IL-4 and IL-13 transcripts were absent in PMBL cell lines and expressed at low levels in tumors, indicating that, contrary to classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), STAT6 activation is not due to an autocrine IL-4/IL-13 secretion. We demonstrated an amplification of the JAK2 gene in 2 of 6 PMBL cases, and showed higher JAK2 mRNA levels in PMBL compared with DLBCL (P =.005). The Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) was constitutively phosphorylated in the PMBL MedB1 cell line. MedB1 treatment with JAK2 inhibitor AG490 partially decreased STAT6 phosphorylation, suggesting that JAK2 is partially involved in STAT6 activation in these cells. Our findings highlight phosphorylated STAT6 as a characteristic distinguishing PMBL from DLBCL, but a common feature to PMBL and cHL, supporting the hypothesis of common pathogenic events in these 2 lymphomas. PMID:15044251

  14. Concurrent and Clonally Related Pediatric Follicular Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma in a 5-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Aaron C; Zimmerman, David; Liu, Mingya; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric follicular lymphoma shares morphologic similarities with the adult form of the disease but lacks other classic features of adult lymphoma, including t(14;18) translocation, BCL2 overexpression, and transformation to aggressive higher-grade lymphoma. Herein, we report a novel case in which a 5-year-old boy (ethnicity unknown) had follicular lymphoma, along with concurrent high-grade and clonally related disease that fulfilled all of the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic criteria for Burkitt lymphoma, including a t(8;14) translocation involving the MYC gene. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported instance of transformation of follicular lymphoma of any sort into true Burkitt lymphoma and the first reported instance of acquisition of MYC abnormalities in pediatric follicular lymphoma.

  15. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  16. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P. Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  17. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Jayakrishnan, R; Thomas, Gigi; Kumar, Aswin; Nair, Rekha A; Mathews, Susan

    2011-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma usually involves lymph nodes, but can involve extranodal sites. Oral lymphomas are relatively rare and often difficult to diagnose in a clinical setting. A case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the hard palate who had undergone external beam radiation therapy and was found to be well one year following treatment is reported. PMID:22482326

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  19. Plant 5-Methylthioribose Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, Andrzej

    1983-01-01

    Activity of 5-methylthioribose kinase, the enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of 1-phospho-5-methylthioribose, has been revealed in the extracts from various higher plant species. Almost 2,000-fold-purified enzyme has been obtained from yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L. cv Topaz) seed extract. Molecular weight of the native enzyme is 70,000 as judged by gel filtration. The lupin 5-methylthioribose kinase exhibits a strict requirement for divalent metal ions. Among the ions tested, only Mg2+ and Mn2+ acted as cofactors. The curve of kinase initial velocity versus pH reaches plateau at pH 10 to 10.5. The Km values calculated for 5-methylthioribose and ATP are 4.3 and 8.3 micromolar, respectively. Among nucleoside triphosphates tested as potential phosphate donors, only dATP could substitute in the reaction for ATP. 5-Isobutylthioribose, an analog of 5-methylthioribose, proved to be the γ-ATP-phosphate acceptor, too. The compound inhibits competitively synthesis of 1-phospho-5-methylthioribose (Ki = 1.4 micromolar). Lupin 5-methylthioribose kinase is completely and irreversibly inhibited by the antisulfhydryl reagent, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. As in bacteria (Ferro, Barrett, Shapiro 1978 J Biol Chem 253: 6021-6025), the enzyme may be involved in a new, alternative pathway of methionine synthesis in plant tissues. PMID:16662931

  20. The NF-κB subunit c-Rel regulates Bach2 tumour suppressor expression in B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J E; Butterworth, J A; Zhao, B; Sellier, H; Campbell, K J; Thomas, H D; Bacon, C M; Cockell, S J; Gewurz, B E; Perkins, N D

    2016-01-01

    The REL gene, encoding the NF-κB subunit c-Rel, is frequently amplified in B-cell lymphoma and functions as a tumour-promoting transcription factor. Here we report the surprising result that c-rel–/– mice display significantly earlier lymphomagenesis in the c-Myc driven, Eμ-Myc model of B-cell lymphoma. c-Rel loss also led to earlier onset of disease in a separate TCL1-Tg-driven lymphoma model. Tumour reimplantation experiments indicated that this is an effect intrinsic to the Eμ-Myc lymphoma cells but, counterintuitively, c-rel–/– Eμ-Myc lymphoma cells were more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli. To learn more about why loss of c-Rel led to earlier onset of disease, microarray gene expression analysis was performed on B cells from 4-week-old, wild-type and c-rel–/– Eμ-Myc mice. Extensive changes in gene expression were not seen at this age, but among those transcripts significantly downregulated by the loss of c-Rel was the B-cell tumour suppressor BTB and CNC homology 2 (Bach2). Quantitative PCR and western blot analysis confirmed loss of Bach2 in c-Rel mutant Eμ-Myc tumours at both 4 weeks and the terminal stages of disease. Moreover, Bach2 expression was also downregulated in c-rel–/– TCL1-Tg mice and RelA Thr505Ala mutant Eμ-Myc mice. Analysis of wild-type Eμ-Myc mice demonstrated that the population expressing low levels of Bach2 exhibited the earlier onset of lymphoma seen in c-rel–/– mice. Confirming the relevance of these findings to human disease, analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data revealed that Bach2 is a c-Rel and NF-κB target gene in transformed human B cells, whereas treatment of Burkitt's lymphoma cells with inhibitors of the NF-κB/IκB kinase pathway or deletion of c-Rel or RelA resulted in loss of Bach2 expression. These data reveal a surprising tumour suppressor role for c-Rel in lymphoma development explained by regulation of Bach2 expression, underlining the context-dependent complexity of NF

  1. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  3. Primary solitary lymphoma of the fourth ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Huang-I; Lai, Ping-Hong; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Shong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary central nervous lymphoma(PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma confined to the central nervous system. Most of the lesions are supratentorial and periventricular, often involving deep structures such as corpus callosum and basal ganglion. Isolated intraventricular lymphoma is rare and only a few case reports. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the seventh case of isolated PCNSL in the fourth ventricle in an immunocompetent patient. Presentation of case A 61-year-old male presenting with 3 months of headache and dizziness followed with unsteady gait for days. The MR imaging of brain revealed a homogeneously enhancing lesion occupying almost the whole 4th ventricle.The tumor was removed subtotally via suboccipital craniotomy. Histopathology revealed the lesion be a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Discussion PCNSL is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of intracranial mass lesion. The unusual location in surgically accessible fourth ventricle in posterior fossa, the isolation of the tumor may present a compelling indication for surgical resection. Conclusion We suggest that primary lymphoma should be considered with homogenous lesions of the 4th ventricle. Also aggressive surgical resection in this surgically accessible location, instead of biopsy only, is rational. PMID:26209757

  4. Oral manifestations of lymphoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Taísa Domingues Bernardes; Ferreira, Camila Belo Tavares; Leite, Gustavo Boehmer; de Menezes Pontes, José Roberto; Antunes, Héliton S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a malignant disease with two forms: Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is diagnosed in extranodal sites in 40% of cases, and the head and neck region is the second most affected, with an incidence of 11–33%, while HL has a very low incidence in extranodal sites (1–4%). The aim of this study was to identify the oral manifestations of lymphoma through a systematic literature review, which we conducted using the PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. We found 1456 articles, from which we selected 73. Among the intraoral findings, the most frequent were ulcerations, pain, swelling, and tooth mobility, while the extraoral findings included facial asymmetry and cervical, submandibular, and submental lymphadenopathy. Among the few studies reporting imaging findings, the most cited lesions included hypodense lesions with diffuse boundaries, bone resorptions, and tooth displacements. The publications reviewed highlight gaps in the areas of early detection, diagnosis, and proper treatment. PMID:27594910

  5. Epigenetics and B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaknovich, Rita; Melnick, Ari

    2011-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Purpose of review It has only recently become apparent that mutations in epigenetic mechanisms and perturbation of epigenomic patterning are frequent events in B-cell lymphomas. The purpose of this review is to highlight these new findings and provide a conceptual framework for understanding how epigenetic modifications might contribute to lymphomagenesis. Recent findings Somatic mutations affecting histone methyltransferases such as EZH2 and MLL2, histone demethylases including UTX and JMJD2C and histone acetyltransferases including CBP and p300 are recurrent and common in lymphomas. These mutations result in disruption of chromatin structure and functions of other proteins, ultimately causing aberrant transcriptional programming affecting multiple gene networks. Widespread perturbation of cytosine methylation patterning now appears to be a hallmark of B-cell lymphomas and occurs in specific patterns that can distinguish disease subtypes. Therapeutic targeting strategies can overcome abnormal epigenetic mechanisms and potently kill lymphoma cells. Summary Newly discovered epigenetic lesions may provide critical insights into the genesis of B-cell lymphomas but further studies are required to understand how they affect biological mechanism. Epigenetic lesions offer tremendous opportunities for the development of improved biomarkers and treatments. PMID:21577103

  6. Oral manifestations of lymphoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Taísa Domingues Bernardes; Ferreira, Camila Belo Tavares; Leite, Gustavo Boehmer; de Menezes Pontes, José Roberto; Antunes, Héliton S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a malignant disease with two forms: Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is diagnosed in extranodal sites in 40% of cases, and the head and neck region is the second most affected, with an incidence of 11–33%, while HL has a very low incidence in extranodal sites (1–4%). The aim of this study was to identify the oral manifestations of lymphoma through a systematic literature review, which we conducted using the PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. We found 1456 articles, from which we selected 73. Among the intraoral findings, the most frequent were ulcerations, pain, swelling, and tooth mobility, while the extraoral findings included facial asymmetry and cervical, submandibular, and submental lymphadenopathy. Among the few studies reporting imaging findings, the most cited lesions included hypodense lesions with diffuse boundaries, bone resorptions, and tooth displacements. The publications reviewed highlight gaps in the areas of early detection, diagnosis, and proper treatment.

  7. Cytodiagnostics of canine lymphomas - possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Sapierzyński, R; Kliczkowska-Klarowicz, K; Jankowska, U; Jagielski, D

    2016-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas are one of the most common malignant tumours occurring in dogs. The basic method of lymphoma diagnosis in human, as well as in canine oncology is histopathology supported by immunohistochemistry. It was suggested that in veterinary medicine excisional biopsy of lymph node and histopathology should be considered only where the cytologic diagnosis is equivocal or needs to be confirmed. There are at least three basic reasons for which cytological examination ought to be accepted as a sufficient and reliable diagnostic method for lymphoma in dogs. Firstly, most dog owners consider the fine-needle biopsy as an acceptable non-harmful method of sample collection. Secondly, an increasing number of studies recommend cytology as an accurate test for diagnosing and subtyping canine lymphoma. Finally, the vast majority of canine lymphoma subtypes belong to 4-5 categories characterized by a typical cytological picture. Immunocytochemical staining of cytological smears gives new diagnostic possibilities, such as detection of markers better characterizing given growth or a potential goal for target therapy in individual cases (for example inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor). PMID:27487521

  8. Oral manifestations of lymphoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Silva, Taísa Domingues Bernardes; Ferreira, Camila Belo Tavares; Leite, Gustavo Boehmer; de Menezes Pontes, José Roberto; Antunes, Héliton S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a malignant disease with two forms: Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is diagnosed in extranodal sites in 40% of cases, and the head and neck region is the second most affected, with an incidence of 11-33%, while HL has a very low incidence in extranodal sites (1-4%). The aim of this study was to identify the oral manifestations of lymphoma through a systematic literature review, which we conducted using the PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. We found 1456 articles, from which we selected 73. Among the intraoral findings, the most frequent were ulcerations, pain, swelling, and tooth mobility, while the extraoral findings included facial asymmetry and cervical, submandibular, and submental lymphadenopathy. Among the few studies reporting imaging findings, the most cited lesions included hypodense lesions with diffuse boundaries, bone resorptions, and tooth displacements. The publications reviewed highlight gaps in the areas of early detection, diagnosis, and proper treatment. PMID:27594910

  9. Gammaherpesviruses and canine lymphoma: no evidence for direct involvement in commonly occurring lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Alice; McAulay, Karen A.; Henriques, Joaquim; Alves, Margarida; Bell, Adam J.; Morris, Joanna S.; Jarrett, Ruth F.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common haematopoietic malignancy in dogs, but little is known about the aetiology of this heterogeneous group of cancers. In humans, the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several lymphoma subtypes. Recently, it was suggested that EBV or an EBV-like virus is circulating in dogs. We therefore investigated whether EBV, or a novel herpesvirus, is associated with canine lymphoma using both serological and molecular techniques. In an assay designed to detect antibodies to EBV viral capsid antigens, 41 % of dogs were positive. Dogs with cancers, including lymphoma, were more frequently positive than controls, but no particular association with B-cell lymphoma was noted. EBV-specific RNA and DNA sequences were not detected in lymphoma tissue by in situ hybridization or PCR, and herpesvirus genomes were not detected using multiple degenerate PCR assays with the ability to detect novel herpesviruses. We therefore found no evidence that herpesviruses are directly involved in common types of canine lymphoma although cannot exclude the presence of an EBV-like virus in the canine population. PMID:25722346

  10. [In situ lymphoma and other early stage malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Martínez, L; Adam, P; Fend, F

    2013-05-01

    The increasing use of immunohistochemical and molecular investigations of lymphatic tissues results in more frequent detection of early lymphoid proliferations. These show some but not all features of malignant lymphomas without fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of lymphoid malignancy. In addition to well-known premalignant B-cell proliferations, such as monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), so-called in situ lymphomas have recently been described with minimal infiltrates of clonal B-cells in morphologically reactive lymphoid tissues which show the phenotypic and genetic features of specific B-cell lymphoma subtypes and often show a characteristic topographical distribution. This article addresses a group of clonal lymphoproliferations with usually localized disease and excellent clinical prognosis, such as pediatric follicular lymphoma and nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Another group of early lesions not addressed in this review are virally induced lymphoproliferations which represent a grey zone between purely reactive lesions and malignant lymphomas and may pose significant diagnostic as well as clinical problems. In this review diagnostic criteria for early or in situ lesions and their distinction from partial infiltration by malignant lymphoma are described. PMID:23459785

  11. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone

  12. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiura, Yoshihito; Kotani, Norihiro; Yamashita, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Harumi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Honke, Koichi

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  13. Emerging immunotherapy and strategies directly targeting B cells for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Magdalena; Smolewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, significant prolonged survival in diffusive large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been observed. The efficacy of initial treatment improved mostly due to addition of a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) to standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Moreover, accurate understanding of DLBCL pathogenesis and remarkable progress in gene expression profiling have led to the development of a variety of tumor-specific regimens. Novel agents target directly the pathways involved in signal transduction, lead to apoptosis and cancer cells differentiation. In this article, we mainly focus on new treatment options, such as monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, currently investigated in aggressive B-cell lymphoma with particular attention to DLBCL type.

  14. Activation of the Syk tyrosine kinase is insufficient for downstream signal transduction in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Robert C; Hammill, Adrienne M; Lee, Jamie A; Uhr, Jonathan W; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2002-01-01

    Background Immature B lymphocytes and certain B cell lymphomas undergo apoptotic cell death following activation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signal transduction pathway. Several biochemical changes occur in response to BCR engagement, including activation of the Syk tyrosine kinase. Although Syk activation appears to be necessary for some downstream biochemical and cellular responses, the signaling events that precede Syk activation remain ill defined. In addition, the requirements for complete activation of the Syk-dependent signaling step remain to be elucidated. Results A mutant form of Syk carrying a combination of a K395A substitution in the kinase domain and substitutions of three phenylalanines (3F) for the three C-terminal tyrosines was expressed in a murine B cell lymphoma cell line, BCL1.3B3 to interfere with normal Syk regulation as a means to examine the Syk activation step in BCR signaling. Introduction of this kinase-inactive mutant led to the constitutive activation of the endogenous wildtype Syk enzyme in the absence of receptor engagement through a 'dominant-positive' effect. Under these conditions, Syk kinase activation occurred in the absence of phosphorylation on Syk tyrosine residues. Although Syk appears to be required for BCR-induced apoptosis in several systems, no increase in spontaneous cell death was observed in these cells. Surprisingly, although the endogenous Syk kinase was enzymatically active, no enhancement in the phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins, including phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a direct Syk target, was observed. Conclusion These data indicate that activation of Syk kinase enzymatic activity is insufficient for Syk-dependent signal transduction. This observation suggests that other events are required for efficient signaling. We speculate that localization of the active enzyme to a receptor complex specifically assembled for signal transduction may be the missing event. PMID:12470302

  15. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  16. [Prognosis of childhood mediastinal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Okamura, J; Ikuno, Y; Sakata, N; Kai, T; Tasaka, H

    1990-11-01

    Between 1973 and 1989, 16 children with non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) with a mediastinal mass (MM) were treated at our institution with multi-agent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. They also received central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis including intrathecal methotrexate administration (14 cases) and cranial irradiation (7 cases). Twelve were boys and 4 girls. Median age was 11 +/- 3. One patient died of air way obstruction one day after admission. Fourteen of 15 patients entered into complete remission (CR) and one patient partial remission. Five remains in CR 7 to 175 months after diagnosis (median 76 months). Nine patients relapsed in the bone marrow (3 cases), CNS (3), testicles (1), neck lymph node (1) and bones plus kidneys (1). Of these, 7 patients died within 13 months after initial relapse. The disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival of all patients were 27% and 33%, respectively. Analysis of the prognostic factors among patients with MM+ -NHL revealed that the serum LDH level below 1,000IU/l was a good prognostic sign. Other factors such as age, stage, initial WBC count, size of MM and response of the MM to the initial treatment did not correlate with DFS. Because of its rarity and the poor treatment result, we need more aggressive treatment program by a multiinstitutional study for MM+ -NHL. PMID:2287064

  17. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-09-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein-Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used.

  18. Selective T-Cell Depletion to Reduce GVHD (Patients) Receiving Stem Cell Tx to Treat Leukemia, Lymphoma or MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Graft vs Host Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Leukemia, Myeloid; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphocytic; Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Mantle-cell; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  19. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Veliparib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Crizotinib (PF-2341066) induces apoptosis due to downregulation of pSTAT3 and BCL-2 family proteins in NPM-ALK(+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hamedani, Farid Saei; Cinar, Munevver; Mo, Zhicheng; Cervania, Melissa A; Amin, Hesham M; Alkan, Serhan

    2014-04-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) is an aberrant fusion gene product with tyrosine kinase activity and is expressed in substantial subset of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). It has been shown that NPM-ALK binds to and activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Although NPM-ALK(+) ALCL overall shows a better prognosis, there is a sub-group of patients who relapses and is resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic regimens. NPM-ALK is a potential target for small molecule kinase inhibitors. Crizotinib (PF-2341066) is a small, orally bioavailable molecule that inhibits growth of tumors with ALK activity as shown in a subgroup of non-small lung cancer patients with EML4-ALK expression. In this study, we have investigated the in vitro effects of Crizotinib in ALCL cell line with NPM-ALK fusion. Crizotinib induced marked downregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation, which was associated with significant apoptotic cell death. Apoptosis induction was attributed to caspase-3 cleavage and marked downregulation of the Bcl-2 family of proteins including MCL-1. These findings implicate that Crizotinib has excellent potential to treat patients with NPM-ALK(+) ALCL through induction of apoptotic cell death and downregulation of major oncogenic proteins in this aggressive lymphoma.

  2. [Primary gastric lymphoma. Analysis of 86 cases].

    PubMed

    Pisano, R; Llorens, P; Levy, I; Backhause, C; Palma, M

    1994-09-01

    We report the retrospective analysis of 86 patients with primary gastric lymphoma diagnosed in a period of 12 years, that constitute 5.6% of malignant gastric lesions diagnosed in that lapse. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy diagnosed a malignant lesion in 93% and lymphoma in 36% of cases. Endoscopic biopsies disclosed malignant lesions in 79 cases (93%) and were diagnostic of lymphoma in 70 (82%). All patients were operated, including the seven subjects in which the biopsy did not show malignant lesions; the surgical indication of the latter was based in clinical grounds. The macroscopic examination of the surgical piece showed ulcerated lesions in 45 (52%) and mixed lesions (ulcerated and protruded with and without multiple erosions) in 15 (18%) patients. Seventeen patients (33%) had an early lesion of the MALT type (mucosa associated lymphoid tissue) and 87% of lesions were of low or intermediate histological type.

  3. Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 2.2015

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Richard T.; Advani, Ranjana H.; Ai, Weiyun Z.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Aoun, Patricia; Bello, Celeste M.; Benitez, Cecil M.; Bierman, Philip J.; Blum, Kristie A.; Chen, Robert; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Forero, Andres; Gordon, Leo I.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Huang, Jiayi; Johnston, Patrick B.; Khan, Nadia; Maloney, David G.; Mauch, Peter M.; Metzger, Monika; Moore, Joseph O.; Morgan, David; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Mulroney, Carolyn; Poppe, Matthew; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Seropian, Stuart; Tsien, Christina; Winter, Jane N.; Yahalom, Joachim; Burns, Jennifer L.; Sundar, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon malignancy involving lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are the 2 main types of HL. CHL accounts for most HL diagnosed in the Western countries. Chemotherapy or combined modality therapy, followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale), is the standard initial treatment for patients with newly diagnosed CHL. Brentuximab vedotin, a CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate, has produced encouraging results in the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. The potential long-term effects of treatment remain an important consideration, and long-term follow-up is essential after completion of treatment. PMID:25964641

  4. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients.

  5. Denis Burkitt and the African lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Magrath, I

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma has provided a model for the understanding of the epidemiology, the molecular abnormalities that induce tumours, and the treatment of other lymphomas. It is important to remember that the early phases of this work were conducted in Africa where today, unfortunately, the disease usually results in death because of limited resources, even though most children in more developed countries are cured. This must be changed. In addition, it is time to re-explore, with modern techniques, some of the questions that were raised some 50 years ago shortly after Burkitt’s first description, as well as new questions that can be asked only in the light of modern understanding of the immune system and the molecular basis of tumor development. The African lymphoma has taught us much, but there is a great deal still to be learned. PMID:22276020

  6. Romidepsin for peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Khot, Amit; Dickinson, Michael; Prince, H Miles

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is comprised of a rare heterogeneous group of diseases with diverse clinical presentations; however outcomes associated with conventional chemotherapy are generally poor in the majority of patients. Newer approaches, which include dose-intensification and agents with novel mechanisms of action, are needed to improve outcomes in this group of patients. In this review we examine the results of two recent large Phase II trials with romidepsin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor which shows considerable activity and good tolerability in patients with T-cell lymphoma. These initial results observed with single-agent romidepsin provide a foundation for exploring combination strategies and demonstrates proof-of-principle that other such drugs with similar mechanisms of action may be effective in T-cell lymphoma.

  7. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients. PMID:26475775

  8. NHL - Extranodal T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Mehta, Gagan

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL) is a rare lymphoid neoplasm that in the past has been grouped with a variety of granulomatous diseases. ENKL occurs in all age groups. However, it seems to occur more often in people in their 50s and affects more men than women. It is strongly linked to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially in people of Asian countries. Because this type of lymphoma occurs in organs or tissues other than lymph nodes, it is called ENKL. This is a case report of a 25-year-old female patient who presented with a nonhealing ulcer at the right nasal ala involving the upper lip and cheek for the last 2 months, which had been treated with antitubercular treatment without success. After biopsy and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis, the patient had been diagnosed a case of extranodal T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26668464

  9. Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma Presenting with Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Shuchi; Corrêa, Zélia M.; Karim, Nagla; Medlin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Context: Elderly patients with visual loss often have age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataract as common causes of visual loss. Other less common etiologies should be considered, especially in those presenting with systemic associations. Case Report: The patient discussed in our review is an 80-year-old female, with a history of diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration who presented with a sudden deterioration of vision. While this was initially attributed to diabetic retinopathy, she was eventually noted to have a salmon patch lesion in her conjunctiva, diagnosed on biopsy to be a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion: Because of the significant rate of disseminated disease among patients with lymphomas in the orbit that carries a worse prognosis, early diagnosis is essential to promote better overall survival of these patients. We describe here a patient diagnosed with conjunctival lymphoma associated with pronounced visual loss and review the literature on this subject. PMID:27011948

  10. Targeting autophagy enhances the anti-tumoral action of crizotinib in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Aurore; Le Gonidec, Sophie; AlSaati, Talal; Beau, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne; Espinos, Estelle; Codogno, Patrice; Brousset, Pierre; Giuriato, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALK+ ALCL) occur predominantly in children and young adults. Their treatment, based on aggressive chemotherapy, is not optimal since ALCL patients can still expect a 30% 2-year relapse rate. Tumor relapses are very aggressive and their underlying mechanisms are unknown. Crizotinib is the most advanced ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is already used in clinics to treat ALK-associated cancers. However, crizotinib escape mechanisms have emerged, thus preventing its use in frontline ALCL therapy. The process of autophagy has been proposed as the next target for elimination of the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is activated in ALCL cells submitted to ALK inactivation (using crizotinib or ALK-targeting siRNA). Classical autophagy read-outs such as autophagosome visualization/quantification by electron microscopy and LC3-B marker turn-over assays were used to demonstrate autophagy induction and flux activation upon ALK inactivation. This was demonstrated to have a cytoprotective role on cell viability and clonogenic assays following combined ALK and autophagy inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that co-treatment with crizotinib and chloroquine (two drugs already used in clinics) could be beneficial for ALK-positive ALCL patients. PMID:26338968

  11. Grayscale and color Doppler features of testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, Michele; Derchi, Lorenzo E; Secil, Mustafa; Dogra, Vikram; Sidhu, Paul S; Clements, Richard; Freeman, Simon; Grenier, Nicolas; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ramchandani, Parvati; Cicero, Calogero; Abete, Luca; Bussani, Rossana; Rocher, Laurence; Spencer, John; Tsili, Athina; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    Pooled data from 16 radiology centers were retrospectively analyzed to seek patients with pathologically proven testicular lymphoma and grayscale and color Doppler images available for review. Forty-three cases were found: 36 (84%) primary and 7 (16%) secondary testicular lymphoma. With unilateral primary lymphoma, involvement was unifocal (n = 10), multifocal (n = 11), or diffuse (n = 11). Synchronous bilateral involvement occurred in 6 patients. Color Doppler sonography showed normal testicular vessels within the tumor in 31 of 43 lymphomas (72%). Testicular lymphoma infiltrates through the tubules, preserving the normal vascular architecture of the testis. Depiction of normal testicular vessels crossing the lesion is a useful adjunctive diagnostic criterion. PMID:26014335

  12. Gamma-delta t-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foppoli, Marco; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas are aggressive and rare diseases originating from gamma-delta lymphocytes. These cells, which naturally play a role in the innate, non-specific immune response, develop from thymic precursor in the bone marrow, lack the major histocompatibility complex restrictions and can be divided into two subpopulations: Vdelta1, mostly represented in the intestine, and Vdelta2, prevalently located in the skin, tonsils and lymph nodes. Chronic immunosuppression such as in solid organ transplanted subjects and prolonged antigenic exposure are probably the strongest risk factors for the triggering of lymphomagenesis. Two entities are recognised by the 2008 WHO Classification: hepatosplenic gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (HSGDTL) and primary cutaneous gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGDTL). The former is more common among young males, presenting with B symptoms, splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia, usually with the absence of nodal involvement. Natural behaviour of HSGDTL is characterised by low response rates, poor treatment tolerability, common early progression of disease and disappointing survival figures. PCGDTL accounts for <1% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas, occurring in adults with relevant comorbidities. Cutaneous lesions may vary, but its clinical behaviour is usually aggressive and long-term survival is anecdotal. Available literature on gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas is fractioned, mostly consisting of case reports or small cumulative series. Therefore, clinical suspicion and diagnosis are usually delayed, and therapeutic management remains to be established. This review critically analyses available evidence on diagnosis, staging and behaviour of gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas, provides recommendations for therapeutic management in routine practice and discusses relevant unmet clinical needs for future studies.

  13. Incidental finding of lymphoma after septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tajudeen, Bobby A.; Bhuta, Sunita M.; Palma Diaz, Miguel Fernando; Kedeshian, Paul A.; Suh, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Septoplasty, or surgical correction of the deviated septum, is an elective, routinely performed rhinologic procedure to address nasal airway obstruction. In many cases, resected septal cartilage and bone fragments are sent for pathologic review, although there is no consensus on this practice. We reported two cases of incidentally diagnosed lymphoma after elective septoplasty and discussed clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Retrospective chart review of two patients who underwent septoplasty at a tertiary academic medical center and found to have incidental lymphoma based on histopathology. Results: Two patients who underwent septoplasty had an incidental diagnosis of lymphoma on pathologic analysis. One patient was noted to have an S-shaped septal deviation that produced bilateral nasal obstruction. She underwent a difficult septoplasty, in which the mucoperichondrial flap was firmly adherent to the underlying septum and bone. Final pathology demonstrated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. She was treated with chemoradiation and remained free of disease at 59 months. The other patient had a history of nasal trauma, which produced left septal deviation. He underwent an uncomplicated septoplasty, with pathology that demonstrated low-grade B-cell lymphoma. Because there was no evidence of active disease, the decision was made to not treat and to observe the patient clinically. Conclusions: This is the first reported series of septal lymphoma incidentally diagnosed on routine septoplasty. Although histopathologic review of specimens from routine nasal and sinus surgery is not routinely performed, this report highlighted the importance of this process, on a case-by-case basis, in detecting unexpected malignancies that otherwise were clinically silent. PMID:27470206

  14. Genomic landscape of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Hong, Bok S.; Bunick, Christopher G.; Chen, Kan; Bjornson, Robert D.; Maman, Yaakov; Wang, Tiffany; Tordoff, Jesse; Carlson, Kacie; Overton, John D.; Liu, Kristina J.; Lewis, Julia M.; Devine, Lesley; Barbarotta, Lisa; Foss, Francine M.; Subtil, Antonio; Vonderheid, Eric C.; Edelson, Richard L.; Schatz, David G.; Boggon, Titus J.; Girardi, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of skin-homing T lymphocytes. We performed exome and whole genome DNA sequence and RNA sequencing on purified CTCL and matched normal cells. The results implicate mutations in 17 genes in CTCL pathogenesis, including genes involved in T cell activation and apoptosis, NFκB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and DNA damage response. CTCL is distinctive in that somatic copy number variants (SCNVs) comprise 92% of all driver mutations (mean of 11.8 pathogenic SCNVs vs. 1.0 somatic single nucleotide variants per CTCL). These findings have implications for novel therapeutics. PMID:26192916

  15. Primary laryngeal lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Hugo; Cuestas, Giselle; Bosaleh, Andrea; Passali, Desiderio; Zubizarreta, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the larynx are very rare in children. They are often diagnosed late, since the initial symptoms are attributed to the process of larynx development or to other, more common pediatric diseases. Early visualization of the larynx with the aid of flexible or rigid fiberoptic laryngoscopy is essential in children having symptoms suggestive of laryngeal disease. Laryngeal lymphoma in children is exceptionally unusual. The certainty of the diagnosis, which is often very difficult to achieve, is generally confirmed by a tissue biopsy. In the present work, we describe the case of a non-Hodgkin lymphoblastic T-cell lymphoma of the larynx in an eight-year-old boy.

  16. Next-generation sequencing discoveries in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Slack, Graham W; Gascoyne, Randy D

    2013-03-01

    Since the mapping of the human genome and the advent of next-generation sequencing technology thorough examination of the cancer genome has become a reality. Over the last few years several studies have used next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the genetic landscape of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, identifying novel genetic mutations and gene rearrangements that have shed new light on the underlying tumor biology in these diseases as well as identifying possible targets for directed therapy. This review covers the major discoveries in lymphoma using next-generation sequencing technology.

  17. The molecular mechanisms of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Felberbaum, Rachael S.

    2005-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the appearance of giant abnormal cells called Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. HRS cells arise from germinal center B lymphocytes and in about 50 percent of patients, are infected with Epstein-Barr Virus. In addition, HRS cells show constitutive NF-kappaB activation and are resistant to apoptosis. This paper reviews several recent studies that for the first time implicate specific molecules in the pathogenesis of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma. Targeting these molecules could lead to the development of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:16720015

  18. Primary cutaneous lymphomas: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative neoplasms, with lymphatic proliferation limited to the skin with no involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow or viscera at the diagnosis. Cutaneous lymphomas originate from mature T-lymphocytes (65% of all cases), mature B-lymphocytes (25%) or NK cells. Histopathological evaluation including immunophenotyping of the skin biopsy specimen is the basis of the diagnosis, which must be complemented with a precise staging of the disease and identification of prognostic factors, to allow for the choice of the best treatment method as well as for the evaluation of the treatment results. PMID:26759546

  19. Medical management update: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mawardi, Hani; Cutler, Corey; Treister, Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    Lymphoma is a heterogeneous malignancy of the lymphatic system characterized by proliferation of lymphoid cells or their precursors. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is associated with significant morbidity and is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Manifestations of NHL as well as complications of the disease and its management are frequently encountered in the head and neck region and often require specific treatment and modifications in the provision of oral health care. The purpose of this article is to review current concepts of the pathophysiology, as well as medical and oral health care management of NHL. PMID:19101479

  20. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  1. [Treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Moreno Nogueira, J A; Ruiz Borrego, M; Pérez Valderrama, B; Valero Azbiru, M

    2009-02-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) in localized stages I and II, without bulky areas and a fair International Prognostic Factor (IPI) (30% of all cases) have high possibilities of cure (80%) when treated with combined chemotherapy, CHOP or CHOP-like (3-4 courses) followed by locoregional radiation therapy. Localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with signs of poor prognosis or advanced stages (III and IV) must be treated with rituximab-containing immunochemotherapy. As second line in responding patients (DHAP, ESHAP, MINE, VIM, DICE, etc., and rituximab) high doses chemotherapy with hematopoietic growth factor support should be considered, although not in refractory patients.

  2. Primary pulmonary Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lluch-Garcia, R; Briones-Gomez, A; Castellano, E Monzó; Sanchez-Toril, F; Lopez, A; Brotons, B

    2010-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented to hospital with a two-month history of productive cough with no other symptoms. Radiology revealed a cavitating lesion in the left upper lobe for which a variety of diagnoses were considered. A biopsy revealed primary pulmonary Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Primary pulmonary Hodgkin’s lymphoma is an uncommon initial presentation; lung lesions usually occur later in the course of the disease. Following diagnosis, the patient began chemotherapy and full remission was achieved. PMID:21165354

  3. Primary cutaneous lymphomas: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska-Wojdyło, Małgorzata; Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-10-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative neoplasms, with lymphatic proliferation limited to the skin with no involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow or viscera at the diagnosis. Cutaneous lymphomas originate from mature T-lymphocytes (65% of all cases), mature B-lymphocytes (25%) or NK cells. Histopathological evaluation including immunophenotyping of the skin biopsy specimen is the basis of the diagnosis, which must be complemented with a precise staging of the disease and identification of prognostic factors, to allow for the choice of the best treatment method as well as for the evaluation of the treatment results. PMID:26759546

  4. Primary malignant lymphomas of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Nime, F A; Cooper, H S; Eggleston, J C

    1976-02-01

    Primary malignant lymphomas of the salivary glands are rare, and only 43 possible cases have been reported. Four new cases from the Johns Hopkins Hospital are described, including clinical presentation, histologic findings, and subsequent course. The literature on this subject is reviewed, including cases arising in preexisting benign lymphoepithelial lesion with or without Sjögren's syndrome. Although the number of reported cases with complete documentation and follow-up information is too small for significant statistical analysis, these patients appear to have a better prognosis than the usual lymphoma patient. The possible reasons for this are discussed.

  5. Feline lymphoma in the post-feline leukemia virus era.

    PubMed

    Louwerens, Mathilde; London, Cheryl A; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoma (lymphosarcoma or malignant lymphoma) is the most common neoplasm of the hematopoietic system of cats and reportedly the cat has the highest incidence for lymphoma of any species. A 21-year retrospective survey of feline lymphoma covering the period 1983-2003 was conducted with the patient database at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital (VMTH) at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. This period comprises the post-feline leukemia virus (FeLV) era. Feline lymphoma historically has been highly associated with retrovirus infection. Mass testing and elimination and quarantine programs beginning in the 1970s and vaccination programs in the 1980s dramatically reduced the subsequent FeLV infection rate among pet cats. The results of this survey confirm a significant decrease in the importance of FeLV-associated types of lymphoma in cats. In spite of this decrease in FeLV infection, the incidence of lymphoma in cats treated at the VMTH actually increased from 1982 to 2003. This increase was due largely to a rise in the incidence of intestinal lymphoma, and to a lesser degree, of atypical lymphoma. A high incidence of mediastinal lymphomas in young Siamese or Oriental breeds also was observed, supporting previous studies. Associations of intestinal lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease and diet should be further considered.

  6. [Lymphoma of Ocular and Periocular Tissues - Clinicopathological Correlations].

    PubMed

    Schmack, I; Grossniklaus, H E; Hartmann, S

    2016-07-01

    Lymphomas of the ocular adnexa and intraocular tissue include a wide range of lymphoproliferative neoplastic disorders. They are predominantly extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lymphoid neoplasm and individual morphological, immunophenotypical, and molecular genetic features, indicate that they may be divided into B-cell (approximately 80 % of all NHL) and T-cell lymphomas (approximately 10-20 % of all NHL). The most common forms of ocular NHL are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT-type), follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and mantel cell lymphoma. The clinical signs and symptoms are usually very unspecific and depend on the location, size, and extent of the underlying lymphoma subtype. Typical low grade lymphomas have an indolent clinical course and often remain unrecognized for many years. On the other hand, high grade NHLs, such as DLBCL or MCL, are frequently aggressive, with rapid tumour growth and poor prognosis, despite early detection. Histopathology is still the gold standard in the diagnosis of ocular lymphomas. Basic understanding of the principal pathophysiological and clinical aspects of the development and progression of orbital and ocular lymphomas seems to be mandatory for optimal diagnosis and treatment and for improving survival and prognosis. Both residents in training and board certified ophthalmologists should be aware of these problems. PMID:27468099

  7. Immune Thrombocytopenia in a Child with T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tokeji, Kayo; Sakaguchi, Sachi; Kurimoto, Tomoko; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with persistent thrombocytopenia during maintenance chemotherapy with mercaptopurine and methotrexate for T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. He was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) after thorough investigations for the relapse of lymphoma and was successfully treated with immunoglobulin and steroids. ITP is known to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but rarely with T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or in children. Diagnosis of ITP with lymphoma is challenging due to the many factors affecting platelet counts, and ITP often complicates the diagnosis or treatment course of lymphoma. The underlying mechanism of ITP with NHL is still unclear. Drug-induced immunomodulation with a reduction of regulatory T cells might have contributed to the development of ITP in our case. PMID:27668103

  8. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  9. Immune Thrombocytopenia in a Child with T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kurimoto, Tomoko; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with persistent thrombocytopenia during maintenance chemotherapy with mercaptopurine and methotrexate for T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. He was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) after thorough investigations for the relapse of lymphoma and was successfully treated with immunoglobulin and steroids. ITP is known to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but rarely with T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or in children. Diagnosis of ITP with lymphoma is challenging due to the many factors affecting platelet counts, and ITP often complicates the diagnosis or treatment course of lymphoma. The underlying mechanism of ITP with NHL is still unclear. Drug-induced immunomodulation with a reduction of regulatory T cells might have contributed to the development of ITP in our case. PMID:27668103

  10. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the ocular adnexa.

    PubMed

    Sasai, K; Yamabe, H; Dodo, Y; Kashii, S; Nagata, Y; Hiraoka, M

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the clinical features of lymphoma in the ocular adnexal region and the revised European and American lymphoma (REAL) classification. Specimens from 41 patients with ocular adnexal lymphoproliferative disease were reassessed pathologically using the REAL classification. Thirty-two patients with primary non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) were included in the study, almost all of them having been treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Seven of the 32 patients with NHL showed distant recurrence after treatment: 3 out of 26 with extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, and 4 with other types of NHL. Although the three patients with recurrent marginal zone B-cell lymphomas all survived, other patients with recurrent lymphomas died of disease. The REAL classification provides a good indication of tumor control probability and survival of patients with ocular adnexal NHL. Radiation therapy is an effective treatment modality for extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the ocular adnexa.

  11. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their clinical potential in the treatment of B-cell malignancies: focus on ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Aalipour, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant signaling of the B-cell receptor pathway has been linked to the development and maintenance of B-cell malignancies. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), a protein early in this pathway, has emerged as a new therapeutic target in a variety of such malignancies. Ibrutinib, the most clinically advanced small molecule inhibitor of BTK, has demonstrated impressive tolerability and activity in a range of B-cell lymphomas which led to its recent approval for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of ibrutinib and discusses its therapeutic potential. PMID:25360238

  12. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a “classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL” in a young male patient and review of literature. PMID:27601842

  15. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a “classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL” in a young male patient and review of literature.

  16. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a "classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL" in a young male patient and review of literature. PMID:27601842

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.