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Sample records for 4-benzyl-6-phenyl pyridazine ligand

  1. Mixed-ligand hydroxocopper(II)/pyridazine clusters embedded into 3D framework lattices.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Anna S; Handke, Marcel; Krämer, Karl W; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Rusanov, Eduard B; Thompson, Laurence K; Krautscheid, Harald; Domasevitch, Konstantin V

    2014-06-14

    Rational combination of pyridazine, hydroxo and carboxylate bridging ligands led to the assembly of three types of mixed-ligand polynuclear Cu(II) clusters (A: [Cu2(μ-OH)(μ-pdz)(μ-COO)]; B: [Cu4(μ3-OH)2(μ-pdz)2]; C: [Cu5(μ-OH)2(μ-pdz)4(μ-COO)2(μ-H2O)2]) and their integration into 3D framework structures. Mixed-ligand complexes [Cu2(μ-OH){TMA}(L)(H2O)] (1), [Cu4(μ3-OH)2{ATC}2(L)2(H2O)2]·H2O (2) [Cu4(μ3-OH)2{TDC}3(L)2(H2O)2]·7H2O (3) (L = 1,3-bis(pyridazin-4-yl)adamantane; TMA(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate, ATC(3-) = adamantane-1,3,5-tricarboxylate, TDC(2-) = 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylate) and [Cu5(μ-OH)2{X}4(L)2(H2O)2]·nH2O (X = benzene-1,3-dicarboxylate, BDC(2-), n = 5 (4) and 5-hydroxybenzene-1,3-dicarboxylate, HO-BDC(2-), n = 6 (5)) are prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Trigonal bridges TMA(3-) and ATC(3-) generate planar Cu(II)/carboxylate subtopologies further pillared into 3D frameworks (1: binodal 3,5-coordinated, doubly interpenetrated tcj-3,5-Ccc2; 2: binodal 3,8-coordinated tfz-d) by bitopic pyridazine ligands. Unprecedented triple bridges in 1 (cluster of type A) support short CuCu separations of 3.0746(6) Å. The framework in 3 is a primitive cubic net (pcu) with multiple bis-pyridazine and TDC(2-) links between the tetranuclear nodes of type . Compounds 4 and 5 adopt uninodal ten-coordinated framework topologies (bct) embedding unprecedented centrosymmetric open-chain pentanuclear clusters of type C with two kinds of multiple bridges, Cu(μ-OH)(μ-pdz)2Cu and Cu(μ-COO)(μ-H2O)Cu (CuCu distances are 3.175 and 3.324 Å, respectively). Magnetic coupling phenomena were detected for every type of cluster by susceptibility measurements of 1, 3 and 4. For binuclear clusters A in 1, the intracluster antiferromagnetic exchange interactions lead to a diamagnetic ground state (J = -17.5 cm(-1); g = 2.1). Strong antiferromagnetic coupling is relevant also for type B, which consequently results in a diamagnetic ground state (J1 = -110 cm(-1

  2. Pyridazine- versus pyridine-based tridentate ligands in first-row transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Katrin R; Volpe, Manuel; Cias, Pawel; Gescheidt, Georg; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2011-08-15

    A series of first-row transition metal complexes with the unsymmetrically disubstituted pyridazine ligand picolinaldehyde (6-chloro-3-pyridazinyl)hydrazone (PIPYH), featuring an easily abstractable proton in the backbone, was prepared. Ligand design was inspired by literature-known picolinaldehyde 2-pyridylhydrazone (PAPYH). Reaction of PIPYH with divalent nickel, copper, and zinc nitrates in ethanol led to complexes of the type [Cu(II)(PIPYH)(NO(3))(2)] (1) or [M(PIPYH)(2)](NO(3))(2) [M = Ni(II) (2) or Zn(II) (3)]. Complex synthesis in the presence of triethylamine yielded fully- or semideprotonated complexes [Cu(II)(PIPY)(NO(3))] (4), [Ni(II)(PIPYH)(PIPY)](NO(3)) (5), and [Zn(II)(PIPY)(2)] (6), respectively. Cobalt(II) nitrate is quantitatively oxidized under the reaction conditions to [Co(III)(PIPY)(2)](NO(3)) (7) in both neutral and basic media. X-ray diffraction analyses reveal a penta- (1) or hexa-coordinated (2, 3, and 7) metal center surrounded by one or two tridentate ligands and, eventually, κ-O,O' nitrate ions. The solid-state stoichiometry was confirmed by electron impact (EI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. The diamagnetic complexes 5 and 6 were subjected to (1)H NMR spectroscopy, suggesting that the ligand to metal ratio remains constant in solution. Electronic properties were analyzed by means of cyclic voltammetry and, in case of copper complexes 1 and 4, also by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing increased symmetry upon deprotonation for the latter, which is in accordance with the proposed stoichiometry [Cu(II)(PIPY)(NO(3))]. Protic behavior of the nickel complexes 2 and 5 was investigated by UV/vis spectroscopy, revealing high π-backbonding ability of the PIPYH ligand resulting in an unexpected low acidity of the hydrazone proton in nickel complex 2.

  3. Six complexes based on bis(imidazole/benzimidazole-1-yl)pyridazine ligands: Syntheses, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Fang; Du, Ceng-Ceng; Zhou, Sheng-Bin; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Herein we reported six new Ni(II)/Cu(II)/Zn(II) complexes, namely, [Ni(L1)4(OH)2] (1), [Cu(L1)4(OH)2] (2), [Cu(L1)2(SiF6)]n (3), {[Cu(L2)(HCOO)2]·H2O·CH3OH}n (4), [Ni(L2)2(NO3)2]n (5) and {[Zn(L2)Cl2]·DMF}n (6) (L1 = 3,6-bis(imidazole-1-yl)pyridazine, L2 = 3,6-bis(benzimidazole-1-yl)pyridazine), which were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR, PXRD. These complexes have been successfully constructed under interface diffusion process, heating reflux or hydrothermal conditions. The structures of 1 and 2 are mononuclear complexes. Complex 3 exhibits a 6-connected 3D topology network with the Schläfli symbol of (412·63). In complex 4, two Cu(II) were connected through two HCOO- anions to form dinuclear structure unit, which is arranged into a 1D ladder-like structure by μ2-L2 ligands. Complexes 5 and 6 are 1D zigzag chains connected by L2 ligands, but the Ni(II) ion is six-coordinated in 5 and the Zn(II) ion is four-coordinated in 6. Moreover, the solid-state luminescence property and UV-vis diffuse reflection spectrum of complex 6 have been investigated and discussed.

  4. Conformational control of the self-assembly of triple helicates and [2 × 2]-grids from zinc(II) and 3,6-di(2-pyridyl)pyridazine based ligands.

    PubMed

    Bodman, Samantha E; Fitchett, Christopher M

    2014-09-07

    The reaction of symmetrical ligands based on 3,6-di(2-pyridyl)pyridazine () with carbocyclic rings fused to the pyridazine ring; 7,10-di(2-pyridyl)-8,9-diazafluoranthene (), 1,4-di(2-pyridyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-cyclopenta[d]pyridazine (), 1,4-di(2-pyridyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrophthalazine (), 1,4-di(2-pyridyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-cyclohepta[d]pyridazine () in reactions with zinc perchlorate gave a series of complexes (). Characterisation of these using single crystal X-ray structure determination showed that less sterically hindered and gave saturated triple helicates ( and , respectively), while [2 × 2]-grids were formed with more sterically hindered ligands ( from and from ), or if methanol (rather than acetonitrile) was used as the reaction solvent with (). The most sterically-hindered ligand formed a mononuclear complex (). The structures of these complexes in solution was determined by (1)H-NMR, and found to match their solid-state structures. The [2 × 2]-grids are effective molecular clips able to hold solvent and anions between their arms via hydrogen bonding to a Zn4(H2O)2(OH)2 core.

  5. New Pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones Fluoroderivatives as Human A1 Adenosine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Alessia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Vergelli, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Giacomelli, Chiara

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones as human A1 adenosine receptor ligands. The tricyclic scaffold was modified at position 6 and 9 by introducing small alkyl chains and substituted phenyls. The most interesting compounds showed Ki for A1 in the submicromolar range (0.105-0.244 µM) and the most interesting term (compound 4c) combined an appreciable affinity for A1 (Ki = 0.132 µM) with a good selectivity toward A2A (43% inhibition at 10 µM) and A3 (46% inhibition at 10 µM).

  6. Pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands with N 4O xS 2 ( x = 2, 4) donor set atoms: Synthesis, characterization, spectral studies and 13C chemical shifts computed by the GIAO-DFT and CSGT-DFT methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2010-01-01

    Six pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands, H 2L n ( n = 1-5) and H 4L, with N 4O 2S 2 and N 4O 4S 2 donor set atoms, respectively, were prepared by condensation reaction of 3,6-bis-((2-aminoethyl)thio)pyridazine with various salicyladehyde derivatives in ethanol and under solvent-free polyphosphate ester catalyzed conditions. The acid-base properties of H 2L 2 and H 2L 3 in DMSO/water (1:1) solution have been studied by spectrophotometric method at 25 °C. Optimized geometries of all compounds were also obtained at the B3LYP level of theory. Additionally, the 13C chemical shielding of gas phase H 2L 1 and H 2L 2 were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) and continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) methods at the level of density functional theory (DFT). The 6-311++G* basis set was utilized for all of the atoms.

  7. Pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands with N4OxS2 (x=2, 4) donor set atoms: synthesis, characterization, spectral studies and 13C chemical shifts computed by the GIAO-DFT and CSGT-DFT methodologies.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2010-01-01

    Six pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands, H(2)L(n) (n=1-5) and H(4)L, with N(4)O(2)S(2) and N(4)O(4)S(2) donor set atoms, respectively, were prepared by condensation reaction of 3,6-bis-((2-aminoethyl)thio)pyridazine with various salicyladehyde derivatives in ethanol and under solvent-free polyphosphate ester catalyzed conditions. The acid-base properties of H(2)L(2) and H(2)L(3) in DMSO/water (1:1) solution have been studied by spectrophotometric method at 25 degrees C. Optimized geometries of all compounds were also obtained at the B3LYP level of theory. Additionally, the (13)C chemical shielding of gas phase H(2)L(1) and H(2)L(2) were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) and continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) methods at the level of density functional theory (DFT). The 6-311++G* basis set was utilized for all of the atoms.

  8. Factors influencing tetranuclear [2 x 2] grid vs dinuclear side-by-side structures for silver(I) complexes of pyridazine-based bis-bidentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Price, Jason R; White, Nicholas G; Perez-Velasco, Alejandro; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Hunter, Christopher A; Brooker, Sally

    2008-11-17

    Silver(I) complexes of five bis-bidentate Schiff-base ligands, derived from 3,6-diformylpyridazine and substituted anilines (2,4-dimethylaniline L ( o,p - Me ); 3,5-dichloroaniline L ( m,m - Cl ); 2-aminobiphenyl L ( o - Ph ); p-toluidine L ( p - Me ); 4-aminophenol L ( p - OH ); p-anisidine L ( p - OMe )), have been prepared. The ligands have a wide range of steric and electronic properties due to variation in the extent and nature of the substitution of the aniline rings. Four of the resulting complexes were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography: three of the four, [Ag 2( L ( o,p - Me )) 2](BF 4) 2, [Ag 2( L ( m,m - Cl )) 2](BF 4) 2 and [Ag 2( L ( o - Ph )) 2](BF 4) 2 formed dinuclear side-by-side complexes, while [Ag 4( L ( p - Me )) 4](BF 4) 4 gave a tetranuclear [2 x 2] grid. The previously reported tetranuclear [2 x 2] grid [Ag 4( L ( p - OMe )) 4](BF 4) 4 was recrystallized in the presence of benzene to see if this would alter the architecture of this complex. It did not: the [2 x 2] grid architecture was retained despite the benzene molecules of solvation. Given the flexibility of silver(I) with regard to coordination geometry, the molecular structure of these complexes is influenced mostly by the ligand rather than the metal ion. In each case, the factors which influence the molecular architecture are presented and discussed. Substituent effects on the electrostatics of the intramolecular ligand-ligand pi-pi interactions (XED2.8) account for some of the differences observed in the structures.

  9. Realization of unusual ligand binding motifs in metalated container molecules: synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of the complexes [(LMe)Ni2(mu-L')]n+ with L'=NO3-, NO2-, N3-, N2H4, pyridazine, phthalazine, pyrazolate, and benzoate.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Julia; Klingele, Marco H; Lozan, Vasile; Steinfeld, Gunther; Siebert, Dieter; Journaux, Yves; Girerd, Jean Jacques; Kersting, Berthold

    2004-04-02

    A series of dinickel(II) complexes with the 24-membered macrocyclic hexaazadithiophenol ligand H(2)L(Me) was prepared and examined. The doubly deprotonated form (L(Me))(2-) forms complexes of the type [(L(Me))Ni2II(mu-L')](n+) with a bioctahedral N(3)Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-L')Ni(II)N(3) core and an overall calixarene-like structure. The bridging coordination site L' is accessible for a wide range of exogenous coligands. In this study L'=NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), N(3)(-), N(2)H(4), pyrazolate (pz), pyridazine (pydz), phthalazine (phtz), and benzoate (OBz). Crystallographic studies reveal that each substrate binds in a distinct fashion to the [(L(Me))Ni(2)](2+) portion: NO(2)(-), N(2)H(4), pz, pydz, and phtz form mu(1,2)-bridges, whereas NO(3)(-), N(3)(-), and OBz(-) are mu(1,3)-bridging. These distinctive binding motifs and the fact that some of the coligands adopt unusual conformations is discussed in terms of complementary host-guest interactions and the size and form of the binding pocket of the [(L(Me))Ni(2)](2+) fragment. UV/Vis and electrochemical studies reveal that the solid-state structures are retained in the solution state. The relative stabilities of the complexes indicate that the [(L(Me))Ni(2)](2+) fragment binds anionic coligands preferentially over neutral ones and strong-field ligands over weak-field ligands. Secondary van der Waals interactions also contribute to the stability of the complexes. Intramolecular ferromagnetic exchange interactions are present in the nitrito-, pyridazine-, and the benzoato-bridged complexes where J=+6.7, +3.5, and +5.8 cm(-1) (H=-2 JS(1)S(2), S(1)=S(2)=1) as indicated by magnetic susceptibility data taken from 300 to 2 K. In contrast, the azido bridge in [(L(Me))Ni(2)(mu(1,3)-N(3))](+) results in an antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J=-46.7 cm(-1). An explanation for this difference is qualitatively discussed in terms of bonding differences.

  10. Some recent approaches of biologically active substituted pyridazine and phthalazine drugs.

    PubMed

    Asif, M

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen atom containing heterocyclic compounds, pyridazines, pyridazinones and phthalazines are important structural feature of many biologically active compounds and show diverse pharmacological properties. Pyridazines and phthalazines hold considerable interest relative to the preparation of organic intermediates and physiologically active compounds. On the basis of literature, pyridazines, pyridazinone and phthalazines further focus our attention because of their easy fictionalization at various ring positions, which makes them attractive synthetic compounds for designing and development of the novel pyridazines and phthalazines drugs in future.

  11. Cobalt(II) complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine: Structures, photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin-Ping; Fan, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2016-07-15

    Six new Co{sup II} complexes [Co(L{sup 1}){sub 4}(OH){sub 2}] (1), {[Co(L"1)(H_2O)_4]·2ClO_4}{sub ∞} (2), {[Co(L"1)(H_2O)_4]·SiF_6}{sub ∞} (3), {[Co(L"1)_3]·2ClO_4}{sub ∞} (4), [Co(L{sup 2})Cl{sub 2}]{sub ∞} (5) and {[Co(L"2)_2]·SiF_6}{sub ∞} (6) [L{sup 1}=3,6-bis(N-imidazolyl) pyridazine, L{sup 2}=3,6-bis (N-benzimidazolyl) pyridazine] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 has a mononuclear structure, while complexes 2 and 3 have 1-D chain structures. Considering the Co{sup II} centers were linked by the L{sup 1} ligands, the 3-D framework of complex 4 can be rationalized to be a {4^12.6^3} 6-c topological net with the stoichiometry uninodal net. 5 reveals a coordination 1-D zigzag chain structure consisting of a neutral chain [Co(L{sup 2})Cl{sub 2}]{sub n} with the Co{sup II} centers. Complex 6 has a rhombohedral grid with a (4, 4) topology. The TGA property, fluorescent property and photocatalytic activity of complexes 1–6 have been investigated and discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six Co{sup II} complexes of bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl)pyridazine were synthesized and structurally characterized. The fluorescence properties and photocatalytic activity for dye degradation under UV light of all complexes have been investigated and discussed. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Six new Co{sup II} complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine. • Structural analysis of all complexes. • Fluorescent property of all complexes. • Photocatalytic activity for dye degradation under UV light of all complexes.

  12. Cobalt(II) complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine: Structures, photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Fan, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Six new CoII complexes [Co(L1)4(OH)2] (1), {[Co(L1)(H2O)4]·2ClO4}∞ (2), {[Co(L1)(H2O)4]·SiF6}∞ (3), {[Co(L1)3]·2ClO4}∞ (4), [Co(L2)Cl2]∞ (5) and {[Co(L2)2]·SiF6}∞ (6) [L1=3,6-bis(N-imidazolyl) pyridazine, L2=3,6-bis (N-benzimidazolyl) pyridazine] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 has a mononuclear structure, while complexes 2 and 3 have 1-D chain structures. Considering the CoII centers were linked by the L1 ligands, the 3-D framework of complex 4 can be rationalized to be a {4^12.6^3} 6-c topological net with the stoichiometry uninodal net. 5 reveals a coordination 1-D zigzag chain structure consisting of a neutral chain [Co(L2)Cl2]n with the CoII centers. Complex 6 has a rhombohedral grid with a (4, 4) topology. The TGA property, fluorescent property and photocatalytic activity of complexes 1-6 have been investigated and discussed.

  13. Lithium-mediated zincation of pyrazine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, and quinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Seggio, Anne; Chevallier, Floris; Vaultier, Michel; Mongin, Florence

    2007-08-17

    Deprotonation of pyrazine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, and quinoxaline using an in situ mixture of ZnCl2.TMEDA (0.5 equiv) and LiTMP (1.5 equiv) was studied. Pyrazine and pyrimidine were deprotonated in THF at room temperature, a result evidenced by trapping with I2. The competitive formation of dimer observed in net hexane was reduced by using cosolvents (TMEDA or THF). Starting from quinoxaline, the dimer formation took place in THF also, and mixtures of mono- and diiodides were obtained whatever the solvent and conditions used. A similar competitive formation of a diiodide was noted with pyridazine; the use of THF at reflux temperature nevertheless afforded the 3-iodo derivative in good yield.

  14. Synthesis of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Photochemical Ring Opening of Pyridazine N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Maribel; Maxwell, Michael A; Frederich, James H

    2016-10-07

    A photochemical method for the direct synthesis of 1H-pyrazoles from pyridazine N-oxides was developed. This chemistry features a regioselective approach to nonsymmetrically substituted pyridazine N-oxides. Herein, we highlight the first strategic use of photoinduced ring-opening reactions of 1,2-diazine N-oxides for the preparative synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles.

  15. trans-Di­aqua­bis­(pyridazine-3-carboxyl­ato-κ2 N 2,O)copper(II)

    PubMed Central

    Pache, Aroa; Iturrospe, Amaia; San Felices, Leire; Reinoso, Santiago; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, [Cu(C5H3N2O2)2(H2O)2], the CuII ion, located on an inversion center, exhibits an octa­hedral coordination geometry. The equatorial plane is defined by two trans-related N,O-bidentate pyridazine-3-carboxyl­ate ligands and the axial positions are occupied by two water mol­ecules. In the crystal, mol­ecules are connected by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the water mol­ecules and the noncoordinating carboxyl­ate O atoms, forming layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are stacked along the a axis by further O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the water mol­ecules and the coordinating carboxyl­ate O atoms. Weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are also observed between the pyridazine rings and the water mol­ecules and between the pyridazine rings and the non-coordinating carboxyl­ate O atoms. PMID:24764943

  16. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  17. catena-Poly[[μ(2)-aqua-diaqua-bis-(μ(4)-pyridazine-3,6-dicarboxyl-ato)tetra-lithium] monohydrate].

    PubMed

    Starosta, Wojciech; Leciejewicz, Janusz

    2011-10-01

    In the polymeric structure of the title compound {[Li(2)(C(6)H(2)N(2)O(4))(2)Li(H(2)O)(2)Li(H(2)O)]·H(2)O}(n), the coordination of two independent Li(I) ions is distorted trigonal-bipyramidal and that of the other two independent Li(I) ions is distorted tetra-hedral. The former two Li(I) ions are bridged by hetero-ring N atoms of two independent pyridazine-3,6-dicarboxyl-ate ligands, making a dimeric moiety. The carboxyl-ato-O atoms of both bidentate ligands bridge the dimers to adjacent independent aqua-coordinated Li(I) ions, forming mol-ecular ribbons. The latter are bridged by ligand carboxyl-ato and aqua O atoms, forming mol-ecular layers parallel to (100) which are held together by an extended system of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  18. Monoclinic and triclinic concomitant polymorphs of di-mu-pyridazine-1kappa(2)N:2kappa(2)N'-bis[(saccharinato)silver(I)].

    PubMed

    Hamamci, Sevim; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2006-01-01

    Crystallization of the title compound, di-mu-pyridazine-1kappa(2)N:2kappa(2)N'-bis[(2,3-dihydro-3-oxobenzisosulfonazolato-kappaN)silver(I)], [Ag2(C7H4NO3S)2(C4H4N2)2], from acetonitrile yields both monoclinic, (I), and triclinic, (II), polymorphs. In both forms, the silver(I) ions have a slightly distorted trigonal AgN(3) coordination geometry and are doubly bridged by two neutral pyridazine (pydz) ligands, generating a centrosymmetric dimeric structure. The saccharinate (sac) ligands are N-coordinated. The dihedral angles between the sac and pydz rings are 8.43 (7) and 7.94 (8) degrees in (I) and (II), respectively, suggesting that the dimeric molecule is nearly flat. The bond geometry is similar in both polymorphs. In (I), the dimers interact with each other via aromatic pi(sac)-pi(pydz) stacking interactions, forming two-dimensional layers, which are further crosslinked by weak C-H...O interactions. Compound (II) exhibits similar C-H...O and pi-pi interactions, but additional C-H...pi and pi...Ag interactions help to stabilize the packing of the dimers.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some novel urea and thiourea derivatives of isoxazolo[4,5-d]pyridazine and structurally related thiazolo[4,5-d]pyridazine as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Faidallah, Hassan M; Rostom, Sherif A F; Basaif, Salem A; Makki, Mohammed S T; Khan, Khalid A

    2013-11-01

    This study reports the synthesis of some novel isoxazolo[4,5-d]pyridazines and structurally related thiazolo[4,5-d]pyridazines, and their biological evaluation as antimicrobial agents. The proposed compounds were designed to contain pharmacophores such as urea, thiourea, sulfonylurea (thiourea) and some derived functionalities that are believed to contribute to the anticipated biological activities. The results revealed that 25 compounds displayed broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, with greater inhibitory effect on the growth of the tested Gram positive strains compared to Gram negative ones. Moreover, 14 compounds were able to produce appreciable growth inhibitory activity against Candida albicans fungus when compared to Clotrimazole. Most of the tested isoxazolo[4,5-d]pyridazines displayed better antimicrobial profile than their corresponding thiazolo[4,5-d]pyridazine congeners. Four compounds namely, p-(3,7-dimethyl-4-oxo-4H-isoxazolo [4,5-d]pyridazine-5-yl)benzenesulfonylthioureas (11c-d), 3-substituted-2-[p-(3,7-dimethyl-4-oxo-4H-isoxazolo[4,5-d]pyridazine-5-yl)-benzene-sufonylimino]-4-oxothiazolidines (13d) and p-(2,7-dimethyl-4-oxo-4H-thiazolo[4,5-d]pyridazin-5-yl)benzenesulfonylthiourea (24c) were found to be most active antimicrobial members in present study.

  20. 4-Benzyl-6-p-tolyl­pyridazin-3(2H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Oubair, Ahmad; Daran, Jean-Claude; Fihi, Rachid; Majidi, Lhou; Azrour, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C18H16N2O, is a new dihydro­pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivative synthesized in one step by condensation of α-benzyl­idene-γ-tolyl­butenolide with hydrazine. The mol­ecule is not planar; the tolyl and pyridazine rings are twisted with respect to each other making a dihedral angle of 27.35 (9)° and the benzyl ring is nearly perpendicular to the pyridazine ring with a dihedral angle of 85.24 (5)°. In the crystal structure, inversion dimers arise, being linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak offset π–π stacking stabilize the packing. The π–π stacking occurs between the pyridazine rings of symmetry-related mol­ecules, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.748 Å, an inter­planar distance of 3.605 Å and a slippage of 1.024 Å. PMID:21583202

  1. Synthesis of peripherally acting analgesic 3-arylpiperazinyl-5-benzyl-pyridazines.

    PubMed

    Moreau, S; Coudert, P; Rubat, C; Albuisson, E; Couquelet, J

    1996-08-01

    A series of 3-arylpiperazinyl-5-benzyl-pyridazines was synthesized and evaluated for analgesic activity. The structures of these new pyridazine derivatives were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR spectra and by elementary analysis. With ED50 values ranging from 6.0 to 71.5 mg/kg i.p. most of the compounds were several times more potent than acetaminophen (ED50 = 228.6 mg/kg i.p.) and noramidopyrine ((ED50 = 68.8 mg/kg i.p.) in the phenylbenzoquinone-induced writhing test (PBQ-test). Quantitative structure-activity relationships were accomplished by a Hansch analysis. The most active pyridazines 2h-j exhibited sedative properties from the dose of 25 mg/kg i.p. Their lack of activity in the hot plate test was in favour of peripherally acting agents. In the PBQ test, analgesic activity of 2h-j was antagonized by naloxone. However, their antinociceptive effect added up to those of 5-hydroxytryptophan when given in association with carbidopa. These results demonstrated that analgesic properties of pyridazine derivatives might involve a serotonergic pathway without interaction with opiodergic systems.

  2. Surface-enhanced raman spectra of pyrazine, pyrimidine, and pyridazine adsorbed on silver sols

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz-Miranda, M.; Neto, N.; Sbrana, G.

    1988-02-25

    Raman spectra of pyrazine, pyrimidine, and pyridazine adsorbed on silver sols have been obtained and compared with existing data from corresponding experiments on Ag electrode. These two techniques give similar results except for pyrazine for with strong bands, observed only in the SER spectrum on the electrode, may be due to reduction products coadsorbed on the Ag surface. Chemisorption plays a role in the absorption of diazines as evidence of Ag-N bond formation was found in the SERS of all three molecules. Both N atoms of pyridazine are bound to the substrate and this explains an enhancement, for the latter molecule, of 2 orders of magnitude larger than for the other two compounds. The presence of low-frequency Ag-N modes and predictions of surface selection rules support edge on, rather than flat, orientation of diazines on the colloidal particles.

  3. Insights from Theory and Experiment on the Photochromic spiro-Dihydropyrrolo-Pyridazine/Betaine System.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Amendra; Shrestha, Tej B; Liu, Yao; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Yu, Jing; McLaurin, Emily J; Turro, Claudia; Bossmann, Stefan H; Aikens, Christine M

    2016-02-18

    We elucidated the photochromic spiro-4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine/betaine (DPP/betaine) system by comparing state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations with nanosecond/millisecond UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, as well as steady-state absorption and cyclization kinetics. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are employed to examine the transformations occurring after photoexcitation. This study shows that the photochromic spiro-4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine and spiro-1,8a-dihydroindolizine (DHI) systems react according to similar pathways. However, notable differences exist. Although photoexcitation of the spiro-DPP system also leads to cis-betaines, which then isomerize to trans-betaines, we found two distinct classes of cis isomers (cis-betaine rotamer-1 and cis-betaine rotamer-2), which do not exist in spiro-1,8a-dihydroindolizine. Similar to our previous study on the spiro-DHI/betaine system, a complicated potential-energy landscape between cis and trans isomers exists in the spiro-DPP system, consisting of a network of transition states and intermediates. Because the spiro-DPP/betaine is even more complicated than the spiro-DHI/betaine system, (substituted) photochromic systems featuring a 4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine functional unit will require thorough in silico design to function properly as logical gates or in devices for information storage.

  4. New pyridazine-fluorine derivatives: synthesis, chemistry and biological activity. Part II.

    PubMed

    Tucaliuc, Roxana-Angela; Cotea, Valeriu V; Niculaua, Marius; Tuchilus, Cristina; Mantu, Dorina; Mangalagiu, Ionel I

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive study concerning synthesis, structure and biological activity of new pyridazine-fluorine (PYF) derivatives is presented. The first synthesis of PYF derivatives in phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) under microwave (MW) and conventional thermal heating (TH) is reported. Under MW irradiation the consumed energy decreases considerably, the amount of used solvent in liquid phase is at least five-fold less comparative with conventional TH, while PTC did not use solvents. Consequently these reactions could be considered environmentally friendly. Also, the reaction time decrease substantially and, in some cases, the yields are higher. A feasible explanation for MW efficiency is presented. Regiochemistry and chorochemistry involved in these reactions are also discussed; the reactions are regioselective and chorospecific or choroselective, respectively. Ten new pyridazine-fluorine cycloadducts are obtained. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the PYF compounds were tested. Introduction of a trifluoromethyl moiety on the pyridazine skeleton is leading to an increasing of the antimicrobial activity. Structure-activity correlationships have been done.

  5. Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids containing pyridazine derivatives as cytosine and thymine analogs, and their duplexes with complementary oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Takahito; Miyatake, Yuya; Sato, Yuta; Kanamori, Takashi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2015-03-20

    Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) is reported with new pyridazine-type nucleobases: 3-aminopyridazine (aPz) and 1-aminophthalazine (aPh) as cytosine analogs, and pyridazin-3-one (Pz(O)) and phthalazin-1-one (Ph(O)) as thymine analogs. The PNAs having an aPz or a Pz(O) formed duplexes with each complementary oligodeoxynucleotide forming a base pair with G or A, respectively, as evaluated by using UV melting analyses and circular dichroism (CD) spectra.

  6. 5-[(tert-Butyl-diphenyl-sil-yloxy)meth-yl]pyridazin-3(2H)-one.

    PubMed

    Costas-Lago, María Carmen; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemí; Terán, Carmen

    2013-11-27

    In the title compound, C21H24N2O2Si, a new pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivative, the carbonyl group of the heterocyclic ring and the O atom of the silyl ether are located on the same side of the pyridazinone ring and the C-C-O-Si torsion angle is -140.69 (17)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of strong N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into centrosymmetric dimers with graph-set notation R 2 (2)(8). Weak C-H⋯π inter-actions are also observed.

  7. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented.

  8. Light-Enhanced Fluorescence of Multi-Level Cavitands Possessing Pyridazine Upper rim.

    PubMed

    Janosi, Tibor Zoltan; Makkai, Geza; Kegl, Timea; Matyus, Peter; Kollar, Laszlo; Erostyak, Janos

    2016-03-01

    Completely different fluorescence behaviour of cavitands based on a same calix[4]resorcinarene compound was observed. While the fluorescence intensity of the parent compound, tetramethyl-cavitand (1) slowly faded as a result of UV-light exposure, the emission of the three-level cavitand with pyridazine moieties at the upper rim (5a) was enhanced by the excitation in the UV-region. The structure of fluorescence emission (characterized by excitation-emission matrices) and the absorption of 5a remained unaltered. The analysis of fluorescence decay curves reveals the presence of two separated components assigned to two individual emitting species. The measured significant increase of the average lifetime and quantum yield is the consequence of the UV-light induced transition between the different states of 5a. These observations can be explained by the structural difference between 5a and 1. As a counterpart of the naked cavitand (1) with methyl substituents at the upper rim only, 5a has three additional moieties benzene, triazole and pyridazine levels. Computational studies proved the existence of two conformational isomers of 5a. Upon ultraviolet light excitation a "dark" to "light" conformational transition occurs between the two isomers. This hypothesis was confirmed by anisotropy decay measurements.

  9. A Pyridazine-Bridged Sandwiched Cluster Incorporating Planar Hexanuclear Cobalt Ring and Bivacant Phosphotungstate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling-Yu; Zeng, Su-Yuan; Jagličić, Zvonko; Hu, Qi-Dong; Wang, Shi-Xuan; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Di

    2016-09-06

    A planar hexanuclear cobalt ring was clamped by two bivacant α1-[PW10O37](9-) with the assistance of the pyridazine bridges to form a novel sandwiched Co(II)-polyoxometalate cluster compound, [Na(H2O)6][Co3(OH) (pydz)4(H2O)7][Co6(PW10O37)2(pydz)4(H2O)6]·43H2O (1; pydz = pyridazine).This cluster was identified by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, elemental analysis, Fourier transform IR and UV-visible spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Structural analysis reveals that 1 comprises a hexahydrated sodium, a trinuclear [Co3(OH) (pydz)4(H2O)7](5+) cationic cluster, and an anionic [Co6(PW10O37)2(pydz)4(H2O)6](6-) sandwiched cluster, thus giving an intrinsical intercluster compound. The isolation of such cluster was dependent on the in situ transformation of trivacant [α-P2W15O56](12-) to α1-[PW10O37](9-) under the hydrothermal condition. The CV shows reversible multielectron waves from the redox of W(VI) in 1. Cluster 1 exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of nitrite. Magnetism studies indicated a weak anti-ferromagnetic exchange interaction between Co(II) ions within 1.

  10. 6-Methyl-2,4-Disubstituted Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: A Novel Class of Small-Molecule Agonists for Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Quinn, Mark T.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Schepetkin, Igor A; Holderness, Jeff; Ye, Richard D.; Rabiet, Marie-Josephe; Biancalani, Claudio; Cesari, Nicoletta; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Pieretti, Stefano; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Giovannoni, Maria Paola

    2010-01-01

    Following a ligand-based drug design approach, a potent mixed formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) agonist (14a) and a potent and specific FPRL1 agonist (14x) were identified. These compounds belong to a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives substituted with a methyl group at position 6 and a methoxy benzyl at position 4. At position 2, an acetamide side chain is essential for activity. Likewise, the presence of lipophilic and/or electronegative substituents in the position para to the aryl group at the end of the chain plays a critical role for activity. Affinity for FPR1 receptors was evaluated by measuring intracellular calcium flux in HL-60 cells transfected with FPR1, FPRL1, and FPRL2. Agonists were able to activate intracellular calcium mobilization and chemotaxis in human neutrophils. The most potent chemotactic agent (EC50 = 0.6 μM) was the mixed FPR/FPRL1 agonist 14h. PMID:19639995

  11. Theoretical investigation of the structures, stabilities, and NLO responses of calcium-doped pyridazine: alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Huang, Jiangen; Jia, Li; Zhou, Guangpei

    2014-02-01

    Currently, whether alkaline-earth-doped compounds with electride characteristics are novel candidates for high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials is unknown. In this paper, using quantum chemical computations, we show that: when doping calcium atoms into a family of alkaline-substituted pyridazines, alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca (M=H, Li, and K) with distended excess electron clouds are formed. Interestingly, from the triplet to the singlet state, the chemical valence of calcium atom changes from +1 to 0, and the dipole moment direction (μ₀) of the molecule reverses for each M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca. Changing pyridazine from without (H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca) to with one alkaline substituent (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca, M=Li and K), the ground state changes from the triplet to the singlet state. The alkaline earth metal doping effect (electride effect) and alkaline salt effect on the static first hyperpolarizabilities (β₀) demonstrates that (1) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1371-fold from 2 (pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂) to 2745au (Ca-doped pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca), (2) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1146-fold from 2 in pyridazine (H₄C₄N₂) to 2294au in an Li-substituted pyridazine (Li-H₃C₄N₂), and (3) the β₀ value is increased 324-(M=Li) and 106-(M=K) fold from 826 (MLi) and 2294au (MK) to 268,679 (M=Li) and 245,878au (M=K), respectively, from the alkalized pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂) to the Ca-doped pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca). These results may provide a new means for designing high-performance NLO materials.

  12. Behavioural profile of two potential antidepressant pyridazine derivatives including arylpiperazinyl moieties in their structure, in mice.

    PubMed

    Rubat, C; Coudert, P; Bastide, P; Tronche, P

    1995-02-01

    The potential antidepressant effects of two pyridazine derivatives, 5-benzyl 6-methyl 2-[4-(3-trifluoro-methyl phenyl) piperazin-1-yl] methylpyridazin-3-one (PC4) and 5-benzyl 6-methyl 2-[4-(3-chlorophenyl) piperazin-1-yl] methylpyridazin-3-one (PC13), were evaluated using classical psychopharmacological tests in mice. The intraperitoneal LD50 values of PC4 and PC13 were respectively 1125.8 and 429.6 mg kg-1. Only at intraperitoneal doses of 100 mg kg-1 did PC4 or PC13 significantly decrease locomotor activity. Both compounds (5-20 mg kg-1, i.p.) reduced the duration of immobility of mice in the forces swimming test, antagonized reserpine (2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.)-induced ptosis, and potentiated reserpine (2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.)-induced hypothermia. PC4 and PC13 (20 mg kg-1, i.p.) partly reversed hypothermia induced by low dose apomorphine (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) but were less effective for higher doses of apomorphine (16 mg kg-1, s.c.). At 200 mg kg-1, intraperitoneal PC13 enhanced the toxic effects of yohimbine (30 mg kg-1, s.c.), while PC4 was inactive. Head twitches produced either by L-5-hydroxytryptophan (4 mg kg-1, i.p.) in mice pretreated with pargyline (100 mg kg-1, i.p.) or by 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (3 mg kg-1, i.p.) were antagonized by both pyridazine derivatives (20 mg kg-1, i.p.). PC4 and PC13 showed analgesic properties in the phenylbenzoquinone-induced abdominal constriction test (5.0 < ED50 < 5.5 mg kg-1, i.p.) and in the hot-plate test (10 to 37% of analgesia at 10 mg kg-1, i.p.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Functionalized heteroarylpyridazines and pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives via palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling methodology.

    PubMed

    Clapham, Kate M; Batsanov, Andrei S; Greenwood, Ryan D R; Bryce, Martin R; Smith, Amy E; Tarbit, Brian

    2008-03-21

    A general method for the synthesis of functionalized pyridazinylboronic acids/esters is described involving a directed ortho metalation (DoM)--boronation protocol (Schemes 1 and 2). A comprehensive study of the reactivity of the C-B bond in palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings with aryl/heteroaryl halides is presented. Aryl-/heteroarylpyridazines are thereby obtained in synthetically viable yields (typically 40-75%) although in some cases competing protodeboronation has been observed. A series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives, including 4,6-diaryl/heteroaryl derivatives, have been obtained from the corresponding 3-methoxypyridazines in straightforward procedures (Schemes 3 and 4). Several X-ray crystal structures of aryl-/heteroarylpyridazines and derived pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives are reported. These multi-ring systems are of considerable interest in contemporary N-heterocyclic chemistry.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  15. Optimization of 5-pyridazin-3-one phenoxypropylamines as potent, selective histamine H₃ receptor antagonists with potent cognition enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ming; Aimone, Lisa D; Huang, Zeqi; Mathiasen, Joanne; Raddatz, Rita; Lyons, Jacquelyn; Hudkins, Robert L

    2012-01-12

    Previous studies have shown that (5-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolin-1-yl-propoxy]phenyl}-2H-pyridazin-3-one) 2 had high affinity for both the human (hH(3)R K(i) = 2.8 nM) and rat H(3)Rs (rH(3)R K(i) = 8.5 nM) but displayed low oral bioavailability in the rat. Optimization of the 5-pyridazin-3-one R(2) and R(6) positions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties over 2 led to the identification of 5-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)propoxy]phenyl}-2-pyridin-2-yl-2H-pyridazin-3-one 29. Compound 29 displayed high affinity for both human and rat H(3)Rs (hH(3)R K(i) = 1.7 nM, rH(3)R K(i) = 3.7 nM) with a greater than 1000-fold selectivity over the other histamine receptor subtypes and favorable pharmacokinetic properties across species (F = 78% rat, 92% dog, 96% monkey). It showed low binding to human plasma proteins, weakly inhibited cytochrome P450 isoforms, and displayed an excellent safety profile for a CNS-active compound. 29 displayed potent H(3)R antagonist activity in the brain in a rat dipsogenia model and demonstrated enhancement of cognitive function in a rat social recognition model at low doses. However, the development of compound 29 was discontinued because of genotoxicity.

  16. Isomeric signatures in the fragmentation of pyridazine and pyrimidine induced by fast ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Wania Luna, Hugo; Montenegro, Eduardo C.

    2015-07-28

    We present fast proton impact induced fragmentations of pyrimidine and pyridazine as an experimental resource to investigate isomeric signatures. Major isomeric imprints are identified for few fragment ions and differences of more than an order of magnitude for the cross sections of fragments of the same mass were measured. The observation of the molecular structure of these isomers gives no apparent indication for the reasons for such substantial differences. It is verified that the simple displacement of the position of one nitrogen atom strongly inhibits or favors the production of some ionic fragment species. The dependency of the fragmentation cross sections on the proton impact energy, investigated by means of time of flight mass spectroscopy and of a model calculation based in first order perturbation theory, allows us to disentangle the complex collision dynamics of the ionic fragments. The proton-induced fragmentation discriminates rather directly the association between a molecular orbital ionization and the fragment-ions creation and abundance, as well as how the redistribution of the energy imparted to the molecules takes place, triggering not only single but also double vacancy and leads to specific fragmentation pathways.

  17. Synthesis, antitubercular, antifungal and antibacterial activities of 6-substituted phenyl-2-(3'-substituted phenyl pyridazin-6'-yl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridazin-3-one.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mojahidul; Siddiqui, Anees A; Rajesh, Ramadoss

    2008-01-01

    A series of 6-substituted phenyl-2-(3'-substituted phenyl pyridazin-6'-yl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridazin-3-ones has been synthesized. An appropriate aromatic hydrocarbon reacts with succinic anhydride in presence of AlCl3 to yield beta-aroyl propionic acid. The corresponding acid was cyclized with hydrazine hydrate to give 6-(substituted aryl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-pyridazinone, which was heated on steam bath with phosphorus(V) oxychloride to yield 3-chloro 6-substituted phenyl pyridazine. This intermediate after reaction with hydrazine hydrate was converted into 3-hydrazino-6-substituted phenyl pyridazine. The resulting product was converted into 6-substituted phenyl-2-(3'-substituted phenyl pyridazin-6'-yl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridazin-3-one by reacting with substituted aroyl propionic acid. Spectral data (IR, NMR, mass spectra) confirmed the structures of the synthesized compounds. The synthesized compounds were investigated for their in vitro antitubercular, antifungal and antibacterial activities. The results indicated that the synthesized compounds have mild to potent activities with reference to their appropriate reference standards.

  18. Synthesis, enantioresolution, and activity profile of chiral 6-methyl-2,4-disubs-tituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones as potent N-formyl peptide receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Graziano, Alessia; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.; Vergelli, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    A series of chiral pyridazin-3(2H)-ones was synthesized, separated as pure enantiomers, and evaluated for N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) agonist activity. Characterization of the purified enantiomers using combined chiral HPLC and chiroptical studies (circular dichroism, allowed unambiguous assignment of the absolute configuration for each pair of enantiomers). Evaluation of the ability of racemic mixtures and purified enantiomers to stimulate intracellular Ca2+ flux in FPR-transfected HL-60 cells and human neutrophils and to induce β-arrestin recruitment in FPR-transfected CHO-K1 cells showed that many enantiomers were potent agonists, inducing responses in the sub-micromolar to nanomolar range. Furthermore, FPRs exhibited enantiomer selectivity, generally preferring the R-(−)-forms over the S-(+)-enantiomers. Finally, we found that elongation of the carbon chain in the chiral center of the active compounds generally increased biological activity. Thus, these studies provide important new information regarding molecular features involved in FPR ligand preference and report the identification of a novel series of FPR agonists. PMID:22607879

  19. Ligand directed self-assembly vs. metal ion coordination algorithm-when does the ligand or the metal take control?

    PubMed

    Shuvaev, Konstantin V; Abedin, Tareque S M; McClary, Corey A; Dawe, Louise N; Collins, Julie L; Thompson, Laurence K

    2009-04-28

    Polyfunctional hydrazone ligands with multidentate terminal donor groups offer metal ions many donor choices, and the coordination outcome depends mainly on the identity of the metal ion. Co(ii) and Ni(ii) prefer to adopt largely undistorted, six-coordinate geometries, while Cu(ii) can easily adapt to a variety of coordination situations (e.g. CN 4-6), and will optimize its coordination number and stereochemistry based on all the available donors. Ni(ii) and Co(ii) form simple [2 x 2] [M(4)-(micro(2)-O)(4)] square grids with such ditopic hydrazone ligands, and ignore other coordination options, while Cu(ii) tries to bind to all the available donors, and forms extended and 2D structures based on linked Cu(ii) triads rather than grids. Ni(ii) is also reluctant to compromise its desire to maximize its crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE) by binding to 'weak' ligands, and with a tetratopic pyrazole bis-hydrazone ligand it ignores the oxygen donors in favour of nitrogen, forming a novel trinuclear, triangular cluster. Also, reaction of a linear Ni(ii)(3) complex of a tetratopic pyridazine bis-hydrazone ligand with NiN(6) coordination spheres with Cu(ii), leads exclusively to a square Cu(12) grid based complex, and complete displacement of nickel. Structural and magnetic properties are highlighted, and metal-ligand interactions are discussed in detail.

  20. A new class of luminescent tricarbonyl rhenium(I) complexes containing bridging 1,2-diazine ligands: electrochemical, photophysical, and computational characterization.

    PubMed

    Donghi, Daniela; D'Alfonso, Giuseppe; Mauro, Matteo; Panigati, Monica; Mercandelli, Pierluigi; Sironi, Angelo; Mussini, Patrizia; D'Alfonso, Laura

    2008-05-19

    A novel class of luminescent tricarbonyl rhenium(I) complexes of general formula [Re2(mu-X)2(CO)6(mu-diaz)] (X=halogen and diaz=1,2-diazine) was prepared by reacting [ReX(CO)5] with 0.5 equiv of diazine (seven different ligands were used). The bridging coordination of the diazine in these dinuclear complexes was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Cyclic voltammetry in acetonitrile showed for all the complexes (but the phthalazine derivative) a chemically and electrochemically reversible ligand-centered reduction, as well as a reversible metal-centered bielectronic oxidation. With respect to the prototypical luminescent [ReCl(CO)3(bpy)] complex, the oxidation is more difficult and the reduction easier (about +0.3 V), so that a similar highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap is observed. All of the complexes exhibit photoluminescence at room temperature in solution, with broad unstructured emission from metal-to-ligand charge-transfer states, at lambda in the range 579-620 nm. Lifetimes (tau=20-2200 ns) and quantum yields (Phi up to 0.12) dramatically change upon varying the bridging ligand X and the diazine substituents: in particular, quantum yields decrease in the series Cl, Br, and I and in the presence of substituents at the alpha positions of the pyridazine ring. A combined density functional and time-dependent density functional study of the geometry, relative stability, electronic structure, and photophysical properties of all the pyridazine derivatives was performed. The nature of the excited states involved in the electronic absorption spectra was ascertained, and trends in the energy of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals upon changing the pyridazine substituents and the bridging halogen ligands were discussed. The observed emission properties of these complexes were shown to be related to a combination of steric and electronic factors affecting their ground-state geometry and their

  1. Electrophilicity of pyridazine-3-carbonitrile, pyrimidine-2-carbonitrile, and pyridine-carbonitrile derivatives: a chemical model to describe the formation of thiazoline derivatives in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sarmistha; Ahire, Deepak; Wagh, Santosh; Mullick, Dibakar; Sistla, Ramesh; Selvakumar, Kumaravel; Cortes, Janet Caceres; Putlur, Siva Prasad; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Johnson, Benjamin M

    2014-12-15

    Certain aromatic nitriles are well-known inhibitors of cysteine proteases. The mode of action of these compounds involves the formation of a reversible or irreversible covalent bond between the nitrile and a thiol group in the active site of the enzyme. However, the reactivity of these aromatic nitrile-substituted heterocycles may lead inadvertently to nonspecific interactions with DNA, protein, glutathione, and other endogenous components, resulting in toxicity and complicating the use of these compounds as therapeutic agents. In the present study, the intrinsic reactivity and associated structure-property relationships of cathepsin K inhibitors featuring substituted pyridazines [6-phenylpyridazine-3-carbonitrile, 6-(4-fluorophenyl)pyridazine-3-carbonitrile, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyridazine-3-carbonitrile, 6-p-tolylpyridazine-3-carbonitrile], pyrimidines [5-p-tolylpyrimidine-2-carbonitrile, 5-(4-fluorophenyl)pyrimidine-2-carbonitrile], and pyridines [5-p-tolylpicolinonitrile and 5-(4-fluorophenyl)picolinonitrile] were evaluated using a combination of computational and analytical approaches to establish correlations between electrophilicity and levels of metabolites that were formed in glutathione- and N-acetylcysteine-supplemented human liver microsomes. Metabolites that were characterized in this study featured substituted thiazolines that were formed following rearrangements of transient glutathione and N-acetylcysteine conjugates. Peptidases including γ-glutamyltranspeptidase were shown to catalyze the formation of these products, which were formed to lesser extents in the presence of the selective γ-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor acivicin and the nonspecific peptidase inhibitors phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and aprotinin. Of the chemical series mentioned above, the pyrimidine series was the most susceptible to metabolism to thiazoline-containing products, followed, in order, by the pyridazine and pyridine series. This trend was in keeping with the

  2. Sarcosine-Based Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) Inhibitors Containing Pyridazine Moiety: A Further Search for Drugs with Potential to Influence Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Timar, Julia; Szabo, Geza; Udvari, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin M; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Czompa, Andrea; Tapolcsanyi, Pal; Kocsis, Akos; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a novel series of N-substituted sarcosines, analogues of NFPS (N-[3-(biphenyl-4- yloxy)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-N-methylglycine), as type-1 glycine transporter (GlyT-1) inhibitors. Several compounds incorporated a diazine ring inhibited recombinant hGlyT-1b expressed permanently in CHO cells and GlyT-1 in rat brain synaptosomal preparations. A structure-activity relationship for the newly synthesized compounds was obtained and discussed on the ground of their GlyT-1 inhibitory potencies. Replacement of the biphenyl-4-yloxy moiety in NFPS with a 5-pyridazinylphenoxy moiety (compounds 3, 4, 5, and 6) or a 2-phenyl-5- pyridazinyloxy moiety (compounds 10, 11, and 12) afforded compounds exhibiting potent inhibition on GlyT-1 activity. The GlyT-1 inhibitory properties of NFPS analogues, in which sarcosine was closed into a ring forming (methylamino)pyridazine-3-(2H)-one, were markedly reduced (compounds 13 and 14). The pyridazine-containing GlyT-1 inhibitors with in vitro GlyT-1 inhibitory potency also enhanced extracellular glycine concentrations in conscious rat striatum as was measured by microdialysis technique. In contrast to NFPS, sarcosine-based pyridazine containing GlyT-1 inhibitors failed to evoke compulsive running behavior whereas they inhibited phencyclidine- induced hypermotility in mice. It is believed that increase of extracellular concentrations of glycine by inhibition of its reuptake may probably influence positively glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type ionotropic receptors in the central nervous system. This may have importance in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurochemical transmission. Thus, impaired NMDA receptor functions have been shown to be involved in the development of the negative symptoms and the cognitive deficit of schizophrenia and the treatment of these symptoms is the possible clinical indication of GlyT-1 inhibitors including

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inhibitory effect of new pyridazine derivatives for the corrosion of mild steel in 1 M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashuga, Motsie E.; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of four pyridazine derivatives namely, 2-(6-chloropyridazin-3-yl)-2-phenylacetonitrile (P1), 3-(6-chloro-3-pyridazinyl)-1H-indole (P2), 4-(6-chloropyridazin-3-yl)benzoic acid (P3) and 3-(6-chloropyridazin-3-yl)benzoic acid (P4) on electrochemical dissolution of mild steel in 1 M HCl were studied using electrochemical, spectroscopic, and theoretical computational chemistry techniques. The inhibition efficiency increases with increasing concentration of the inhibitors and the shift in corrosion potentials obtained revealed that the compounds are mixed-type inhibitors and steel dissolution was found to be a charge transfer process with the steel/electrolyte interface showed pseudo-capacitive behaviour. P1 and P2 showed the best protection performances for mild steel in the studied medium, attributable to the presence of more nitrogen atoms and unsaturated groups in their molecules compared to P3 and P4. The experimental adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir and Temkin isotherm models and was found to involve both physisorption and chemisorption. Spectroscopic studies revealed that the inhibitor molecules interact chemically with mild steel and the pyridazine ring is actively involved in these interactions. Quantum chemical calculations also showed that pyridazine ring has the tendency of interacting with metallic atoms via both forward and backward donations. Molecular dynamic simulation revealed that the molecules can adsorb strongly onto the surface of iron in a near flat orientation.

  4. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235–360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, [4-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, and [1-{sup 15}N]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (R{sub e}) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final R{sub e} structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (I{sub a} and I{sub b} for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to

  5. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Stanton, John F.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-13C]-C4H4N2, [4-13C]-C4H4N2, and [1-15N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key to

  6. Half a grid is better than no grid: competition between 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and 3,6-di(pyrid-2-yl)pyridazine for copper(II).

    PubMed

    Constable, Edwin C; Decurtins, Silvio; Housecroft, Catherine E; Keene, Tony D; Palivan, Cornelia G; Price, Jason R; Zampese, Jennifer A

    2010-03-07

    The reaction between Cu(NO(3))(2).3H(2)O, 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (tpy) and 3,6-di(pyrid-2-yl)pyridazine (1) in a 2 : 2 : 1 molar equivalent ratio in aqueous MeCN in the presence of excess NH(4)PF(6) leads to competition between the assembly of the dinuclear half-grid [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).2H(2)O and the mononuclear complex [Cu(1)(2)(OH(2))][PF(6)](2). The yield of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).2H(2)O has been optimized using microwave conditions. [Cu(1)(2)(OH(2))][PF(6)](2) can be selectively produced by treating Cu(NO(3))(2).3H(2)O with 1 (1 : 2 molar equivalents) in aqueous MeCN in the presence of NH(4)PF(6). The single crystal structures of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).4MeNO(2) and [Cu(1)(2)(OH(2))][PF(6)](2) are presented. In the [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)](4+) cation, ligand 1 bridges the two copper(II) centres, each of which is further coordinated by a tpy ligand. The copper(II) coordination geometry is closely associated with the arrangement of the two tpy ligands which engage in efficient face-to-face pi-stacking. Magnetic data for crystalline [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).4MeNO(2) are consistent with a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the two copper(II) centres. EPR spectroscopic data for a powder sample of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).2H(2)O are consistent with the dinuclear structure, but in frozen DMF and DMSO solutions, the data indicate that the dinuclear structure of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)](4+) is not preserved.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopic, optical and thermal properties of a hybride pyridazine perchlorate complex-An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podsiadła, D.; Czupiński, O.; Rospenk, M.; Czapla, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Various methods of experiment: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been used to investigate the phase transitions in pyridazine perchlorate crystal. DSC showed the existence of phase transition at T = 341 K. The vibrational IR spectra in Nujol and Perfluorolube mulls were studied in a wide temperature range, from room temperature to 380 K. Special attention was put on the temperatures near the phase transition temperature. The temperature changes of wavenumbers, gravity center and band intensities were analyzed to clarify the phase transition molecular mechanism. Information about hydrogen bonds was obtained. For more detailed band assignment and overall spectral presentation Raman and far infrared (FT-FIR) spectra at room temperature have been carried out. The experimental data interpretation was supported by theoretical calculations based on density functional theory, with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d,p) basic set. Some theoretical conformations were analyzed. Calculated normal vibrational modes of the molecule, their frequencies and intensities were compared with these recorded in experiment.

  8. Synthesis and complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 6-substituted and 2,6-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemi; Chessa, Carla; Terán, Carmen

    2011-07-01

    Several pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were synthesized starting from alkyl furans using oxidation with singlet oxygen to give 4-methoxy or 4-hydroxybutenolides, key intermediates of the synthetic strategy followed. For all pyridazinones reported, a complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, which included NOE, DEPT, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, was accomplished. Correlations between the chemical shifts of the heterocyclic ring atoms and substituents at N-2 and C-6 were analyzed.

  9. Structure-Property Study on Two New D-A Type Materials Comprising Pyridazine Moiety and the OLED Application as Host.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaojie; Zhang, Xunlu; Ou, Changjin; Wang, Shulei; Yang, Xinli; Zhou, Xinhui; Mi, Baoxiu; Cao, Dapeng; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2017-08-09

    In this paper, two new pyridazine based donor-acceptor type materials, i.e., 3CzPyaPy: 9,9'-(3-(6-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)pyridazin-3-yl)pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(9H-carbazole) and 4CzPyPyaPy: 3,6-bis(2,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)pyridin-3-yl)pyridazine, were synthesized with high yields. These two materials exhibited strong absorption/emission with high molar extinction coefficients and moderate photoluminescence quantum yield. The glass transition temperature of 3CzPyaPy was detected to be as high as 131 °C, showing its high thermal stability. Although the absorption energies and oxidation/reduction behaviors of the two materials were similar, the emission from 4CzPyPyaPy with longer effective-conjugation length presented hypsochromic shift both in films and in dilute solutions, contradicting to the common sense. The single crystal structure study disclosed their different space stretching and packing: 3CzPyaPy was twisted in larger angles and adopted dimerlike packing, while 4CzPyPyaPy showed smaller torsion angles and exhibited slipped herringbone packing. The dimerlike packing in 3CzPyaPy is responsible for its bathochromic shift of emission in solid state, while its unsymmetrical molecular structure accounts for that in solution. We believe that the unsymmetrical molecular structure of 3CzPyaPy is partially responsible for its high thermal-stability and also responsible for its HOMO dispersion which renders it slightly more difficult to oxidize. 3CzPyaPy was proved to be a bipolar-transport material and when served as a phosphor host, a green phosphorescent device achieved maximum efficiencies of 54.0 cd A(-1), 42.4 lm W(-1), and 17.7%, which are among the best with nonoptimized device structure, demonstrating its great potential for optoelectronic application. Furthermore, the new synthesized pyridazine derivatives and the corresponding structural and molecular-packing influences on material properties give a new insight into molecule tailoring.

  10. [UV-spectrophotometry in drug control. 41. Drug substances with chromophores and auxochromes in monocyclic compounds (pyrazolone, pyrazolidine, pyridazine, pyrimidine and pyrazine) and bicyclic compounds (benzoxazole, imidazole, benzthiazole and indene)].

    PubMed

    Krácmar, J; Krácmarová, J; Remsová, M; Kovárová, A

    1988-10-01

    The results of a systematic examination of the spectra of 15 drug substances with chromophores and auxochromes in monocyclic (pyrazolone, pyrazolidin, pyridazine, pyrimidine and pyrazine) and bicyclic compounds (benzoxazol, imidazole, benzthiazole and indene) in the UV and visible range were evaluated. Influences of substituents and solvents on shifts of the E, K, B and R bands were discussed.

  11. Structure-Based Design of Novel Pyrimido[4,5-c]pyridazine Derivatives as Dihydropteroate Synthase Inhibitors with Increased Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ying; Hammoudeh, Dalia; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Qi, Jianjun; White, Stephen W.; Lee, Richard E.

    2012-05-29

    Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) is the validated drug target for sulfonamide antimicrobial therapy. However, due to widespread drug resistance and poor tolerance, the use of sulfonamide antibiotics is now limited. The pterin binding pocket in DHPS is highly conserved and is distinct from the sulfonamide binding site. It therefore represents an attractive alternative target for the design of novel antibacterial agents. We previously carried out the structural characterization of a known pyridazine inhibitor in the Bacillus anthracis DHPS pterin site and identified a number of unfavorable interactions that appear to compromise binding. With this structural information, a series of 4,5-dioxo-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimido[4,5-c]pyridazines were designed to improve binding affinity. Most importantly, the N-methyl ring substitution was removed to improve binding within the pterin pocket, and the length of the side chain carboxylic acid was optimized to fully engage the pyrophosphate binding site. These inhibitors were synthesized and evaluated by an enzyme activity assay, X-ray crystallography, isothermal calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the binding interactions from structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic perspectives. This study clearly demonstrates that compounds lacking the N-methyl substitution exhibit increased inhibition of DHPS, but the beneficial effects of optimizing the side chain length are less apparent.

  12. FT-IR, micro-Raman and UV-vis spectroscopic and quantum chemical calculation studies on the 6-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyridazine compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarıkaya, Ebru Karakaş; Bahçeli, Semiha; Varkal, Döndü; Dereli, Ömer

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the study of the6-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyridazine compound, (C10 H7 N2 O Cl with synonym 4-pyridazinol, 6-chloro-3-phenyl-), was verified experimentally by using the Fourier Transformed Infrared (FT-IR), micro-Raman and UV/vis (in N,N-dimethylformamide solvent) spectroscopies. Furthermore, the optimized molecular geometry, conformatinal analysis, vibrational frequencies, the simulated UV/vis spectra (in gas and in N,N-dimethylformamide solvent), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift (in gas, in chloroform and N,N-dimethylformamide in solvents) values, HOMO-LUMO analysis, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface and thermodynamic parameters ofthe6-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyridazine compound were calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state. The comparison of the calculated and vibrational frequencies with the experimental values provides important information about the title compound.

  13. Supramolecular self-assembled polynuclear complexes from tritopic, tetratopic, and pentatopic ligands: structural, magnetic and surface studies.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subrata K; Abedin, Tareque S M; Dawe, Louise N; Tandon, Santokh S; Collins, Julie L; Thompson, Laurence K; Postnikov, Andrei V; Alam, Mohammad S; Müller, Paul

    2007-09-17

    Polymetallic, highly organized molecular architectures can be created by "bottom-up" self-assembly methods using ligands with appropriately programmed coordination information. Ligands based on 2,6-picolyldihydrazone (tritopic and pentatopic) and 3,6-pyridazinedihydrazone (tetratopic) cores, with tridentate coordination pockets, are highly specific and lead to the efficient self-assembly of square [3 x 3] Mn9, [4 x 4] Mn16, and [5 x 5] Mn25 nanoscale grids. Subtle changes in the tritopic ligand composition to include bulky end groups can lead to a rectangular 3 x [1 x 3] Mn9 grid, while changing the central pyridazine to a more sterically demanding pyrazole leads to simple dinuclear copper complexes, despite the potential for binding four metal ions. The creation of all bidentate sites in a tetratopic pyridazine ligand leads to a dramatically different spiral Mn4 strand. Single-crystal X-ray structural data show metallic connectivity through both mu-O and mu-NN bridges, which leads to dominant intramolecular antiferromagnetic spin exchange in all cases. Surface depositions of the Mn9, Mn16, and Mn25 square grid molecules on graphite (HOPG) have been examined using STM/CITS imagery (scanning tunneling microscopy/current imaging tunneling spectroscopy), where tunneling through the metal d-orbital-based HOMO levels reveals the metal ion positions. CITS imagery of the grids clearly shows the presence of 9, 16, and 25 manganese ions in the expected square grid arrangements, highlighting the importance and power of this technique in establishing the molecular nature of the surface adsorbed species. Nanoscale, electronically functional, polymetallic assemblies of this sort, created by such a bottom-up synthetic approach, constitute important components for advanced molecule-based materials.

  14. Multinitrogen heteroaromatics studied at Pt(111) surfaces by EELS, Auger spectroscopy, and electrochemistry: Pyrazine, pyrimidine, pyridazine, 1,3,5-triazine, and their carboxylic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffins, S.A.; Gui, J.Y.; Lin, Chiu-Hsun; Lu, F.; Salaita, G.N.; Stern, D.A.; Hubbard, A.T. )

    1990-07-01

    Reported here are surface electrochemical studies of several multinitrogen heteroaromatics and their carboxylic acid derivatives adsorbed at well-defined Pt(111) electrode surfaces from aqueous solutions. The adsorbates studied include pyrazine (PZ), pyrimidine (PM), pyridazine (PD), 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid (PZCA), 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (23PZDCA), 4-pyridazinecarboxylic acid (4PDCA), and 1,3,5-triazine (TZ). Packing densities (moles adsorbed per unit area) of each compound adsorbed from solution at controlled pH and electrode potential are measured by means of Auger spectroscopy. All of the above compounds except TZ adsorb strongly to Pt(111). Surface vibrational spectra of these adsorbed layers are obtained by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and are compared with either vapor- or condensed-phase infrared (IR) spectra of the parent compounds. The similarity of EELS and IR spectra indicates that the adsorbates retain their molecular structure unchanged as a result of adsorption.

  15. Synthesis, HPLC Enantioresolution, and X-ray Analysis of a New Series of C5-methyl Pyridazines as N-Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Soldani, Giacomo; Quinn, Mark T.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Faggi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of three racemates and the corresponding non chiral analogues of a C5-methyl pyridazine series is described here, as well as the isolation of pure enantiomers and their absolute configuration assignment. In order to obtain optically active compounds, direct chromatographic methods of separation by HPLC-UV were investigated using four chiral stationary phases (CSPs: Lux Amylose-2®, Lux Cellulose-1®, Lux Cellulose-2® and Lux Cellulose-3®). The best resolution was achieved using amylose tris(5-chloro-2-methylphenylcarbamate) (Lux Amylose-2®), and single enantiomers were isolated on a semipreparative scale with high enantiomeric excess, suitable for biological assays. The absolute configuration of optically active compounds was unequivocally established by X-ray crystallographic analysis and comparative chiral HPLC-UV profile. All compounds of the series were tested for formyl peptide receptor (FPR) agonist activity, and four were found to be active, with EC50 values in the micromolar range. PMID:23744588

  16. Development of new highly potent imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines targeting Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Moine, Espérance; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cécile; Logé, Cédric; Pénichon, Mélanie; Moiré, Nathalie; Delehouzé, Claire; Foll-Josselin, Béatrice; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Bach, Stéphane; Gueiffier, Alain; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Denevault-Sabourin, Caroline

    2015-11-13

    Using a structure-based design approach, we have developed a new series of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines, targeting the calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CDPK1) from Toxoplasma gondii. Twenty derivatives were thus synthesized. Structure-activity relationships and docking studies confirmed the binding mode of these inhibitors within the ATP binding pocket of TgCDPK1. Two lead compounds (16a and 16f) were then identified, which were able to block TgCDPK1 enzymatic activity at low nanomolar concentrations, with a good selectivity profile against a panel of mammalian kinases. The potential of these inhibitors was confirmed in vitro on T. gondii growth, with EC50 values of 100 nM and 70 nM, respectively. These best candidates also displayed low toxicity to mammalian cells and were selected for further in vivo investigations on murine model of acute toxoplasmosis.

  17. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship study of novel 3-heteroarylcoumarins based on pyridazine scaffold as selective MAO-B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Costas-Lago, María Carmen; Besada, Pedro; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Fernanda; Viña, Dolores; Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Borges, Fernanda; Terán, Carmen

    2017-10-20

    Compounds of hybrid structure pyridazine-coumarin were discovered as potent, selective and reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). These compounds were synthesized in good yield following a multistep approach based on Knoevenagel reaction and using as key intermediate pyridazinone 16, which was obtained from maleic anhydride and furan. Compounds 9b and 9d are the most active compounds of these series, with IC50 values in the sub-micromolar range, and lack of cytotoxic effects. Theoretical calculation of ADME properties also suggested a good pharmacokinetic profile for both compounds. Docking simulations provided insights into enzyme inhibitor interactions and allowed us to rationalize the observed structure-activity relationships (SARs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  19. Metal Free Formation of Various 3-Iodo-1H-pyrrolo[3',2':4,5]imidazo-[1,2-a]pyridines and [1,2-b]Pyridazines and Their Further Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Tber, Z; Hiebel, M-A; El Hakmaoui, A; Akssira, M; Guillaumet, G; Berteina-Raboin, S

    2015-07-02

    3-iodo-1H-pyrrolo[3',2':4,5]imidazo-[1,2-a]pyridines and [1,2-b]pyridazines were prepared following Groebke-Blackburn-Bienaymé MCR combined with I2-promoted electrophilic cyclization. The flexibility of the method enables the introduction of diversity in the 2, 5, 6, and 7 positions on the resulting scaffold using commercially available starting materials. Furthermore, subsequent palladium-catalyzed reactions were successfully achieved using our iodinated derivatives.

  20. Design and synthesis of potent and selective pyridazin-4(1H)-one-based PDE10A inhibitors interacting with Tyr683 in the PDE10A selectivity pocket.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masato; Hitaka, Takenori; Hasui, Tomoaki; Fushimi, Makoto; Kunitomo, Jun; Kokubo, Hironori; Oki, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-15

    Utilizing structure-based drug design techniques, we designed and synthesized phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors based on pyridazin-4(1H)-one. These compounds can interact with Tyr683 in the PDE10A selectivity pocket. Pyridazin-4(1H)-one derivative 1 was linked with a benzimidazole group through an alkyl spacer to interact with the OH of Tyr683 and fill the PDE10A selectivity pocket. After optimizing the linker length, we identified 1-(cyclopropylmethyl)-5-[3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)propoxy]-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridazin-4(1H)-one (16f) as having highly potent PDE10A inhibitory activity (IC50=0.76nM) and perfect selectivity against other PDEs (>13,000-fold, IC50=>10,000nM). The crystal structure of 16f bound to PDE10A revealed that the benzimidazole moiety was located deep within the PDE10A selectivity pocket and interacted with Tyr683. Additionally, a bidentate interaction existed between the 5-alkoxypyridazin-4(1H)-one moiety and the conserved Gln716 present in all PDEs.

  1. Characterization of Imidazo[4,5-d]Pyridazine Nucleosides as Modulators of Unwinding Reaction Mediated by West Nile Virus Nucleoside Triphosphatase/Helicase: Evidence for Activity on the Level of Substrate and/or Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, Peter; Lang, Melanie; Haag, Annemarie; Schmitz, Herbert; Choe, Joonho; Chen, Huan-Ming; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.

    2002-01-01

    Compounds that interact with DNA or RNA generally act as inhibitors of enzymes that unwind DNA or RNA. In the present study we describe the synthesis and properties of some nucleoside analogues that interact with double-stranded DNA but that, in contrast, facilitate the unwinding reaction mediated by West Nile (WN) virus nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)/helicase. The nucleoside analogues described, 1-(2′-O-methyl-β-d-ribofuranosyl)imidazo[4,5-d]pyridazine-4,7(5H,6H)-dione (HMC-HO4), 1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)imidazo[4,5-d]pyridazine-4,7(5H,6H)-dione, and 1-(2′-deoxy-α-d-ribofuranosyl)imidazo[4,5-d]pyridazine-4,7(5H,6H)dione, all contain the imidazo[4,5-d]pyridazine ring system. The extent of the enhancing effect on helicase activity was found to be dependent on the time of exposure of the DNA substrate to the compounds and their concentrations. The nucleoside analogues were nevertheless found to be capable of uncoupling the ATPase and helicase activities of the enzyme by a mechanism operating on the level of the enzyme. Thus, in the case of HMC-HO4, the direct interaction with the enzyme caused inhibition of its helicase activity, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 30 μM. The similar potency of the compound against replication of WN virus in cell culture suggests that inhibition of the helicase activity of the viral enzyme is responsible for the observed antiviral activity of HMC-HO4 and may indeed represent an important mode of action of antiviral drugs in general. Comparative studies performed with the related NTPase/helicase from hepatitis C virus revealed that the extent of the effects mediated by imidazo[4,5-d]pyridazine nucleosides is enzyme specific. The substances described may represent a starting point for the development of a new class of helicase-specific antivirals. PMID:11959550

  2. Bis(arylvinyl)pyrazines, -pyrimidines, and -pyridazines as imaging agents for tau fibrils and β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Boländer, Alexander; Kieser, Daniel; Voss, Constantin; Bauer, Silvia; Schön, Christian; Burgold, Steffen; Bittner, Tobias; Hölzer, Jana; Heyny-von Haußen, Roland; Mall, Gerhard; Goetschy, Valérie; Czech, Christian; Knust, Henner; Berger, Robert; Herms, Jochen; Hilger, Ingrid; Schmidt, Boris

    2012-11-08

    The in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of high socioeconomic interest and remains a demanding field of research. The biopathological hallmarks of the disease are extracellular plaques consisting of aggregated β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and tau protein derived intracellular tangles. Here we report the synthesis and evaluation of fluorescent pyrazine, pyrimidine,and pyridazine derivatives in vitro and in vivo aiming at a tau-based diagnosis of AD. The probes were pre-evaluated on human brain tissue by fluorescence microscopy and were found to label all known disease-related alterations at high contrast and specificity. To quantify the binding affinity, a new thiazine red displacement assay was developed and selected candidates were toxicologically profiled. The application in transgenic mouse models demonstrated bioavailability and brain permeability for one compound. In the course of histological testing, we discovered an AD-related deposition of tau aggregates in the Bowman's glands of the olfactory epithelium, which holds potential for an endoscopic diagnosis of AD in the olfactory system.

  3. Intra-periaqueductal grey microinjections of an imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine derivative, DM2, affects rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity and shows antinociceptive effect.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Enza; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; De Chiaro, Maria; Guida, Francesca; Melisi, Daniela; Curcio, Annalisa; de Novellis, Vito; Marabese, Ida; Rossi, Francesco; Abignente, Enrico; Maione, Sabatino

    2010-03-01

    The 6-methoxy-2-phenylimidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine-3-carboxylic acid, DM2, exerts anti-absence activity and blocks Cav3.1 channel, a T-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel subtype, in vitro. The current study investigated the effect of intra-ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (VLPAG) administration of DM2 on formalin-induced nocifensive responses in rats. In addition, the effect of intra-VLPAG microinjection of DM2 on the ongoing and tail flick-related activities of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) cell population was also investigated. Formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the hind paws of awake rats. We found that DM2 reduced nocifensive responses in the late phase of the formalin test. Moreover, in the RVM, the intra-VLPAG microinjection of DM2 reduced the ongoing and tail flick-related activity of the nociceptive ON cells, whereas it increased the ongoing activity and reduced the tail flick-induced pause of the antinociceptive OFF cells, consistent with antinociception. Behavioural and electrophysiological effects were reproduced by intra-VLPAG microinjection of ethosuximide, a conventional T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. Finally, DM2 administration did not produce any adverse cardiovascular effects as blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged. In conclusion, DM2 plays an analgesic role in vivo and changes RVM cell activity, consistent with antinociception. These effects were even more potent than those elicited by ethosuximide treatments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of 6H-Chromeno[3,4-c]pyrido[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-e]pyridazin-6-ones as Par-4 Secretagogues

    PubMed Central

    Frasinyuk, Mykhaylo S.; Bondarenko, Svitlana P.; Sviripa, Vitaliy M.; Burikhanov, Ravshan; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Liu, Chunming; Watt, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrosation and cyclization of 4-(3-aminothieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-yl)-2H-chromen-2-ones 1 afforded substituted 6H-chromeno[3,4-c]pyrido[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-e]pyridazin-6-ones 2 that inhibited the intermediary filament protein, vimentin, at low micromolar concentrations. This inhibition promoted the secretion of Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 protein (Par-4), which selectively triggered apoptosis in prostate cancer cells such as CWR22Rv1, LNCaP-derivative C4-2B, PC-3 and its aggressive analog, PC-3 MM2. PMID:26236052

  5. Second hyperpolarizabilities of the lithium salt of pyridazine Li-H3C4N2 and lithium salt electride Li-H3C4N2⋯Na2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Orlando; Castro, Marcos A.; Leão, Salviano A.; Fonseca, Tertius L.

    2015-07-01

    This Letter reports static and dynamic second hyperpolarizabilities of the lithium salt of pyridazine Li-H3C4N2 and lithium salt electride Li-H3C4N2⋯Na2. The results show strong dependence of the computed values with respect to the electron correlation treatment. The static value obtained at the CCSD level with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set for the Li-H3C4N2⋯Na2 is 1.1 × 109 au. This extremely large value of the second hyperpolarizability reinforces the potential of this system for application in nonlinear optics.

  6. On the spectroscopic analyses of 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP): A comparative experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    El-Mansy, M A M; El-Bana, M S; Fouad, S S

    2017-04-05

    We have systematically calculated various physical characteristics such as optimized molecular structural parameters, vibrational frequencies, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, total dipole moment and thermochemical parameters: nuclear repulsion energy, ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, electronic chemical potential, global electrophilicity index and finally softness (ζ) using DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set for 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP). Also, HPHP nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been checked by DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set. In addition, we have investigated the influence of exposure to UV radiation on HPHP physical properties at the same level of theory. Our results show that HPHP possesses a dipole moment (2.68Debye) and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of 3.99eV that emphasize its high applicability for manufacturing photovoltaic devices such as solar cells. After exposure to UV radiation, the HPHP dipole moment has been lowered from 2.68 to 2.3Debye due to UV radiation. Moreover, a double spin in HPHP has been observed, as electrons are aligned according to their spin state. Electrons (spin ↑) and (spin ↓) are aligned in alpha and beta levels with energy gaps 3.82 and 3.17eV, respectively. This anomalous behavior may be justified by considering that HPHP undergoes anomalous Zeeman-like effect. The presence of this phenomenon in HPHP introduces it as a modern organic semiconductor which has high applicability to be used in modern spintronics.

  7. On the spectroscopic analyses of 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP): A comparative experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mansy, M. A. M.; El-Bana, M. S.; Fouad, S. S.

    2017-04-01

    We have systematically calculated various physical characteristics such as optimized molecular structural parameters, vibrational frequencies, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, total dipole moment and thermochemical parameters: nuclear repulsion energy, ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, electronic chemical potential, global electrophilicity index and finally softness (ζ) using DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set for 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP). Also, HPHP nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been checked by DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set. In addition, we have investigated the influence of exposure to UV radiation on HPHP physical properties at the same level of theory. Our results show that HPHP possesses a dipole moment (2.68 Debye) and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of 3.99 eV that emphasize its high applicability for manufacturing photovoltaic devices such as solar cells. After exposure to UV radiation, the HPHP dipole moment has been lowered from 2.68 to 2.3 Debye due to UV radiation. Moreover, a double spin in HPHP has been observed, as electrons are aligned according to their spin state. Electrons (spin ↑) and (spin ↓) are aligned in alpha and beta levels with energy gaps 3.82 and 3.17 eV, respectively. This anomalous behavior may be justified by considering that HPHP undergoes anomalous Zeeman-like effect. The presence of this phenomenon in HPHP introduces it as a modern organic semiconductor which has high applicability to be used in modern spintronics.

  8. Methyl 4-{[6-(4-bromo­phen­yl)-3-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetra­hydro­pyridazin-4-yl]methyl}benzoate

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Adailton J.; Souza, Luciana B. P.; Joussef, Antônio C.; Meyer, Emerson

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, C19H17BrN2O3, consists of two cyclic groups, viz. 4-(meth­oxy­carbon­yl)phenyl and 6-(4-bromo­phen­yl)-3-oxo-2,3,4,5-dihydro­pyridazin-4-yl, which are linked by a methyl­ene spacer. The pyridazine ring is twisted and the dihedral angle between its mean plane and that of the bromo­phenyl mean plane is 17.2 (2)°. The 4-(meth­oxy­carbon­yl)phenyl group shows a quasi-planar conformation, where the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the phenyl ring and carboxyl­ate ester group is 7.9 (4)°. Centrosymmetric inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers. These are linked by C—Br⋯O=C inter­actions [Br⋯O = 3.10 (1) Å] to form a one-dimensional polymeric structure running along the [10] direction. PMID:21754527

  9. Environmentally-Safe Conditions for a Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C3-Arylation with High Turn Over Frequency of Imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines Using Aryl Bromides and Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, Sabah; Djebbar, Safia; Soulé, Jean-François; Doucet, Henri

    2016-09-06

    Pd(OAc)2 was found to catalyze very efficiently the direct arylation of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine at C3-position under a very low catalyst loading and phosphine-free conditions. The reaction can be performed in very high TOFs and TONs employing as little as 0.1-0.05 mol % catalyst using a wide range of aryl bromides. In addition, some electron-deficient aryl chlorides were also found to be suitable substrates. Moreover, 31 examples of the cross couplings were reported using green, safe, and renewable solvents, such as pentan-1-ol, diethylcarbonate or cyclopentyl methyl ether, without loss of efficiency. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  11. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  12. Functionalization of Krebs-type polyoxometalates with N,O-chelating ligands: a systematic study.

    PubMed

    Artetxe, Beñat; Reinoso, Santiago; San Felices, Leire; Vitoria, Pablo; Pache, Aroa; Martín-Caballero, Jagoba; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan M

    2015-01-05

    The first organic derivatives of 3d-metal-disubstituted Krebs-type polyoxometalates have been synthesized under mild bench conditions via straightforward replacement of labile aqua ligands with N,O-chelating planar anions on either preformed or in situ-generated precursors. Nine hybrid clusters containing carboxylate derivatives of five- or six-membered aromatic N-heterocycles as antenna ligands have been obtained as pure crystalline phases and characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, infrared spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They all show the general formula [{M(II)L(H2O)}2(WO2)2(B-β-XW9O33)2](n-) and can be classified as follows: 1-SbM, where L = 1H-imidazole-4-carboxylate (imc), X = Sb(III), n = 12, and M(II) = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn; 1-TeM, where L = imc, X = Te(IV), n = 10, and M(II) = Mn, Co; 2-SbNi, where L = 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate (pzc), X = Sb(III), n = 12, and M(II) = Ni; and 3-SbM, where L = pyrazine-2-carboxylate (pyzc), X =Sb(III), n = 12, and M(II) = Co, Zn. The 3d-metal-disubstituted tungstotellurate(IV) skeleton of compounds 1-TeM is unprecedented in polyoxometalate chemistry. The stability of these hybrid Krebs-type species in aqueous solution has been confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy performed on the diamagnetic 1-SbZn and 3-SbZn derivatives. Our systematic study of the reactivity of disubtituted Krebs-type polyoxotungstates toward diazole-, pyridine-, and diazinecarboxylates demonstrates that organic derivatization is strongly dependent on the nature of the ligand, as follows: imc displays a "universal ligand" character, as functionalization takes place regardless of the external 3d metal and heteroatom; pzc and pyzc show selectivity toward specific 3d metals; pyridazine-3-carboxylate and pyrimidine-4-carboxylate promote partial decomposition of specific precursors, leading to [M(II)L2(H2O)2] complexes; and picolinate is inert under all conditions tested.

  13. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation studies on the 5-hydroxy-2H-pyridazin-3-one derivatives as HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijing; Fang, Yu; Lu, Xia; Liu, Yongjuan; Zhang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    The NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) is a promising therapeutic target for developing novel anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs. In this work, a combined molecular modeling study was performed on a series of 193 5-hydroxy-2H-pyridazin-3-one derivatives as inhibitors of HCV NS5B Polymerase. The best 3D-QSAR models, including CoMFA and CoMSIA, are based on receptor (or docking). Furthermore, a 40-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and binding free energy calculations using docked structures of NS5B with ten compounds, which have diverse structures and pIC50 values, were employed to determine the detailed binding process and to compare the binding modes of the inhibitors with different activities. On one side, the stability and rationality of molecular docking and 3D-QSAR results were validated by MD simulation. The binding free energies calculated by the MM-PBSA method gave a good correlation with the experimental biological activity. On the other side, by analyzing some differences between the molecular docking and the MD simulation results, we can find that the MD simulation could also remedy the defects of molecular docking. The analyses of the combined molecular modeling results have identified that Tyr448, Ser556, and Asp318 are the key amino acid residues in the NS5B binding pocket. The results from this study can provide some insights into the development of novel potent NS5B inhibitors.

  14. 3-(1,3-Di­phenyl­propan-2-yl)-4-methyl-6-phenyl­isoxazolo[3,4-d]pyridazin-7(6H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Charles F.; Mirzaei, Joseph; Koerner, Chris; Gates, Christina; Natale, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C27H23N3O2, the geminal benzyl groups branching out from the methine adjacent to the isoxazole group are both syn-oriented to the methyl group of the pyridazinone moiety, as reflected by C—C distances of 3.812 (2) and 4.369 (2) Å between the methyl carbon and the nearest ring carbon of each benzyl group. This kind of conformation is retained in CDCl3 solution, as evidenced by distinct phenyl-shielding effects on the 1H NMR signals of the methyl H atoms. The isoxazolo[3,4-d]pyridazin ring system is virtually planar (r.m.s. deviation from planarity = 0.031 Å), but the N-bonded phenyl group is inclined to the former by an ring–ring angle of 55.05 (3)°. In the crystal, the T-shaped mol­ecules are arranged in an inter­locked fashion, forming rod-like assemblies along [10-1]. The mol­ecules are held together by unremarkable weak C—H⋯N, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions (C—O,N,C > 3.4 A), while significant π–π-stacking inter­actions are absent. PMID:24454112

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nitrogen-rich macrocyclic ligands and an investigation of their coordination chemistry with lanthanum(III).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Justin J; Birnbaum, Eva R; Batista, Enrique R; Martin, Richard L; John, Kevin D

    2015-01-05

    Derivatives of the ligand 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen) containing pendant N-heterocyclic donors were prepared. The heterocycles pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, and pyrazine were conjugated to cyclen to give 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(py)), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(3-pyridazylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pyd)), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(4-pyrimidylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pyr)), and 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-pyrazinylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pz)), respectively. The coordination chemistry of these ligands was explored using the La(3+) ion. Accordingly, complexes of the general formula [La(L)(OTf)](OTf)2, where OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate and L = L(py) (1), L(pyd) (2), L(pyr) (3), and L(pz) (4), were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Crystal structures of 1 and 2 were also determined by X-ray diffraction studies, which revealed 9-coordinate capped, twisted square-antiprismatic coordination geometries for the central La(3+) ion. The conformational dynamics of 1-4 in solution were investigated by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. Dynamic line-shape and Eyring analyses enabled the determination of the activation parameters for the interconversion of enantiomeric forms of the complexes. Unexpectedly, the different pendant N-heterocycles of 1-4 give rise to varying values for the enthalpies and entropies of activation for this process. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the mechanism of this enantiomeric interconversion. Computed activation parameters were consistent with those experimentally determined for 1 but differed somewhat from those of 2-4.

  16. Novel benzoylpiperidine-based stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 inhibitors: Identification of 6-[4-(2-methylbenzoyl)piperidin-1-yl]pyridazine-3-carboxylic acid (2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-3-ylethyl)amide and its plasma triglyceride-lowering effects in Zucker fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshikazu; Ogata, Tsuneaki; Kiyotsuka, Yohei; Ueno, Yuko; Miyazawa, Yuriko; Kurata, Hitoshi; Deguchi, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Konishi, Masahiro; Okuyama, Ryo; Kurikawa, Nobuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Wakimoto, Satoko; Ohsumi, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a known piperazine-based SCD-1 inhibitor, we obtained more potent benzoylpiperidine analogs. Optimization of the structure of the benzoylpiperidine-based SCD-1 inhibitors resulted in the identification of 6-[4-(2-methylbenzoyl)piperidin-1-yl]pyridazine-3-carboxylic acid (2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-3-yl-ethyl)amide (24) which showed strong inhibitory activity against both human and murine SCD-1. In addition, this compound exhibited good oral bioavailability and demonstrated plasma triglyceride lowering effects in Zucker fatty rats in a dose-dependent manner after a 7-day oral administration (qd).

  17. Ligand fitting with CCP4

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Crystal structures of protein–ligand complexes are often used to infer biology and inform structure-based drug discovery. Hence, it is important to build accurate, reliable models of ligands that give confidence in the interpretation of the respective protein–ligand complex. This paper discusses key stages in the ligand-fitting process, including ligand binding-site identification, ligand description and conformer generation, ligand fitting, refinement and subsequent validation. The CCP4 suite contains a number of software tools that facilitate this task: AceDRG for the creation of ligand descriptions and conformers, Lidia and JLigand for two-dimensional and three-dimensional ligand editing and visual analysis, Coot for density interpretation, ligand fitting, analysis and validation, and REFMAC5 for macromolecular refinement. In addition to recent advancements in automatic carbohydrate building in Coot (LO/Carb) and ligand-validation tools (FLEV), the release of the CCP4i2 GUI provides an integrated solution that streamlines the ligand-fitting workflow, seamlessly passing results from one program to the next. The ligand-fitting process is illustrated using instructive practical examples, including problematic cases such as post-translational modifications, highlighting the need for careful analysis and rigorous validation. PMID:28177312

  18. Ligand efficiency metrics considered harmful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; Montanari, Carlos A.

    2014-07-01

    Ligand efficiency metrics are used in drug discovery to normalize biological activity or affinity with respect to physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity and molecular size. This Perspective provides an overview of ligand efficiency metrics and summarizes thermodynamics of protein-ligand binding. Different classes of ligand efficiency metric are critically examined and the study concludes with suggestions for alternative ways to account for physicochemical properties when prioritizing and optimizing leads.

  19. Hydrolysis of the amide bond in histidine- and methionine-containing dipeptides promoted by pyrazine and pyridazine palladium(II)-aqua dimers: Comparative study with platinum(II) analogues.

    PubMed

    Živković, Marija D; Rajković, Snežana; Glišić, Biljana Đ; Drašković, Nenad S; Djuran, Miloš I

    2017-06-01

    Two dinuclear palladium(II) complexes, [{Pd(en)Cl}2(μ-pz)](NO3)2 and [{Pd(en)Cl}2(μ-pydz)](NO3)2, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental microanalysis and spectroscopic ((1)H and (13)C NMR, IR and UV-vis) techniques (en is ethylenediamine; pz is pyrazine and pydz is pyridazine). The square planar geometry of palladium(II) metal centers in these complexes has been predicted by DFT calculations. The chlorido complexes were converted into the corresponding aqua complexes, [{Pd(en)(H2O)}2(μ-pz)](4+) and [{Pd(en)(H2O)}2(μ-pydz)](4+), and their reactions with N-acetylated l-histidylglycine (Ac-l-His-Gly) and l-methionylglycine (Ac-l-Met-Gly) were studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The palladium(II)-aqua complexes and dipeptides were reacted in 1:1 M ratio, and all reactions performed in the pH range 2.0

  20. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  1. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  2. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  3. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  4. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands.

  5. Bifunctional DTPA-type ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1990-03-26

    The subject matter of the invention relates to bifunctional cyclohexyl DTPA ligands and methods of using these compounds. Specifically, such ligands are useful for radiolabeling proteins with radioactive metals, and can consequently be utilized with respect to radioimmunoimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy.

  6. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  7. Novel spiropiperidine-based stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 inhibitors: Identification of 1'-{6-[5-(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]pyridazin-3-yl}-5-(trifluoromethyl)-3,4-dihydrospiro[chromene-2,4'-piperidine].

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshikazu; Kiyotsuka, Yohei; Ueno, Yuko; Miyazawa, Yuriko; Kurata, Hitoshi; Ogata, Tsuneaki; Deguchi, Tsuneo; Yamada, Makiko; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Konishi, Masahiro; Kurikawa, Nobuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Wakimoto, Satoko; Kono, Keita; Ohsumi, Jun

    2010-01-15

    Cyclization of the benzoylpiperidine in lead compound 2 generated a series of novel and highly potent spiropiperidine-based stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1 inhibitors. Among them, 1'-{6-[5-(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]pyridazin-3-yl}-5-(trifluoromethyl)-3,4-dihydrospiro[chromene-2,4'-piperidine] (19) demonstrated the most powerful inhibitory activity against SCD-1, not only in vitro but also in vivo (C57BL/6J mice). With regard to the pharmacological evaluation, 19 showed powerful reduction of the desaturation index in the plasma of C57BL/6J mice on a non-fat diet after a 7-day oral administration (q.d.) without causing notable abnormalities in the eyes or skin up to the highest dose (3mg/kg) in our preliminary analysis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein ligand interaction database (PLID).

    PubMed

    Reddy, A Srinivas; Amarnath, H S Durga; Bapi, Raju S; Sastry, G Madhavi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2008-10-01

    A comprehensive database named, protein ligand interaction database (PLID), is created with 6295 ligands bound to proteins extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). This is by far the most comprehensive database of physico-chemical properties, quantum mechanical descriptors and the residues present in the active site of proteins. It is a publicly available web-based database (via the Internet) at http://203.199.182.73/gnsmmg/databases/plid/.

  9. Validity of ligand efficiency metrics.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher W; Erlanson, Daniel A; Hopkins, Andrew L; Keserü, György M; Leeson, Paul D; Rees, David C; Reynolds, Charles H; Richmond, Nicola J

    2014-06-12

    A recent viewpoint article (Improving the plausibility of success with inefficient metrics. ACS Med. Chem. Lett. 2014, 5, 2-5) argued that the standard definition of ligand efficiency (LE) is mathematically invalid. In this viewpoint, we address this criticism and show categorically that the definition of LE is mathematically valid. LE and other metrics such as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) can be useful during the multiparameter optimization challenge faced by medicinal chemists.

  10. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  11. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-06-27

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects, and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions, and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well-known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms.

  12. Studies on Pyridazine Azide Cyclisation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, R.D.; Greenwood, J.; Hambley, T.; Hanrahan, J.R.; Hibbs, D.E.; Itani, S.; Tran, H.; Turner, P.

    2010-11-16

    Reaction of sodium azide with 4-methyl-3,5,6-tribromopyridazine results in the formation of 3,5,6-triazide intermediate which could cyclise to give two possible bicyclic products while ab initio calculations show that the formation of a tricyclic compound is extremely energetically unfavourable. However, experimentally, only one major product is isolated. The structure of this unstable product has been conclusively established by X-ray crystallography as 3,5-diazido-4-methyl[1,5-b]tetrazolopyridazine confirming theoretical predictions.

  13. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardi, Demian M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Gu, Baohua; Parks, Jerry M; Summers, Anne; Miller, S; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  14. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  15. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  16. Allosteric Modulation of Related Ligand-Gated Ion Channels Synergistically Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus and Enhances Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhenglin; Yoshimura, Ryan F.; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Hogenkamp, Derk J.; Whittemore, Edward R.; Huang, Jin-Cheng; Tran, Minhtam B.; Belluzzi, James D.; Yakel, Jerrel L.; Gee, Kelvin W.

    2011-01-01

    α5 Subunit-containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and α7 neuronal nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that mediate cognitive and attentional processes in the hippocampus. α5 GABAARs alter network activity by tonic inhibition of CA1/CA3 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus. Postsynaptic α7 nAChRs in the hippocampus regulate inhibitory GABAergic interneuron activity required for synchronization of pyramidal neurons in the CA1, whereas presynaptic α7 nAChRs regulate glutamate release. Can simultaneous allosteric modulation of these LGICs produce synergistic effects on cognition? We show that combined transient application of two allosteric modulators that individually 1) inhibit α5 GABAARs and 2) enhance α7 nAChRs causes long-term potentiation (LTP) of mossy fiber stimulation-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSC) from CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. The LTP effect evoked by two compounds is replicated by 3-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-6-(N-ethylindol-5-yl)-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine (522-054), a compound we designed to simultaneously inhibit α5 GABAARs and enhance α7 nAChRs. Selective antagonists for either receptor block sustained EPSC potentiation produced by 522-054. In vivo, 522-054 enhances performance in the radial arm maze and facilitates attentional states in the five-choice serial reaction time trial with similar receptor antagonist sensitivity. These observations may translate into therapeutic utility of dual action compounds in diseases of hippocampal-based cognitive impairment. PMID:21159751

  17. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  18. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  19. Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, V B; Babayan, S Y; Tairyan, V I; Arakelyan, A V; Parsadanyan, M A; Vardevanyan, P O

    2006-02-01

    Ligand binding to nucleic acids (NA) is considered as a stationary Markov process. It is shown that the probabilistic description of ligand-NA binding allows one to describe not only the kinetics of the change of number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. The general analysis of absorption isotherms and kinetics of ligand binding to NA make it possible to determine of rate constants of ligand-NA complex formation and dissociation.

  20. Multicoordinate ligands for actinide/lanthanide separations.

    PubMed

    Dam, Henk H; Reinhoudt, David N; Verboom, Willem

    2007-02-01

    In nuclear waste treatment processes there is a need for improved ligands for the separation of actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)). Several research groups are involved in the design and synthesis of new An(III) ligands and in the confinement of these and existing An(III) ligands onto molecular platforms giving multicoordinate ligands. The preorganization of ligands considerably improves the An(III) extraction properties, which are largely dependent on the solubility and rigidity of the platform. This tutorial review summarizes the most important An(III) ligands with emphasis on the preorganization strategy using (macrocyclic) platforms.

  1. Ligand-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Srinivasarao, Madduri; Low, Philip S

    2017-09-12

    Safety and efficacy constitute the major criteria governing regulatory approval of any new drug. The best method to maximize safety and efficacy is to deliver a proven therapeutic agent with a targeting ligand that exhibits little affinity for healthy cells but high affinity for pathologic cells. The probability of regulatory approval can conceivably be further enhanced by exploiting the same targeting ligand, conjugated to an imaging agent, to select patients whose diseased tissues display sufficient targeted receptors for therapeutic efficacy. The focus of this Review is to summarize criteria that must be met during design of ligand-targeted drugs (LTDs) to achieve the required therapeutic potency with minimal toxicity. Because most LTDs are composed of a targeting ligand (e.g., organic molecule, aptamer, protein scaffold, or antibody), spacer, cleavable linker, and therapeutic warhead, criteria for successful design of each component will be described. Moreover, because obstacles to successful drug design can differ among human pathologies, limitations to drug delivery imposed by the unique characteristics of different diseases will be considered. With the explosion of genomic and transcriptomic data providing an ever-expanding selection of disease-specific targets, and with tools for high-throughput chemistry offering an escalating diversity of warheads, opportunities for innovating safe and effective LTDs has never been greater.

  2. An alternate binding site for PPARγ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis S.; Giri, Pankaj Kumar; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Marciano, David P.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Shin, Youseung; Blayo, Anne-Laure; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Burris, Thomas P.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    PPARγ is a target for insulin sensitizing drugs such as glitazones, which improve plasma glucose maintenance in patients with diabetes. Synthetic ligands have been designed to mimic endogenous ligand binding to a canonical ligand-binding pocket to hyperactivate PPARγ. Here we reveal that synthetic PPARγ ligands also bind to an alternate site, leading to unique receptor conformational changes that impact coregulator binding, transactivation and target gene expression. Using structure-function studies we show that alternate site binding occurs at pharmacologically relevant ligand concentrations, and is neither blocked by covalently bound synthetic antagonists nor by endogenous ligands indicating non-overlapping binding with the canonical pocket. Alternate site binding likely contributes to PPARγ hyperactivation in vivo, perhaps explaining why PPARγ full and partial or weak agonists display similar adverse effects. These findings expand our understanding of PPARγ activation by ligands and suggest that allosteric modulators could be designed to fine tune PPARγ activity without competing with endogenous ligands. PMID:24705063

  3. Glyconanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Ligand Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying surface-tethered carbohydrate ligands, have emerged and demonstrated increasing potential in biomedical imaging, therapeutics, and diagnostics. These materials combine the unique properties of nanometer-scale objects with the ability to present multiple copies of carbohydrate ligands, greatly enhancing the weak affinity of individual ligands to their binding partners. Critical to the performance of glyconanomaterials is the proper display of carbohydrate ligands, taking into consideration of the coupling chemistry, the type and length of the spacer linkage, and the ligand density. This article provides an overview of the coupling chemistry for attaching carbohydrate ligands to nanomaterials, and discusses the need for thorough characterization of glyconanomaterials, especially quantitative analyses of the ligand density and binding affinities. Using glyconanoparticles synthesized by a versatile photocoupling chemistry, methods for determining the ligand density by colorimetry and the binding affinity with lectins by a fluorescence competition assay are determined. The results show that the multivalent presentation of carbohydrate ligands significantly enhances the binding affinity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the free ligands in solution. The effect is sizeable even at low surface ligand density. The type and length of the spacer linkage also affect the binding affinity, with the longer linkage promoting the association of bound ligands with the corresponding lectins. PMID:20301131

  4. Glyconanomaterials: synthesis, characterization, and ligand presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-05-04

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying surface-tethered carbohydrate ligands, have emerged and demonstrated increasing potential in biomedical imaging, therapeutics, and diagnostics. These materials combine the unique properties of nanometer-scale objects with the ability to present multiple copies of carbohydrate ligands, greatly enhancing the weak affinity of individual ligands to their binding partners. Critical to the performance of glyconanomaterials is the proper display of carbohydrate ligands, taking into consideration of the coupling chemistry, the type and length of the spacer linkage, and the ligand density. This article provides an overview of the coupling chemistry for attaching carbohydrate ligands to nanomaterials, and discusses the need for thorough characterization of glyconanomaterials, especially quantitative analyses of the ligand density and binding affinities. Using glyconanoparticles synthesized by a versatile photocoupling chemistry, methods for determining the ligand density by colorimetry and the binding affinity with lectins by a fluorescence competition assay are determined. The results show that the multivalent presentation of carbohydrate ligands significantly enhances the binding affinity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the free ligands in solution. The effect is sizeable even at low surface ligand density. The type and length of the spacer linkage also affect the binding affinity, with the longer linkage promoting the association of bound ligands with the corresponding lectins.

  5. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications.

  6. Presentation of Ligands on Hydroxylapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Barbara C. F.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1997-01-01

    Conjugates of biotin with the decamer of glutamic acid (glu(sub 10)) and the trimer of D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (I) have been synthesized, and it has been shown that they mediate the binding of avidin to hydroxylapatite. In a similar way a conjugate of methotrexate with glu(sub 10) mediates the binding of dihydrofolate reductase to the mineral. The presentation of ligands on the hydroxylapatite component of bone may find applications in clinical medicine.

  7. Mg(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structures and determine the binding energies of Mg(+) to a series of ligands. Mg(+) bonds electrostatically with benzene, acetone, H2, CO, and NH3 and a self-consistent-field treatment gives a good description of the bonding. The bonding in MgCN(+) and MgCH3(+) is largely covalent and a correlated treatment is required.

  8. Bifunctional crosslinking ligands for transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Mangione, P. Patrizia; Deroo, Stéphanie; Ellmerich, Stephan; Bellotti, Vittorio; Kolstoe, Simon; Wood, Stephen P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Smith, Martin D.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Broadbridge, Robert J.; Council, Claire E.; Thurston, Joanne R.; Steadman, Victoria A.; Vong, Antonio K.; Swain, Christopher J.; Pepys, Mark B.; Taylor, Graham W.

    2015-01-01

    Wild-type and variant forms of transthyretin (TTR), a normal plasma protein, are amyloidogenic and can be deposited in the tissues as amyloid fibrils causing acquired and hereditary systemic TTR amyloidosis, a debilitating and usually fatal disease. Reduction in the abundance of amyloid fibril precursor proteins arrests amyloid deposition and halts disease progression in all forms of amyloidosis including TTR type. Our previous demonstration that circulating serum amyloid P component (SAP) is efficiently depleted by administration of a specific small molecule ligand compound, that non-covalently crosslinks pairs of SAP molecules, suggested that TTR may be also amenable to this approach. We first confirmed that chemically crosslinked human TTR is rapidly cleared from the circulation in mice. In order to crosslink pairs of TTR molecules, promote their accelerated clearance and thus therapeutically deplete plasma TTR, we prepared a range of bivalent specific ligands for the thyroxine binding sites of TTR. Non-covalently bound human TTR–ligand complexes were formed that were stable in vitro and in vivo, but they were not cleared from the plasma of mice in vivo more rapidly than native uncomplexed TTR. Therapeutic depletion of circulating TTR will require additional mechanisms. PMID:26400472

  9. Tumor Targeting via Integrin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad Ali; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Kessler, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side-effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability, and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor-specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug-delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells. PMID:24010121

  10. Tools for ligand validation in Coot

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Coot is a molecular-graphics program primarily aimed at model building using X-ray data. Recently, tools for the manipulation and representation of ligands have been introduced. Here, these new tools for ligand validation and comparison are described. Ligands in the wwPDB have been scored by density-fit, distortion and atom-clash metrics. The distributions of these scores can be used to assess the relative merits of the particular ligand in the protein–ligand complex of interest by means of ‘sliders’ akin to those now available for each accession code on the wwPDB websites. PMID:28291755

  11. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  12. Molecular recognition of agonist ligands by RXRs.

    PubMed

    Egea, Pascal F; Mitschler, André; Moras, Dino

    2002-05-01

    The nuclear receptor RXR is an obligate partner in many signal transduction pathways. We report the high-resolution structures of two complexes of the human RXRalpha ligand-binding domain specifically bound to two different and chemically unrelated agonist compounds: docosa hexaenoic acid, a natural derivative of eicosanoic acid, present in mammalian cells and recently identified as a potential endogenous RXR ligand in the mouse brain, and the synthetic ligand BMS 649. In both structures the RXR-ligand-binding domain forms homodimers and exhibits the active conformation previously observed with 9-cis-RA. Analysis of the differences in ligand-protein contacts (predominantly van der Waals forces) and binding cavity geometries and volumes for the several agonist-bound RXR structures clarifies the structural features important for ligand recognition. The L-shaped ligand-binding pocket adapts to the diverse ligands, especially at the level of residue N306, which might thus constitute a new target for drug-design. Despite its highest affinity 9-cis-RA displays the lowest number of ligand-protein contacts. These structural results support the idea that docosa hexaenoic acid and related fatty acids could be natural agonists of RXRs and question the real nature of the endogenous ligand(s) in mammalian cells.

  13. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of novel stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 inhibitors: 1'-{6-[5-(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]pyridazin-3-yl}-3,4-dihydrospiro[chromene-2,4'-piperidine] analogs.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshikazu; Ueno, Yuko; Kiyotsuka, Yohei; Miyazawa, Yuriko; Kurata, Hitoshi; Ogata, Tsuneaki; Yamada, Makiko; Deguchi, Tsuneo; Konishi, Masahiro; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Wakimoto, Satoko; Ohsumi, Jun

    2010-11-01

    In continuation of our investigation on novel stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) 1 inhibitors, we have already reported on the structural modification of the benzoylpiperidines that led to a series of novel and highly potent spiropiperidine-based SCD1 inhibitors. In this report, we would like to extend the scope of our previous investigation and disclose details of the synthesis, SAR, ADME, PK, and pharmacological evaluation of the spiropiperidines with high potency for SCD1 inhibition. Our current efforts have culminated in the identification of 5-fluoro-1'-{6-[5-(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]pyridazin-3-yl}-3,4-dihydrospiro[chromene-2,4'-piperidine] (10e), which demonstrated a very strong potency for liver SCD1 inhibition (ID(50)=0.6 mg/kg). This highly efficacious inhibition is presumed to be the result of a combination of strong enzymatic inhibitory activity (IC(50) (mouse)=2 nM) and good oral bioavailability (F >95%). Pharmacological evaluation of 10e has demonstrated potent, dose-dependent reduction of the plasma desaturation index in C57BL/6J mice on a high carbohydrate diet after a 7-day oral administration (q.d.). In addition, it did not cause any noticeable skin abnormalities up to the highest dose (10 mg/kg).

  15. Novel Ligands for a Purine Riboswitch Discovered by RNA-Ligand Docking

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Reyes, Francis E.; Robinson, David A.; Hammond, Colin M.; Lilley, David M.; Batey, Robert T.; Brenk, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Summary The increasing number of RNA crystal structures enables a structure-based approach to the discovery of new RNA-binding ligands. To develop the poorly explored area of RNA-ligand docking, we have conducted a virtual screening exercise for a purine riboswitch to probe the strengths and weaknesses of RNA-ligand docking. Using a standard protein-ligand docking program with only minor modifications, four new ligands with binding affinities in the micromolar range were identified, including two compounds based on molecular scaffolds not resembling known ligands. RNA-ligand docking performed comparably to protein-ligand docking indicating that this approach is a promising option to explore the wealth of RNA structures for structure-based ligand design. PMID:21439477

  16. Prediction of Protein Pairs Sharing Common Active Ligands Using Protein Sequence, Structure, and Ligand Similarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Tolbert, Robert; Aronov, Alex M; McGaughey, Georgia; Walters, W Patrick; Meireles, Lidio

    2016-09-26

    We benchmarked the ability of comparative computational approaches to correctly discriminate protein pairs sharing a common active ligand (positive protein pairs) from protein pairs with no common active ligands (negative protein pairs). Since the target and the off-targets of a drug share at least a common ligand, i.e., the drug itself, the prediction of positive protein pairs may help identify off-targets. We evaluated representative protein-centric and ligand-centric approaches, including (1) 2D and 3D ligand similarity, (2) several measures of protein sequence similarity in conjunction with different sequence sources (e.g., full protein sequence versus binding site residues), and (3) a newly described pocket shape similarity and alignment program called SiteHopper. While the sequence-based alignment of pocket residues achieved the best overall performance, SiteHopper outperformed sequence-based approaches for unrelated proteins with only 20-30% pocket residue identity. Analogously, among ligand-centric approaches, path-based fingerprints achieved the best overall performance, but ROCS-based ligand shape similarity outperformed path-based fingerprints for structurally dissimilar ligands (Tanimoto 25%-40%). A significant drop in recognition performance was observed for ligand-centric approaches when PDB ligands were used instead of ChEMBL ligands. Finally, we analyzed the relationship between pocket shape and ligand shape in our data set and found that similar ligands tend to bind to similar pockets while similar pockets may accept a range of different-shaped ligands.

  17. Canonical and non-canonical Notch ligands

    PubMed Central

    D’SOUZA, BRENDAN; MELOTY-KAPELLA, LAURENCE; WEINMASTER, GERRY

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling induced by canonical Notch ligands is critical for normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis through the regulation of a variety of cell fate decisions and cellular processes. Activation of Notch signaling is normally tightly controlled by direct interactions with ligand-expressing cells and dysregulated Notch signaling is associated with developmental abnormalities and cancer. While canonical Notch ligands are responsible for the majority of Notch signaling, a diverse group of structurally unrelated non-canonical ligands has also been identified that activate Notch and likely contribute to the pleiotropic effects of Notch signaling. Soluble forms of both canonical and non-canonical ligands have been isolated, some of which block Notch signaling and could serve as natural inhibitors of this pathway. Ligand activity can also be indirectly regulated by other signaling pathways at the level of ligand expression, serving to spatio-temporally compartmentalize Notch signaling activity and integrate Notch signaling into a molecular network that orchestrates developmental events. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the dual role of Notch ligands as activators and inhibitors of Notch signaling. Additionally, evidence that Notch ligands function independent of Notch are presented. We also discuss how ligand post-translational modification, endocytosis, proteolysis and spatio-temporal expression regulate their signaling activity. PMID:20816393

  18. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W. Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR

  19. A universal rule for organic ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    You, Hongjun; Wang, Wenjin; Yang, Shengchun

    2014-11-12

    Most synthetic routes to high-quality nanocrystals with tunable morphologies predominantly employ long hydro-carbon molecules as ligands, which are detrimental for electronic and catalytic applications. Here, a rule is found that the adsorption energy of an organic ligand is related to its carbon-chain length. Using the density functional theory method, the adsorption energies of some commonly used ligand molecules with different carbon-chain lengths are calculated, including carboxylate, hydroxyl, and amine molecules adsorbed on metal or metal oxide crystal surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of the ligand molecule with a long carbon chain is weaker than that of a smaller molecule with same functional group. This rule provides a theoretical support for a new kind of ligand exchange method in which large organic ligand molecules can be exchanged by small molecules with same functional group to improve the catalytic properties.

  20. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    PubMed

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  1. CB receptor ligands from plants.

    PubMed

    Woelkart, Karin; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology and pharmacology of the endogenous cannabinoid system have potentiated the interest of cannabinoid receptors as potential therapeutic targets. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate a variety of immune cell functions and have therapeutic implications on central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may be therapeutically useful in treating autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Many of these drug effects occur through cannabinoid receptor signalling mechanisms and the modulation of cytokines and other gene products. Further, endocannabinoids have been found to have many physiological and patho-physiological functions, including mood alteration and analgesia, control of energy balance, gut motility, motor and co-ordination activities, as well as alleviation of neurological, psychiatric and eating disorders. Plants offer a wide range of chemical diversity and have been a growing domain in the search for effective cannabinoid ligands. Cannabis sativa L. with the known plant cannabinoid, Delta(9-)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Echinacea species with the cannabinoid (CB) receptor-binding lipophilic alkamides are the best known herbal cannabimimetics. This review focuses on the state of the art in CB ligands from plants, as well their possible therapeutic and immunomodulatory effects.

  2. Measurement of protein-ligand complex formation.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Peter N; Vaughan, Cara K; Daviter, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Experimental approaches to detect, measure, and quantify protein-ligand binding, along with their theoretical bases, are described. A range of methods for detection of protein-ligand interactions is summarized. Specific protocols are provided for a nonequilibrium procedure pull-down assay, for an equilibrium direct binding method and its modification into a competition-based measurement and for steady-state measurements based on the effects of ligands on enzyme catalysis.

  3. Asymmetric catalysis with chiral ferrocene ligands.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Xin; Tu, Tao; You, Shu-Li; Deng, Wei-Ping; Hou, Xue-Long

    2003-09-01

    Chiral ferrocene ligands have been widely used in asymmetric catalysis. The advantages of using ferrocene as a scaffold for chiral ligands are described, particularly those regarding planar chirality, rigid bulkiness, and ease of derivatization. The role of planar chirality in 1,2- and 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene systems is discussed. By using a bulky ferrocene fragment, novel ferrocene ligands were designed, and high enantioselectivity and regioselectivity were achieved in the allylic substitution reaction of monosubstituted allyl substrates. Using the tunable electronic properties of a diphosphine-oxazoline ferrocenyl ligand, the regioselectivity of the intermolecular asymmetric Heck reaction was also examined.

  4. Integrated ligand based pharmacophore model derived from diverse FAAH covalent ligand classes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lingling; Huang, Hongwei; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Fisher, Luke S

    2012-12-01

    3D pharmacophore modeling is an important computational methodology for ligand-enzyme binding interactions in drug discovery. More specifically, a consensus pharmacophore model derived from diverse ligands is a key determinant upon which the prediction power of computational models is based for designing novel ligands. In this work, by merging the important pharmacophore features based on four classes of covalent FAAH ligands, and then integrating the exclusion volume spheres derived from the crystal structure, we created for the first time an integrated FAAH pharmacophore model to describe the ligand-enzyme binding interactions. This new integrated FAAH pharmacophore model can correctly predict the covalent ligand binding mode, which correlates with the SAR data. The study is expected to provide insights into novel covalent ligand-FAAH binding interactions, and facilitate the design of covalent ligands against FAAH.

  5. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    sub 10nM range efficacy. Our primary objective was to establish a series of compounds blocking the AR ligand-dependent and ligand-independent gene ...of AR driven genes to be more comprehensive and more in line with what is currently known about AR-driven signaling in prostate cancer. We have...developed a robust panel of genes for AR signaling that is reflective of the clinical findings in both ligand dependent and ligand-independent androgen

  6. Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, William Hunt; Jia, Dongyu; Deng, Wu-Min

    2014-01-01

    The Notch pathway is integrated into numerous developmental processes and therefore is fine-tuned on many levels, including receptor production, endocytosis, and degradation. Notch is further characterized by a twofold relationship with its Delta-Serrate (DSL) ligands, as ligands from opposing cells (trans-ligands) activate Notch, whereas ligands expressed in the same cell (cis-ligands) inhibit signaling. We show that cells without both cis- and trans-ligands can mediate Notch-dependent developmental events during Drosophila oogenesis, indicating ligand-independent Notch activity occurs when the receptor is free of cis- and trans-ligands. Furthermore, cis-ligands can reduce Notch activity in endogenous and genetically induced situations of elevated trans-ligand-independent Notch signaling. We conclude that cis-expressed ligands exert their repressive effect on Notch signaling in cases of trans-ligand-independent activation, and propose a new function of cis-inhibition which buffers cells against accidental Notch activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04415.001 PMID:25486593

  7. Natural ligands of hamster aphrodisin.

    PubMed

    Briand, Loïc; Blon, Florence; Trotier, Didier; Pernollet, Jean-Claude

    2004-06-01

    The chemical nature of vertebrate pheromones remains largely to be deciphered. Hamster aphrodisin is a rare instance of mammal proteinaceous sexual pheromone. This protein, found in vaginal secretions, facilitates the mounting behaviour of males via activation of a specialized sensory structure named the vomeronasal organ, which activates the accessory olfactory bulb. Since it might carry small pheromonal ligands due to its lipocalin structure, we analysed organic extracts from natural aphrodisin. We identified five predominant compounds specifically bound onto natural aphrodisin as 1-hexadecanol (44.7%), 1-octadecanol (19.5%), Z-9-octadecen-1-ol (18.2%), E-9-octadecen-1-ol (15.4%) and hexadecanoic acid (2.2%). Interestingly, these compounds are also described as part of insect pheromone blends, disclosing the continuing story of amazing coincidences of chemical communication shared by mammals and insects.

  8. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  9. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    PubMed Central

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR leverages prior knowledge from earlier structures to facilitate ligand placement in the current structure. PMID:24419386

  10. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  11. Flexible ligand docking using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, C. M.; Kuntz, I. D.; Dixon, J. Scott

    1995-04-01

    Two computational techniques have been developed to explore the orientational and conformational space of a flexible ligand within an enzyme. Both methods use the Genetic Algorithm (GA) to generate conformationally flexible ligands in conjunction with algorithms from the DOCK suite of programs to characterize the receptor site. The methods are applied to three enzyme-ligand complexes: dihydrofolate reductase-methotrexate, thymidylate synthase-phenolpthalein and HIV protease-thioketal haloperidol. Conformations and orientations close to the crystallographically determined structures are obtained, as well as alternative structures with low energy. The potential for the GA method to screen a database of compounds is also examined. A collection of ligands is evaluated simultaneously, rather than docking the ligands individually into the enzyme.

  12. Asymmetric catalysis based on tropos ligands.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Kohsuke; Mikami, Koichi

    2012-11-21

    All enantiopure atropisomeric (atropos) ligands essentially require enantiomeric resolution or synthetic transformation from a chiral pool. In sharp contrast, the use of tropos (chirally flexible) ligands, which are highly modular, versatile, and easy to synthesize without enantiomeric resolution, has recently been the topic of much interest in asymmetric catalysis. Racemic catalysts bearing tropos ligands can be applied to asymmetric catalysis through enantiomeric discrimination by the addition of a chiral source, which preferentially transforms one catalyst enantiomer into a highly activated catalyst enantiomer. Additionally, racemic catalysts bearing tropos ligands can also be utilized as atropos enantiopure catalysts obtained via the control of chirality by a chiral source followed by the memory of chirality. In this feature article, our results on the asymmetric catalysis via the combination of various central metals and tropos ligands are summarized.

  13. Qualification of a free ligand assay in the presence of anti-ligand antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan J; Brown, Robin M; Lu, Jirong; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and characterize an ELISA to measure free ligand concentrations in rat serum in the presence of a Fab to the same ligand. A variety of experiments were conducted to understand optimal assay conditions and to verify that only free ligand was detected. The parameters explored included sample incubation time on plate, the initial concentrations of Fab and ligand, and the pre-incubation time required for the Fab-ligand complex concentrations to reach equilibrium. We found the optimal experimental conditions to include a 10-minute on-plate incubation of ligand-containing samples, with a 24-hour pre-incubation time for test samples of Fab and ligand to reach equilibrium. An alternative approach, involving removal of Fab-ligand complexes from the solution prior to measuring concentrations of the ligand, was also used to verify that the assay only measured free ligand. Rats were dosed subcutaneously with Fab and the assay was used to demonstrate dose-dependent suppression of endogenous free ligand levels in vivo.

  14. The ligand binding domain controls glucocorticoid receptor dynamics independent of ligand release.

    PubMed

    Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Elbi, Cem; Luecke, Hans F; Hager, Gordon L; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2007-04-01

    Ligand binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) results in receptor binding to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) and the formation of transcriptional regulatory complexes. Equally important, these complexes are continuously disassembled, with active processes driving GR off GREs. We found that co-chaperone p23-dependent disruption of GR-driven transcription depended on the ligand binding domain (LBD). Next, we examined the importance of the LBD and of ligand dissociation in GR-GRE dissociation in living cells. We showed in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies that dissociation of GR from GREs is faster in the absence of the LBD. Furthermore, GR interaction with a target promoter revealed ligand-specific exchange rates. However, using covalently binding ligands, we demonstrated that ligand dissociation is not required for receptor dissociation from GREs. Overall, these studies showed that activities impinging on the LBD regulate GR exchange with GREs but that the dissociation of GR from GREs is independent from ligand dissociation.

  15. Protein-ligand-based pharmacophores: generation and utility assessment in computational ligand profiling.

    PubMed

    Meslamani, Jamel; Li, Jiabo; Sutter, Jon; Stevens, Adrian; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Rognan, Didier

    2012-04-23

    Ligand profiling is an emerging computational method for predicting the most likely targets of a bioactive compound and therefore anticipating adverse reactions, side effects and drug repurposing. A few encouraging successes have already been reported using ligand 2-D similarity searches and protein-ligand docking. The current study describes the use of receptor-ligand-derived pharmacophore searches as a tool to link ligands to putative targets. A database of 68,056 pharmacophores was first derived from 8,166 high-resolution protein-ligand complexes. In order to limit the number of queries, a maximum of 10 pharmacophores was generated for each complex according to their predicted selectivity. Pharmacophore search was compared to ligand-centric (2-D and 3-D similarity searches) and docking methods in profiling a set of 157 diverse ligands against a panel of 2,556 unique targets of known X-ray structure. As expected, ligand-based methods outperformed, in most of the cases, structure-based approaches in ranking the true targets among the top 1% scoring entries. However, we could identify ligands for which only a single method was successful. Receptor-ligand-based pharmacophore search is notably a fast and reliable alternative to docking when few ligand information is available for some targets. Overall, the present study suggests that a workflow using the best profiling method according to the protein-ligand context is the best strategy to follow. We notably present concrete guidelines for selecting the optimal computational method according to simple ligand and binding site properties.

  16. Distribution of unselectively bound ligands along DNA.

    PubMed

    Lando, Dmitri Y; Nechipurenko, Yury D

    2008-10-01

    Unselective and reversible adsorption of ligands on DNA for a model of binding proposed by Zasedatelev, Gursky, and Volkenshtein is considered. In this model, the interaction between neighboring ligands located at the distance of i binding centers is characterized by the statistical weight ai. Each ligand covers L binding centers. For this model, expressions for binding averages are represented in a new simple form. This representation is convenient for the calculation of the fraction of inter-ligand distances of i binding centers fd(i) and the fraction of binding centers included in the distances of i binding centers fbc(i) for various types of interaction between bound ligands. It is shown that, for non-cooperative binding, contact cooperativity and long-range cooperativity, the fraction of the zero inter-ligand distance fd(0) is maximal at any relative concentration of bound ligands (r). Calculations demonstrate that, at low r, fd(0) approximately r.ao, and fd(i) approximately r at 1ligand interaction (ao not equal to 1, ai=1 for i not equal 0). The function fd(i) decreases in this i interval, but the decrease is very slow. If i>1/r-L, then fd(i) rapidly decreases with i at any r for all types of inter-ligand interaction. At high ligand concentration (r is close to rmax=L(-1)), fd(0) is close to unity and fd(i) rapidly decreases with i for any type of inter-ligand interaction. For strong contact cooperativity, fd(0) is close to unity in a much lager r interval ((0.5-1).rmax), and fd(1) approximately ao(-1) at r approximately 0.5.rmax. In the case of long-range interaction between bound ligands, the dependence fd(i) is more complex and has a maximum at i approximately (1/r-L)1/2 for anti-cooperative binding. fbc(i) is maximal at i approximately 1/r-L for all types of binding except the contact cooperativity. A strong asymmetry in the influence of contact cooperativity and

  17. Ligand binding domain of vitamin D receptors.

    PubMed

    Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino

    2006-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor subgroup NR1I, is regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 to control calcium metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation and immunomodulation. The therapeutic applications of vitamin D metabolites are wide. To develop efficient therapy, the elucidation of the structure-function relationships of VDR and its ligands are essential. In this review we will focus on the current structural understanding of the interactions of ligands in the ligand binding pocket of the VDR. These structures revealed the mutual adaptability of the ligands and the protein. In silico modeling has further revealed a possible new pocket in the VDR LBD responsible of the non-genomic action mediated by VDR. With the availability of all these structural information on VDR LBD, new ligands that are more selective, such as non-steroidal ligands, could be designed by taking into account the flexibility of some VDR regions. Tissue selectivity may also be achieved by developing ligands that specifically activate the non-genomic pathway.

  18. Chemistry of Marine Ligands and Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vraspir, Julia M.; Butler, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are presented with unique challenges to obtain essential metal ions required to survive and thrive in the ocean. The production of organic ligands to complex transition metal ions is one strategy to both facilitate uptake of specific metals, such as iron, and to mitigate the potential toxic effects of other metal ions, such as copper. A number of important trace metal ions are complexed by organic ligands in seawater, including iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and cadmium, thus defining the speciation of these metal ions in the ocean. In the case of iron, siderophores have been identified and structurally characterized. Siderophores are low molecular weight iron-binding ligands produced by marine bacteria. Although progress has been made toward the identity of in situ iron-binding ligands, few compounds have been identified that coordinate the other trace metals. Deciphering the chemical structures and production stimuli of naturally produced organic ligands and the organisms they come from is fundamental to understanding metal speciation and bioavailability. The current evidence for marine ligands, with an emphasis on siderophores, and discussion of the importance and implications of metal-binding ligands in controlling metal speciation and cycling within the world's oceans are presented.

  19. Energy transfer ligands of the GluR2 ligand binding core.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Amy F; Strub, Marie-Paule; Lee, Jennifer C

    2010-03-09

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory signaling in the central nervous system. When a ligand binds to the extracellular domain of iGluRs, local conformational changes ensue and this motion is translated to the transmembrane domain, inducing channel opening. We have used an isolated ligand binding domain, GluR2-S1S2J (GluR2), as a model system to study the protein-ligand complex by steady-state and time-resolved intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements. Specifically, we determined that the widely used and structurally characterized antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), acts as an efficient fluorescence energy transfer (FET) acceptor for Trp. Consistent with crystallographic data, our results indicate that the four native tryptophans are within Forster's radius (R(o) approximately 33 A) of the bound ligand. Additionally, we demonstrate the broader value of this technique by identifying an original FET ligand, 3-nitrotyrosine (3NY), for GluR2 (R(o) approximately 24 A; apparent dissociation constant K(d) approximately 170 microM). Estimated average donor-acceptor (Trp-ligand) distances extracted from tryptophan excited-state decays are similar for both ligands (approximately 24 A), suggesting that 3NY binds in the structurally characterized ligand binding cleft. Moreover, an alternative competition assay utilizing Trp --> DNQX quenching for detection of ligand binding in GluR2 is described.

  20. Energy Transfer Ligands of the GluR2 Ligand Binding Core†

    PubMed Central

    Petrik, Amy F.; Strub, Marie-Paule; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory signaling in the central nervous system. Upon ligand binding to the extracellular domain of iGluRs local conformational changes ensue and this motion is translated to the transmembrane domain inducing channel opening. We have used an isolated ligand binding domain, GluR2-S1S2J (GluR2), as a model system to study the protein-ligand complex by steady-state and time-resolved intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements. Specifically, we determined that the widely used and structurally characterized antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) acts as an efficient fluorescence energy transfer (FET) acceptor for Trp. Consistent with crystallographic data, our results indicate that the four native tryptophans are within Förster's radius (Ro ∼ 33 Å) of the bound ligand. Additionally, we demonstrate the broader value of this technique by identifying an original FET ligand, 3-nitrotyrosine (3NY) for GluR2 (Ro ∼ 24 Å, apparent dissociation constant, Kd ∼ 170 μM). Estimated average donor-acceptor (Trp-to-ligand) distances extracted from tryptophan excited-state decays are similar for both ligands (∼24 Å) suggesting that 3NY binds in the structurally characterized ligand-binding cleft. Moreover, an alternative competition assay utilizing Trp→DNQX quenching for detection of ligand binding in GluR2 is described. PMID:20155979

  1. ProPose: steered virtual screening by simultaneous protein-ligand docking and ligand-ligand alignment.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Markus H J

    2005-01-01

    The 'model-free' screening engine ProPose implements a general method for performing simultaneous protein-ligand docking, ligand-ligand alignment, pharmacophore queries-and combinations thereof-in order to incorporate a priori information into screening protocols. In this manuscript we describe a case study on herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, an important antiviral drug target, where we evaluate different approaches for handling a specific type of a priori information, i.e., multiple target structures. We demonstrate that a simultaneous alignment on two target structures--in conjunction with logic operations on interactions and docking constraints derived from protein structure--is an effective means of (i) improving the enrichment of chemical substructures that are compatible with the a priori known ligands, (ii) ensuring the steric fit into the target protein, and (iii) handling target flexibility. The combination of ligand- and receptor-based methods steers the virtual screening by ranking molecules according to the similarity of their interaction pattern with known ligands, thereby--to some extent--outweighing the deficiencies of simple scoring functions often used in initial virtual screening.

  2. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F; Shin, Antony I; Webster, Lauren A; Simeons, Frederick R C; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G; Constam, Daniel B; Bickerton, G Richard; Read, Kevin D; Wetsel, William C; Gilbert, Ian H; Roth, Bryan L; Hopkins, Andrew L

    2012-12-13

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across many proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to design drugs rationally a priori against profiles of several proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. Here we describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain-penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein-coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed to be correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads when multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology.

  3. Ligand accumulation in autocrine cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Monine, Michael I; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Joslin, Elizabeth J; Wiley, H Steven; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2005-04-01

    Cell-culture assays are routinely used to analyze autocrine signaling systems, but quantitative experiments are rarely possible. To enable the quantitative design and analysis of experiments with autocrine cells, we develop a biophysical theory of ligand accumulation in cell-culture assays. Our theory predicts the ligand concentration as a function of time and measurable parameters of autocrine cells and cell-culture experiments. The key step of our analysis is the derivation of the survival probability of a single ligand released from the surface of an autocrine cell. An expression for this probability is derived using the boundary homogenization approach and tested by stochastic simulations. We use this expression in the integral balance equations, from which we find the Laplace transform of the ligand concentration. We demonstrate how the theory works by analyzing the autocrine epidermal growth factor receptor system and discuss the extension of our methods to other experiments with cultured autocrine cells.

  4. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  5. GW-501516 GlaxoSmithKline/Ligand.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    GlaxoSmithKline and Ligand are developing GW-501516, a peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor-delta agonist for the potential treatment of dyslipidemia. Phase II clinical trials of this compound are ongoing.

  6. Ligand inducible assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-28

    Here we show that a small synthetic ligand can be used as a key building component for DNA nanofabrication. Using naphthyridinecarbamate dimer (NCD) as a molecular glue for DNA hybridization, we demonstrate NCD-triggered formation of a DNA tetrahedron.

  7. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F.; Shin, Antony I.; Webster, Lauren A.; Simeons, Frederick R.C.; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G.; Constam, Daniel B.; Bickerton, G. Richard; Read, Kevin D.; Wetsel, William C.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Roth, Bryan L.; Hopkins, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across multiple proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to rationally design drugs a priori against profiles of multiple proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. We describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads where multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology. PMID:23235874

  8. Ligand engineering of nanoparticle solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Marton

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NP) are promising materials to build cheap and efficient solar cells. One of the key challenges in their utilization for solar energy conversion is the control of NP surfaces and ligand-NP interfaces. Recent experiments have shown that by carefully choosing the ligands terminating the NPs, one can tailor electronic and optical absorption properties of NP assemblies, along with their transport properties. By using density functional theory based methods, we investigated how the opto-electronic properties of lead chalcogenide NPs may be tuned by using diverse organic and inorganic ligands. We interpreted experiments, and we showed that an essential prerequisite to avoid detrimental trap states is to ensure charge balance at the ligand-NP interface, possibly with the help of hydrogen treatment Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. Advanced Organic Ligands for Protecting Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jonathan Ka-Wing

    Organic monolayer protected metal nanoparticles have been utilized in many different fields such as catalysis, drug delivery, and sensor chemistry. However, these nanomaterials are prone to increase in size consequently losing its function at the nanoscale. The stability these nanoparticles have been a great interest of research. This thesis focuses on the synthesis of a novel cross-linkable ligand for the protection of metal nanoparticles. Chapter 1 reviews key concepts of nanoparticles, its usefulness in applications, some of the stabilizing strategies employed, and the scope of the thesis project. Chapter 2 describes the synthetic attempts and optimization of the novel cross-linkable ligand. In addition, its characterization data is also included. Section 2.8 also highlights another fully synthesized novel hydrophobic ligand. Chapter 3 contains the summary of the work and closing remarks. Future works is also included to describe the prospects of the synthesis of the novel ligand. Chapter 4 entails the experimental data and supplementary information.

  10. SnapShot: GPCR-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Eshan; Nidhi, Kumari; Shukla, Arun K

    2014-12-18

    G-protein-coupled receptors enable cells to recognize numerous external stimuli and to transmit corresponding signals across the plasma membrane to trigger appropriate cellular responses. Crystal structures of a number of these receptors have now been determined in inactive and active conformations bound to chemically and functionally distinct ligands. These crystal structures illustrate overall receptor organization and atomic details of ligand-receptor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  12. New bifunctional ligands for radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brechbiel, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The bifunctional EDTA ligand and two bifunctional DTPA ligands were synthesized by direct aminolysis of an amino acid ester followed by reduction, alkylation, and functional group modification to introduced bifunctionality. The reactive substituent chosen for protein conjugation was the isothiocyanate group. The generality of this approach was demonstrated with 9 different amino acids to produce the respective substituted diethylenetriamines. The remaining three bifunctional DTPA ligands were synthesized via classical peptide methodology producing a dipeptide amide which, after deprotection, was reduced to the triamine and alkylated to produce the ligand. Biodistribution studies of the ligands conjugated to monoclonal antibody B72.3 and labelled with In-111 revealed that superior retention of In-111 was attained and the dose to the liver was minimized when a full intact octadentate bifunctional DTPA chelate was used, e.g. DTPA > EDTA > DTTA (diethylenetritetraacetic acid from use of DTPA dianhydride (CA-DTPA)). The best scintigraphic images were obtained after 72 hours when a DTPA ligand was used to complex the In-111. Biodistribution studies using Yttrium-88 revealed that the disubstituted bifunctional DTPA was necessary to minimize the bone dose from the Yttrium while maintaining a high dose to the tumor.

  13. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  14. Interrupting autocrine ligand-receptor binding: comparison between receptor blockers and ligand decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of cell behavioral functions by ligand/receptor binding can be accomplished in autocrine fashion, where cells secrete ligand capable of binding to receptors on their own surfaces. This proximal secretion of autocrine ligands near the surface receptors on the secreting cell suggests that control of these systems by inhibitors of receptor/ligand binding may be more difficult than for systems involving exogenous ligands. Hence, it is of interest to predict the conditions under which successful inhibition of cell receptor binding by the autocrine ligand can be expected. Previous theoretical work using a compartmentalized model for autocrine cells has elucidated the conditions under which addition of solution decoys for the autocrine ligand can interrupt cell receptor/ligand binding via competitive binding of the secreted molecules (Forsten, K. E., and D. A. Lauffenburger. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1-12.) We now apply a similar modeling approach to examine the addition of solution blockers targeted against the cell receptor. Comparison of the two alternative inhibition strategies reveals that a significantly lower concentration of receptor blockers, compared to ligand decoys, will obtain a high degree of inhibition. The more direct interruption scheme characteristic of the receptor blockers may make them a preferred strategy when feasible. PMID:1330038

  15. Fully Flexible Docking of Medium Sized Ligand Libraries with RosettaLigand

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, Samuel; Khar, Karen; Meiler, Jens

    2015-01-01

    RosettaLigand has been successfully used to predict binding poses in protein-small molecule complexes. However, the RosettaLigand docking protocol is comparatively slow in identifying an initial starting pose for the small molecule (ligand) making it unfeasible for use in virtual High Throughput Screening (vHTS). To overcome this limitation, we developed a new sampling approach for placing the ligand in the protein binding site during the initial ‘low-resolution’ docking step. It combines the translational and rotational adjustments to the ligand pose in a single transformation step. The new algorithm is both more accurate and more time-efficient. The docking success rate is improved by 10–15% in a benchmark set of 43 protein/ligand complexes, reducing the number of models that typically need to be generated from 1000 to 150. The average time to generate a model is reduced from 50 seconds to 10 seconds. As a result we observe an effective 30-fold speed increase, making RosettaLigand appropriate for docking medium sized ligand libraries. We demonstrate that this improved initial placement of the ligand is critical for successful prediction of an accurate binding position in the ‘high-resolution’ full atom refinement step. PMID:26207742

  16. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  17. Exploiting ligand-protein conjugates to monitor ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hirohito; Gonzalez, Monica Rengifo; Johnsson, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three assays for analyzing ligand-receptor interactions based on the specific conjugation of ligands to SNAP-tag fusion proteins. Conjugation of ligands to different SNAP-tag fusions permits the validation of suspected interactions in cell extracts and fixed cells as well as the establishment of high-throughput assays. The different assays allow the analysis of strong and weak interactions. Conversion of ligands into SNAP-tag substrates thus provides access to a powerful toolbox for the analysis of their interactions with proteins.

  18. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  19. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  20. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  1. Posttranslational regulation of Fas ligand function

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Matthias; Lettau, Marcus; Paulsen, Maren; Janssen, Ottmar

    2008-01-01

    The TNF superfamily member Fas ligand acts as a prototypic death factor. Due to its ability to induce apoptosis in Fas (APO-1, CD95) expressing cells, Fas ligand participates in essential effector functions of the immune system. It is involved in natural killer cell- and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, the establishment of immune privilege, and in termination of immune responses by induction of activation-induced cell death. In addition, Fas ligand-positive tumours may evade immune surveillance by killing Fas-positive tumour-infiltrating cells. Given these strong cytotoxic capabilities of Fas ligand, it is obvious that its function has to be strictly regulated to avoid uncontrolled damage. In hematopoietic cells, the death factor is stored in secretory lysosomes and is mobilised to the immunological synapse only upon activation. The selective sorting to and the release from this specific lysosomal compartment requires interactions of the Fas ligand cytosolic moiety, which mediates binding to various adapter proteins involved in trafficking and cytoskeletal reorganisation. In addition, Fas ligand surface expression is further regulated by posttranslational ectodomain shedding and subsequent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, releasing a soluble ectodomain cytokine into the extracellular space and an N-terminal fragment with a potential role in intracellular signalling processes. Moreover, other posttranslational modifications of the cytosolic domain, including phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, have been described to affect various aspects of Fas ligand biology. Since FasL is regarded as a potential target for immunotherapy, the further characterisation of its biological regulation and function will be of great importance for the development and evaluation of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:19114018

  2. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking: orchestrated dancing of ligands in binding sites of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Huameng; Li, Chenglong

    2010-07-30

    Present docking methodologies simulate only one single ligand at a time during docking process. In reality, the molecular recognition process always involves multiple molecular species. Typical protein-ligand interactions are, for example, substrate and cofactor in catalytic cycle; metal ion coordination together with ligand(s); and ligand binding with water molecules. To simulate the real molecular binding processes, we propose a novel multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD) strategy, which can deal with all the above processes, vastly improving docking sampling and binding free energy scoring. The work also compares two search strategies: Lamarckian genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization, which have respective advantages depending on the specific systems. The methodology proves robust through systematic testing against several diverse model systems: E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) complex with two substrates, SHP2NSH2 complex with two peptides and Bcl-xL complex with ABT-737 fragments. In all cases, the final correct docking poses and relative binding free energies were obtained. In PNP case, the simulations also capture the binding intermediates and reveal the binding dynamics during the recognition processes, which are consistent with the proposed enzymatic mechanism. In the other two cases, conventional single-ligand docking fails due to energetic and dynamic coupling among ligands, whereas MLSD results in the correct binding modes. These three cases also represent potential applications in the areas of exploring enzymatic mechanism, interpreting noisy X-ray crystallographic maps, and aiding fragment-based drug design, respectively.

  3. Expansion of the Ligand Knowledge Base for Chelating P,P-Donor Ligands (LKB-PP)†

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have expanded the ligand knowledge base for bidentate P,P- and P,N-donor ligands (LKB-PP, Organometallics2008, 27, 1372–1383) by 208 ligands and introduced an additional steric descriptor (nHe8). This expanded knowledge base now captures information on 334 bidentate ligands and has been processed with principal component analysis (PCA) of the descriptors to produce a detailed map of bidentate ligand space, which better captures ligand variation and has been used for the analysis of ligand properties. PMID:24882917

  4. Surface Ligand Mediated Plasmon Driven Photochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Bijesh; Poveda, Marisa; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-02-07

    Contrary to the general expectation that surface ligands reduce the reactivity of surfaces by blocking the active sites, we present experimental evidence that surface ligands can in fact increase reactivity and induce important reaction pathways in plasmon-driven surface photochemistry. The remarkable effect of surface ligands is demonstrated by comparing the photochemistry of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) on resonant plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) in the presence of citrate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and no surface ligands under visible light irradiation. The use of AuNRs with citrate and no surface ligand results in the usual azo-coupling reaction. In contrast, CTAB coated AuNRs oxidize PATP primarily to p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP). Strong correlation has been observed between the N-O and Au-Br vibration band intensities, suggesting that CTAB influences the reaction pathway through the Br- counterions that can minimize electron-hole recombination rate by reacting with hole, and hence increasing the concentration of hot electrons that drive the oxidation reaction.

  5. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Carly S.; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S.; Villagomez, Rosa A.; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:25422593

  7. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Casey W; Jacob, Reed B; McDougal, Owen M; Hampikian, Greg; Andersen, Tim

    2010-11-08

    The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management.

  8. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. Results DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. Conclusions DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management. PMID:21059259

  9. Design of a Hole Trapping Ligand

    DOE PAGES

    La Croix, Andrew D.; O’Hara, Andrew; Reid, Kemar R.; ...

    2017-01-18

    A new ligand that covalently attaches to the surface of colloidal CdSe/ CdS nanorods and can simultaneously chelate a molecular metal center is described. The dithiocarbamate$-$bipyridine ligand system facilitates hole transfer through energetic overlap at the inorganic$-$organic interface and conjugation through the organic ligand to a chelated metal center. Density functional theory calculations show that the coordination of the free ligand to a CdS surface causes the formation of two hybridized molecular states that lie in the band gap of CdS. The further chelation of Fe(II) to the bipyridine moiety causes the presence of seven midgap states. Hole transfer frommore » the CdS valence band to the midgap states is dipole allowed and occurs at a faster rate than what is experimentally known for the CdSe/CdS band-edge radiative recombination. In the case of the ligand bound with iron, a two-step process emerges that places the hole on the iron, again at rates much faster than band gap recombination. The system was experimentally assembled and characterized via UV$-$vis absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Lastly, theoretically predicted red shifts in absorbance were observed experimentally, as well as the expected quench in photoluminescence and lifetimes in time-resolved photoluminescence« less

  10. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors.

  11. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

    PubMed

    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Controlling Gold Nanoclusters by Diphospine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qianfan; Bonaccorso, Timary A.; Williard, Paul G.; Wang, Lai S.

    2014-01-08

    We report the synthesis and structure determination of a new Au22 nanocluster coordinated by six bidentate diphosphine ligands: 1,8-bis(diphenylphosphino) octane (L8 for short). Single crystal x-ray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry show that the cluster assembly is neutral and can be formulated as Au22(L8)6. The Au22 core consists of two Au11 units clipped together by four L8 ligands, while the additional two ligands coordinate to each Au11 unit in a bidentate fashion. Eight gold atoms at the interface of the two Au11 units are not coordinated by any ligands. Four short gold-gold distances (2.64?2.65 Å) are observed at the interface of the two Au11 clusters as a result of the clamping force of the four clipping ligands and strong electronic interactions. The eight uncoordinated surface gold atoms in the Au22(L8)6 nanocluster are unprecedented in atom-precise gold nanoparticles and can be considered as potential in-situ active sites for catalysis.

  13. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M

    2015-09-09

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  14. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  15. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  16. Coevolution between cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid ligands.

    PubMed

    McPartland, John M; Norris, Ryan W; Kilpatrick, C William

    2007-08-01

    Genes for receptors and ligands must coevolve to maintain coordinated gene expression and binding affinities. Researchers have debated whether anandamide or 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) is a more "intrinsic" ligand of cannabinoid receptors. We addressed this debate with a coevolutionary analysis, by examining genes for CB1, CB2, and ten genes that encode ligand metabolic enzymes: abhydrolase domain containing 4 protein, cyclooxygenase 2, diacylglycerol lipase paralogs (DAGLalpha, DAGLbeta), fatty acid amide hydrolase paralogs (FAAH1, FAAH2), monoglyceride lipase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase, NAPE-selective phospholipase D, and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22. Gene trees (cladograms) of CB1, CB2, and ligand enzymes were obtained by searching for orthologs (tBLASTn) in the genomes of nine phylogenetically diverse species, aligning ortholog sequences with ClustalX, and applying Bayesian analysis (MrBayes). Mirrored cladograms provided evidence of coevolution (i.e., parallel cladogenesis). Next we constructed phylograms of CB1, CB2, and the ten enzymes. Phylogram branch lengths were proportional to three sets of maximum likelihood metrics: all-nucleotide-substitutions and NS/SS ratios (using PAUP()), and Ka/Ks ratios (using FUGE). Spurious correlations in all-nucleotide-substitutions trees (due to phylogenetic bias) and in Ka/Ks ratio trees (due to simplistic modeling) were parsed. Branch lengths from equivalent branches in paired trees were correlated by linear regression. Regression analyses, mirrored cladograms, and phylogenetic profiles produced the same results: close associations between cannabinoid receptors and DAGL enzymes. Therefore we propose that cannabinoid receptors initially coevolved with a fatty acid ester ligand (akin to 2-AG) in ancestral metazoans, and affinity for fatty acid ethanolamide ligands (e.g., AEA) evolved thereafter.

  17. Efficient chemoenzymatic synthesis of chiral pincer ligands.

    PubMed

    Felluga, Fulvia; Baratta, Walter; Fanfoni, Lidia; Pitacco, Giuliana; Rigo, Pierluigi; Benedetti, Fabio

    2009-05-01

    Chiral, nonracemic pincer ligands based on the 6-phenyl-2-aminomethylpyridine and 2-aminomethylbenzo[h]quinoline scaffolds were obtained by a chemoenzymatic approach starting from 2-pyridyl and 2-benzoquinolyl ethanone. In the enantiodifferentiating step, secondary alcohols of opposite absolute configuration were obtained by a baker's yeast reduction of the ketones and by lipase-mediated dynamic kinetic resolution of the racemic alcohols. Their transformation into homochiral 1-methyl-1-heteroarylethanamines occurred without loss of optical purity, giving access to pincer ligands used in enantioselective catalysis.

  18. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  19. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Guillaume X; Langer, Gerrit G; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein-ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  20. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Guillaume X.; Langer, Gerrit G.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement. PMID:17164533

  1. Ligand expansion in ligand-based virtual screening using relevance feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Ammar; Saeed, Faisal; Hamza, Hentabli; Ahmed, Ali; Salim, Naomie

    2012-03-01

    Query expansion is the process of reformulating an original query to improve retrieval performance in information retrieval systems. Relevance feedback is one of the most useful query modification techniques in information retrieval systems. In this paper, we introduce query expansion into ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) using the relevance feedback technique. In this approach, a few high-ranking molecules of unknown activity are filtered from the outputs of a Bayesian inference network based on a single ligand molecule to form a set of ligand molecules. This set of ligand molecules is used to form a new ligand molecule. Simulated virtual screening experiments with the MDL Drug Data Report and maximum unbiased validation data sets show that the use of ligand expansion provides a very simple way of improving the LBVS, especially when the active molecules being sought have a high degree of structural heterogeneity. However, the effectiveness of the ligand expansion is slightly less when structurally-homogeneous sets of actives are being sought.

  2. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  3. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  4. [Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids at random fillings].

    PubMed

    Arakelian, V B; Babaian, S Iu; Tairian, V I; Arakelian, A V; Parsadanian, M A; Vardevanian, P O

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding with nucleic acids is described in frames of the theory of random processes. It is shown that the probabilistic description of binding of a ligand to nucleic acid allows one to describe not only the kinetics of changes in the number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. A general analysis of absorption isotherms and the kinetics of ligand binding with nucleic acids allows one to determine the rate constants of formation and decomposition of the ligand-nucleic acid complex. A comparison of the results obtained with the case of low fillings is conducted.

  5. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound.

  6. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  7. Determination of Ligand Pathways in Globins

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Mallory D.; Blouin, George C.; Soman, Jayashree; Singleton, Eileen W.; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Olson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Although molecular dynamics simulations suggest multiple interior pathways for O2 entry into and exit from globins, most experiments indicate well defined single pathways. In 2001, we highlighted the effects of large-to-small amino acid replacements on rates for ligand entry and exit onto the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin. The resultant map argued strongly for ligand movement through a short channel from the heme iron to solvent that is gated by the distal histidine (His-64(E7)) near the solvent edge of the porphyrin ring. In this work, we have applied the same mutagenesis mapping strategy to the neuronal mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb), which has a large internal tunnel from the heme iron to the C-terminal ends of the E and H helices, a direction that is 180° opposite to the E7 channel. Detailed comparisons of the new CerHb map with expanded results for Mb show unambiguously that the dominant (>90%) ligand pathway in CerHb is through the internal tunnel, and the major (>75%) ligand pathway in Mb is through the E7 gate. These results demonstrate that: 1) mutagenesis mapping can identify internal pathways when they exist; 2) molecular dynamics simulations need to be refined to address discrepancies with experimental observations; and 3) alternative pathways have evolved in globins to meet specific physiological demands. PMID:22859299

  8. CXCR4 Ligands: The Next Big Hit?

    PubMed

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M E; Lapa, Constantin; Herrmann, Ken; Wester, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    The G protein-coupled protein receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is an attractive target for cancer diagnosis and treatment, as it is overexpressed in many solid and hematologic cancers. Binding of its ligand, C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), results in receptor internalization and activation of several signal transduction pathways, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, which are critical in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, development of metastasis, and survival. Also, the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis is involved in the interaction between hematopoietic stem cells (as well as hematologic and solid tumor cells) and their protective microenvironment. This interaction can be disrupted by CXCR4 antagonists. This concept is being used clinically to harvest hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells from bone marrow and to sensitize cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and the potential to overcome tumor microenvironment-driven immunosuppression is being explored. This review focuses on new strategies for improvement of cancer treatment by targeting of the CXCR4-CXCL12 interaction. Because of its critical role in cancer, many peptidic and nonpeptidic ligands with different modes of antagonistic activity against the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis have been developed, with some of them reaching clinical trials. Molecular imaging with recently developed radiolabeled CXCR4 ligands could facilitate the selection of patients who might benefit from directed targeted therapy, including CXCR4-directed endoradiotherapy. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  9. Identification of ligands for bacterial sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Martín-Mora, David; López-Farfán, Diana; Reyes-Darias, José Antonio; Matilla, Miguel A; Ortega, Álvaro; Krell, Tino

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria have evolved a variety of different signal transduction mechanisms. However, the cognate signal molecule for the very large amount of corresponding sensor proteins is unknown and their functional annotation represents a major bottleneck in the field of signal transduction. The knowledge of the signal molecule is an essential prerequisite to understand the signalling mechanisms. Recently, the identification of signal molecules by the high-throughput protein screening of commercially available ligand collections using differential scanning fluorimetry has shown promise to resolve this bottleneck. Based on the analysis of a significant number of different ligand binding domains (LBDs) in our laboratory, we identified two issues that need to be taken into account in the experimental design. Since a number of LBDs require the dimeric state for ligand recognition, it has to be assured that the protein analysed is indeed in the dimeric form. A number of other examples demonstrate that purified LBDs can contain bound ligand which prevents further binding. In such cases, the apo-form can be generated by denaturation and subsequent refolding. We are convinced that this approach will accelerate the functional annotation of sensor proteins which will help to understand regulatory circuits in bacteria.

  10. CXCR3 ligands in disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Katrien; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Liekens, Sandra; Van Damme, Jo; Struyf, Sofie

    2015-06-01

    Chemokines, binding their various G protein-coupled receptors, lead the way for leukocytes in health and inflammation. Yet chemokine receptor expression is not limited to leukocytes. Accordingly, chemokines are remarkably pleiotropic molecules involved in a range of physiological as well as pathological processes. For example, the CXCR3 chemokine receptor is expressed on activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells and natural killer cells, but also fibroblasts and smooth muscle, epithelial and endothelial cells. In men, these cells express either CXCR3A, its splice variant CXCR3B or a balanced combination of both. The CXCR3 ligands, activating both receptor variants, include CXCL4, CXCL4L1, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11. Upon CXCR3A activation these ELR-negative CXC chemokines mediate chemotactic and proliferative responses, for example in leukocytes. In contrast, CXCR3B induces anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects, as exemplified by angiostatic effects on endothelial cells. Taken together, the unusual and versatile characteristics of CXCR3 and its ligands form the basis for their pertinent involvement in a myriad of diseases. In this review, we discuss the presence and function of all CXCR3 ligands in various malignant, angiogenic, infectious, inflammatory and other disorders. By extension, we have also elaborated on the potential therapeutic applicability of CXCR3 ligand administration or blockade, as well as their additional value as predictive or prognostic biomarkers. This review illustrates the multifunctional, intriguing character of the various CXCR3-binding chemokines.

  11. Solar energy conversion through ligand photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, B.M.; Sima, P.D.

    1983-04-06

    A new technique for photochemical conversion of solar energy based on ligand photodissociation from metal complexes is examined. The concept is illustrated with a photogalvanic cell in which voltages are generated by photodissociation of CO from carbonylferroheme and with a cell in which the illuminated electrode is coated with an iron tetraphenylporphyrin.

  12. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Panasci, Adele Frances

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  13. [Central effects of ORL1 receptor ligands].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Calo, G; Ma, L

    2003-01-01

    It has been discussed literature data on molecular structure of ORL1 receptor and its interaction with intracellular signal systems and neurotransmitters. Data on chemical structure of ORL1 receptor ligands and their central effects (nociception, locomotion, feeding, cognition) are presented.

  14. Cooperative Ligand Binding to Linear Chain Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applequist, Jon

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes the Ising model of ligand binding as it applies to cooperative binding to long chain molecules. Also presents some illustrations which help to visualize the connection between the interaction parameters and the shape of the binding isotherm. (Author/MR)

  15. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigations of ligand exchange in guanidinate ligand systems for group 13 metals.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Allison L; DiLabio, Gino A; Kreisel, Kevin A; Monillas, Wesley; Yap, Glenn P A; Barry, Seán T

    2007-08-14

    The ligand exchange of guanidinate ligands between metal centres can play an important role in guanidinate chemistry, and ligand exchange between aluminium centres will form a dimeric intermediate. The synthesis and characterization of the dimer [Me(2)NC(N(i)Pr)(2)](2)Al(2)Cl(4) is reported here: compound crystallizes with a twisted boat conformation of its dimer ring. This compound decomposes to monomers at room temperature over four days, or within 18 hours at 90 degrees C. We undertook a detailed computational characterization of the reaction pathway, which supported the dimer structure and subsequent monomer formation. The ligand exchange route was also exploited for the synthesis of [MeC(N(i)Pr)(2)](2)AlCl, [EtC(N(i)Pr)(2)](2)AlCl, [MeC(N(i)Pr)(2)](2)GaCl, and [Me(2)NC(N(i)Pr)(2)](2)GaCl.

  17. Ammonia formation by metal-ligand cooperative hydrogenolysis of a nitrido ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askevold, Bjorn; Nieto, Jorge Torres; Tussupbayev, Samat; Diefenbach, Martin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Holthausen, Max C.; Schneider, Sven

    2011-07-01

    Bioinspired hydrogenation of N2 to ammonia at ambient conditions by stepwise nitrogen protonation/reduction with metal complexes in solution has experienced remarkable progress. In contrast, the highly desirable direct hydrogenation with H2 remains difficult. In analogy to the heterogeneously catalysed Haber-Bosch process, such a reaction is conceivable via metal-centred N2 splitting and unprecedented hydrogenolysis of the nitrido ligands to ammonia. We report the synthesis of a ruthenium(IV) nitrido complex. The high nucleophilicity of the nitrido ligand is demonstrated by unusual N-C coupling with π-acidic CO. Furthermore, the terminal nitrido ligand undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H2 at ambient conditions to produce ammonia in high yield. Kinetic and quantum chemical examinations of this reaction suggest cooperative behaviour of a phosphorus-nitrogen-phosphorus pincer ligand in rate-determining heterolytic hydrogen splitting.

  18. Thermodynamic proton-ligand and metal-ligand stability constants of some drugs.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y K; Patel, D R

    1986-02-01

    The thermodynamic proton-ligand (pKa) and metal-ligand stability constants of clioquinol, clofibrate, nitrofurazone, and tetracycline with Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ have been determined at 35 degrees C in 50% ethanol-water media. An empirical pH correction for mixed-aqueous media has been applied. The metal-ligand stability constants were determined by following the Bjerrum Calvin titration technique as applied by Agrawal to mixed-aqueous solvents. The effect of the basicity of the ligand and the order of stability constants is discussed. The stability constants of the divalent metals follow the order: Cu2+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Mn2+ greater than Mg2+ greater than Ca2+ with all the drugs.

  19. Dissociation of Multisubunit Protein-Ligand Complexes in the Gas Phase. Evidence for Ligand Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixuan; Deng, Lu; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2013-10-01

    The results of collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments performed on gaseous protonated and deprotonated ions of complexes of cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer (CTB5) with the pentasaccharide (β-D-Gal p-(1→3)-β-D-Gal pNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-D-Gal p-(1→4)-β-D-Glc p (GM1)) and corresponding glycosphingolipid (β-D-Gal p-(1→3)-β-D-Gal pNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-D-Gal p-(1→4)-β-D-Glc p-Cer (GM1-Cer)) ligands, and the homotetramer streptavidin (S4) with biotin (B) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(biotinyl) (Btl), are reported. The protonated (CTB5 + 5GM1)n+ ions dissociated predominantly by the loss of a single subunit, with the concomitant migration of ligand to another subunit. The simultaneous loss of ligand and subunit was observed as a minor pathway. In contrast, the deprotonated (CTB5 + 5GM1)n- ions dissociated preferentially by the loss of deprotonated ligand; the loss of ligand-bound and ligand-free subunit were minor pathways. The presence of ceramide (Cer) promoted ligand migration and the loss of subunit. The main dissociation pathway for the protonated and deprotonated (S4 + 4B)n+/- ions, as well as for deprotonated (S4 + 4Btl)n- ions, was loss of the ligand. However, subunit loss from the (S4 + 4B)n+ ions was observed as a minor pathway. The (S4 + 4Btl)n+ ions dissociated predominantly by the loss of free and ligand-bound subunit. The charge state of the complex and the collision energy were found to have little effect on the relative contribution of the different dissociation channels. Thermally-driven ligand migration between subunits was captured in the results of molecular dynamics simulations performed on protonated (CTB5 + 5GM1)15+ ions (with a range of charge configurations) at 800 K. Notably, the migration pathway was found to be highly dependent on the charge configuration of the ion. The main conclusion of this study is that the dissociation pathways of multisubunit protein-ligand

  20. Targeting Ligand Dependent and Ligand Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    or replace the effect of a natural peptide. A classic example is the human analogue of insulin , admin- istered to patients with insulin - dependent ... diabetes . Initially purified from bovine and porcine (44), insulin is now routinely manufactured via recombinant methods as pro- insulin (45). However...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Ligand Dependent and Ligand Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  1. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein–ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system

    PubMed Central

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein–ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein–ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments—the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein–ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pKa values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html. PMID:22669908

  2. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html.

  3. All-Inorganic Germanium Nanocrystal Films by Cationic Ligand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lance M; Nichols, Asa W; Chernomordik, Boris D; Anderson, Nicholas C; Beard, Matthew C; Neale, Nathan R

    2016-03-09

    We introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.

  4. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; ...

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport inmore » germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.« less

  5. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.

  6. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  7. Fusion of ligand-coated nanoparticles with lipid bilayers: effect of ligand flexibility.

    PubMed

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-08-07

    Amphiphilic, monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have recently been shown to insert into and fuse with lipid bilayers, driven by the hydrophobic effect. The inserted transmembrane state is stabilized by the "snorkeling" of charged ligand end groups out of the bilayer interior. This snorkeling process is facilitated by the backbone flexibility of the alkanethiol ligands that comprise the monolayer. In this work, we show that fusion is favorable even in the absence of backbone flexibility by modeling the ligands as rigid rods. For rigid ligands, snorkeling is still accommodated by rotations of the ligand with respect to the grafting point, but the process incurs a more significant free energy penalty than if the backbone were fully flexible. We show that the rigid rod model predicts similar trends in the free energy change for insertion as the previous flexible model when the size of the AuNPs is varied. However, the rigidity of the ligand backbone reduces the overall magnitude of the free energy change compared to that of the flexible model. These results thus generalize previous findings to systems with hindered backbone flexibility due to either structural constraints or low temperature.

  8. Virtual ligand screening against comparative protein structure models.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hao; Irwin, John J; Sali, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    Virtual ligand screening uses computation to discover new ligands of a protein by screening one or more of its structural models against a database of potential ligands. Comparative protein structure modeling extends the applicability of virtual screening beyond the atomic structures determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. Here, we describe an integrated modeling and docking protocol, combining comparative modeling by MODELLER and virtual ligand screening by DOCK.

  9. Amino Acids in Nine Ligand-Prefer Ramachandran Regions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Lincong; Chen, Xiaoyang; Zou, Shuxue; Wang, Guishen; Xu, Shutan

    2015-01-01

    Several secondary structures, such as π-helix and left-handed helix, have been frequently identified at protein ligand-binding sites. A secondary structure is considered to be constrained to a specific region of dihedral angles. However, a comprehensive analysis of the correlation between main chain dihedral angles and ligand-binding sites has not been performed. We undertook an extensive analysis of the relationship between dihedral angles in proteins and their distance to ligand-binding sites, frequency of occurrence, molecular potential energy, amino acid composition, van der Waals contacts, and hydrogen bonds with ligands. The results showed that the values of dihedral angles have a strong preference for ligand-binding sites at certain regions in the Ramachandran plot. We discovered that amino acids preceding the ligand-prefer ϕ/ψ box residues are exposed more to solvents, whereas amino acids following ligand-prefer ϕ/ψ box residues form more hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts with ligands. Our method exhibited a similar performance compared with the program Ligsite-csc for both ligand-bound structures and ligand-free structures when just one ligand-binding site was predicted. These results should be useful for the prediction of protein ligand-binding sites and for analysing the relationship between structure and function.

  10. Ligand redox activity and mixed valency in first-row transition-metal complexes containing tetrachlorocatecholate and radical tetrachlorosemiquinonate ligands.

    PubMed

    Pierpont, Cortlandt G

    2011-10-17

    Ligand noninnocence occurs for complexes composed of redox-active ligands and metals, with frontier orbitals of similar energy. Usually methods of analysis can be used to define the charge distribution, and cases where the metal oxidation state and ligand charge are unclear are unusual. Ligands derived from o-benzoquinones can bond with metals as radical semiquinonates (SQ(•-)) or as catecholates (Cat(2-)). Spectroscopic, magnetic, and structural properties can be used to assess the metal and ligand charges. With the redox activity at both the metal and ligands, reversible multicomponent redox series can be observed using electrochemical methods. Steps in the series may occur at either the ligand or metal, and ligand substituent effects can be used to tune the range of ligand-based redox steps. Complexes that appear as intermediates in a ligand-based redox series may contain both SQ and Cat ligands "bridged" by the metal as mixed-valence complexes. Properties reflect the strength of metal-mediated interligand electronic coupling in the same way that ligand-bridged bimetallics conform to the Robin and Day classification scheme. In this review, we will focus specifically on complexes of first-row transition-metal ions coordinated with three ligands derived from tetrachloro-1,2-benzoquinone (Cl(4)BQ). The redox activity of this ligand overlaps with the potentials of common metal oxidation states, providing examples of metal- and ligand-based redox activity, in some cases, within a single redox series. The strength of the interligand electronic coupling is important in defining the separation between ligand-based couples of a redox series. The complex of ferric iron will be described as an example where coupling is weak, and the steps associated with the Fe(III)(Cl(4)SQ)(3)/[Fe(III)(Cl(4)Cat)(3)](3-) redox series are observed over a narrow range in electrochemical potential.

  11. Computational ligand design by free energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Nikolay P.; Dean, Philip M.

    1999-10-01

    We present a computational method for de novo ligand design based on simulated annealing optimization of an empirical free energy function which has been derived from regression analysis of protein-ligand complexes. Structures are built by joining together molecular fragments from the Available Chemicals Directory. The algorithm navigates through the space of molecular structures, conformations and rigid-body transformations. The diversity of the generated structures can range from completely de novo to products of a combinatorial synthetic reaction scheme and docking of single molecules. The synthetic feasibility of the proposed molecules is considered by the incorporation of penalty terms to reduce undesirable connectivity and chemical features. Test results for tripsin are presented.

  12. Challenges of ligand identification for riboswitch candidates

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michelle M; Hammond, Ming C; Salinas, Yasmmyn; Roth, Adam; Sudarsan, Narasimhan

    2011-01-01

    Expanding DNA sequence databases and improving methods for comparative analysis are being exploited to identify numerous noncoding RNA elements including riboswitches. Ligands for many riboswitch classes usually can be inferred based on the genomic contexts of representative RNAs, and complex formation or genetic regulation subsequently demonstrated experimentally. However, there are several candidate riboswitches for which ligands have not been identified. In this report, we discuss three of the most compelling riboswitch candidates: the ykkC/yzkD, yybP/ykoY and pfl RNAs. Each of these RNAs is numerous, phylogenetically widespread and carries features that are hallmarks of metabolite-binding riboswitches, such as a well-conserved aptamer-like structure and apparent interactions with gene regulation elements such as ribosome binding sites or intrinsic transcription termination stems. These RNAs likely represent only a small sampling of the challenging motifs that researchers will encounter as new noncoding RNAs are identified. PMID:21317561

  13. Muscarinic receptors and ligands in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirish; Khurana, Sandeep; Cheng, Kunrong; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that muscarinic receptors and ligands play key roles in regulating cellular proliferation and cancer progression. Both neuronal and nonneuronal acetylcholine production results in neurocrine, paracrine, and autocrine promotion of cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and other features critical for cancer cell survival and spread. The present review comprises a focused critical analysis of evidence supporting the role of muscarinic receptors and ligands in cancer. Criteria are proposed to validate the biological importance of muscarinic receptor expression, activation, and postreceptor signaling. Likewise, criteria are proposed to validate the role of nonneuronal acetylcholine production in cancer. Dissecting cellular mechanisms necessary for muscarinic receptor activation as well as those needed for acetylcholine production and release will identify multiple novel targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19036940

  14. Mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics of ligand binding to biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, Javier; Morín, José A; Beltrán-Heredia, Elena; Villaluenga, Juan P G; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Ligands binding to polymers regulate polymer functions by changing their physical and chemical properties. This ligand regulation plays a key role in many biological processes. We propose here a model to explain the mechanical, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of the process of binding of small ligands to long biopolymers. These properties can now be measured at the single molecule level using force spectroscopy techniques. Our model performs an effective decomposition of the ligand-polymer system on its covered and uncovered regions, showing that the elastic properties of the ligand-polymer depend explicitly on the ligand coverage of the polymer (i.e., the fraction of the polymer covered by the ligand). The equilibrium coverage that minimizes the free energy of the ligand-polymer system is computed as a function of the applied force. We show how ligands tune the mechanical properties of a polymer, in particular its length and stiffness, in a force dependent manner. In addition, it is shown how ligand binding can be regulated applying mechanical tension on the polymer. Moreover, the binding kinetics study shows that, in the case where the ligand binds and organizes the polymer in different modes, the binding process can present transient shortening or lengthening of the polymer, caused by changes in the relative coverage by the different ligand modes. Our model will be useful to understand ligand-binding regulation of biological processes, such as the metabolism of nucleic acid. In particular, this model allows estimating the coverage fraction and the ligand mode characteristics from the force extension curves of a ligand-polymer system.

  15. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  16. Protein-ligand binding affinity determination by the waterLOGSY method: An optimised approach considering ligand rebinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Renjie; Bonnichon, Arnaud; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.

    2017-03-01

    WaterLOGSY is a popular ligand-observed NMR technique to screen for protein-ligand interactions, yet when applied to measure dissociation constants (KD) through ligand titration, the results were found to be strongly dependent on sample conditions. Herein, we show that accurate KDs can be obtained by waterLOGSY with optimised experimental setup.

  17. Protein-ligand binding affinity determination by the waterLOGSY method: An optimised approach considering ligand rebinding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjie; Bonnichon, Arnaud; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.

    2017-01-01

    WaterLOGSY is a popular ligand-observed NMR technique to screen for protein-ligand interactions, yet when applied to measure dissociation constants (KD) through ligand titration, the results were found to be strongly dependent on sample conditions. Herein, we show that accurate KDs can be obtained by waterLOGSY with optimised experimental setup. PMID:28256624

  18. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  19. Selective oxoanion separation using a tripodal ligand

    DOEpatents

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Rajbanshi, Arbin

    2016-02-16

    The present invention relates to urea-functionalized crystalline capsules self-assembled by sodium or potassium cation coordination and by hydrogen-bonding water bridges to selectively encapsulate tetrahedral divalent oxoanions from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions and methods using this system for selective anion separations from industrial solutions. The method involves competitive crystallizations using a tripodal tris(urea) functionalized ligand and, in particular, provides a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  20. galectin-3 ligand — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Galectin-3 is an endogenous lectin that binds glycan epitopes of cell membrane and some extracellular glycoproteins such as integrins and laminin. Galectin-3 is involved in several biological activities including regulation of cellular cycle, modulation of adhesion and tumor progression and metastasis. Serum galectin-3 ligands have been shown to modulate the immune reaction against tumors and viruses and their level increases in sera of several neoplastic diseases.

  1. Container molecules based on imine type ligands.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A Carina; Oppel, Iris M

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will give a short overview about container molecules, their synthesis and possible applications. The main focus is on those which are based on imine type ligands. These containers can be used for example for guest exchange, gas separation, as chemical sensors or for the stabilisation of white phosphorus under water. The described cages have wide openings or tightly closed ones. For one cage the reversible opening and closing is also described.

  2. Gated escaping of ligand out of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2000-01-01

    We construct a new gating model and develop a new theory to study the escaping process of a ligand out of a spherical cavity with a puncture (or gate) on the surface. The gate undulation can be regulated by any time-dependent function and the motion of the ligand inside the spherical cavity is mapped into a two-dimensional entropy potential surface. Hence the driving force of our model is entropy only. For a static gate, the escaping process corresponds to climbing a two-dimensional entropy barrier. When the gate open angle is small, the escaping rate is proportional to the square of the opening angle. The prefactor of the escaping rate constant depends on the curvature of the entropy potential surface. For coherent gating, the survival time depends not only on the gate undulation frequency but also on how the initial state is defined. On the escaping from protein, our escaping rate shows it is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result of ligand recombination in myoglobin.

  3. RAGE and its ligands in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Gaetano R; Schmidt, Ann M

    2007-12-01

    RAGE, the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), is a multiligand signal transduction receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. These diverse biologic disorders reflect the multiplicity of ligands capable of cellular interaction via RAGE that include, in addition to AGEs, amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, the S100/calgranulin family of proinflammatory cytokines, and amphoterin, a member of the High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) DNA-binding proteins. In the retina, RAGE expression is present in neural cells, the vasculature, and RPE cells, and it has also been detected in pathologic cellular retinal responses including epiretinal and neovascular membrane formation. Ligands for RAGE, in particular AGEs, have emerged as relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular disease. While the understanding of RAGE and its role in retinal dysfunction with aging, diabetes mellitus, and/or activation of pro-inflammatory pathways is less complete compared to other organ systems, increasing evidence indicates that RAGE can initiate and sustain significant cellular perturbations in the inner and outer retina. For these reasons, antagonism of RAGE interactions with its ligands may be a worthwhile therapeutic target in such seemingly disparate, visually threatening retinal diseases as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  4. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  5. Ligand Characteristics Important to Avidity Interactions of Multivalent Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Hsin; Zong, Hong; Leroueil, Pascale R; Choi, Seok Ki; Baker, James R

    2017-04-11

    Multivalent interactions involve the engagement of multiple ligand-receptor pairs and are important in synthetic biology as design paradigms for targeted nanoparticles (NPs). However, little is known about the specific ligand parameters important to multivalent interactions. We employed a series of oligonucleotides as ligands conjugated to dendrimers as nanoparticles, and used complementary oligonucleotides on a functionalized SPR surface to measure binding. We compared the effect of ligand affinity to ligand number on the avidity characteristics of functionalized NPs. Changing the ligand affinity, either by changing the temperature of the system or by substitution non-complementary base pairs into the oligonucleotides, had little effect on multivalent interaction; the overall avidity, number of ligands required for avidity per particle and the number of particles showing avidity did not significantly change. We then made NP conjugates with the same oligonucleotide using an efficient copper-free click chemistry that resulted in essentially all of the NP in the population exceeding the threshold ligand value. The particles exceeding the threshold ligand number again demonstrated high avidity interactions. This work validates the concept of a threshold ligand valence and suggests that the number of ligands per nanoparticle is the defining factor in achieving high avidity interactions.

  6. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    SciTech Connect

    Evrard, Guillaume X. Langer, Gerrit G.; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the ligand-building module of the ARP/wARP software suite is assessed through a large-scale test on known protein–ligand complexes. The results provide a detailed benchmark and guidelines for future improvements. The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  7. The Recognition of Identical Ligands by Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barelier, Sarah; Sterling, Teague; O'Meara, Matthew J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    The binding of drugs and reagents to off-targets is well-known. Whereas many off-targets are related to the primary target by sequence and fold, many ligands bind to unrelated pairs of proteins, and these are harder to anticipate. If the binding site in the off-target can be related to that of the primary target, this challenge resolves into aligning the two pockets. However, other cases are possible: the ligand might interact with entirely different residues and environments in the off-target, or wholly different ligand atoms may be implicated in the two complexes. To investigate these scenarios at atomic resolution, the structures of 59 ligands in 116 complexes (62 pairs in total), where the protein pairs were unrelated by fold but bound an identical ligand, were examined. In almost half of the pairs, the ligand interacted with unrelated residues in the two proteins (29 pairs), and in 14 of the pairs wholly different ligand moieties were implicated in each complex. Even in those 19 pairs of complexes that presented similar environments to the ligand, ligand superposition rarely resulted in the overlap of related residues. There appears to be no single pattern-matching “code” for identifying binding sites in unrelated proteins that bind identical ligands, though modeling suggests that there might be a limited number of different patterns that suffice to recognize different ligand functional groups. PMID:26421501

  8. Identification of Ligand-Receptor Interactions: Ligand Molecular Arrays, SPR and NMR Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Korolik, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Despite many years of research into bacterial chemotaxis, the only well characterized system to date is that of E. coli. Even for E. coli, the direct ligand binding had been fully characterized only for aspartate and serene receptors Tar and Tsr. In 30 years since, no other direct receptor-ligand interaction had been described for bacteria, until the characterization of the C. jejuni aspartate and multiligand receptors (Hartley-Tassell et al. Mol Microbiol 75:710-730, 2010). While signal transduction components of many sensory pathways have now been characterized, ligand-receptor interactions remain elusive due to paucity of high-throughput screening methods. Here, we describe the use of microarray screening we developed to identify ligands, surface plasmon resonance, and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) we used to verify the hits and to determine the affinity constants of the interactions, allowing for more targeted verification of ligands with traditional chemotaxis and in vivo assays described in Chapter 13 .

  9. Full-electron ligand-to-ligand charge transfer in a compact Re(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuankai; Grusenmeyer, Tod; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Peng; Schmehl, Russell H; Beratan, David N; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2014-11-13

    Ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) states in transition metal complexes are often characterized by fractional electron transfer due to coupling of the LLCT state with many other states via the metal. We designed and characterized a compact Re(I) complex that displays essentially full-electron charge transfer in the LLCT excited state. The complex, [Re(DCEB)(CO)3(L)](+) (DCEB = 4,4'-dicarboxyethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), referred to as ReEBA, features two redox active ligands with strong electron accepting (DCEB) and electron donating (L is 3-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (3DMABN)) properties. The lowest energy excited state formed with a ca. 10 ps time constant and was characterized as the full-electron 3DMABN → DCEB LLCT state using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR), transient absorption spectroscopy, and DFT computations. Analysis of a range of vibrational modes helped to assign the charge transfer characteristics of the complex. The LLCT state lifetime in ReEBA shows a strong dependence on the solvent polarity and features solvent dependent frequency shifts for several vibrational reporters. The formation of a full-electron LLCT state (∼92%) was enabled by tuning the redox properties of the electron accepting ligand (DCEB) and simultaneously decoupling the redox active group of the electron donating ligand (3DMABN) from the metal center. This strategy is generally applicable for designing compact transition metal complexes that have full-electron LLCT states.

  10. Nanoparticle multivalency counterbalances the ligand affinity loss upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Robert; Pollinger, Klaus; Veser, Anika; Breunig, Miriam; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-11-28

    The conjugation of receptor ligands to shielded nanoparticles is a widely used strategy to precisely control nanoparticle-cell interactions. However, it is often overlooked that a ligand's affinity can be severely impaired by its attachment to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains that are frequently used to protect colloids from serum protein adsorption. Using the model ligand EXP3174, a small-molecule antagonist for the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R), we investigated the ligand's affinity before and after its PEGylation and when attached to PEGylated nanoparticles. The PEGylated ligand displayed a 580-fold decreased receptor affinity compared to the native ligand. Due to their multivalency, the nanoparticles regained a low nanomolar receptor affinity, which is in the range of the affinity of the native ligand. Moreover, a four orders of magnitude higher concentration of free ligand was required to displace PEGylated nanoparticles carrying EXP3174 from the receptor. On average, one nanoparticle was decorated with 11.2 ligand molecules, which led to a multivalent enhancement factor of 22.5 compared to the monovalent PEGylated ligand. The targeted nanoparticles specifically bound the AT1R and showed no interaction to receptor negative cells. Our study shows that the attachment of a small-molecule ligand to a PEG chain can severely affect its receptor affinity. Concomitantly, when the ligand is tethered to nanoparticles, the immense avidity greatly increases the ligand-receptor interaction. Based on our results, we highly recommend the affinity testing of receptor ligands before and after PEGylation to identify potent molecules for active nanoparticle targeting.

  11. Controlling ligand binding for tunable and switchable catalysis: cation-modulated hemilability in pincer-crown ether ligands.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexander J M

    2017-09-28

    Methods for in situ reversible control over ligand binding processes at transition metal complexes can enable advances in switchable and tunable catalysis. After a brief overview of different approaches to controlling ligand binding, this Perspective details the development of "pincer-crown ether" ligands that contain a rigid pincer backbone and a hemilabile aza-crown ether unit that enables cation-modulated hemilability. Applications of pincer-crown ether complexes in small molecule activation and catalysis are discussed, culminating in a set of design principles for ligands capable of cation-modulated ligand binding.

  12. A chemogenomics view on protein-ligand spaces

    PubMed Central

    Strömbergsson, Helena; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemogenomics is an emerging inter-disciplinary approach to drug discovery that combines traditional ligand-based approaches with biological information on drug targets and lies at the interface of chemistry, biology and informatics. The ultimate goal in chemogenomics is to understand molecular recognition between all possible ligands and all possible drug targets. Protein and ligand space have previously been studied as separate entities, but chemogenomics studies deal with large datasets that cover parts of the joint protein-ligand space. Since drug discovery has traditionally focused on ligand optimization, the chemical space has been studied extensively. The protein space has been studied to some extent, typically for the purpose of classification of proteins into functional and structural classes. Since chemogenomics deals not only with ligands but also with the macromolecules the ligands interact with, it is of interest to find means to explore, compare and visualize protein-ligand subspaces. Results Two chemogenomics protein-ligand interaction datasets were prepared for this study. The first dataset covers the known structural protein-ligand space, and includes all non-redundant protein-ligand interactions found in the worldwide Protein Data Bank (PDB). The second dataset contains all approved drugs and drug targets stored in the DrugBank database, and represents the approved drug-drug target space. To capture biological and physicochemical features of the chemogenomics datasets, sequence-based descriptors were computed for the proteins, and 0, 1 and 2 dimensional descriptors for the ligands. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the multidimensional data and to create global models of protein-ligand space. The nearest neighbour method, computed using the principal components, was used to obtain a measure of overlap between the datasets. Conclusion In this study, we present an approach to visualize protein-ligand spaces from a

  13. Influence of the Outer Ligands on Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer in Solvated Manganese Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Pohl, Marvin; Schwanke, Christoph; Neubauer, Antje; Lange, Kathrin M; Atak, Kaan; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-01-04

    Two manganese porphyrin complexes, manganese tetraphenylporphyrin chloride (MnTPP-Cl) and manganese octaethylporphyrin chloride (MnOEP-Cl), exhibit distinctive spectral features of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) when dissolved in dichloromethane, characterized by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Mn L-edge and N K-edge. The metal-ligand orbital mixing that mediates the MLCT is analyzed with the help of density functional theory/restricted open-shell configuration interaction singles calculations. On the basis of experimental and theoretical analyses, the distinctive MLCT is argued to originate from alteration of the porphyrin outer ligands: phenyl groups in MnTPP-Cl and ethyl groups in MnOEP-Cl.

  14. Binding constant determination of high-affinity protein-ligand complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ligand competition.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Arno; Jecklin, Matthias C; Touboul, David; Badertscher, Martin; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-05-01

    We describe an approach for the determination of binding constants for protein-ligand complexes with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, based on the observation of unbound ligands competing for binding to a protein target. For the first time, dissociation constants lower than picomolar could be determined with good accuracy by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The presented methodology relies only on the determination of signal intensity ratios for free ligands in the low mass region. Therefore, all the advantages of measuring low masses with mass spectrometry, such as high resolution are preserved. By using a reference ligand with known binding affinity, the affinity of a second ligand can be determined. Since no noncovalently bound species are observed, assumptions about response factors are not necessary. The method is validated with ligands binding to avidin and applied to ligands binding to p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  15. Quantification of ligand bias for clinically relevant β2-adrenergic receptor ligands: implications for drug taxonomy.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, Emma T; Breton, Billy; Christopoulos, Arthur; Bouvier, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The concepts of functional selectivity and ligand bias are becoming increasingly appreciated in modern drug discovery programs, necessitating more informed approaches to compound classification and, ultimately, therapeutic candidate selection. Using the β2-adrenergic receptor as a model, we present a proof of concept study that assessed the bias of 19 β-adrenergic ligands, including many clinically used compounds, across four pathways [cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation, calcium mobilization, and receptor endocytosis] in the same cell background (human embryonic kidney 293S cells). Efficacy-based clustering placed the ligands into five distinct groups with respect to signaling signatures. In some cases, apparent functional selectivity originated from off-target effects on other endogenously expressed adrenergic receptors, highlighting the importance of thoroughly assessing selectivity of the responses before concluding receptor-specific ligand-biased signaling. Eliminating the nonselective compounds did not change the clustering of the 10 remaining compounds. Some ligands exhibited large differences in potency for the different pathways, suggesting that the nature of the receptor-effector complexes influences the relative affinity of the compounds for specific receptor conformations. Calculation of relative effectiveness (within pathway) and bias factors (between pathways) for each of the compounds, using an operational model of agonism, revealed a global signaling signature for all of the compounds relative to isoproterenol. Most compounds were biased toward ERK1/2 activation over the other pathways, consistent with the notion that many proximal effectors converge on this pathway. Overall, we demonstrate a higher level of ligand texture than previously anticipated, opening perspectives for the establishment of pluridimensional correlations between signaling profiles, drug classification, therapeutic efficacy, and

  16. Evaluation of small ligand-protein interaction by ligation reaction with DNA-modified ligand.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Rie; Mie, Masayasu; Funabashi, Hisakage; Kobatake, Eiry

    2010-01-01

    A method for the evaluation of interactions between protein and ligand using DNA-modified ligands, including signal enhancement of the DNA ligation reactions, is described. For proof of principle, a DNA probe modified by biotin was used. Two DNA probes were prepared with complementary sticky-ends. While one DNA probe was modified at the 5'-end of the sticky-end, the other was not modified. The probes could be ligated together by T4 DNA ligase along the strand without biotin modification. However, in the presence of streptavidin or anti-biotin Fab, the ligation reaction joining the two probes could not occur on either strand.

  17. Effect of Thiolated Ligands in Au Nanowire Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawen; He, Jiating; Yu, Suzhu; Chen, Hongyu

    2017-08-30

    Thiolated ligands are seldom used as morphology-directing reagent in the synthesis of Au nanostructures due to their low selectivity toward the different facets. Recently, we developed a thiolated ligands-induced synthesis of nanowires where the selective Au deposition only occurs at the ligand-deficient Au-substrate interface. Herein, the structural effect of thiolated ligands in this active surface growth is systematically investigated. It is revealed that their ability of rendering surface is closely related to the molecular structure. Ligands with aromatic backbones are capable of inducing nanowire formation, whereas those with aliphatic backbones cannot, likely because the former can pack better at short time scale of the rapid growth. The substituents of the ligands are critical for the colloidal stability of the final structure. It is further demonstrated that aromatic and aliphatic ligands could be mixed to turn on the continual lateral growth, leading to nanowires with tapered ends. The ligand generality in this growth mode also allows the creation of superhydrophobic surface, with the nanowire forest providing the nanoscale surface roughness and the hydrophobic ligand offering the surface property. These applications of the thiolated ligands in the nanosynthesis open a new approach for controlled synthesis of Au-based nanostructures with various morphologies and properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Landscape of protein–small ligand binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small‐molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long‐standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein–ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all‐against‐all comparison of 20,040 protein–ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein–ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein‐ and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R 2 = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein–ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  19. Ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines undergoing clinical evaluation: current status.

    PubMed

    van der Meel, Roy; Vehmeijer, Laurens J C; Kok, Robbert J; Storm, Gert; van Gaal, Ethlinn V B

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of Doxil® on the market nearly 20years ago, a number of nanomedicines have become part of treatment regimens in the clinic. With the exception of antibody-drug conjugates, these nanomedicines are all devoid of targeting ligands and rely solely on their physicochemical properties and the (patho)physiological processes in the body for their biodistribution and targeting capability. At the same time, many preclinical studies have reported on nanomedicines exposing targeting ligands, or ligand-targeted nanomedicines, yet none of these have been approved at this moment. In the present review, we provide a concise overview of 13 ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines (ligand-targeted PNMs) that have progressed into clinical trials. The progress of each ligand-targeted PNM is discussed based on available (pre)clinical data. Main conclusions of these analyses are that (a) ligand-targeted PNMs have proven to be safe and efficacious in preclinical models; (b) the vast majority of ligand-targeted PNMs is generated for the treatment of cancer; (c) contribution of targeting ligands to the PNM efficacy is not unambiguously proven; and (d) targeting ligands do not cause localization of the PNM within the target tissue, but rather provide benefits in terms of target cell internalization and target tissue retention once the PNM has arrived at the target site. Increased understanding of the in vivo fate and interactions of the ligand-targeted PNMs with proteins and cells in the human body is mandatory to rationally advance the clinical translation of ligand-targeted PNMs. Future perspectives for ligand-targeted PNM approaches include the delivery of drugs that are unable or inefficient in passing cellular membranes, treatment of drug resistant tumors, targeting of the tumor blood supply, the generation of targeted vaccines and nanomedicines that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  20. Characterization of ligands for fish taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Nagai, Toshitada; Furuyama, Akira; Okada, Shinji; Aihara, Yoshiko; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Marui, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2007-05-23

    Recent progress in the molecular biology of taste reception has revealed that in mammals, the heteromeric receptors T1R1/3 and T1R2/3 respond to amino acids and sweeteners, respectively, whereas T2Rs are receptors for bitter tastants. Similar taste receptors have also been characterized in fish, but their ligands have not been identified yet. In the present study, we conducted a series of experiments to identify the fish taste receptor ligands. Facial nerve recordings in zebrafish (Danio rerio) demonstrated that the fish perceived amino acids and even denatonium, which is a representative of aversive bitter compounds for mammals and Drosophila. Calcium imaging analysis of T1Rs in zebrafish and medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) using an HEK293T heterologous expression system revealed that both T1R1/3 and a series of T1R2/3 responded to amino acids but not to sugars. A triple-labeling, in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that cells expressing T1R1/3 and T1R2/3s exist in PLCbeta2-expressing taste bud cells of medaka fish. Functional analysis using T2Rs showed that zfT2R5 and mfT2R1 responded to denatonium. Behavior observations confirmed that zebrafish prefer amino acids and avoid denatonium. These results suggest that, although there may be some fish-specific way of discriminating ligands, vertebrates could have a conserved gustatory mechanism by which T1Rs and T2Rs respond to attractive and aversive tastants, respectively.

  1. Nicotinic acid receptor subtypes and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Soudijn, Willem; van Wijngaarden, Ineke; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2007-05-01

    Half a century ago, nicotinic acid (niacin) was introduced into the clinic as the first orally available drug to treat high cholesterol levels and to improve the balance between (V)low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Remarkably, its putative mechanism of action has only been recently elucidated, particularly because of the cloning of a G protein-coupled receptor (HM74A or GPR109A). This receptor responds to both nicotinic acid and the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate, the latter thought to be the more probable endogenous ligand for HM74A. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of this receptor subtype and a related one (HM74 or GPR109B). Although still in its infancy, the ligand repertoire is developing, and a number of compound classes have now been described, among which are both full and partial agonists. Antagonists, however, are still lacking, thus compromising thorough pharmacological studies. Mutagenesis experiments have provided clues regarding the ligand binding site; in particular, an arginine residue in transmembrane domain 3 of the receptor seems to recognize the acidic moiety present in nicotinic acid and related substances. HM74A has also been linked to one of the major side effects of nicotinic acid, that is, flushing, since this receptor subtype also occurs in skin immune cells. It is not known yet whether HM74 is also present on these cells. Since nicotinic acid is one of the few available medicines that raise HDL ("good cholesterol") levels, HM74A and HM74 appear promising targets for future pharmacotherapy. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Transmutable nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngeun; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-02-01

    Unlike conventional inorganic materials, biological systems are exquisitely adapted to respond to their surroundings. Proteins and other biological molecules can process a complex set of chemical binding events as informational inputs and respond accordingly via a change in structure and function. We applied this principle to the design and synthesis of inorganic materials by preparing nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands, where interparticle bonding can be programmed in response to specific chemical cues in a dynamic manner. As a result, a nascent set of “transmutable nanoparticles” can be driven to crystallize along multiple thermodynamic trajectories, resulting in rational control over the phase and time evolution of nanoparticle-based matter.

  3. Computer-aided design of GPCR ligands.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Keränen, Henrik; Azuaje, Jhonny; Rodríguez, David; Åqvist, Johan; Sotelo, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    The recent availability of several GPCR crystal structures now contributes decisively to the perspective of structure-based ligand design. In this context, computational approaches are extremely helpful, particularly if properly integrated in drug design projects with cooperation between computational and medicinal chemistry teams. Here, we present the pipelines used in one such project, devoted to the design of novel potent and selective antagonists for the different adenosine receptors. The details of the computational strategies are described, and particular attention is given to explain how these procedures can effectively guide the synthesis of novel chemical entities.

  4. (Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX' complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  5. Differential Effects of TR Ligands on Hormone Dissociation Rates: Evidence for Multiple Ligand Entry/Exit Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Suzana T. Cunha; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ha; Togashi, Marie; Apriletti, James W.; Nguyen, Phuong; Polikarpov, Igor; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Baxter, John D.; Webb, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Some nuclear receptor (NR) ligands promote dissociation of radiolabeled bound hormone from the buried ligand binding cavity (LBC) more rapidly than excess unlabeled hormone itself. This result was interpreted to mean that challenger ligands bind allosteric sites on the LBD to induce hormone dissociation, and recent findings indicate that ligands bind weakly to multiple sites on the LBD surface. Here, we show that a large fraction of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) ligands promote rapid dissociation (T1/2 <2 hours) of radiolabeled T3 versus T3 (T1/2 ≈5–7 hours). We cannot discern relationships between this effect and ligand size, activity or affinity for TRβ. One ligand, GC-24, binds the TR LBC and (weakly) to the TRβ-LBD surface that mediates dimer/heterodimer interaction, but we cannot link this interaction to rapid T3 dissociation. Instead, several lines of evidence suggest that the challenger ligand must interact with the buried LBC to promote rapid T3 release. Since previous molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TR ligands leave the LBC by several routes, we propose that a subset of challenger ligands binds and stabilizes a partially unfolded intermediate state of TR that arises during T3 release and that this effect enhances hormone dissociation. PMID:19729063

  6. Differential effects of TR ligands on hormone dissociation rates: evidence for multiple ligand entry/exit pathways.

    PubMed

    Cunha Lima, Suzana T; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ha; Togashi, Marie; Apriletti, James W; Nguyen, Phuong; Polikarpov, Igor; Scanlan, Thomas S; Baxter, John D; Webb, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Some nuclear receptor (NR) ligands promote dissociation of radiolabeled bound hormone from the buried ligand binding cavity (LBC) more rapidly than excess unlabeled hormone itself. This result was interpreted to mean that challenger ligands bind allosteric sites on the LBD to induce hormone dissociation, and recent findings indicate that ligands bind weakly to multiple sites on the LBD surface. Here, we show that a large fraction of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) ligands promote rapid dissociation (T(1/2)<2h) of radiolabeled T(3) vs. T(3) (T(1/2) approximately 5-7h). We cannot discern relationships between this effect and ligand size, activity or affinity for TRbeta. One ligand, GC-24, binds the TR LBC and (weakly) to the TRbeta-LBD surface that mediates dimer/heterodimer interaction, but we cannot link this interaction to rapid T(3) dissociation. Instead, several lines of evidence suggest that the challenger ligand must interact with the buried LBC to promote rapid T(3) release. Since previous molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TR ligands leave the LBC by several routes, we propose that a subset of challenger ligands binds and stabilizes a partially unfolded intermediate state of TR that arises during T(3) release and that this effect enhances hormone dissociation.

  7. DNA-ligand interactions gained and lost: light-induced ligand redistribution in a supramolecular cascade.

    PubMed

    Berdnikova, Daria V; Aliyeu, Tseimur M; Paululat, Thomas; Fedorov, Yuri V; Fedorova, Olga A; Ihmels, Heiko

    2015-03-21

    A supramolecular five-component cascade is presented that enables light-controlled transport of an in situ modified ligand between three host systems based on the different complexation preferences of cyclodextrin, cucurbituril, and double-stranded DNA. The results point out novel approaches for the control of drug-DNA interactions in DNA-targeting therapy.

  8. SuperLigands – a database of ligand structures derived from the Protein Data Bank

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Elke; Dunkel, Mathias; Goede, Andrean; Preissner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, the PDB contains approximately 29,000 protein structures comprising over 70,000 experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of over 5,000 different low molecular weight compounds. Information about these PDB ligands can be very helpful in the field of molecular modelling and prediction, particularly for the prediction of protein binding sites and function. Description Here we present an Internet accessible database delivering PDB ligands in the MDL Mol file format which, in contrast to the PDB format, includes information about bond types. Structural similarity of the compounds can be detected by calculation of Tanimoto coefficients and by three-dimensional superposition. Topological similarity of PDB ligands to known drugs can be assessed via Tanimoto coefficients. Conclusion SuperLigands supplements the set of existing resources of information about small molecules bound to PDB structures. Allowing for three-dimensional comparison of the compounds as a novel feature, this database represents a valuable means of analysis and prediction in the field of biological and medical research. PMID:15943884

  9. Does the ligand-biopolymer equilibrium binding constant depend on the number of bound ligands?

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2010-11-01

    Conventional methods, such as Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel analyses, used to treat ligand-biopolymer interactions, indirectly make the assumption that the microscopic binding constant is independent of the number of ligands, i, already bound to the biopolymer. Recent results on the aggregation of aromatic molecules (Beshnova et al., J Chem Phys 2009, 130, 165105) indicated that the equilibrium constant of self-association depends intrinsically on the number of molecules in an aggregate due to loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on formation of the complex. The influence of these factors on the equilibrium binding constant for ligand-biopolymer complexation was analyzed in this work. It was shown that under the conditions of binding of "small" molecules, these factors can effectively be ignored and, hence, do not provide any hidden systematic error in such widely-used approaches, such as the Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel methods for analyzing ligand-biopolymer complexation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 932-935, 2010.

  10. New chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis system with chiral amino amide ionic liquids as ligands.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junfang; Mu, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Juan; Su, Yuan; Qi, Li

    2017-12-01

    Using chiral amino amide ionic liquids as the ligands, a new chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis method with Cu(II) as the central ion was constructed for enantioseparation of labeled D,L-amino acids. The effects of key parameters, including pH value of the running buffer, the ratio of Cu(II) to chiral amino amide ionic liquids, the concentration of complexes based on Cu(II)-chiral amino amide ionic liquids were investigated. It has been observed that eight pairs of labeled D,L-amino acids could be baseline-separated with a running buffer of 15.0mM ammonium acetate, 10.0mM Cu(II) and 20.0mML-phenylalaninamide based ionic liquid at pH 5.0. The quantitation of D,L-amino acids was conducted and good linearity (r(2) ≥ 0.964) was obtained. Furthermore, an assay for determining the enantiomeric purity of D,L-amino acids was developed and the possible enantiorecognition mechanism was discussed briefly. The results indicated that the chiral amino amide ionic liquids could play the role of ligands in chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis system and exhibit great potential in chiral analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multidentate 2-pyridyl-phosphine ligands - towards ligand tuning and chirality.

    PubMed

    Hanf, S; García-Rodríguez, R; Feldmann, S; Bond, A D; Hey-Hawkins, E; Wright, D S

    2017-01-17

    In the current work a range of multidentate pyridyl-phosphine ligands are synthesised with tuneable electronic and steric character, through the incorporation of a variety of alcohols into (amino)pyridyl-phosphine frameworks. The stoichiometric reactions of compounds of the type (R2N)xP(2-py)3-x (2-py = 2-pyridyl) with alkyl as well as aryl alcohols result in the formation of (alkoxy)pyridyl-phosphines (RO)xP(2-py)3-x (R = Me, 2-Bu, Ph). This synthetic procedure also allows the introduction of enantiomerically pure alcohols, like (R)-(-)-2-BuOH and (S)-(+)-2-BuOH, and as such provides a very convenient two-step route to chiral multidentate pyridyl-phosphine ligand sets. Using the bis-amino-phosphine (Et2N)2P(2-py), the stepwise introduction of alcohols enables the synthesis of racemic alkoxy-amino-phosphines (R2N)(RO)P(2-py), as well as alkoxy-phosphines (RO)2P(2-py) and therefore offers easy access to a library of different pyridyl-phosphine ligands. Coordination studies of the (amino)pyridyl-phosphines and (alkoxy)pyridyl-phosphines with copper(i) reveal that ligands with two N donor atoms form dimeric arrangements, while (PhO)2P(2-py), in-corporating only one N donor atom, shows completely different coordination behaviour.

  12. LASSO—ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S.; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-06-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  13. Synthesis of planar five-connected nodal ligands.

    PubMed

    Oms, Olivier; Jarrosson, Thibaut; Tong, Lok H; Vaccaro, Andrea; Bernardinelli, Gérald; Williams, Alan F

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic routes to a penta(4-pyridyl)cyclopentadienyl ligand are explored. The most successful route uses a palladium-catalysed pentapyridation of di(tert-butyl)phosphinoferrocene by using a procedure developed by Hartwig. The same method allows the synthesis of cyclopentadiene ligands substituted with 4-benzaldehydes or 4-phenylthiols. The pyridine ligands are formally five-connected nodes that may be linked by linear coordination metals to give closed spherical complexes of composition [(metal)(30)(ligand)(12)] as shown by molecular modelling. Experiment shows that the ligand complexes copper(I) and silver(I) with the expected 1:2.5 stoichiometry, and the (1)H NMR spectrum of the resulting product shows the ligands to be equivalent. NMR diffusion and light-scattering measurements support the formation of a species with a hydrodynamic radius of the order of 15 A, in agreement with the modelling studies. The resulting complex would be topologically identical to the C(60) fullerene structure.

  14. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-08-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display.

  15. Ligand migration in sperm whale myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Scott, E E; Gibson, Q H

    1997-09-30

    Geminate oxygen rebinding to myoglobin was followed from a few nanoseconds to a few microseconds after photolysis for more than 25 different oxymyoglobin point mutants in the presence and absence of 12 atm of xenon. In all cases, two relaxations were observed: an initial fast phase (half-time 20 ns) and a slower, smaller phase (half-time 0.5-2 micros). Generally, xenon accelerates the fast reaction but slows the slower reaction and diminishes its amplitude. The rates and proportions of the two components and the effects of xenon on them vary widely for different mutants. The locations of specific xenon binding sites [Tilton, R. F., Kuntz, I. D. Jr., and Petsko, G. A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2849-2857], the effects of point mutations on the geminate reactions, and molecular dynamics simulations were used to suggest locations in the protein interior occupied by ligands on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale. Photodissociated ligands may occupy xenon site 4 in the distal pocket and xenon site 1 below the plane of the heme. Rebinding from these positions corresponds to the slower geminate phase for O2 rebinding. The rapid geminate component is determined by competition between rebinding from a position closer to the iron atom and escape to solvent or more distant locations in the protein.

  16. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  17. Inhibition of nickel precipitation by organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D.

    1996-11-01

    Wastewaters from electroplating are very complex due to the composition of the plating baths. A nickel plating bath typically consists of a nickel source (nickel chloride or nickel sulfate), complexing agents to solubilize nickel ions controlling their concentration in the solution, buffering agents to maintain pH, brighteners to improve brightness of the plated metal, stabilizers (inhibitors) to prevent undesired reactions, accelerators to enhance speed of reactions, wetting agents to reduce surface tension at the metal surface, and reducing agents (only for electroless nickel plating) to supply electrons for reduction of the nickel. Alkaline precipitation is the most common method of recovering nickel from wastewaters. However, organic constituents found in the wastewaters can mask or completely inhibit the precipitation of nickel. The objective of this study was to conduct an equilibrium study to explore the inhibition behavior of various organic ligands on nickel precipitation. This will lay the groundwork for development of technologies efficacious in the treatment of complexed nickel. The organic ligands used in this study are EDTA, triethanolamine (TEA), gluconate, and tartrate.

  18. Multiple geminate ligand recombinations in human hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Esquerra, R M; Goldbeck, R A; Reaney, S H; Batchelder, A M; Wen, Y; Lewis, J W; Kliger, D S

    2000-01-01

    The geminate ligand recombination reactions of photolyzed carbonmonoxyhemoglobin were studied in a nanosecond double-excitation-pulse time-resolved absorption experiment. The second laser pulse, delayed by intervals as long as 400 ns after the first, provided a measure of the geminate kinetics by rephotolyzing ligands that have recombined during the delay time. The peak-to-trough magnitude of the Soret band photolysis difference spectrum measured as a function of the delay between excitation pulses showed that the room temperature kinetics of geminate recombination in adult human hemoglobin are best described by two exponential processes, with lifetimes of 36 and 162 ns. The relative amounts of bimolecular recombination to T- and R-state hemoglobins and the temperature dependence of the submicrosecond kinetics between 283 and 323 K are also consistent with biexponential kinetics for geminate recombination. These results are discussed in terms of two models: geminate recombination kinetics modulated by concurrent protein relaxation and heterogeneous kinetics arising from alpha and beta chain differences. PMID:10827999

  19. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display. PMID:27578501

  20. Phenotypic spandrel: absolute discrimination and ligand antagonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Paul; Hemery, Mathieu; Johnson, Kyle A.; Saunders, Laura N.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the general problem of sensitive and specific discrimination between biochemical species. An important instance is immune discrimination between self and not-self, where it is also observed experimentally that ligands just below the discrimination threshold negatively impact response, a phenomenon called antagonism. We characterize mathematically the generic properties of such discrimination, first relating it to biochemical adaptation. Then, based on basic biochemical rules, we establish that, surprisingly, antagonism is a generic consequence of any strictly specific discrimination made independently from ligand concentration. Thus antagonism constitutes a ‘phenotypic spandrel’: a phenotype existing as a necessary by-product of another phenotype. We exhibit a simple analytic model of discrimination displaying antagonism, where antagonism strength is linear in distance from the detection threshold. This contrasts with traditional proofreading based models where antagonism vanishes far from threshold and thus displays an inverted hierarchy of antagonism compared to simpler models. The phenotypic spandrel studied here is expected to structure many decision pathways such as immune detection mediated by TCRs and FCɛRIs, as well as endocrine signalling/disruption.

  1. A model of smart G-quadruplex ligand.

    PubMed

    Haudecoeur, Romain; Stefan, Loic; Denat, Franck; Monchaud, David

    2013-01-16

    An unprecedented strategy to control the quadruplex- vs duplex-DNA selectivity of a ligand is reported. We designed a compound whose structure can rearrange when it interacts with a G-quadruplex, thereby controlling its affinity. Thus, the first "smart G-quadruplex ligand" is reported, since this ligand experiences a structural change in the presence of quadruplexes but not in the presence of duplexes, ensuring a high level of quadruplex selectivity.

  2. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  3. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  4. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of POSS ligand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyoligosilsesquioxanes are molecules having cage-like structures composed of silicon and oxygen. These molecules can have a wide variety of functional ligands attached to them. Depending on the nature of the ligand, interesting properties and applications are found. In this work we present results from quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of four different POSS molecules that illustrate the presence of strong coupling between the ligand dynamics and the POSS crystal structures.

  5. Characterisation of iron binding ligands in seawater by reverse titration.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Gledhill, Martha; Connelly, Douglas P; Achterberg, Eric P

    2013-03-05

    Here we demonstrate the use of reverse titration - competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (RT-CLE-ACSV) for the analysis of iron (Fe) binding ligands in seawater. In contrast to the forward titration, which examines excess ligands in solution, RT-CLE-ACSV examines the existing Fe-ligand complexes by increasing the concentration of added (electroactive) ligand (1-nitroso-2-naphthol) and analysis of the proportion of Fe bound to the added ligand. The data manipulation allows the accurate characterisation of ligands at equal or lower concentrations than Fe in seawater, and disregards electrochemically inert dissolved Fe such as some colloidal phases. The method is thus superior to the forward titration in environments with high Fe and low ligand concentrations or high concentrations of inert Fe. We validated the technique using the siderophore ligand ferrioxamine B, and observed a stability constant [Formula: see text] of 0.74-4.37×10(21) mol(-1), in agreement with previous results. We also successfully analysed samples from coastal waters and a deep ocean hydrothermal plume. Samples from these environments could not be analysed with confidence using the forward titration, highlighting the effectiveness of the RT-CLE-ACSV technique in waters with high concentrations of inert Fe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Dynamics of Ligand Barrier Crossing Inside the Acetylcholinesterase Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2003-10-01

    The dynamics of ligand movement through the constricted region of the acetylcholinesterase gorge is important in understanding how the ligand gains access to and is released from the active site of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the simple ligand, tetramethylammonium, crossing this bottleneck region are conducted using umbrella potential sampling and activated .ux techniques. The low potential of mean force obtained is consistent with the fast reaction rate of acetylcholinesterase observed experimentally. From the results of the activated dynamics simulations, local conformational .uctuations of the gorge residues and larger scale collective motions of the protein are found to correlate highly with the ligand crossing.

  7. ADAM Proteases: Ligand Processing and Modulation of the Notch Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zolkiewska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    ADAM metalloproteases play important roles in development and disease. One of the key functions of ADAMs is the proteolytic processing of Notch receptors and their ligands. ADAM-mediated cleavage of Notch represents the first step of the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the receptor, leading to activation of the Notch pathway. Recent reports indicate that the transmembrane Notch ligands also undergo ADAM-mediated processing in cultured cells and in vivo. The proteolytic processing of Notch ligands modulates the strength and duration of Notch signals, leads to generation of soluble intracellular domains of the ligands, and may support a bi-directional signaling between cells. PMID:18344021

  8. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands.

  9. Mixed Extracellular Matrix Ligands Synergistically Modulate Integrin Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Catherine D.; Petrie, Timothy A.; García, Andrés J

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components through cell-surface integrin receptors is essential to the formation, maintenance and repair of numerous tissues, and therefore represents a central theme in the design of bioactive materials that successfully interface with the body. While the adhesive responses associated with a single ligand have been extensively analyzed, the effects of multiple integrin subtypes binding to multivalent ECM signals remain poorly understood. In the present study, we generated a high throughput platform of non-adhesive surfaces presenting well-defined, independent densities of two integrin-specific engineered ligands for the type I collagen (COL-I) receptor α2β1 and the fibronectin (FN) receptor α5β1 to evaluate the effects of integrin cross-talk on adhesive responses. Engineered surfaces displayed ligand density-dependent adhesive effects, and mixed ligand surfaces significantly enhanced cell adhesion strength and focal adhesion assembly compared to single FN and COL-I ligand surfaces. Moreover, surfaces presenting mixed COL-I/FN ligands synergistically enhanced FAK activation compared to the single ligand substrates. The enhanced adhesive activities of the mixed ligand surfaces also promoted elevated proliferation rates. Our results demonstrate interplay between multivalent ECM ligands in adhesive responses and downstream cellular signaling. PMID:18613064

  10. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  11. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  12. Riboswitch Structure: an Internal Residue Mimicking the Purine Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, V.; Bouchard, P; Bonneau, E; Dagenais, P; Lemay, J; Lafontaine, D; Legault, P

    2009-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson-Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39-C65 and A39-U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation.

  13. Hysteresis of ligand binding in CNGA2 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Benndorf, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate receptor potentials in olfaction and vision. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a binding domain embedded in the C terminus of each subunit. Here using a fluorescent cGMP derivative (fcGMP), we show for homotetrameric CNGA2 channels that ligand unbinding is ~50 times faster at saturating than at subsaturating fcGMP. Analysis with complex Markovian models reveals two pathways for ligand unbinding; the partially liganded open channel unbinds its ligands from closed states only, whereas the fully liganded channel reaches a different open state from which it unbinds all four ligands rapidly. Consequently, the transition pathways for ligand binding and activation of a fully liganded CNGA2 channel differ from that of ligand unbinding and deactivation, resulting in pronounced hysteresis of the gating mechanism. This concentration-dependent gating mechanism allows the channels to respond to changes in the cyclic nucleotide concentration with different kinetics. PMID:24287615

  14. Melanoma Cell Galectin-1 Ligands Functionally Correlate with Malignant Potential.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Erika M; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C; Barthel, Steven R; Opperman, Matthew J; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C; Mihm, Martin C; Qureshi, Abrar A; Widlund, Hans R; Murphy, George F; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2015-07-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening antitumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity, and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely dysplastic nevi, as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAM(KD)) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6(O/E)) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAM(KD) or ST6(O/E) melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1/melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy.

  15. Design of targeting ligands in medicinal inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Storr, Tim; Thompson, Katherine H; Orvig, Chris

    2006-06-01

    This tutorial review will highlight recent advances in medicinal inorganic chemistry pertaining to the use of multifunctional ligands for enhanced effect. Ligands that adequately bind metal ions and also include specific targeting features are gaining in popularity due to their ability to enhance the efficacy of less complicated metal-based agents. Moving beyond the traditional view of ligands modifying reactivity, stabilizing specific oxidation states, and contributing to substitution inertness, we will discuss recent work involving metal complexes with multifunctional ligands that target specific tissues, membrane receptors, or endogenous molecules, including enzymes.

  16. LibME-automatic extraction of 3D ligand-binding motifs for mechanistic analysis of protein-ligand recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liang, Zhi; Teng, MaiKun; Niu, LiWen

    2016-12-01

    Identifying conserved binding motifs is an efficient way to study protein-ligand recognition. Most 3D binding motifs only contain information from the protein side, and so motifs that combine information from both protein and ligand sides are desired. Here, we propose an algorithm called LibME (Ligand-binding Motif Extractor), which automatically extracts 3D binding motifs composed of the target ligand and surrounding conserved residues. We show that the motifs extracted by LibME for ATP and its analogs are highly similar to well-known motifs reported by previous studies. The superiority of our method to handle flexible ligands was also demonstrated using isocitric acid as an example. Finally, we show that these motifs, together with their visual exhibition, permit better investigating and understanding of protein-ligand recognition process.

  17. Ultrafast heme-ligand recombination in truncated hemoglobin HbO from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A ligand cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Ouellet, Hugues; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Jean-Louis; Friedman, Joel M.; Guertin, Michel; Vos, Marten H.

    2012-03-01

    Truncated hemoglobin HbO from Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays very slow exchange of diatomic ligands with its environment. Using femtosecond spectroscopy, we show that upon photoexcitation, ligands rebind with unusual speed and efficiency. Only ˜1% O2 can escape from the heme pocket and less than 1% NO. Most remarkably, CO rebinding occurs for 95%, predominantly in 1.2 ns. The general CO rebinding properties are unexpectedly robust against changes in the interactions with close by aromatic residues Trp88 (G8) and Tyr36 (CD1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the CO complex suggest that interactions of the ligand with structural water molecules as well as its rotational freedom play a role in the high reactivity of the ligand and the heme. The slow exchange of ligands between heme and environment may result from a combination of hindered ligand access to the heme pocket by the network of distal aromatic residues, and low escape probability from the pocket.

  18. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-06

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K.

  19. Interaction between alkaline earth cations and oxo ligands: a DFT study of the affinity of Mg2+ for carbonyl ligands.

    PubMed

    Moreira da Costa, Leonardo; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Walkimar de M Carneiro, José

    2012-09-01

    The affinities of Mg(2+) for various substituted carbonyl ligands were determined at the DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) and semi-empirical (PM6) levels of theory. Two sets of carbonyl ligands were studied: monosubstituted [aldehydes R-CHO and RPh-CHO] and homodisubstituted [ketones R(2)C=O and (RPh)(2)C=O], where R = NH(2), OCH(3), OH, CH(3), H, F, Cl, Br, CN, or NO(2)). In the (RPh)(2)CO case, the R group was bonded to the para position of a phenyl ring. The enthalpies of interaction between the ligands and a pentaaquomagnesium(II) complex were calculated to determine the affinity of each ligand for the Mg(2+) cation and to correlate with geometrical and electronic parameters. These parameters exhibited the same trends for all of the ligands studied, showing that the affinity of Mg(2+) for electron-donating ligands is higher than its affinity for electron-withdrawing ligands. In the complexes, electron-donating groups increase both the electrostatic and the covalent components of the Mg-ligand interaction. This behavior correlates with the Mg-O(carbonyl) distance and the ligand electron-donor strength.

  20. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands.

  1. [Effect of ligand concentration on the precision of determining the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction by serial dilution methods].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2004-01-01

    Earlier we suggested the method of serial dilution, which allows one to determine the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction even if the reactants are in a mixture and their concentrations are unknown. The method is especially useful if the liability of studied receptor does not allow its separation from corresponding ligand. The important prerequisite of the method's precision is that the concentration of the ligand should be sufficiently high comparing to the concentration of the receptor. In the present paper it was demonstrated that the method allows one to obtain sufficiently good precision even in the case when the concentration of the ligand is only one tenth of the receptor concentration.

  2. Characterizing mixed phosphonic acid ligand capping on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using ligand exchange and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Lisowski, Carmen E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-03-01

    The ligand capping of phosphonic acid functionalized CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) was investigated with a combination of solution and solid-state (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two phosphonic acid ligands were used in the synthesis of the QDs, tetradecylphosphonic acid and ethylphosphonic acid. Both alkyl phosphonic acids showed broad liquid and solid-state (31) P NMR resonances for the bound ligands, indicative of heterogeneous binding to the QD surface. In order to quantify the two ligand populations on the surface, ligand exchange facilitated by phenylphosphonic acid resulted in the displacement of the ethylphosphonic acid and tetradecylphosphonic acid and allowed for quantification of the free ligands using (31) P liquid-state NMR. After washing away the free ligand, two broad resonances were observed in the liquids' (31) P NMR corresponding to the alkyl and aromatic phosphonic acids. The washed samples were analyzed via solid-state (31) P NMR, which confirmed the ligand populations on the surface following the ligand exchange process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Pathways of ligand clearance in acetylcholinesterase by multiple copy sampling.

    PubMed

    Van Belle, D; De Maria, L; Iurcu, G; Wodak, S J

    2000-05-12

    The clearance of seven different ligands from the deeply buried active-site of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase is investigated by combining multiple copy sampling molecular dynamics simulations, with the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, protein motion and the electrostatic potential sampled by the ligand copies along their journey outwards. The considered ligands are the cations ammonium, methylammonium, and tetramethylammonium, the hydrophobic methane and neopentane, and the anionic product acetate and its neutral form, acetic acid. We find that the pathways explored by the different ligands vary with ligand size and chemical properties. Very small ligands, such as ammonium and methane, exit through several routes. One involves the main exit through the mouth of the enzyme gorge, another is through the so-called back door near Trp84, and a third uses a side door at a direction of approximately 45 degrees to the main exit. The larger polar ligands, methylammonium and acetic acid, leave through the main exit, but the bulkiest, tetramethylammonium and neopentane, as well as the smaller acetate ion, remain trapped in the enzyme gorge during the time of the simulations. The pattern of protein-ligand contacts during the diffusion process is highly non-random and differs for different ligands. A majority is made with aromatic side-chains, but classical H-bonds are also formed. In the case of acetate, but not acetic acid, the anionic and neutral form, respectively, of one of the reaction products, specific electrostatic interactions with protein groups, seem to slow ligand motion and interfere with protein flexibility; protonation of the acetate ion is therefore suggested to facilitate clearance. The Poisson-Boltzmann formalism is used to compute the electrostatic potential of the thermally fluctuating acetylcholinesterase protein at positions actually visited by the diffusing ligand copies. Ligands of different charge and size are shown to sample

  4. Phosphinothiolates as ligands for polyhydrido copper nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Huertos, Miguel A; Cano, Israel; Bandeira, Nuno A G; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Bo, Carles; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-12-01

    The reaction of [CuI(HSC6 H4 PPh2 )]2 with NaBH4 in CH2 Cl2 /EtOH led to air- and moisture-stable copper hydride nanoparticles (CuNPs) containing phosphinothiolates as new ligands, one of which was isolated by crystallization. The X-ray crystal structure of [Cu18 H7 L10 I] (L=(-) S(C6 H4 )PPh2 ) shows unprecedented features in its 28-atom framework (18 Cu and 10 S atoms). Seven hydrogen atoms, in hydride form, are needed for charge balance and were located by density functional theory methods. H2 was released from the copper hydride nanoparticles by thermolysis and visible light irradiation.

  5. Early development of sigma-receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Bhat, Rohit; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors (σ-1 and σ-2) are non-opioid proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders and cancer. The σ-1 subtype is a chaperon protein widely distributed in the CNS and peripheral tissues. These receptors are involved in the modulation of K(+)- and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling cascades at the endoplasmic reticulum and modulation of neurotransmitter release. σ-1 receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of neurophychiatric diseases (schizophrenia and depression) and cocaine addiction. σ-2 receptors are lipid raft proteins. They are highly expressed on many tumor cells and hence considered potential targets for anticancer drugs. σ receptors bind to a diverse class of pharmacological compounds like cocaine, methamphetamine, benzomorphans like (±)-pentazocine, (±)-SKF-10,047 and endogenous neurosteroids and sphingolipids. In this review we focus on the early development of σ receptor-specific ligands and radiolabeling agents.

  6. Rational design of class I MHC ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, D.; Scapozza, L.; Folkers, G.; Daser, Angelika

    1995-04-01

    From the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of a class I MHC protein, several non natural peptides were designed in order to either optimize the interactions of one secondary anchor amino acid with its HLA binding pocket or to substitute the non interacting part with spacer residues. All peptides were synthesized and tested for binding to the class I MHC protein in an in vitro reconstitution assay. As predicted, the non natural peptides present an enhanced binding to the HLA-B27 molecule with respect to their natural parent peptides. This study constitutes the first step towards the rational design of non peptidic MHC ligands that should be very promising tools for the selective immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Investigating silver coordination to mixed chalcogen ligands.

    PubMed

    Knight, Fergus R; Randall, Rebecca A M; Wakefield, Lucy; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Woollins, J Derek

    2012-11-08

    Six silver(I) coordination complexes have been prepared and structurally characterised. Mixed chalcogen-donor acenaphthene ligands L1-L3 [Acenap(EPh)(E'Ph)] (Acenap = acenaphthene-5,6-diyl; E/E' = S, Se, Te) were independently treated with silver(I) salts (AgBF₄/AgOTf). In order to keep the number of variables to a minimum, all reactions were carried out using a 1:1 ratio of Ag/L and run in dichloromethane. The nature of the donor atoms, the coordinating ability of the respective counter-anion and the type of solvent used in recrystallisation, all affect the structural architecture of the final silver(I) complex, generating monomeric, silver(I) complexes {[AgBF₄(L)₂] (1 L = L1; 2 L = L2; 3 L = L3), [AgOTf(L)₃] (4 L = L1; 5 L = L3), [AgBF₄(L)₃] (2a L = L1; 3a L = L3)} and a 1D polymeric chain {[AgOTf(L3)](n) 6}. The organic acenaphthene ligands L1-L3 adopt a number of ligation modes (bis-monodentate μ₂-η²-bridging, quasi-chelating combining monodentate and η⁶-E(phenyl)-Ag(I) and classical monodentate coordination) with the central silver atom at the centre of a tetrahedral or trigonal planar coordination geometry in each case. The importance of weak interactions in the formation of metal-organic structures is also highlighted by the number of short non-covalent contacts present within each complex.

  8. Ligand interactions with galactose oxidase: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between galactose oxidase and small molecules have been explored using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to detect complex formation and characterize the products. Anions bind directly to the cupric center in both active and inactive galactose oxidase, converting to complexes with optical and EPR spectra that are distinctly different from those of the starting aquo enzyme. Azide binding is coupled to stoichiometric proton uptake by the enzyme, reflecting the generation of a strong base (pKa > 9) in the active site anion adduct. At low temperature, the aquo enzyme converts to a form that exhibits the characteristic optical and EPR spectra of an anion complex, apparently reflecting deprotonation of the coordinated water. Anion binding results in a loss of the optical transition arising from coordinated tyrosine, implying displacement of the axial tyrosine ligand on forming the adduct. Nitric oxide binds to galactose oxidase, forming a specific complex exhibiting an unusual EPR spectrum with all g values below 2. The absence of Cu splitting in this spectrum and the observation that the cupric EPR signal from the active site metal ion is not significantly decreased in the complex suggest a nonmetal interaction site for NO in galactose oxidase. These results have been interpreted in terms of a mechanistic scheme where substrate binding displaces a tyrosinate ligand from the active site cupric ion, generating a base that may serve to deprotonate the coordinated hydroxyl group of the substrate, activating it for oxidation. The protein-NO interactions may probe a nonmetal O2 binding site in this enzyme. PMID:8386015

  9. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  10. Technetium radiodiagnostic fatty acids derived from bisamide bisthiol ligands

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Lister-James, John; Davison, Alan

    1988-05-24

    A bisamide-bisthiol ligand containing fatty acid substituted thiol useful for producing Tc-labelled radiodiagnostic imaging agents is described. The ligand forms a complex with the radionuclide .sup.99m Tc suitable for administration as a radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of the heart for diagnosis of myocardial disfunction.

  11. A structural analysis of G-quadruplex/ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Haider, Shozeb M; Neidle, Stephen; Parkinson, Gary N

    2011-08-01

    This focused review article discusses in detail, all available high-resolution small molecule ligand/G-quadruplex structural data derived from crystallographic and NMR based techniques, in an attempt to understand key factors in ligand binding and to highlight the biological importance of these complexes. In contrast to duplex DNA, G-quadruplexes are four-stranded nucleic acid structures folded from guanine rich repeat sequences stabilized by the stacking of guanine G-quartets and extensive Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding. Thermally stable, these topologies can play a role in telomere regulation and gene expression. The core structures of G-quadruplexes form stable scaffolds while the loops have been shown, by the addition of small molecule ligands, to be sufficiently adaptable to generate new and extended binding platforms for ligands to associate, either by extending G-quartet surfaces or by forming additional planar dinucleotide pairings. Many of these structurally characterised loop rearrangements were totally unexpected opening up new opportunities for the design of selective ligands. However these rearrangements do significantly complicate attempts to rationally design ligands against well defined but unbound topologies, as seen for the series of napthalene diimides complexes. Drawing together previous findings and with the introduction of two new crystallographic quadruplex/ligand structures we aim to expand the understanding of possible structural adaptations available to quadruplexes in the presence of ligands, thereby aiding in the design of new selective entities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymerization catalysts containing electron-withdrawing amide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Watkin, John G.; Click, Damon R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention describes methods of making a series of amine-containing organic compounds which are used as ligands for group 3-10 and lanthanide metal compounds. The ligands have electron-withdrawing groups bonded to them. The metal compounds, when combined with a cocatalyst, are catalysts for the polymerization of olefins.

  13. Correcting binding parameters for interacting ligand-lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervy, Jordan; Bicout, Dominique J.

    2017-07-01

    Binding of ligands to macromolecules is central to many functional and regulatory biological processes. Key parameters characterizing ligand-macromolecule interactions are the stoichiometry, inducing the number of ligands per macromolecule binding site, and the dissociation constant, quantifying the ligand-binding site affinity. Both these parameters can be obtained from analyses of classical saturation experiments using the standard binding equation that offers the great advantage of mathematical simplicity but becomes an approximation for situations of interest when a ligand binds and covers more than one single binding site on the macromolecule. Using the framework of car-parking problem with latticelike macromolecules where each ligand can cover simultaneously several consecutive binding sites, we showed that employing the standard analysis leads to underestimation of binding parameters, i.e., ligands appear larger than they actually are and their affinity is also greater than it is. Therefore, we have derived expressions allowing to determine the ligand size and true binding parameters (stoichiometry and dissociation constant) as a function of apparent binding parameters retrieved from standard saturation experiments.

  14. Ligand-modified metal clusters for gas separation and purification

    DOEpatents

    Okrut, Alexander; Ouyang, Xiaoying; Runnebaum, Ron; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    Provided is an organic ligand-bound metal surface that selects one gaseous species over another. The species can be closely sized molecular species having less than 1 Angstrom difference in kinetic diameter. In one embodiment, the species comprise carbon monoxide and ethylene. Such organic ligand-bound metal surfaces can be successfully used in gas phase separations or purifications, sensing, and in catalysis.

  15. Digestive Ripening of Au Nanoparticles Using Multidentate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Puspanjali; Shimpi, Jayesh; Lee, Han Ju; Lee, T Randall; Prasad, Bhagavatula L V

    2017-02-16

    The efficiency of multidentate ligands as digestive ripening (DR) agents for the preparation of monodisperse Au nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. This systematic investigation was performed using ligands possessing one, two, or three thiol moieties as ligands/DR agents. Our results clearly establish that among the different ligands, monodentate ligands and the use of temperature in the range of 60-120 °C offer the best conditions for DR. In addition, when DR was carried out at lower temperatures (e.g., 60 °C), the NP size increased as the number of thiol groups per ligand increased. However, in the case of ligands possessing two and three thiol moieties, when they were heated with polydispersed particles at higher temperatures (120 or 180 °C), the etching process dominated, which affected the quality of the NPs in terms of their monodispersity. We conclude that the temperature-dependent strength of the interaction between the ligand headgroup and the NP surface plays a vital role in controlling the final particle sizes.

  16. Regulation of ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Anita R; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of an encounter between a cytotoxic cell and a potential target cell depends on the balance of signals from inhibitory and activating receptors. Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) has recently emerged as a major activating receptor on T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In both humans and mice, multiple different genes encode ligands for NKG2D, and these ligands are non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The NKG2D–ligand interaction triggers an activating signal in the cell expressing NKG2D and this promotes cytotoxic lysis of the cell expressing the ligand. Most normal tissues do not express ligands for NKG2D, but ligand expression has been documented in tumour and virus-infected cells, leading to lysis of these cells. Tight regulation of ligand expression is important. If there is inappropriate expression in normal tissues, this will favour autoimmune processes, whilst failure to up-regulate the ligands in pathological conditions would favour cancer development or dissemination of intracellular infection. PMID:17614877

  17. Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Correia, Bruno E.; Lum, Kenneth M.; Forli, Stefano; Horning, Benjamin D.; González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Chatterjee, Sandip; Lanning, Bryan R.; Teijaro, John R.; Olson, Arthur J.; Wolan, Dennis W.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are powerful tools for investigating protein function and can serve as leads for new therapeutics. Most human proteins, however, lack small-molecule ligands, and entire protein classes are considered “undruggable” 1,2. Fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD) can identify small-molecule probes for proteins that have proven difficult to target using high-throughput screening of complex compound libraries 1,3. Although reversibly binding ligands are commonly pursued, covalent fragments provide an alternative route to small-molecule probes 4–10, including those that can access regions of proteins that are difficult to access through binding affinity alone 5,10,11. In this manuscript, we report a quantitative analysis of cysteine-reactive small-molecule fragments screened against thousands of proteins. Covalent ligands were identified for >700 cysteines found in both druggable proteins and proteins deficient in chemical probes, including transcription factors, adaptor/scaffolding proteins, and uncharacterized proteins. Among the atypical ligand-protein interactions discovered were compounds that react preferentially with pro- (inactive) caspases. We used these ligands to distinguish extrinsic apoptosis pathways in human cell lines versus primary human T-cells, showing that the former is largely mediated by caspase-8 while the latter depends on both caspase-8 and −10. Fragment-based covalent ligand discovery provides a greatly expanded portrait of the ligandable proteome and furnishes compounds that can illuminate protein functions in native biological systems. PMID:27309814

  18. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Marc C.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  19. [Peripheral effects of ligands of ORL1 receptors].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Calo, G; Ma, L; Lambert, D G

    2003-01-01

    It has been discussed literature data on the role for ORL1 (NOR) receptors in the regulation of function of gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, endocrine systems. In addition, it has been discussed a possibility of penetration of blood brain barrier for ORL1 receptor ligands and species dependence of NOR-ligands' effects.

  20. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX

    DOE PAGES

    Janowski, Pawel A.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Kelley, Brian P.; ...

    2016-08-31

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows.PHENIX–AFITTrefinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentiallymore » difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows.PHENIX–AFITTrefinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combiningAFITTand thePHENIXsoftware suite on a data set of 189 protein–ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements usingPHENIX–AFITTsignificantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. Finally, for the data presented,PHENIX–AFITTrefinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands.« less

  1. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Pawel A.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Kelley, Brian P.; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.; Adams, Paul D.; Warren, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX–AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX–AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein–ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX–AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX–AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands. PMID:27599738

  2. Multifunctional ligand for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1996-05-14

    A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical are revealed. The ligand comprises either a phosphorous or germanium core and at least two hydrazine groups forming a ligand for bonding to a metal extending from the phosphorous or germanium core.

  3. Transient Ligand Docking Sites in Cerebratulus lacteus Mini-Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pengchi; Nienhaus, Karin; Palladino, Pasquale; Olson, John S.; Blouin, George; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Geuens, Eva; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    The monomeric hemoglobin of the nemertean worm Cerebratulus lacteus functions as an oxygen storage protein to maintain neural activity under hypoxic conditions. It shares a large, apolar matrix tunnel with other small hemoglobins, which has been implicated as a potential ligand migration pathway. Here we explore ligand migration and binding within the distal heme pocket, to which the tunnel provides access to ligands from the outside. FTIR/TDS experiments performed at cryogenic temperatures reveal the presence of three transient ligand docking sites within the distal pocket, the primary docking site B on top of pyrrole C and secondary sites C and D. Site C is assigned to a cavity adjacent to the distal portion of the heme pocket, surrounded by the B and E helices. It has an opening to the apolar tunnel and is expected to be on the pathway for ligand entry and exit, whereas site D, circumscribed by TyrB10, GlnE7, and the CD corner, most likely is located on a side pathway of ligand migration. Flash photolysis experiments at ambient temperatures indicate that the rate-limiting step for ligand binding to CerHb is migration through the apolar channel to site C. Movement from C to B and iron-ligand bond formation involve low energy barriers and thus are very rapid processes in the wt protein. PMID:17531406

  4. Identifying Marine Copper-Binding Ligands in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, H.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Maldonado, M. T.; Ouchi, S.; van den Berg, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    Complexation reactions are important because they affect the bioavailability of trace metals such as copper and iron. For example, organic complexation can determine whether copper is a limiting or a toxic micronutrient at natural levels. Copper competes with iron for complexing ligands, and when iron is limiting, copper can also substitute for iron in some metabolic pathways. The speciation of copper can be measured using complexing capacity titrations, which provide the concentration of individual ligand classes (L1, L2 etc.) and the complex stabilities (log K). Using methods recently developed in our laboratory, we show that the ligands within these classes can be measured independently of titrations, thus confirming the titration method and simultaneously identifying the ligands within each class. Thiols were identified as the L1 ligand class and humic compounds as the weaker L2 class in samples from coastal Georgia, USA, collected monthly from April to December. Log K values of the ligand complexes were consistent with values expected for thiols and humic substances. Recent results from culture studies and from samples collected along Line P, a coastal - oceanic transect in the HNLC region of the NE subarctic Pacific, will be presented in comparison to the estuarine results. This comparison will help to broaden our perspective on copper complexation and the ligands responsible, furthering our understanding of ligand sources and life cycles.

  5. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Moriarty, Nigel W; Kelley, Brian P; Case, David A; York, Darrin M; Adams, Paul D; Warren, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein-ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX-AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX-AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands.

  6. GLIDA: GPCR-ligand database for chemical genomic drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Yasushi; Yang, Jiyoon; Taneishi, Kei; Yabuuchi, Hiroaki; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important families of drug targets in pharmaceutical development. GPCR-LIgand DAtabase (GLIDA) is a novel public GPCR-related chemical genomic database that is primarily focused on the correlation of information between GPCRs and their ligands. It provides correlation data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as access information to the various web databases regarding GPCRs. These data are connected with each other in a relational database, allowing users in the field of GPCR-related drug discovery to easily retrieve such information from either biological or chemical starting points. GLIDA includes structure similarity search functions for the GPCRs and for their ligands. Thus, GLIDA can provide correlation maps linking the searched homologous GPCRs (or ligands) with their ligands (or GPCRs). By analyzing the correlation patterns between GPCRs and ligands, we can gain more detailed knowledge about their interactions and improve drug design efforts by focusing on inferred candidates for GPCR-specific drugs. GLIDA is publicly available at . We hope that it will prove very useful for chemical genomic research and GPCR-related drug discovery. PMID:16381956

  7. Synthesis of 3-alkyl naphthalenes as novel estrogen receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jing; Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Britton, Jonathan E.; Katamreddy, Subba R.; Navas III, Frank; Miller, Aaron B.; Williams, Shawn P.; Gray, David W.; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Shearin, Jean; Heyer, Dennis

    2009-06-24

    A series of estrogen receptor ligands based on a 3-alkyl naphthalene scaffold was synthesized using an intramolecular enolate-alkyne cycloaromatization as the key step. Several of these compounds bearing a C6-OH group were shown to be high affinity ligands. All compounds had similar ER{alpha} and ER{beta} binding affinity ranging from micromolar to low nanomolar.

  8. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A; Geisler, C; Karjalainen, K

    2001-12-28

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affinity determine the level of T cell activation. When fitted to T cell responses against purified ligands immobilized on plastic surfaces, the 2D-affinity model adequately simulated changes in cellular activation as a result of varying ligand affinity and ligand density. These observations further demonstrated the importance of receptor cross-linking density in determining TCR signaling. Moreover, it was found that the functional two-dimensional affinity of TCR ligands was affected by the chemical composition of the ligand-presenting surface. This makes it possible that cell-bound TCR ligands, despite their low affinity in solution, are of optimal two-dimensional affinity thereby allowing effective TCR binding under physiological conditions, i.e. at low ligand densities in cellular interfaces.

  9. Subtle balance of ligand steric effects in Stille transmetalation.

    PubMed

    Ariafard, Alireza; Yates, Brian F

    2009-10-07

    Experimental results have previously suggested that the transmetalation step in the Stille reaction is hindered at one extreme by very bulky ligands L on the PdL(2) catalyst, yet at the other extreme, transmetalation is also found to be slow for small ligands. Our aim in this paper is to resolve this dilemma using computational chemistry and to show which ligand is best and why. With the use of density functional theory we show that the reason why L = P(t)Bu(3) retards transmetalation is because the bulky ligand hinders the coordination of the organostannane. On the other hand a small ligand such as L = PMe(3) leads to the formation of a very stable intermediate in the catalytic cycle which then requires a large activation energy for the transmetalation to proceed. The L = PPh(3) ligand appears to provide just the right balance in that it can readily coordinate the organostannane but avoids forming the very stable intermediate, and is thus the ligand of choice. L = PPh(2)Me is predicted to be the next best option, but L = PPhMe(2) is too small and forms an intermediate whose stability prevents further reaction in the transmetalation step. Our calculations are also able to account for the accelerating role of CsF in the transmetalation step of the Stille reaction. Finally, this work demonstrates the importance of taking into account the steric properties of the full ligand in theoretical studies of such reactions, rather than using small model phosphines.

  10. An agent based model of integrin clustering: Exploring the role of ligand clustering, integrin homo-oligomerization, integrin-ligand affinity, membrane crowdedness and ligand mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Yousef; Jamali, Tahereh; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2013-07-01

    Integrins are cell-surface protein heterodimers that coordinate cellular responses to mechanochemical cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM) and stimulate the assembly of small adhesion complexes, which are the initial sites of cell-ECM adhesion. Clustering of integrins is known to mediate signaling through a variety of signal transduction pathways. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of integrin clustering are poorly understood. In this paper, we develop computational models, using agent based modeling (ABM) techniques, to explore two key underlying mechanisms of integrin clustering, namely ligand organization and integrin homo-oligomerization. Our models help to shed light on the potential roles ligand clustering and integrin homo-oligomerization may play in controlling integrin clustering. A potential mechanism for the clustering of integrin is discussed and the effects of other parameters such as integrin-ligand affinity, membrane crowdedness and ligand mobility on integrin clustering are examined.

  11. Enthalpy of ligand substitution in cis organopalladium complexes with monodentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Salas, Gorka; Casares, Juan A; Espinet, Pablo

    2009-10-21

    The enthalpy for the substitution reaction cis-[PdRf(2)(THF)(2)] + 2 L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(2)] + 2THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) has been measured in THF by calorimetric methods for Rf = 3,5-dichloro-2,4,6-trifluorophenyl, L = PPh(3), AsPh(3), SbPh(3), PMePh(2), PCyPh(2), PMe(3), AsMePh(2), or L(2) = dppe (1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane), dppf (1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene). The values determined show that the substitution enthalpy has a strong dependence on the electronic and steric properties of the ligand. The study of the consecutive substitution reactions cis-[PdRf(2)(THF)(2)] + L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(THF)] + THF, and cis-[PdRf(2)L(THF)] + L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(2)] + THF has been carried our for L = PPh(3) and L = PCyPh(2). The first substitution is clearly more favorable for the bulkier leaving ligand, but the second gives practically the same DeltaH value for both cases, indicating that the differences in steric hindrance happen to compensate the electronic differences for both ligands. The X-ray structures of cis-[PdRf(2)(PMePh(2))(2)], cis-[PdRf(2)(dppe)] and cis-[PdRf(2)(dppf)] are reported.

  12. Identifying ligand-specific signalling within biased responses: focus on δ opioid receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Charfi, I; Audet, N; Bagheri Tudashki, H; Pineyro, G

    2015-01-01

    Opioids activate GPCRs to produce powerful analgesic actions but at the same time induce side effects and generate tolerance, which restrict their clinical use. Reducing this undesired response profile has remained a major goal of opioid research and the notion of ‘biased agonism’ is raising increasing interest as a means of separating therapeutic responses from unwanted side effects. However, to fully exploit this opportunity, it is necessary to confidently identify biased signals and evaluate which type of bias may support analgesia and which may lead to undesired effects. The development of new computational tools has made it possible to quantify ligand-dependent signalling and discriminate this component from confounders that may also yield biased responses. Here, we analyse different approaches to identify and quantify ligand-dependent bias and review different types of confounders. Focus is on δ opioid receptor ligands, which are currently viewed as promising agents for chronic pain management. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24665881

  13. Non-aqueous chemistry of uranyl complexes with tripodal ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Carol J.; Clark, David L.; Duval, Paul B.; Scott, Brian L.

    2000-07-01

    The trans dioxo uranyl(VI) ion (UO22+) is remarkably stable with respect to the U=O bond, which dominates the stereochemistry of its coordination compounds in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The linear O=U=O unit directs all other ligands to coordinate in an equatorial plane perpendicular to the O=U=O axis. In aqueous solution, uranyl coordination chemistry has been developed with a wide array of weak-field ligands that coordinate in the equatorial plane. In contrast, non-aqueous uranyl chemistry incorporating stronger donor ligands at equatorial sites has been less well developed. In this paper, the use of tripodal ligands with strong amide and alkoxide donors is employed, with an aim towards probing the electronic and steric effects of these cis-directing ligands on the structure and bonding of the trans dioxo unit.

  14. Endogenous toll-like receptor ligands and their biological significance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors, recognize and respond to conserved components of microbes and play a crucial role in both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition to binding exogenous ligands derived from pathogens, TLRs interact with endogenous molecules released from damaged tissues or dead cells and regulate many sterile inflammation processes. Putative endogenous TLR ligands include proteins and peptides, polysaccharides and proteoglycan, nucleic acids and phospholipids, which are cellular components, particularly extracellular matrix degradation products. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endogenous ligand-mediated TLR signalling is involved in pathological conditions such as tissue injury, repair and regeneration; autoimmune diseases and tumorigenesis. The ability of TLRs to recognize endogenous stimulators appears to be essential to their function in regulating non-infectious inflammation. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLR ligands and discuss the biological significance of TLR signalling triggered by endogenous ligands in several sterile inflammation conditions. PMID:20629986

  15. Ligand binding was acquired during evolution of nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Escriva, Hector; Safi, Rachid; Hänni, Catherine; Langlois, Marie-Claire; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Stehelin, Dominique; Capron, André; Pierce, Raymond; Laudet, Vincent

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily comprises, in addition to ligand-activated transcription factors, members for which no ligand has been identified to date. We demonstrate that orphan receptors are randomly distributed in the evolutionary tree and that there is no relationship between the position of a given liganded receptor in the tree and the chemical nature of its ligand. NRs are specific to metazoans, as revealed by a screen of NR-related sequences in early- and non-metazoan organisms. The analysis of the NR gene duplication pattern during the evolution of metazoans shows that the present NR diversity arose from two waves of gene duplications. Strikingly, our results suggest that the ancestral NR was an orphan receptor that acquired ligand-binding ability during subsequent evolution. PMID:9192646

  16. Development of chiral sulfoxide ligands for asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Rao, Meera

    2015-04-20

    Nitrogen-, phosphorus-, and oxygen-based ligands with chiral backbones have been the historic workhorses of asymmetric transition-metal-catalyzed reactions. On the contrary, sulfoxides containing chirality at the sulfur atom have mainly been used as chiral auxiliaries for diastereoselective reactions. Despite several distinct advantages over traditional ligand scaffolds, such as the proximity of the chiral information to the metal center and the ability to switch between S and O coordination, these compounds have only recently emerged as a versatile class of chiral ligands. In this Review, we detail the history of the development of chiral sulfoxide ligands for asymmetric catalysis. We also provide brief descriptions of metal-sulfoxide bonding and strategies for the synthesis of enantiopure sulfoxides. Finally, insights into the future development of this underutilized ligand class are discussed.

  17. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  18. Affinity Screening Using Competition with Fluorine-19 Hyperpolarized Ligands**

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (KD) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand to the binding pocket of interest is known. PMID:25703090

  19. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Predicting protein-ligand affinity with a random matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Brenner, Michael P; Colwell, Lucy J

    2016-11-29

    Rapid determination of whether a candidate compound will bind to a particular target receptor remains a stumbling block in drug discovery. We use an approach inspired by random matrix theory to decompose the known ligand set of a target in terms of orthogonal "signals" of salient chemical features, and distinguish these from the much larger set of ligand chemical features that are not relevant for binding to that particular target receptor. After removing the noise caused by finite sampling, we show that the similarity of an unknown ligand to the remaining, cleaned chemical features is a robust predictor of ligand-target affinity, performing as well or better than any algorithm in the published literature. We interpret our algorithm as deriving a model for the binding energy between a target receptor and the set of known ligands, where the underlying binding energy model is related to the classic Ising model in statistical physics.

  1. Exploiting Ultra Tight-Binding Ligands for Separations Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Daryle; Givens, Richard S.; Zuo, Xiaobin; Zhang, Chi; Mosha, Donnati; Lee, Jong0Ill; Bushan, K. Mani; Hassan, Mansour M.; Loving, Galen

    2003-09-10

    The classic slowness that has kept the most powerful ligands from being used in separations applications is under attack in two ways: (1) replacing metal ion - ligand equilibration with switch binding and release as the mode of complexation. By exploiting the tight-binding capabilities of cryptands, the capture of selected metal ions isolates them from their environment. These cryptands are constructed with photoactivatable functions that sever the cryptand, releasing encapsulated metal ions. The precursors have been modified to capture the metal ion concomitant with crytate formation. (2) developing a methodology (the soil poultice) so slow that powerful ligands can be used. A solution containing the specially designed ligand is mixed with a solid macroporous imprinted polymer (MIPs) and applied to the contaminated area. The ligand captures the metal ion and the MIPs captures the resulting complex. Current studies focus on combinations of MIPs-complex interactions to optimize strength of binding and selectivity.

  2. Ligand Electron Density Shape Recognition Using 3D Zernike Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, Prasad; Grandison, Scott; Cowtan, Kevin; Mak, Lora; Lawson, David M.; Morris, Richard J.

    We present a novel approach to crystallographic ligand density interpretation based on Zernike shape descriptors. Electron density for a bound ligand is expanded in an orthogonal polynomial series (3D Zernike polynomials) and the coefficients from this expansion are employed to construct rotation-invariant descriptors. These descriptors can be compared highly efficiently against large databases of descriptors computed from other molecules. In this manuscript we describe this process and show initial results from an electron density interpretation study on a dataset containing over a hundred OMIT maps. We could identify the correct ligand as the first hit in about 30 % of the cases, within the top five in a further 30 % of the cases, and giving rise to an 80 % probability of getting the correct ligand within the top ten matches. In all but a few examples, the top hit was highly similar to the correct ligand in both shape and chemistry. Further extensions and intrinsic limitations of the method are discussed.

  3. Metrical oxidation states of 2-amidophenoxide and catecholate ligands: structural signatures of metal-ligand π bonding in potentially noninnocent ligands.

    PubMed

    Brown, Seth N

    2012-02-06

    Catecholates and 2-amidophenoxides are prototypical "noninnocent" ligands which can form metal complexes where the ligands are best described as being in the monoanionic (imino)semiquinone or neutral (imino)quinone oxidation state instead of their closed-shell dianionic form. Through a comprehensive analysis of structural data available for compounds with these ligands in unambiguous oxidation states (109 amidophenolates, 259 catecholates), the well-known structural changes in the ligands with oxidation state can be quantified. Using these correlations, an empirical "metrical oxidation state" (MOS) which gives a continuous measure of the apparent oxidation state of the ligand can be determined based on least-squares fitting of its C-C, C-O, and C-N bond lengths to this single parameter (a simple procedure for doing so is provided via a spreadsheet in the Supporting Information). High-valent d(0) metal complexes, particularly those of vanadium(V) and molybdenum(VI), have ligands with unexpectedly positive, and generally nonintegral, MOS values. The structural effects in these complexes are attributed not to electron transfer, but rather to amidophenoxide- or catecholate-to-metal π bonding, an interpretation supported by the systematic variation of the MOS values as a function of the degree of competition with the other π-donating groups in the structures.

  4. Ligand-size and ligand-chain hydrophilicity effects on the relaxometric properties of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Lee, Sang Hyup; Chae, Kwon Seok; Cha, Hyunsil; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2016-06-01

    The relaxometric properties of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles coated with various ligands were investigated. These ligands include small diacids with hydrophobic chains, namely, succinic acid (Mw = 118.09 amu), glutaric acid (Mw = 132.12 amu), and terephthalic acid (Mw = 166.13 amu), and large polyethylenimines (PEIs) with hydrophilic chains, namely, PEI-1300 ( M ¯ n = 1300 ) and PEI-10000 ( M ¯ n = 10000 ). Ligand-size and ligand-chain hydrophilicity effects were observed. The longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r2) water proton relaxivities generally decreased with increasing ligand-size (the ligand-size effect). The ligand-size effect was weaker for PEI because its hydrophilic chains allow water molecules to access the nanoparticle (the ligand-chain hydrophilicity effect). This result was explained on the basis of the magnetic dipole interaction between the dipoles of the nanoparticle and water proton. In addition, all samples were found to be non-toxic in cellular cytotoxicity tests.

  5. Quantitative Measurement of Ligand Exchange with Small-Molecule Ligands on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles via Radioanalytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen; Cole, Brian; Ghelardini, Melanie; Powell, Brian A; Mefford, O Thompson

    2016-12-27

    Ligand exchange on the surface of hydrophobic iron oxide nanoparticles is a common method for controlling surface chemistry for a desired application. Furthermore, ligand exchange with small-molecule ligands may be necessary to obtain particles with a specific size or functionality. Understanding to what extent ligand exchange occurs and what factors affect it is important for the optimization of this critical procedure. However, quantifying the amount of exchange may be difficult because of the limitations of commonly used characterization techniques. Therefore, we utilized a radiotracer technique to track the exchange of a radiolabeled (14)C-oleic acid ligand with hydrophilic small-molecule ligands on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. Iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with (14)C-oleic acid were modified with small-molecule ligands with terminal functional groups including catechols, phosphonates, sulfonates, thiols, carboxylic acids, and silanes. These moieties were selected because they represent the most commonly used ligands for this procedure. The effectiveness of these molecules was compared using both procedures widely found in the literature and using a standardized procedure. After ligand exchange, the nanoparticles were analyzed using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The labeled and unlabeled particles were further characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to determine the particle size, hydrodynamic diameter, and zeta potential. The unlabeled particles were characterized via attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) to confirm the presence of the small molecules on the particles and verify the magnetic properties, respectively. Radioanalytical determination of (14)C-oleic acid was used to calculate the total amount of oleic acid remaining on the surface of the

  6. CD22 regulates B lymphocyte function in vivo through both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Poe, Jonathan C; Fujimoto, Yoko; Hasegawa, Minoru; Haas, Karen M; Miller, Ann S; Sanford, Isaac G; Bock, Cheryl B; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tedder, Thomas F

    2004-10-01

    The interaction of CD22 with alpha2,6-linked sialic acid ligands has been widely proposed to regulate B lymphocyte function and migration. Here, we generated gene-targeted mice that express mutant CD22 molecules that do not interact with these ligands. CD22 ligand binding regulated the expression of cell surface CD22, immunoglobulin M and major histocompatibility complex class II on mature B cells, maintenance of the marginal zone B cell population, optimal B cell antigen receptor-induced proliferation, and B cell turnover rates. However, CD22 negative regulation of calcium mobilization after B cell antigen receptor ligation, CD22 phosphorylation, recruitment of SHP-1 to CD22 and B cell migration did not require CD22 ligand engagement. These observations resolve longstanding questions regarding the physiological importance of CD22 ligand binding in the regulation of B cell function in vivo.

  7. Scoring ligand similarity in structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zavodszky, Maria I; Rohatgi, Anjali; Van Voorst, Jeffrey R; Yan, Honggao; Kuhn, Leslie A

    2009-01-01

    Scoring to identify high-affinity compounds remains a challenge in virtual screening. On one hand, protein-ligand scoring focuses on weighting favorable and unfavorable interactions between the two molecules. Ligand-based scoring, on the other hand, focuses on how well the shape and chemistry of each ligand candidate overlay on a three-dimensional reference ligand. Our hypothesis is that a hybrid approach, using ligand-based scoring to rank dockings selected by protein-ligand scoring, can ensure that high-ranking molecules mimic the shape and chemistry of a known ligand while also complementing the binding site. Results from applying this approach to screen nearly 70 000 National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds for thrombin inhibitors tend to support the hypothesis. EON ligand-based ranking of docked molecules yielded the majority (4/5) of newly discovered, low to mid-micromolar inhibitors from a panel of 27 assayed compounds, whereas ranking docked compounds by protein-ligand scoring alone resulted in one new inhibitor. Since the results depend on the choice of scoring function, an analysis of properties was performed on the top-scoring docked compounds according to five different protein-ligand scoring functions, plus EON scoring using three different reference compounds. The results indicate that the choice of scoring function, even among scoring functions measuring the same types of interactions, can have an unexpectedly large effect on which compounds are chosen from screening. Furthermore, there was almost no overlap between the top-scoring compounds from protein-ligand versus ligand-based scoring, indicating the two approaches provide complementary information. Matchprint analysis, a new addition to the SLIDE (Screening Ligands by Induced-fit Docking, Efficiently) screening toolset, facilitated comparison of docked molecules' interactions with those of known inhibitors. The majority of interactions conserved among top-scoring compounds for a given scoring

  8. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  9. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  10. Development and validation of a novel protein-ligand fingerprint to mine chemogenomic space: application to G protein-coupled receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Weill, Nathanael; Rognan, Didier

    2009-04-01

    The present study introduces a novel low-dimensionality fingerprint encoding both ligand and target properties which is suitable to mine protein-ligand chemogenomic space. Whereas ligand properties have been represented by standard descriptors, protein cavities are encoded by a fixed length bit string describing pharmacophoric properties of a definite number of binding site residues. In order to simplify the cavity fingerprint, the concept was applied here to a unique family of targets (G protein-coupled receptors) with a homogeneous cavity description. Particular attention was given to set up data sets of really diverse protein-ligand pairs covering as exhaustively as possible both ligand and target spaces. Several machine learning classification algorithms were trained on two sets of roughly 200000 receptor-ligand fingerprints with a different definition of inactive decoys. Cross-validated models show excellent precision (>0.9) in distinguishing true from false pairs with a particular preference for support vector machine classifiers. When applied to two external test sets of GPCR ligands, the most predictive models were not those performing the best in the previous cross-validation. The ability to recover true GPCR ligands (ligand prediction mode) or true GPCRs (receptor prediction mode) depends on multiple parameters: the molecular complexity of the ligands, the chemical space from which ligand decoys are selected to generate false protein-ligand pairs, and the target space under consideration. In most cases, predicting ligands is easier than predicting receptors. Although receptor profiling is possible, it probably requires a more detailed description of the ligand-binding site. Noteworthy, protein-ligand fingerprints outperform the corresponding ligand fingerprints in mining the GPCR-ligand space. Since they can be applied to a much larger number of receptors than ligand-based fingerprints, protein-ligand fingerprints represent a novel and promising way to

  11. Electronic spectra and photophysics of platinum(II) complexes with alpha-diimine ligands - Solid-state effects. I - Monomers and ligand pi dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskowski, Vincent M.; Houlding, Virginia H.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of emission behavior for Pt(II) complexes containing alpha-diimine ligands have been observed in dilute solution. If the complex also has weak field ligands such as chloride, ligand field (d-d) excited states become the lowest energy excited states. If only strong field ligands are present, a diimine 3(pi-pi/asterisk/) state becomes the lowest. In none of the cases studied did metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state lie lowest.

  12. On the significance of the retention of ligand by protein.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Szmelcman, S; Boos, W; Schwartz, M

    1975-01-01

    When a solution of binding protein and its ligand is dialyzed against a large volume of ligand-free medium the rate of exit of the ligand from the protein-containing compartment can be extremely slow, much slower than the rate observed in the absence of protein. This is what we call retention of ligand by protein. A simple calculation demonstrates that when the protein concentration is in large excess over the total ligand concentration, the exit of ligand follows quasi-first-order kinetics, the half-life being proportional to (1 + (P)/Kd), where (P) is the concentration of binding sites, and Kd the dissociation constant characteristic of the equilibrium between the ligand and the protein. Experimental verification of this relation is provided in the case of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli; The implications of the retention effect in biochemical techniques are discussed, as well as its possible significance in biological phenomena, such as bacterial chemotaxis and transport, mechanism of hormone action, or transmission of the nerve impulse. PMID:1094454

  13. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimont, Marta; Sun, Shan-Liang; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-03-10

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure-activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor-ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors.

  14. BINANA: A Novel Algorithm for Ligand-Binding Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Computational chemists and structural biologists are often interested in characterizing ligand-receptor complexes for hydrogen-bond, hydrophobic, salt-bridge, van der Waals, and other interactions in order to assess ligand binding. When done by hand, this characterization can become tedious, especially when many complexes need be analyzed. In order to facilitate the characterization of ligand binding, we here present a novel Python-implemented computer algorithm called BINANA (BINding ANAlyzer), which is freely available for download at http://www.nbcr.net/binana/. To demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm, we use BINANA to confirm that the number of hydrophobic contacts between a ligand and its protein receptor is positively correlated with ligand potency. Additionally, we show how BINANA can be used to search through a large ligand-receptor database to identify those complexes that are remarkable for selected binding features, and to identify lead candidates from a virtual screen with specific, desirable binding characteristics. We are hopeful that BINANA will be useful to computational chemists and structural biologists who wish to automatically characterize many ligand-receptor complexes for key binding characteristics. PMID:21310640

  15. NMR-based analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Cala, Olivier; Guillière, Florence; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Physiological processes are mainly controlled by intermolecular recognition mechanisms involving protein-protein and protein-ligand (low molecular weight molecules) interactions. One of the most important tools for probing these interactions is high-field solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through protein-observed and ligand-observed experiments, where the protein receptor or the organic compounds are selectively detected. NMR binding experiments rely on comparison of NMR parameters of the free and bound states of the molecules. Ligand-observed methods are not limited by the protein molecular size and therefore have great applicability for analysing protein-ligand interactions. The use of these NMR techniques has considerably expanded in recent years, both in chemical biology and in drug discovery. We review here three major ligand-observed NMR methods that depend on the nuclear Overhauser effect-transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference spectroscopy and water-ligand interactions observed via gradient spectroscopy experiments-with the aim of reporting recent developments and applications for the characterization of protein-ligand complexes, including affinity measurements and structural determination.

  16. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor–Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure–activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor–ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors. PMID:28165741

  17. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of small molecules with proteins (protein–ligand interactions) mediate various biological phenomena including signal transduction and protein transcription and translation. Synthetic compounds such as drugs can also bind to target proteins, leading to the inhibition of protein–ligand interactions. These interactions typically accompany association–dissociation equilibrium according to the free energy difference between free and bound states; therefore, the quantitative biophysical analysis of the interactions, which uncovers the stoichiometry and dissociation constant, is important for understanding biological reactions as well as for rational drug development. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to determine the precise molecular masses of molecules. Recent advancements in MS enable us to determine the molecular masses of protein–ligand complexes without disrupting the non-covalent interactions through the gentle desolvation of the complexes by increasing the vacuum pressure of a chamber in a mass spectrometer. This method is called MS under non-denaturing conditions or native MS and allows the unambiguous determination of protein–ligand interactions. Under a few assumptions, MS has also been applied to determine the dissociation constants for protein–ligand interactions. The structural information of a protein–ligand interaction, such as the location of the interaction and conformational change in a protein, can also be analyzed using hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS. In this paper, we briefly describe the history, principle, and recent applications of MS for the study of protein–ligand interactions. PMID:27924262

  18. Novel biosensors for the detection of estrogen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    De, Siddhartha; Macara, Ian G; Lannigan, Deborah A

    2005-08-01

    There exists a significant need for the detection of novel estrogen receptor (ER) ligands for pharmaceutical uses, especially for treating complications associated with menopause. We have developed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors that permit the direct in vitro detection of ER ligands. These biosensors contain an ER ligand-binding domain (LBD) flanked by the FRET donor fluorophore, cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and the acceptor fluorophore, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). The ER-LBD has been modified so that Ala 430 has been changed to Asp, which increases the magnitude of the FRET signal in response to ligand-binding by more than four-fold compared to the wild-type LBD. The binding of agonists can be distinguished from that of antagonists on the basis of the distinct ligand-induced conformations in the ER-LBD. The approach to binding equilibrium occurs within 30min, and the FRET signal is stable over 24h. The biosensor demonstrates a high signal-to-noise, with a Z' value (a statistical determinant of assay quality) of 0.72. The affinity of the ER for different ligands can be determined using a modified version of the biosensor in which a truncated YFP and an enhanced CFP are used. Thus, we have developed platforms for high-throughput screens for the identification of novel estrogen receptor ligands. Moreover, we have demonstrated that this FRET technology can be applied to other nuclear receptors, such as the androgen receptor.

  19. Brain endogenous liver X receptor ligands selectively promote midbrain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Wang, Yuqin; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Sacchetti, Paola; Sousa, Kyle M; Bodin, Karl; Kirk, Jayne; Saltó, Carmen; Gustafsson, Magnus; Toledo, Enrique M; Karu, Kersti; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J; Arenas, Ernest

    2013-02-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrα and Lxrβ) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors critical for ventral midbrain neurogenesis in vivo. However, no endogenous midbrain Lxr ligand has so far been identified. Here we used LC/MS and functional assays to identify cholic acid as a new Lxr ligand. Moreover, 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25-EC) was found to be the most potent and abundant Lxr ligand in the developing mouse midbrain. Both Lxr ligands promoted neural development in an Lxr-dependent manner in zebrafish in vivo. Notably, each ligand selectively regulated the development of distinct midbrain neuronal populations. Whereas cholic acid increased survival and neurogenesis of Brn3a-positive red nucleus neurons, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic neurogenesis. These results identify an entirely new class of highly selective and cell type-specific regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Moreover, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells, suggesting that Lxr ligands may thus contribute to the development of cell replacement and regenerative therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  20. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  1. The Death Ligand TRAIL in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorz, Corina; Benito-Martín, Alberto; Boucherot, Anissa; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Henger, Anna; Armelloni, Silvia; Santamaría, Beatriz; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death contributes to diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its role is not well understood. The tubulointerstitium from DN biopsy specimens was microdissected, and expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis were analyzed. A total of 112 (25%) of 455 cell death–related genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated. Among those that showed the greatest changes in regulation were two death receptors, OPG (the gene encoding osteoprotegerin) and Fas, and the death ligand TRAIL. Glomerular and proximal tubular TRAIL expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was higher in DN kidneys than controls and was associated with clinical and histologic severity of disease. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines but not glucose alone regulated TRAIL expression in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2. TRAIL induced tubular cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependant manner, an effect that was more marked in the presence of high levels of glucose and proinflammatory cytokines. TRAIL also activated NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. It is proposed that TRAIL-induced cell death could play an important role in the progression of human DN. PMID:18287563

  2. Cationic aluminum alkyl complexes incorporating aminotroponiminate ligands.

    PubMed

    Korolev, A V; Ihara, E; Guzei, I A; Young, V G; Jordan, R F

    2001-08-29

    The synthesis, structures, and reactivity of cationic aluminum complexes containing the N,N'-diisopropylaminotroponiminate ligand ((i)Pr(2)-ATI(-)) are described. The reaction of ((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR(2) (1a-e,g,h; R = H (a), Me (b), Et (c), Pr (d), (i)Bu (e), Cy (g), CH(2)Ph (h)) with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] yields ((i)()Pr(2)-ATI)AlR(+) species whose fate depends on the properties of the R ligand. 1a and 1b react with 0.5 equiv of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to produce dinuclear monocationic complexes [([(i)Pr(2)-ATI] AlR)(2)(mu-R)][(C(6)F(5))(4)] (2a,b). The cation of 2b contains two ((i)()Pr(2)-ATI)AlMe(+) units linked by an almost linear Al-Me-Al bridge; 2a is presumed to have an analogous structure. 2b does not react further with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)]. However, 1a reacts with 1 equiv of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to afford ((i Pr(2)-ATI)Al(C(6)F(5))(mu-H)(2)B(C(6)F(5))(2) (3) and other products, presumably via C(6)F(5)(-) transfer and ligand redistribution of a [((i)()Pr(2)-ATI)AlH][(C(6)F(5))(4)] intermediate. 1c-e react with 1 equiv of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to yield stable base-free [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] complexes (4c-e). 4c crystallizes from chlorobenzene as 4c(ClPh).0.5PhCl, which has been characterized by X-ray crystallography. In the solid state the PhCl ligand of 4c(ClPh) is coordinated by a dative PhCl-Al bond and an ATI/Ph pi-stacking interaction. 1g,h react with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to yield ((i)Pr(2)-ATI)Al(R)(C(6)F(5)) (5g,h) via C(6)F(5)(-) transfer of [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR][(BC(6)F(5))(4)] intermediates. 1c,h react with B(C(6)F(5))(3) to yield ((i)Pr(2)-ATI)Al(R)(C(6)F(5)) (5c,h) via C(6)F(5)(-) transfer of [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR][RB(C(6)F(5))(3)] intermediates. The reaction of 4c-e with MeCN or acetone yields [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)Al(R)(L)][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] adducts (L = MeCN (8c-e), acetone (9c-e)), which undergo associative intermolecular L exchange. 9c-e undergo slow beta-H transfer to afford the dinuclear dicationic alkoxide complex [(((i

  3. ZINC 15 – Ligand Discovery for Everyone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many questions about the biological activity and availability of small molecules remain inaccessible to investigators who could most benefit from their answers. To narrow the gap between chemoinformatics and biology, we have developed a suite of ligand annotation, purchasability, target, and biology association tools, incorporated into ZINC and meant for investigators who are not computer specialists. The new version contains over 120 million purchasable “drug-like” compounds – effectively all organic molecules that are for sale – a quarter of which are available for immediate delivery. ZINC connects purchasable compounds to high-value ones such as metabolites, drugs, natural products, and annotated compounds from the literature. Compounds may be accessed by the genes for which they are annotated as well as the major and minor target classes to which those genes belong. It offers new analysis tools that are easy for nonspecialists yet with few limitations for experts. ZINC retains its original 3D roots – all molecules are available in biologically relevant, ready-to-dock formats. ZINC is freely available at http://zinc15.docking.org. PMID:26479676

  4. Xylamine, a ligand for the catecholamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Waggaman, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have established xylamine (N-2'-chloro-ethyl-N-ethyl-2-methylbenzylamine) irreversibly inhibits neuronal norepinephrine uptake with no concomitant effect on other neurotransmitter systems. Since xylamine is thought to alkylate transport-associated sites in the plasma membrane of noradrenergic neurons, so the loss of endogenous norepinephrine may be a consequence of neuronal membrane damage resulting from the alkylation of membrane components. In these studies, xylamine, under in vitro conditions, irreversibly inhibited both neuronal norepinephrine and dopamine uptake in the rat cortex and striatum, respectively. The efficacy of xylamine as a neuronal dopamine uptake inhibitor appeared to depend on its ability to access dopaminergic neurons during tissue exposure to the drug. In sympathetically innervated peripheral tissues, (/sup 3/H)xylamine was accumulated in noradrenergic neurons in a carrier-dependent manner. Although the data suggested that xylamine was interacting with the norepinephrine uptake carrier, (/sup 3/H)xylamine exposure to isolated synaptic membranes from superior cervical ganglia revealed a large proportion of (/sup 3/H)xylamine binding that was not associated with the noradrenergic transporter. For a closer characterization of xylamine binding in synaptic membranes, brain tissue was chosen as a more practical source of these membranes. While these experiments did not meet with great success, xylamine remains potentially useful as a ligand for identifying the catecholamine transporter, particularly in conjunction with procedures for protein purification and reconstitution.

  5. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  6. Structure-activity relationship of nuclear receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Greschik, Holger; Moras, Dino

    2003-01-01

    Small molecules such as retinoids, steroid hormones, fatty acids, cholesterol metabolites, or xenobiotics are involved in the regulation of numerous physiological and patho-physiological processes by binding to and controlling the activity of members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. In addition to natural ligands, synthetic agonists or antagonists have been identified that in some cases specifically target NR isotypes, or elicit tissue-, signaling pathway-, or promoter-selective transcriptional responses. For these ligands the term "selective NR modulators" (SNRMs) has been introduced. Structure determination of apo- and holo-NR ligand-binding domains (LBDs)--some of them complexed to small coactivator or corepressor fragments--revealed the major principles of ligand-dependent NR action and determinants of (isotype-) selective ligand binding. These studies also stimulated the interpretation of tissue-specific effects of SNRMs on wild-type or mutant receptors. In contrast to the increasing knowledge on the structure-activity relationship of NRs with known SNRMs, rather basic questions remain about the regulation of orphan NRs (for which no ligands are known) or "adopted" orphan NRs (for which only recently ligands were identified). Several crystal structures of orphan NR LBDs uncovered unexpected properties, contributed to the understanding of orphan NR function, and may in the future permit the identification or design of ligands. This review will (i) focus on the current understanding of the structure-activity relationship of NR-ligand interactions, (ii) discuss recent advances in the field of "orphan" NR crystallography, and (iii) outline future challenges in NR structural biology.

  7. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  8. Charge Optimization Theory for Induced-Fit Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The design of ligands with high affinity and specificity remains a fundamental challenge in understanding molecular recognition and developing therapeutic interventions. Charge optimization theory addresses this problem by determining ligand charge distributions that produce the most favorable electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy. The theory has been applied to the design of binding specificity as well. However, the formulations described only treat a rigid ligand—one that does not change conformation upon binding. Here, we extend the theory to treat induced-fit ligands for which the unbound ligand conformation may differ from the bound conformation. We develop a thermodynamic pathway analysis for binding contributions relevant to the theory, and we illustrate application of the theory using HIV-1 protease with our previously designed and validated subnanomolar inhibitor. Direct application of rigid charge optimization approaches to nonrigid cases leads to very favorable intramolecular electrostatic interactions that are physically unreasonable, and analysis shows the ligand charge distribution massively stabilizes the preconformed (bound) conformation over the unbound. After analyzing this case, we provide a treatment for the induced-fit ligand charge optimization problem that produces physically realistic results. The key factor is introducing the constraint that the free energy of the unbound ligand conformation be lower or equal to that of the preconformed ligand structure, which corresponds to the notion that the unbound structure is the ground unbound state. Results not only demonstrate the applicability of this methodology to discovering optimized charge distributions in an induced-fit model, but also provide some insights into the energetic consequences of ligand conformational change on binding. Specifically, the results show that, from an electrostatic perspective, induced-fit binding is not an adaptation designed to enhance binding

  9. Binding of flexible and constrained ligands to the Grb2 SH2 domain: structural effects of ligand preorganization

    PubMed Central

    Clements, John H.; DeLorbe, John E.; Benfield, Aaron P.; Martin, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Structures of the Grb2 SH2 domain complexed with a series of pseudopeptides containing flexible (benzyl succinate) and constrained (aryl cyclopropanedicarboxylate) replacements of the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue in tripeptides derived from Ac-pYXN-NH2 (where X = V, I, E and Q) were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. Complexes of flexible/constrained pairs having the same pY + 1 amino acid were analyzed in order to ascertain what structural differences might be attributed to constraining the phosphotyrosine replacement. In this context, a given structural dissimilarity between complexes was considered to be significant if it was greater than the corresponding difference in complexes coexisting within the same asymmetric unit. The backbone atoms of the domain generally adopt a similar conformation and orientation relative to the ligands in the complexes of each flexible/constrained pair, although there are some significant differences in the relative orientations of several loop regions, most notably in the BC loop that forms part of the binding pocket for the phosphate group in the tyrosine replacements. These variations are greater in the set of complexes of constrained ligands than in the set of complexes of flexible ligands. The constrained ligands make more direct polar contacts to the domain than their flexible counterparts, whereas the more flexible ligand of each pair makes more single-water-mediated contacts to the domain; there was no correlation between the total number of protein–ligand contacts and whether the phosphotyrosine replacement of the ligand was preorganized. The observed differences in hydrophobic interactions between the complexes of each flexible/constrained ligand pair were generally similar to those observed upon comparing such contacts in coexisting complexes. The average adjusted B factors of the backbone atoms of the domain and loop regions are significantly greater in the complexes of constrained ligands than in the complexes of

  10. Ligands targeting the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs).

    PubMed

    Dunlop, John; Butera, John A

    2006-01-01

    This review provides an overview of ligands for the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), a family of high-affinity glutamate transporters localized to the plasma membrane of neurons and astroglial cells. Ligand development from the perspective of identifying novel and more selective tools for elucidating transporter subtype function, and the potential of transporter ligands in a therapeutic setting are discussed. Acute pharmacological modulation of EAAT activity in the form of linear and conformationally restricted glutamate and aspartate analogs is presented, in addition to recent strategies aimed more toward modulating transporter expression levels, the latter of particular significance to the development of transporter based therapeutics.

  11. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  12. Facile dimer synthesis for DNA-binding polyamide ligands.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, Modi; Wemmer, David E

    2010-08-06

    Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide ligands are highly sequence specific synthetic DNA-binding ligands that bind with high affinity. To counter the synthetic difficulties associated with coupling the electron-rich heterocyclic acids to the electron-deficient nucleophilic imidazole amine, a novel approach is described for synthesis of Fmoc-protected dimers for solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method produces the dimers in high yields, is broadly applicable to other heterocyclic-containing polyamides, and results in improved ligand yields and synthesis times.

  13. A divergent strategy for attaching polypyridyl ligands to peptides.

    PubMed

    Jabre, Nitinkumar D; Respondek, Tomasz; Ulku, Selma A; Korostelova, Nadiya; Kodanko, Jeremy J

    2010-02-05

    A divergent method for incorporating polypyridyl ligands into peptides is reported. Three N-Fmoc unnatural amino acids (1-3) that contain varying linkers between the alpha-carbon and a 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridyl group were synthesized in enantioenriched form. These amino acids were used as anchors for incorporating multidentate ligands onto a peptide chain in a site-specific fashion. Multiple peptide-ligand conjugates were synthesized from single precursors by solution- or solid-phase methods. Peptides containing more than one metal-binding unit can be produced by this method.

  14. Polyethylene glycol-based homologated ligands for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Scates, Bradley A.; Lashbrook, Bethany L.; Chastain, Benjamin C.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Elliott, Brandon T.; Theising, Nicholas J.; Baker, Thomas A.; Fitch, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A homologous series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomethyl ethers were conjugated with three ligand series for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Conjugates of acetylaminocholine, the cyclic analog 1-acetyl-4,4-dimethylpiperazinium, and pyridyl ether A-84543 were prepared. Each series was found to retain significant affinity at nicotinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with tethers of up to six PEG units. Such compounds are hydrophilic ligands which may serve as models for fluorescent/affinity probes and multivalent ligands for nAChR. PMID:19006672

  15. Advances and Challenges in Protein-Ligand Docking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-You; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a widely-used computational tool for the study of molecular recognition, which aims to predict the binding mode and binding affinity of a complex formed by two or more constituent molecules with known structures. An important type of molecular docking is protein-ligand docking because of its therapeutic applications in modern structure-based drug design. Here, we review the recent advances of protein flexibility, ligand sampling, and scoring functions—the three important aspects in protein-ligand docking. Challenges and possible future directions are discussed in the Conclusion. PMID:21152288

  16. Regioselectivity in ligand substitution reactions on diiron complexes governed by nucleophilic and electrophilic ligand properties.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Ryan D; Crouthers, Danielle J; Hsieh, Chung-Hung; Denny, Jason A; Hall, Michael B; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2015-04-06

    The discovery of a diiron organometallic site in nature within the diiron hydrogenase, [FeFe]-H2ase, active site has prompted revisits of the classic organometallic chemistry involving the Fe-Fe bond and bridging ligands, particularly of the (μ-SCH2XCH2S)[Fe(CO)3]2 and (μ-SCH2XCH2S)[Fe(CO)2L]2 (X = CH2, NH; L = PMe3, CN(-), and NHC's (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene)), derived from CO/L exchange reactions. Through the synergy of synthetic chemistry and density functional theory computations, the regioselectivity of nucleophilic (PMe3 or CN(-)) and electrophilic (nitrosonium, NO(+)) ligand substitution on the diiron dithiolate framework of the (μ-pdt)[Fe(CO)2NHC][Fe(CO)3] complex (pdt = propanedithiolate) reveals the electron density shifts in the diiron core of such complexes that mimic the [FeFe]-H2ase active site. While CO substitution by PMe3, followed by reaction with NO(+), produces (μ-pdt)(μ-CO)[Fe(NHC)(NO)][Fe(CO)2PMe3](+), the alternate order of reagent addition produces the structural isomer (μ-pdt)[Fe(NHC)(NO)PMe3][Fe(CO)3](+), illustrating how the nucleophile and electrophile choose the electron-poor metal and the electron-rich metal, respectively. Theoretical explorations of simpler analogues, (μ-pdt)[Fe(CO)2CN][Fe(CO)3](-), (μ-pdt)[Fe(CO)3]2, and (μ-pdt)[Fe(CO)2NO][Fe(CO)3](+), provide an explanation for the role that the electron-rich iron moiety plays in inducing the rotation of the electron-poor iron moiety to produce a bridging CO ligand, a key factor in stabilizing the electron-rich iron moiety and for support of the rotated structure as found in the enzyme active site.

  17. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  18. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  19. Ligand and structure-based methodologies for the prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered.

  20. Role of ligand-dependent GR phosphorylation and half-life in determination of ligand-specific transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Avenant, Chanel; Ronacher, Katharina; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Louw, Ann; Hapgood, Janet P

    2010-10-07

    A central question in glucocorticoid mechanism of action via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is what determines ligand-selective transcriptional responses. Using a panel of 12 GR ligands, we show that the extent of GR phosphorylation at S226 and S211, GR half-life and transcriptional response, occur in a ligand-selective manner. While GR phosphorylation at S226 was shown to inhibit maximal transcription efficacy, phosphorylation at S211 is required for maximal transactivation, but not for transrepression efficacy. Both ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life correlated with efficacy for transactivation and transrepression. For both expressed and endogenous GR, in two different cell lines, agonists resulted in the greatest extent of phosphorylation and the greatest extent of GR downregulation, suggesting a link between these functions. However, using phosphorylation-deficient GR mutants we established that phosphorylation of the GR at S226 or S211 does not determine the rank order of ligand-selective GR transactivation. These results are consistent with a model whereby ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life are a consequence of upstream events, such as ligand-specific GR conformations, which are maintained in the phosphorylation mutants.

  1. Ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking (LigBEnD): a hybrid ligand/receptor structure-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Polo C.-H.; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2017-09-01

    Ligand docking to flexible protein molecules can be efficiently carried out through ensemble docking to multiple protein conformations, either from experimental X-ray structures or from in silico simulations. The success of ensemble docking often requires the careful selection of complementary protein conformations, through docking and scoring of known co-crystallized ligands. False positives, in which a ligand in a wrong pose achieves a better docking score than that of native pose, arise as additional protein conformations are added. In the current study, we developed a new ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking method and composite scoring function which combine the use of ligand-based atomic property field (APF) method with receptor structure-based docking. This method helps us to correctly dock 30 out of 36 ligands presented by the D3R docking challenge. For the six mis-docked ligands, the cognate receptor structures prove to be too different from the 40 available experimental Pocketome conformations used for docking and could be identified only by receptor sampling beyond experimentally explored conformational subspace.

  2. Ligand and Structure-based Methodologies for the Prediction of the Activity of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered. PMID:18483766

  3. Riding the Wave of Monodentate Ligand Revival: From the A/B Concept to Noncovalent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, Luca; Gennari, Cesare

    2016-12-01

    The rediscovery of chiral monodentate ligands made in the period 1999-2003 had important consequences in enantioselective transition-metal catalysis, such as the introduction of the A/B concept (i.e., use of monodentate ligand mixtures) and, later, a renewed interest in supramolecular ligands capable of ligand-ligand and ligand-substrate interactions. This Personal Account summarizes the contributions made by our research group in this area in the period 2004-2015, which reflect the abovementioned developments. Within this area, we introduced some original concepts, such as 1) the use of chiral tropos ligand mixtures; 2) the development of new strategies to maximize heterocomplex formation from combinations of simple monodentate ligands; 3) the investigation of new ligand-ligand interactions to achieve selective heterocomplex formation; and 4) the development of highly efficient and synthetically accessible supramolecular ligands. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Bench-top to clinical therapies: A review of melanocortin ligands from 1954 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mark D; Lensing, Cody J; Fleming, Katlyn A; Schlasner, Katherine N; Doering, Skye R; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2017-03-29

    The discovery of the endogenous melanocortin agonists in the 1950s have resulted in sixty years of melanocortin ligand research. Early efforts involved truncations or select modifications of the naturally occurring agonists leading to the development of many potent and selective ligands. With the identification and cloning of the five known melanocortin receptors, many ligands were improved upon through bench-top in vitro assays. Optimization of select properties resulted in ligands adopted as clinical candidates. A summary of every melanocortin ligand is outside the scope of this review. Instead, this review will focus on the following topics: classic melanocortin ligands, selective ligands, small molecule (non-peptide) ligands, ligands with sex-specific effects, bivalent and multivalent ligands, and ligands advanced to clinical trials. Each topic area will be summarized with current references to update the melanocortin field on recent progress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Melanocortin Receptors - edited by Ya-Xiong Tao.

  5. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work.

  6. Disulfide Bond Requirements for Active Wnt Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Bryan T.; Hien, Annie; Zhang, Xinjun; Iranloye, Oladoyin; Virshup, David M.; Waterman, Marian L.; He, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Secreted Wnt lipoproteins are cysteine-rich and lipid-modified morphogens that bind to the Frizzled (FZD) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). Wnt engages FZD through protruding thumb and index finger domains, which are each assembled from paired β strands secured by disulfide bonds and grasp two sides of the FZD ectodomain. The importance of Wnt disulfide bonds has been assumed but uncharacterized. We systematically analyzed cysteines and associated disulfide bonds in the prototypic Wnt3a. Our data show that mutation of any individual cysteine of Wnt3a results in covalent Wnt oligomers through ectopic intermolecular disulfide bond formation and diminishes/abolishes Wnt signaling. Although individual cysteine mutations in the amino part of the saposin-like domain and in the base of the index finger are better tolerated and permit residual Wnt3a secretion/activity, those in the amino terminus, the thumb, and at the tip of the index finger are incompatible with secretion and/or activity. A few select double cysteine mutants based on the disulfide bond pattern restore Wnt secretion/activity. Further, a double cysteine mutation at the index finger tip results in a Wnt3a with normal secretion but minimal FZD binding and dominant negative properties. Our results experimentally validate predictions from the Wnt crystal structure and highlight critical but different roles of the saposin-like and cytokine-like domains, including the thumb and the index finger in Wnt folding/secretion and FZD binding. Finally, we modified existing expression vectors for 19 epitope-tagged human WNT proteins by removal of a tag-supplied ectopic cysteine, thereby generating tagged WNT ligands active in canonical and non-canonical signaling. PMID:24841207

  7. The Foundations of Protein-Ligand Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    For the specific design of a drug we must first answer the question: How does a drug achieve its activity? An active ingredient must, in order to develop its action, bind to a particular target molecule in the body. Usually this is a protein, but also nucleic acids in the form of RNA and DNA can be target structures for active agents. The most important condition for binding is at first that the active agent exhibits the correct size and shape in order to optimally fit into a cavity exposed to the surface of the protein, the "bindingpocket". It is further necessary for the surface properties of the ligand and protein to be mutually compatible to form specific interactions. In 1894 Emil Fischer compared the exact fit of a substrate for the catalytic centre of an enzyme with the picture of a "lock-and-key". Paul Ehrlich coined in 1913 "Corpora non agunt nisi fixata", literally "bodies do not work when they are not bound". He wanted to imply that active agents that are meant to kill bacteria or parasites must be "fixed" by them, i.e. linked to their structures. Both concepts form the starting point for any rational concept in the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In many respects they still apply today. A drug must, after being administered, reach its target and interact with a biological macromolecule. Specific agents have a large affinity and sufficient selectivity to bind to the macromolecule's active site. This is the only way they can develop the desired biological activity without side-effects.

  8. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Diaconescu, Paula L.; Garcia, Evan

    2014-05-31

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  9. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  10. "Clickable" affinity ligands for effective separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Suksrichavalit, Thummaruk; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Bülow, Leif; Ye, Lei

    2010-06-04

    In this paper, we present a new modular approach to immobilize boronic acid ligands that can offer effective separation of glycoproteins. A new "clickable" boronic acid ligand was synthesized by introducing a terminal acetylene group into commercially available 3-aminophenyl boronic acid. The clickable ligand, 3-(prop-2-ynyloxycarbonylamino)phenylboronic acid (2) could be easily coupled to azide-functionalized hydrophilic Sepharose using Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction under mild condition. Compared to other boronic acid affinity gels, the new affinity gel displayed superior effectiveness in separating model glycoproteins (ovalbumin and RNase B) from closely related bovine serum albumin and RNase A in the presence of crude Escherichia coli proteins. Because of the simplicity of the immobilization through "click chemistry", the new ligand 2 is expected to not only offer improved glycoprotein separation in other formats, but also act as a useful building block to develop new chemical sensors for analysis of other glycan compounds.

  11. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  12. Ligand development in the Ni-catalyzed hydrocyanation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Bini, Laura; Müller, Christian; Vogt, Dieter

    2010-11-28

    The addition of HCN to alkenes is a very useful reaction for the synthesis of functional organic substrates. Industrially the nickel-catalyzed hydrocyanation has gained considerable importance mainly because of the production of adiponitrile in the DuPont process. In this process the hydrocyanation of butadiene is carried out using aryl phosphite-modified nickel catalyst. Since the performance of organo-transition metal complexes is largely determined by the ligand environment of the metal, fundamental understanding and ligand development is of pivotal importance for any progress. This feature article gives an account of the development and application of different mono- and bidentate phosphorus-based ligands in the Ni-catalyzed hydrocyanation reaction of alkenes. Special attention will be paid to the development of insight and understanding of the ligand structural and electronic properties towards the improvement of the catalyst performance in terms of stability, activity, and selectivity.

  13. Protein-Ligand Scoring with Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Ragoza, Matthew; Hochuli, Joshua; Idrobo, Elisa; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2017-04-11

    Computational approaches to drug discovery can reduce the time and cost associated with experimental assays and enable the screening of novel chemotypes. Structure-based drug design methods rely on scoring functions to rank and predict binding affinities and poses. The ever-expanding amount of protein-ligand binding and structural data enables the use of deep machine learning techniques for protein-ligand scoring. We describe convolutional neural network (CNN) scoring functions that take as input a comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) representation of a protein-ligand interaction. A CNN scoring function automatically learns the key features of protein-ligand interactions that correlate with binding. We train and optimize our CNN scoring functions to discriminate between correct and incorrect binding poses and known binders and nonbinders. We find that our CNN scoring function outperforms the AutoDock Vina scoring function when ranking poses both for pose prediction and virtual screening.

  14. Pharmacophore-based discovery of ligands for drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Ekins, Sean; Bahadduri, Praveen; Swaan, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to identify ligands for drug transporters is an important step in drug discovery and development. It can both improve accurate profiling of lead pharmacokinetic properties and assist in the discovery of new chemical entities targeting transporters. In silico approaches, especially pharmacophore-based database screening methods have great potential in improving the throughput of current transporter ligand identification assays, leading to a higher hit rate by focusing in vitro testing to the most promising hits. In this review, the potential of different in silico methods in transporter ligand identification studies are compared and summarized with an emphasis on pharmacophore modeling. Various implementations of pharmacophore model generation, database compilation and flexible screening algorithms are also introduced. Recent successful utilization of database searching with pharmacophores to identify novel ligands for the pharmaceutically significant transporters hPepT1, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and DAT are reviewed and challenges encountered with current approaches are discussed. PMID:17097188

  15. Enantioselective catalysis with tropos ligands in chiral ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Schmitkamp, Mike; Chen, Dianjun; Leitner, Walter; Klankermayer, Jürgen; Franciò, Giancarlo

    2007-10-21

    Enantioselective homogeneous rhodium-catalysed hydrogenation using tropoisomeric biphenylphosphine ligands was accomplished in readily available chiral ionic liquids and the catalytic system could be reused after extraction with scCO(2).

  16. Adenosine receptor ligands: differences with acute versus chronic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; von Lubitz, Dag K. J. E.; Daly, John W.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors have been the target of intense research with respect to potential use of selective ligands in a variety of therapeutic areas. Caffeine and theophylline are adenosine receptor antagonists, and over the past three decades a wide range of selective agonists and antagonists for adenosine receptor subtypes have been developed. A complication to the therapeutic use of adenosine receptor ligands is the observation that the effects of acute administration of a particular ligand can be diametrically opposite to the chronic effects of the same ligand. This ‘effect inversion’ is discussed here by Ken Jecobson and colleagues, and has been observed for effects on cognitive processes, seizures and ischaemic damage. PMID:8936347

  17. A Correlation between Protein Function and Ligand Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Bokemper, Michael; Copeland, Jennifer C.; Stark, Jaime L.; Powers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We report that proteins with the same function bind the same set of small molecules from a standardized chemical library. This observation led to a quantifiable and rapidly adaptable method for protein functional analysis using experimentally-derived ligand binding profiles. Ligand binding is measured using a high-throughput NMR ligand affinity screen with a structurally diverse chemical library. The method was demonstrated using a set of 19 proteins with a range of functions. A statistically significant similarity in ligand binding profiles was only observed between the two functionally identical albumins and between the five functionally similar amylases. This new approach is independent of sequence, structure or evolutionary information, and therefore, extends our ability to analyze and functionally annotate novel genes. PMID:21366353

  18. Characterizing ligand-microtubule binding by competition methods.

    PubMed

    Díaz, José Fernando; Buey, Rubén Martínez

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of drug-microtubule interaction is essential to understand the structure/affinity relationship of a given ligand family. When a ligand does not show an appropriate signal change (absorbance or fluorescence) upon binding, the extensive direct characterization of its binding affinities and kinetic rate constants of association and dissociation becomes a complex task. In those cases it is possible to obtain these parameters by competition of the ligand with a reference one of the same binding site that shows such change. Nevertheless, although the experimental setup of the competition measurements is easier, the treatment of the data is complex because simultaneous equilibrium/kinetic equations have to be solved. In this chapter, the taxoid-binding site of the microtubules will be used as an example to describe experimental competition and data analysis methods to determine the binding constants and kinetic rates of association and dissociation of ligands for microtubules.

  19. Water-soluble semiconductor nanocrystals cap exchanged with metalated ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Snee, Preston T

    2011-01-25

    We report a novel method for cap exchange of emissive semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) using thiol functional ligands metalated with zinc. Utilizing this method, the NCs can be several times brighter and much more resistant to precipitation compared to control samples. This method has been applied using a variety of caps such as dihydrolipoic acid and cysteine. Our data suggest that the improved properties of the metalated cap exchanged NCs are due to a ligand metathesis process occurring at the NC surface where the zinc complex reacts with NC surface bound ligands, gently removing them and replacing them with another cap. Overall, the use of metalated ligands helps resolve many long-standing issues concerning the application of small cap exchanged NCs for biological imaging.

  20. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  1. Searching for Practically Useful P-Chirogenic Phosphine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Imamoto, Tsuneo

    2016-12-01

    In this account, the design, synthesis, and application of P-chirogenic phosphine ligands that have been mainly carried out in our laboratory over the last three decades are described. Various enantiopure P-chirogenic phosphine ligands have been efficiently prepared by using phosphine boranes as intermediates. Conformationally rigid and electron-rich P-chirogenic phosphine ligands possessing C2 symmetry as well as a bulky alkyl group and a small group at the phosphorus atoms exhibit excellent enantioselectivities and catalytic efficiency in a variety of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions. Enantiopure 2,3-bis(tert-butylmethylphosphino)quinoxaline (QuinoxP*) is an air-stable crystalline solid that shows superior enantioinduction ability in catalytic asymmetric syntheses. Mechanistic studies of Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation using structurally simple P-chirogenic phosphine ligands, such as tBu-BisP*, are briefly described.

  2. Ligand engineering of lead chalcogenide nanoparticle solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Marton; Brawand, Nicholas; Galli, Giulia

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NP) are promising materials to build cheap and efficient solar cells. One of the key challenges in their utilization for solar energy conversion is the control of ligand-NP interfaces. Recent experiments have shown that by carefully choosing the ligands terminating the NPs, one can tailor electronic and optical absorption properties of NP assemblies, along with their transport properties. By using density functional theory based methods, we investigated how the opto-electronic properties of lead chalcogenide NPs may be tuned by using diverse organic and inorganic ligands. We interpreted experiments, and we showed that an essential prerequisite to avoid detrimental trap states is to ensure charge balance at the ligand-NP interface, possibly with the help of hydrogen treatment. Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. Bivalent Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which by virtue of its pentameric architecture, can be considered to be an intriguing example of intrinsically multivalent biological receptors. This paper describes a general design approach to the study of multivalency in this multimeric ion channel. Bivalent ligands for 5-HT3 receptor have been designed by linking an arylpiperazine moiety to probes showing different functional features. Both homobivalent and heterobivalent ligands have shown 5-HT3 receptor affinity in the nanomolar range, providing evidence for the viability of our design approach. Moreover, the high affinity shown by homobivalent ligands suggests that bivalency is a promising approach in 5-HT3 receptor modulation and provides the rational basis for applying the concepts of multivalency to the study of 5-HT3 receptor function. PMID:24900351

  4. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system.

  5. Fluorescent Ligand for Human Progesterone Receptor Imaging in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of 18F into the BODIPY core. PMID:23600997

  6. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Veenman, Leo; Vainshtein, Alex; Yasin, Nasra; Azrad, Maya; Gavish, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO’s importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles’ membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships. PMID:27271616

  7. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands.

    PubMed

    Veenman, Leo; Vainshtein, Alex; Yasin, Nasra; Azrad, Maya; Gavish, Moshe

    2016-06-04

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO's importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles' membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships.

  8. Models of protein–ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    PubMed Central

    Deller, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein–ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein–ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein–ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein–ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein–ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein–ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein–ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved. PMID:25665575

  9. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, M.D.; Wilson, T.E.; Mastandra, M.S.

    1996-04-23

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided. 7 figs.

  10. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  11. Drawing Mononuclear Octahedral Coordination Compounds Containing Tridentate Chelating Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamadou, Aminou; Ple, Karen; Haudrechy, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Complexes with tridentate ligands of the type [M(A-B-C)2], where A [not equal to] B [not equal to] C and with an imposed bonding sequence A-B-C, require special attention to draw all possible stereoisomers. Depending on the nature of the central donor atom B of the tridentate ligand, an easy drawing method is presented that shows seven chiral…

  12. CD6-ligand interactions: a paradigm for SRCR domain function?

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Bowen, M A; Patel, D D; Haynes, B F; Starling, G C; Gebe, J A; Bajorath, J

    1997-10-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily, which includes proteins expressed by leukocytes, can be subdivided into groups A and B. Group B contains the lymphocyte cell-surface receptor CD6. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the interaction between CD6 and its ligand, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM). Analysis of the CD6-ALCAM interaction may help to understand how other SRCR domains bind to their ligands.

  13. Square planar Cu(I) stabilized by a pyridinediimine ligand.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Pui Man; Berger, Robert F; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2016-03-18

    A set of distorted square planar Cu(I) complexes were synthesized and characterized utilizing the sterically encumbering pyridinediimine ligand, (iPr)PDI (where (iPr)PDI = 2,6-(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3N=CMe)2C5H3N). The oxidation state of the Cu center(s) were elucidated to be Cu(I) with a neutral PDI ligand system based on structural, spectroscopic, and computational data.

  14. Pharmacological profiles of opioid ligands at Kappa opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozlou, Parham; Hashemi, Ezzat; DeLorey, Timothy M; Clark, J David; Lameh, Jelveh

    2006-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to describe the activity of a set of opioid drugs, including partial agonists, in a human embryonic kidney cell system stably expressing only the mouse κ-opioid receptors. Receptor activation was assessed by measuring the inhibition of cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP) production stimulated by 5 μM forskolin. Intrinsic activities and potencies of these ligands were determined relative to the endogenous ligand dynorphin and the κ agonist with the highest intrinsic activity that was identified in this study, fentanyl. Results Among the ligands studied naltrexone, WIN 44,441 and dezocine, were classified as antagonists, while the remaining ligands were agonists. Intrinsic activity of agonists was assessed by determining the extent of inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production. The absolute levels of inhibition of cAMP production by each ligand was used to describe the rank order of intrinsic activity of the agonists; fentanyl = lofentanil ≥ hydromorphone = morphine = nalorphine ≥ etorphine ≥ xorphanol ≥ metazocine ≥ SKF 10047 = cyclazocine ≥ butorphanol > nalbuphine. The rank order of affinity of these ligands was; cyclazocine > naltrexone ≥ SKF 10047 ≥ xorphanol ≥ WIN 44,441 > nalorphine > butorphanol > nalbuphine ≥ lofentanil > dezocine ≥ metazocine ≥ morphine > hydromorphone > fentanyl. Conclusion These results elucidate the relative activities of a set of opioid ligands at κ-opioid receptor and can serve as the initial step in a systematic study leading to understanding of the mode of action of these opioid ligands at this receptor. PMID:16433932

  15. Structural parameterization of the binding enthalpy of small ligands.

    PubMed

    Luque, Irene; Freire, Ernesto

    2002-11-01

    A major goal in ligand and drug design is the optimization of the binding affinity of selected lead molecules. However, the binding affinity is defined by the free energy of binding, which, in turn, is determined by the enthalpy and entropy changes. Because the binding enthalpy is the term that predominantly reflects the strength of the interactions of the ligand with its target relative to those with the solvent, it is desirable to develop ways of predicting enthalpy changes from structural considerations. The application of structure/enthalpy correlations derived from protein stability data has yielded inconsistent results when applied to small ligands of pharmaceutical interest (MW < 800). Here we present a first attempt at an empirical parameterization of the binding enthalpy for small ligands in terms of structural information. We find that at least three terms need to be considered: (1) the intrinsic enthalpy change that reflects the nature of the interactions between ligand, target, and solvent; (2) the enthalpy associated with any possible conformational change in the protein or ligand upon binding; and, (3) the enthalpy associated with protonation/deprotonation events, if present. As in the case of protein stability, the intrinsic binding enthalpy scales with changes in solvent accessible surface areas. However, an accurate estimation of the intrinsic binding enthalpy requires explicit consideration of long-lived water molecules at the binding interface. The best statistical structure/enthalpy correlation is obtained when buried water molecules within 5-7 A of the ligand are included in the calculations. For all seven protein systems considered (HIV-1 protease, dihydrodipicolinate reductase, Rnase T1, streptavidin, pp60c-Src SH2 domain, Hsp90 molecular chaperone, and bovine beta-trypsin) the binding enthalpy of 25 small molecular weight peptide and nonpeptide ligands can be accounted for with a standard error of +/-0.3 kcal x mol(-1). Copyright 2002 Wiley

  16. Ligand-Promoted Protein Folding by Biased Kinetic Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Karan S.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Deming, Derrick T.; Garman, Scott C.; Powers, Evan T.; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2017-01-01

    Protein folding in cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of endogenous binding partners, and exogenous binding partners have been exploited as pharmacological chaperones. A combined mathematical modeling and experimental approach shows that a ligand improves the folding of a destabilized protein by biasing the kinetic partitioning between folding and alternative fates (aggregation or degradation). Computationally predicted inhibition of test protein aggregation and degradation as a function of ligand concentration are validated by experiments in two disparate cellular systems. PMID:28218913

  17. Drawing Mononuclear Octahedral Coordination Compounds Containing Tridentate Chelating Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamadou, Aminou; Ple, Karen; Haudrechy, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Complexes with tridentate ligands of the type [M(A-B-C)2], where A [not equal to] B [not equal to] C and with an imposed bonding sequence A-B-C, require special attention to draw all possible stereoisomers. Depending on the nature of the central donor atom B of the tridentate ligand, an easy drawing method is presented that shows seven chiral…

  18. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, Mark D.; Wilson, Troy E.; Mastandra, Mark S.

    1996-01-01

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided.

  19. Dynamic 3D cell culture via a chemoselective photoactuated ligand.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Nathan P; Luo, Wei; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2014-09-01

    A new strategy to create a dynamic scaffold for three-dimensional (3D) cell experiments based on a photo-activated cell adhesive peptide ligand is described. After polymerization, the inert matrix becomes cell adhesive by chemoselective modification through the conjugation of oxyamine-terminated ligands. Furthermore, spatial and temporal control of cell culture within the 3D matrix was achieved by the use of a biospecific photoprotected peptide and visualized by confocal microscopy.

  20. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  1. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  2. Ligand and interfacial dynamics in a homodimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant Kumar; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics of dimeric hemoglobin (HbI) from Scapharca inaequivalvis in different ligand-binding states is studied from atomistic simulations on the μs time scale. The intermediates are between the fully ligand-bound (R) and ligand-free (T) states. Tertiary structural changes, such as rotation of the side chain of Phe97, breaking of the Lys96–heme salt bridge, and the Fe–Fe separation, are characterized and the water dynamics along the R-T transition is analyzed. All these properties for the intermediates are bracketed by those determined experimentally for the fully ligand-bound and ligand-free proteins, respectively. The dynamics of the two monomers is asymmetric on the 100 ns timescale. Several spontaneous rotations of the Phe97 side chain are observed which suggest a typical time scale of 50–100 ns for this process. Ligand migration pathways include regions between the B/G and C/G helices and, if observed, take place in the 100 ns time scale. PMID:26958581

  3. FXR and its ligands inhibit the function of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Ali, Marfoua S.; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Sage, Tanya; Flora, Gagan D; Bye, Alex P; Kriek, Neline; Dorchies, Emilie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Dombrowicz, David; Staels, Bart; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective While initially seemingly paradoxical due to the lack of nucleus, platelets possess a number of transcription factors that regulate their function through DNA-independent mechanisms. These include the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), a member of the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that has been identified as a bile acid receptor. In this study, we show that FXR is present in human platelets and FXR ligands, GW4064 and 6-ECDCA, modulate platelet activation nongenomically. Approach and Results FXR ligands inhibited the activation of platelets in response to stimulation of collagen or thrombin receptors, resulting in diminished intracellular calcium mobilization and secretion, fibrinogen binding and aggregation. Exposure to FXR ligands also reduced integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling and thereby reduced the ability of platelets to spread and to stimulate clot retraction. FXR function in platelets was found to be associated with the modulation of cGMP levels in platelets and associated downstream inhibitory signaling. Platelets from FXR-deficient mice were refractory to the actions of FXR agonists on platelet function and cyclic nucleotide signaling, firmly linking the non-genomic actions of these ligands to the FXR receptor. Conclusion This study provides support for the ability of FXR ligands to modulate platelet activation. The athero-protective effects of GW4064, with its novel antiplatelet effects, indicate FXR as a potential target for prevention of athero-thrombotic disease. PMID:27758768

  4. Porphyrin-based design of bioinspired multitarget quadruplex ligands.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Desbois, Nicolas; Stefan, Loic; Richard, Philippe; Gros, Claude P; Monchaud, David

    2014-09-01

    Secondary nucleic acid structures, such as DNA and RNA quadruplexes, are potential targets for cancer therapies. Ligands that interact with these targets could thus find application as anticancer agents. Synthetic G-quartets have recently found numerous applications, including use as bioinspired G-quadruplex ligands. Herein, the design, synthesis and preliminary biophysical evaluation of a new prototype multitarget G-quadruplex ligand, (PNA)PorphySQ, are reported, where peptidic nucleic acid guanine ((PNA)G) was incorporated in the porphyrin-templated synthetic G-quartet (PorphySQ). Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-melting experiments, PorphySQ was shown to possess enhanced quadruplex-interacting properties thanks to the presence of four positively charged (PNA)G residues that improve its electrostatic interactions with the binding site of both DNA and RNA quadruplexes (i.e., their negatively charged and accessible G-quartets), thereby making (PNA)PorphySQ an interesting prototype of a multitarget ligand. Both the chemical stability and water solubility of (PNA)PorphySQ are improved over the non-PNA derivative (PorphySQ), which are desirable properties for drug development, and while improvements remain to be made, this ligand is a promising lead for the further development of multitarget G-quadruplex ligands. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ligand exchange in quaternary alloyed nanocrystals--a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2014-11-14

    Exchange of initial, predominantly stearate ligands for pyridine in the first step and butylamine (BA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) in the second one was studied for alloyed quaternary Cu-In-Zn-S nanocrystals. The NMR results enabled us to demonstrate, for the first time, direct binding of the pyridine labile ligand to the nanocrystal surface as evidenced by paramagnetic shifts of the three signals attributed to its protons to 7.58, 7.95 and 8.75 ppm. XPS investigations indicated, in turn, a significant change in the composition of the nanocrystal surface upon the exchange of initial ligands for pyridine, which being enriched in indium in the 'as prepared' form became enriched in zinc after pyridine binding. This finding indicated that the first step of ligand exchange had to involve the removal of the surface layer enriched in indium with simultaneous exposure of a new, zinc-enriched layer. In the second ligand exchange step (replacement of pyridine with BA or MUA) the changes in the nanocrystal surface compositions were much less significant. The presence of zinc in the nanocrystal surface layer turned out necessary for effective binding of pyridine as shown by a comparative study of ligand exchange in Cu-In-Zn-S, Ag-In-Zn-S and CuInS2, carried out by complementary XPS and NMR investigations.

  6. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  7. Narrow escape for a stochastically gated Brownian ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2010-02-01

    Molecular activation in cellular microdomains is usually characterized by a forward binding rate, which is the reciprocal of the arrival time of a ligand to a key target. Upon chemical interactions or conformational changes, a Brownian ligand may randomly switch between different states, and when target activation is possible in a specific state only, switching can significantly alter the activation process. The main goal of this paper is to study the mean time for a switching ligand to activate a small substrate, modelled as the time to exit a microdomain through a small absorbing window on the surface. We present the equations for the mean sojourn times the ligand spends in each state, and study the escape process with switching between two states in dimension one and three. When the ligand can exit in only one of the two states, we find that switching always decreases its sojourn time in the state where it can exit. Moreover, the fastest exit is obtained when the ligand diffuses most of the time in the state with the maximal diffusion coefficient, although this may imply that it spends most of the time 'hidden' in the state where it cannot exit. We discuss the physical mechanisms responsible for this apparent paradox. In dimension three we confirm our results with Brownian simulations. Finally, we suggest possible applications in cellular biology.

  8. Regulation of NKG2D ligand gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Traherne, James A; Ashiru, Omodele; Wills, Mark R; Trowsdale, John

    2006-03-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D has seven known host ligands encoded by the MHC class I chain-related MIC and ULBP/RAET genes. Why there is such diversity of NKG2D ligands is not known but one hypothesis is that they are differentially expressed in different tissues in response to different stresses. To explore this, we compared expression patterns and promoters of NKG2D ligand genes. ULBP/RAET genes were transcribed independent of each other in a panel of cell lines. ULBP/RAET gene expression was upregulated on infection with human cytomegalovirus; however, a clinical strain, Toledo, induced expression more slowly than did a laboratory strain, AD169. ULBP4/RAET1E was not induced by infection with either strain. To investigate the mechanisms behind the similarities and differences in NKG2D ligand gene expression a comparative sequence analysis of NKG2D ligand gene putative promoter regions was conducted. Sequence alignments demonstrated that there was significant sequence diversity; however, one region of high similarity between most of the genes is evident. This region contains a number of potential transcription factor binding sites, including those involved in shock responses and sites for retinoic acid-induced factors. Promoters of some NKG2D ligand genes are polymorphic and several sequence alterations in these alleles abolished putative transcription factor binding.

  9. Lyar Is a New Ligand for Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Liu, Robert; Shen, Chen; Yu, Jisu; Zhou, Yixiong; Salero, Enrique; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to tissue homeostasis, as highlighted by phagocytosis defect of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with debris accumulation, photoreceptor degeneration and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to delineating molecular mechanisms and functional roles of phagocytes, but are traditionally identified in individual cases with technical challenges. We recently developed open reading frame phage display (OPD) for phagocytosis-based functional cloning (PFC) to identify unknown ligands. One of the identified ligands was Ly-1 antibody reactive clone (Lyar) with functions poorly defined. Herein, we characterized Lyar as a new ligand to stimulate RPE phagocytosis. In contrast to its reported nucleolar expression, immunohistochemistry showed that Lyar was highly expressed in photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) of the retina. Cytoplasmic Lyar was released from apoptotic cells, and selectively bound to shed POSs and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. POS vesicles engulfed through Lyar-dependent pathway were targeted to phagosomes and colocalized with phagosome marker Rab7. These results suggest that Lyar is a genuine RPE phagocytosis ligand, which in turn supports the validity of OPD/PFC as the only available approach for unbiased identification of phagocytosis ligands with broad applicability to various phagocytes.

  10. Ligand- and receptor-based docking with LiBELa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Muniz, Heloisa; Nascimento, Alessandro S.

    2015-08-01

    Methodologies on molecular docking are constantly improving. The problem consists on finding an optimal interplay between the computational cost and a satisfactory physical description of ligand-receptor interaction. In pursuit of an advance in current methods we developed a mixed docking approach combining ligand- and receptor-based strategies in a docking engine, where tridimensional descriptors for shape and charge distribution of a reference ligand guide the initial placement of the docking molecule and an interaction energy-based global minimization follows. This hybrid docking was evaluated with soft-core and force field potentials taking into account ligand pose and scoring. Our approach was found to be competitive to a purely receptor-based dock resulting in improved logAUC values when evaluated with DUD and DUD-E. Furthermore, the smoothed potential as evaluated here, was not advantageous when ligand binding poses were compared to experimentally determined conformations. In conclusion we show that a combination of ligand- and receptor-based strategy docking with a force field energy model results in good reproduction of binding poses and enrichment of active molecules against decoys. This strategy is implemented in our tool, LiBELa, available to the scientific community.

  11. Orphan receptor ligand discovery by pickpocketing pharmacological neighbors.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tony; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Stewart, Alastair G; Coleman, James L J; McRobb, Fiona M; Riek, R Peter; Graham, Robert M; Abagyan, Ruben; Kufareva, Irina; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the pharmacological similarity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is paramount for predicting ligand off-target effects, drug repurposing, and ligand discovery for orphan receptors. Phylogenetic relationships do not always correctly capture pharmacological similarity. Previous family-wide attempts to define pharmacological relationships were based on three-dimensional structures and/or known receptor-ligand pairings, both unavailable for orphan GPCRs. Here, we present GPCR-CoINPocket, a novel contact-informed neighboring pocket metric of GPCR binding-site similarity that is informed by patterns of ligand-residue interactions observed in crystallographically characterized GPCRs. GPCR-CoINPocket is applicable to receptors with unknown structure or ligands and accurately captures known pharmacological relationships between GPCRs, even those undetected by phylogeny. When applied to orphan receptor GPR37L1, GPCR-CoINPocket identified its pharmacological neighbors, and transfer of their pharmacology aided in discovery of the first surrogate ligands for this orphan with a 30% success rate. Although primarily designed for GPCRs, the method is easily transferable to other protein families.

  12. Ligand-Dependent Conformational Dynamics of Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Reddish, Michael J.; Vaughn, Morgan B.; Fu, Rong; Dyer, R. Brian

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are known to change among several conformational states during turnover. The role of such dynamic structural changes in catalysis is not fully understood. The influence of dynamics in catalysis can be inferred, but not proven, by comparison of equilibrium structures of protein variants and protein–ligand complexes. A more direct way to establish connections between protein dynamics and the catalytic cycle is to probe the kinetics of specific protein motions in comparison to progress along the reaction coordinate. We have examined the enzyme model system dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli with tryptophan fluorescence-probed temperature-jump spectroscopy. We aimed to observe the kinetics of the ligand binding and ligand-induced conformational changes of three DHFR complexes to establish the relationship among these catalytic steps. Surprisingly, in all three complexes, the observed kinetics do not match a simple sequential two-step process. Through analysis of the relationship between ligand concentration and observed rate, we conclude that the observed kinetics correspond to the ligand binding step of the reaction and a noncoupled enzyme conformational change. The kinetics of the conformational change vary with the ligand's identity and presence but do not appear to be directly related to progress along the reaction coordinate. These results emphasize the need for kinetic studies of DHFR with highly specific spectroscopic probes to determine which dynamic events are coupled to the catalytic cycle and which are not. PMID:26901612

  13. Riboswitch structure in the ligand-free state.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Molecular investigations of riboswitches bound to small-molecule effectors have produced a wealth of information on how these molecules achieve high affinity and specificity for a target ligand. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for the ligand-free state for representatives of the preQ₁-I, S-adenosylmethionine I, lysine, and glycine aptamer classes. These structures in conjunction with complimentary techniques, such as in-line probing, NMR spectroscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer, small-angle scattering, and computational simulations, have demonstrated that riboswitches adopt multiple conformations in the absence of ligand. Despite a number of investigations that support ligand-dependent folding, mounting evidence suggests that free-state riboswitches interact with their effectors in the sub-populations of largely prefolded states as embodied by the principle of conformational selection, which has been documented extensively for protein-mediated ligand interactions. Fundamental riboswitch investigations of the bound and free states have advanced our understanding of RNA folding, ligand recognition, and how these factors culminate in communication between an aptamer and its expression platform. An understanding of these topics is essential to comprehend riboswitch gene regulation at the molecular level, which has already provided a basis to understand the mechanism of action of natural antimicrobials.

  14. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  15. Cell mechanosensory recognizes ligand compliance at biomaterial interface.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, Chiara; Lettera, Vincenzo; Causa, Filippo; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cells activate signalling through ligand-receptor bonds by sensing the mechanical properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Ligands, indeed, have to withstand the pulling force elicited by cell receptors through focal adhesions (FAs). On this basis, we developed functional ligands to be simply adsorbed on surfaces and constituted by a two-domain peptide: one derived from ECM proteins and available to receptors to offer biochemical cues, and another adsorbed on material to withstand the tension upon receptor engagement. Tuneable compliance of the anchoring domain of the peptide ligand was verified by single peptide analysis through molecular dynamics and adsorption measurements. We showed that the highest adsorbed peptides combined with integrin cell-binding motifs allow for the cell recognition and polarization with larger mature FA areas. On the contrary, the lowest adsorbed sequences did not provide mechanical resistance to the integrin pulling action, leading to more rounded cells with smaller FA areas. This evidence demonstrates that cell mechanosensory can discriminate ligands on surfaces and should be considered as a criterion in ligand design for material bioactivation.

  16. Ligand binding analysis and screening by chemical denaturation shift.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Toward this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Because ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization effect elicited by binding can be used to identify and characterize ligands. For example, the shift in protein denaturation temperature (Tm shift) has become a popular approach to identify potential ligands. However, Tm shifts cannot be readily transformed into binding affinities, and the ligand rank order obtained at denaturation temperatures (≥60°C) does not necessarily coincide with the rank order at physiological temperature. An alternative approach is the use of chemical denaturation, which can be implemented at any temperature. Chemical denaturation shifts allow accurate determination of binding affinities with a surprisingly wide dynamic range (high micromolar to sub nanomolar) and in situations where binding changes the cooperativity of the unfolding transition. In this article, we develop the basic analytical equations and provide several experimental examples.

  17. Phage Selection of Chemically Stabilized α-Helical Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Philippe; Bertoldo, Davide; Dessen, Pierre; Khan, Maola M; Pizzitola, Irene; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg; Heinis, Christian

    2016-05-20

    Short α-helical peptides stabilized by linkages between constituent amino acids offer an attractive format for ligand development. In recent years, a range of excellent ligands based on stabilized α-helices were generated by rational design using α-helical peptides of natural proteins as templates. Herein, we developed a method to engineer chemically stabilized α-helical ligands in a combinatorial fashion. In brief, peptides containing cysteines in position i and i + 4 are genetically encoded by phage display, the cysteines are modified with chemical bridges to impose α-helical conformations, and binders are isolated by affinity selection. We applied the strategy to affinity mature an α-helical peptide binding β-catenin. We succeeded in developing ligands with Kd's as low as 5.2 nM, having >200-fold improved affinity. The strategy is generally applicable for affinity maturation of any α-helical peptide. Compared to hydrocarbon stapled peptides, the herein evolved thioether-bridged peptide ligands can be synthesized more easily, as no unnatural amino acids are required and the cyclization reaction is more efficient and yields no stereoisomers. A further advantage of the thioether-bridged peptide ligands is that they can be expressed recombinantly as fusion proteins.

  18. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  19. Ligands Slow Down Pure-Dephasing in Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Kilina, Svetlana V; Tretiak, Sergei; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-09-22

    It is well-known experimentally and theoretically that surface ligands provide additional pathways for energy relaxation in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). They increase the rate of inelastic charge-phonon scattering and provide trap sites for the charges. We show that, surprisingly, ligands have the opposite effect on elastic electron-phonon scattering. Our simulations demonstrate that elastic scattering slows down in CdSe QDs passivated with ligands compared to that in bare QDs. As a result, the pure-dephasing time is increased, and the homogeneous luminescence line width is decreased in the presence of ligands. The lifetime of quantum superpositions of single and multiple excitons increases as well, providing favorable conditions for multiple excitons generation (MEG). Ligands reduce the pure-dephasing rates by decreasing phonon-induced fluctuations of the electronic energy levels. Surface atoms are most mobile in QDs, and therefore, they contribute greatly to the electronic energy fluctuations. The mobility is reduced by interaction with ligands. A simple analytical model suggests that the differences between the bare and passivated QDs persist for up to 5 nm diameters. Both low-frequency acoustic and high-frequency optical phonons participate in the dephasing processes in bare QDs, while low-frequency acoustic modes dominate in passivated QDs. The theoretical predictions regarding the pure-dephasing time, luminescence line width, and MEG can be verified experimentally by studying QDs with different surface passivation.

  20. Solution NMR Structure of a Ligand/Hybrid-2-G-Quadruplex Complex Reveals Rearrangements that Affect Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Wirmer-Bartoschek, Julia; Bendel, Lars Erik; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Grün, J Tassilo; Papi, Francesco; Bazzicalupi, Carla; Messori, Luigi; Gratteri, Paola; Schwalbe, Harald

    2017-06-12

    Telomeric G-quadruplexes have recently emerged as drug targets in cancer research. Herein, we present the first NMR structure of a telomeric DNA G-quadruplex that adopts the biologically relevant hybrid-2 conformation in a ligand-bound state. We solved the complex with a metalorganic gold(III) ligand that stabilizes G-quadruplexes. Analysis of the free and bound structures reveals structural changes in the capping region of the G-quadruplex. The ligand is sandwiched between one terminal G-tetrad and a flanking nucleotide. This complex structure involves a major structural rearrangement compared to the free G-quadruplex structure as observed for other G-quadruplexes in different conformations, invalidating simple docking approaches to ligand-G-quadruplex structure determination. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Rule of five in 2015 and beyond: Target and ligand structural limitations, ligand chemistry structure and drug discovery project decisions.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    The rule of five (Ro5), based on physicochemical profiles of phase II drugs, is consistent with structural limitations in protein targets and the drug target ligands. Three of four parameters in Ro5 are fundamental to the structure of both target and drug binding sites. The chemical structure of the drug ligand depends on the ligand chemistry and design philosophy. Two extremes of chemical structure and design philosophy exist; ligands constructed in the medicinal chemistry synthesis laboratory without input from natural selection and natural product (NP) metabolites biosynthesized based on evolutionary selection. Exceptions to Ro5 are found mostly among NPs. Chemistry chameleon-like behavior of some NPs due to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding as exemplified by cyclosporine A is a strong contributor to NP Ro5 outliers. The fragment derived, drug Navitoclax is an example of the extensive expertise, resources, time and key decisions required for the rare discovery of a non-NP Ro5 outlier.

  2. A Ferrocene-Based Catecholamide Ligand: the Consequences of Ligand Swivel for Directed Supramolecular Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Fiedler, Dorothea; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-02-04

    A ferrocene-based biscatecholamide ligand was prepared and investigated for the formation of metal-ligand supramolecular assemblies with different metals. Reaction with Ge(IV) resulted in the formation of a variety of Ge{sub n}L{sub m} coordination complexes, including [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 3}]{sup 4-} and [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 2}({mu}-OMe){sub 2}]{sup 2-}. The ligand's ability to swivel about the ferrocenyl linker and adopt different conformations accounts for formation of many different Ge{sub n}L{sub m} species. This study demonstrates why conformational ligand rigidity is essential in the rational design and directed self-assembly of supramolecular complexes.

  3. electronic Ligand Builder and Optimization Workbench (eLBOW): a tool for ligand coordinate and restraint generation

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic Ligand Builder and Optimization Workbench (eLBOW) is a program module of the PHENIX suite of computational crystallographic software. It is designed to be a flexible procedure that uses simple and fast quantum-chemical techniques to provide chemically accurate information for novel and known ligands alike. A variety of input formats and options allow the attainment of a number of diverse goals including geometry optimization and generation of restraints. PMID:19770504

  4. electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW): A tool for ligand coordinate and restraint generation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf; Adams, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW) is a program module of the PHENIX suite of computational crystallographic software. It's designed to be a flexible procedure using simple and fast quantum chemical techniques to provide chemically accurate information for novel and known ligands alike. A variety of input formats and options allow for the attainment of a number of diverse goals including geometry optimisation and generation of restraints.

  5. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  6. An Analysis of Central Residues Between Ligand-Bound and Ligand-Free Protein Structures Based on Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Amala, Arumugam; Emerson, Isacc Arnold

    2017-08-01

    Depiction of protein structures as networks of interacting residues has enabled us to understand the structure and function of the protein. Previous investigations on closeness centrality have identified protein functional sites from three- dimensional structures. It is well recognized that ligand binding to a receptor protein induces a wide range of structural changes. An interesting question is how central residues function during conformational changes triggered during ligand binding? The aim of this study is to comprehend at what extent central residues change during ligand binding to receptor proteins. To determine this, we examined 37 pairs of protein structures consisting of ligand-bound and ligand-free forms. These protein structures were modelled as an undirected network and significant central residues were obtained using residue centrality measures. In addition to these, the basic network parameters were also analysed. On analysing the residue centrality measures, we observed that 60% of central residues were common in both the ligand-bound and ligand-free states. The geometry of the central residues revealed that they were situated closer to the protein center of the mass. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of central residues in amino acids substitutions and in the evolution itself. The closeness centrality was also analyzed among different protein domain sizes and the values gradually declined from single-domains to multi-domain proteins suggesting that the network has potential for hierarchical organization. Betweenness centrality measure was also used to determine the central residues and 31% of these residues were common between the holo/apo states. Findings reveal that central residues play a significant role in determining the functional properties of proteins. These results have implications in predicting binding/active site residues, specifically in the context of drug designing, if additional information concerning ligand binding is

  7. The biotic ligand model: a historical overview.

    PubMed

    Paquin, Paul R; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Apte, Simon; Batley, Graeme E; Bowles, Karl C; Campbell, Peter G C; Delos, Charles G; Di Toro, Dominic M; Dwyer, Robert L; Galvez, Fernando; Gensemer, Robert W; Goss, Gregory G; Hostrand, Christer; Janssen, Colin R; McGeer, James C; Naddy, Rami B; Playle, Richard C; Santore, Robert C; Schneider, Uwe; Stubblefield, William A; Wood, Chris M; Wu, Kuen Benjamin

    2002-09-01

    During recent years, the biotic ligand model (BLM) has been proposed as a tool to evaluate quantitatively the manner in which water chemistry affects the speciation and biological availability of metals in aquatic systems. This is an important consideration because it is the bioavailability and bioreactivity of metals that control their potential to cause adverse effects. The BLM approach has gained widespread interest amongst the scientific, regulated and regulatory communities because of its potential for use in developing water quality criteria (WQC) and in performing aquatic risk assessments for metals. Specifically, the BLM does this in a way that considers the important influences of site-specific water quality. This journal issue includes papers that describe recent advances with regard to the development of the BLM approach. Here, the current status of the BLM development effort is described in the context of the longer-term history of advances in the understanding of metal interactions in the environment upon which the BLM is based. Early developments in the aquatic chemistry of metals, the physiology of aquatic organisms and aquatic toxicology are reviewed first, and the degree to which each of these disciplines influenced the development of water quality regulations is discussed. The early scientific advances that took place in each of these fields were not well coordinated, making it difficult for regulatory authorities to take full advantage of the potential utility of what had been learned. However, this has now changed, with the BLM serving as a useful interface amongst these scientific disciplines, and within the regulatory arena as well. The more recent events that have led to the present situation are reviewed, and consideration is given to some of the future needs and developments related to the BLM that are envisioned. The research results that are described in the papers found in this journal issue represent a distinct milestone in the ongoing

  8. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  9. Biotechnological Fluorescent Ligands of the Bradykinin B1 Receptor: Protein Ligands for a Peptide Receptor.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2016-01-01

    The bradykinin (BK) B1 receptor (B1R) is a peculiar G protein coupled receptor that is strongly regulated to the point of being inducible in immunopathology. Limited clinical evidence suggests that its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a biomarker of active inflammatory states. In an effort to develop a novel imaging/diagnostic tool, we report the rational design and testing of a fusion protein that is a ligand of the human B1R but not likely to label peptidases. This ligand is composed of a fluorescent protein (FP) (enhanced green FP [EGFP] or mCherry) prolonged at its N-terminus by a spacer peptide and a classical peptide agonist or antagonist (des-Arg9-BK, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK, respectively). The design of the spacer-ligand joint peptide was validated by a competition assay for [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK binding to the human B1R applied to 4 synthetic peptides of 18 or 19 residues. The labeling of B1R-expressing cells with EGFP or mCherry fused with 7 of such peptides was performed in parallel (microscopy). Both assays indicated that the best design was FP-(Asn-Gly)n-Lys-des-Arg9-BK; n = 15 was superior to n = 5, suggesting benefits from minimizing steric hindrance between the FP and the receptor. Cell labeling concerned mostly plasma membranes and was inhibited by a B1R antagonist. EGFP-(Asn-Gly)15-Lys-des-Arg9-BK competed for the binding of [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK to human recombinant B1R, being only 10-fold less potent than the unlabeled form of Lys-des-Arg9-BK to do so. The fusion protein did not label HEK 293a cells expressing recombinant human BK B2 receptors or angiotensin converting enzyme. This study identifies a modular C-terminal sequence that can be adapted to protein cargoes, conferring high affinity for the BK B1R, with possible applications in diagnostic cytofluorometry, histology and drug delivery (e.g., in oncology).

  10. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  12. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    DOE PAGES

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; ...

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  13. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  14. Ligand-binding pocket of the ecdysone receptor.

    PubMed

    Billas, Isabelle M L; Moras, Dino

    2005-01-01

    The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a central role in regulating the expression of a vast array of genes during development and reproduction. The functional entity is a heterodimer composed of EcR and the ultraspiracle protein (USP)-the orthologue of the vertebrate retinoid X receptor (RXR). Ecdysone receptor is the molecular target of ecdysteroids-the endogenous steroidal molting hormones found in arthropods and nonarthropod invertebrates. In addition, EcR is the target of the environmentally safe bisacylhydrazine insecticides used against pests, such as caterpillars, that cause severe damage to agriculture. The crystal structures of the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of the EcR/USP heterodimer, complexed to the ecdysteroid ponasterone A (ponA) and to the lepidopteran specific bisacylhydrazine BYI06830 used in the agrochemical pest control, provide the first insight at atomic level for these important functional complexes. The EcR/USP heterodimer has a shape similar to that seen for the known vertebrate heterodimer complexes with a conserved main interface, but with features, that are specific to this invertebrate heterodimer. The two EcR-LBD structures in complex with steroidal and nonsteroidal ligands reveal substantial differences. The adaptability of EcR to its ligand results in two radically different and only partially overlapping ligand-binding pockets with different residues involved in ligand recognition. The concept brought by these structural studies of a ligand-dependent binding pocket has potential applications for other NRs.

  15. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Behren, Mathias M.; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise).

  16. Ligand binding assays at equilibrium: validation and interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Hulme, Edward C; Trevethick, Mike A

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this review paper is factors affecting data interpretation in ligand binding assays under equilibrium conditions. Protocols for determining Kd (the equilibrium dissociation constant) and KdA (the equilibrium inhibitor constant) for receptor ligands are discussed. The basic theory describing the interaction of a radiotracer and an unlabelled competitor ligand with a receptor is developed. Inappropriate experimental design may result in ligand depletion and non-attainment of equilibrium, distorting the calculation of Kd and KdA. Strategies, both theoretical and practical, will be given to avoid and correct such errors, thus leading to the determination of reliable values for these constants. In determining KdA from competition binding studies, two additional concepts are discussed. First, the necessity to measure an adequate specific binding signal from the bound radiotracer ligand limits the range of affinity constants that can be measured: a particular set of assay conditions may lead to an upper limit on the apparent affinity of unlabelled ligands. Second, an extension of the basic assay methodology can indicate whether the interaction between the tracer and a test ligand is mediated by a competitive or an allosteric mechanism. Finally, the review ends with a discussion of two factors that are often overlooked: buffer composition and the temperature at which the assay is conducted, and the impact these can have on affinity measurements and the understanding of drug interactions. British Journal of Pharmacology (2010) 161, 1219–1237; doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00604.x; published online 2 February 2010 This article is part of a themed section on Analytical Receptor Pharmacology in Drug Discovery. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2010.161.issue-6 PMID:20132208

  17. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Behren, Mathias M.; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise).

  18. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints.

    PubMed

    von Behren, Mathias M; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise ).

  19. Triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry concept for thyroid transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Aqai, Payam; Fryganas, Christos; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2012-08-07

    For the analysis of thyroid transporter ligands, a triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry (BioMS) concept was developed, with the aim at three different analytical objectives: rapid screening of any ligand, confirmation of known ligands in accordance with legislative requirements, and identification of emerging yet unknown ligands. These three purposes share the same biorecognition element, recombinant thyroid transport protein transthyretin (rTTR), and dedicated modes of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). For screening, a rapid and radiolabel-free competitive inhibition MS binding assay was developed with fast ultrahigh performance-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple-quadrupole-MS (UPLC-QqQ-MS) as the readout system. It uses the nonradioactive stable isotopic thyroid hormone (13)C(6)-L-thyroxine as the label of which the binding to rTTR is inhibited by any ligand such as thyroid drugs and thyroid endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). To this end, rTTR is either used in solution or immobilized on paramagnetic microbeads. The concentration-dependent inhibition of the label by the natural thyroid hormone l-thyroxine (T4), as a model analyte, is demonstrated in water at part-per-trillion and in urine at part-per-billion level. For confirmation of identity of known ligands, rTTR was used for bioaffinity purification for confirmation of naturally present free T4 in urine. As a demonstrator for identification of unknown ligands, the same rTTR was used again but in combination with nano-UPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight-MS (nLC-Q-TOF-MS) and urine samples spiked with the model "unknown" EDCs triclosan and tetrabromobisphenol-A. This study highlights the potential of BioMS using one affinity system, both for rapid screening and for confirmation and identification of known and unknown emerging thyroid EDCs.

  20. Dimolybdenum cyclopentadienyl complexes with bridging chalcogenophosphinidene ligands.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Belén; Alvarez, M Angeles; Amor, Inmaculada; García, M Esther; García-Vivó, Daniel; Suárez, Jaime; Ruiz, Miguel A

    2012-07-16

    The reactions of the phosphinidene-bridged complex [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-PH)(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (1), the arylphosphinidene complexes [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(6)-PMes*)(CO)(2)] (2), [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(4)-PMes*)(CO)(3)] (3), [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(4)-PMes*)(CO)(2)(CN(t)Bu)] (4), and the cyclopentadienylidene-phosphinidene complex [Mo(2)Cp(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(5)-PC(5)H(4))(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (5) toward different sources of chalcogen atoms were investigated (Mes* = 2,4,6-C(6)H(2)(t)Bu(3); Cp = η(5)-C(5)H(5)). The bare elements were appropriate sources in all cases except for oxygen, in which case dimethyldioxirane gave the best results. Complex 1 reacted with the mentioned chalcogen sources at low temperature, to give the corresponding chalcogenophosphinidene derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(2){μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P)-ZPH}(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (Z = O, S, Se, Te; P-Se = 2.199(2) Å). The arylphosphinidene complex 2 was the least reactive substrate and gave only chalcogenophosphinidene derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P),η(6)-ZPMes*)(CO)(2)] for Z = O and S (P-O = 1.565(2) Å), along with small amounts of the dithiophosphorane complex [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(2)(P,S):κ(1)(S'),η(6)-S(2)PMes*)(CO)(2)], in the reaction with sulfur. The η(4)-complexes 3 and 4 reacted with sulfur and gray selenium to give the corresponding derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P),η(4)-ZPMes*)(CO)(2)L] (L = CO, CN(t)Bu), obtained respectively as syn (Z = Se; P-Se = 2.190(1) Å for L = CO) or a mixture of syn and anti isomers (Z = S; P-S = 2.034(1)-2.043(1) Å), with these diastereoisomers differing in the relative positioning of the chalcogen atom and the terminal ligand at the metallocene fragment, relative to the Mo(2)P plane. The cyclopentadienylidene compound 5 reacted with all chalcogens, and gave with good yields the chalcogenophosphinidene derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P),η(5)-ZPC(5)H(4))(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (Z = S, Se, Te), these displaying in solution

  1. Aluminum complexes of the redox-active [ONO] pincer ligand.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Géza; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-07-14

    A series of aluminum complexes containing the tridentate, redox-active ligand bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine ([ONO]H(3)) in three different oxidation states were synthesized. The aluminum halide salts AlCl(3) and AlBr(3) were reacted with the doubly deprotonated form of the ligand to afford five-coordinate [ONHO(cat)]AlX(solv) complexes (1a, X = Cl, solv = OEt(2); 1b, X = Br, solv = THF), each having a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry at the aluminum and containing the [ONHO(cat)](2-) ligand with a protonated, sp(3)-hybridized nitrogen donor. The [ONO] ligand platform may also be added to aluminum through the use of the oxidized ligand salt [ONO(q)]K, which was reacted with AlCl(3) in the presence of either diphenylacetylacetonate (acacPh(2)(-)) or 8-oxyquinoline (quinO(-)) to afford [ONO(q)]Al(acacPh(2))Cl (2) or [ONO(q)]Al(quinO)Cl (3), respectively, with well-defined [ONO(q)](-) ligands. Quinonate complexes 2 and 3 were reduced by one electron to afford the corresponding complexes K{[ONO(sq)]Al(acacPh(2))(py)} (4) and K{[ONO(sq)]Al(quinO)(py)} (5), respectively, containing well-defined [ONO(sq)](2-) ligands. The addition of tetrachloro-1,2-quinone to 1a in the presence of pyridine resulted in the expulsion of HCl and the formation of an aluminum complex with two different redox active ligands, [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(6)Cl(4))(py) (6). Similar results were obtained when 1a was reacted with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(14)H(8))(py) (7) or with pyrene-4,5-dione to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(16)H(8))(py) (8). Structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic measurements on 6-8 suggest ligand non-innocent redox behavior in these complexes.

  2. Ligand Migration and Binding in Myoglobin Mutant L29W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Waschipky, Robert; Nienhaus, Karin; Minkow, Oleksandr; Ostermann, Andreas; Parak, Fritz G.

    2001-09-01

    Myoglobin, a small globular heme protein that binds gaseous ligands such as O2, CO, and NO reversibly at the heme iron, has for many years been a paradigm for studying the effects of structure and dynamics on protein reactions. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements after photodissociation of the ligand reveal a complex ligand binding reaction with multiple kinetic intermediates, resulting from protein relaxation and movements of the ligand within the protein. To observe structural changes induced by ligand dissociation, we have investigated carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) mutant L29W using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in combination with x-ray crystallography. The presence of two distinct infrared stretch bands of the bound CO, AI at 1945 cm-1 and AII at 1955 cm-1, implies that L29W MbCO assumes two different conformations at neutral pH. Low-temperature flash photolysis experiments with monitoring of the absorption changes in the individual CO lines reveal markedly different rebinding properties. While recombination in AII is conceptually simple and well described by a two-state transition involving a distribution of enthalpy barriers, recombination in AI is more complicated: Besides a fast kinetic component, a second, slower kinetic component appears; its population grows with increasing temperature. X-ray crystallography of crystals illuminated below 180 K to photodissociate the CO reveals that the slow component arises from ligands that have migrated from their initial docking site to a remote site within the distal heme pocket. This process occurs in an essentially immobilized, frozen protein. Subsequently, ligands rebind by thermal activation over a barrier that is much higher than the barrier for recombination from the initial docking site. Upon photodissociation above 180 K, ligands escape from the distal pocket, aided by protein fluctuations that transiently open exit channels. The x-ray structure shows a large proportion of ligands in a cavity on

  3. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  4. Ligand binding to a high-energy partially unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Joseph R; Park, Chiwook

    2015-01-01

    The conformational energy landscape of a protein determines populations of all possible conformations of the protein and also determines the kinetics of the conversion between the conformations. Interaction with ligands influences the conformational energy landscapes of proteins and shifts populations of proteins in different conformational states. To investigate the effect of ligand binding on partial unfolding of a protein, we use Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its functional ligand NADP(+) as a model system. We previously identified a partially unfolded form of DHFR that is populated under native conditions. In this report, we determined the free energy for partial unfolding of DHFR at varying concentrations of NADP(+) and found that NADP(+) binds to the partially unfolded form as well as the native form. DHFR unfolds partially without releasing the ligand, though the binding affinity for NADP(+) is diminished upon partial unfolding. Based on known crystallographic structures of NADP(+) -bound DHFR and the model of the partially unfolded protein we previously determined, we propose that the adenosine-binding domain of DHFR remains folded in the partially unfolded form and interacts with the adenosine moiety of NADP(+) . Our result demonstrates that ligand binding may affect the conformational free energy of not only native forms but also high-energy non-native forms.

  5. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  6. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  7. The Chemistry of Separations Ligand Degradation by Organic Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Horne, Gregory P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Zalupski, Peter R.; Cook, Andrew R.; Wishart, James F.

    2016-12-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexants and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R•+), carbon-centered radicals (R), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R•+ as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with various ligands. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved.

  8. A model for ligand binding to hexacoordinate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Trent, J T; Hvitved, A N; Hargrove, M S

    2001-05-22

    Hexacoordinate hemoglobins are heme proteins capable of reversible intramolecular coordination of the ligand binding site by an amino acid side chain from within the heme pocket. Examples of these proteins are found in many living organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. The nonsymbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) are a class of hexacoordinate heme proteins present in all plants. The nsHb from rice (rHb1) has been used as a model system to develop methods for determining rate constants characterizing binding and dissociation of the His residue responsible for hexacoordination. Measurement of these reactions exploits laser flash photolysis to initiate the reaction from the unligated, pentacoordinate form of the heme protein. A model for ligand binding is presented that incorporates the reaction following rapid mixing with the reaction starting from the pentacoordinate hemoglobin (Hb). This model is based on results indicating that ligand binding to hexacoordinate Hbs is not a simple combination of competing first order (hexacoordination) and second order (exogenous ligand binding) reactions. Ligand binding following rapid mixing is a multiphasic reaction displaying time courses ranging from milliseconds to minutes. The new model incorporates a "closed", slow reacting form of the protein that is not at rapid equilibrium with the reactive conformation. It is also demonstrated that formation of the closed protein species is not dependent on hexacoordination.

  9. Structural basis for EGFR ligand sequestration by Argos

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Daryl E.; Stayrook, Steven E.; Shi, Fumin; Narayan, Kartik; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2008-06-26

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or ErbB/HER family and their activating ligands are essential regulators of diverse developmental processes. Inappropriate activation of these receptors is a key feature of many human cancers, and its reversal is an important clinical goal. A natural secreted antagonist of EGFR signalling, called Argos, was identified in Drosophila. We showed previously that Argos functions by directly binding (and sequestering) growth factor ligands that activate EGFR5. Here we describe the 1.6-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Argos bound to an EGFR ligand. Contrary to expectations, Argos contains no EGF-like domain. Instead, a trio of closely related domains (resembling a three-finger toxin fold) form a clamp-like structure around the bound EGF ligand. Although structurally unrelated to the receptor, Argos mimics EGFR by using a bipartite binding surface to entrap EGF. The individual Argos domains share unexpected structural similarities with the extracellular ligand-binding regions of transforming growth factor-{beta} family receptors. The three-domain clamp of Argos also resembles the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor, which uses a similar mechanism to engulf the EGF-like module of uPA. Our results indicate that undiscovered mammalian counterparts of Argos may exist among other poorly characterized structural homologues. In addition, the structures presented here define requirements for the design of artificial EGF-sequestering proteins that would be valuable anti-cancer therapeutics.

  10. Surface Ligand-Mediated Plasmon-Driven Photochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Bijesh; Poveda, Marisa; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-03-02

    Contrary to the general expectation that surface ligands reduce the reactivity of surfaces by blocking the active sites, we present experimental evidence that surface ligands can in fact increase reactivity and induce important reaction pathways in plasmon-driven surface photochemistry. The remarkable effect of surface ligands is demonstrated by comparing the photochemistry of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) on resonant plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) in the presence of citrate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and no surface ligands under visible light irradiation. The use of AuNRs with citrate and no surface ligand results in the usual azo-coupling reaction. In contrast, CTAB-coated AuNRs oxidize PATP primarily to p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP). Strong correlation has been observed between the N-O and Au-Br vibration band intensities, suggesting that CTAB influences the reaction pathway through the Br(-) counterions that can minimize the electron-hole recombination rate by reacting with the hole and hence increasing the concentration of hot electrons that drive the oxidation reaction.

  11. Conformational Dynamics of a Ligand-Free Adenylate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Deok; Zhu, Fangqiang

    2013-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AdK) is a phosphoryl-transfer enzyme with important physiological functions. Based on a ligand-free open structure and a ligand-bound closed structure solved by crystallography, here we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the stability and dynamics of AdK conformations in the absence of ligands. We first perform multiple simulations starting from the open or the closed structure, and observe their free evolutions during a simulation time of 100 or 200 nanoseconds. In all seven simulations starting from the open structure, AdK remained stable near the initial conformation. The eight simulations initiated from the closed structure, in contrast, exhibited large variation in the subsequent evolutions, with most (seven) undergoing large-scale spontaneous conformational changes and approaching or reaching the open state. To characterize the thermodynamics of the transition, we propose and apply a new sampling method that employs a series of restrained simulations to calculate a one-dimensional free energy along a curved pathway in the high-dimensional conformational space. Our calculated free energy profile features a single minimum at the open conformation, and indicates that the closed state, with a high (∼13 kcal/mol) free energy, is not metastable, consistent with the observed behaviors of the unrestrained simulations. Collectively, our simulations suggest that it is energetically unfavorable for the ligand-free AdK to access the closed conformation, and imply that ligand binding may precede the closure of the enzyme. PMID:23861846

  12. New synthetic routes toward enantiopure nitrogen donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sala, Xavier; Rodríguez, Anna M; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Parella, Teodor; von Zelewsky, Alexander; Llobet, Antoni; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi

    2006-12-08

    New polypyridylic chiral ligands, having either C3 or lower symmetry, have been prepared via a de novo construction of the pyridine nucleus by means of Kröhnke methodology in the key step. The chiral moieties of these ligands originate from the monoterpen chiral pool, namely (-)-alpha-pinene ((-)-14, (-)-15) and (-)-myrtenal ((-)-9, (-)-10). Extension of the above-mentioned asymmetric synthesis procedure to the preparation of enantiopure derivatives of some commonly used polypyridylic ligands has been achieved through a new aldehyde building block ((-)-16). As an example, the synthesis of a chiral derivative of N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine (bpea) ligand, (-)-19, has been performed to illustrate the viability of the method. The coordinative ability of the ligands has been tested through the synthesis and characterization of complexes [Mn((-)-19)Br2], (-)-20, and [RuCl((-)-10)(bpy)](BF4), (-)-21. Some preliminary results related to the enantioselective catalytic epoxidation of styrene with the ruthenium complex are also presented.

  13. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  14. Consensus virtual screening approaches to predict protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of receptor-based virtual screening, namely time/cost saving and specificity, it is important to rely on algorithms that predict a high number of active ligands at the top ranks of a small molecule database. Towards that goal consensus methods combining the results of several docking algorithms were developed and compared against the individual algorithms. Furthermore, a recently proposed rescoring method based on drug efficiency indices was evaluated. Among AutoDock Vina 1.0, AutoDock 4.2 and GemDock, AutoDock Vina was the best performing single method in predicting high affinity ligands from a database of known ligands and decoys. The rescoring of predicted binding energies with the water/octanol partition coefficient did not lead to an improvement averaged over ten receptor targets. Various consensus algorithms were investigated and a simple combination of AutoDock and AutoDock Vina results gave the most consistent performance that showed early enrichment of known ligands for all receptor targets investigated. In case a number of ligands is known for a specific target, every method proposed in this study should be evaluated.

  15. Protein-Ligand Docking Based on Beta-Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chong-Min; Won, Chung-In; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Ryu, Joonghyun; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Deok-Soo

    Protein-ligand docking is to predict the location and orientation of a ligand with respect to a protein within its binding site, and has been known to be essential for the development of new drugs. The protein-ligand docking problem is usually formulated as an energy minimization problem to identify the docked conformation of the ligand. A ligand usually docks around a depressed region, called a pocket, on the surface of a protein. Presented in this paper is a docking method, called BetaDock, based on the newly developed geometric construct called the β-shape and the β-complex. To cope with the computational intractability, the global minimum of the potential energy function is searched using the genetic algorithm. The proposed algorithm first locates initial chromosomes at some locations within the pocket recognized according to the local shape of the β-shape. Then, the algorithm proceeds generations by taking advantage of powerful properties of the β-shape to achieve an extremely fast and good solution. We claim that the proposed method is much faster than other popular docking softwares including AutoDock.

  16. Efficient mapping of ligand migration channel networks in dynamic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tu-Liang; Song, Guang

    2011-08-01

    For many proteins such as myoglobin, the binding site lies in the interior, and there is no obvious route from the exterior to the binding site in the average structure. Although computer simulations for a limited number of proteins have found some transiently open channels, it is not clear if there exist more channels elsewhere or how the channels are regulated. A systematic approach that can map out the whole ligand migration channel network is lacking. Ligand migration in a dynamic protein resembles closely a well-studied problem in robotics, namely, the navigation of a mobile robot in a dynamic environment. In this work, we present a novel robotic motion planning inspired approach that can map the ligand migration channel network in a dynamic protein. The method combines an efficient spatial mapping of protein inner space with a temporal exploration of protein structural heterogeneity, which is represented by a structure ensemble. The spatial mapping of each conformation in the ensemble produces a partial map of protein inner cavities and their inter-connectivity. These maps are then merged to form a super map that contains all the channels that open dynamically. Results on the pathways in myoglobin for gaseous ligands demonstrate the efficiency of our approach in mapping the ligand migration channel networks. The results, obtained in a significantly less amount of time than trajectory-based approaches, are in agreement with previous simulation results. Additionally, the method clearly illustrates how and what conformational changes open or close a channel.

  17. A modified fluorescent intercalator displacement assay for RNA ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chow, Christine S.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) is a convenient and practical tool for identifying new nucleic-acid-binding ligands. The success of FID is based on the fact that it can be fashioned into a versatile screening assay for assessing the relative binding affinities of compounds to nucleic acids. FID is a tagless approach; the target RNAs and the ligands or small molecules under investigation do not have to be modified in order to be examined. In this study, a modified FID assay for screening RNA-binding ligands was established using 3-methyl-2-((1-(3-(trimethylammonio)propyl)-4-quinolinylidene)methyl)benzothiazolium (TO-PRO) as the fluorescent indicator. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results provide direct evidence that correlates the reduction in fluorescence intensity observed in the FID assay with displacement of the dye molecule from RNA. The assay was successfully applied to screen a variety of RNA-binding ligands with a set of small hairpin RNAs. Ligands that bind with moderate affinity to the chosen RNA constructs (A-site, TAR, h31, and H69) were identified. PMID:20863807

  18. Ligand specificity and evolution of liver X receptors§

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, Erica J.; Ai, Ni; Welsh, William J.; Ekins, Sean; Hagey, Lee R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are key regulators of lipid and cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Little is known, however, about the function and evolution of LXRs in non-mammalian species. The present study reports the cloning of LXRs from African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), Western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis), and zebrafish (Danio rerio), and their functional characterization and comparison with human and mouse LXRs. Additionally, an ortholog of LXR in the chordate invertebrate Ciona intestinalis was cloned and functionally characterized. Ligand specificities of the frog and zebrafish LXRs were very similar to LXRα and LXRβ from human and mouse. All vertebrate LXRs studied were activated robustly by the synthetic ligands T-0901317 and GW3965 and by a variety of oxysterols. In contrast, Ciona LXR was not activated by T-0901317 or GW3965 but was activated by a limited number of oxysterols, as well as some androstane and pregnane steroids. Pharmacophore analysis, homology modeling, and docking studies of Ciona LXR predict a receptor with a more restricted ligand-binding pocket and less intrinsic disorder in the ligand-binding domain compared to vertebrate LXRs. The results suggest that LXRs have a long evolutionary history, with vertebrate LXRs diverging from invertebrate LXRs in ligand specificity. PMID:18395439

  19. Insights into Protein-Ligand Interactions: Mechanisms, Models, and Methods.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Li, Yi; Xia, Yuan-Ling; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liang, Jing; Sang, Peng; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-26

    Molecular recognition, which is the process of biological macromolecules interacting with each other or various small molecules with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex, constitutes the basis of all processes in living organisms. Proteins, an important class of biological macromolecules, realize their functions through binding to themselves or other molecules. A detailed understanding of the protein-ligand interactions is therefore central to understanding biology at the molecular level. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the protein-ligand recognition and binding will also facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In the present review, first, the physicochemical mechanisms underlying protein-ligand binding, including the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and relationships, and binding driving forces, are introduced and rationalized. Next, three currently existing protein-ligand binding models--the "lock-and-key", "induced fit", and "conformational selection"--are described and their underlying thermodynamic mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the methods available for investigating protein-ligand binding affinity, including experimental and theoretical/computational approaches, are introduced, and their advantages, disadvantages, and challenges are discussed.

  20. PLIP: fully automated protein-ligand interaction profiler.

    PubMed

    Salentin, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sven; Haupt, V Joachim; Adasme, Melissa F; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of interactions in protein-ligand complexes is essential for research in structural bioinformatics, drug discovery and biology. However, comprehensive tools are not freely available to the research community. Here, we present the protein-ligand interaction profiler (PLIP), a novel web service for fully automated detection and visualization of relevant non-covalent protein-ligand contacts in 3D structures, freely available at projects.biotec.tu-dresden.de/plip-web. The input is either a Protein Data Bank structure, a protein or ligand name, or a custom protein-ligand complex (e.g. from docking). In contrast to other tools, the rule-based PLIP algorithm does not require any structure preparation. It returns a list of detected interactions on single atom level, covering seven interaction types (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic contacts, pi-stacking, pi-cation interactions, salt bridges, water bridges and halogen bonds). PLIP stands out by offering publication-ready images, PyMOL session files to generate custom images and parsable result files to facilitate successive data processing. The full python source code is available for download on the website. PLIP's command-line mode allows for high-throughput interaction profiling. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Rediscovery of halogen bonds in protein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, P; Tian, F; Zou, J; Shang, Z

    2010-04-01

    Although the halogen bond has attracted much interest in chemistry and material science communities, its implications for drug design are just now coming to light. The protein-ligand interactions through short halogen-oxygen/nitrogen/sulfur contacts have been observed in crystal structures for a long time, but only in recent years, with the experimental and theoretical progress in weak biological interactions, especially the pioneering works contributed by Ho and co-workers (Auffinger, P.; Hays, F. A.; Westhof, E.; Ho, P. S. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2004, 101, 16789-16794), these short contacts involving halogens in biomolecules were rediscovered and re-recognized as halogen bonds to stress their shared similarities with hydrogen bonds in strength and directionality. Crystal structure determinations of protein complexes with halogenated ligands preliminarily unveiled the functionality of halogen bonds in protein-ligand recogni-tion. Database surveys further revealed a considerable number of short halogen-oxygen contacts between proteins and halogenated ligands. Theoretical calculations on model and real systems eventually gave a quantitative pronouncement for the substantial contribution of halogen bonds to ligand binding. All of these works forebode that the halogen bond can be exploited as a new and versatile tool for rational drug design and bio-crystal engineering.

  2. Analysis of protein-ligand interactions by fluorescence polarization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ana M.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of the associations between biomolecules is required both to predict and understand the interactions that underpin all biological activity. Fluorescence polarization (FP) provides a non-disruptive means of measuring the association of a fluorescent ligand with a larger molecule. We describe an FP assay in which binding of fluorescein-labelled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to N-terminal fragments of IP3 receptors can be characterised at different temperatures and in competition with other ligands. The assay allows the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) changes of ligand binding to be determined. The method is applicable to any purified ligand-binding site for which an appropriate fluorescent ligand is available. FP can be used to measure low-affinity interactions in real-time without use of radioactive materials, it is non-destructive, and with appropriate care it can resolve ΔH° and ΔS°. The first part of the protocol, protein preparation, may take several weeks, while the FP measurements, once they have been optimised, would normally take 1-6 h. PMID:21372817

  3. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  4. Thiophene-Core Estrogen Receptor Ligands Having Superagonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jian; Wang, Pengcheng; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Guo, Pu; Huang, Minjian; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Nettles, Kendall W.; Zhou, Hai-Bing

    2013-01-01

    To probe the importance of the heterocyclic core of estrogen receptor (ER) ligands, we prepared a series of thiophene-core ligands by Suzuki cross-coupling of aryl boronic acids with bromo-thiophenes, and we assessed their receptor binding and cell biological activities. The disposition of the phenol substituents on the thiophene core, at alternate or adjacent sites, and the nature of substituents on these phenols all contribute to binding affinity and subtype selectivity. Most of the bis(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERβ selective, whereas the tris(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERα selective; analogous furan-core compounds generally have lower affinity and less selectivity. Some diarylthiophenes show distinct superagonist activity in reporter gene assays, giving maximal activities 2–3 times that of estradiol, and modeling suggests that these ligands have a different interaction with a hydrogen-bonding residue in helix-11. Ligand-core modification may be a new strategy for developing ER ligands whose selectivity is based on having transcriptional activity greater than that of estradiol. PMID:23586645

  5. The Chemistry of Separations Ligand Degradation by Organic Radical Cations

    DOE PAGES

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Horne, Gregory P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; ...

    2016-12-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexants and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normalmore » alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R•+), carbon-centered radicals (R•), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R•+ as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with various ligands. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved.« less

  6. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  7. A grand unified model for liganded gold clusters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zhu, Beien; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) is developed to achieve fundamental understanding of rich structures of all 71 liganded gold clusters reported to date. Inspired by the quark model by which composite particles (for example, protons and neutrons) are formed by combining three quarks (or flavours), here gold atoms are assigned three ‘flavours' (namely, bottom, middle and top) to represent three possible valence states. The ‘composite particles' in GUM are categorized into two groups: variants of triangular elementary block Au3(2e) and tetrahedral elementary block Au4(2e), all satisfying the duet rule (2e) of the valence shell, akin to the octet rule in general chemistry. The elementary blocks, when packed together, form the cores of liganded gold clusters. With the GUM, structures of 71 liganded gold clusters and their growth mechanism can be deciphered altogether. Although GUM is a predictive heuristic and may not be necessarily reflective of the actual electronic structure, several highly stable liganded gold clusters are predicted, thereby offering GUM-guided synthesis of liganded gold clusters by design. PMID:27910848

  8. Pharmacophore modeling and parallel screening for PPAR ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markt, Patrick; Schuster, Daniela; Kirchmair, Johannes; Laggner, Christian; Langer, Thierry

    2007-10-01

    We describe the generation and validation of pharmacophore models for PPARs, as well as a large scale validation of the parallel screening approach by screening PPAR ligands against a large database of structure-based models. A large test set of 357 PPAR ligands was screened against 48 PPAR models to determine the best models for agonists of PPAR-α, PPAR-δ, and PPAR-γ. Afterwards, a parallel screen was performed using the 357 PPAR ligands and 47 structure-based models for PPARs, which were integrated into a 1537 models comprising in-house pharmacophore database, to assess the enrichment of PPAR ligands within the PPAR hypotheses. For these purposes, we categorized the 1537 database models into 181 protein targets and developed a score that ranks the retrieved targets for each ligand. Thus, we tried to find out if the concept of parallel screening is able to predict the correct pharmacological target for a set of compounds. The PPAR target was ranked first more often than any other target. This confirms the ability of parallel screening to forecast the pharmacological active target for a set of compounds.

  9. Structural basis for EGFR ligand sequestration by Argos.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daryl E; Stayrook, Steven E; Shi, Fumin; Narayan, Kartik; Lemmon, Mark A

    2008-06-26

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or ErbB/HER family and their activating ligands are essential regulators of diverse developmental processes. Inappropriate activation of these receptors is a key feature of many human cancers, and its reversal is an important clinical goal. A natural secreted antagonist of EGFR signalling, called Argos, was identified in Drosophila. We showed previously that Argos functions by directly binding (and sequestering) growth factor ligands that activate EGFR. Here we describe the 1.6-A resolution crystal structure of Argos bound to an EGFR ligand. Contrary to expectations, Argos contains no EGF-like domain. Instead, a trio of closely related domains (resembling a three-finger toxin fold) form a clamp-like structure around the bound EGF ligand. Although structurally unrelated to the receptor, Argos mimics EGFR by using a bipartite binding surface to entrap EGF. The individual Argos domains share unexpected structural similarities with the extracellular ligand-binding regions of transforming growth factor-beta family receptors. The three-domain clamp of Argos also resembles the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor, which uses a similar mechanism to engulf the EGF-like module of uPA. Our results indicate that undiscovered mammalian counterparts of Argos may exist among other poorly characterized structural homologues. In addition, the structures presented here define requirements for the design of artificial EGF-sequestering proteins that would be valuable anti-cancer therapeutics.

  10. A modified fluorescent intercalator displacement assay for RNA ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chow, Christine S

    2011-01-15

    Fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) is a convenient and practical tool for identifying new nucleic acid-binding ligands. The success of FID is based on the fact that it can be fashioned into a versatile screening assay for assessing the relative binding affinities of compounds to nucleic acids. FID is a tagless approach; the target RNAs and the ligands or small molecules under investigation do not need to be modified in order to be examined. In this study, a modified FID assay for screening RNA-binding ligands was established using 3-methyl-2-((1-(3-(trimethylammonio)propyl)-4-quinolinylidene)methyl)benzothiazolium (TO-PRO) as the fluorescent indicator. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results provide direct evidence that correlates the reduction in fluorescence intensity observed in the FID assay with displacement of the dye molecule from RNA. The assay was successfully applied to screen a variety of RNA-binding ligands with a set of small hairpin RNAs. Ligands that bind with moderate affinity to the chosen RNA constructs (A-site, TAR [transactivation response element], h31 [helix 31], and H69 [helix 69] were identified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure-guided development of heterodimer-selective GPCR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Harald; Schellhorn, Tamara; Gienger, Marie; Schaab, Carolin; Kaindl, Jonas; Leeb, Laurin; Clark, Timothy; Möller, Dorothee; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand complexes allow a rational design of novel molecular probes and drugs. Here we report the structure-guided design, chemical synthesis and biological investigations of bivalent ligands for dopamine D2 receptor/neurotensin NTS1 receptor (D2R/NTS1R) heterodimers. The compounds of types 1–3 consist of three different D2R pharmacophores bound to an affinity-generating lipophilic appendage, a polyethylene glycol-based linker and the NTS1R agonist NT(8-13). The bivalent ligands show binding affinity in the picomolar range for cells coexpressing both GPCRs and unprecedented selectivity (up to three orders of magnitude), compared with cells that only express D2Rs. A functional switch is observed for the bivalent ligands 3b,c inhibiting cAMP formation in cells singly expressing D2Rs but stimulating cAMP accumulation in D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. Moreover, the newly synthesized bivalent ligands show a strong, predominantly NTS1R-mediated β-arrestin-2 recruitment at the D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. PMID:27457610

  12. Homologous ligands accommodated by discrete conformations of a buried cavity

    PubMed Central

    Merski, Matthew; Fischer, Marcus; Balius, Trent E.; Eidam, Oliv; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change in protein–ligand complexes is widely modeled, but the protein accommodation expected on binding a congeneric series of ligands has received less attention. Given their use in medicinal chemistry, there are surprisingly few substantial series of congeneric ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Here we determine the structures of eight alkyl benzenes, in single-methylene increases from benzene to n-hexylbenzene, bound to an enclosed cavity in T4 lysozyme. The volume of the apo cavity suffices to accommodate benzene but, even with toluene, larger cavity conformations become observable in the electron density, and over the series two other major conformations are observed. These involve discrete changes in main-chain conformation, expanding the site; few continuous changes in the site are observed. In most structures, two discrete protein conformations are observed simultaneously, and energetic considerations suggest that these conformations are low in energy relative to the ground state. An analysis of 121 lysozyme cavity structures in the PDB finds that these three conformations dominate the previously determined structures, largely modeled in a single conformation. An investigation of the few congeneric series in the PDB suggests that discrete changes are common adaptations to a series of growing ligands. The discrete, but relatively few, conformational states observed here, and their energetic accessibility, may have implications for anticipating protein conformational change in ligand design. PMID:25847998

  13. A grand unified model for liganded gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zhu, Beien; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) is developed to achieve fundamental understanding of rich structures of all 71 liganded gold clusters reported to date. Inspired by the quark model by which composite particles (for example, protons and neutrons) are formed by combining three quarks (or flavours), here gold atoms are assigned three `flavours' (namely, bottom, middle and top) to represent three possible valence states. The `composite particles' in GUM are categorized into two groups: variants of triangular elementary block Au3(2e) and tetrahedral elementary block Au4(2e), all satisfying the duet rule (2e) of the valence shell, akin to the octet rule in general chemistry. The elementary blocks, when packed together, form the cores of liganded gold clusters. With the GUM, structures of 71 liganded gold clusters and their growth mechanism can be deciphered altogether. Although GUM is a predictive heuristic and may not be necessarily reflective of the actual electronic structure, several highly stable liganded gold clusters are predicted, thereby offering GUM-guided synthesis of liganded gold clusters by design.

  14. Organic ligands reduce copper toxicity in Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Azenha, M.; Vasconcelos, M.T.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae cells were exposed to 100 {mu}M copper alone, or to previously equilibrated copper sulfate-ligand solutions. Ligand concentrations were determined experimentally as those that reduced the free copper concentration to 5 {mu}M (determined with a Cu{sup 2+}-selective electrode). These values were in agreement with those calculated by computational equilibrium simulation based on published stability constants. Exposure of P. syringae cells to copper sulfate, chloride, or nitrate resulted in similar high mortality, suggesting that copper was responsible for cell death. Acetate, succinate, proline, lysine, cysteine, and EDTA significantly reduced both the amount of copper bound to the cells and cell death, indicating that not only strong chelating agents but also weak and moderate copper ligands can effectively antagonize copper toxicity. However, cysteine and EDTA were considerably more effective than acetate, succinate, proline, and lysine, indicating that copper toxicity is not simply a function of free copper concentration but depends on the nature of the ligand. The results suggested that a significant fraction of copper bound to acetate, succinate, proline, or lysine was displaced to the bacteria or, alternatively, mixed copper-ligand-cell complexes could be formed. On the contrary, none of these phenomena occurred for the copper complexes with cysteine or EDTA.

  15. Insights into Protein–Ligand Interactions: Mechanisms, Models, and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xing; Li, Yi; Xia, Yuan-Ling; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liang, Jing; Sang, Peng; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition, which is the process of biological macromolecules interacting with each other or various small molecules with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex, constitutes the basis of all processes in living organisms. Proteins, an important class of biological macromolecules, realize their functions through binding to themselves or other molecules. A detailed understanding of the protein–ligand interactions is therefore central to understanding biology at the molecular level. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the protein-ligand recognition and binding will also facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In the present review, first, the physicochemical mechanisms underlying protein–ligand binding, including the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and relationships, and binding driving forces, are introduced and rationalized. Next, three currently existing protein-ligand binding models—the “lock-and-key”, “induced fit”, and “conformational selection”—are described and their underlying thermodynamic mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the methods available for investigating protein–ligand binding affinity, including experimental and theoretical/computational approaches, are introduced, and their advantages, disadvantages, and challenges are discussed. PMID:26821017

  16. Entangled zinc-ditetrazolate frameworks involving in situ ligand synthesis and topological modulation by various secondary N-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yunwu; Chen Weilin; Wang Yonghui; Li Yangguang; Wang Enbo

    2009-04-15

    The introduction of various secondary N-donor ligands into an in situ ditetrazolate-ligand synthesis system of terephthalonitrile, NaN{sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} led to the formation of three new entangled frameworks Zn(pdtz)(4,4'-bipy).3H{sub 2}O (1), [Zn(pdtz)(bpp)]{sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O (2) and Zn(pdtz){sub 0.5}(N{sub 3})(2,2'-bipy) (3) (4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine; bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane; 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine; H{sub 2}pdtz=5,5'-1,4-phenylene-ditetrazole). The formation of pdtz{sup 2-} ligand involves the Sharpless [2+3] cycloaddition reaction between terephthalonitrile and NaN{sub 3} in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} ion as a Lewis-acid catalyst under hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1 exhibits a fivefold interpenetrating 3D framework based on the diamondoid topology. Compound 2 displays a twofold parallel interpenetrating framework based on the wavelike individual network. Compound 3 possesses a 2D puckered network. These new Zn-ditetrazolate frameworks are highly dependent on the modulation of different secondary N-donor ligands. Their luminescent properties were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new entangled frameworks were prepared by an in situ ditetrazolate-ligand synthesis system assisted with various auxiliary N-donor ligands. The entangled structures can be modulated by different secondary ligands.

  17. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei

    2015-12-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}ndc) or 4,4′-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H{sub 2}hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd{sub 2}(2,6-ndc){sub 2}(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd{sub 3}(hmdb){sub 3}(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 exhibits a 3D self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster, and 2 displays an infinite 3D ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster. The flexible 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  18. Synthesis, structure characterization and biological activity of selected metal complexes of sulfonamide Schiff base as a primary ligand and some mixed ligand complexes with glycine as a secondary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaby, Carmen M.; Amine, Mona F.; Hamed, Asmaa A.

    2017-04-01

    The current work reports synthesis of metal complexes and mixed ligand complexes of a novel sulfonamide Schiff base ligand (HL) resulted from the condensation of sulfametrole [N‧-(4-methoxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yl]sulfanilamide and acetyl-acetone as a primary ligand and glycine as a secondary ligand. The metal complexes and mixed ligand complexes of HL Schiff base ligand were synthesized and characterized using different physicochemical studies as elemental analyses, mass spectra, conductivity measurement, IR spectra, 1H NMR spectra, UV-vis Spectra, solid reflectance, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analyses (TGA and DTA) and their microbial and anticancer activities. The spectroscopic data of the complexes suggest their 1:2(L1:M) complex structures and 1:2:2(L1:L2:M) mixed ligand complex structures, where L1 = HL and L2 = glycine. Also, the spectroscopic studies suggested the octahedral structure for all complexes. The synthesized Schiff base, its metal and mixed ligand complexes were screened for their bacterial, antifungal and anticancer activity. The activity data show that the metal complexes and mixed ligand complexes exhibited promising microbial and anticancer activities than their parent HL Schiff base ligand, also the data show that the mixed ligand complexes more effective than the metal complexes.

  19. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; ...

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with amore » nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.« less

  20. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  1. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-01

    The high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is believed to result from the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Moreover, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  2. Noncovalent ligand-to-ligand interactions alter sense of optical chirality in luminescent tris(β-diketonate) lanthanide(III) complexes containing a chiral bis(oxazolinyl) pyridine ligand.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Junpei; Ohno, Tomoko; Miyata, Kohei; Tsumatori, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2011-06-29

    Highly luminescent tris[β-diketonate (HFA, 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoropentane-2,4-dione)] europium(III) complexes containing a chiral bis(oxazolinyl) pyridine (pybox) ligand--[(Eu(III)(R)-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)], [(Eu(III)(R)-i-Pr-pybox)(HFA)(3)], and [(Eu(III)(R)-Me-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)])--exhibit strong circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) at the magnetic-dipole ((5)D(0) → (7)F(1)) transition, where the [(Eu(III)(R)-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)] complexes show virtually opposite CPL spectra as compared to those with the same chirality of [(Eu(III)(R)-i-Pr-pybox)(HFA)(3)] and [(Eu(III)(R)-Me-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)]. Similarly, the [(Tb(III)(R)-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)] complexes were found to exhibit CPL signals almost opposite to those of [(Tb(III)(R)-i-Pr-pybox)(HFA)(3)] and [(Tb(III)(R)-Me-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)] complexes with the same pybox chirality. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis revealed ligand-ligand interactions between the pybox ligand and the HFA ligand in each lanthanide(III) complex: π-π stacking interactions in the Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes with the Ph-pybox ligand, CH/F interactions in those with the i-Pr-pybox ligand, and CH/π interactions in those with the Me-Ph-pybox ligand. The ligand-ligand interactions between the achiral HFA ligands and the chiral pybox results in an asymmetric arrangement of three HFA ligands around the metal center. The metal center geometry varies depending on the types of ligand-ligand interaction.

  3. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  4. Memetic algorithms for ligand expulsion from protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydzewski, J.; Nowak, W.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand diffusion through a protein interior is a fundamental process governing biological signaling and enzymatic catalysis. A complex topology of channels in proteins leads often to difficulties in modeling ligand escape pathways by classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, two novel memetic methods for searching the exit paths and cavity space exploration are proposed: Memory Enhanced Random Acceleration (MERA) Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Immune Algorithm (IA). In MERA, a pheromone concept is introduced to optimize an expulsion force. In IA, hybrid learning protocols are exploited to predict ligand exit paths. They are tested on three protein channels with increasing complexity: M2 muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor, enzyme nitrile hydratase, and heme-protein cytochrome P450cam. In these cases, the memetic methods outperform simulated annealing and random acceleration molecular dynamics. The proposed algorithms are general and appropriate in all problems where an accelerated transport of an object through a network of channels is studied.

  5. GPCR biased ligands as novel heart failure therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Soergel, David G; Boerrigter, Guido; Burnett, John C; Lark, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors have been successfully targeted by numerous therapeutics including drugs that have transformed the management of cardiovascular disease. However, many GPCRs, when activated or blocked by drugs, elicit both beneficial and adverse pharmacology. Recent work has demonstrated that in some cases, the salutary and deleterious signals linked to a specific GPCR can be selectively targeted by "biased ligands" that entrain subsets of a receptor's normal pharmacology. This review briefly summarizes the advances and current state of the biased ligand field, focusing on an example: biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These compounds exhibit unique pharmacology, distinct from classic agonists or antagonists, and one such molecule is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute heart failure.

  6. Coordination chemistry of N-heterocyclic nitrenium-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Tulchinsky, Yuri; Kozuch, Sebastian; Saha, Prasenjit; Mauda, Assaf; Nisnevich, Gennady; Botoshansky, Mark; Shimon, Linda J W; Gandelman, Mark

    2015-05-04

    Comprehensive studies on the coordination properties of tridentate nitrenium-based ligands are presented. N-heterocyclic nitrenium ions demonstrate general and versatile binding abilities to various transition metals, as exemplified by the synthesis and characterization of Rh(I) , Rh(III) , Mo(0) , Ru(0) , Ru(II) , Pd(II) , Pt(II) , Pt(IV) , and Ag(I) complexes based on these unusual ligands. Formation of nitrenium-metal bonds is unambiguously confirmed both in solution by selective (15) N-labeling experiments and in the solid state by X-ray crystallography. The generality of N-heterocyclic nitrenium as a ligand is also validated by a systematic DFT study of its affinity towards all second-row transition and post-transition metals (Y-Cd) in terms of the corresponding bond-dissociation energies.

  7. slate: A method for the superposition of flexible ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, J. E. J.; de Esch, I. J. P.; Perkins, T. D. J.; Dean, P. M.

    2001-01-01

    A novel program for the superposition of flexible molecules, slate, is presented. It uses simulated annealing to minimise the difference between the distance matrices calculated from the hydrogen-bonding and aromatic-ring properties of two ligands. A method for generating a molecular stack using multiple pairwise matches is illustrated. These stacks are used by the program doh to predict the relative positions of receptor atoms that could form hydrogen bonds to two or more ligands in the dataset. The methodology has been applied to ligands binding to dihydrofolate reductase, thermolysin, H3 histamine receptors, α2 adrenoceptors and 5-HT1D receptors. When there are sufficient numbers and diversity of molecules in the dataset, the prediction of receptor-atom positions is applicable to compound design.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators. PMID:16841196

  9. IGF Ligand and Receptor Regulation of Mammary Development

    PubMed Central

    Rowzee, Anne M.; Lazzarino, Deborah A.; Rota, Lauren; Sun, Zhaoyu; Wood, Teresa L.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors, IGF-I and IGF-II, have endocrine as well as autocrine-paracrine actions on tissue growth. Both IGF ligands are expressed within developing mammary tissue throughout postnatal stages with specific sites of expression in the epithelial and stromal compartments. The elucidation of circulating versus local actions and of epithelial versus stromal actions of IGFs in stimulating mammary epithelial development has been the focus of several laboratories. The recent studies addressing IGF ligand function provide support for the hypotheses that 1) the diverse sites of IGF expression may mediate different cellular outcomes, and 2) IGF-I and IGF-II are distinctly regulated and have diverse functions in mammary development. The mechanisms for IGF function likely are mediated, in part, through diverse IGF signaling receptors. The local actions of the IGF ligands and receptors as revealed through recent publications are the focus of this review. PMID:19020961

  10. Quantitation of Membrane-Ligand Interactions Using Backscattering Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Kussrow, Amanda K.; Mileni, Mauro; Finn, M.G.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    Though membrane-associated proteins are ubiquitous within all living organisms and represent the majority of drug targets, a general method for direct, label-free measurement of ligand binding to native membranes has not been reported. Here we show backscattering interferometry (BSI) to be a viable technique for quantifying ligand-receptor binding affinities in a variety of membrane environments. By detecting minute changes in the refractive index of a solution, BSI allows binding interactions of proteins with their ligands to be measured at picomolar concentrations. Equilibrium binding constants in the micromolar to picomolar range were obtained for small- and large-molecule interactions in both synthetic- and cell-derived membranes without the use of labels or supporting substrates. The simple and low-cost hardware, high sensitivity, and label-free nature of BSI should make it readily applicable to the study of many membrane-associated proteins of biochemical and pharmacological interest. PMID:21399645

  11. Ligand-gated Diffusion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    B Lepore; M Indic; H Pham; E Hearn; D Patel; B van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    Ligand-gated channels, in which a substrate transport pathway is formed as a result of the binding of a small-molecule chemical messenger, constitute a diverse class of membrane proteins with important functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Despite their widespread nature, no ligand-gated channels have yet been found within the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. Here we show, using in vivo transport assays, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and X-ray crystallography, that high-affinity (submicromolar) substrate binding to the OM long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL from Escherichia coli causes conformational changes in the N terminus that open up a channel for substrate diffusion. The OM long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL from E. coli is a unique paradigm for OM diffusion-driven transport, in which ligand gating within a {beta}-barrel membrane protein is a prerequisite for channel formation.

  12. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikunj B; Pandya, Darpan N; Xu, Jide; Tatum, David; Magda, Darren; Wadas, Thaddeus J

    2017-01-01

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. Herein we report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. While both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. Differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimization is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.

  13. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  14. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  15. Evaluation of macrocyclic hydroxyisophthalamide ligands as chelators for zirconium-89

    DOE PAGES

    Bhatt, Nikunj B.; Pandya, Darpan N.; Xu, Jide; ...

    2017-06-02

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) for zirconium-89 immuno-PET applications is an area of active research. We report the synthesis and evaluation of octadentate hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (1 and 2) as zirconium-89 chelators. And while both radiometal complexes could be prepared quantitatively and with excellent specific activity, preparation of 89Zr-1 required elevated temperature and an increased reaction time. 89Zr-1 was more stable than 89Zr-2 when challenged in vitro by excess DTPA or serum proteins and in vivo during acute biodistribution studies. The differences in radiometal complex stability arise from structural changes between the two ligand systems, and suggest further ligand optimizationmore » is necessary to enhance 89Zr chelation.« less

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2006-08-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators.

  17. Automated identification of crystallographic ligands using sparse-density representations

    PubMed Central

    Carolan, C. G.; Lamzin, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel procedure for the automatic identification of ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. It is based on the sparse parameterization of density clusters and the matching of the pseudo-atomic grids thus created to conformationally variant ligands using mathematical descriptors of molecular shape, size and topology. In large-scale tests on experimental data derived from the Protein Data Bank, the procedure could quickly identify the deposited ligand within the top-ranked compounds from a database of candidates. This indicates the suitability of the method for the identification of binding entities in fragment-based drug screening and in model completion in macromolecular structure determination. PMID:25004962

  18. Structure and properties of a new rigid tripodal oxime ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premužić, Dejan; Filarowski, Aleksander; Hołyńska, Małgorzata

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis and properties of a new rigid tripodal oxime ligand are reported. The ligand is a derivative of phloroglucine with three carboxime arms alternate with hydroxyl groups and three intramolecular Osbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds. Intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in formation of a characteristic three-dimensional network. The structure of the compound is further analyzed and confirmed by NMR, IR and MS-techniques. DFT calculations were employed to accomplish the analysis of both the hydrogen bonding and the conformational state of the ligand under study. Additionally, the study addresses the way the conformational state and metal-replacement influence the tautomeric equilibrium OH⋯N ⇆ O-⋯+HN in the studied moieties.

  19. Identification of nucleolin as a new L-selectin ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Harms, G; Kraft, R; Grelle, G; Volz, B; Dernedde, J; Tauber, R

    2001-01-01

    Apart from leucocyte-endothelial interactions, the adhesion molecule L-selectin mediates the homotypic adhesion of leucocytes during recruitment at sites of acute inflammation, as well as intercellular adhesion of haematopoietic progenitor cells during haematopoiesis. There is evidence that, in addition to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, other as-yet-unidentified proteins function as L-selectin ligands on human leucocytes and haematopoietic progenitor cells. In the present study, we show: (i) by affinity chromatography on L-selectin-agarose; (ii) by protein identification using MS; and (iii) by covalent cell-surface labelling with sulphosuccinimidyl-2-(biotinamido)ethyl-1,3-dithiopropionate that the multifunctional nuclear protein nucleolin is partly exposed on the cell surface, and is a ligand of L-selectin in human leucocytes and haematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:11736641

  20. Complexation of trivalent americium and lanthanides with terdentate 'N' donor ligands: the role of rigidity in the ligand structure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Gadly, Trilochan; Pathak, Priyanath; Ghosh, Sunil K; Mohapatra, Manoj; Ghanty, Tapan K; Mohapatra, Prasanta K

    2014-08-28

    A systematic study on the Ln(3+) complexation behaviour with two terdentate 'N' donor ligands of varying structural rigidity, viz. 5,6-dimethyl-(1,2,4)-triazinylbipyridine (Me2TBipy) and 5,6-dimethyl-(1,2,4)-triazinylphenanthroline (Me2TPhen), is performed in the present work by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) studies. These studies indicate the formation of a 1 : 1 complex of La(3+), 1 : 2 complexes of Eu(3+) and Er(3+) with both the ligands. Density functional theoretical (DFT) study is carried out to determine the solution phase structure of the Eu(3+) complex considering the species (from UV-Vis spectrophotometry) and C2v site symmetry around the Eu(3+) ion (from TRFS study). Me2TPhen is found to be a stronger complexing ligand as compared to Me2TBipy irrespective of the Ln(3+) ions. The solid state crystal structure of the La(3+) complex of Me2TPhen is determined using the single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) technique. The complexation of the trivalent Am(3+) ion is also studied with both these ligands using UV-Vis spectrophotometric titrations which show the formation of 1 : 2 complexes with higher complexation constant values as compared to all the Ln(3+) ions studied, indicating the selectivity of these ligands for the trivalent actinides over the lanthanides.