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Sample records for 4-benzyl-6-phenyl pyridazine ligand

  1. Mixed-ligand hydroxocopper(II)/pyridazine clusters embedded into 3D framework lattices.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Anna S; Handke, Marcel; Krämer, Karl W; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Rusanov, Eduard B; Thompson, Laurence K; Krautscheid, Harald; Domasevitch, Konstantin V

    2014-06-14

    Rational combination of pyridazine, hydroxo and carboxylate bridging ligands led to the assembly of three types of mixed-ligand polynuclear Cu(II) clusters (A: [Cu2(μ-OH)(μ-pdz)(μ-COO)]; B: [Cu4(μ3-OH)2(μ-pdz)2]; C: [Cu5(μ-OH)2(μ-pdz)4(μ-COO)2(μ-H2O)2]) and their integration into 3D framework structures. Mixed-ligand complexes [Cu2(μ-OH){TMA}(L)(H2O)] (1), [Cu4(μ3-OH)2{ATC}2(L)2(H2O)2]·H2O (2) [Cu4(μ3-OH)2{TDC}3(L)2(H2O)2]·7H2O (3) (L = 1,3-bis(pyridazin-4-yl)adamantane; TMA(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate, ATC(3-) = adamantane-1,3,5-tricarboxylate, TDC(2-) = 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylate) and [Cu5(μ-OH)2{X}4(L)2(H2O)2]·nH2O (X = benzene-1,3-dicarboxylate, BDC(2-), n = 5 (4) and 5-hydroxybenzene-1,3-dicarboxylate, HO-BDC(2-), n = 6 (5)) are prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Trigonal bridges TMA(3-) and ATC(3-) generate planar Cu(II)/carboxylate subtopologies further pillared into 3D frameworks (1: binodal 3,5-coordinated, doubly interpenetrated tcj-3,5-Ccc2; 2: binodal 3,8-coordinated tfz-d) by bitopic pyridazine ligands. Unprecedented triple bridges in 1 (cluster of type A) support short CuCu separations of 3.0746(6) Å. The framework in 3 is a primitive cubic net (pcu) with multiple bis-pyridazine and TDC(2-) links between the tetranuclear nodes of type . Compounds 4 and 5 adopt uninodal ten-coordinated framework topologies (bct) embedding unprecedented centrosymmetric open-chain pentanuclear clusters of type C with two kinds of multiple bridges, Cu(μ-OH)(μ-pdz)2Cu and Cu(μ-COO)(μ-H2O)Cu (CuCu distances are 3.175 and 3.324 Å, respectively). Magnetic coupling phenomena were detected for every type of cluster by susceptibility measurements of 1, 3 and 4. For binuclear clusters A in 1, the intracluster antiferromagnetic exchange interactions lead to a diamagnetic ground state (J = -17.5 cm(-1); g = 2.1). Strong antiferromagnetic coupling is relevant also for type B, which consequently results in a diamagnetic ground state (J1 = -110 cm(-1

  2. Pyridazine- versus pyridine-based tridentate ligands in first-row transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Katrin R; Volpe, Manuel; Cias, Pawel; Gescheidt, Georg; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2011-08-15

    A series of first-row transition metal complexes with the unsymmetrically disubstituted pyridazine ligand picolinaldehyde (6-chloro-3-pyridazinyl)hydrazone (PIPYH), featuring an easily abstractable proton in the backbone, was prepared. Ligand design was inspired by literature-known picolinaldehyde 2-pyridylhydrazone (PAPYH). Reaction of PIPYH with divalent nickel, copper, and zinc nitrates in ethanol led to complexes of the type [Cu(II)(PIPYH)(NO(3))(2)] (1) or [M(PIPYH)(2)](NO(3))(2) [M = Ni(II) (2) or Zn(II) (3)]. Complex synthesis in the presence of triethylamine yielded fully- or semideprotonated complexes [Cu(II)(PIPY)(NO(3))] (4), [Ni(II)(PIPYH)(PIPY)](NO(3)) (5), and [Zn(II)(PIPY)(2)] (6), respectively. Cobalt(II) nitrate is quantitatively oxidized under the reaction conditions to [Co(III)(PIPY)(2)](NO(3)) (7) in both neutral and basic media. X-ray diffraction analyses reveal a penta- (1) or hexa-coordinated (2, 3, and 7) metal center surrounded by one or two tridentate ligands and, eventually, κ-O,O' nitrate ions. The solid-state stoichiometry was confirmed by electron impact (EI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. The diamagnetic complexes 5 and 6 were subjected to (1)H NMR spectroscopy, suggesting that the ligand to metal ratio remains constant in solution. Electronic properties were analyzed by means of cyclic voltammetry and, in case of copper complexes 1 and 4, also by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing increased symmetry upon deprotonation for the latter, which is in accordance with the proposed stoichiometry [Cu(II)(PIPY)(NO(3))]. Protic behavior of the nickel complexes 2 and 5 was investigated by UV/vis spectroscopy, revealing high π-backbonding ability of the PIPYH ligand resulting in an unexpected low acidity of the hydrazone proton in nickel complex 2.

  3. Six complexes based on bis(imidazole/benzimidazole-1-yl)pyridazine ligands: Syntheses, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Fang; Du, Ceng-Ceng; Zhou, Sheng-Bin; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Herein we reported six new Ni(II)/Cu(II)/Zn(II) complexes, namely, [Ni(L1)4(OH)2] (1), [Cu(L1)4(OH)2] (2), [Cu(L1)2(SiF6)]n (3), {[Cu(L2)(HCOO)2]·H2O·CH3OH}n (4), [Ni(L2)2(NO3)2]n (5) and {[Zn(L2)Cl2]·DMF}n (6) (L1 = 3,6-bis(imidazole-1-yl)pyridazine, L2 = 3,6-bis(benzimidazole-1-yl)pyridazine), which were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR, PXRD. These complexes have been successfully constructed under interface diffusion process, heating reflux or hydrothermal conditions. The structures of 1 and 2 are mononuclear complexes. Complex 3 exhibits a 6-connected 3D topology network with the Schläfli symbol of (412·63). In complex 4, two Cu(II) were connected through two HCOO- anions to form dinuclear structure unit, which is arranged into a 1D ladder-like structure by μ2-L2 ligands. Complexes 5 and 6 are 1D zigzag chains connected by L2 ligands, but the Ni(II) ion is six-coordinated in 5 and the Zn(II) ion is four-coordinated in 6. Moreover, the solid-state luminescence property and UV-vis diffuse reflection spectrum of complex 6 have been investigated and discussed.

  4. Conformational control of the self-assembly of triple helicates and [2 × 2]-grids from zinc(II) and 3,6-di(2-pyridyl)pyridazine based ligands.

    PubMed

    Bodman, Samantha E; Fitchett, Christopher M

    2014-09-07

    The reaction of symmetrical ligands based on 3,6-di(2-pyridyl)pyridazine () with carbocyclic rings fused to the pyridazine ring; 7,10-di(2-pyridyl)-8,9-diazafluoranthene (), 1,4-di(2-pyridyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-cyclopenta[d]pyridazine (), 1,4-di(2-pyridyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrophthalazine (), 1,4-di(2-pyridyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-cyclohepta[d]pyridazine () in reactions with zinc perchlorate gave a series of complexes (). Characterisation of these using single crystal X-ray structure determination showed that less sterically hindered and gave saturated triple helicates ( and , respectively), while [2 × 2]-grids were formed with more sterically hindered ligands ( from and from ), or if methanol (rather than acetonitrile) was used as the reaction solvent with (). The most sterically-hindered ligand formed a mononuclear complex (). The structures of these complexes in solution was determined by (1)H-NMR, and found to match their solid-state structures. The [2 × 2]-grids are effective molecular clips able to hold solvent and anions between their arms via hydrogen bonding to a Zn4(H2O)2(OH)2 core.

  5. New Pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones Fluoroderivatives as Human A1 Adenosine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Alessia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Vergelli, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Giacomelli, Chiara

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones as human A1 adenosine receptor ligands. The tricyclic scaffold was modified at position 6 and 9 by introducing small alkyl chains and substituted phenyls. The most interesting compounds showed Ki for A1 in the submicromolar range (0.105-0.244 µM) and the most interesting term (compound 4c) combined an appreciable affinity for A1 (Ki = 0.132 µM) with a good selectivity toward A2A (43% inhibition at 10 µM) and A3 (46% inhibition at 10 µM).

  6. Pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands with N4OxS2 (x=2, 4) donor set atoms: synthesis, characterization, spectral studies and 13C chemical shifts computed by the GIAO-DFT and CSGT-DFT methodologies.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2010-01-01

    Six pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands, H(2)L(n) (n=1-5) and H(4)L, with N(4)O(2)S(2) and N(4)O(4)S(2) donor set atoms, respectively, were prepared by condensation reaction of 3,6-bis-((2-aminoethyl)thio)pyridazine with various salicyladehyde derivatives in ethanol and under solvent-free polyphosphate ester catalyzed conditions. The acid-base properties of H(2)L(2) and H(2)L(3) in DMSO/water (1:1) solution have been studied by spectrophotometric method at 25 degrees C. Optimized geometries of all compounds were also obtained at the B3LYP level of theory. Additionally, the (13)C chemical shielding of gas phase H(2)L(1) and H(2)L(2) were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) and continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) methods at the level of density functional theory (DFT). The 6-311++G* basis set was utilized for all of the atoms.

  7. Pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands with N 4O xS 2 ( x = 2, 4) donor set atoms: Synthesis, characterization, spectral studies and 13C chemical shifts computed by the GIAO-DFT and CSGT-DFT methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2010-01-01

    Six pyridazine-based Schiff base ligands, H 2L n ( n = 1-5) and H 4L, with N 4O 2S 2 and N 4O 4S 2 donor set atoms, respectively, were prepared by condensation reaction of 3,6-bis-((2-aminoethyl)thio)pyridazine with various salicyladehyde derivatives in ethanol and under solvent-free polyphosphate ester catalyzed conditions. The acid-base properties of H 2L 2 and H 2L 3 in DMSO/water (1:1) solution have been studied by spectrophotometric method at 25 °C. Optimized geometries of all compounds were also obtained at the B3LYP level of theory. Additionally, the 13C chemical shielding of gas phase H 2L 1 and H 2L 2 were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) and continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) methods at the level of density functional theory (DFT). The 6-311++G* basis set was utilized for all of the atoms.

  8. Realization of unusual ligand binding motifs in metalated container molecules: synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of the complexes [(LMe)Ni2(mu-L')]n+ with L'=NO3-, NO2-, N3-, N2H4, pyridazine, phthalazine, pyrazolate, and benzoate.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Julia; Klingele, Marco H; Lozan, Vasile; Steinfeld, Gunther; Siebert, Dieter; Journaux, Yves; Girerd, Jean Jacques; Kersting, Berthold

    2004-04-02

    A series of dinickel(II) complexes with the 24-membered macrocyclic hexaazadithiophenol ligand H(2)L(Me) was prepared and examined. The doubly deprotonated form (L(Me))(2-) forms complexes of the type [(L(Me))Ni2II(mu-L')](n+) with a bioctahedral N(3)Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-L')Ni(II)N(3) core and an overall calixarene-like structure. The bridging coordination site L' is accessible for a wide range of exogenous coligands. In this study L'=NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), N(3)(-), N(2)H(4), pyrazolate (pz), pyridazine (pydz), phthalazine (phtz), and benzoate (OBz). Crystallographic studies reveal that each substrate binds in a distinct fashion to the [(L(Me))Ni(2)](2+) portion: NO(2)(-), N(2)H(4), pz, pydz, and phtz form mu(1,2)-bridges, whereas NO(3)(-), N(3)(-), and OBz(-) are mu(1,3)-bridging. These distinctive binding motifs and the fact that some of the coligands adopt unusual conformations is discussed in terms of complementary host-guest interactions and the size and form of the binding pocket of the [(L(Me))Ni(2)](2+) fragment. UV/Vis and electrochemical studies reveal that the solid-state structures are retained in the solution state. The relative stabilities of the complexes indicate that the [(L(Me))Ni(2)](2+) fragment binds anionic coligands preferentially over neutral ones and strong-field ligands over weak-field ligands. Secondary van der Waals interactions also contribute to the stability of the complexes. Intramolecular ferromagnetic exchange interactions are present in the nitrito-, pyridazine-, and the benzoato-bridged complexes where J=+6.7, +3.5, and +5.8 cm(-1) (H=-2 JS(1)S(2), S(1)=S(2)=1) as indicated by magnetic susceptibility data taken from 300 to 2 K. In contrast, the azido bridge in [(L(Me))Ni(2)(mu(1,3)-N(3))](+) results in an antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J=-46.7 cm(-1). An explanation for this difference is qualitatively discussed in terms of bonding differences.

  9. Some recent approaches of biologically active substituted pyridazine and phthalazine drugs.

    PubMed

    Asif, M

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen atom containing heterocyclic compounds, pyridazines, pyridazinones and phthalazines are important structural feature of many biologically active compounds and show diverse pharmacological properties. Pyridazines and phthalazines hold considerable interest relative to the preparation of organic intermediates and physiologically active compounds. On the basis of literature, pyridazines, pyridazinone and phthalazines further focus our attention because of their easy fictionalization at various ring positions, which makes them attractive synthetic compounds for designing and development of the novel pyridazines and phthalazines drugs in future.

  10. Cobalt(II) complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine: Structures, photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin-Ping; Fan, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2016-07-15

    Six new Co{sup II} complexes [Co(L{sup 1}){sub 4}(OH){sub 2}] (1), {[Co(L"1)(H_2O)_4]·2ClO_4}{sub ∞} (2), {[Co(L"1)(H_2O)_4]·SiF_6}{sub ∞} (3), {[Co(L"1)_3]·2ClO_4}{sub ∞} (4), [Co(L{sup 2})Cl{sub 2}]{sub ∞} (5) and {[Co(L"2)_2]·SiF_6}{sub ∞} (6) [L{sup 1}=3,6-bis(N-imidazolyl) pyridazine, L{sup 2}=3,6-bis (N-benzimidazolyl) pyridazine] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 has a mononuclear structure, while complexes 2 and 3 have 1-D chain structures. Considering the Co{sup II} centers were linked by the L{sup 1} ligands, the 3-D framework of complex 4 can be rationalized to be a {4^12.6^3} 6-c topological net with the stoichiometry uninodal net. 5 reveals a coordination 1-D zigzag chain structure consisting of a neutral chain [Co(L{sup 2})Cl{sub 2}]{sub n} with the Co{sup II} centers. Complex 6 has a rhombohedral grid with a (4, 4) topology. The TGA property, fluorescent property and photocatalytic activity of complexes 1–6 have been investigated and discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six Co{sup II} complexes of bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl)pyridazine were synthesized and structurally characterized. The fluorescence properties and photocatalytic activity for dye degradation under UV light of all complexes have been investigated and discussed. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Six new Co{sup II} complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine. • Structural analysis of all complexes. • Fluorescent property of all complexes. • Photocatalytic activity for dye degradation under UV light of all complexes.

  11. Cobalt(II) complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine: Structures, photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Fan, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Six new CoII complexes [Co(L1)4(OH)2] (1), {[Co(L1)(H2O)4]·2ClO4}∞ (2), {[Co(L1)(H2O)4]·SiF6}∞ (3), {[Co(L1)3]·2ClO4}∞ (4), [Co(L2)Cl2]∞ (5) and {[Co(L2)2]·SiF6}∞ (6) [L1=3,6-bis(N-imidazolyl) pyridazine, L2=3,6-bis (N-benzimidazolyl) pyridazine] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 has a mononuclear structure, while complexes 2 and 3 have 1-D chain structures. Considering the CoII centers were linked by the L1 ligands, the 3-D framework of complex 4 can be rationalized to be a {4^12.6^3} 6-c topological net with the stoichiometry uninodal net. 5 reveals a coordination 1-D zigzag chain structure consisting of a neutral chain [Co(L2)Cl2]n with the CoII centers. Complex 6 has a rhombohedral grid with a (4, 4) topology. The TGA property, fluorescent property and photocatalytic activity of complexes 1-6 have been investigated and discussed.

  12. Synthesis of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Photochemical Ring Opening of Pyridazine N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Maribel; Maxwell, Michael A; Frederich, James H

    2016-10-07

    A photochemical method for the direct synthesis of 1H-pyrazoles from pyridazine N-oxides was developed. This chemistry features a regioselective approach to nonsymmetrically substituted pyridazine N-oxides. Herein, we highlight the first strategic use of photoinduced ring-opening reactions of 1,2-diazine N-oxides for the preparative synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles.

  13. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  14. Monoclinic and triclinic concomitant polymorphs of di-mu-pyridazine-1kappa(2)N:2kappa(2)N'-bis[(saccharinato)silver(I)].

    PubMed

    Hamamci, Sevim; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2006-01-01

    Crystallization of the title compound, di-mu-pyridazine-1kappa(2)N:2kappa(2)N'-bis[(2,3-dihydro-3-oxobenzisosulfonazolato-kappaN)silver(I)], [Ag2(C7H4NO3S)2(C4H4N2)2], from acetonitrile yields both monoclinic, (I), and triclinic, (II), polymorphs. In both forms, the silver(I) ions have a slightly distorted trigonal AgN(3) coordination geometry and are doubly bridged by two neutral pyridazine (pydz) ligands, generating a centrosymmetric dimeric structure. The saccharinate (sac) ligands are N-coordinated. The dihedral angles between the sac and pydz rings are 8.43 (7) and 7.94 (8) degrees in (I) and (II), respectively, suggesting that the dimeric molecule is nearly flat. The bond geometry is similar in both polymorphs. In (I), the dimers interact with each other via aromatic pi(sac)-pi(pydz) stacking interactions, forming two-dimensional layers, which are further crosslinked by weak C-H...O interactions. Compound (II) exhibits similar C-H...O and pi-pi interactions, but additional C-H...pi and pi...Ag interactions help to stabilize the packing of the dimers.

  15. 4-Benzyl-6-p-tolyl­pyridazin-3(2H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Oubair, Ahmad; Daran, Jean-Claude; Fihi, Rachid; Majidi, Lhou; Azrour, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C18H16N2O, is a new dihydro­pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivative synthesized in one step by condensation of α-benzyl­idene-γ-tolyl­butenolide with hydrazine. The mol­ecule is not planar; the tolyl and pyridazine rings are twisted with respect to each other making a dihedral angle of 27.35 (9)° and the benzyl ring is nearly perpendicular to the pyridazine ring with a dihedral angle of 85.24 (5)°. In the crystal structure, inversion dimers arise, being linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak offset π–π stacking stabilize the packing. The π–π stacking occurs between the pyridazine rings of symmetry-related mol­ecules, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.748 Å, an inter­planar distance of 3.605 Å and a slippage of 1.024 Å. PMID:21583202

  16. Insights from Theory and Experiment on the Photochromic spiro-Dihydropyrrolo-Pyridazine/Betaine System.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Amendra; Shrestha, Tej B; Liu, Yao; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Yu, Jing; McLaurin, Emily J; Turro, Claudia; Bossmann, Stefan H; Aikens, Christine M

    2016-02-18

    We elucidated the photochromic spiro-4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine/betaine (DPP/betaine) system by comparing state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations with nanosecond/millisecond UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, as well as steady-state absorption and cyclization kinetics. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are employed to examine the transformations occurring after photoexcitation. This study shows that the photochromic spiro-4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine and spiro-1,8a-dihydroindolizine (DHI) systems react according to similar pathways. However, notable differences exist. Although photoexcitation of the spiro-DPP system also leads to cis-betaines, which then isomerize to trans-betaines, we found two distinct classes of cis isomers (cis-betaine rotamer-1 and cis-betaine rotamer-2), which do not exist in spiro-1,8a-dihydroindolizine. Similar to our previous study on the spiro-DHI/betaine system, a complicated potential-energy landscape between cis and trans isomers exists in the spiro-DPP system, consisting of a network of transition states and intermediates. Because the spiro-DPP/betaine is even more complicated than the spiro-DHI/betaine system, (substituted) photochromic systems featuring a 4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine functional unit will require thorough in silico design to function properly as logical gates or in devices for information storage.

  17. New pyridazine-fluorine derivatives: synthesis, chemistry and biological activity. Part II.

    PubMed

    Tucaliuc, Roxana-Angela; Cotea, Valeriu V; Niculaua, Marius; Tuchilus, Cristina; Mantu, Dorina; Mangalagiu, Ionel I

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive study concerning synthesis, structure and biological activity of new pyridazine-fluorine (PYF) derivatives is presented. The first synthesis of PYF derivatives in phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) under microwave (MW) and conventional thermal heating (TH) is reported. Under MW irradiation the consumed energy decreases considerably, the amount of used solvent in liquid phase is at least five-fold less comparative with conventional TH, while PTC did not use solvents. Consequently these reactions could be considered environmentally friendly. Also, the reaction time decrease substantially and, in some cases, the yields are higher. A feasible explanation for MW efficiency is presented. Regiochemistry and chorochemistry involved in these reactions are also discussed; the reactions are regioselective and chorospecific or choroselective, respectively. Ten new pyridazine-fluorine cycloadducts are obtained. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the PYF compounds were tested. Introduction of a trifluoromethyl moiety on the pyridazine skeleton is leading to an increasing of the antimicrobial activity. Structure-activity correlationships have been done.

  18. 5-[(tert-Butyl-diphenyl-sil-yloxy)meth-yl]pyridazin-3(2H)-one.

    PubMed

    Costas-Lago, María Carmen; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemí; Terán, Carmen

    2013-11-27

    In the title compound, C21H24N2O2Si, a new pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivative, the carbonyl group of the heterocyclic ring and the O atom of the silyl ether are located on the same side of the pyridazinone ring and the C-C-O-Si torsion angle is -140.69 (17)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of strong N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into centrosymmetric dimers with graph-set notation R 2 (2)(8). Weak C-H⋯π inter-actions are also observed.

  19. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented.

  20. Light-Enhanced Fluorescence of Multi-Level Cavitands Possessing Pyridazine Upper rim.

    PubMed

    Janosi, Tibor Zoltan; Makkai, Geza; Kegl, Timea; Matyus, Peter; Kollar, Laszlo; Erostyak, Janos

    2016-03-01

    Completely different fluorescence behaviour of cavitands based on a same calix[4]resorcinarene compound was observed. While the fluorescence intensity of the parent compound, tetramethyl-cavitand (1) slowly faded as a result of UV-light exposure, the emission of the three-level cavitand with pyridazine moieties at the upper rim (5a) was enhanced by the excitation in the UV-region. The structure of fluorescence emission (characterized by excitation-emission matrices) and the absorption of 5a remained unaltered. The analysis of fluorescence decay curves reveals the presence of two separated components assigned to two individual emitting species. The measured significant increase of the average lifetime and quantum yield is the consequence of the UV-light induced transition between the different states of 5a. These observations can be explained by the structural difference between 5a and 1. As a counterpart of the naked cavitand (1) with methyl substituents at the upper rim only, 5a has three additional moieties benzene, triazole and pyridazine levels. Computational studies proved the existence of two conformational isomers of 5a. Upon ultraviolet light excitation a "dark" to "light" conformational transition occurs between the two isomers. This hypothesis was confirmed by anisotropy decay measurements.

  1. 6-Methyl-2,4-Disubstituted Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: A Novel Class of Small-Molecule Agonists for Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Quinn, Mark T.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Schepetkin, Igor A; Holderness, Jeff; Ye, Richard D.; Rabiet, Marie-Josephe; Biancalani, Claudio; Cesari, Nicoletta; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Pieretti, Stefano; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Giovannoni, Maria Paola

    2010-01-01

    Following a ligand-based drug design approach, a potent mixed formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) agonist (14a) and a potent and specific FPRL1 agonist (14x) were identified. These compounds belong to a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives substituted with a methyl group at position 6 and a methoxy benzyl at position 4. At position 2, an acetamide side chain is essential for activity. Likewise, the presence of lipophilic and/or electronegative substituents in the position para to the aryl group at the end of the chain plays a critical role for activity. Affinity for FPR1 receptors was evaluated by measuring intracellular calcium flux in HL-60 cells transfected with FPR1, FPRL1, and FPRL2. Agonists were able to activate intracellular calcium mobilization and chemotaxis in human neutrophils. The most potent chemotactic agent (EC50 = 0.6 μM) was the mixed FPR/FPRL1 agonist 14h. PMID:19639995

  2. Theoretical investigation of the structures, stabilities, and NLO responses of calcium-doped pyridazine: alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Huang, Jiangen; Jia, Li; Zhou, Guangpei

    2014-02-01

    Currently, whether alkaline-earth-doped compounds with electride characteristics are novel candidates for high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials is unknown. In this paper, using quantum chemical computations, we show that: when doping calcium atoms into a family of alkaline-substituted pyridazines, alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca (M=H, Li, and K) with distended excess electron clouds are formed. Interestingly, from the triplet to the singlet state, the chemical valence of calcium atom changes from +1 to 0, and the dipole moment direction (μ₀) of the molecule reverses for each M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca. Changing pyridazine from without (H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca) to with one alkaline substituent (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca, M=Li and K), the ground state changes from the triplet to the singlet state. The alkaline earth metal doping effect (electride effect) and alkaline salt effect on the static first hyperpolarizabilities (β₀) demonstrates that (1) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1371-fold from 2 (pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂) to 2745au (Ca-doped pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca), (2) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1146-fold from 2 in pyridazine (H₄C₄N₂) to 2294au in an Li-substituted pyridazine (Li-H₃C₄N₂), and (3) the β₀ value is increased 324-(M=Li) and 106-(M=K) fold from 826 (MLi) and 2294au (MK) to 268,679 (M=Li) and 245,878au (M=K), respectively, from the alkalized pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂) to the Ca-doped pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca). These results may provide a new means for designing high-performance NLO materials.

  3. Functionalized heteroarylpyridazines and pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives via palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling methodology.

    PubMed

    Clapham, Kate M; Batsanov, Andrei S; Greenwood, Ryan D R; Bryce, Martin R; Smith, Amy E; Tarbit, Brian

    2008-03-21

    A general method for the synthesis of functionalized pyridazinylboronic acids/esters is described involving a directed ortho metalation (DoM)--boronation protocol (Schemes 1 and 2). A comprehensive study of the reactivity of the C-B bond in palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings with aryl/heteroaryl halides is presented. Aryl-/heteroarylpyridazines are thereby obtained in synthetically viable yields (typically 40-75%) although in some cases competing protodeboronation has been observed. A series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives, including 4,6-diaryl/heteroaryl derivatives, have been obtained from the corresponding 3-methoxypyridazines in straightforward procedures (Schemes 3 and 4). Several X-ray crystal structures of aryl-/heteroarylpyridazines and derived pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives are reported. These multi-ring systems are of considerable interest in contemporary N-heterocyclic chemistry.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  5. Optimization of 5-pyridazin-3-one phenoxypropylamines as potent, selective histamine H₃ receptor antagonists with potent cognition enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ming; Aimone, Lisa D; Huang, Zeqi; Mathiasen, Joanne; Raddatz, Rita; Lyons, Jacquelyn; Hudkins, Robert L

    2012-01-12

    Previous studies have shown that (5-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolin-1-yl-propoxy]phenyl}-2H-pyridazin-3-one) 2 had high affinity for both the human (hH(3)R K(i) = 2.8 nM) and rat H(3)Rs (rH(3)R K(i) = 8.5 nM) but displayed low oral bioavailability in the rat. Optimization of the 5-pyridazin-3-one R(2) and R(6) positions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties over 2 led to the identification of 5-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)propoxy]phenyl}-2-pyridin-2-yl-2H-pyridazin-3-one 29. Compound 29 displayed high affinity for both human and rat H(3)Rs (hH(3)R K(i) = 1.7 nM, rH(3)R K(i) = 3.7 nM) with a greater than 1000-fold selectivity over the other histamine receptor subtypes and favorable pharmacokinetic properties across species (F = 78% rat, 92% dog, 96% monkey). It showed low binding to human plasma proteins, weakly inhibited cytochrome P450 isoforms, and displayed an excellent safety profile for a CNS-active compound. 29 displayed potent H(3)R antagonist activity in the brain in a rat dipsogenia model and demonstrated enhancement of cognitive function in a rat social recognition model at low doses. However, the development of compound 29 was discontinued because of genotoxicity.

  6. The structure-AChE inhibitory activity relationships study in a series of pyridazine analogues.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, M; Kandemirli, F

    2009-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships (SAR) are investigated by means of the Electronic-Topological Method (ETM) followed by the Neural Networks application (ETM-NN) for a class of anti-cholinesterase inhibitors (AChE, 53 molecules) being pyridazine derivatives. AChE activities of the series were measured in IC(50) units, and relative to the activity levels, the series was partitioned into classes of active and inactive compounds. Based on pharmacophores and antipharmacophores calculated by the ETM-software as sub-matrices containing important spatial and electronic characteristics, a system for the activity prognostication is developed. Input data for the ETM were taken as the results of conformational and quantum-mechanics calculations. To predict the activity, we used one of the most well known neural networks, namely, the feed-forward neural networks (FFNNs) trained with the back propagation algorithm. The supervised learning was performed using a variant of FFNN known as the Associative Neural Networks (ASNN). The result of the testing revealed that the high ETM's ability of predicting both activity and inactivity of potential AChE inhibitors. Analysis of HOMOs for the compounds containing Ph1 and APh1 has shown that atoms with the highest values of the atomic orbital coefficients are mainly those atoms that enter into the pharmacophores. Thus, the set of pharmacophores and antipharmacophores found as the result of this study forms a basis for a system of the anti-cholinesterase activity prediction.

  7. Synthesis, antitubercular, antifungal and antibacterial activities of 6-substituted phenyl-2-(3'-substituted phenyl pyridazin-6'-yl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridazin-3-one.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mojahidul; Siddiqui, Anees A; Rajesh, Ramadoss

    2008-01-01

    A series of 6-substituted phenyl-2-(3'-substituted phenyl pyridazin-6'-yl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridazin-3-ones has been synthesized. An appropriate aromatic hydrocarbon reacts with succinic anhydride in presence of AlCl3 to yield beta-aroyl propionic acid. The corresponding acid was cyclized with hydrazine hydrate to give 6-(substituted aryl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-pyridazinone, which was heated on steam bath with phosphorus(V) oxychloride to yield 3-chloro 6-substituted phenyl pyridazine. This intermediate after reaction with hydrazine hydrate was converted into 3-hydrazino-6-substituted phenyl pyridazine. The resulting product was converted into 6-substituted phenyl-2-(3'-substituted phenyl pyridazin-6'-yl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropyridazin-3-one by reacting with substituted aroyl propionic acid. Spectral data (IR, NMR, mass spectra) confirmed the structures of the synthesized compounds. The synthesized compounds were investigated for their in vitro antitubercular, antifungal and antibacterial activities. The results indicated that the synthesized compounds have mild to potent activities with reference to their appropriate reference standards.

  8. Synthesis, enantioresolution, and activity profile of chiral 6-methyl-2,4-disubs-tituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones as potent N-formyl peptide receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Graziano, Alessia; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.; Vergelli, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    A series of chiral pyridazin-3(2H)-ones was synthesized, separated as pure enantiomers, and evaluated for N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) agonist activity. Characterization of the purified enantiomers using combined chiral HPLC and chiroptical studies (circular dichroism, allowed unambiguous assignment of the absolute configuration for each pair of enantiomers). Evaluation of the ability of racemic mixtures and purified enantiomers to stimulate intracellular Ca2+ flux in FPR-transfected HL-60 cells and human neutrophils and to induce β-arrestin recruitment in FPR-transfected CHO-K1 cells showed that many enantiomers were potent agonists, inducing responses in the sub-micromolar to nanomolar range. Furthermore, FPRs exhibited enantiomer selectivity, generally preferring the R-(−)-forms over the S-(+)-enantiomers. Finally, we found that elongation of the carbon chain in the chiral center of the active compounds generally increased biological activity. Thus, these studies provide important new information regarding molecular features involved in FPR ligand preference and report the identification of a novel series of FPR agonists. PMID:22607879

  9. Ligand directed self-assembly vs. metal ion coordination algorithm-when does the ligand or the metal take control?

    PubMed

    Shuvaev, Konstantin V; Abedin, Tareque S M; McClary, Corey A; Dawe, Louise N; Collins, Julie L; Thompson, Laurence K

    2009-04-28

    Polyfunctional hydrazone ligands with multidentate terminal donor groups offer metal ions many donor choices, and the coordination outcome depends mainly on the identity of the metal ion. Co(ii) and Ni(ii) prefer to adopt largely undistorted, six-coordinate geometries, while Cu(ii) can easily adapt to a variety of coordination situations (e.g. CN 4-6), and will optimize its coordination number and stereochemistry based on all the available donors. Ni(ii) and Co(ii) form simple [2 x 2] [M(4)-(micro(2)-O)(4)] square grids with such ditopic hydrazone ligands, and ignore other coordination options, while Cu(ii) tries to bind to all the available donors, and forms extended and 2D structures based on linked Cu(ii) triads rather than grids. Ni(ii) is also reluctant to compromise its desire to maximize its crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE) by binding to 'weak' ligands, and with a tetratopic pyrazole bis-hydrazone ligand it ignores the oxygen donors in favour of nitrogen, forming a novel trinuclear, triangular cluster. Also, reaction of a linear Ni(ii)(3) complex of a tetratopic pyridazine bis-hydrazone ligand with NiN(6) coordination spheres with Cu(ii), leads exclusively to a square Cu(12) grid based complex, and complete displacement of nickel. Structural and magnetic properties are highlighted, and metal-ligand interactions are discussed in detail.

  10. Sarcosine-Based Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) Inhibitors Containing Pyridazine Moiety: A Further Search for Drugs with Potential to Influence Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Timar, Julia; Szabo, Geza; Udvari, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin M; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Czompa, Andrea; Tapolcsanyi, Pal; Kocsis, Akos; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a novel series of N-substituted sarcosines, analogues of NFPS (N-[3-(biphenyl-4- yloxy)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-N-methylglycine), as type-1 glycine transporter (GlyT-1) inhibitors. Several compounds incorporated a diazine ring inhibited recombinant hGlyT-1b expressed permanently in CHO cells and GlyT-1 in rat brain synaptosomal preparations. A structure-activity relationship for the newly synthesized compounds was obtained and discussed on the ground of their GlyT-1 inhibitory potencies. Replacement of the biphenyl-4-yloxy moiety in NFPS with a 5-pyridazinylphenoxy moiety (compounds 3, 4, 5, and 6) or a 2-phenyl-5- pyridazinyloxy moiety (compounds 10, 11, and 12) afforded compounds exhibiting potent inhibition on GlyT-1 activity. The GlyT-1 inhibitory properties of NFPS analogues, in which sarcosine was closed into a ring forming (methylamino)pyridazine-3-(2H)-one, were markedly reduced (compounds 13 and 14). The pyridazine-containing GlyT-1 inhibitors with in vitro GlyT-1 inhibitory potency also enhanced extracellular glycine concentrations in conscious rat striatum as was measured by microdialysis technique. In contrast to NFPS, sarcosine-based pyridazine containing GlyT-1 inhibitors failed to evoke compulsive running behavior whereas they inhibited phencyclidine- induced hypermotility in mice. It is believed that increase of extracellular concentrations of glycine by inhibition of its reuptake may probably influence positively glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type ionotropic receptors in the central nervous system. This may have importance in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurochemical transmission. Thus, impaired NMDA receptor functions have been shown to be involved in the development of the negative symptoms and the cognitive deficit of schizophrenia and the treatment of these symptoms is the possible clinical indication of GlyT-1 inhibitors including

  11. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235–360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, [4-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, and [1-{sup 15}N]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (R{sub e}) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final R{sub e} structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (I{sub a} and I{sub b} for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to

  12. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Stanton, John F.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-13C]-C4H4N2, [4-13C]-C4H4N2, and [1-15N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key to

  13. Vibrational spectroscopic, optical and thermal properties of a hybride pyridazine perchlorate complex-An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podsiadła, D.; Czupiński, O.; Rospenk, M.; Czapla, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Various methods of experiment: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been used to investigate the phase transitions in pyridazine perchlorate crystal. DSC showed the existence of phase transition at T = 341 K. The vibrational IR spectra in Nujol and Perfluorolube mulls were studied in a wide temperature range, from room temperature to 380 K. Special attention was put on the temperatures near the phase transition temperature. The temperature changes of wavenumbers, gravity center and band intensities were analyzed to clarify the phase transition molecular mechanism. Information about hydrogen bonds was obtained. For more detailed band assignment and overall spectral presentation Raman and far infrared (FT-FIR) spectra at room temperature have been carried out. The experimental data interpretation was supported by theoretical calculations based on density functional theory, with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d,p) basic set. Some theoretical conformations were analyzed. Calculated normal vibrational modes of the molecule, their frequencies and intensities were compared with these recorded in experiment.

  14. Half a grid is better than no grid: competition between 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and 3,6-di(pyrid-2-yl)pyridazine for copper(II).

    PubMed

    Constable, Edwin C; Decurtins, Silvio; Housecroft, Catherine E; Keene, Tony D; Palivan, Cornelia G; Price, Jason R; Zampese, Jennifer A

    2010-03-07

    The reaction between Cu(NO(3))(2).3H(2)O, 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (tpy) and 3,6-di(pyrid-2-yl)pyridazine (1) in a 2 : 2 : 1 molar equivalent ratio in aqueous MeCN in the presence of excess NH(4)PF(6) leads to competition between the assembly of the dinuclear half-grid [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).2H(2)O and the mononuclear complex [Cu(1)(2)(OH(2))][PF(6)](2). The yield of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).2H(2)O has been optimized using microwave conditions. [Cu(1)(2)(OH(2))][PF(6)](2) can be selectively produced by treating Cu(NO(3))(2).3H(2)O with 1 (1 : 2 molar equivalents) in aqueous MeCN in the presence of NH(4)PF(6). The single crystal structures of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).4MeNO(2) and [Cu(1)(2)(OH(2))][PF(6)](2) are presented. In the [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)](4+) cation, ligand 1 bridges the two copper(II) centres, each of which is further coordinated by a tpy ligand. The copper(II) coordination geometry is closely associated with the arrangement of the two tpy ligands which engage in efficient face-to-face pi-stacking. Magnetic data for crystalline [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).4MeNO(2) are consistent with a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the two copper(II) centres. EPR spectroscopic data for a powder sample of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)][PF(6)](4).2H(2)O are consistent with the dinuclear structure, but in frozen DMF and DMSO solutions, the data indicate that the dinuclear structure of [Cu(2)(1)(tpy)(2)](4+) is not preserved.

  15. Synthesis and complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 6-substituted and 2,6-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemi; Chessa, Carla; Terán, Carmen

    2011-07-01

    Several pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were synthesized starting from alkyl furans using oxidation with singlet oxygen to give 4-methoxy or 4-hydroxybutenolides, key intermediates of the synthetic strategy followed. For all pyridazinones reported, a complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, which included NOE, DEPT, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, was accomplished. Correlations between the chemical shifts of the heterocyclic ring atoms and substituents at N-2 and C-6 were analyzed.

  16. Structure-Based Design of Novel Pyrimido[4,5-c]pyridazine Derivatives as Dihydropteroate Synthase Inhibitors with Increased Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ying; Hammoudeh, Dalia; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Qi, Jianjun; White, Stephen W.; Lee, Richard E.

    2012-05-29

    Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) is the validated drug target for sulfonamide antimicrobial therapy. However, due to widespread drug resistance and poor tolerance, the use of sulfonamide antibiotics is now limited. The pterin binding pocket in DHPS is highly conserved and is distinct from the sulfonamide binding site. It therefore represents an attractive alternative target for the design of novel antibacterial agents. We previously carried out the structural characterization of a known pyridazine inhibitor in the Bacillus anthracis DHPS pterin site and identified a number of unfavorable interactions that appear to compromise binding. With this structural information, a series of 4,5-dioxo-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimido[4,5-c]pyridazines were designed to improve binding affinity. Most importantly, the N-methyl ring substitution was removed to improve binding within the pterin pocket, and the length of the side chain carboxylic acid was optimized to fully engage the pyrophosphate binding site. These inhibitors were synthesized and evaluated by an enzyme activity assay, X-ray crystallography, isothermal calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the binding interactions from structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic perspectives. This study clearly demonstrates that compounds lacking the N-methyl substitution exhibit increased inhibition of DHPS, but the beneficial effects of optimizing the side chain length are less apparent.

  17. Supramolecular self-assembled polynuclear complexes from tritopic, tetratopic, and pentatopic ligands: structural, magnetic and surface studies.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subrata K; Abedin, Tareque S M; Dawe, Louise N; Tandon, Santokh S; Collins, Julie L; Thompson, Laurence K; Postnikov, Andrei V; Alam, Mohammad S; Müller, Paul

    2007-09-17

    Polymetallic, highly organized molecular architectures can be created by "bottom-up" self-assembly methods using ligands with appropriately programmed coordination information. Ligands based on 2,6-picolyldihydrazone (tritopic and pentatopic) and 3,6-pyridazinedihydrazone (tetratopic) cores, with tridentate coordination pockets, are highly specific and lead to the efficient self-assembly of square [3 x 3] Mn9, [4 x 4] Mn16, and [5 x 5] Mn25 nanoscale grids. Subtle changes in the tritopic ligand composition to include bulky end groups can lead to a rectangular 3 x [1 x 3] Mn9 grid, while changing the central pyridazine to a more sterically demanding pyrazole leads to simple dinuclear copper complexes, despite the potential for binding four metal ions. The creation of all bidentate sites in a tetratopic pyridazine ligand leads to a dramatically different spiral Mn4 strand. Single-crystal X-ray structural data show metallic connectivity through both mu-O and mu-NN bridges, which leads to dominant intramolecular antiferromagnetic spin exchange in all cases. Surface depositions of the Mn9, Mn16, and Mn25 square grid molecules on graphite (HOPG) have been examined using STM/CITS imagery (scanning tunneling microscopy/current imaging tunneling spectroscopy), where tunneling through the metal d-orbital-based HOMO levels reveals the metal ion positions. CITS imagery of the grids clearly shows the presence of 9, 16, and 25 manganese ions in the expected square grid arrangements, highlighting the importance and power of this technique in establishing the molecular nature of the surface adsorbed species. Nanoscale, electronically functional, polymetallic assemblies of this sort, created by such a bottom-up synthetic approach, constitute important components for advanced molecule-based materials.

  18. Synthesis, HPLC Enantioresolution, and X-ray Analysis of a New Series of C5-methyl Pyridazines as N-Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Soldani, Giacomo; Quinn, Mark T.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Faggi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of three racemates and the corresponding non chiral analogues of a C5-methyl pyridazine series is described here, as well as the isolation of pure enantiomers and their absolute configuration assignment. In order to obtain optically active compounds, direct chromatographic methods of separation by HPLC-UV were investigated using four chiral stationary phases (CSPs: Lux Amylose-2®, Lux Cellulose-1®, Lux Cellulose-2® and Lux Cellulose-3®). The best resolution was achieved using amylose tris(5-chloro-2-methylphenylcarbamate) (Lux Amylose-2®), and single enantiomers were isolated on a semipreparative scale with high enantiomeric excess, suitable for biological assays. The absolute configuration of optically active compounds was unequivocally established by X-ray crystallographic analysis and comparative chiral HPLC-UV profile. All compounds of the series were tested for formyl peptide receptor (FPR) agonist activity, and four were found to be active, with EC50 values in the micromolar range. PMID:23744588

  19. Development of new highly potent imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines targeting Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Moine, Espérance; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cécile; Logé, Cédric; Pénichon, Mélanie; Moiré, Nathalie; Delehouzé, Claire; Foll-Josselin, Béatrice; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Bach, Stéphane; Gueiffier, Alain; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Denevault-Sabourin, Caroline

    2015-11-13

    Using a structure-based design approach, we have developed a new series of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines, targeting the calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CDPK1) from Toxoplasma gondii. Twenty derivatives were thus synthesized. Structure-activity relationships and docking studies confirmed the binding mode of these inhibitors within the ATP binding pocket of TgCDPK1. Two lead compounds (16a and 16f) were then identified, which were able to block TgCDPK1 enzymatic activity at low nanomolar concentrations, with a good selectivity profile against a panel of mammalian kinases. The potential of these inhibitors was confirmed in vitro on T. gondii growth, with EC50 values of 100 nM and 70 nM, respectively. These best candidates also displayed low toxicity to mammalian cells and were selected for further in vivo investigations on murine model of acute toxoplasmosis.

  20. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  1. Metal Free Formation of Various 3-Iodo-1H-pyrrolo[3',2':4,5]imidazo-[1,2-a]pyridines and [1,2-b]Pyridazines and Their Further Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Tber, Z; Hiebel, M-A; El Hakmaoui, A; Akssira, M; Guillaumet, G; Berteina-Raboin, S

    2015-07-02

    3-iodo-1H-pyrrolo[3',2':4,5]imidazo-[1,2-a]pyridines and [1,2-b]pyridazines were prepared following Groebke-Blackburn-Bienaymé MCR combined with I2-promoted electrophilic cyclization. The flexibility of the method enables the introduction of diversity in the 2, 5, 6, and 7 positions on the resulting scaffold using commercially available starting materials. Furthermore, subsequent palladium-catalyzed reactions were successfully achieved using our iodinated derivatives.

  2. Design and synthesis of potent and selective pyridazin-4(1H)-one-based PDE10A inhibitors interacting with Tyr683 in the PDE10A selectivity pocket.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masato; Hitaka, Takenori; Hasui, Tomoaki; Fushimi, Makoto; Kunitomo, Jun; Kokubo, Hironori; Oki, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-15

    Utilizing structure-based drug design techniques, we designed and synthesized phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors based on pyridazin-4(1H)-one. These compounds can interact with Tyr683 in the PDE10A selectivity pocket. Pyridazin-4(1H)-one derivative 1 was linked with a benzimidazole group through an alkyl spacer to interact with the OH of Tyr683 and fill the PDE10A selectivity pocket. After optimizing the linker length, we identified 1-(cyclopropylmethyl)-5-[3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)propoxy]-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridazin-4(1H)-one (16f) as having highly potent PDE10A inhibitory activity (IC50=0.76nM) and perfect selectivity against other PDEs (>13,000-fold, IC50=>10,000nM). The crystal structure of 16f bound to PDE10A revealed that the benzimidazole moiety was located deep within the PDE10A selectivity pocket and interacted with Tyr683. Additionally, a bidentate interaction existed between the 5-alkoxypyridazin-4(1H)-one moiety and the conserved Gln716 present in all PDEs.

  3. Second hyperpolarizabilities of the lithium salt of pyridazine Li-H3C4N2 and lithium salt electride Li-H3C4N2⋯Na2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Orlando; Castro, Marcos A.; Leão, Salviano A.; Fonseca, Tertius L.

    2015-07-01

    This Letter reports static and dynamic second hyperpolarizabilities of the lithium salt of pyridazine Li-H3C4N2 and lithium salt electride Li-H3C4N2⋯Na2. The results show strong dependence of the computed values with respect to the electron correlation treatment. The static value obtained at the CCSD level with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set for the Li-H3C4N2⋯Na2 is 1.1 × 109 au. This extremely large value of the second hyperpolarizability reinforces the potential of this system for application in nonlinear optics.

  4. Development of 6H-Chromeno[3,4-c]pyrido[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-e]pyridazin-6-ones as Par-4 Secretagogues

    PubMed Central

    Frasinyuk, Mykhaylo S.; Bondarenko, Svitlana P.; Sviripa, Vitaliy M.; Burikhanov, Ravshan; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Liu, Chunming; Watt, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrosation and cyclization of 4-(3-aminothieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-yl)-2H-chromen-2-ones 1 afforded substituted 6H-chromeno[3,4-c]pyrido[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-e]pyridazin-6-ones 2 that inhibited the intermediary filament protein, vimentin, at low micromolar concentrations. This inhibition promoted the secretion of Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 protein (Par-4), which selectively triggered apoptosis in prostate cancer cells such as CWR22Rv1, LNCaP-derivative C4-2B, PC-3 and its aggressive analog, PC-3 MM2. PMID:26236052

  5. Environmentally-Safe Conditions for a Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C3-Arylation with High Turn Over Frequency of Imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines Using Aryl Bromides and Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, Sabah; Djebbar, Safia; Soulé, Jean-François; Doucet, Henri

    2016-09-06

    Pd(OAc)2 was found to catalyze very efficiently the direct arylation of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine at C3-position under a very low catalyst loading and phosphine-free conditions. The reaction can be performed in very high TOFs and TONs employing as little as 0.1-0.05 mol % catalyst using a wide range of aryl bromides. In addition, some electron-deficient aryl chlorides were also found to be suitable substrates. Moreover, 31 examples of the cross couplings were reported using green, safe, and renewable solvents, such as pentan-1-ol, diethylcarbonate or cyclopentyl methyl ether, without loss of efficiency.

  6. On the spectroscopic analyses of 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP): A comparative experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mansy, M. A. M.; El-Bana, M. S.; Fouad, S. S.

    2017-04-01

    We have systematically calculated various physical characteristics such as optimized molecular structural parameters, vibrational frequencies, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, total dipole moment and thermochemical parameters: nuclear repulsion energy, ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, electronic chemical potential, global electrophilicity index and finally softness (ζ) using DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set for 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP). Also, HPHP nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been checked by DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set. In addition, we have investigated the influence of exposure to UV radiation on HPHP physical properties at the same level of theory. Our results show that HPHP possesses a dipole moment (2.68 Debye) and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of 3.99 eV that emphasize its high applicability for manufacturing photovoltaic devices such as solar cells. After exposure to UV radiation, the HPHP dipole moment has been lowered from 2.68 to 2.3 Debye due to UV radiation. Moreover, a double spin in HPHP has been observed, as electrons are aligned according to their spin state. Electrons (spin ↑) and (spin ↓) are aligned in alpha and beta levels with energy gaps 3.82 and 3.17 eV, respectively. This anomalous behavior may be justified by considering that HPHP undergoes anomalous Zeeman-like effect. The presence of this phenomenon in HPHP introduces it as a modern organic semiconductor which has high applicability to be used in modern spintronics.

  7. On the spectroscopic analyses of 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP): A comparative experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    El-Mansy, M A M; El-Bana, M S; Fouad, S S

    2017-04-05

    We have systematically calculated various physical characteristics such as optimized molecular structural parameters, vibrational frequencies, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, total dipole moment and thermochemical parameters: nuclear repulsion energy, ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, electronic chemical potential, global electrophilicity index and finally softness (ζ) using DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set for 3-Hydroxy-1-Phenyl-Pyridazin-6(2H)one (HPHP). Also, HPHP nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been checked by DFT/B3LYP utilizing 6-311G(d,p) basis set. In addition, we have investigated the influence of exposure to UV radiation on HPHP physical properties at the same level of theory. Our results show that HPHP possesses a dipole moment (2.68Debye) and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of 3.99eV that emphasize its high applicability for manufacturing photovoltaic devices such as solar cells. After exposure to UV radiation, the HPHP dipole moment has been lowered from 2.68 to 2.3Debye due to UV radiation. Moreover, a double spin in HPHP has been observed, as electrons are aligned according to their spin state. Electrons (spin ↑) and (spin ↓) are aligned in alpha and beta levels with energy gaps 3.82 and 3.17eV, respectively. This anomalous behavior may be justified by considering that HPHP undergoes anomalous Zeeman-like effect. The presence of this phenomenon in HPHP introduces it as a modern organic semiconductor which has high applicability to be used in modern spintronics.

  8. Methyl 4-{[6-(4-bromo­phen­yl)-3-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetra­hydro­pyridazin-4-yl]methyl}benzoate

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Adailton J.; Souza, Luciana B. P.; Joussef, Antônio C.; Meyer, Emerson

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, C19H17BrN2O3, consists of two cyclic groups, viz. 4-(meth­oxy­carbon­yl)phenyl and 6-(4-bromo­phen­yl)-3-oxo-2,3,4,5-dihydro­pyridazin-4-yl, which are linked by a methyl­ene spacer. The pyridazine ring is twisted and the dihedral angle between its mean plane and that of the bromo­phenyl mean plane is 17.2 (2)°. The 4-(meth­oxy­carbon­yl)phenyl group shows a quasi-planar conformation, where the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the phenyl ring and carboxyl­ate ester group is 7.9 (4)°. Centrosymmetric inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers. These are linked by C—Br⋯O=C inter­actions [Br⋯O = 3.10 (1) Å] to form a one-dimensional polymeric structure running along the [10] direction. PMID:21754527

  9. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  10. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  11. 3-(1,3-Di­phenyl­propan-2-yl)-4-methyl-6-phenyl­isoxazolo[3,4-d]pyridazin-7(6H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Charles F.; Mirzaei, Joseph; Koerner, Chris; Gates, Christina; Natale, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C27H23N3O2, the geminal benzyl groups branching out from the methine adjacent to the isoxazole group are both syn-oriented to the methyl group of the pyridazinone moiety, as reflected by C—C distances of 3.812 (2) and 4.369 (2) Å between the methyl carbon and the nearest ring carbon of each benzyl group. This kind of conformation is retained in CDCl3 solution, as evidenced by distinct phenyl-shielding effects on the 1H NMR signals of the methyl H atoms. The isoxazolo[3,4-d]pyridazin ring system is virtually planar (r.m.s. deviation from planarity = 0.031 Å), but the N-bonded phenyl group is inclined to the former by an ring–ring angle of 55.05 (3)°. In the crystal, the T-shaped mol­ecules are arranged in an inter­locked fashion, forming rod-like assemblies along [10-1]. The mol­ecules are held together by unremarkable weak C—H⋯N, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions (C—O,N,C > 3.4 A), while significant π–π-stacking inter­actions are absent. PMID:24454112

  12. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation studies on the 5-hydroxy-2H-pyridazin-3-one derivatives as HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijing; Fang, Yu; Lu, Xia; Liu, Yongjuan; Zhang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    The NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) is a promising therapeutic target for developing novel anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs. In this work, a combined molecular modeling study was performed on a series of 193 5-hydroxy-2H-pyridazin-3-one derivatives as inhibitors of HCV NS5B Polymerase. The best 3D-QSAR models, including CoMFA and CoMSIA, are based on receptor (or docking). Furthermore, a 40-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and binding free energy calculations using docked structures of NS5B with ten compounds, which have diverse structures and pIC50 values, were employed to determine the detailed binding process and to compare the binding modes of the inhibitors with different activities. On one side, the stability and rationality of molecular docking and 3D-QSAR results were validated by MD simulation. The binding free energies calculated by the MM-PBSA method gave a good correlation with the experimental biological activity. On the other side, by analyzing some differences between the molecular docking and the MD simulation results, we can find that the MD simulation could also remedy the defects of molecular docking. The analyses of the combined molecular modeling results have identified that Tyr448, Ser556, and Asp318 are the key amino acid residues in the NS5B binding pocket. The results from this study can provide some insights into the development of novel potent NS5B inhibitors.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nitrogen-rich macrocyclic ligands and an investigation of their coordination chemistry with lanthanum(III).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Justin J; Birnbaum, Eva R; Batista, Enrique R; Martin, Richard L; John, Kevin D

    2015-01-05

    Derivatives of the ligand 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen) containing pendant N-heterocyclic donors were prepared. The heterocycles pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, and pyrazine were conjugated to cyclen to give 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(py)), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(3-pyridazylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pyd)), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(4-pyrimidylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pyr)), and 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-pyrazinylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (L(pz)), respectively. The coordination chemistry of these ligands was explored using the La(3+) ion. Accordingly, complexes of the general formula [La(L)(OTf)](OTf)2, where OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate and L = L(py) (1), L(pyd) (2), L(pyr) (3), and L(pz) (4), were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Crystal structures of 1 and 2 were also determined by X-ray diffraction studies, which revealed 9-coordinate capped, twisted square-antiprismatic coordination geometries for the central La(3+) ion. The conformational dynamics of 1-4 in solution were investigated by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. Dynamic line-shape and Eyring analyses enabled the determination of the activation parameters for the interconversion of enantiomeric forms of the complexes. Unexpectedly, the different pendant N-heterocycles of 1-4 give rise to varying values for the enthalpies and entropies of activation for this process. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the mechanism of this enantiomeric interconversion. Computed activation parameters were consistent with those experimentally determined for 1 but differed somewhat from those of 2-4.

  14. Ligand fitting with CCP4

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Crystal structures of protein–ligand complexes are often used to infer biology and inform structure-based drug discovery. Hence, it is important to build accurate, reliable models of ligands that give confidence in the interpretation of the respective protein–ligand complex. This paper discusses key stages in the ligand-fitting process, including ligand binding-site identification, ligand description and conformer generation, ligand fitting, refinement and subsequent validation. The CCP4 suite contains a number of software tools that facilitate this task: AceDRG for the creation of ligand descriptions and conformers, Lidia and JLigand for two-dimensional and three-dimensional ligand editing and visual analysis, Coot for density interpretation, ligand fitting, analysis and validation, and REFMAC5 for macromolecular refinement. In addition to recent advancements in automatic carbohydrate building in Coot (LO/Carb) and ligand-validation tools (FLEV), the release of the CCP4i2 GUI provides an integrated solution that streamlines the ligand-fitting workflow, seamlessly passing results from one program to the next. The ligand-fitting process is illustrated using instructive practical examples, including problematic cases such as post-translational modifications, highlighting the need for careful analysis and rigorous validation. PMID:28177312

  15. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  16. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  17. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  18. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands.

  19. Bifunctional DTPA-type ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1990-03-26

    The subject matter of the invention relates to bifunctional cyclohexyl DTPA ligands and methods of using these compounds. Specifically, such ligands are useful for radiolabeling proteins with radioactive metals, and can consequently be utilized with respect to radioimmunoimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy.

  20. Validity of ligand efficiency metrics.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher W; Erlanson, Daniel A; Hopkins, Andrew L; Keserü, György M; Leeson, Paul D; Rees, David C; Reynolds, Charles H; Richmond, Nicola J

    2014-06-12

    A recent viewpoint article (Improving the plausibility of success with inefficient metrics. ACS Med. Chem. Lett. 2014, 5, 2-5) argued that the standard definition of ligand efficiency (LE) is mathematically invalid. In this viewpoint, we address this criticism and show categorically that the definition of LE is mathematically valid. LE and other metrics such as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) can be useful during the multiparameter optimization challenge faced by medicinal chemists.

  1. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  2. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-06-27

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects, and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions, and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well-known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms.

  3. Studies on Pyridazine Azide Cyclisation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, R.D.; Greenwood, J.; Hambley, T.; Hanrahan, J.R.; Hibbs, D.E.; Itani, S.; Tran, H.; Turner, P.

    2010-11-16

    Reaction of sodium azide with 4-methyl-3,5,6-tribromopyridazine results in the formation of 3,5,6-triazide intermediate which could cyclise to give two possible bicyclic products while ab initio calculations show that the formation of a tricyclic compound is extremely energetically unfavourable. However, experimentally, only one major product is isolated. The structure of this unstable product has been conclusively established by X-ray crystallography as 3,5-diazido-4-methyl[1,5-b]tetrazolopyridazine confirming theoretical predictions.

  4. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardi, Demian M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Gu, Baohua; Parks, Jerry M; Summers, Anne; Miller, S; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  5. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  6. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  7. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  8. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  9. Allosteric Modulation of Related Ligand-Gated Ion Channels Synergistically Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus and Enhances Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhenglin; Yoshimura, Ryan F.; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Hogenkamp, Derk J.; Whittemore, Edward R.; Huang, Jin-Cheng; Tran, Minhtam B.; Belluzzi, James D.; Yakel, Jerrel L.; Gee, Kelvin W.

    2011-01-01

    α5 Subunit-containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and α7 neuronal nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that mediate cognitive and attentional processes in the hippocampus. α5 GABAARs alter network activity by tonic inhibition of CA1/CA3 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus. Postsynaptic α7 nAChRs in the hippocampus regulate inhibitory GABAergic interneuron activity required for synchronization of pyramidal neurons in the CA1, whereas presynaptic α7 nAChRs regulate glutamate release. Can simultaneous allosteric modulation of these LGICs produce synergistic effects on cognition? We show that combined transient application of two allosteric modulators that individually 1) inhibit α5 GABAARs and 2) enhance α7 nAChRs causes long-term potentiation (LTP) of mossy fiber stimulation-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSC) from CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. The LTP effect evoked by two compounds is replicated by 3-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-6-(N-ethylindol-5-yl)-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine (522-054), a compound we designed to simultaneously inhibit α5 GABAARs and enhance α7 nAChRs. Selective antagonists for either receptor block sustained EPSC potentiation produced by 522-054. In vivo, 522-054 enhances performance in the radial arm maze and facilitates attentional states in the five-choice serial reaction time trial with similar receptor antagonist sensitivity. These observations may translate into therapeutic utility of dual action compounds in diseases of hippocampal-based cognitive impairment. PMID:21159751

  10. Multicoordinate ligands for actinide/lanthanide separations.

    PubMed

    Dam, Henk H; Reinhoudt, David N; Verboom, Willem

    2007-02-01

    In nuclear waste treatment processes there is a need for improved ligands for the separation of actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)). Several research groups are involved in the design and synthesis of new An(III) ligands and in the confinement of these and existing An(III) ligands onto molecular platforms giving multicoordinate ligands. The preorganization of ligands considerably improves the An(III) extraction properties, which are largely dependent on the solubility and rigidity of the platform. This tutorial review summarizes the most important An(III) ligands with emphasis on the preorganization strategy using (macrocyclic) platforms.

  11. Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, V B; Babayan, S Y; Tairyan, V I; Arakelyan, A V; Parsadanyan, M A; Vardevanyan, P O

    2006-02-01

    Ligand binding to nucleic acids (NA) is considered as a stationary Markov process. It is shown that the probabilistic description of ligand-NA binding allows one to describe not only the kinetics of the change of number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. The general analysis of absorption isotherms and kinetics of ligand binding to NA make it possible to determine of rate constants of ligand-NA complex formation and dissociation.

  12. Glyconanomaterials: synthesis, characterization, and ligand presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-05-04

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying surface-tethered carbohydrate ligands, have emerged and demonstrated increasing potential in biomedical imaging, therapeutics, and diagnostics. These materials combine the unique properties of nanometer-scale objects with the ability to present multiple copies of carbohydrate ligands, greatly enhancing the weak affinity of individual ligands to their binding partners. Critical to the performance of glyconanomaterials is the proper display of carbohydrate ligands, taking into consideration of the coupling chemistry, the type and length of the spacer linkage, and the ligand density. This article provides an overview of the coupling chemistry for attaching carbohydrate ligands to nanomaterials, and discusses the need for thorough characterization of glyconanomaterials, especially quantitative analyses of the ligand density and binding affinities. Using glyconanoparticles synthesized by a versatile photocoupling chemistry, methods for determining the ligand density by colorimetry and the binding affinity with lectins by a fluorescence competition assay are determined. The results show that the multivalent presentation of carbohydrate ligands significantly enhances the binding affinity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the free ligands in solution. The effect is sizeable even at low surface ligand density. The type and length of the spacer linkage also affect the binding affinity, with the longer linkage promoting the association of bound ligands with the corresponding lectins.

  13. Glyconanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Ligand Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying surface-tethered carbohydrate ligands, have emerged and demonstrated increasing potential in biomedical imaging, therapeutics, and diagnostics. These materials combine the unique properties of nanometer-scale objects with the ability to present multiple copies of carbohydrate ligands, greatly enhancing the weak affinity of individual ligands to their binding partners. Critical to the performance of glyconanomaterials is the proper display of carbohydrate ligands, taking into consideration of the coupling chemistry, the type and length of the spacer linkage, and the ligand density. This article provides an overview of the coupling chemistry for attaching carbohydrate ligands to nanomaterials, and discusses the need for thorough characterization of glyconanomaterials, especially quantitative analyses of the ligand density and binding affinities. Using glyconanoparticles synthesized by a versatile photocoupling chemistry, methods for determining the ligand density by colorimetry and the binding affinity with lectins by a fluorescence competition assay are determined. The results show that the multivalent presentation of carbohydrate ligands significantly enhances the binding affinity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the free ligands in solution. The effect is sizeable even at low surface ligand density. The type and length of the spacer linkage also affect the binding affinity, with the longer linkage promoting the association of bound ligands with the corresponding lectins. PMID:20301131

  14. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications.

  15. Presentation of Ligands on Hydroxylapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Barbara C. F.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1997-01-01

    Conjugates of biotin with the decamer of glutamic acid (glu(sub 10)) and the trimer of D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (I) have been synthesized, and it has been shown that they mediate the binding of avidin to hydroxylapatite. In a similar way a conjugate of methotrexate with glu(sub 10) mediates the binding of dihydrofolate reductase to the mineral. The presentation of ligands on the hydroxylapatite component of bone may find applications in clinical medicine.

  16. Tumor Targeting via Integrin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad Ali; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Kessler, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side-effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability, and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor-specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug-delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells. PMID:24010121

  17. Tools for ligand validation in Coot

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Coot is a molecular-graphics program primarily aimed at model building using X-ray data. Recently, tools for the manipulation and representation of ligands have been introduced. Here, these new tools for ligand validation and comparison are described. Ligands in the wwPDB have been scored by density-fit, distortion and atom-clash metrics. The distributions of these scores can be used to assess the relative merits of the particular ligand in the protein–ligand complex of interest by means of ‘sliders’ akin to those now available for each accession code on the wwPDB websites. PMID:28291755

  18. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  19. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  20. Novel Ligands for a Purine Riboswitch Discovered by RNA-Ligand Docking

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Reyes, Francis E.; Robinson, David A.; Hammond, Colin M.; Lilley, David M.; Batey, Robert T.; Brenk, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Summary The increasing number of RNA crystal structures enables a structure-based approach to the discovery of new RNA-binding ligands. To develop the poorly explored area of RNA-ligand docking, we have conducted a virtual screening exercise for a purine riboswitch to probe the strengths and weaknesses of RNA-ligand docking. Using a standard protein-ligand docking program with only minor modifications, four new ligands with binding affinities in the micromolar range were identified, including two compounds based on molecular scaffolds not resembling known ligands. RNA-ligand docking performed comparably to protein-ligand docking indicating that this approach is a promising option to explore the wealth of RNA structures for structure-based ligand design. PMID:21439477

  1. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W. Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR

  2. A universal rule for organic ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    You, Hongjun; Wang, Wenjin; Yang, Shengchun

    2014-11-12

    Most synthetic routes to high-quality nanocrystals with tunable morphologies predominantly employ long hydro-carbon molecules as ligands, which are detrimental for electronic and catalytic applications. Here, a rule is found that the adsorption energy of an organic ligand is related to its carbon-chain length. Using the density functional theory method, the adsorption energies of some commonly used ligand molecules with different carbon-chain lengths are calculated, including carboxylate, hydroxyl, and amine molecules adsorbed on metal or metal oxide crystal surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of the ligand molecule with a long carbon chain is weaker than that of a smaller molecule with same functional group. This rule provides a theoretical support for a new kind of ligand exchange method in which large organic ligand molecules can be exchanged by small molecules with same functional group to improve the catalytic properties.

  3. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    PubMed

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  4. CB receptor ligands from plants.

    PubMed

    Woelkart, Karin; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology and pharmacology of the endogenous cannabinoid system have potentiated the interest of cannabinoid receptors as potential therapeutic targets. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate a variety of immune cell functions and have therapeutic implications on central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may be therapeutically useful in treating autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Many of these drug effects occur through cannabinoid receptor signalling mechanisms and the modulation of cytokines and other gene products. Further, endocannabinoids have been found to have many physiological and patho-physiological functions, including mood alteration and analgesia, control of energy balance, gut motility, motor and co-ordination activities, as well as alleviation of neurological, psychiatric and eating disorders. Plants offer a wide range of chemical diversity and have been a growing domain in the search for effective cannabinoid ligands. Cannabis sativa L. with the known plant cannabinoid, Delta(9-)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Echinacea species with the cannabinoid (CB) receptor-binding lipophilic alkamides are the best known herbal cannabimimetics. This review focuses on the state of the art in CB ligands from plants, as well their possible therapeutic and immunomodulatory effects.

  5. Measurement of protein-ligand complex formation.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Peter N; Vaughan, Cara K; Daviter, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Experimental approaches to detect, measure, and quantify protein-ligand binding, along with their theoretical bases, are described. A range of methods for detection of protein-ligand interactions is summarized. Specific protocols are provided for a nonequilibrium procedure pull-down assay, for an equilibrium direct binding method and its modification into a competition-based measurement and for steady-state measurements based on the effects of ligands on enzyme catalysis.

  6. Asymmetric catalysis with chiral ferrocene ligands.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Xin; Tu, Tao; You, Shu-Li; Deng, Wei-Ping; Hou, Xue-Long

    2003-09-01

    Chiral ferrocene ligands have been widely used in asymmetric catalysis. The advantages of using ferrocene as a scaffold for chiral ligands are described, particularly those regarding planar chirality, rigid bulkiness, and ease of derivatization. The role of planar chirality in 1,2- and 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene systems is discussed. By using a bulky ferrocene fragment, novel ferrocene ligands were designed, and high enantioselectivity and regioselectivity were achieved in the allylic substitution reaction of monosubstituted allyl substrates. Using the tunable electronic properties of a diphosphine-oxazoline ferrocenyl ligand, the regioselectivity of the intermolecular asymmetric Heck reaction was also examined.

  7. Integrated ligand based pharmacophore model derived from diverse FAAH covalent ligand classes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lingling; Huang, Hongwei; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Fisher, Luke S

    2012-12-01

    3D pharmacophore modeling is an important computational methodology for ligand-enzyme binding interactions in drug discovery. More specifically, a consensus pharmacophore model derived from diverse ligands is a key determinant upon which the prediction power of computational models is based for designing novel ligands. In this work, by merging the important pharmacophore features based on four classes of covalent FAAH ligands, and then integrating the exclusion volume spheres derived from the crystal structure, we created for the first time an integrated FAAH pharmacophore model to describe the ligand-enzyme binding interactions. This new integrated FAAH pharmacophore model can correctly predict the covalent ligand binding mode, which correlates with the SAR data. The study is expected to provide insights into novel covalent ligand-FAAH binding interactions, and facilitate the design of covalent ligands against FAAH.

  8. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    sub 10nM range efficacy. Our primary objective was to establish a series of compounds blocking the AR ligand-dependent and ligand-independent gene ...of AR driven genes to be more comprehensive and more in line with what is currently known about AR-driven signaling in prostate cancer. We have...developed a robust panel of genes for AR signaling that is reflective of the clinical findings in both ligand dependent and ligand-independent androgen

  9. Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, William Hunt; Jia, Dongyu; Deng, Wu-Min

    2014-01-01

    The Notch pathway is integrated into numerous developmental processes and therefore is fine-tuned on many levels, including receptor production, endocytosis, and degradation. Notch is further characterized by a twofold relationship with its Delta-Serrate (DSL) ligands, as ligands from opposing cells (trans-ligands) activate Notch, whereas ligands expressed in the same cell (cis-ligands) inhibit signaling. We show that cells without both cis- and trans-ligands can mediate Notch-dependent developmental events during Drosophila oogenesis, indicating ligand-independent Notch activity occurs when the receptor is free of cis- and trans-ligands. Furthermore, cis-ligands can reduce Notch activity in endogenous and genetically induced situations of elevated trans-ligand-independent Notch signaling. We conclude that cis-expressed ligands exert their repressive effect on Notch signaling in cases of trans-ligand-independent activation, and propose a new function of cis-inhibition which buffers cells against accidental Notch activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04415.001 PMID:25486593

  10. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  11. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    PubMed Central

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR leverages prior knowledge from earlier structures to facilitate ligand placement in the current structure. PMID:24419386

  12. Flexible ligand docking using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, C. M.; Kuntz, I. D.; Dixon, J. Scott

    1995-04-01

    Two computational techniques have been developed to explore the orientational and conformational space of a flexible ligand within an enzyme. Both methods use the Genetic Algorithm (GA) to generate conformationally flexible ligands in conjunction with algorithms from the DOCK suite of programs to characterize the receptor site. The methods are applied to three enzyme-ligand complexes: dihydrofolate reductase-methotrexate, thymidylate synthase-phenolpthalein and HIV protease-thioketal haloperidol. Conformations and orientations close to the crystallographically determined structures are obtained, as well as alternative structures with low energy. The potential for the GA method to screen a database of compounds is also examined. A collection of ligands is evaluated simultaneously, rather than docking the ligands individually into the enzyme.

  13. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  14. Qualification of a free ligand assay in the presence of anti-ligand antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan J; Brown, Robin M; Lu, Jirong; Wroblewski, Victor J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and characterize an ELISA to measure free ligand concentrations in rat serum in the presence of a Fab to the same ligand. A variety of experiments were conducted to understand optimal assay conditions and to verify that only free ligand was detected. The parameters explored included sample incubation time on plate, the initial concentrations of Fab and ligand, and the pre-incubation time required for the Fab-ligand complex concentrations to reach equilibrium. We found the optimal experimental conditions to include a 10-minute on-plate incubation of ligand-containing samples, with a 24-hour pre-incubation time for test samples of Fab and ligand to reach equilibrium. An alternative approach, involving removal of Fab-ligand complexes from the solution prior to measuring concentrations of the ligand, was also used to verify that the assay only measured free ligand. Rats were dosed subcutaneously with Fab and the assay was used to demonstrate dose-dependent suppression of endogenous free ligand levels in vivo.

  15. Chemistry of Marine Ligands and Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vraspir, Julia M.; Butler, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are presented with unique challenges to obtain essential metal ions required to survive and thrive in the ocean. The production of organic ligands to complex transition metal ions is one strategy to both facilitate uptake of specific metals, such as iron, and to mitigate the potential toxic effects of other metal ions, such as copper. A number of important trace metal ions are complexed by organic ligands in seawater, including iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and cadmium, thus defining the speciation of these metal ions in the ocean. In the case of iron, siderophores have been identified and structurally characterized. Siderophores are low molecular weight iron-binding ligands produced by marine bacteria. Although progress has been made toward the identity of in situ iron-binding ligands, few compounds have been identified that coordinate the other trace metals. Deciphering the chemical structures and production stimuli of naturally produced organic ligands and the organisms they come from is fundamental to understanding metal speciation and bioavailability. The current evidence for marine ligands, with an emphasis on siderophores, and discussion of the importance and implications of metal-binding ligands in controlling metal speciation and cycling within the world's oceans are presented.

  16. ProPose: steered virtual screening by simultaneous protein-ligand docking and ligand-ligand alignment.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Markus H J

    2005-01-01

    The 'model-free' screening engine ProPose implements a general method for performing simultaneous protein-ligand docking, ligand-ligand alignment, pharmacophore queries-and combinations thereof-in order to incorporate a priori information into screening protocols. In this manuscript we describe a case study on herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, an important antiviral drug target, where we evaluate different approaches for handling a specific type of a priori information, i.e., multiple target structures. We demonstrate that a simultaneous alignment on two target structures--in conjunction with logic operations on interactions and docking constraints derived from protein structure--is an effective means of (i) improving the enrichment of chemical substructures that are compatible with the a priori known ligands, (ii) ensuring the steric fit into the target protein, and (iii) handling target flexibility. The combination of ligand- and receptor-based methods steers the virtual screening by ranking molecules according to the similarity of their interaction pattern with known ligands, thereby--to some extent--outweighing the deficiencies of simple scoring functions often used in initial virtual screening.

  17. Ligand engineering of nanoparticle solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Marton

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NP) are promising materials to build cheap and efficient solar cells. One of the key challenges in their utilization for solar energy conversion is the control of NP surfaces and ligand-NP interfaces. Recent experiments have shown that by carefully choosing the ligands terminating the NPs, one can tailor electronic and optical absorption properties of NP assemblies, along with their transport properties. By using density functional theory based methods, we investigated how the opto-electronic properties of lead chalcogenide NPs may be tuned by using diverse organic and inorganic ligands. We interpreted experiments, and we showed that an essential prerequisite to avoid detrimental trap states is to ensure charge balance at the ligand-NP interface, possibly with the help of hydrogen treatment Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F.; Shin, Antony I.; Webster, Lauren A.; Simeons, Frederick R.C.; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G.; Constam, Daniel B.; Bickerton, G. Richard; Read, Kevin D.; Wetsel, William C.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Roth, Bryan L.; Hopkins, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across multiple proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to rationally design drugs a priori against profiles of multiple proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. We describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads where multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology. PMID:23235874

  19. Ligand inducible assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-28

    Here we show that a small synthetic ligand can be used as a key building component for DNA nanofabrication. Using naphthyridinecarbamate dimer (NCD) as a molecular glue for DNA hybridization, we demonstrate NCD-triggered formation of a DNA tetrahedron.

  20. Advanced Organic Ligands for Protecting Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jonathan Ka-Wing

    Organic monolayer protected metal nanoparticles have been utilized in many different fields such as catalysis, drug delivery, and sensor chemistry. However, these nanomaterials are prone to increase in size consequently losing its function at the nanoscale. The stability these nanoparticles have been a great interest of research. This thesis focuses on the synthesis of a novel cross-linkable ligand for the protection of metal nanoparticles. Chapter 1 reviews key concepts of nanoparticles, its usefulness in applications, some of the stabilizing strategies employed, and the scope of the thesis project. Chapter 2 describes the synthetic attempts and optimization of the novel cross-linkable ligand. In addition, its characterization data is also included. Section 2.8 also highlights another fully synthesized novel hydrophobic ligand. Chapter 3 contains the summary of the work and closing remarks. Future works is also included to describe the prospects of the synthesis of the novel ligand. Chapter 4 entails the experimental data and supplementary information.

  1. GW-501516 GlaxoSmithKline/Ligand.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    GlaxoSmithKline and Ligand are developing GW-501516, a peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor-delta agonist for the potential treatment of dyslipidemia. Phase II clinical trials of this compound are ongoing.

  2. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  3. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  4. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  5. New bifunctional ligands for radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brechbiel, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The bifunctional EDTA ligand and two bifunctional DTPA ligands were synthesized by direct aminolysis of an amino acid ester followed by reduction, alkylation, and functional group modification to introduced bifunctionality. The reactive substituent chosen for protein conjugation was the isothiocyanate group. The generality of this approach was demonstrated with 9 different amino acids to produce the respective substituted diethylenetriamines. The remaining three bifunctional DTPA ligands were synthesized via classical peptide methodology producing a dipeptide amide which, after deprotection, was reduced to the triamine and alkylated to produce the ligand. Biodistribution studies of the ligands conjugated to monoclonal antibody B72.3 and labelled with In-111 revealed that superior retention of In-111 was attained and the dose to the liver was minimized when a full intact octadentate bifunctional DTPA chelate was used, e.g. DTPA > EDTA > DTTA (diethylenetritetraacetic acid from use of DTPA dianhydride (CA-DTPA)). The best scintigraphic images were obtained after 72 hours when a DTPA ligand was used to complex the In-111. Biodistribution studies using Yttrium-88 revealed that the disubstituted bifunctional DTPA was necessary to minimize the bone dose from the Yttrium while maintaining a high dose to the tumor.

  6. Interrupting autocrine ligand-receptor binding: comparison between receptor blockers and ligand decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of cell behavioral functions by ligand/receptor binding can be accomplished in autocrine fashion, where cells secrete ligand capable of binding to receptors on their own surfaces. This proximal secretion of autocrine ligands near the surface receptors on the secreting cell suggests that control of these systems by inhibitors of receptor/ligand binding may be more difficult than for systems involving exogenous ligands. Hence, it is of interest to predict the conditions under which successful inhibition of cell receptor binding by the autocrine ligand can be expected. Previous theoretical work using a compartmentalized model for autocrine cells has elucidated the conditions under which addition of solution decoys for the autocrine ligand can interrupt cell receptor/ligand binding via competitive binding of the secreted molecules (Forsten, K. E., and D. A. Lauffenburger. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1-12.) We now apply a similar modeling approach to examine the addition of solution blockers targeted against the cell receptor. Comparison of the two alternative inhibition strategies reveals that a significantly lower concentration of receptor blockers, compared to ligand decoys, will obtain a high degree of inhibition. The more direct interruption scheme characteristic of the receptor blockers may make them a preferred strategy when feasible. PMID:1330038

  7. Fully Flexible Docking of Medium Sized Ligand Libraries with RosettaLigand

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, Samuel; Khar, Karen; Meiler, Jens

    2015-01-01

    RosettaLigand has been successfully used to predict binding poses in protein-small molecule complexes. However, the RosettaLigand docking protocol is comparatively slow in identifying an initial starting pose for the small molecule (ligand) making it unfeasible for use in virtual High Throughput Screening (vHTS). To overcome this limitation, we developed a new sampling approach for placing the ligand in the protein binding site during the initial ‘low-resolution’ docking step. It combines the translational and rotational adjustments to the ligand pose in a single transformation step. The new algorithm is both more accurate and more time-efficient. The docking success rate is improved by 10–15% in a benchmark set of 43 protein/ligand complexes, reducing the number of models that typically need to be generated from 1000 to 150. The average time to generate a model is reduced from 50 seconds to 10 seconds. As a result we observe an effective 30-fold speed increase, making RosettaLigand appropriate for docking medium sized ligand libraries. We demonstrate that this improved initial placement of the ligand is critical for successful prediction of an accurate binding position in the ‘high-resolution’ full atom refinement step. PMID:26207742

  8. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  9. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  10. Posttranslational regulation of Fas ligand function

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Matthias; Lettau, Marcus; Paulsen, Maren; Janssen, Ottmar

    2008-01-01

    The TNF superfamily member Fas ligand acts as a prototypic death factor. Due to its ability to induce apoptosis in Fas (APO-1, CD95) expressing cells, Fas ligand participates in essential effector functions of the immune system. It is involved in natural killer cell- and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, the establishment of immune privilege, and in termination of immune responses by induction of activation-induced cell death. In addition, Fas ligand-positive tumours may evade immune surveillance by killing Fas-positive tumour-infiltrating cells. Given these strong cytotoxic capabilities of Fas ligand, it is obvious that its function has to be strictly regulated to avoid uncontrolled damage. In hematopoietic cells, the death factor is stored in secretory lysosomes and is mobilised to the immunological synapse only upon activation. The selective sorting to and the release from this specific lysosomal compartment requires interactions of the Fas ligand cytosolic moiety, which mediates binding to various adapter proteins involved in trafficking and cytoskeletal reorganisation. In addition, Fas ligand surface expression is further regulated by posttranslational ectodomain shedding and subsequent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, releasing a soluble ectodomain cytokine into the extracellular space and an N-terminal fragment with a potential role in intracellular signalling processes. Moreover, other posttranslational modifications of the cytosolic domain, including phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, have been described to affect various aspects of Fas ligand biology. Since FasL is regarded as a potential target for immunotherapy, the further characterisation of its biological regulation and function will be of great importance for the development and evaluation of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:19114018

  11. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking: orchestrated dancing of ligands in binding sites of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Huameng; Li, Chenglong

    2010-07-30

    Present docking methodologies simulate only one single ligand at a time during docking process. In reality, the molecular recognition process always involves multiple molecular species. Typical protein-ligand interactions are, for example, substrate and cofactor in catalytic cycle; metal ion coordination together with ligand(s); and ligand binding with water molecules. To simulate the real molecular binding processes, we propose a novel multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD) strategy, which can deal with all the above processes, vastly improving docking sampling and binding free energy scoring. The work also compares two search strategies: Lamarckian genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization, which have respective advantages depending on the specific systems. The methodology proves robust through systematic testing against several diverse model systems: E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) complex with two substrates, SHP2NSH2 complex with two peptides and Bcl-xL complex with ABT-737 fragments. In all cases, the final correct docking poses and relative binding free energies were obtained. In PNP case, the simulations also capture the binding intermediates and reveal the binding dynamics during the recognition processes, which are consistent with the proposed enzymatic mechanism. In the other two cases, conventional single-ligand docking fails due to energetic and dynamic coupling among ligands, whereas MLSD results in the correct binding modes. These three cases also represent potential applications in the areas of exploring enzymatic mechanism, interpreting noisy X-ray crystallographic maps, and aiding fragment-based drug design, respectively.

  12. Design of a Hole Trapping Ligand

    DOE PAGES

    La Croix, Andrew D.; O’Hara, Andrew; Reid, Kemar R.; ...

    2017-01-18

    A new ligand that covalently attaches to the surface of colloidal CdSe/ CdS nanorods and can simultaneously chelate a molecular metal center is described. The dithiocarbamate$-$bipyridine ligand system facilitates hole transfer through energetic overlap at the inorganic$-$organic interface and conjugation through the organic ligand to a chelated metal center. Density functional theory calculations show that the coordination of the free ligand to a CdS surface causes the formation of two hybridized molecular states that lie in the band gap of CdS. The further chelation of Fe(II) to the bipyridine moiety causes the presence of seven midgap states. Hole transfer frommore » the CdS valence band to the midgap states is dipole allowed and occurs at a faster rate than what is experimentally known for the CdSe/CdS band-edge radiative recombination. In the case of the ligand bound with iron, a two-step process emerges that places the hole on the iron, again at rates much faster than band gap recombination. The system was experimentally assembled and characterized via UV$-$vis absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Lastly, theoretically predicted red shifts in absorbance were observed experimentally, as well as the expected quench in photoluminescence and lifetimes in time-resolved photoluminescence« less

  13. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors.

  14. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering.

  15. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Carly S.; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S.; Villagomez, Rosa A.; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:25422593

  16. Surface Ligand Mediated Plasmon Driven Photochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Bijesh; Poveda, Marisa; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-02-07

    Contrary to the general expectation that surface ligands reduce the reactivity of surfaces by blocking the active sites, we present experimental evidence that surface ligands can in fact increase reactivity and induce important reaction pathways in plasmon-driven surface photochemistry. The remarkable effect of surface ligands is demonstrated by comparing the photochemistry of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) on resonant plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) in the presence of citrate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and no surface ligands under visible light irradiation. The use of AuNRs with citrate and no surface ligand results in the usual azo-coupling reaction. In contrast, CTAB coated AuNRs oxidize PATP primarily to p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP). Strong correlation has been observed between the N-O and Au-Br vibration band intensities, suggesting that CTAB influences the reaction pathway through the Br- counterions that can minimize electron-hole recombination rate by reacting with hole, and hence increasing the concentration of hot electrons that drive the oxidation reaction.

  17. Controlling Gold Nanoclusters by Diphospine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qianfan; Bonaccorso, Timary A.; Williard, Paul G.; Wang, Lai S.

    2014-01-08

    We report the synthesis and structure determination of a new Au22 nanocluster coordinated by six bidentate diphosphine ligands: 1,8-bis(diphenylphosphino) octane (L8 for short). Single crystal x-ray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry show that the cluster assembly is neutral and can be formulated as Au22(L8)6. The Au22 core consists of two Au11 units clipped together by four L8 ligands, while the additional two ligands coordinate to each Au11 unit in a bidentate fashion. Eight gold atoms at the interface of the two Au11 units are not coordinated by any ligands. Four short gold-gold distances (2.64?2.65 Å) are observed at the interface of the two Au11 clusters as a result of the clamping force of the four clipping ligands and strong electronic interactions. The eight uncoordinated surface gold atoms in the Au22(L8)6 nanocluster are unprecedented in atom-precise gold nanoparticles and can be considered as potential in-situ active sites for catalysis.

  18. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M

    2015-09-09

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  19. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  20. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  1. Efficient chemoenzymatic synthesis of chiral pincer ligands.

    PubMed

    Felluga, Fulvia; Baratta, Walter; Fanfoni, Lidia; Pitacco, Giuliana; Rigo, Pierluigi; Benedetti, Fabio

    2009-05-01

    Chiral, nonracemic pincer ligands based on the 6-phenyl-2-aminomethylpyridine and 2-aminomethylbenzo[h]quinoline scaffolds were obtained by a chemoenzymatic approach starting from 2-pyridyl and 2-benzoquinolyl ethanone. In the enantiodifferentiating step, secondary alcohols of opposite absolute configuration were obtained by a baker's yeast reduction of the ketones and by lipase-mediated dynamic kinetic resolution of the racemic alcohols. Their transformation into homochiral 1-methyl-1-heteroarylethanamines occurred without loss of optical purity, giving access to pincer ligands used in enantioselective catalysis.

  2. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  3. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Guillaume X.; Langer, Gerrit G.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement. PMID:17164533

  4. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Guillaume X; Langer, Gerrit G; Perrakis, Anastassis; Lamzin, Victor S

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein-ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  5. Ligand expansion in ligand-based virtual screening using relevance feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Ammar; Saeed, Faisal; Hamza, Hentabli; Ahmed, Ali; Salim, Naomie

    2012-03-01

    Query expansion is the process of reformulating an original query to improve retrieval performance in information retrieval systems. Relevance feedback is one of the most useful query modification techniques in information retrieval systems. In this paper, we introduce query expansion into ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) using the relevance feedback technique. In this approach, a few high-ranking molecules of unknown activity are filtered from the outputs of a Bayesian inference network based on a single ligand molecule to form a set of ligand molecules. This set of ligand molecules is used to form a new ligand molecule. Simulated virtual screening experiments with the MDL Drug Data Report and maximum unbiased validation data sets show that the use of ligand expansion provides a very simple way of improving the LBVS, especially when the active molecules being sought have a high degree of structural heterogeneity. However, the effectiveness of the ligand expansion is slightly less when structurally-homogeneous sets of actives are being sought.

  6. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  7. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  8. [Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids at random fillings].

    PubMed

    Arakelian, V B; Babaian, S Iu; Tairian, V I; Arakelian, A V; Parsadanian, M A; Vardevanian, P O

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding with nucleic acids is described in frames of the theory of random processes. It is shown that the probabilistic description of binding of a ligand to nucleic acid allows one to describe not only the kinetics of changes in the number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. A general analysis of absorption isotherms and the kinetics of ligand binding with nucleic acids allows one to determine the rate constants of formation and decomposition of the ligand-nucleic acid complex. A comparison of the results obtained with the case of low fillings is conducted.

  9. Solar energy conversion through ligand photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, B.M.; Sima, P.D.

    1983-04-06

    A new technique for photochemical conversion of solar energy based on ligand photodissociation from metal complexes is examined. The concept is illustrated with a photogalvanic cell in which voltages are generated by photodissociation of CO from carbonylferroheme and with a cell in which the illuminated electrode is coated with an iron tetraphenylporphyrin.

  10. Identification of ligands for bacterial sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Martín-Mora, David; López-Farfán, Diana; Reyes-Darias, José Antonio; Matilla, Miguel A; Ortega, Álvaro; Krell, Tino

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria have evolved a variety of different signal transduction mechanisms. However, the cognate signal molecule for the very large amount of corresponding sensor proteins is unknown and their functional annotation represents a major bottleneck in the field of signal transduction. The knowledge of the signal molecule is an essential prerequisite to understand the signalling mechanisms. Recently, the identification of signal molecules by the high-throughput protein screening of commercially available ligand collections using differential scanning fluorimetry has shown promise to resolve this bottleneck. Based on the analysis of a significant number of different ligand binding domains (LBDs) in our laboratory, we identified two issues that need to be taken into account in the experimental design. Since a number of LBDs require the dimeric state for ligand recognition, it has to be assured that the protein analysed is indeed in the dimeric form. A number of other examples demonstrate that purified LBDs can contain bound ligand which prevents further binding. In such cases, the apo-form can be generated by denaturation and subsequent refolding. We are convinced that this approach will accelerate the functional annotation of sensor proteins which will help to understand regulatory circuits in bacteria.

  11. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  12. Cooperative Ligand Binding to Linear Chain Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applequist, Jon

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes the Ising model of ligand binding as it applies to cooperative binding to long chain molecules. Also presents some illustrations which help to visualize the connection between the interaction parameters and the shape of the binding isotherm. (Author/MR)

  13. [Central effects of ORL1 receptor ligands].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Calo, G; Ma, L

    2003-01-01

    It has been discussed literature data on molecular structure of ORL1 receptor and its interaction with intracellular signal systems and neurotransmitters. Data on chemical structure of ORL1 receptor ligands and their central effects (nociception, locomotion, feeding, cognition) are presented.

  14. CXCR3 ligands in disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Katrien; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Liekens, Sandra; Van Damme, Jo; Struyf, Sofie

    2015-06-01

    Chemokines, binding their various G protein-coupled receptors, lead the way for leukocytes in health and inflammation. Yet chemokine receptor expression is not limited to leukocytes. Accordingly, chemokines are remarkably pleiotropic molecules involved in a range of physiological as well as pathological processes. For example, the CXCR3 chemokine receptor is expressed on activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells and natural killer cells, but also fibroblasts and smooth muscle, epithelial and endothelial cells. In men, these cells express either CXCR3A, its splice variant CXCR3B or a balanced combination of both. The CXCR3 ligands, activating both receptor variants, include CXCL4, CXCL4L1, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11. Upon CXCR3A activation these ELR-negative CXC chemokines mediate chemotactic and proliferative responses, for example in leukocytes. In contrast, CXCR3B induces anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects, as exemplified by angiostatic effects on endothelial cells. Taken together, the unusual and versatile characteristics of CXCR3 and its ligands form the basis for their pertinent involvement in a myriad of diseases. In this review, we discuss the presence and function of all CXCR3 ligands in various malignant, angiogenic, infectious, inflammatory and other disorders. By extension, we have also elaborated on the potential therapeutic applicability of CXCR3 ligand administration or blockade, as well as their additional value as predictive or prognostic biomarkers. This review illustrates the multifunctional, intriguing character of the various CXCR3-binding chemokines.

  15. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  16. Ammonia formation by metal-ligand cooperative hydrogenolysis of a nitrido ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askevold, Bjorn; Nieto, Jorge Torres; Tussupbayev, Samat; Diefenbach, Martin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Holthausen, Max C.; Schneider, Sven

    2011-07-01

    Bioinspired hydrogenation of N2 to ammonia at ambient conditions by stepwise nitrogen protonation/reduction with metal complexes in solution has experienced remarkable progress. In contrast, the highly desirable direct hydrogenation with H2 remains difficult. In analogy to the heterogeneously catalysed Haber-Bosch process, such a reaction is conceivable via metal-centred N2 splitting and unprecedented hydrogenolysis of the nitrido ligands to ammonia. We report the synthesis of a ruthenium(IV) nitrido complex. The high nucleophilicity of the nitrido ligand is demonstrated by unusual N-C coupling with π-acidic CO. Furthermore, the terminal nitrido ligand undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H2 at ambient conditions to produce ammonia in high yield. Kinetic and quantum chemical examinations of this reaction suggest cooperative behaviour of a phosphorus-nitrogen-phosphorus pincer ligand in rate-determining heterolytic hydrogen splitting.

  17. Thermodynamic proton-ligand and metal-ligand stability constants of some drugs.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y K; Patel, D R

    1986-02-01

    The thermodynamic proton-ligand (pKa) and metal-ligand stability constants of clioquinol, clofibrate, nitrofurazone, and tetracycline with Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ have been determined at 35 degrees C in 50% ethanol-water media. An empirical pH correction for mixed-aqueous media has been applied. The metal-ligand stability constants were determined by following the Bjerrum Calvin titration technique as applied by Agrawal to mixed-aqueous solvents. The effect of the basicity of the ligand and the order of stability constants is discussed. The stability constants of the divalent metals follow the order: Cu2+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Mn2+ greater than Mg2+ greater than Ca2+ with all the drugs.

  18. Dissociation of Multisubunit Protein-Ligand Complexes in the Gas Phase. Evidence for Ligand Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixuan; Deng, Lu; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2013-10-01

    The results of collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments performed on gaseous protonated and deprotonated ions of complexes of cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer (CTB5) with the pentasaccharide (β-D-Gal p-(1→3)-β-D-Gal pNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-D-Gal p-(1→4)-β-D-Glc p (GM1)) and corresponding glycosphingolipid (β-D-Gal p-(1→3)-β-D-Gal pNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-D-Gal p-(1→4)-β-D-Glc p-Cer (GM1-Cer)) ligands, and the homotetramer streptavidin (S4) with biotin (B) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(biotinyl) (Btl), are reported. The protonated (CTB5 + 5GM1)n+ ions dissociated predominantly by the loss of a single subunit, with the concomitant migration of ligand to another subunit. The simultaneous loss of ligand and subunit was observed as a minor pathway. In contrast, the deprotonated (CTB5 + 5GM1)n- ions dissociated preferentially by the loss of deprotonated ligand; the loss of ligand-bound and ligand-free subunit were minor pathways. The presence of ceramide (Cer) promoted ligand migration and the loss of subunit. The main dissociation pathway for the protonated and deprotonated (S4 + 4B)n+/- ions, as well as for deprotonated (S4 + 4Btl)n- ions, was loss of the ligand. However, subunit loss from the (S4 + 4B)n+ ions was observed as a minor pathway. The (S4 + 4Btl)n+ ions dissociated predominantly by the loss of free and ligand-bound subunit. The charge state of the complex and the collision energy were found to have little effect on the relative contribution of the different dissociation channels. Thermally-driven ligand migration between subunits was captured in the results of molecular dynamics simulations performed on protonated (CTB5 + 5GM1)15+ ions (with a range of charge configurations) at 800 K. Notably, the migration pathway was found to be highly dependent on the charge configuration of the ion. The main conclusion of this study is that the dissociation pathways of multisubunit protein-ligand

  19. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein–ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system

    PubMed Central

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein–ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein–ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments—the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein–ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pKa values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html. PMID:22669908

  20. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html.

  1. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    DOE PAGES

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; ...

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport inmore » germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.« less

  2. All-Inorganic Germanium Nanocrystal Films by Cationic Ligand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lance M; Nichols, Asa W; Chernomordik, Boris D; Anderson, Nicholas C; Beard, Matthew C; Neale, Nathan R

    2016-03-09

    We introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.

  3. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.

  4. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  5. Fusion of ligand-coated nanoparticles with lipid bilayers: effect of ligand flexibility.

    PubMed

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-08-07

    Amphiphilic, monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have recently been shown to insert into and fuse with lipid bilayers, driven by the hydrophobic effect. The inserted transmembrane state is stabilized by the "snorkeling" of charged ligand end groups out of the bilayer interior. This snorkeling process is facilitated by the backbone flexibility of the alkanethiol ligands that comprise the monolayer. In this work, we show that fusion is favorable even in the absence of backbone flexibility by modeling the ligands as rigid rods. For rigid ligands, snorkeling is still accommodated by rotations of the ligand with respect to the grafting point, but the process incurs a more significant free energy penalty than if the backbone were fully flexible. We show that the rigid rod model predicts similar trends in the free energy change for insertion as the previous flexible model when the size of the AuNPs is varied. However, the rigidity of the ligand backbone reduces the overall magnitude of the free energy change compared to that of the flexible model. These results thus generalize previous findings to systems with hindered backbone flexibility due to either structural constraints or low temperature.

  6. Amino Acids in Nine Ligand-Prefer Ramachandran Regions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Lincong; Chen, Xiaoyang; Zou, Shuxue; Wang, Guishen; Xu, Shutan

    2015-01-01

    Several secondary structures, such as π-helix and left-handed helix, have been frequently identified at protein ligand-binding sites. A secondary structure is considered to be constrained to a specific region of dihedral angles. However, a comprehensive analysis of the correlation between main chain dihedral angles and ligand-binding sites has not been performed. We undertook an extensive analysis of the relationship between dihedral angles in proteins and their distance to ligand-binding sites, frequency of occurrence, molecular potential energy, amino acid composition, van der Waals contacts, and hydrogen bonds with ligands. The results showed that the values of dihedral angles have a strong preference for ligand-binding sites at certain regions in the Ramachandran plot. We discovered that amino acids preceding the ligand-prefer ϕ/ψ box residues are exposed more to solvents, whereas amino acids following ligand-prefer ϕ/ψ box residues form more hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts with ligands. Our method exhibited a similar performance compared with the program Ligsite-csc for both ligand-bound structures and ligand-free structures when just one ligand-binding site was predicted. These results should be useful for the prediction of protein ligand-binding sites and for analysing the relationship between structure and function.

  7. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  8. Protein-ligand binding affinity determination by the waterLOGSY method: An optimised approach considering ligand rebinding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjie; Bonnichon, Arnaud; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.

    2017-01-01

    WaterLOGSY is a popular ligand-observed NMR technique to screen for protein-ligand interactions, yet when applied to measure dissociation constants (KD) through ligand titration, the results were found to be strongly dependent on sample conditions. Herein, we show that accurate KDs can be obtained by waterLOGSY with optimised experimental setup. PMID:28256624

  9. Protein-ligand binding affinity determination by the waterLOGSY method: An optimised approach considering ligand rebinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Renjie; Bonnichon, Arnaud; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.

    2017-03-01

    WaterLOGSY is a popular ligand-observed NMR technique to screen for protein-ligand interactions, yet when applied to measure dissociation constants (KD) through ligand titration, the results were found to be strongly dependent on sample conditions. Herein, we show that accurate KDs can be obtained by waterLOGSY with optimised experimental setup.

  10. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  11. Container molecules based on imine type ligands.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A Carina; Oppel, Iris M

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will give a short overview about container molecules, their synthesis and possible applications. The main focus is on those which are based on imine type ligands. These containers can be used for example for guest exchange, gas separation, as chemical sensors or for the stabilisation of white phosphorus under water. The described cages have wide openings or tightly closed ones. For one cage the reversible opening and closing is also described.

  12. galectin-3 ligand — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Galectin-3 is an endogenous lectin that binds glycan epitopes of cell membrane and some extracellular glycoproteins such as integrins and laminin. Galectin-3 is involved in several biological activities including regulation of cellular cycle, modulation of adhesion and tumor progression and metastasis. Serum galectin-3 ligands have been shown to modulate the immune reaction against tumors and viruses and their level increases in sera of several neoplastic diseases.

  13. Selective oxoanion separation using a tripodal ligand

    DOEpatents

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Rajbanshi, Arbin

    2016-02-16

    The present invention relates to urea-functionalized crystalline capsules self-assembled by sodium or potassium cation coordination and by hydrogen-bonding water bridges to selectively encapsulate tetrahedral divalent oxoanions from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions and methods using this system for selective anion separations from industrial solutions. The method involves competitive crystallizations using a tripodal tris(urea) functionalized ligand and, in particular, provides a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  14. Gated escaping of ligand out of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2000-01-01

    We construct a new gating model and develop a new theory to study the escaping process of a ligand out of a spherical cavity with a puncture (or gate) on the surface. The gate undulation can be regulated by any time-dependent function and the motion of the ligand inside the spherical cavity is mapped into a two-dimensional entropy potential surface. Hence the driving force of our model is entropy only. For a static gate, the escaping process corresponds to climbing a two-dimensional entropy barrier. When the gate open angle is small, the escaping rate is proportional to the square of the opening angle. The prefactor of the escaping rate constant depends on the curvature of the entropy potential surface. For coherent gating, the survival time depends not only on the gate undulation frequency but also on how the initial state is defined. On the escaping from protein, our escaping rate shows it is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result of ligand recombination in myoglobin.

  15. RAGE and its ligands in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Gaetano R; Schmidt, Ann M

    2007-12-01

    RAGE, the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), is a multiligand signal transduction receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. These diverse biologic disorders reflect the multiplicity of ligands capable of cellular interaction via RAGE that include, in addition to AGEs, amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, the S100/calgranulin family of proinflammatory cytokines, and amphoterin, a member of the High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) DNA-binding proteins. In the retina, RAGE expression is present in neural cells, the vasculature, and RPE cells, and it has also been detected in pathologic cellular retinal responses including epiretinal and neovascular membrane formation. Ligands for RAGE, in particular AGEs, have emerged as relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular disease. While the understanding of RAGE and its role in retinal dysfunction with aging, diabetes mellitus, and/or activation of pro-inflammatory pathways is less complete compared to other organ systems, increasing evidence indicates that RAGE can initiate and sustain significant cellular perturbations in the inner and outer retina. For these reasons, antagonism of RAGE interactions with its ligands may be a worthwhile therapeutic target in such seemingly disparate, visually threatening retinal diseases as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  16. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  17. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    SciTech Connect

    Evrard, Guillaume X. Langer, Gerrit G.; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the ligand-building module of the ARP/wARP software suite is assessed through a large-scale test on known protein–ligand complexes. The results provide a detailed benchmark and guidelines for future improvements. The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  18. The Recognition of Identical Ligands by Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barelier, Sarah; Sterling, Teague; O'Meara, Matthew J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    The binding of drugs and reagents to off-targets is well-known. Whereas many off-targets are related to the primary target by sequence and fold, many ligands bind to unrelated pairs of proteins, and these are harder to anticipate. If the binding site in the off-target can be related to that of the primary target, this challenge resolves into aligning the two pockets. However, other cases are possible: the ligand might interact with entirely different residues and environments in the off-target, or wholly different ligand atoms may be implicated in the two complexes. To investigate these scenarios at atomic resolution, the structures of 59 ligands in 116 complexes (62 pairs in total), where the protein pairs were unrelated by fold but bound an identical ligand, were examined. In almost half of the pairs, the ligand interacted with unrelated residues in the two proteins (29 pairs), and in 14 of the pairs wholly different ligand moieties were implicated in each complex. Even in those 19 pairs of complexes that presented similar environments to the ligand, ligand superposition rarely resulted in the overlap of related residues. There appears to be no single pattern-matching “code” for identifying binding sites in unrelated proteins that bind identical ligands, though modeling suggests that there might be a limited number of different patterns that suffice to recognize different ligand functional groups. PMID:26421501

  19. Identification of Ligand-Receptor Interactions: Ligand Molecular Arrays, SPR and NMR Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Korolik, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Despite many years of research into bacterial chemotaxis, the only well characterized system to date is that of E. coli. Even for E. coli, the direct ligand binding had been fully characterized only for aspartate and serene receptors Tar and Tsr. In 30 years since, no other direct receptor-ligand interaction had been described for bacteria, until the characterization of the C. jejuni aspartate and multiligand receptors (Hartley-Tassell et al. Mol Microbiol 75:710-730, 2010). While signal transduction components of many sensory pathways have now been characterized, ligand-receptor interactions remain elusive due to paucity of high-throughput screening methods. Here, we describe the use of microarray screening we developed to identify ligands, surface plasmon resonance, and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) we used to verify the hits and to determine the affinity constants of the interactions, allowing for more targeted verification of ligands with traditional chemotaxis and in vivo assays described in Chapter 13 .

  20. Nanoparticle multivalency counterbalances the ligand affinity loss upon PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Robert; Pollinger, Klaus; Veser, Anika; Breunig, Miriam; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-11-28

    The conjugation of receptor ligands to shielded nanoparticles is a widely used strategy to precisely control nanoparticle-cell interactions. However, it is often overlooked that a ligand's affinity can be severely impaired by its attachment to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains that are frequently used to protect colloids from serum protein adsorption. Using the model ligand EXP3174, a small-molecule antagonist for the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R), we investigated the ligand's affinity before and after its PEGylation and when attached to PEGylated nanoparticles. The PEGylated ligand displayed a 580-fold decreased receptor affinity compared to the native ligand. Due to their multivalency, the nanoparticles regained a low nanomolar receptor affinity, which is in the range of the affinity of the native ligand. Moreover, a four orders of magnitude higher concentration of free ligand was required to displace PEGylated nanoparticles carrying EXP3174 from the receptor. On average, one nanoparticle was decorated with 11.2 ligand molecules, which led to a multivalent enhancement factor of 22.5 compared to the monovalent PEGylated ligand. The targeted nanoparticles specifically bound the AT1R and showed no interaction to receptor negative cells. Our study shows that the attachment of a small-molecule ligand to a PEG chain can severely affect its receptor affinity. Concomitantly, when the ligand is tethered to nanoparticles, the immense avidity greatly increases the ligand-receptor interaction. Based on our results, we highly recommend the affinity testing of receptor ligands before and after PEGylation to identify potent molecules for active nanoparticle targeting.

  1. A chemogenomics view on protein-ligand spaces

    PubMed Central

    Strömbergsson, Helena; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemogenomics is an emerging inter-disciplinary approach to drug discovery that combines traditional ligand-based approaches with biological information on drug targets and lies at the interface of chemistry, biology and informatics. The ultimate goal in chemogenomics is to understand molecular recognition between all possible ligands and all possible drug targets. Protein and ligand space have previously been studied as separate entities, but chemogenomics studies deal with large datasets that cover parts of the joint protein-ligand space. Since drug discovery has traditionally focused on ligand optimization, the chemical space has been studied extensively. The protein space has been studied to some extent, typically for the purpose of classification of proteins into functional and structural classes. Since chemogenomics deals not only with ligands but also with the macromolecules the ligands interact with, it is of interest to find means to explore, compare and visualize protein-ligand subspaces. Results Two chemogenomics protein-ligand interaction datasets were prepared for this study. The first dataset covers the known structural protein-ligand space, and includes all non-redundant protein-ligand interactions found in the worldwide Protein Data Bank (PDB). The second dataset contains all approved drugs and drug targets stored in the DrugBank database, and represents the approved drug-drug target space. To capture biological and physicochemical features of the chemogenomics datasets, sequence-based descriptors were computed for the proteins, and 0, 1 and 2 dimensional descriptors for the ligands. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the multidimensional data and to create global models of protein-ligand space. The nearest neighbour method, computed using the principal components, was used to obtain a measure of overlap between the datasets. Conclusion In this study, we present an approach to visualize protein-ligand spaces from a

  2. Evaluation of small ligand-protein interaction by ligation reaction with DNA-modified ligand.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Rie; Mie, Masayasu; Funabashi, Hisakage; Kobatake, Eiry

    2010-01-01

    A method for the evaluation of interactions between protein and ligand using DNA-modified ligands, including signal enhancement of the DNA ligation reactions, is described. For proof of principle, a DNA probe modified by biotin was used. Two DNA probes were prepared with complementary sticky-ends. While one DNA probe was modified at the 5'-end of the sticky-end, the other was not modified. The probes could be ligated together by T4 DNA ligase along the strand without biotin modification. However, in the presence of streptavidin or anti-biotin Fab, the ligation reaction joining the two probes could not occur on either strand.

  3. Landscape of protein–small ligand binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small‐molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long‐standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein–ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all‐against‐all comparison of 20,040 protein–ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein–ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein‐ and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R 2 = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein–ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  4. Ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines undergoing clinical evaluation: current status.

    PubMed

    van der Meel, Roy; Vehmeijer, Laurens J C; Kok, Robbert J; Storm, Gert; van Gaal, Ethlinn V B

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of Doxil® on the market nearly 20years ago, a number of nanomedicines have become part of treatment regimens in the clinic. With the exception of antibody-drug conjugates, these nanomedicines are all devoid of targeting ligands and rely solely on their physicochemical properties and the (patho)physiological processes in the body for their biodistribution and targeting capability. At the same time, many preclinical studies have reported on nanomedicines exposing targeting ligands, or ligand-targeted nanomedicines, yet none of these have been approved at this moment. In the present review, we provide a concise overview of 13 ligand-targeted particulate nanomedicines (ligand-targeted PNMs) that have progressed into clinical trials. The progress of each ligand-targeted PNM is discussed based on available (pre)clinical data. Main conclusions of these analyses are that (a) ligand-targeted PNMs have proven to be safe and efficacious in preclinical models; (b) the vast majority of ligand-targeted PNMs is generated for the treatment of cancer; (c) contribution of targeting ligands to the PNM efficacy is not unambiguously proven; and (d) targeting ligands do not cause localization of the PNM within the target tissue, but rather provide benefits in terms of target cell internalization and target tissue retention once the PNM has arrived at the target site. Increased understanding of the in vivo fate and interactions of the ligand-targeted PNMs with proteins and cells in the human body is mandatory to rationally advance the clinical translation of ligand-targeted PNMs. Future perspectives for ligand-targeted PNM approaches include the delivery of drugs that are unable or inefficient in passing cellular membranes, treatment of drug resistant tumors, targeting of the tumor blood supply, the generation of targeted vaccines and nanomedicines that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  5. (Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX' complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  6. Transmutable nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngeun; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-02-01

    Unlike conventional inorganic materials, biological systems are exquisitely adapted to respond to their surroundings. Proteins and other biological molecules can process a complex set of chemical binding events as informational inputs and respond accordingly via a change in structure and function. We applied this principle to the design and synthesis of inorganic materials by preparing nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands, where interparticle bonding can be programmed in response to specific chemical cues in a dynamic manner. As a result, a nascent set of “transmutable nanoparticles” can be driven to crystallize along multiple thermodynamic trajectories, resulting in rational control over the phase and time evolution of nanoparticle-based matter.

  7. Differential Effects of TR Ligands on Hormone Dissociation Rates: Evidence for Multiple Ligand Entry/Exit Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Suzana T. Cunha; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ha; Togashi, Marie; Apriletti, James W.; Nguyen, Phuong; Polikarpov, Igor; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Baxter, John D.; Webb, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Some nuclear receptor (NR) ligands promote dissociation of radiolabeled bound hormone from the buried ligand binding cavity (LBC) more rapidly than excess unlabeled hormone itself. This result was interpreted to mean that challenger ligands bind allosteric sites on the LBD to induce hormone dissociation, and recent findings indicate that ligands bind weakly to multiple sites on the LBD surface. Here, we show that a large fraction of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) ligands promote rapid dissociation (T1/2 <2 hours) of radiolabeled T3 versus T3 (T1/2 ≈5–7 hours). We cannot discern relationships between this effect and ligand size, activity or affinity for TRβ. One ligand, GC-24, binds the TR LBC and (weakly) to the TRβ-LBD surface that mediates dimer/heterodimer interaction, but we cannot link this interaction to rapid T3 dissociation. Instead, several lines of evidence suggest that the challenger ligand must interact with the buried LBC to promote rapid T3 release. Since previous molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TR ligands leave the LBC by several routes, we propose that a subset of challenger ligands binds and stabilizes a partially unfolded intermediate state of TR that arises during T3 release and that this effect enhances hormone dissociation. PMID:19729063

  8. Does the ligand-biopolymer equilibrium binding constant depend on the number of bound ligands?

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2010-11-01

    Conventional methods, such as Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel analyses, used to treat ligand-biopolymer interactions, indirectly make the assumption that the microscopic binding constant is independent of the number of ligands, i, already bound to the biopolymer. Recent results on the aggregation of aromatic molecules (Beshnova et al., J Chem Phys 2009, 130, 165105) indicated that the equilibrium constant of self-association depends intrinsically on the number of molecules in an aggregate due to loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on formation of the complex. The influence of these factors on the equilibrium binding constant for ligand-biopolymer complexation was analyzed in this work. It was shown that under the conditions of binding of "small" molecules, these factors can effectively be ignored and, hence, do not provide any hidden systematic error in such widely-used approaches, such as the Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel methods for analyzing ligand-biopolymer complexation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 932-935, 2010.

  9. SuperLigands – a database of ligand structures derived from the Protein Data Bank

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Elke; Dunkel, Mathias; Goede, Andrean; Preissner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, the PDB contains approximately 29,000 protein structures comprising over 70,000 experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of over 5,000 different low molecular weight compounds. Information about these PDB ligands can be very helpful in the field of molecular modelling and prediction, particularly for the prediction of protein binding sites and function. Description Here we present an Internet accessible database delivering PDB ligands in the MDL Mol file format which, in contrast to the PDB format, includes information about bond types. Structural similarity of the compounds can be detected by calculation of Tanimoto coefficients and by three-dimensional superposition. Topological similarity of PDB ligands to known drugs can be assessed via Tanimoto coefficients. Conclusion SuperLigands supplements the set of existing resources of information about small molecules bound to PDB structures. Allowing for three-dimensional comparison of the compounds as a novel feature, this database represents a valuable means of analysis and prediction in the field of biological and medical research. PMID:15943884

  10. DNA-ligand interactions gained and lost: light-induced ligand redistribution in a supramolecular cascade.

    PubMed

    Berdnikova, Daria V; Aliyeu, Tseimur M; Paululat, Thomas; Fedorov, Yuri V; Fedorova, Olga A; Ihmels, Heiko

    2015-03-21

    A supramolecular five-component cascade is presented that enables light-controlled transport of an in situ modified ligand between three host systems based on the different complexation preferences of cyclodextrin, cucurbituril, and double-stranded DNA. The results point out novel approaches for the control of drug-DNA interactions in DNA-targeting therapy.

  11. Phenotypic spandrel: absolute discrimination and ligand antagonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Paul; Hemery, Mathieu; Johnson, Kyle A.; Saunders, Laura N.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the general problem of sensitive and specific discrimination between biochemical species. An important instance is immune discrimination between self and not-self, where it is also observed experimentally that ligands just below the discrimination threshold negatively impact response, a phenomenon called antagonism. We characterize mathematically the generic properties of such discrimination, first relating it to biochemical adaptation. Then, based on basic biochemical rules, we establish that, surprisingly, antagonism is a generic consequence of any strictly specific discrimination made independently from ligand concentration. Thus antagonism constitutes a ‘phenotypic spandrel’: a phenotype existing as a necessary by-product of another phenotype. We exhibit a simple analytic model of discrimination displaying antagonism, where antagonism strength is linear in distance from the detection threshold. This contrasts with traditional proofreading based models where antagonism vanishes far from threshold and thus displays an inverted hierarchy of antagonism compared to simpler models. The phenotypic spandrel studied here is expected to structure many decision pathways such as immune detection mediated by TCRs and FCɛRIs, as well as endocrine signalling/disruption.

  12. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  13. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-08-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display.

  14. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display. PMID:27578501

  15. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  16. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  17. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of POSS ligand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyoligosilsesquioxanes are molecules having cage-like structures composed of silicon and oxygen. These molecules can have a wide variety of functional ligands attached to them. Depending on the nature of the ligand, interesting properties and applications are found. In this work we present results from quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of four different POSS molecules that illustrate the presence of strong coupling between the ligand dynamics and the POSS crystal structures.

  18. Mixed Extracellular Matrix Ligands Synergistically Modulate Integrin Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Catherine D.; Petrie, Timothy A.; García, Andrés J

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components through cell-surface integrin receptors is essential to the formation, maintenance and repair of numerous tissues, and therefore represents a central theme in the design of bioactive materials that successfully interface with the body. While the adhesive responses associated with a single ligand have been extensively analyzed, the effects of multiple integrin subtypes binding to multivalent ECM signals remain poorly understood. In the present study, we generated a high throughput platform of non-adhesive surfaces presenting well-defined, independent densities of two integrin-specific engineered ligands for the type I collagen (COL-I) receptor α2β1 and the fibronectin (FN) receptor α5β1 to evaluate the effects of integrin cross-talk on adhesive responses. Engineered surfaces displayed ligand density-dependent adhesive effects, and mixed ligand surfaces significantly enhanced cell adhesion strength and focal adhesion assembly compared to single FN and COL-I ligand surfaces. Moreover, surfaces presenting mixed COL-I/FN ligands synergistically enhanced FAK activation compared to the single ligand substrates. The enhanced adhesive activities of the mixed ligand surfaces also promoted elevated proliferation rates. Our results demonstrate interplay between multivalent ECM ligands in adhesive responses and downstream cellular signaling. PMID:18613064

  19. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  20. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands.

  1. ADAM Proteases: Ligand Processing and Modulation of the Notch Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zolkiewska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    ADAM metalloproteases play important roles in development and disease. One of the key functions of ADAMs is the proteolytic processing of Notch receptors and their ligands. ADAM-mediated cleavage of Notch represents the first step of the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the receptor, leading to activation of the Notch pathway. Recent reports indicate that the transmembrane Notch ligands also undergo ADAM-mediated processing in cultured cells and in vivo. The proteolytic processing of Notch ligands modulates the strength and duration of Notch signals, leads to generation of soluble intracellular domains of the ligands, and may support a bi-directional signaling between cells. PMID:18344021

  2. Hysteresis of ligand binding in CNGA2 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Benndorf, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate receptor potentials in olfaction and vision. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a binding domain embedded in the C terminus of each subunit. Here using a fluorescent cGMP derivative (fcGMP), we show for homotetrameric CNGA2 channels that ligand unbinding is ~50 times faster at saturating than at subsaturating fcGMP. Analysis with complex Markovian models reveals two pathways for ligand unbinding; the partially liganded open channel unbinds its ligands from closed states only, whereas the fully liganded channel reaches a different open state from which it unbinds all four ligands rapidly. Consequently, the transition pathways for ligand binding and activation of a fully liganded CNGA2 channel differ from that of ligand unbinding and deactivation, resulting in pronounced hysteresis of the gating mechanism. This concentration-dependent gating mechanism allows the channels to respond to changes in the cyclic nucleotide concentration with different kinetics. PMID:24287615

  3. Riboswitch Structure: an Internal Residue Mimicking the Purine Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, V.; Bouchard, P; Bonneau, E; Dagenais, P; Lemay, J; Lafontaine, D; Legault, P

    2009-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson-Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39-C65 and A39-U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation.

  4. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  5. Design of targeting ligands in medicinal inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Storr, Tim; Thompson, Katherine H; Orvig, Chris

    2006-06-01

    This tutorial review will highlight recent advances in medicinal inorganic chemistry pertaining to the use of multifunctional ligands for enhanced effect. Ligands that adequately bind metal ions and also include specific targeting features are gaining in popularity due to their ability to enhance the efficacy of less complicated metal-based agents. Moving beyond the traditional view of ligands modifying reactivity, stabilizing specific oxidation states, and contributing to substitution inertness, we will discuss recent work involving metal complexes with multifunctional ligands that target specific tissues, membrane receptors, or endogenous molecules, including enzymes.

  6. Ultrafast heme-ligand recombination in truncated hemoglobin HbO from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A ligand cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Ouellet, Hugues; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Jean-Louis; Friedman, Joel M.; Guertin, Michel; Vos, Marten H.

    2012-03-01

    Truncated hemoglobin HbO from Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays very slow exchange of diatomic ligands with its environment. Using femtosecond spectroscopy, we show that upon photoexcitation, ligands rebind with unusual speed and efficiency. Only ˜1% O2 can escape from the heme pocket and less than 1% NO. Most remarkably, CO rebinding occurs for 95%, predominantly in 1.2 ns. The general CO rebinding properties are unexpectedly robust against changes in the interactions with close by aromatic residues Trp88 (G8) and Tyr36 (CD1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the CO complex suggest that interactions of the ligand with structural water molecules as well as its rotational freedom play a role in the high reactivity of the ligand and the heme. The slow exchange of ligands between heme and environment may result from a combination of hindered ligand access to the heme pocket by the network of distal aromatic residues, and low escape probability from the pocket.

  7. LibME-automatic extraction of 3D ligand-binding motifs for mechanistic analysis of protein-ligand recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liang, Zhi; Teng, MaiKun; Niu, LiWen

    2016-12-01

    Identifying conserved binding motifs is an efficient way to study protein-ligand recognition. Most 3D binding motifs only contain information from the protein side, and so motifs that combine information from both protein and ligand sides are desired. Here, we propose an algorithm called LibME (Ligand-binding Motif Extractor), which automatically extracts 3D binding motifs composed of the target ligand and surrounding conserved residues. We show that the motifs extracted by LibME for ATP and its analogs are highly similar to well-known motifs reported by previous studies. The superiority of our method to handle flexible ligands was also demonstrated using isocitric acid as an example. Finally, we show that these motifs, together with their visual exhibition, permit better investigating and understanding of protein-ligand recognition process.

  8. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-06

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K.

  9. [Effect of ligand concentration on the precision of determining the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction by serial dilution methods].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2004-01-01

    Earlier we suggested the method of serial dilution, which allows one to determine the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction even if the reactants are in a mixture and their concentrations are unknown. The method is especially useful if the liability of studied receptor does not allow its separation from corresponding ligand. The important prerequisite of the method's precision is that the concentration of the ligand should be sufficiently high comparing to the concentration of the receptor. In the present paper it was demonstrated that the method allows one to obtain sufficiently good precision even in the case when the concentration of the ligand is only one tenth of the receptor concentration.

  10. Characterizing mixed phosphonic acid ligand capping on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using ligand exchange and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Lisowski, Carmen E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-03-01

    The ligand capping of phosphonic acid functionalized CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) was investigated with a combination of solution and solid-state (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two phosphonic acid ligands were used in the synthesis of the QDs, tetradecylphosphonic acid and ethylphosphonic acid. Both alkyl phosphonic acids showed broad liquid and solid-state (31) P NMR resonances for the bound ligands, indicative of heterogeneous binding to the QD surface. In order to quantify the two ligand populations on the surface, ligand exchange facilitated by phenylphosphonic acid resulted in the displacement of the ethylphosphonic acid and tetradecylphosphonic acid and allowed for quantification of the free ligands using (31) P liquid-state NMR. After washing away the free ligand, two broad resonances were observed in the liquids' (31) P NMR corresponding to the alkyl and aromatic phosphonic acids. The washed samples were analyzed via solid-state (31) P NMR, which confirmed the ligand populations on the surface following the ligand exchange process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands.

  12. Interaction between alkaline earth cations and oxo ligands: a DFT study of the affinity of Mg2+ for carbonyl ligands.

    PubMed

    Moreira da Costa, Leonardo; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Walkimar de M Carneiro, José

    2012-09-01

    The affinities of Mg(2+) for various substituted carbonyl ligands were determined at the DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) and semi-empirical (PM6) levels of theory. Two sets of carbonyl ligands were studied: monosubstituted [aldehydes R-CHO and RPh-CHO] and homodisubstituted [ketones R(2)C=O and (RPh)(2)C=O], where R = NH(2), OCH(3), OH, CH(3), H, F, Cl, Br, CN, or NO(2)). In the (RPh)(2)CO case, the R group was bonded to the para position of a phenyl ring. The enthalpies of interaction between the ligands and a pentaaquomagnesium(II) complex were calculated to determine the affinity of each ligand for the Mg(2+) cation and to correlate with geometrical and electronic parameters. These parameters exhibited the same trends for all of the ligands studied, showing that the affinity of Mg(2+) for electron-donating ligands is higher than its affinity for electron-withdrawing ligands. In the complexes, electron-donating groups increase both the electrostatic and the covalent components of the Mg-ligand interaction. This behavior correlates with the Mg-O(carbonyl) distance and the ligand electron-donor strength.

  13. Early development of sigma-receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Bhat, Rohit; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors (σ-1 and σ-2) are non-opioid proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders and cancer. The σ-1 subtype is a chaperon protein widely distributed in the CNS and peripheral tissues. These receptors are involved in the modulation of K(+)- and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling cascades at the endoplasmic reticulum and modulation of neurotransmitter release. σ-1 receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of neurophychiatric diseases (schizophrenia and depression) and cocaine addiction. σ-2 receptors are lipid raft proteins. They are highly expressed on many tumor cells and hence considered potential targets for anticancer drugs. σ receptors bind to a diverse class of pharmacological compounds like cocaine, methamphetamine, benzomorphans like (±)-pentazocine, (±)-SKF-10,047 and endogenous neurosteroids and sphingolipids. In this review we focus on the early development of σ receptor-specific ligands and radiolabeling agents.

  14. Phosphinothiolates as ligands for polyhydrido copper nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Huertos, Miguel A; Cano, Israel; Bandeira, Nuno A G; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Bo, Carles; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-12-01

    The reaction of [CuI(HSC6 H4 PPh2 )]2 with NaBH4 in CH2 Cl2 /EtOH led to air- and moisture-stable copper hydride nanoparticles (CuNPs) containing phosphinothiolates as new ligands, one of which was isolated by crystallization. The X-ray crystal structure of [Cu18 H7 L10 I] (L=(-) S(C6 H4 )PPh2 ) shows unprecedented features in its 28-atom framework (18 Cu and 10 S atoms). Seven hydrogen atoms, in hydride form, are needed for charge balance and were located by density functional theory methods. H2 was released from the copper hydride nanoparticles by thermolysis and visible light irradiation.

  15. Rational design of class I MHC ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, D.; Scapozza, L.; Folkers, G.; Daser, Angelika

    1995-04-01

    From the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of a class I MHC protein, several non natural peptides were designed in order to either optimize the interactions of one secondary anchor amino acid with its HLA binding pocket or to substitute the non interacting part with spacer residues. All peptides were synthesized and tested for binding to the class I MHC protein in an in vitro reconstitution assay. As predicted, the non natural peptides present an enhanced binding to the HLA-B27 molecule with respect to their natural parent peptides. This study constitutes the first step towards the rational design of non peptidic MHC ligands that should be very promising tools for the selective immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Ligand interactions with galactose oxidase: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between galactose oxidase and small molecules have been explored using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to detect complex formation and characterize the products. Anions bind directly to the cupric center in both active and inactive galactose oxidase, converting to complexes with optical and EPR spectra that are distinctly different from those of the starting aquo enzyme. Azide binding is coupled to stoichiometric proton uptake by the enzyme, reflecting the generation of a strong base (pKa > 9) in the active site anion adduct. At low temperature, the aquo enzyme converts to a form that exhibits the characteristic optical and EPR spectra of an anion complex, apparently reflecting deprotonation of the coordinated water. Anion binding results in a loss of the optical transition arising from coordinated tyrosine, implying displacement of the axial tyrosine ligand on forming the adduct. Nitric oxide binds to galactose oxidase, forming a specific complex exhibiting an unusual EPR spectrum with all g values below 2. The absence of Cu splitting in this spectrum and the observation that the cupric EPR signal from the active site metal ion is not significantly decreased in the complex suggest a nonmetal interaction site for NO in galactose oxidase. These results have been interpreted in terms of a mechanistic scheme where substrate binding displaces a tyrosinate ligand from the active site cupric ion, generating a base that may serve to deprotonate the coordinated hydroxyl group of the substrate, activating it for oxidation. The protein-NO interactions may probe a nonmetal O2 binding site in this enzyme. PMID:8386015

  17. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  18. How to Compute Labile Metal-Ligand Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The different methods used for computing labile metal-ligand complexes, which are suitable for an iterative computer solution, are illustrated. The ligand function has allowed students to relegate otherwise tedious iterations to a computer, while retaining complete control over what is calculated.

  19. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Pawel A.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Kelley, Brian P.; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.; Adams, Paul D.; Warren, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX–AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX–AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein–ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX–AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX–AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands. PMID:27599738

  20. Regulation of ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Anita R; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of an encounter between a cytotoxic cell and a potential target cell depends on the balance of signals from inhibitory and activating receptors. Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) has recently emerged as a major activating receptor on T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In both humans and mice, multiple different genes encode ligands for NKG2D, and these ligands are non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The NKG2D–ligand interaction triggers an activating signal in the cell expressing NKG2D and this promotes cytotoxic lysis of the cell expressing the ligand. Most normal tissues do not express ligands for NKG2D, but ligand expression has been documented in tumour and virus-infected cells, leading to lysis of these cells. Tight regulation of ligand expression is important. If there is inappropriate expression in normal tissues, this will favour autoimmune processes, whilst failure to up-regulate the ligands in pathological conditions would favour cancer development or dissemination of intracellular infection. PMID:17614877

  1. Technetium radiodiagnostic fatty acids derived from bisamide bisthiol ligands

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Lister-James, John; Davison, Alan

    1988-05-24

    A bisamide-bisthiol ligand containing fatty acid substituted thiol useful for producing Tc-labelled radiodiagnostic imaging agents is described. The ligand forms a complex with the radionuclide .sup.99m Tc suitable for administration as a radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of the heart for diagnosis of myocardial disfunction.

  2. Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Correia, Bruno E.; Lum, Kenneth M.; Forli, Stefano; Horning, Benjamin D.; González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Chatterjee, Sandip; Lanning, Bryan R.; Teijaro, John R.; Olson, Arthur J.; Wolan, Dennis W.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are powerful tools for investigating protein function and can serve as leads for new therapeutics. Most human proteins, however, lack small-molecule ligands, and entire protein classes are considered “undruggable” 1,2. Fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD) can identify small-molecule probes for proteins that have proven difficult to target using high-throughput screening of complex compound libraries 1,3. Although reversibly binding ligands are commonly pursued, covalent fragments provide an alternative route to small-molecule probes 4–10, including those that can access regions of proteins that are difficult to access through binding affinity alone 5,10,11. In this manuscript, we report a quantitative analysis of cysteine-reactive small-molecule fragments screened against thousands of proteins. Covalent ligands were identified for >700 cysteines found in both druggable proteins and proteins deficient in chemical probes, including transcription factors, adaptor/scaffolding proteins, and uncharacterized proteins. Among the atypical ligand-protein interactions discovered were compounds that react preferentially with pro- (inactive) caspases. We used these ligands to distinguish extrinsic apoptosis pathways in human cell lines versus primary human T-cells, showing that the former is largely mediated by caspase-8 while the latter depends on both caspase-8 and −10. Fragment-based covalent ligand discovery provides a greatly expanded portrait of the ligandable proteome and furnishes compounds that can illuminate protein functions in native biological systems. PMID:27309814

  3. [Peripheral effects of ligands of ORL1 receptors].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Calo, G; Ma, L; Lambert, D G

    2003-01-01

    It has been discussed literature data on the role for ORL1 (NOR) receptors in the regulation of function of gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, endocrine systems. In addition, it has been discussed a possibility of penetration of blood brain barrier for ORL1 receptor ligands and species dependence of NOR-ligands' effects.

  4. Multifunctional ligand for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1996-05-14

    A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical are revealed. The ligand comprises either a phosphorous or germanium core and at least two hydrazine groups forming a ligand for bonding to a metal extending from the phosphorous or germanium core.

  5. Digestive Ripening of Au Nanoparticles Using Multidentate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Puspanjali; Shimpi, Jayesh; Lee, Han Ju; Lee, T Randall; Prasad, Bhagavatula L V

    2017-02-16

    The efficiency of multidentate ligands as digestive ripening (DR) agents for the preparation of monodisperse Au nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. This systematic investigation was performed using ligands possessing one, two, or three thiol moieties as ligands/DR agents. Our results clearly establish that among the different ligands, monodentate ligands and the use of temperature in the range of 60-120 °C offer the best conditions for DR. In addition, when DR was carried out at lower temperatures (e.g., 60 °C), the NP size increased as the number of thiol groups per ligand increased. However, in the case of ligands possessing two and three thiol moieties, when they were heated with polydispersed particles at higher temperatures (120 or 180 °C), the etching process dominated, which affected the quality of the NPs in terms of their monodispersity. We conclude that the temperature-dependent strength of the interaction between the ligand headgroup and the NP surface plays a vital role in controlling the final particle sizes.

  6. Ligand-modified metal clusters for gas separation and purification

    DOEpatents

    Okrut, Alexander; Ouyang, Xiaoying; Runnebaum, Ron; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    Provided is an organic ligand-bound metal surface that selects one gaseous species over another. The species can be closely sized molecular species having less than 1 Angstrom difference in kinetic diameter. In one embodiment, the species comprise carbon monoxide and ethylene. Such organic ligand-bound metal surfaces can be successfully used in gas phase separations or purifications, sensing, and in catalysis.

  7. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Marc C.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  8. Polymerization catalysts containing electron-withdrawing amide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Watkin, John G.; Click, Damon R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention describes methods of making a series of amine-containing organic compounds which are used as ligands for group 3-10 and lanthanide metal compounds. The ligands have electron-withdrawing groups bonded to them. The metal compounds, when combined with a cocatalyst, are catalysts for the polymerization of olefins.

  9. An agent based model of integrin clustering: Exploring the role of ligand clustering, integrin homo-oligomerization, integrin-ligand affinity, membrane crowdedness and ligand mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Yousef; Jamali, Tahereh; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2013-07-01

    Integrins are cell-surface protein heterodimers that coordinate cellular responses to mechanochemical cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM) and stimulate the assembly of small adhesion complexes, which are the initial sites of cell-ECM adhesion. Clustering of integrins is known to mediate signaling through a variety of signal transduction pathways. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of integrin clustering are poorly understood. In this paper, we develop computational models, using agent based modeling (ABM) techniques, to explore two key underlying mechanisms of integrin clustering, namely ligand organization and integrin homo-oligomerization. Our models help to shed light on the potential roles ligand clustering and integrin homo-oligomerization may play in controlling integrin clustering. A potential mechanism for the clustering of integrin is discussed and the effects of other parameters such as integrin-ligand affinity, membrane crowdedness and ligand mobility on integrin clustering are examined.

  10. Enthalpy of ligand substitution in cis organopalladium complexes with monodentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Salas, Gorka; Casares, Juan A; Espinet, Pablo

    2009-10-21

    The enthalpy for the substitution reaction cis-[PdRf(2)(THF)(2)] + 2 L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(2)] + 2THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) has been measured in THF by calorimetric methods for Rf = 3,5-dichloro-2,4,6-trifluorophenyl, L = PPh(3), AsPh(3), SbPh(3), PMePh(2), PCyPh(2), PMe(3), AsMePh(2), or L(2) = dppe (1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane), dppf (1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene). The values determined show that the substitution enthalpy has a strong dependence on the electronic and steric properties of the ligand. The study of the consecutive substitution reactions cis-[PdRf(2)(THF)(2)] + L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(THF)] + THF, and cis-[PdRf(2)L(THF)] + L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(2)] + THF has been carried our for L = PPh(3) and L = PCyPh(2). The first substitution is clearly more favorable for the bulkier leaving ligand, but the second gives practically the same DeltaH value for both cases, indicating that the differences in steric hindrance happen to compensate the electronic differences for both ligands. The X-ray structures of cis-[PdRf(2)(PMePh(2))(2)], cis-[PdRf(2)(dppe)] and cis-[PdRf(2)(dppf)] are reported.

  11. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  12. Predicting protein-ligand affinity with a random matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Brenner, Michael P; Colwell, Lucy J

    2016-11-29

    Rapid determination of whether a candidate compound will bind to a particular target receptor remains a stumbling block in drug discovery. We use an approach inspired by random matrix theory to decompose the known ligand set of a target in terms of orthogonal "signals" of salient chemical features, and distinguish these from the much larger set of ligand chemical features that are not relevant for binding to that particular target receptor. After removing the noise caused by finite sampling, we show that the similarity of an unknown ligand to the remaining, cleaned chemical features is a robust predictor of ligand-target affinity, performing as well or better than any algorithm in the published literature. We interpret our algorithm as deriving a model for the binding energy between a target receptor and the set of known ligands, where the underlying binding energy model is related to the classic Ising model in statistical physics.

  13. Exploiting Ultra Tight-Binding Ligands for Separations Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Daryle; Givens, Richard S.; Zuo, Xiaobin; Zhang, Chi; Mosha, Donnati; Lee, Jong0Ill; Bushan, K. Mani; Hassan, Mansour M.; Loving, Galen

    2003-09-10

    The classic slowness that has kept the most powerful ligands from being used in separations applications is under attack in two ways: (1) replacing metal ion - ligand equilibration with switch binding and release as the mode of complexation. By exploiting the tight-binding capabilities of cryptands, the capture of selected metal ions isolates them from their environment. These cryptands are constructed with photoactivatable functions that sever the cryptand, releasing encapsulated metal ions. The precursors have been modified to capture the metal ion concomitant with crytate formation. (2) developing a methodology (the soil poultice) so slow that powerful ligands can be used. A solution containing the specially designed ligand is mixed with a solid macroporous imprinted polymer (MIPs) and applied to the contaminated area. The ligand captures the metal ion and the MIPs captures the resulting complex. Current studies focus on combinations of MIPs-complex interactions to optimize strength of binding and selectivity.

  14. Development of chiral sulfoxide ligands for asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Rao, Meera

    2015-04-20

    Nitrogen-, phosphorus-, and oxygen-based ligands with chiral backbones have been the historic workhorses of asymmetric transition-metal-catalyzed reactions. On the contrary, sulfoxides containing chirality at the sulfur atom have mainly been used as chiral auxiliaries for diastereoselective reactions. Despite several distinct advantages over traditional ligand scaffolds, such as the proximity of the chiral information to the metal center and the ability to switch between S and O coordination, these compounds have only recently emerged as a versatile class of chiral ligands. In this Review, we detail the history of the development of chiral sulfoxide ligands for asymmetric catalysis. We also provide brief descriptions of metal-sulfoxide bonding and strategies for the synthesis of enantiopure sulfoxides. Finally, insights into the future development of this underutilized ligand class are discussed.

  15. Ligand binding was acquired during evolution of nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Escriva, Hector; Safi, Rachid; Hänni, Catherine; Langlois, Marie-Claire; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Stehelin, Dominique; Capron, André; Pierce, Raymond; Laudet, Vincent

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily comprises, in addition to ligand-activated transcription factors, members for which no ligand has been identified to date. We demonstrate that orphan receptors are randomly distributed in the evolutionary tree and that there is no relationship between the position of a given liganded receptor in the tree and the chemical nature of its ligand. NRs are specific to metazoans, as revealed by a screen of NR-related sequences in early- and non-metazoan organisms. The analysis of the NR gene duplication pattern during the evolution of metazoans shows that the present NR diversity arose from two waves of gene duplications. Strikingly, our results suggest that the ancestral NR was an orphan receptor that acquired ligand-binding ability during subsequent evolution. PMID:9192646

  16. Non-aqueous chemistry of uranyl complexes with tripodal ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Carol J.; Clark, David L.; Duval, Paul B.; Scott, Brian L.

    2000-07-01

    The trans dioxo uranyl(VI) ion (UO22+) is remarkably stable with respect to the U=O bond, which dominates the stereochemistry of its coordination compounds in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The linear O=U=O unit directs all other ligands to coordinate in an equatorial plane perpendicular to the O=U=O axis. In aqueous solution, uranyl coordination chemistry has been developed with a wide array of weak-field ligands that coordinate in the equatorial plane. In contrast, non-aqueous uranyl chemistry incorporating stronger donor ligands at equatorial sites has been less well developed. In this paper, the use of tripodal ligands with strong amide and alkoxide donors is employed, with an aim towards probing the electronic and steric effects of these cis-directing ligands on the structure and bonding of the trans dioxo unit.

  17. CD22 regulates B lymphocyte function in vivo through both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Poe, Jonathan C; Fujimoto, Yoko; Hasegawa, Minoru; Haas, Karen M; Miller, Ann S; Sanford, Isaac G; Bock, Cheryl B; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tedder, Thomas F

    2004-10-01

    The interaction of CD22 with alpha2,6-linked sialic acid ligands has been widely proposed to regulate B lymphocyte function and migration. Here, we generated gene-targeted mice that express mutant CD22 molecules that do not interact with these ligands. CD22 ligand binding regulated the expression of cell surface CD22, immunoglobulin M and major histocompatibility complex class II on mature B cells, maintenance of the marginal zone B cell population, optimal B cell antigen receptor-induced proliferation, and B cell turnover rates. However, CD22 negative regulation of calcium mobilization after B cell antigen receptor ligation, CD22 phosphorylation, recruitment of SHP-1 to CD22 and B cell migration did not require CD22 ligand engagement. These observations resolve longstanding questions regarding the physiological importance of CD22 ligand binding in the regulation of B cell function in vivo.

  18. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  19. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  20. Electronic spectra and photophysics of platinum(II) complexes with alpha-diimine ligands - Solid-state effects. I - Monomers and ligand pi dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskowski, Vincent M.; Houlding, Virginia H.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of emission behavior for Pt(II) complexes containing alpha-diimine ligands have been observed in dilute solution. If the complex also has weak field ligands such as chloride, ligand field (d-d) excited states become the lowest energy excited states. If only strong field ligands are present, a diimine 3(pi-pi/asterisk/) state becomes the lowest. In none of the cases studied did metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state lie lowest.

  1. Brain endogenous liver X receptor ligands selectively promote midbrain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Wang, Yuqin; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Sacchetti, Paola; Sousa, Kyle M; Bodin, Karl; Kirk, Jayne; Saltó, Carmen; Gustafsson, Magnus; Toledo, Enrique M; Karu, Kersti; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J; Arenas, Ernest

    2013-02-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrα and Lxrβ) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors critical for ventral midbrain neurogenesis in vivo. However, no endogenous midbrain Lxr ligand has so far been identified. Here we used LC/MS and functional assays to identify cholic acid as a new Lxr ligand. Moreover, 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25-EC) was found to be the most potent and abundant Lxr ligand in the developing mouse midbrain. Both Lxr ligands promoted neural development in an Lxr-dependent manner in zebrafish in vivo. Notably, each ligand selectively regulated the development of distinct midbrain neuronal populations. Whereas cholic acid increased survival and neurogenesis of Brn3a-positive red nucleus neurons, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic neurogenesis. These results identify an entirely new class of highly selective and cell type-specific regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Moreover, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells, suggesting that Lxr ligands may thus contribute to the development of cell replacement and regenerative therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  2. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of small molecules with proteins (protein–ligand interactions) mediate various biological phenomena including signal transduction and protein transcription and translation. Synthetic compounds such as drugs can also bind to target proteins, leading to the inhibition of protein–ligand interactions. These interactions typically accompany association–dissociation equilibrium according to the free energy difference between free and bound states; therefore, the quantitative biophysical analysis of the interactions, which uncovers the stoichiometry and dissociation constant, is important for understanding biological reactions as well as for rational drug development. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to determine the precise molecular masses of molecules. Recent advancements in MS enable us to determine the molecular masses of protein–ligand complexes without disrupting the non-covalent interactions through the gentle desolvation of the complexes by increasing the vacuum pressure of a chamber in a mass spectrometer. This method is called MS under non-denaturing conditions or native MS and allows the unambiguous determination of protein–ligand interactions. Under a few assumptions, MS has also been applied to determine the dissociation constants for protein–ligand interactions. The structural information of a protein–ligand interaction, such as the location of the interaction and conformational change in a protein, can also be analyzed using hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS. In this paper, we briefly describe the history, principle, and recent applications of MS for the study of protein–ligand interactions. PMID:27924262

  3. BINANA: A Novel Algorithm for Ligand-Binding Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Computational chemists and structural biologists are often interested in characterizing ligand-receptor complexes for hydrogen-bond, hydrophobic, salt-bridge, van der Waals, and other interactions in order to assess ligand binding. When done by hand, this characterization can become tedious, especially when many complexes need be analyzed. In order to facilitate the characterization of ligand binding, we here present a novel Python-implemented computer algorithm called BINANA (BINding ANAlyzer), which is freely available for download at http://www.nbcr.net/binana/. To demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm, we use BINANA to confirm that the number of hydrophobic contacts between a ligand and its protein receptor is positively correlated with ligand potency. Additionally, we show how BINANA can be used to search through a large ligand-receptor database to identify those complexes that are remarkable for selected binding features, and to identify lead candidates from a virtual screen with specific, desirable binding characteristics. We are hopeful that BINANA will be useful to computational chemists and structural biologists who wish to automatically characterize many ligand-receptor complexes for key binding characteristics. PMID:21310640

  4. Novel biosensors for the detection of estrogen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    De, Siddhartha; Macara, Ian G; Lannigan, Deborah A

    2005-08-01

    There exists a significant need for the detection of novel estrogen receptor (ER) ligands for pharmaceutical uses, especially for treating complications associated with menopause. We have developed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors that permit the direct in vitro detection of ER ligands. These biosensors contain an ER ligand-binding domain (LBD) flanked by the FRET donor fluorophore, cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and the acceptor fluorophore, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). The ER-LBD has been modified so that Ala 430 has been changed to Asp, which increases the magnitude of the FRET signal in response to ligand-binding by more than four-fold compared to the wild-type LBD. The binding of agonists can be distinguished from that of antagonists on the basis of the distinct ligand-induced conformations in the ER-LBD. The approach to binding equilibrium occurs within 30min, and the FRET signal is stable over 24h. The biosensor demonstrates a high signal-to-noise, with a Z' value (a statistical determinant of assay quality) of 0.72. The affinity of the ER for different ligands can be determined using a modified version of the biosensor in which a truncated YFP and an enhanced CFP are used. Thus, we have developed platforms for high-throughput screens for the identification of novel estrogen receptor ligands. Moreover, we have demonstrated that this FRET technology can be applied to other nuclear receptors, such as the androgen receptor.

  5. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimont, Marta; Sun, Shan-Liang; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-03-10

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure-activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor-ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors.

  6. NMR-based analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Cala, Olivier; Guillière, Florence; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Physiological processes are mainly controlled by intermolecular recognition mechanisms involving protein-protein and protein-ligand (low molecular weight molecules) interactions. One of the most important tools for probing these interactions is high-field solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through protein-observed and ligand-observed experiments, where the protein receptor or the organic compounds are selectively detected. NMR binding experiments rely on comparison of NMR parameters of the free and bound states of the molecules. Ligand-observed methods are not limited by the protein molecular size and therefore have great applicability for analysing protein-ligand interactions. The use of these NMR techniques has considerably expanded in recent years, both in chemical biology and in drug discovery. We review here three major ligand-observed NMR methods that depend on the nuclear Overhauser effect-transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference spectroscopy and water-ligand interactions observed via gradient spectroscopy experiments-with the aim of reporting recent developments and applications for the characterization of protein-ligand complexes, including affinity measurements and structural determination.

  7. ZINC 15 – Ligand Discovery for Everyone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many questions about the biological activity and availability of small molecules remain inaccessible to investigators who could most benefit from their answers. To narrow the gap between chemoinformatics and biology, we have developed a suite of ligand annotation, purchasability, target, and biology association tools, incorporated into ZINC and meant for investigators who are not computer specialists. The new version contains over 120 million purchasable “drug-like” compounds – effectively all organic molecules that are for sale – a quarter of which are available for immediate delivery. ZINC connects purchasable compounds to high-value ones such as metabolites, drugs, natural products, and annotated compounds from the literature. Compounds may be accessed by the genes for which they are annotated as well as the major and minor target classes to which those genes belong. It offers new analysis tools that are easy for nonspecialists yet with few limitations for experts. ZINC retains its original 3D roots – all molecules are available in biologically relevant, ready-to-dock formats. ZINC is freely available at http://zinc15.docking.org. PMID:26479676

  8. Xylamine, a ligand for the catecholamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Waggaman, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have established xylamine (N-2'-chloro-ethyl-N-ethyl-2-methylbenzylamine) irreversibly inhibits neuronal norepinephrine uptake with no concomitant effect on other neurotransmitter systems. Since xylamine is thought to alkylate transport-associated sites in the plasma membrane of noradrenergic neurons, so the loss of endogenous norepinephrine may be a consequence of neuronal membrane damage resulting from the alkylation of membrane components. In these studies, xylamine, under in vitro conditions, irreversibly inhibited both neuronal norepinephrine and dopamine uptake in the rat cortex and striatum, respectively. The efficacy of xylamine as a neuronal dopamine uptake inhibitor appeared to depend on its ability to access dopaminergic neurons during tissue exposure to the drug. In sympathetically innervated peripheral tissues, (/sup 3/H)xylamine was accumulated in noradrenergic neurons in a carrier-dependent manner. Although the data suggested that xylamine was interacting with the norepinephrine uptake carrier, (/sup 3/H)xylamine exposure to isolated synaptic membranes from superior cervical ganglia revealed a large proportion of (/sup 3/H)xylamine binding that was not associated with the noradrenergic transporter. For a closer characterization of xylamine binding in synaptic membranes, brain tissue was chosen as a more practical source of these membranes. While these experiments did not meet with great success, xylamine remains potentially useful as a ligand for identifying the catecholamine transporter, particularly in conjunction with procedures for protein purification and reconstitution.

  9. Cationic aluminum alkyl complexes incorporating aminotroponiminate ligands.

    PubMed

    Korolev, A V; Ihara, E; Guzei, I A; Young, V G; Jordan, R F

    2001-08-29

    The synthesis, structures, and reactivity of cationic aluminum complexes containing the N,N'-diisopropylaminotroponiminate ligand ((i)Pr(2)-ATI(-)) are described. The reaction of ((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR(2) (1a-e,g,h; R = H (a), Me (b), Et (c), Pr (d), (i)Bu (e), Cy (g), CH(2)Ph (h)) with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] yields ((i)()Pr(2)-ATI)AlR(+) species whose fate depends on the properties of the R ligand. 1a and 1b react with 0.5 equiv of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to produce dinuclear monocationic complexes [([(i)Pr(2)-ATI] AlR)(2)(mu-R)][(C(6)F(5))(4)] (2a,b). The cation of 2b contains two ((i)()Pr(2)-ATI)AlMe(+) units linked by an almost linear Al-Me-Al bridge; 2a is presumed to have an analogous structure. 2b does not react further with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)]. However, 1a reacts with 1 equiv of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to afford ((i Pr(2)-ATI)Al(C(6)F(5))(mu-H)(2)B(C(6)F(5))(2) (3) and other products, presumably via C(6)F(5)(-) transfer and ligand redistribution of a [((i)()Pr(2)-ATI)AlH][(C(6)F(5))(4)] intermediate. 1c-e react with 1 equiv of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to yield stable base-free [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] complexes (4c-e). 4c crystallizes from chlorobenzene as 4c(ClPh).0.5PhCl, which has been characterized by X-ray crystallography. In the solid state the PhCl ligand of 4c(ClPh) is coordinated by a dative PhCl-Al bond and an ATI/Ph pi-stacking interaction. 1g,h react with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] to yield ((i)Pr(2)-ATI)Al(R)(C(6)F(5)) (5g,h) via C(6)F(5)(-) transfer of [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR][(BC(6)F(5))(4)] intermediates. 1c,h react with B(C(6)F(5))(3) to yield ((i)Pr(2)-ATI)Al(R)(C(6)F(5)) (5c,h) via C(6)F(5)(-) transfer of [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)AlR][RB(C(6)F(5))(3)] intermediates. The reaction of 4c-e with MeCN or acetone yields [((i)Pr(2)-ATI)Al(R)(L)][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] adducts (L = MeCN (8c-e), acetone (9c-e)), which undergo associative intermolecular L exchange. 9c-e undergo slow beta-H transfer to afford the dinuclear dicationic alkoxide complex [(((i

  10. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  11. The Death Ligand TRAIL in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorz, Corina; Benito-Martín, Alberto; Boucherot, Anissa; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Henger, Anna; Armelloni, Silvia; Santamaría, Beatriz; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death contributes to diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its role is not well understood. The tubulointerstitium from DN biopsy specimens was microdissected, and expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis were analyzed. A total of 112 (25%) of 455 cell death–related genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated. Among those that showed the greatest changes in regulation were two death receptors, OPG (the gene encoding osteoprotegerin) and Fas, and the death ligand TRAIL. Glomerular and proximal tubular TRAIL expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was higher in DN kidneys than controls and was associated with clinical and histologic severity of disease. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines but not glucose alone regulated TRAIL expression in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2. TRAIL induced tubular cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependant manner, an effect that was more marked in the presence of high levels of glucose and proinflammatory cytokines. TRAIL also activated NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. It is proposed that TRAIL-induced cell death could play an important role in the progression of human DN. PMID:18287563

  12. Charge Optimization Theory for Induced-Fit Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The design of ligands with high affinity and specificity remains a fundamental challenge in understanding molecular recognition and developing therapeutic interventions. Charge optimization theory addresses this problem by determining ligand charge distributions that produce the most favorable electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy. The theory has been applied to the design of binding specificity as well. However, the formulations described only treat a rigid ligand—one that does not change conformation upon binding. Here, we extend the theory to treat induced-fit ligands for which the unbound ligand conformation may differ from the bound conformation. We develop a thermodynamic pathway analysis for binding contributions relevant to the theory, and we illustrate application of the theory using HIV-1 protease with our previously designed and validated subnanomolar inhibitor. Direct application of rigid charge optimization approaches to nonrigid cases leads to very favorable intramolecular electrostatic interactions that are physically unreasonable, and analysis shows the ligand charge distribution massively stabilizes the preconformed (bound) conformation over the unbound. After analyzing this case, we provide a treatment for the induced-fit ligand charge optimization problem that produces physically realistic results. The key factor is introducing the constraint that the free energy of the unbound ligand conformation be lower or equal to that of the preconformed ligand structure, which corresponds to the notion that the unbound structure is the ground unbound state. Results not only demonstrate the applicability of this methodology to discovering optimized charge distributions in an induced-fit model, but also provide some insights into the energetic consequences of ligand conformational change on binding. Specifically, the results show that, from an electrostatic perspective, induced-fit binding is not an adaptation designed to enhance binding

  13. Encoding protein-ligand interaction patterns in fingerprints and graphs.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jérémy; Raimbaud, Eric; Ducrot, Pierre; Rognan, Didier

    2013-03-25

    We herewith present a novel and universal method to convert protein-ligand coordinates into a simple fingerprint of 210 integers registering the corresponding molecular interaction pattern. Each interaction (hydrophobic, aromatic, hydrogen bond, ionic bond, metal complexation) is detected on the fly and physically described by a pseudoatom centered either on the interacting ligand atom, the interacting protein atom, or the geometric center of both interacting atoms. Counting all possible triplets of interaction pseudoatoms within six distance ranges, and pruning the full integer vector to keep the most frequent triplets enables the definition of a simple (210 integers) and coordinate frame-invariant interaction pattern descriptor (TIFP) that can be applied to compare any pair of protein-ligand complexes. TIFP fingerprints have been calculated for ca. 10,000 druggable protein-ligand complexes therefore enabling a wide comparison of relationships between interaction pattern similarity and ligand or binding site pairwise similarity. We notably show that interaction pattern similarity strongly depends on binding site similarity. In addition to the TIFP fingerprint which registers intermolecular interactions between a ligand and its target protein, we developed two tools (Ishape, Grim) to align protein-ligand complexes from their interaction patterns. Ishape is based on the overlap of interaction pseudoatoms using a smooth Gaussian function, whereas Grim utilizes a standard clique detection algorithm to match interaction pattern graphs. Both tools are complementary and enable protein-ligand complex alignments capitalizing on both global and local pattern similarities. The new fingerprint and companion alignment tools have been successfully used in three scenarios: (i) interaction-biased alignment of protein-ligand complexes, (ii) postprocessing docking poses according to known interaction patterns for a particular target, and (iii) virtual screening for bioisosteric

  14. Binding of flexible and constrained ligands to the Grb2 SH2 domain: structural effects of ligand preorganization

    PubMed Central

    Clements, John H.; DeLorbe, John E.; Benfield, Aaron P.; Martin, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Structures of the Grb2 SH2 domain complexed with a series of pseudopeptides containing flexible (benzyl succinate) and constrained (aryl cyclopropanedicarboxylate) replacements of the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue in tripeptides derived from Ac-pYXN-NH2 (where X = V, I, E and Q) were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. Complexes of flexible/constrained pairs having the same pY + 1 amino acid were analyzed in order to ascertain what structural differences might be attributed to constraining the phosphotyrosine replacement. In this context, a given structural dissimilarity between complexes was considered to be significant if it was greater than the corresponding difference in complexes coexisting within the same asymmetric unit. The backbone atoms of the domain generally adopt a similar conformation and orientation relative to the ligands in the complexes of each flexible/constrained pair, although there are some significant differences in the relative orientations of several loop regions, most notably in the BC loop that forms part of the binding pocket for the phosphate group in the tyrosine replacements. These variations are greater in the set of complexes of constrained ligands than in the set of complexes of flexible ligands. The constrained ligands make more direct polar contacts to the domain than their flexible counterparts, whereas the more flexible ligand of each pair makes more single-water-mediated contacts to the domain; there was no correlation between the total number of protein–ligand contacts and whether the phosphotyrosine replacement of the ligand was preorganized. The observed differences in hydrophobic interactions between the complexes of each flexible/constrained ligand pair were generally similar to those observed upon comparing such contacts in coexisting complexes. The average adjusted B factors of the backbone atoms of the domain and loop regions are significantly greater in the complexes of constrained ligands than in the complexes of

  15. Facile dimer synthesis for DNA-binding polyamide ligands.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, Modi; Wemmer, David E

    2010-08-06

    Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide ligands are highly sequence specific synthetic DNA-binding ligands that bind with high affinity. To counter the synthetic difficulties associated with coupling the electron-rich heterocyclic acids to the electron-deficient nucleophilic imidazole amine, a novel approach is described for synthesis of Fmoc-protected dimers for solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method produces the dimers in high yields, is broadly applicable to other heterocyclic-containing polyamides, and results in improved ligand yields and synthesis times.

  16. A divergent strategy for attaching polypyridyl ligands to peptides.

    PubMed

    Jabre, Nitinkumar D; Respondek, Tomasz; Ulku, Selma A; Korostelova, Nadiya; Kodanko, Jeremy J

    2010-02-05

    A divergent method for incorporating polypyridyl ligands into peptides is reported. Three N-Fmoc unnatural amino acids (1-3) that contain varying linkers between the alpha-carbon and a 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridyl group were synthesized in enantioenriched form. These amino acids were used as anchors for incorporating multidentate ligands onto a peptide chain in a site-specific fashion. Multiple peptide-ligand conjugates were synthesized from single precursors by solution- or solid-phase methods. Peptides containing more than one metal-binding unit can be produced by this method.

  17. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  18. Ligands targeting the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs).

    PubMed

    Dunlop, John; Butera, John A

    2006-01-01

    This review provides an overview of ligands for the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), a family of high-affinity glutamate transporters localized to the plasma membrane of neurons and astroglial cells. Ligand development from the perspective of identifying novel and more selective tools for elucidating transporter subtype function, and the potential of transporter ligands in a therapeutic setting are discussed. Acute pharmacological modulation of EAAT activity in the form of linear and conformationally restricted glutamate and aspartate analogs is presented, in addition to recent strategies aimed more toward modulating transporter expression levels, the latter of particular significance to the development of transporter based therapeutics.

  19. Polyethylene glycol-based homologated ligands for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Scates, Bradley A.; Lashbrook, Bethany L.; Chastain, Benjamin C.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Elliott, Brandon T.; Theising, Nicholas J.; Baker, Thomas A.; Fitch, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A homologous series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomethyl ethers were conjugated with three ligand series for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Conjugates of acetylaminocholine, the cyclic analog 1-acetyl-4,4-dimethylpiperazinium, and pyridyl ether A-84543 were prepared. Each series was found to retain significant affinity at nicotinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with tethers of up to six PEG units. Such compounds are hydrophilic ligands which may serve as models for fluorescent/affinity probes and multivalent ligands for nAChR. PMID:19006672

  20. Advances and Challenges in Protein-Ligand Docking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-You; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a widely-used computational tool for the study of molecular recognition, which aims to predict the binding mode and binding affinity of a complex formed by two or more constituent molecules with known structures. An important type of molecular docking is protein-ligand docking because of its therapeutic applications in modern structure-based drug design. Here, we review the recent advances of protein flexibility, ligand sampling, and scoring functions—the three important aspects in protein-ligand docking. Challenges and possible future directions are discussed in the Conclusion. PMID:21152288

  1. Ligand and Structure-based Methodologies for the Prediction of the Activity of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered. PMID:18483766

  2. Ligand and structure-based methodologies for the prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered.

  3. Role of ligand-dependent GR phosphorylation and half-life in determination of ligand-specific transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Avenant, Chanel; Ronacher, Katharina; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Louw, Ann; Hapgood, Janet P

    2010-10-07

    A central question in glucocorticoid mechanism of action via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is what determines ligand-selective transcriptional responses. Using a panel of 12 GR ligands, we show that the extent of GR phosphorylation at S226 and S211, GR half-life and transcriptional response, occur in a ligand-selective manner. While GR phosphorylation at S226 was shown to inhibit maximal transcription efficacy, phosphorylation at S211 is required for maximal transactivation, but not for transrepression efficacy. Both ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life correlated with efficacy for transactivation and transrepression. For both expressed and endogenous GR, in two different cell lines, agonists resulted in the greatest extent of phosphorylation and the greatest extent of GR downregulation, suggesting a link between these functions. However, using phosphorylation-deficient GR mutants we established that phosphorylation of the GR at S226 or S211 does not determine the rank order of ligand-selective GR transactivation. These results are consistent with a model whereby ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life are a consequence of upstream events, such as ligand-specific GR conformations, which are maintained in the phosphorylation mutants.

  4. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  5. Bench-top to clinical therapies: A review of melanocortin ligands from 1954 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mark D; Lensing, Cody J; Fleming, Katlyn A; Schlasner, Katherine N; Doering, Skye R; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2017-03-29

    The discovery of the endogenous melanocortin agonists in the 1950s have resulted in sixty years of melanocortin ligand research. Early efforts involved truncations or select modifications of the naturally occurring agonists leading to the development of many potent and selective ligands. With the identification and cloning of the five known melanocortin receptors, many ligands were improved upon through bench-top in vitro assays. Optimization of select properties resulted in ligands adopted as clinical candidates. A summary of every melanocortin ligand is outside the scope of this review. Instead, this review will focus on the following topics: classic melanocortin ligands, selective ligands, small molecule (non-peptide) ligands, ligands with sex-specific effects, bivalent and multivalent ligands, and ligands advanced to clinical trials. Each topic area will be summarized with current references to update the melanocortin field on recent progress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Melanocortin Receptors - edited by Ya-Xiong Tao.

  6. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work.

  7. Disulfide Bond Requirements for Active Wnt Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Bryan T.; Hien, Annie; Zhang, Xinjun; Iranloye, Oladoyin; Virshup, David M.; Waterman, Marian L.; He, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Secreted Wnt lipoproteins are cysteine-rich and lipid-modified morphogens that bind to the Frizzled (FZD) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). Wnt engages FZD through protruding thumb and index finger domains, which are each assembled from paired β strands secured by disulfide bonds and grasp two sides of the FZD ectodomain. The importance of Wnt disulfide bonds has been assumed but uncharacterized. We systematically analyzed cysteines and associated disulfide bonds in the prototypic Wnt3a. Our data show that mutation of any individual cysteine of Wnt3a results in covalent Wnt oligomers through ectopic intermolecular disulfide bond formation and diminishes/abolishes Wnt signaling. Although individual cysteine mutations in the amino part of the saposin-like domain and in the base of the index finger are better tolerated and permit residual Wnt3a secretion/activity, those in the amino terminus, the thumb, and at the tip of the index finger are incompatible with secretion and/or activity. A few select double cysteine mutants based on the disulfide bond pattern restore Wnt secretion/activity. Further, a double cysteine mutation at the index finger tip results in a Wnt3a with normal secretion but minimal FZD binding and dominant negative properties. Our results experimentally validate predictions from the Wnt crystal structure and highlight critical but different roles of the saposin-like and cytokine-like domains, including the thumb and the index finger in Wnt folding/secretion and FZD binding. Finally, we modified existing expression vectors for 19 epitope-tagged human WNT proteins by removal of a tag-supplied ectopic cysteine, thereby generating tagged WNT ligands active in canonical and non-canonical signaling. PMID:24841207

  8. The Foundations of Protein-Ligand Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    For the specific design of a drug we must first answer the question: How does a drug achieve its activity? An active ingredient must, in order to develop its action, bind to a particular target molecule in the body. Usually this is a protein, but also nucleic acids in the form of RNA and DNA can be target structures for active agents. The most important condition for binding is at first that the active agent exhibits the correct size and shape in order to optimally fit into a cavity exposed to the surface of the protein, the "bindingpocket". It is further necessary for the surface properties of the ligand and protein to be mutually compatible to form specific interactions. In 1894 Emil Fischer compared the exact fit of a substrate for the catalytic centre of an enzyme with the picture of a "lock-and-key". Paul Ehrlich coined in 1913 "Corpora non agunt nisi fixata", literally "bodies do not work when they are not bound". He wanted to imply that active agents that are meant to kill bacteria or parasites must be "fixed" by them, i.e. linked to their structures. Both concepts form the starting point for any rational concept in the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In many respects they still apply today. A drug must, after being administered, reach its target and interact with a biological macromolecule. Specific agents have a large affinity and sufficient selectivity to bind to the macromolecule's active site. This is the only way they can develop the desired biological activity without side-effects.

  9. Ligand engineering of lead chalcogenide nanoparticle solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Marton; Brawand, Nicholas; Galli, Giulia

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NP) are promising materials to build cheap and efficient solar cells. One of the key challenges in their utilization for solar energy conversion is the control of ligand-NP interfaces. Recent experiments have shown that by carefully choosing the ligands terminating the NPs, one can tailor electronic and optical absorption properties of NP assemblies, along with their transport properties. By using density functional theory based methods, we investigated how the opto-electronic properties of lead chalcogenide NPs may be tuned by using diverse organic and inorganic ligands. We interpreted experiments, and we showed that an essential prerequisite to avoid detrimental trap states is to ensure charge balance at the ligand-NP interface, possibly with the help of hydrogen treatment. Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Bivalent Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which by virtue of its pentameric architecture, can be considered to be an intriguing example of intrinsically multivalent biological receptors. This paper describes a general design approach to the study of multivalency in this multimeric ion channel. Bivalent ligands for 5-HT3 receptor have been designed by linking an arylpiperazine moiety to probes showing different functional features. Both homobivalent and heterobivalent ligands have shown 5-HT3 receptor affinity in the nanomolar range, providing evidence for the viability of our design approach. Moreover, the high affinity shown by homobivalent ligands suggests that bivalency is a promising approach in 5-HT3 receptor modulation and provides the rational basis for applying the concepts of multivalency to the study of 5-HT3 receptor function. PMID:24900351

  11. Ligand development in the Ni-catalyzed hydrocyanation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Bini, Laura; Müller, Christian; Vogt, Dieter

    2010-11-28

    The addition of HCN to alkenes is a very useful reaction for the synthesis of functional organic substrates. Industrially the nickel-catalyzed hydrocyanation has gained considerable importance mainly because of the production of adiponitrile in the DuPont process. In this process the hydrocyanation of butadiene is carried out using aryl phosphite-modified nickel catalyst. Since the performance of organo-transition metal complexes is largely determined by the ligand environment of the metal, fundamental understanding and ligand development is of pivotal importance for any progress. This feature article gives an account of the development and application of different mono- and bidentate phosphorus-based ligands in the Ni-catalyzed hydrocyanation reaction of alkenes. Special attention will be paid to the development of insight and understanding of the ligand structural and electronic properties towards the improvement of the catalyst performance in terms of stability, activity, and selectivity.

  12. Pharmacophore-based discovery of ligands for drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Ekins, Sean; Bahadduri, Praveen; Swaan, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to identify ligands for drug transporters is an important step in drug discovery and development. It can both improve accurate profiling of lead pharmacokinetic properties and assist in the discovery of new chemical entities targeting transporters. In silico approaches, especially pharmacophore-based database screening methods have great potential in improving the throughput of current transporter ligand identification assays, leading to a higher hit rate by focusing in vitro testing to the most promising hits. In this review, the potential of different in silico methods in transporter ligand identification studies are compared and summarized with an emphasis on pharmacophore modeling. Various implementations of pharmacophore model generation, database compilation and flexible screening algorithms are also introduced. Recent successful utilization of database searching with pharmacophores to identify novel ligands for the pharmaceutically significant transporters hPepT1, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and DAT are reviewed and challenges encountered with current approaches are discussed. PMID:17097188

  13. "Clickable" affinity ligands for effective separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Suksrichavalit, Thummaruk; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Bülow, Leif; Ye, Lei

    2010-06-04

    In this paper, we present a new modular approach to immobilize boronic acid ligands that can offer effective separation of glycoproteins. A new "clickable" boronic acid ligand was synthesized by introducing a terminal acetylene group into commercially available 3-aminophenyl boronic acid. The clickable ligand, 3-(prop-2-ynyloxycarbonylamino)phenylboronic acid (2) could be easily coupled to azide-functionalized hydrophilic Sepharose using Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction under mild condition. Compared to other boronic acid affinity gels, the new affinity gel displayed superior effectiveness in separating model glycoproteins (ovalbumin and RNase B) from closely related bovine serum albumin and RNase A in the presence of crude Escherichia coli proteins. Because of the simplicity of the immobilization through "click chemistry", the new ligand 2 is expected to not only offer improved glycoprotein separation in other formats, but also act as a useful building block to develop new chemical sensors for analysis of other glycan compounds.

  14. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  15. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Diaconescu, Paula L.; Garcia, Evan

    2014-05-31

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  16. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  17. Searching for Practically Useful P-Chirogenic Phosphine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Imamoto, Tsuneo

    2016-12-01

    In this account, the design, synthesis, and application of P-chirogenic phosphine ligands that have been mainly carried out in our laboratory over the last three decades are described. Various enantiopure P-chirogenic phosphine ligands have been efficiently prepared by using phosphine boranes as intermediates. Conformationally rigid and electron-rich P-chirogenic phosphine ligands possessing C2 symmetry as well as a bulky alkyl group and a small group at the phosphorus atoms exhibit excellent enantioselectivities and catalytic efficiency in a variety of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions. Enantiopure 2,3-bis(tert-butylmethylphosphino)quinoxaline (QuinoxP*) is an air-stable crystalline solid that shows superior enantioinduction ability in catalytic asymmetric syntheses. Mechanistic studies of Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation using structurally simple P-chirogenic phosphine ligands, such as tBu-BisP*, are briefly described.

  18. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system.

  19. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Veenman, Leo; Vainshtein, Alex; Yasin, Nasra; Azrad, Maya; Gavish, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO’s importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles’ membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships. PMID:27271616

  20. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands.

    PubMed

    Veenman, Leo; Vainshtein, Alex; Yasin, Nasra; Azrad, Maya; Gavish, Moshe

    2016-06-04

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO's importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles' membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships.

  1. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  2. Square planar Cu(I) stabilized by a pyridinediimine ligand.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Pui Man; Berger, Robert F; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2016-03-18

    A set of distorted square planar Cu(I) complexes were synthesized and characterized utilizing the sterically encumbering pyridinediimine ligand, (iPr)PDI (where (iPr)PDI = 2,6-(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3N=CMe)2C5H3N). The oxidation state of the Cu center(s) were elucidated to be Cu(I) with a neutral PDI ligand system based on structural, spectroscopic, and computational data.

  3. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, M.D.; Wilson, T.E.; Mastandra, M.S.

    1996-04-23

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided. 7 figs.

  4. Drawing Mononuclear Octahedral Coordination Compounds Containing Tridentate Chelating Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamadou, Aminou; Ple, Karen; Haudrechy, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Complexes with tridentate ligands of the type [M(A-B-C)2], where A [not equal to] B [not equal to] C and with an imposed bonding sequence A-B-C, require special attention to draw all possible stereoisomers. Depending on the nature of the central donor atom B of the tridentate ligand, an easy drawing method is presented that shows seven chiral…

  5. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, Mark D.; Wilson, Troy E.; Mastandra, Mark S.

    1996-01-01

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided.

  6. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  7. CD6-ligand interactions: a paradigm for SRCR domain function?

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Bowen, M A; Patel, D D; Haynes, B F; Starling, G C; Gebe, J A; Bajorath, J

    1997-10-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily, which includes proteins expressed by leukocytes, can be subdivided into groups A and B. Group B contains the lymphocyte cell-surface receptor CD6. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the interaction between CD6 and its ligand, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM). Analysis of the CD6-ALCAM interaction may help to understand how other SRCR domains bind to their ligands.

  8. Models of protein–ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    PubMed Central

    Deller, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein–ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein–ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein–ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein–ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein–ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein–ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein–ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved. PMID:25665575

  9. Regulation of NKG2D ligand gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Traherne, James A; Ashiru, Omodele; Wills, Mark R; Trowsdale, John

    2006-03-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D has seven known host ligands encoded by the MHC class I chain-related MIC and ULBP/RAET genes. Why there is such diversity of NKG2D ligands is not known but one hypothesis is that they are differentially expressed in different tissues in response to different stresses. To explore this, we compared expression patterns and promoters of NKG2D ligand genes. ULBP/RAET genes were transcribed independent of each other in a panel of cell lines. ULBP/RAET gene expression was upregulated on infection with human cytomegalovirus; however, a clinical strain, Toledo, induced expression more slowly than did a laboratory strain, AD169. ULBP4/RAET1E was not induced by infection with either strain. To investigate the mechanisms behind the similarities and differences in NKG2D ligand gene expression a comparative sequence analysis of NKG2D ligand gene putative promoter regions was conducted. Sequence alignments demonstrated that there was significant sequence diversity; however, one region of high similarity between most of the genes is evident. This region contains a number of potential transcription factor binding sites, including those involved in shock responses and sites for retinoic acid-induced factors. Promoters of some NKG2D ligand genes are polymorphic and several sequence alterations in these alleles abolished putative transcription factor binding.

  10. Riboswitch structure in the ligand-free state.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Molecular investigations of riboswitches bound to small-molecule effectors have produced a wealth of information on how these molecules achieve high affinity and specificity for a target ligand. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for the ligand-free state for representatives of the preQ₁-I, S-adenosylmethionine I, lysine, and glycine aptamer classes. These structures in conjunction with complimentary techniques, such as in-line probing, NMR spectroscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer, small-angle scattering, and computational simulations, have demonstrated that riboswitches adopt multiple conformations in the absence of ligand. Despite a number of investigations that support ligand-dependent folding, mounting evidence suggests that free-state riboswitches interact with their effectors in the sub-populations of largely prefolded states as embodied by the principle of conformational selection, which has been documented extensively for protein-mediated ligand interactions. Fundamental riboswitch investigations of the bound and free states have advanced our understanding of RNA folding, ligand recognition, and how these factors culminate in communication between an aptamer and its expression platform. An understanding of these topics is essential to comprehend riboswitch gene regulation at the molecular level, which has already provided a basis to understand the mechanism of action of natural antimicrobials.

  11. Orphan receptor ligand discovery by pickpocketing pharmacological neighbors.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tony; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Stewart, Alastair G; Coleman, James L J; McRobb, Fiona M; Riek, R Peter; Graham, Robert M; Abagyan, Ruben; Kufareva, Irina; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the pharmacological similarity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is paramount for predicting ligand off-target effects, drug repurposing, and ligand discovery for orphan receptors. Phylogenetic relationships do not always correctly capture pharmacological similarity. Previous family-wide attempts to define pharmacological relationships were based on three-dimensional structures and/or known receptor-ligand pairings, both unavailable for orphan GPCRs. Here, we present GPCR-CoINPocket, a novel contact-informed neighboring pocket metric of GPCR binding-site similarity that is informed by patterns of ligand-residue interactions observed in crystallographically characterized GPCRs. GPCR-CoINPocket is applicable to receptors with unknown structure or ligands and accurately captures known pharmacological relationships between GPCRs, even those undetected by phylogeny. When applied to orphan receptor GPR37L1, GPCR-CoINPocket identified its pharmacological neighbors, and transfer of their pharmacology aided in discovery of the first surrogate ligands for this orphan with a 30% success rate. Although primarily designed for GPCRs, the method is easily transferable to other protein families.

  12. Lyar Is a New Ligand for Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Liu, Robert; Shen, Chen; Yu, Jisu; Zhou, Yixiong; Salero, Enrique; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to tissue homeostasis, as highlighted by phagocytosis defect of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with debris accumulation, photoreceptor degeneration and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to delineating molecular mechanisms and functional roles of phagocytes, but are traditionally identified in individual cases with technical challenges. We recently developed open reading frame phage display (OPD) for phagocytosis-based functional cloning (PFC) to identify unknown ligands. One of the identified ligands was Ly-1 antibody reactive clone (Lyar) with functions poorly defined. Herein, we characterized Lyar as a new ligand to stimulate RPE phagocytosis. In contrast to its reported nucleolar expression, immunohistochemistry showed that Lyar was highly expressed in photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) of the retina. Cytoplasmic Lyar was released from apoptotic cells, and selectively bound to shed POSs and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. POS vesicles engulfed through Lyar-dependent pathway were targeted to phagosomes and colocalized with phagosome marker Rab7. These results suggest that Lyar is a genuine RPE phagocytosis ligand, which in turn supports the validity of OPD/PFC as the only available approach for unbiased identification of phagocytosis ligands with broad applicability to various phagocytes.

  13. Cell mechanosensory recognizes ligand compliance at biomaterial interface.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, Chiara; Lettera, Vincenzo; Causa, Filippo; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cells activate signalling through ligand-receptor bonds by sensing the mechanical properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Ligands, indeed, have to withstand the pulling force elicited by cell receptors through focal adhesions (FAs). On this basis, we developed functional ligands to be simply adsorbed on surfaces and constituted by a two-domain peptide: one derived from ECM proteins and available to receptors to offer biochemical cues, and another adsorbed on material to withstand the tension upon receptor engagement. Tuneable compliance of the anchoring domain of the peptide ligand was verified by single peptide analysis through molecular dynamics and adsorption measurements. We showed that the highest adsorbed peptides combined with integrin cell-binding motifs allow for the cell recognition and polarization with larger mature FA areas. On the contrary, the lowest adsorbed sequences did not provide mechanical resistance to the integrin pulling action, leading to more rounded cells with smaller FA areas. This evidence demonstrates that cell mechanosensory can discriminate ligands on surfaces and should be considered as a criterion in ligand design for material bioactivation.

  14. Ligand binding analysis and screening by chemical denaturation shift.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Toward this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Because ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization effect elicited by binding can be used to identify and characterize ligands. For example, the shift in protein denaturation temperature (Tm shift) has become a popular approach to identify potential ligands. However, Tm shifts cannot be readily transformed into binding affinities, and the ligand rank order obtained at denaturation temperatures (≥60°C) does not necessarily coincide with the rank order at physiological temperature. An alternative approach is the use of chemical denaturation, which can be implemented at any temperature. Chemical denaturation shifts allow accurate determination of binding affinities with a surprisingly wide dynamic range (high micromolar to sub nanomolar) and in situations where binding changes the cooperativity of the unfolding transition. In this article, we develop the basic analytical equations and provide several experimental examples.

  15. Phage Selection of Chemically Stabilized α-Helical Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Philippe; Bertoldo, Davide; Dessen, Pierre; Khan, Maola M; Pizzitola, Irene; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg; Heinis, Christian

    2016-05-20

    Short α-helical peptides stabilized by linkages between constituent amino acids offer an attractive format for ligand development. In recent years, a range of excellent ligands based on stabilized α-helices were generated by rational design using α-helical peptides of natural proteins as templates. Herein, we developed a method to engineer chemically stabilized α-helical ligands in a combinatorial fashion. In brief, peptides containing cysteines in position i and i + 4 are genetically encoded by phage display, the cysteines are modified with chemical bridges to impose α-helical conformations, and binders are isolated by affinity selection. We applied the strategy to affinity mature an α-helical peptide binding β-catenin. We succeeded in developing ligands with Kd's as low as 5.2 nM, having >200-fold improved affinity. The strategy is generally applicable for affinity maturation of any α-helical peptide. Compared to hydrocarbon stapled peptides, the herein evolved thioether-bridged peptide ligands can be synthesized more easily, as no unnatural amino acids are required and the cyclization reaction is more efficient and yields no stereoisomers. A further advantage of the thioether-bridged peptide ligands is that they can be expressed recombinantly as fusion proteins.

  16. Ligand exchange in quaternary alloyed nanocrystals--a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2014-11-14

    Exchange of initial, predominantly stearate ligands for pyridine in the first step and butylamine (BA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) in the second one was studied for alloyed quaternary Cu-In-Zn-S nanocrystals. The NMR results enabled us to demonstrate, for the first time, direct binding of the pyridine labile ligand to the nanocrystal surface as evidenced by paramagnetic shifts of the three signals attributed to its protons to 7.58, 7.95 and 8.75 ppm. XPS investigations indicated, in turn, a significant change in the composition of the nanocrystal surface upon the exchange of initial ligands for pyridine, which being enriched in indium in the 'as prepared' form became enriched in zinc after pyridine binding. This finding indicated that the first step of ligand exchange had to involve the removal of the surface layer enriched in indium with simultaneous exposure of a new, zinc-enriched layer. In the second ligand exchange step (replacement of pyridine with BA or MUA) the changes in the nanocrystal surface compositions were much less significant. The presence of zinc in the nanocrystal surface layer turned out necessary for effective binding of pyridine as shown by a comparative study of ligand exchange in Cu-In-Zn-S, Ag-In-Zn-S and CuInS2, carried out by complementary XPS and NMR investigations.

  17. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  18. Ligand and interfacial dynamics in a homodimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant Kumar; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics of dimeric hemoglobin (HbI) from Scapharca inaequivalvis in different ligand-binding states is studied from atomistic simulations on the μs time scale. The intermediates are between the fully ligand-bound (R) and ligand-free (T) states. Tertiary structural changes, such as rotation of the side chain of Phe97, breaking of the Lys96–heme salt bridge, and the Fe–Fe separation, are characterized and the water dynamics along the R-T transition is analyzed. All these properties for the intermediates are bracketed by those determined experimentally for the fully ligand-bound and ligand-free proteins, respectively. The dynamics of the two monomers is asymmetric on the 100 ns timescale. Several spontaneous rotations of the Phe97 side chain are observed which suggest a typical time scale of 50–100 ns for this process. Ligand migration pathways include regions between the B/G and C/G helices and, if observed, take place in the 100 ns time scale. PMID:26958581

  19. FXR and its ligands inhibit the function of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Ali, Marfoua S.; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Sage, Tanya; Flora, Gagan D; Bye, Alex P; Kriek, Neline; Dorchies, Emilie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Dombrowicz, David; Staels, Bart; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective While initially seemingly paradoxical due to the lack of nucleus, platelets possess a number of transcription factors that regulate their function through DNA-independent mechanisms. These include the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), a member of the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that has been identified as a bile acid receptor. In this study, we show that FXR is present in human platelets and FXR ligands, GW4064 and 6-ECDCA, modulate platelet activation nongenomically. Approach and Results FXR ligands inhibited the activation of platelets in response to stimulation of collagen or thrombin receptors, resulting in diminished intracellular calcium mobilization and secretion, fibrinogen binding and aggregation. Exposure to FXR ligands also reduced integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling and thereby reduced the ability of platelets to spread and to stimulate clot retraction. FXR function in platelets was found to be associated with the modulation of cGMP levels in platelets and associated downstream inhibitory signaling. Platelets from FXR-deficient mice were refractory to the actions of FXR agonists on platelet function and cyclic nucleotide signaling, firmly linking the non-genomic actions of these ligands to the FXR receptor. Conclusion This study provides support for the ability of FXR ligands to modulate platelet activation. The athero-protective effects of GW4064, with its novel antiplatelet effects, indicate FXR as a potential target for prevention of athero-thrombotic disease. PMID:27758768

  20. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  1. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  2. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  3. Ligands Slow Down Pure-Dephasing in Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Kilina, Svetlana V; Tretiak, Sergei; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-09-22

    It is well-known experimentally and theoretically that surface ligands provide additional pathways for energy relaxation in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). They increase the rate of inelastic charge-phonon scattering and provide trap sites for the charges. We show that, surprisingly, ligands have the opposite effect on elastic electron-phonon scattering. Our simulations demonstrate that elastic scattering slows down in CdSe QDs passivated with ligands compared to that in bare QDs. As a result, the pure-dephasing time is increased, and the homogeneous luminescence line width is decreased in the presence of ligands. The lifetime of quantum superpositions of single and multiple excitons increases as well, providing favorable conditions for multiple excitons generation (MEG). Ligands reduce the pure-dephasing rates by decreasing phonon-induced fluctuations of the electronic energy levels. Surface atoms are most mobile in QDs, and therefore, they contribute greatly to the electronic energy fluctuations. The mobility is reduced by interaction with ligands. A simple analytical model suggests that the differences between the bare and passivated QDs persist for up to 5 nm diameters. Both low-frequency acoustic and high-frequency optical phonons participate in the dephasing processes in bare QDs, while low-frequency acoustic modes dominate in passivated QDs. The theoretical predictions regarding the pure-dephasing time, luminescence line width, and MEG can be verified experimentally by studying QDs with different surface passivation.

  4. Rule of five in 2015 and beyond: Target and ligand structural limitations, ligand chemistry structure and drug discovery project decisions.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    The rule of five (Ro5), based on physicochemical profiles of phase II drugs, is consistent with structural limitations in protein targets and the drug target ligands. Three of four parameters in Ro5 are fundamental to the structure of both target and drug binding sites. The chemical structure of the drug ligand depends on the ligand chemistry and design philosophy. Two extremes of chemical structure and design philosophy exist; ligands constructed in the medicinal chemistry synthesis laboratory without input from natural selection and natural product (NP) metabolites biosynthesized based on evolutionary selection. Exceptions to Ro5 are found mostly among NPs. Chemistry chameleon-like behavior of some NPs due to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding as exemplified by cyclosporine A is a strong contributor to NP Ro5 outliers. The fragment derived, drug Navitoclax is an example of the extensive expertise, resources, time and key decisions required for the rare discovery of a non-NP Ro5 outlier.

  5. A Ferrocene-Based Catecholamide Ligand: the Consequences of Ligand Swivel for Directed Supramolecular Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Fiedler, Dorothea; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-02-04

    A ferrocene-based biscatecholamide ligand was prepared and investigated for the formation of metal-ligand supramolecular assemblies with different metals. Reaction with Ge(IV) resulted in the formation of a variety of Ge{sub n}L{sub m} coordination complexes, including [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 3}]{sup 4-} and [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 2}({mu}-OMe){sub 2}]{sup 2-}. The ligand's ability to swivel about the ferrocenyl linker and adopt different conformations accounts for formation of many different Ge{sub n}L{sub m} species. This study demonstrates why conformational ligand rigidity is essential in the rational design and directed self-assembly of supramolecular complexes.

  6. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  7. electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW): A tool for ligand coordinate and restraint generation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf; Adams, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW) is a program module of the PHENIX suite of computational crystallographic software. It's designed to be a flexible procedure using simple and fast quantum chemical techniques to provide chemically accurate information for novel and known ligands alike. A variety of input formats and options allow for the attainment of a number of diverse goals including geometry optimisation and generation of restraints.

  8. The biotic ligand model: a historical overview.

    PubMed

    Paquin, Paul R; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Apte, Simon; Batley, Graeme E; Bowles, Karl C; Campbell, Peter G C; Delos, Charles G; Di Toro, Dominic M; Dwyer, Robert L; Galvez, Fernando; Gensemer, Robert W; Goss, Gregory G; Hostrand, Christer; Janssen, Colin R; McGeer, James C; Naddy, Rami B; Playle, Richard C; Santore, Robert C; Schneider, Uwe; Stubblefield, William A; Wood, Chris M; Wu, Kuen Benjamin

    2002-09-01

    During recent years, the biotic ligand model (BLM) has been proposed as a tool to evaluate quantitatively the manner in which water chemistry affects the speciation and biological availability of metals in aquatic systems. This is an important consideration because it is the bioavailability and bioreactivity of metals that control their potential to cause adverse effects. The BLM approach has gained widespread interest amongst the scientific, regulated and regulatory communities because of its potential for use in developing water quality criteria (WQC) and in performing aquatic risk assessments for metals. Specifically, the BLM does this in a way that considers the important influences of site-specific water quality. This journal issue includes papers that describe recent advances with regard to the development of the BLM approach. Here, the current status of the BLM development effort is described in the context of the longer-term history of advances in the understanding of metal interactions in the environment upon which the BLM is based. Early developments in the aquatic chemistry of metals, the physiology of aquatic organisms and aquatic toxicology are reviewed first, and the degree to which each of these disciplines influenced the development of water quality regulations is discussed. The early scientific advances that took place in each of these fields were not well coordinated, making it difficult for regulatory authorities to take full advantage of the potential utility of what had been learned. However, this has now changed, with the BLM serving as a useful interface amongst these scientific disciplines, and within the regulatory arena as well. The more recent events that have led to the present situation are reviewed, and consideration is given to some of the future needs and developments related to the BLM that are envisioned. The research results that are described in the papers found in this journal issue represent a distinct milestone in the ongoing

  9. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  10. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  11. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    DOE PAGES

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; ...

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  12. Triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry concept for thyroid transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Aqai, Payam; Fryganas, Christos; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2012-08-07

    For the analysis of thyroid transporter ligands, a triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry (BioMS) concept was developed, with the aim at three different analytical objectives: rapid screening of any ligand, confirmation of known ligands in accordance with legislative requirements, and identification of emerging yet unknown ligands. These three purposes share the same biorecognition element, recombinant thyroid transport protein transthyretin (rTTR), and dedicated modes of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). For screening, a rapid and radiolabel-free competitive inhibition MS binding assay was developed with fast ultrahigh performance-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple-quadrupole-MS (UPLC-QqQ-MS) as the readout system. It uses the nonradioactive stable isotopic thyroid hormone (13)C(6)-L-thyroxine as the label of which the binding to rTTR is inhibited by any ligand such as thyroid drugs and thyroid endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). To this end, rTTR is either used in solution or immobilized on paramagnetic microbeads. The concentration-dependent inhibition of the label by the natural thyroid hormone l-thyroxine (T4), as a model analyte, is demonstrated in water at part-per-trillion and in urine at part-per-billion level. For confirmation of identity of known ligands, rTTR was used for bioaffinity purification for confirmation of naturally present free T4 in urine. As a demonstrator for identification of unknown ligands, the same rTTR was used again but in combination with nano-UPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight-MS (nLC-Q-TOF-MS) and urine samples spiked with the model "unknown" EDCs triclosan and tetrabromobisphenol-A. This study highlights the potential of BioMS using one affinity system, both for rapid screening and for confirmation and identification of known and unknown emerging thyroid EDCs.

  13. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints.

    PubMed

    von Behren, Mathias M; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise ).

  14. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Behren, Mathias M.; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise).

  15. Dimolybdenum cyclopentadienyl complexes with bridging chalcogenophosphinidene ligands.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Belén; Alvarez, M Angeles; Amor, Inmaculada; García, M Esther; García-Vivó, Daniel; Suárez, Jaime; Ruiz, Miguel A

    2012-07-16

    The reactions of the phosphinidene-bridged complex [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-PH)(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (1), the arylphosphinidene complexes [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(6)-PMes*)(CO)(2)] (2), [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(4)-PMes*)(CO)(3)] (3), [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(4)-PMes*)(CO)(2)(CN(t)Bu)] (4), and the cyclopentadienylidene-phosphinidene complex [Mo(2)Cp(μ-κ(1):κ(1),η(5)-PC(5)H(4))(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (5) toward different sources of chalcogen atoms were investigated (Mes* = 2,4,6-C(6)H(2)(t)Bu(3); Cp = η(5)-C(5)H(5)). The bare elements were appropriate sources in all cases except for oxygen, in which case dimethyldioxirane gave the best results. Complex 1 reacted with the mentioned chalcogen sources at low temperature, to give the corresponding chalcogenophosphinidene derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(2){μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P)-ZPH}(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (Z = O, S, Se, Te; P-Se = 2.199(2) Å). The arylphosphinidene complex 2 was the least reactive substrate and gave only chalcogenophosphinidene derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P),η(6)-ZPMes*)(CO)(2)] for Z = O and S (P-O = 1.565(2) Å), along with small amounts of the dithiophosphorane complex [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(2)(P,S):κ(1)(S'),η(6)-S(2)PMes*)(CO)(2)], in the reaction with sulfur. The η(4)-complexes 3 and 4 reacted with sulfur and gray selenium to give the corresponding derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(2)(μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P),η(4)-ZPMes*)(CO)(2)L] (L = CO, CN(t)Bu), obtained respectively as syn (Z = Se; P-Se = 2.190(1) Å for L = CO) or a mixture of syn and anti isomers (Z = S; P-S = 2.034(1)-2.043(1) Å), with these diastereoisomers differing in the relative positioning of the chalcogen atom and the terminal ligand at the metallocene fragment, relative to the Mo(2)P plane. The cyclopentadienylidene compound 5 reacted with all chalcogens, and gave with good yields the chalcogenophosphinidene derivatives [Mo(2)Cp(μ-κ(2)(P,Z):κ(1)(P),η(5)-ZPC(5)H(4))(η(6)-HMes*)(CO)(2)] (Z = S, Se, Te), these displaying in solution

  16. Ligand Migration and Binding in Myoglobin Mutant L29W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Waschipky, Robert; Nienhaus, Karin; Minkow, Oleksandr; Ostermann, Andreas; Parak, Fritz G.

    2001-09-01

    Myoglobin, a small globular heme protein that binds gaseous ligands such as O2, CO, and NO reversibly at the heme iron, has for many years been a paradigm for studying the effects of structure and dynamics on protein reactions. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements after photodissociation of the ligand reveal a complex ligand binding reaction with multiple kinetic intermediates, resulting from protein relaxation and movements of the ligand within the protein. To observe structural changes induced by ligand dissociation, we have investigated carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) mutant L29W using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in combination with x-ray crystallography. The presence of two distinct infrared stretch bands of the bound CO, AI at 1945 cm-1 and AII at 1955 cm-1, implies that L29W MbCO assumes two different conformations at neutral pH. Low-temperature flash photolysis experiments with monitoring of the absorption changes in the individual CO lines reveal markedly different rebinding properties. While recombination in AII is conceptually simple and well described by a two-state transition involving a distribution of enthalpy barriers, recombination in AI is more complicated: Besides a fast kinetic component, a second, slower kinetic component appears; its population grows with increasing temperature. X-ray crystallography of crystals illuminated below 180 K to photodissociate the CO reveals that the slow component arises from ligands that have migrated from their initial docking site to a remote site within the distal heme pocket. This process occurs in an essentially immobilized, frozen protein. Subsequently, ligands rebind by thermal activation over a barrier that is much higher than the barrier for recombination from the initial docking site. Upon photodissociation above 180 K, ligands escape from the distal pocket, aided by protein fluctuations that transiently open exit channels. The x-ray structure shows a large proportion of ligands in a cavity on

  17. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  18. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  19. Thiophene-Core Estrogen Receptor Ligands Having Superagonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jian; Wang, Pengcheng; Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Guo, Pu; Huang, Minjian; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Nettles, Kendall W.; Zhou, Hai-Bing

    2013-01-01

    To probe the importance of the heterocyclic core of estrogen receptor (ER) ligands, we prepared a series of thiophene-core ligands by Suzuki cross-coupling of aryl boronic acids with bromo-thiophenes, and we assessed their receptor binding and cell biological activities. The disposition of the phenol substituents on the thiophene core, at alternate or adjacent sites, and the nature of substituents on these phenols all contribute to binding affinity and subtype selectivity. Most of the bis(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERβ selective, whereas the tris(hydroxyphenyl)-thiophenes were ERα selective; analogous furan-core compounds generally have lower affinity and less selectivity. Some diarylthiophenes show distinct superagonist activity in reporter gene assays, giving maximal activities 2–3 times that of estradiol, and modeling suggests that these ligands have a different interaction with a hydrogen-bonding residue in helix-11. Ligand-core modification may be a new strategy for developing ER ligands whose selectivity is based on having transcriptional activity greater than that of estradiol. PMID:23586645

  20. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  1. Surface Ligand-Mediated Plasmon-Driven Photochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Bijesh; Poveda, Marisa; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-03-02

    Contrary to the general expectation that surface ligands reduce the reactivity of surfaces by blocking the active sites, we present experimental evidence that surface ligands can in fact increase reactivity and induce important reaction pathways in plasmon-driven surface photochemistry. The remarkable effect of surface ligands is demonstrated by comparing the photochemistry of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) on resonant plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) in the presence of citrate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and no surface ligands under visible light irradiation. The use of AuNRs with citrate and no surface ligand results in the usual azo-coupling reaction. In contrast, CTAB-coated AuNRs oxidize PATP primarily to p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP). Strong correlation has been observed between the N-O and Au-Br vibration band intensities, suggesting that CTAB influences the reaction pathway through the Br(-) counterions that can minimize the electron-hole recombination rate by reacting with the hole and hence increasing the concentration of hot electrons that drive the oxidation reaction.

  2. Ligand specificity and evolution of liver X receptors§

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, Erica J.; Ai, Ni; Welsh, William J.; Ekins, Sean; Hagey, Lee R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are key regulators of lipid and cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Little is known, however, about the function and evolution of LXRs in non-mammalian species. The present study reports the cloning of LXRs from African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), Western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis), and zebrafish (Danio rerio), and their functional characterization and comparison with human and mouse LXRs. Additionally, an ortholog of LXR in the chordate invertebrate Ciona intestinalis was cloned and functionally characterized. Ligand specificities of the frog and zebrafish LXRs were very similar to LXRα and LXRβ from human and mouse. All vertebrate LXRs studied were activated robustly by the synthetic ligands T-0901317 and GW3965 and by a variety of oxysterols. In contrast, Ciona LXR was not activated by T-0901317 or GW3965 but was activated by a limited number of oxysterols, as well as some androstane and pregnane steroids. Pharmacophore analysis, homology modeling, and docking studies of Ciona LXR predict a receptor with a more restricted ligand-binding pocket and less intrinsic disorder in the ligand-binding domain compared to vertebrate LXRs. The results suggest that LXRs have a long evolutionary history, with vertebrate LXRs diverging from invertebrate LXRs in ligand specificity. PMID:18395439

  3. Structural basis for EGFR ligand sequestration by Argos

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Daryl E.; Stayrook, Steven E.; Shi, Fumin; Narayan, Kartik; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2008-06-26

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or ErbB/HER family and their activating ligands are essential regulators of diverse developmental processes. Inappropriate activation of these receptors is a key feature of many human cancers, and its reversal is an important clinical goal. A natural secreted antagonist of EGFR signalling, called Argos, was identified in Drosophila. We showed previously that Argos functions by directly binding (and sequestering) growth factor ligands that activate EGFR5. Here we describe the 1.6-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Argos bound to an EGFR ligand. Contrary to expectations, Argos contains no EGF-like domain. Instead, a trio of closely related domains (resembling a three-finger toxin fold) form a clamp-like structure around the bound EGF ligand. Although structurally unrelated to the receptor, Argos mimics EGFR by using a bipartite binding surface to entrap EGF. The individual Argos domains share unexpected structural similarities with the extracellular ligand-binding regions of transforming growth factor-{beta} family receptors. The three-domain clamp of Argos also resembles the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor, which uses a similar mechanism to engulf the EGF-like module of uPA. Our results indicate that undiscovered mammalian counterparts of Argos may exist among other poorly characterized structural homologues. In addition, the structures presented here define requirements for the design of artificial EGF-sequestering proteins that would be valuable anti-cancer therapeutics.

  4. A grand unified model for liganded gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zhu, Beien; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) is developed to achieve fundamental understanding of rich structures of all 71 liganded gold clusters reported to date. Inspired by the quark model by which composite particles (for example, protons and neutrons) are formed by combining three quarks (or flavours), here gold atoms are assigned three `flavours' (namely, bottom, middle and top) to represent three possible valence states. The `composite particles' in GUM are categorized into two groups: variants of triangular elementary block Au3(2e) and tetrahedral elementary block Au4(2e), all satisfying the duet rule (2e) of the valence shell, akin to the octet rule in general chemistry. The elementary blocks, when packed together, form the cores of liganded gold clusters. With the GUM, structures of 71 liganded gold clusters and their growth mechanism can be deciphered altogether. Although GUM is a predictive heuristic and may not be necessarily reflective of the actual electronic structure, several highly stable liganded gold clusters are predicted, thereby offering GUM-guided synthesis of liganded gold clusters by design.

  5. Efficient mapping of ligand migration channel networks in dynamic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tu-Liang; Song, Guang

    2011-08-01

    For many proteins such as myoglobin, the binding site lies in the interior, and there is no obvious route from the exterior to the binding site in the average structure. Although computer simulations for a limited number of proteins have found some transiently open channels, it is not clear if there exist more channels elsewhere or how the channels are regulated. A systematic approach that can map out the whole ligand migration channel network is lacking. Ligand migration in a dynamic protein resembles closely a well-studied problem in robotics, namely, the navigation of a mobile robot in a dynamic environment. In this work, we present a novel robotic motion planning inspired approach that can map the ligand migration channel network in a dynamic protein. The method combines an efficient spatial mapping of protein inner space with a temporal exploration of protein structural heterogeneity, which is represented by a structure ensemble. The spatial mapping of each conformation in the ensemble produces a partial map of protein inner cavities and their inter-connectivity. These maps are then merged to form a super map that contains all the channels that open dynamically. Results on the pathways in myoglobin for gaseous ligands demonstrate the efficiency of our approach in mapping the ligand migration channel networks. The results, obtained in a significantly less amount of time than trajectory-based approaches, are in agreement with previous simulation results. Additionally, the method clearly illustrates how and what conformational changes open or close a channel.

  6. Protein-Ligand Docking Based on Beta-Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chong-Min; Won, Chung-In; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Ryu, Joonghyun; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Deok-Soo

    Protein-ligand docking is to predict the location and orientation of a ligand with respect to a protein within its binding site, and has been known to be essential for the development of new drugs. The protein-ligand docking problem is usually formulated as an energy minimization problem to identify the docked conformation of the ligand. A ligand usually docks around a depressed region, called a pocket, on the surface of a protein. Presented in this paper is a docking method, called BetaDock, based on the newly developed geometric construct called the β-shape and the β-complex. To cope with the computational intractability, the global minimum of the potential energy function is searched using the genetic algorithm. The proposed algorithm first locates initial chromosomes at some locations within the pocket recognized according to the local shape of the β-shape. Then, the algorithm proceeds generations by taking advantage of powerful properties of the β-shape to achieve an extremely fast and good solution. We claim that the proposed method is much faster than other popular docking softwares including AutoDock.

  7. A grand unified model for liganded gold clusters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zhu, Beien; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) is developed to achieve fundamental understanding of rich structures of all 71 liganded gold clusters reported to date. Inspired by the quark model by which composite particles (for example, protons and neutrons) are formed by combining three quarks (or flavours), here gold atoms are assigned three ‘flavours' (namely, bottom, middle and top) to represent three possible valence states. The ‘composite particles' in GUM are categorized into two groups: variants of triangular elementary block Au3(2e) and tetrahedral elementary block Au4(2e), all satisfying the duet rule (2e) of the valence shell, akin to the octet rule in general chemistry. The elementary blocks, when packed together, form the cores of liganded gold clusters. With the GUM, structures of 71 liganded gold clusters and their growth mechanism can be deciphered altogether. Although GUM is a predictive heuristic and may not be necessarily reflective of the actual electronic structure, several highly stable liganded gold clusters are predicted, thereby offering GUM-guided synthesis of liganded gold clusters by design. PMID:27910848

  8. A modified fluorescent intercalator displacement assay for RNA ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chow, Christine S.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) is a convenient and practical tool for identifying new nucleic-acid-binding ligands. The success of FID is based on the fact that it can be fashioned into a versatile screening assay for assessing the relative binding affinities of compounds to nucleic acids. FID is a tagless approach; the target RNAs and the ligands or small molecules under investigation do not have to be modified in order to be examined. In this study, a modified FID assay for screening RNA-binding ligands was established using 3-methyl-2-((1-(3-(trimethylammonio)propyl)-4-quinolinylidene)methyl)benzothiazolium (TO-PRO) as the fluorescent indicator. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) results provide direct evidence that correlates the reduction in fluorescence intensity observed in the FID assay with displacement of the dye molecule from RNA. The assay was successfully applied to screen a variety of RNA-binding ligands with a set of small hairpin RNAs. Ligands that bind with moderate affinity to the chosen RNA constructs (A-site, TAR, h31, and H69) were identified. PMID:20863807

  9. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  10. Structural basis for EGFR ligand sequestration by Argos.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daryl E; Stayrook, Steven E; Shi, Fumin; Narayan, Kartik; Lemmon, Mark A

    2008-06-26

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or ErbB/HER family and their activating ligands are essential regulators of diverse developmental processes. Inappropriate activation of these receptors is a key feature of many human cancers, and its reversal is an important clinical goal. A natural secreted antagonist of EGFR signalling, called Argos, was identified in Drosophila. We showed previously that Argos functions by directly binding (and sequestering) growth factor ligands that activate EGFR. Here we describe the 1.6-A resolution crystal structure of Argos bound to an EGFR ligand. Contrary to expectations, Argos contains no EGF-like domain. Instead, a trio of closely related domains (resembling a three-finger toxin fold) form a clamp-like structure around the bound EGF ligand. Although structurally unrelated to the receptor, Argos mimics EGFR by using a bipartite binding surface to entrap EGF. The individual Argos domains share unexpected structural similarities with the extracellular ligand-binding regions of transforming growth factor-beta family receptors. The three-domain clamp of Argos also resembles the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor, which uses a similar mechanism to engulf the EGF-like module of uPA. Our results indicate that undiscovered mammalian counterparts of Argos may exist among other poorly characterized structural homologues. In addition, the structures presented here define requirements for the design of artificial EGF-sequestering proteins that would be valuable anti-cancer therapeutics.

  11. Rediscovery of halogen bonds in protein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, P; Tian, F; Zou, J; Shang, Z

    2010-04-01

    Although the halogen bond has attracted much interest in chemistry and material science communities, its implications for drug design are just now coming to light. The protein-ligand interactions through short halogen-oxygen/nitrogen/sulfur contacts have been observed in crystal structures for a long time, but only in recent years, with the experimental and theoretical progress in weak biological interactions, especially the pioneering works contributed by Ho and co-workers (Auffinger, P.; Hays, F. A.; Westhof, E.; Ho, P. S. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2004, 101, 16789-16794), these short contacts involving halogens in biomolecules were rediscovered and re-recognized as halogen bonds to stress their shared similarities with hydrogen bonds in strength and directionality. Crystal structure determinations of protein complexes with halogenated ligands preliminarily unveiled the functionality of halogen bonds in protein-ligand recogni-tion. Database surveys further revealed a considerable number of short halogen-oxygen contacts between proteins and halogenated ligands. Theoretical calculations on model and real systems eventually gave a quantitative pronouncement for the substantial contribution of halogen bonds to ligand binding. All of these works forebode that the halogen bond can be exploited as a new and versatile tool for rational drug design and bio-crystal engineering.

  12. Organic ligands reduce copper toxicity in Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Azenha, M.; Vasconcelos, M.T.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae cells were exposed to 100 {mu}M copper alone, or to previously equilibrated copper sulfate-ligand solutions. Ligand concentrations were determined experimentally as those that reduced the free copper concentration to 5 {mu}M (determined with a Cu{sup 2+}-selective electrode). These values were in agreement with those calculated by computational equilibrium simulation based on published stability constants. Exposure of P. syringae cells to copper sulfate, chloride, or nitrate resulted in similar high mortality, suggesting that copper was responsible for cell death. Acetate, succinate, proline, lysine, cysteine, and EDTA significantly reduced both the amount of copper bound to the cells and cell death, indicating that not only strong chelating agents but also weak and moderate copper ligands can effectively antagonize copper toxicity. However, cysteine and EDTA were considerably more effective than acetate, succinate, proline, and lysine, indicating that copper toxicity is not simply a function of free copper concentration but depends on the nature of the ligand. The results suggested that a significant fraction of copper bound to acetate, succinate, proline, or lysine was displaced to the bacteria or, alternatively, mixed copper-ligand-cell complexes could be formed. On the contrary, none of these phenomena occurred for the copper complexes with cysteine or EDTA.

  13. Ligand binding to a high-energy partially unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Joseph R; Park, Chiwook

    2015-01-01

    The conformational energy landscape of a protein determines populations of all possible conformations of the protein and also determines the kinetics of the conversion between the conformations. Interaction with ligands influences the conformational energy landscapes of proteins and shifts populations of proteins in different conformational states. To investigate the effect of ligand binding on partial unfolding of a protein, we use Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its functional ligand NADP(+) as a model system. We previously identified a partially unfolded form of DHFR that is populated under native conditions. In this report, we determined the free energy for partial unfolding of DHFR at varying concentrations of NADP(+) and found that NADP(+) binds to the partially unfolded form as well as the native form. DHFR unfolds partially without releasing the ligand, though the binding affinity for NADP(+) is diminished upon partial unfolding. Based on known crystallographic structures of NADP(+) -bound DHFR and the model of the partially unfolded protein we previously determined, we propose that the adenosine-binding domain of DHFR remains folded in the partially unfolded form and interacts with the adenosine moiety of NADP(+) . Our result demonstrates that ligand binding may affect the conformational free energy of not only native forms but also high-energy non-native forms.

  14. New synthetic routes toward enantiopure nitrogen donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sala, Xavier; Rodríguez, Anna M; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Parella, Teodor; von Zelewsky, Alexander; Llobet, Antoni; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi

    2006-12-08

    New polypyridylic chiral ligands, having either C3 or lower symmetry, have been prepared via a de novo construction of the pyridine nucleus by means of Kröhnke methodology in the key step. The chiral moieties of these ligands originate from the monoterpen chiral pool, namely (-)-alpha-pinene ((-)-14, (-)-15) and (-)-myrtenal ((-)-9, (-)-10). Extension of the above-mentioned asymmetric synthesis procedure to the preparation of enantiopure derivatives of some commonly used polypyridylic ligands has been achieved through a new aldehyde building block ((-)-16). As an example, the synthesis of a chiral derivative of N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine (bpea) ligand, (-)-19, has been performed to illustrate the viability of the method. The coordinative ability of the ligands has been tested through the synthesis and characterization of complexes [Mn((-)-19)Br2], (-)-20, and [RuCl((-)-10)(bpy)](BF4), (-)-21. Some preliminary results related to the enantioselective catalytic epoxidation of styrene with the ruthenium complex are also presented.

  15. A model for ligand binding to hexacoordinate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Trent, J T; Hvitved, A N; Hargrove, M S

    2001-05-22

    Hexacoordinate hemoglobins are heme proteins capable of reversible intramolecular coordination of the ligand binding site by an amino acid side chain from within the heme pocket. Examples of these proteins are found in many living organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. The nonsymbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) are a class of hexacoordinate heme proteins present in all plants. The nsHb from rice (rHb1) has been used as a model system to develop methods for determining rate constants characterizing binding and dissociation of the His residue responsible for hexacoordination. Measurement of these reactions exploits laser flash photolysis to initiate the reaction from the unligated, pentacoordinate form of the heme protein. A model for ligand binding is presented that incorporates the reaction following rapid mixing with the reaction starting from the pentacoordinate hemoglobin (Hb). This model is based on results indicating that ligand binding to hexacoordinate Hbs is not a simple combination of competing first order (hexacoordination) and second order (exogenous ligand binding) reactions. Ligand binding following rapid mixing is a multiphasic reaction displaying time courses ranging from milliseconds to minutes. The new model incorporates a "closed", slow reacting form of the protein that is not at rapid equilibrium with the reactive conformation. It is also demonstrated that formation of the closed protein species is not dependent on hexacoordination.

  16. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  17. Insights into Protein–Ligand Interactions: Mechanisms, Models, and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xing; Li, Yi; Xia, Yuan-Ling; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liang, Jing; Sang, Peng; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition, which is the process of biological macromolecules interacting with each other or various small molecules with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex, constitutes the basis of all processes in living organisms. Proteins, an important class of biological macromolecules, realize their functions through binding to themselves or other molecules. A detailed understanding of the protein–ligand interactions is therefore central to understanding biology at the molecular level. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the protein-ligand recognition and binding will also facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In the present review, first, the physicochemical mechanisms underlying protein–ligand binding, including the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and relationships, and binding driving forces, are introduced and rationalized. Next, three currently existing protein-ligand binding models—the “lock-and-key”, “induced fit”, and “conformational selection”—are described and their underlying thermodynamic mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the methods available for investigating protein–ligand binding affinity, including experimental and theoretical/computational approaches, are introduced, and their advantages, disadvantages, and challenges are discussed. PMID:26821017

  18. Entangled zinc-ditetrazolate frameworks involving in situ ligand synthesis and topological modulation by various secondary N-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yunwu; Chen Weilin; Wang Yonghui; Li Yangguang; Wang Enbo

    2009-04-15

    The introduction of various secondary N-donor ligands into an in situ ditetrazolate-ligand synthesis system of terephthalonitrile, NaN{sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} led to the formation of three new entangled frameworks Zn(pdtz)(4,4'-bipy).3H{sub 2}O (1), [Zn(pdtz)(bpp)]{sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O (2) and Zn(pdtz){sub 0.5}(N{sub 3})(2,2'-bipy) (3) (4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine; bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane; 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine; H{sub 2}pdtz=5,5'-1,4-phenylene-ditetrazole). The formation of pdtz{sup 2-} ligand involves the Sharpless [2+3] cycloaddition reaction between terephthalonitrile and NaN{sub 3} in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} ion as a Lewis-acid catalyst under hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1 exhibits a fivefold interpenetrating 3D framework based on the diamondoid topology. Compound 2 displays a twofold parallel interpenetrating framework based on the wavelike individual network. Compound 3 possesses a 2D puckered network. These new Zn-ditetrazolate frameworks are highly dependent on the modulation of different secondary N-donor ligands. Their luminescent properties were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new entangled frameworks were prepared by an in situ ditetrazolate-ligand synthesis system assisted with various auxiliary N-donor ligands. The entangled structures can be modulated by different secondary ligands.

  19. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei

    2015-12-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}ndc) or 4,4′-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H{sub 2}hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd{sub 2}(2,6-ndc){sub 2}(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd{sub 3}(hmdb){sub 3}(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 exhibits a 3D self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster, and 2 displays an infinite 3D ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster. The flexible 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  20. Synthesis, structure characterization and biological activity of selected metal complexes of sulfonamide Schiff base as a primary ligand and some mixed ligand complexes with glycine as a secondary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaby, Carmen M.; Amine, Mona F.; Hamed, Asmaa A.

    2017-04-01

    The current work reports synthesis of metal complexes and mixed ligand complexes of a novel sulfonamide Schiff base ligand (HL) resulted from the condensation of sulfametrole [N‧-(4-methoxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yl]sulfanilamide and acetyl-acetone as a primary ligand and glycine as a secondary ligand. The metal complexes and mixed ligand complexes of HL Schiff base ligand were synthesized and characterized using different physicochemical studies as elemental analyses, mass spectra, conductivity measurement, IR spectra, 1H NMR spectra, UV-vis Spectra, solid reflectance, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analyses (TGA and DTA) and their microbial and anticancer activities. The spectroscopic data of the complexes suggest their 1:2(L1:M) complex structures and 1:2:2(L1:L2:M) mixed ligand complex structures, where L1 = HL and L2 = glycine. Also, the spectroscopic studies suggested the octahedral structure for all complexes. The synthesized Schiff base, its metal and mixed ligand complexes were screened for their bacterial, antifungal and anticancer activity. The activity data show that the metal complexes and mixed ligand complexes exhibited promising microbial and anticancer activities than their parent HL Schiff base ligand, also the data show that the mixed ligand complexes more effective than the metal complexes.

  1. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  2. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; ...

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with amore » nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.« less

  3. Noncovalent ligand-to-ligand interactions alter sense of optical chirality in luminescent tris(β-diketonate) lanthanide(III) complexes containing a chiral bis(oxazolinyl) pyridine ligand.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Junpei; Ohno, Tomoko; Miyata, Kohei; Tsumatori, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2011-06-29

    Highly luminescent tris[β-diketonate (HFA, 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoropentane-2,4-dione)] europium(III) complexes containing a chiral bis(oxazolinyl) pyridine (pybox) ligand--[(Eu(III)(R)-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)], [(Eu(III)(R)-i-Pr-pybox)(HFA)(3)], and [(Eu(III)(R)-Me-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)])--exhibit strong circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) at the magnetic-dipole ((5)D(0) → (7)F(1)) transition, where the [(Eu(III)(R)-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)] complexes show virtually opposite CPL spectra as compared to those with the same chirality of [(Eu(III)(R)-i-Pr-pybox)(HFA)(3)] and [(Eu(III)(R)-Me-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)]. Similarly, the [(Tb(III)(R)-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)] complexes were found to exhibit CPL signals almost opposite to those of [(Tb(III)(R)-i-Pr-pybox)(HFA)(3)] and [(Tb(III)(R)-Me-Ph-pybox)(HFA)(3)] complexes with the same pybox chirality. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis revealed ligand-ligand interactions between the pybox ligand and the HFA ligand in each lanthanide(III) complex: π-π stacking interactions in the Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes with the Ph-pybox ligand, CH/F interactions in those with the i-Pr-pybox ligand, and CH/π interactions in those with the Me-Ph-pybox ligand. The ligand-ligand interactions between the achiral HFA ligands and the chiral pybox results in an asymmetric arrangement of three HFA ligands around the metal center. The metal center geometry varies depending on the types of ligand-ligand interaction.

  4. Ligand-gated Diffusion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    B Lepore; M Indic; H Pham; E Hearn; D Patel; B van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    Ligand-gated channels, in which a substrate transport pathway is formed as a result of the binding of a small-molecule chemical messenger, constitute a diverse class of membrane proteins with important functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Despite their widespread nature, no ligand-gated channels have yet been found within the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. Here we show, using in vivo transport assays, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and X-ray crystallography, that high-affinity (submicromolar) substrate binding to the OM long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL from Escherichia coli causes conformational changes in the N terminus that open up a channel for substrate diffusion. The OM long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL from E. coli is a unique paradigm for OM diffusion-driven transport, in which ligand gating within a {beta}-barrel membrane protein is a prerequisite for channel formation.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2006-08-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators.

  6. slate: A method for the superposition of flexible ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, J. E. J.; de Esch, I. J. P.; Perkins, T. D. J.; Dean, P. M.

    2001-01-01

    A novel program for the superposition of flexible molecules, slate, is presented. It uses simulated annealing to minimise the difference between the distance matrices calculated from the hydrogen-bonding and aromatic-ring properties of two ligands. A method for generating a molecular stack using multiple pairwise matches is illustrated. These stacks are used by the program doh to predict the relative positions of receptor atoms that could form hydrogen bonds to two or more ligands in the dataset. The methodology has been applied to ligands binding to dihydrofolate reductase, thermolysin, H3 histamine receptors, α2 adrenoceptors and 5-HT1D receptors. When there are sufficient numbers and diversity of molecules in the dataset, the prediction of receptor-atom positions is applicable to compound design.

  7. Automated identification of crystallographic ligands using sparse-density representations

    PubMed Central

    Carolan, C. G.; Lamzin, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel procedure for the automatic identification of ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. It is based on the sparse parameterization of density clusters and the matching of the pseudo-atomic grids thus created to conformationally variant ligands using mathematical descriptors of molecular shape, size and topology. In large-scale tests on experimental data derived from the Protein Data Bank, the procedure could quickly identify the deposited ligand within the top-ranked compounds from a database of candidates. This indicates the suitability of the method for the identification of binding entities in fragment-based drug screening and in model completion in macromolecular structure determination. PMID:25004962

  8. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  9. GPCR biased ligands as novel heart failure therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Soergel, David G; Boerrigter, Guido; Burnett, John C; Lark, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors have been successfully targeted by numerous therapeutics including drugs that have transformed the management of cardiovascular disease. However, many GPCRs, when activated or blocked by drugs, elicit both beneficial and adverse pharmacology. Recent work has demonstrated that in some cases, the salutary and deleterious signals linked to a specific GPCR can be selectively targeted by "biased ligands" that entrain subsets of a receptor's normal pharmacology. This review briefly summarizes the advances and current state of the biased ligand field, focusing on an example: biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These compounds exhibit unique pharmacology, distinct from classic agonists or antagonists, and one such molecule is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute heart failure.

  10. Memetic algorithms for ligand expulsion from protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydzewski, J.; Nowak, W.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand diffusion through a protein interior is a fundamental process governing biological signaling and enzymatic catalysis. A complex topology of channels in proteins leads often to difficulties in modeling ligand escape pathways by classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, two novel memetic methods for searching the exit paths and cavity space exploration are proposed: Memory Enhanced Random Acceleration (MERA) Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Immune Algorithm (IA). In MERA, a pheromone concept is introduced to optimize an expulsion force. In IA, hybrid learning protocols are exploited to predict ligand exit paths. They are tested on three protein channels with increasing complexity: M2 muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor, enzyme nitrile hydratase, and heme-protein cytochrome P450cam. In these cases, the memetic methods outperform simulated annealing and random acceleration molecular dynamics. The proposed algorithms are general and appropriate in all problems where an accelerated transport of an object through a network of channels is studied.

  11. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  12. Coordination chemistry of N-heterocyclic nitrenium-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Tulchinsky, Yuri; Kozuch, Sebastian; Saha, Prasenjit; Mauda, Assaf; Nisnevich, Gennady; Botoshansky, Mark; Shimon, Linda J W; Gandelman, Mark

    2015-05-04

    Comprehensive studies on the coordination properties of tridentate nitrenium-based ligands are presented. N-heterocyclic nitrenium ions demonstrate general and versatile binding abilities to various transition metals, as exemplified by the synthesis and characterization of Rh(I) , Rh(III) , Mo(0) , Ru(0) , Ru(II) , Pd(II) , Pt(II) , Pt(IV) , and Ag(I) complexes based on these unusual ligands. Formation of nitrenium-metal bonds is unambiguously confirmed both in solution by selective (15) N-labeling experiments and in the solid state by X-ray crystallography. The generality of N-heterocyclic nitrenium as a ligand is also validated by a systematic DFT study of its affinity towards all second-row transition and post-transition metals (Y-Cd) in terms of the corresponding bond-dissociation energies.

  13. Quantitation of Membrane-Ligand Interactions Using Backscattering Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Kussrow, Amanda K.; Mileni, Mauro; Finn, M.G.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    Though membrane-associated proteins are ubiquitous within all living organisms and represent the majority of drug targets, a general method for direct, label-free measurement of ligand binding to native membranes has not been reported. Here we show backscattering interferometry (BSI) to be a viable technique for quantifying ligand-receptor binding affinities in a variety of membrane environments. By detecting minute changes in the refractive index of a solution, BSI allows binding interactions of proteins with their ligands to be measured at picomolar concentrations. Equilibrium binding constants in the micromolar to picomolar range were obtained for small- and large-molecule interactions in both synthetic- and cell-derived membranes without the use of labels or supporting substrates. The simple and low-cost hardware, high sensitivity, and label-free nature of BSI should make it readily applicable to the study of many membrane-associated proteins of biochemical and pharmacological interest. PMID:21399645

  14. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  15. Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR Is a Complementary Ligand Discovery Method to (1)H CPMG Ligand-Observed NMR.

    PubMed

    Urick, Andrew K; Calle, Luis Pablo; Espinosa, Juan F; Hu, Haitao; Pomerantz, William C K

    2016-11-18

    To evaluate its potential as a ligand discovery tool, we compare a newly developed 1D protein-observed fluorine NMR (PrOF NMR) screening method with the well-characterized ligand-observed (1)H CPMG NMR screen. We selected the first bromodomain of Brd4 as a model system to benchmark PrOF NMR because of the high ligandability of Brd4 and the need for small molecule inhibitors of related epigenetic regulatory proteins. We compare the two methods' hit sensitivity, triaging ability, experiment speed, material consumption, and the potential for false positives and negatives. To this end, we screened 930 fragment molecules against Brd4 in mixtures of five and followed up these studies with mixture deconvolution and affinity characterization of the top hits. In selected examples, we also compare the environmental responsiveness of the (19)F chemical shift to (1)H in 1D-protein observed (1)H NMR experiments. To address concerns of perturbations from fluorine incorporation, ligand binding trends and affinities were verified via thermal shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry. We conclude that for the protein understudy here, PrOF NMR and (1)H CPMG have similar sensitivity, with both being effective tools for ligand discovery. In cases where an unlabeled protein can be used, 1D protein-observed (1)H NMR may also be effective; however, the (19)F chemical shift remains significantly more responsive.

  16. Improved Estimation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy by Using the Ligand-Entropy and Mobility of Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed the direct interaction approximation (DIA) method to estimate the protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG). The DIA method estimates the ΔG value based on the direct van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between the protein and the ligand. In the current study, the effect of the entropy of the ligand was introduced with protein dynamic properties by molecular dynamics simulations, and the interaction between each residue of the protein and the ligand was also weighted considering the hydration of each residue. The molecular dynamics simulation of the apo target protein gave the hydration effect of each residue, under the assumption that the residues, which strongly bind the water molecules, are important in the protein-ligand binding. These two effects improved the reliability of the DIA method. In fact, the parameters used in the DIA became independent of the target protein. The averaged error of ΔG estimation was 1.3 kcal/mol and the correlation coefficient between the experimental ΔG value and the calculated ΔG value was 0.75. PMID:24276169

  17. Complexation of trivalent americium and lanthanides with terdentate 'N' donor ligands: the role of rigidity in the ligand structure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Gadly, Trilochan; Pathak, Priyanath; Ghosh, Sunil K; Mohapatra, Manoj; Ghanty, Tapan K; Mohapatra, Prasanta K

    2014-08-28

    A systematic study on the Ln(3+) complexation behaviour with two terdentate 'N' donor ligands of varying structural rigidity, viz. 5,6-dimethyl-(1,2,4)-triazinylbipyridine (Me2TBipy) and 5,6-dimethyl-(1,2,4)-triazinylphenanthroline (Me2TPhen), is performed in the present work by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) studies. These studies indicate the formation of a 1 : 1 complex of La(3+), 1 : 2 complexes of Eu(3+) and Er(3+) with both the ligands. Density functional theoretical (DFT) study is carried out to determine the solution phase structure of the Eu(3+) complex considering the species (from UV-Vis spectrophotometry) and C2v site symmetry around the Eu(3+) ion (from TRFS study). Me2TPhen is found to be a stronger complexing ligand as compared to Me2TBipy irrespective of the Ln(3+) ions. The solid state crystal structure of the La(3+) complex of Me2TPhen is determined using the single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) technique. The complexation of the trivalent Am(3+) ion is also studied with both these ligands using UV-Vis spectrophotometric titrations which show the formation of 1 : 2 complexes with higher complexation constant values as compared to all the Ln(3+) ions studied, indicating the selectivity of these ligands for the trivalent actinides over the lanthanides.

  18. SODOCK: swarm optimization for highly flexible protein-ligand docking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Liu, Bo-Fu; Huang, Hui-Ling; Hwang, Shiow-Fen; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2007-01-30

    Protein-ligand docking can be formulated as a parameter optimization problem associated with an accurate scoring function, which aims to identify the translation, orientation, and conformation of a docked ligand with the lowest energy. The parameter optimization problem for highly flexible ligands with many rotatable bonds is more difficult than that for less flexible ligands using genetic algorithm (GA)-based approaches, due to the large numbers of parameters and high correlations among these parameters. This investigation presents a novel optimization algorithm SODOCK based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) for solving flexible protein-ligand docking problems. To improve efficiency and robustness of PSO, an efficient local search strategy is incorporated into SODOCK. The implementation of SODOCK adopts the environment and energy function of AutoDock 3.05. Computer simulation results reveal that SODOCK is superior to the Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA) of AutoDock, in terms of convergence performance, robustness, and obtained energy, especially for highly flexible ligands. The results also reveal that PSO is more suitable than the conventional GA in dealing with flexible docking problems with high correlations among parameters. This investigation also compared SODOCK with four state-of-the-art docking methods, namely GOLD 1.2, DOCK 4.0, FlexX 1.8, and LGA of AutoDock 3.05. SODOCK obtained the smallest RMSD in 19 of 37 cases. The average 2.29 A of the 37 RMSD values of SODOCK was better than those of other docking programs, which were all above 3.0 A.

  19. Estrogen Receptor Ligands: A Review (2013–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Shabnam; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of compounds named for their importance in both menstrual and estrous reproductive cycles. They are involved in the regulation of various processes ranging from tissue growth maintenance to reproduction. Their action is mediated through ER nuclear receptors. Two subtypes of the estrogen receptor, ERα and ERβ, exist and exhibit distinct cellular and tissue distribution patterns. In humans, both receptor subtypes are expressed in many cells and tissues, and they control key physiological functions in various organ systems. Estrogens attract great attention due to their wide applications in female reproductive functions and treatment of some estrogen-dependent cancers and osteoporosis. This paper provides a general review of ER ligands published in international journals patented between 2013 and 2015. The broad physiological profile of estrogens has attracted the attention of many researchers to develop new estrogen ligands as therapeutic molecules for various clinical purposes. After the discovery of the ERβ receptor, subtype-selective ligands could be used to elicit beneficial estrogen-like activities and reduce adverse side effects, based on the different distributions and relative levels of the two ER subtypes in different estrogen target tissues. Therefore, recent literature has focused on selective estrogen ligands as highly promising agents for the treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Estrogen receptors are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological functions in humans. Selective estrogen ligands are highly promising targets for treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies of ER ligands based on small molecules indicate that many different structural scaffolds may provide high

  20. Evaluation of nanoparticle-ligand distributions to determine nanoparticle concentration.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Shergill, Ravi T; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-01-20

    The concentration of nanoparticles in solution is an important, yet challenging, parameter to quantify. In this work, a facile strategy for the determination of nanoparticle concentration is presented. The method relies on the quantitative analysis of the inherent distribution of nanoparticle-ligand conjugates that are generated when nanoparticles are functionalized with ligands. Validation of the method was accomplished by applying it to gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles (CdSe/ZnS; core/shell). Poly(ethylene glycol) based ligands, with functional groups that quantitatively react with the nanoparticles, were incubated with the nanoparticles at varying equivalences. Agarose gel electrophoresis was subsequently used to separate and quantify the nanoparticle-ligand conjugates of varying valences. The distribution in the nanoparticle-ligand conjugates agreed well with that predicted by the Poisson model. A protocol was then developed, where a series of only eight different ligand amounts could provide an estimate of the nanoparticle concentration that spans 3 orders of magnitude (1 μM to 1 mM). For the gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles, the measured concentrations were found to deviate by only 7% and 2%, respectively, from those determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The precision of the assay was evaluated, resulting in a coefficient of variation of 5-7%. Finally, the protocol was used to determine the extinction coefficient of alloyed semiconductor nanoparticles (CdSxSe1-x/ZnS), for which a reliable estimate is currently unavailable, of three different emission wavelengths (525, 575, and 630 nm). The extinction coefficient of the nanoparticles of all emission wavelengths was similar and was found to be 2.1 × 10(5) M(-1)cm(-1).

  1. Designing simple tridentate ligands for highly luminescent europium complexes.

    PubMed

    Shavaleev, Nail M; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Scopelliti, Rosario; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2009-10-19

    A series of tridentate benzimidazole-substituted pyridine-2-carboxylic acids have been prepared with a halogen, methyl or alkoxy group in the 6-position of the benzimidazole ring, which additionally contains a solubilising N-alkyl chain. The ligands form neutral homoleptic nine-coordinate lanthanum, europium and terbium complexes as established from X-ray crystallographic analysis of eight structures. The coordination polyhedron around the lanthanide ion is close to a tricapped trigonal prism with ligands arranged in an up-up-down fashion. The coordinated ligands serve as light-harvesting chromophores in the complexes with absorption maxima in the range 321-341 nm (epsilon=(4.9-6.0)x10(4) M(-1) cm(-1)) and triplet-state energies between 21 300 and 18 800 cm(-1); the largest redshifts occur for bromine and electron-donor alkoxy substituents. The ligands efficiently sensitise europium luminescence with overall quantum yields (Q(L)(Eu)) and observed lifetimes (tau(obs)) reaching 71 % and 3.00 ms, respectively, in the solid state and 52 % and 2.81 ms, respectively, in CH(2)Cl(2) at room temperature. The radiative lifetimes of the Eu((5)D(0)) level amount to tau(rad)=3.6-4.6 ms and the sensitisation efficiency eta(sens)=Q(L)(Eu)(tau(rad)/tau(obs)) is close to unity for most of the complexes in the solid state and equal to approximately 80 % in solution. The photophysical parameters of the complexes correlate with the triplet energy of the ligands, which in turn is determined by the nature of the benzimidazole substituent. Facile modification of the ligands makes them promising for the development of brightly emissive europium-containing materials.

  2. Protein-ligand docking with multiple flexible side chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Sanner, Michel F.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, we validate and analyze the results of previously published cross docking experiments and classify failed dockings based on the conformational changes observed in the receptors. We show that a majority of failed experiments (i.e. 25 out of 33, involving four different receptors: cAPK, CDK2, Ricin and HIVp) are due to conformational changes in side chains near the active site. For these cases, we identify the side chains to be made flexible during docking calculation by superimposing receptors and analyzing steric overlap between various ligands and receptor side chains. We demonstrate that allowing these side chains to assume rotameric conformations enables the successful cross docking of 19 complexes (ligand all atom RMSD < 2.0 Å) using our docking software FLIPDock. The number of side receptor side chains interacting with a ligand can vary according to the ligand's size and shape. Hence, when starting from a complex with a particular ligand one might have to extend the region of potential interacting side chains beyond the ones interacting with the known ligand. We discuss distance-based methods for selecting additional side chains in the neighborhood of the known active site. We show that while using the molecular surface to grow the neighborhood is more efficient than Euclidian-distance selection, the number of side chains selected by these methods often remains too large and additional methods for reducing their count are needed. Despite these difficulties, using geometric constraints obtained from the network of bonded and non-bonded interactions to rank residues and allowing the top ranked side chains to be flexible during docking makes 22 out of 25 complexes successful.

  3. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  4. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  5. Discovery of Potent Dual PPARα Agonists/CB1 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Fresno, Nieves; Macías-González, Manuel; Elguero, José; Decara, Juan; Girón, Rocío; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Ana; Martín, María Isabel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Goya, Pilar

    2011-11-10

    This letter describes the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of dual ligands targeting the cannabinoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). These compounds were obtained from fusing the pharmacophores of fibrates and the diarylpyrazole rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor antagonist. They are the first examples of dual compounds with nanomolar affinity for both PPARα and cannabinoid receptors. Besides, lead compound 2 proved to be CB1 selective. Unexpectedly, the phenol intermediates tested were equipotent (compound 1 as compared to 2) or even more potent (compound 3 as compared with 4). This discovery opens the way to design new dual ligands.

  6. Development of catalysts and ligands for enantioselective gold catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ming; Lackner, Aaron D; Toste, F Dean

    2014-03-18

    During the past decade, the use of Au(I) complexes for the catalytic activation of C-C π-bonds has been investigated intensely. Over this time period, the development of homogeneous gold catalysis has been extraordinarily rapid and has yielded a host of mild and selective methods for the formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. The facile formation of new bonds facilitated by gold naturally led to efforts toward rendering these transformations enantioselective. In this Account, we survey the development of catalysts and ligands for enantioselective gold catalysis by our research group as well as related work by others. We also discuss some of our strategies to address the challenges of enantioselective gold(I) catalysis. Early on, our work with enantioselective gold-catalyzed transformations focused on bis(phosphinegold) complexes derived from axially chiral scaffolds. Although these complexes were highly successful in some reactions like cyclopropanation, the careful choice of the weakly coordinating ligand (or counterion) was necessary to obtain high levels of enantioselectivity for the case of allene hydroamination. These counterion effects led us to use the anion itself as a source of chirality, which was successful in the case of allene hydroalkoxylation. In general, these tactics enhance the steric influence around the reactive gold center beyond the two-coordinate ligand environment. The use of binuclear complexes allowed us to use the second gold center and its associated ligand (or counterion) to exert a further steric influence. In a similar vein, we employed a chiral anion (in place of or in addition to a chiral ligand) to move the chiral information closer to the reactive center. In order to expand the scope of reactions amenable to enantioselective gold catalysis to cycloadditions and other carbocyclization processes, we also developed a new class of mononuclear phosphite and phosphoramidite ligands to supplement the previously widely

  7. Ultrafast electron trapping in ligand-exchanged quantum dot assemblies.

    PubMed

    Turk, Michael E; Vora, Patrick M; Fafarman, Aaron T; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R; Kikkawa, James M

    2015-02-24

    We use time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption to characterize the low-temperature optical properties of CdSe quantum dot solids after exchanging native aliphatic ligands for thiocyanate and subsequent thermal annealing. In contrast to trends established at room temperature, our data show that at low temperature the band-edge absorptive bleach is dominated by 1S3/2h hole occupation in the quantum dot interior. We find that our ligand treatments, which bring enhanced interparticle coupling, lead to faster surface state electron trapping, a greater proportion of surface-related photoluminescence, and decreased band-edge photoluminescence lifetimes.

  8. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry: Assisted Crystallization of RNA-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Da Veiga, Cyrielle; Mezher, Joelle; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The success rate of nucleic acids/ligands co-crystallization can be significantly improved by performing preliminary biophysical analyses. Among suitable biophysical approaches, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is certainly a method of choice. ITC can be used in a wide range of experimental conditions to monitor in real time the formation of the RNA- or DNA-ligand complex, with the advantage of providing in addition the complete binding profile of the interaction. Following the ITC experiment, the complex is ready to be concentrated for crystallization trials. This chapter describes a detailed experimental protocol for using ITC as a tool for monitoring RNA/small molecule binding, followed by co-crystallization.

  9. Double-ligand modulation for engineering magnetic nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs) are agglomerated individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that show great promise in increasing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity. Here, we report an effective strategy to engineer MNCs based on double-ligand modulation to enhance MRI sensitivity. The oleic acid-coated individual MNPs self-assembled and then were enveloped by polysorbate 80, using a nanoemulsion method to prepare MNCs. By modulating the amounts of the two ligands, and thus the size and magnetic content of the resultant MNCs, we were able to enormously improve MRI sensitivity. PMID:23433032

  10. [Determining the parameters for receptor-ligand interaction by serial dilution method for the case when the ligand and receptor are in a pre-existing mixture].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2005-01-01

    New methods of determining the binding parameters for ligand-receptor interaction are considered. The considered approaches are based on the earlier suggested method of serial dilution and application of so-called coordinates of dilution. It was shown that the suggested methods allow to evaluate affinity constant and ligand concentration even for the case, when the receptor and corresponding ligand of unknown concentration are in a mixture and their separation from each other is impossible. In this connection the suggested methods are especially useful for studying the ligand-receptor interaction if the receptor is very liable and its purification from the ligand would cause drastic changes of its binding properties.

  11. From α4β2 Nicotinic Ligands to the Discovery of σ1 Receptor Ligands: Pharmacophore Analysis and Rational Design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Han-Kun; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-12-13

    Comparative analyses of the pharmacophoric elements required for σ1 and nicotinic ligands led to the identification of a potent and selective σ1 ligand (15). Compound 15 displayed high selectivity for the σ1 receptor (Ki, σ1 = 4.1 nM, Ki, σ2 = 1312 nM) with moderate binding affinity for the DAT (Ki = 373 nM) and NET (Ki = 203 nM) in the PDSP broad screening panel of common CNS neurotransmitter transporters and receptors. The key finding in this present work is that a subtle structural modifica tion could be used as a tool to switch a ligand's selectivity between nAChRs and sigma receptors.

  12. Predicting Electrophoretic Mobility of Protein-Ligand Complexes for Ligands from DNA-Encoded Libraries of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Hale, Robert L; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Chiu, Cynthia H; Shaginian, Alex; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-05-17

    Selection of target-binding ligands from DNA-encoded libraries of small molecules (DELSMs) is a rapidly developing approach in drug-lead discovery. Methods of kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) may facilitate highly efficient homogeneous selection of ligands from DELSMs. However, KCE methods require accurate prediction of electrophoretic mobilities of protein-ligand complexes. Such prediction, in turn, requires a theory that would be applicable to DNA tags of different structures used in different DELSMs. Here we present such a theory. It utilizes a model of a globular protein connected, through a single point (small molecule), to a linear DNA tag containing a combination of alternating double-stranded and single-stranded DNA (dsDNA and ssDNA) regions of varying lengths. The theory links the unknown electrophoretic mobility of protein-DNA complex with experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities of the protein and DNA. Mobility prediction was initially tested by using a protein interacting with 18 ligands of various combinations of dsDNA and ssDNA regions, which mimicked different DELSMs. For all studied ligands, deviation of the predicted mobility from the experimentally determined value was within 11%. Finally, the prediction was tested for two proteins and two ligands with a DNA tag identical to those of DELSM manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Deviation between the predicted and experimentally determined mobilities did not exceed 5%. These results confirm the accuracy and robustness of our model, which makes KCE methods one step closer to their practical use in selection of drug leads, and diagnostic probes from DELSMs.

  13. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Ligand Interactions: Structural Cross Talk between Ligands and the Extracellular Domain

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Willard, Francis S.; Sloop, Kyle W.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R) were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R). In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. PMID:25180755

  14. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianshu; Kaercher, Sabrina; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-01-07

    A comprehensive review of structurally characterized rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands is presented. Since rare-earth elements form hard ions and phosphorus is considered as a soft ligand, the rare-earth metal phosphorus coordination is regarded as a less favorite combination. Three classes of phosphorus ligands, (1) the monoanionic organophosphide ligands (PR2(-)) bearing one negative charge on the phosphorus atom; (2) the dianionic phosphinidene (PR(2-)) and P(3-) ligands; and (3) the pure inorganic polyphosphide ligands (Pn(x-)), are included here. Particular attention has been paid to the synthesis, structure, and reactivity of the rare-earth metal phosphides.

  15. SANS Study on the Behaviors of Polymeric Ligands on the Nanoparticle Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyong; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Huh, June; Bang, Joona

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we employed small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and contrast variation technique to characterize the behaviors of polymer ligands on the nanoparticle (NPs) surfaces. The Janus-type Au NPs were coated with a mixture of two different ligands, PMMA-SH and deuterated PS-SH, and the Au NPs coated only with P(MMA-r-dS)-SH were also prepared for the control case of NPs with homogeneous ligands. From the SANS analysis, it was observed that the ligands become phase separated with increasing the molecular weight of ligands. Furthermore, computational simulation was performed to examine how ligands are phase separated on the curved NPs surfaces.

  16. Secondary ligand-directed assembly of Co(II) coordination polymers based on a pyridine carboxylate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ke-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Cai, Yi-Ni; Xu, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Yun-Long

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands on the structures and properties of the resulting frameworks, five new Co(II) compounds have been synthesized by the reactions of Co(II) salts and 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL) with four rationally selected dicarboxylic acid ligands. Without secondary ligand, we got one compound [CoL{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O (1), which possesses a 1D chain structure. In the presence of ancillary ligands, namely, 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}adbc), terephthalic acid (H{sub 2}tpa), thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) and 1,4-benzenedithioacetic acid (H{sub 2}bdtc), four 3D structures [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(adbc)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (2), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(tpa)]{sub n} (3), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(tdc)]{sub n} (4), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(bdtc)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (5) were obtained, respectively. It can be observed from the architectures of 1–5 that hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands both have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. The XRPD, TGA data of title polymers and the magnetic properties for 2 and 5 have also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The structural differences show that the ancillary ligands have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. - Highlights: • Five new Co(II) coordination polymers have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions based on 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL). • The long-flexible ligand (HL) is a good candidate to produce interpenetrating architectures. • The secondary dicarboxylic acid ligands play important roles in the spatial connective fashions and the formation of various dimensional compounds. • The magnetism studies show that both 2 and 5 exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions.

  17. Rhodium complexes bearing tetradentate diamine-bis(phenolate) ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang Y; Lokare, Kapil S; Ganesh, Somesh K; Gonzales, Jason M; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01

    Using tetradentate, dianionic ligands, several new rhodium complexes have been prepared. Some of these diamine-bis(phenolate) compounds, are active for C–H activation of benzene. These complexes are air and thermally stable. All four complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  19. Ultrafast Electron Trapping in Ligand-Exchanged Quantum Dot Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, J. M.; Turk, M. E.; Vora, P. M.; Fafarman, A. T.; Diroll, B. T.; Murray, C. B.; Kagan, C. R.

    2015-03-01

    We use time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption to characterize the low-temperature (10 K) optical properties of CdSe quantum dot (QD) solids with different ligand and annealing preparation. Close-packed CdSe quantum dot solids are prepared with native aliphatic ligands and with thiocyanate with and without thermal annealing. Using sub-picosecond, broadband time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption, we find that ligand exchange increases the rate of carrier surface trapping. We further determine that holes within the QD core, rather than electrons, can bleach the band-edge transition in these samples at low temperature, a finding that comes as a surprise given what is known about the surface treatment in these QDs. We find that our ligand treatments lead to faster electron trapping to the quantum dot surface, a greater proportion of surface photoluminescence, and an increased rate of nonradiative decay due to enhanced interparticle coupling upon exchange and annealing. All aspects of this work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Award No. DE-SC0002158.

  20. Local Innate Responses to TLR Ligands in the Chicken Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Barjesteh, Neda; Alkie, Tamiru Negash; Hodgins, Douglas C.; Nagy, Éva; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    The chicken upper respiratory tract is the portal of entry for respiratory pathogens, such as avian influenza virus (AIV). The presence of microorganisms is sensed by pathogen recognition receptors (such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs)) of the innate immune defenses. Innate responses are essential for subsequent induction of potent adaptive immune responses, but little information is available about innate antiviral responses of the chicken trachea. We hypothesized that TLR ligands induce innate antiviral responses in the chicken trachea. Tracheal organ cultures (TOC) were used to investigate localized innate responses to TLR ligands. Expression of candidate genes, which play a role in antiviral responses, was quantified. To confirm the antiviral responses of stimulated TOC, chicken macrophages were treated with supernatants from stimulated TOC, prior to infection with AIV. The results demonstrated that TLR ligands induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, type I interferons and interferon stimulated genes in the chicken trachea. In conclusion, TLR ligands induce functional antiviral responses in the chicken trachea, which may act against some pathogens, such as AIV. PMID:27455308

  1. The Principles of Ligand Specificity on beta-2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Filipek, Slawomir; Yuan, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are recognized as one of the largest families of membrane proteins. Despite sharing a characteristic seven-transmembrane topology, G protein-coupled receptors regulate a wide range of cellular signaling pathways in response to various physical and chemical stimuli, and prevail as an important target for drug discovery. Notably, the recent progress in crystallographic methods led to a breakthrough in elucidating the structures of membrane proteins. The structures of β2-adrenergic receptor bound with a variety of ligands provide atomic details of the binding modes of agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. In this study, we selected four representative molecules from each functional class of ligands and investigated their impacts on β2-adrenergic receptor through a total of 12 × 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. From the obtained trajectories, we generated molecular fingerprints exemplifying propensities of protein-ligand interactions. For each functional class of compounds, we characterized and compared the fluctuation of the protein backbone, the volumes in the intracellular pockets, the water densities in the receptors, the domain interaction networks as well as the movements of transmembrane helices. We discovered that each class of ligands exhibits a distinct mode of interactions with mainly TM5 and TM6, altering the shape and eventually the state of the receptor. Our findings provide insightful prospective into GPCR targeted structure-based drug discoveries. PMID:27703221

  2. Spin-dependent mechanism for diatomic ligand binding to heme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Stefan

    2002-12-01

    The nature of diatomic ligand recombination in heme proteins is elucidated by using a Landau-Zener model for the electronic coupling in the recombination rate constant. The model is developed by means of explicit potential energy surfaces calculated by using density functional theory (DFT). The interaction of all possible spin states of the three common diatomic ligands, CO, NO, and O2, and high-spin heme iron is compared. The electronic coupling, rebinding barrier, and Landau-Zener force terms can be obtained and used to demonstrate significant differences among the ligands. In particular the intermediate spin states of NO (S = 3/2) and O2 (S = 1) are shown to be bound states. Rapid recombination occurs from these bound states in agreement with experimental data. The slower phases of O2 recombination can be explained by the presence of two higher spin states, S = 2 and S = 3, which have a small and relatively large barrier to ligand recombination, respectively. By contrast, the intermediate spin state for CO is not a bound state, and the only recombination pathway for CO involves direct recombination from the S = 2 state. This process is significantly slower according to the Landau-Zener model. Quantitative estimates of the parameters used in the rate constants provide a complete description that explains rebinding rates that range from femtoseconds to milliseconds at ambient temperature.

  3. Analyzing Ligand Depletion in a Saturation Equilibrium Binding Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claro, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    I present a proposal for a laboratory practice to generate and analyze data from a saturation equilibrium binding experiment addressed to advanced undergraduate students. [[superscript 3]H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a nonselective muscarinic ligand with very high affinity and very low nonspecific binding to brain membranes, which contain a high…

  4. Trapping of palindromic ligands within native transthyretin prevents amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Kolstoe, Simon E.; Mangione, Palma P.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Taylor, Graham W.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Deroo, Stéphanie; Morrison, Angus J.; Cobb, Alexander J. A.; Coyne, Anthony; McCammon, Margaret G.; Warner, Timothy D.; Mitchell, Jane; Gill, Raj; Smith, Martin D.; Ley, Steven V.; Robinson, Carol V.; Wood, Stephen P.; Pepys, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is a fatal disease for which new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. We have designed two palindromic ligands, 2,2'-(4,4'-(heptane-1,7-diylbis(oxy))bis(3,5-dichloro-4,1-phenylene)) bis(azanediyl)dibenzoic acid (mds84) and 2,2'-(4,4'-(undecane-1,11-diylbis(oxy))bis(3,5-dichloro-4,1-phenylene)) bis(azanediyl)dibenzoic acid (4ajm15), that are rapidly bound by native wild-type TTR in whole serum and even more avidly by amyloidogenic TTR variants. One to one stoichiometry, demonstrable in solution and by MS, was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis showing simultaneous occupation of both T4 binding sites in each tetrameric TTR molecule by the pair of ligand head groups. Ligand binding by native TTR was irreversible under physiological conditions, and it stabilized the tetrameric assembly and inhibited amyloidogenic aggregation more potently than other known ligands. These superstabilizers are orally bioavailable and exhibit low inhibitory activity against cyclooxygenase (COX). They offer a promising platform for development of drugs to treat and prevent TTR amyloidosis. PMID:21059958

  5. Photocontrol over cooperative porphyrin self-assembly with phenylazopyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Takashi; Helmich, Floris; Meijer, E W

    2013-01-02

    The cooperative self-assembly of chiral zinc porphyrins is regulated by a photoresponsive phenylazopyridine ligand. Porphyrin stacks depolymerize into dimers upon axial ligation and the strength of the coordination is regulated by its photoinduced isomerization, which shows more than 95 % conversion ratio for both photostationary states.

  6. Ligand influences on homoleptic Group 12 m-terphenyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Toby J; Hastings, Fiona R; Gridley, Benjamin M; Moxey, Graeme J; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Kays, Deborah L

    2014-10-14

    Three m-terphenyl ligands 2,6-Ar2C6H3(-) [Ar = 2,6-Me2C6H3 (2,6-Xyl); 3,5-Me2C6H3 (3,5-Xyl); 2,3,4,5,6-Me5C6 (Pmp)] have been used to stabilise three series of two-coordinate Group 12 diaryl complexes; (2,6-Ar2C6H3)2M [M = Zn, Cd, Hg, Ar = 2,6-Xyl 1-3, 3,5-Xyl 4-6, Pmp 7-9], where differing steric demands on the metal centres are imparted. These are the first homoleptic d-block complexes featuring any of these ligands. Complexes 1-9 have been characterised in solution and the solid state; the analysis of structural changes produced by differences in ligand properties is reported. In particular, complexes 4-6 show smaller C-M-C bond angles and contain secondary ligand interactions that are not seen in the analogous complexes 1-3 and 7-9.

  7. Phosphite-oxazole/imidazole ligands in asymmetric intermolecular Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Mazuela, Javier; Tolstoy, Paivi; Pàmies, Oscar; Andersson, Pher G; Diéguez, Montserrat

    2011-02-07

    We describe the application of a new class of ligands--the phosphite-oxazole/imidazole (L1-L5a-g)--in asymmetric intermolecular Pd-catalyzed Heck reactions under thermal and microwave conditions. These ligands combine the advantages of the oxazole/imidazole moiety with those of the phosphite moiety: they are more stable than their oxazoline counterparts, less sensitive to air and other oxidizing agents than phosphines and phosphinites, and easy to synthesize from readily available alcohols. The results indicate that activities, regio- and enantioselectivities, are highly influenced by the type of nitrogen donor group (oxazole or imidazole), the oxazole and biaryl-phosphite substituents and the axial chirality of the biaryl moiety of the ligand. By carefully selecting the ligand components, we achieved high activities, regio- (up to 99%) and enantioselectivities (up to 99%) using several triflate sources. Under microwave-irradiation conditions, reaction times were considerably shorter (from 24 h to 30 min) and regio- and enantioselectivities were still excellent.

  8. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF CONFORMATIONALLY-FLEXIBLE RETINOID RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoids and associated derivatives represent a class of endogenousr hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of normal vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXRs ligands is of i...

  9. Theoretical investigations of silver clusters and silver-ligand systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Salian, U.; Srinivas, S.

    1999-05-19

    Studies directed at understanding structural and electronic properties of silver clusters have been and remain the subject of an active theoretical [1-22] and experimental [23- 38] effort. One of the reasons is the (still) important role these systems play in the photographic process. Investigations of interactions of silver clusters with different atoms and molecules are motivated primarily by a possible utility of these clusters in catalytic processes. The important role of silver in the selective oxidation of ethylene into ethylene oxide, the feedstock for polyester production, is well-known [39]. Possible variations in chemical reactivity with the cluster size and understanding of the mechanisms of interactions with different ligands may lead to new and more efficient applications. Investigations of cluster-ligand systems also contribute a great deal to a better understanding of gas-surface interactions. Accordingly, theoretical studies of silver clusters and cluster-ligand systems [40-44] fall into two categories--those that use clusters as models for silver surfaces [40], and those that target clusters and cluster-ligand interactions as subjects in their own right [41-44]. The common goal of all these studies is to elucidate the nature of the interatomic interactions and bonding at the microscopic level and thereby arrive at a fundamental understanding and description of the various structural and electronic properties.

  10. Development of Benzophenone-Alkyne Bifunctional Sigma Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lian-Wang; Hajipour, Abdol R.; Karaoglu, Kerim; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2012-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors represent unique non-opioid binding sites that are associated with a broad range of disease states. Sigma-2 receptors provide a promising target for diagnostic imaging and pharmacological interventions to curb tumor progression. Most recently, the progesterone receptor (PGRMC1, 25 kDa) has been identified to contain σ2 receptor-like binding properties, highlighting the need to understand the biological function of an 18-kDa protein that exhibits σ2-like photoaffinity labeling (herein denoted as σ2-18k) but the amino acid sequence of which is not known. In order to provide novel tools for the study of the σ2-18k protein, we have developed bifunctional sigma receptor ligands that bear a benzophenone photo-crosslinking moiety and an alkyne group, to which an azide-containing biotin affinity tag can be covalently attached via click chemistry following photo-crosslink. While several compounds showed favorable σ2 binding properties, compound 22 exhibited the highest affinity (2 nM) and the greatest potency in blocking photolabeling of the σ2-18k by a radioactive photoaffinity ligand. Thus, these benzophenone-alkyne sigma receptor ligands may be amenable for studying the σ2-18k protein via chemical biology approaches. To our knowledge, these compounds represent the first reported benzophenone-containing clickable sigma receptor ligands, which may potentially serve broad applications by “plugging” in various tags. PMID:23001760

  11. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  12. Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands: Versatile Syntheses and Biological Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report herein a stereoselective and straightforward methodology for the synthesis of new androgen receptor ligands with (anti)-agonistic activities. Oxygen–nitrogen replacement in bicalutamide-like structures paves the way to the disclosure of a new class of analogues, including cyclized/nitrogen-substituted derivatives, with promising antiandrogen (or anabolic) activity. PMID:24900495

  13. Role of sulfide and ligand strength in controlling nanosilver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okkyoung; Clevenger, Thomas E; Deng, Baolin; Surampalli, Rao Y; Ross, Louis; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2009-04-01

    Nanosilver has been used broadly in nanotechnology enhanced consumer products because of its strong antimicrobial properties. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) released from these products will likely enter wastewater collection and treatment systems. This research evaluated the role of sulfide and ligand strength in controlling nanosilver toxicity to nitrifying bacteria that are important in wastewater treatment. The nanosilver toxicity in the absence and presence of ligands (SO(4)(2-), S(2-), Cl(-), PO(4)(3-), and EDTA(-)) commonly present in wastewater was determined from the oxygen uptake rate measurements. Sulfide appeared to be the only ligand to effectively reduce nanosilver toxicity. By adding a small aliquot of sulfide that was stoichiometrically complexed with AgNPs, the nanosilver toxicity to nitrifying organisms was reduced by up to 80%. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that AgNPs were highly reactive with sulfide to form new Ag(x)S(y) complexes or precipitates. These complexes were not oxidized after a prolonged period of aeration (18h). This information is useful for wastewater treatment design and operation to reduce nanosilver toxicity via sulfide complexation. While the biotic ligand model was successful in predicting the toxicity of Ag(+) ions, it could not accurately predict the toxicity of AgNPs. Nevertheless, it could be one of the many tools useful in predicting and controlling nanosilver toxicity to wastewater microorganisms.

  14. Protein flexibility and ligand recognition: challenges for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Spyrakis, Francesca; BidonChanal, Axel; Barril, Xavier; Luque, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic dynamics of macromolecules is an essential property to relate the structure of biomolecular systems with their function in the cell. In the field of ligand-receptor recognition, numerous evidences have revealed the limitations of the lock-and-key theory, and the need to elaborate models that take into account the inherent plasticity of biomolecules, such as the induced-fit model or the existence of an ensemble of pre-equilibrated conformations. Depending on the nature of the target system, ligand binding can be associated with small local adjustments in side chains or even the backbone to large-scale motions of structural fragments, domains or even subunits. Reproducing the inherent flexibility of biomolecules has thus become one of the most challenging issues in molecular modeling and simulation studies, as it has direct implications in our understanding of the structure-function relationships, but even in areas such as virtual screening and structure-based drug discovery. Given the intrinsic limitation of conventional simulation tools, only events occurring in short time scales can be reproduced at a high accuracy level through all-atom techniques such as Molecular Dynamics simulations. However, larger structural rearrangements demand the use of enhanced sampling methods relying on modified descriptions of the biomolecular system or the potential surface. This review illustrates the crucial role that structural plasticity plays in mediating ligand recognition through representative examples. In addition, it discusses some of the most powerful computational tools developed to characterize the conformational flexibility in ligand-receptor complexes.

  15. Supramolecular coordination and antimicrobial activities of constructed mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Abou-Dobara, M. I.; Seyam, H. A.

    2013-03-01

    A novel series of copper(II) and palladium(II) with 4-derivatives benzaldehyde pyrazolone (Ln) were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as second ligand. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirm by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as thermal analysis. The ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand through ON donor sites. ESR spectra show the simultaneous presence of a planar trans and a nearly planar cis isomers in the 1:2 ratio for all N,O complexes [Cu(Ln)2]Cl2ṡ2H2O. Schiff bases (Ln) were tested against bacterial species; namely two Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungal species (Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium italicum and Alternaria alternata). The tested compounds have antibacterial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus and K. pneumoniae.

  16. Central nicotinic receptors: structure, function, ligands, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, M Novella; Gratteri, Paola; Guandalini, Luca; Martini, Elisabetta; Bonaccini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2007-06-01

    The growing interest in nicotinic receptors, because of their wide expression in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and their involvement in several important CNS pathologies, has stimulated the synthesis of a high number of ligands able to modulate their function. These membrane proteins appear to be highly heterogeneous, and still only incomplete information is available on their structure, subunit composition, and stoichiometry. This is due to the lack of selective ligands to study the role of nAChR under physiological or pathological conditions; so far, only compounds showing selectivity between alpha4beta2 and alpha7 receptors have been obtained. The nicotinic receptor ligands have been designed starting from lead compounds from natural sources such as nicotine, cytisine, or epibatidine, and, more recently, through the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This review focuses on the structure of the new agonists, antagonists, and allosteric ligands of nicotinic receptors, it highlights the current knowledge on the binding site models as a molecular modeling approach to design new compounds, and it discusses the nAChR modulators which have entered clinical trials.

  17. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  18. Multifunctional ligand for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1996-01-01

    A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises either a phosphorous or germanium core and at least two hydrazine groups forming a ligand for bonding to a metal extending from the phosphorous or germanium core.

  19. Ligand Pose and Orientational Sampling in Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Carchia, Michael; Sterling, Teague; Irwin, John J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular docking remains an important tool for structure-based screening to find new ligands and chemical probes. As docking ambitions grow to include new scoring function terms, and to address ever more targets, the reliability and extendability of the orientation sampling, and the throughput of the method, become pressing. Here we explore sampling techniques that eliminate stochastic behavior in DOCK3.6, allowing us to optimize the method for regularly variable sampling of orientations. This also enabled a focused effort to optimize the code for efficiency, with a three-fold increase in the speed of the program. This, in turn, facilitated extensive testing of the method on the 102 targets, 22,805 ligands and 1,411,214 decoys of the Directory of Useful Decoys - Enhanced (DUD-E) benchmarking set, at multiple levels of sampling. Encouragingly, we observe that as sampling increases from 50 to 500 to 2000 to 5000 to 20000 molecular orientations in the binding site (and so from about 1×1010 to 4×1010 to 1×1011 to 2×1011 to 5×1011 mean atoms scored per target, since multiple conformations are sampled per orientation), the enrichment of ligands over decoys monotonically increases for most DUD-E targets. Meanwhile, including internal electrostatics in the evaluation ligand conformational energies, and restricting aromatic hydroxyls to low energy rotamers, further improved enrichment values. Several of the strategies used here to improve the efficiency of the code are broadly applicable in the field. PMID:24098414

  20. Hierarchical Docking of Databases of Multiple Ligand Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, David M.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2006-01-01

    Ligand flexibility is an important problem in molecular docking and virtual screening. To address this challenge, we investigate a hierarchical pre-organization of multiple conformations of small molecules. Such organization of pre-calculated conformations removes the exploration of ligand conformational space from the docking calculation and allows for concise representation of what can be thousands of conformations. The hierarchy also recognizes and prunes incompatible conformations early in the calculation, eliminating redundant calculations of fit. We investigate the method by docking the MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR), an annotated database of 100,000 molecules, into apo and holo forms of seven unrelated targets. This annotated database allows us to track the ranking of tens to hundreds of annotated ligands in each of the docking systems. The binding sites and database are prepared in an automated fashion in an attempt to remove some human bias from the calculations. Many thousands of explicit and implicit ligand conformations may be docked in calculations not much longer than required for single conformer docking. As long as internal energies are not considered, recombination with the hierarchy is additive as the number of degrees of freedom is increased. Molecules with even millions of conformations can be docked in a few minutes on a single desktop computer. PMID:16101414

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Complexes with Schiff Base Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Shane M.; Sheedy, Timothy M.; New, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    In order for undergraduate laboratory experiments to reflect modern research practice, it is essential that they include a range of elements, and that synthetic tasks are accompanied by characterization and analysis. This intermediate general chemistry laboratory exercise runs over 2 weeks, and involves the preparation of a Schiff base ligand and…

  2. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  3. Docking validation resources: protein family and ligand flexibility experiments.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Balius, Trent E; Rizzo, Robert C

    2010-11-22

    A database consisting of 780 ligand-receptor complexes, termed SB2010, has been derived from the Protein Databank to evaluate the accuracy of docking protocols for regenerating bound ligand conformations. The goal is to provide easily accessible community resources for development of improved procedures to aid virtual screening for ligands with a wide range of flexibilities. Three core experiments using the program DOCK, which employ rigid (RGD), fixed anchor (FAD), and flexible (FLX) protocols, were used to gauge performance by several different metrics: (1) global results, (2) ligand flexibility, (3) protein family, and (4) cross-docking. Global spectrum plots of successes and failures vs rmsd reveal well-defined inflection regions, which suggest the commonly used 2 Å criteria is a reasonable choice for defining success. Across all 780 systems, success tracks with the relative difficulty of the calculations: RGD (82.3%) > FAD (78.1%) > FLX (63.8%). In general, failures due to scoring strongly outweigh those due to sampling. Subsets of SB2010 grouped by ligand flexibility (7-or-less, 8-to-15, and 15-plus rotatable bonds) reveal that success degrades linearly for FAD and FLX protocols, in contrast to RGD, which remains constant. Despite the challenges associated with FLX anchor orientation and on-the-fly flexible growth, success rates for the 7-or-less (74.5%) and, in particular, the 8-to-15 (55.2%) subset are encouraging. Poorer results for the very flexible 15-plus set (39.3%) indicate substantial room for improvement. Family-based success appears largely independent of ligand flexibility, suggesting a strong dependence on the binding site environment. For example, zinc-containing proteins are generally problematic, despite moderately flexible ligands. Finally, representative cross-docking examples, for carbonic anhydrase, thermolysin, and neuraminidase families, show the utility of family-based analysis for rapid identification of particularly good or bad

  4. Magnesium incorporation in calcite in the presence of organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The formation of authigenic Mg-calcites in marine early diagenetic environments is commonly driven by a bio-induced process, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), which provides inorganic carbon required for the precipitation of such authigenic carbonates. In such settings the availability of major and/or trace divalent metal cations (Me2+) incorporated in calcite and their aqueous speciation are controlled by the presence of aqueous organic molecules that are produced either as (by-)products of biological activity (i.e. exopolymeric substances) or during degradation of allochthonous organic matter in the sediments. Despite the fact that the presence of aqueous organic ligands strongly affects the growth rates and the mineralogy of precipitating CaCO3 polymorphs, till now no study addresses the role of Me2+-ligand aqueous complexes on the extent of Mg and/or other trace element content of Mg-calcites. In order to shed light on this process, relevant to authigenic calcite formation in organic-rich marine sediments and continental soils, we precipitated calcite in the presence of aqueous Mg and a variety of low molecular weight carboxylic- and aminoacids. Our experimental data indicate that the presence of organic ligands augments significantly the saturation state of calcite in the parent fluid during its precipitation. Moreover, they suggest that the higher the ligand concentration, the higher the obtained distribution coefficient of Mg in calcite. The latter is directly proportional to the ratio of Mg2+/Ca2+ aqueous ions for all ligands used. Hydrogeochemical modelling of the aqueous fluids indicate that the observed correlation can be explained by the stronger complexation of Ca2+ with organic ligands compared to Mg2+, which results in higher availability of Mg2+ vs. Ca2+ aqueous ions. Overall the obtained results suggest that the higher the organic ligand aqueous concentration the higher the Mg content of calcite forming from this fluid. These findings are

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF VDR ANTAGONISTS AMONG NUCLEAR RECEPTOR LIGANDS USING VIRTUAL SCREENING

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Kelly; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Bogart, Jonathan W.; Feleke, Belaynesh; Sidhu, Preetpal; Yuan, Nina; Preston, Joshua; Goy, Robin; Han, Lanlan; Silvaggi, Nicholas R; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bikle, Daniel D.; Cook, James M.; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we described the development of two virtual screens to identify new vitamin D receptor (VDR) antagonists among nuclear receptor (NR) ligands. Therefore, a database of 14330 nuclear receptor ligands and their NR affinities was assembled using the online available “Binding Database”. Two different virtual screens were carried out in conjunction with a reported VDR crystal structure applying a stringent and less stringent pharmacophore model to filter docked NR ligand conformations. The pharmacophore models were based on the spatial orientation of the hydroxyl functionalities of VDR’s natural ligands 1,25(OH2)D3 and 25(OH2)D3. The first virtual screen identified 32 NR ligands with a calculate free energy of VDR binding of more than −6.0 kJ/mol. All but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) are VDR ligands, which inhibited the interaction between VDR and coactivator peptide SRC2-3 with an IC50 value of 15.8 µM. The second screen identified 162 NR ligands with a calculate free energy of VDR binding of more than −6.0 kJ/mol. More than half of these ligands were developed to bind VDR followed by ERα/β ligands (26%), TRα/β ligands (7%) and LxRα/β ligands (7%). The binding between VDR and ERα ligand H6036 as well as TRα/β ligand triiodothyronine and a homoserine analog thereof was confirmed by fluorescence polarization. PMID:25419525

  6. Ligands located within a cholesterol domain enhance gene delivery to the target tissue

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Long; Betker, Jamie; Yin, Hao; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted gene delivery provides enormous potential for clinical treatment of many incurable diseases. Liposomes formulated with targeting ligands have been tested extensively both in vitro and in vivo, and many studies have strived to identify more efficacious ligands. However, the environment of the ligand within the delivery vehicle is generally not considered, and this study assesses the effect of ligand micoenvironment by utilizing a lipoplex possessing a cholesterol domain. Our recent work has shown that the presence of the targeting ligand within the cholesterol domain promotes more productive transfection in cultured cells. In the present study, lipoplexes having the identical lipid composition were formulated with different conjugates of the folate ligand such that the ligand was included in, or excluded from, the cholesterol domain. The effect of locating the ligand within the cholesterol domain was then tested in a xenograft tumor model in mice. Lipoplexes that included the ligand within the cholesterol domain showed significantly higher luciferase expression and plasmid accumulation in tumors as compared to lipoplexes in which the ligand was excluded from the domain. These results demonstrate that the microenvironment of the ligand can affect gene delivery to tumors, and show that ligand-mediated delivery can be enhanced by locating targeting ligands within a cholesterol domain. PMID:22440429

  7. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  8. Investigations into the synthesis and fluorescence properties of Tb(III) complexes of a novel bis-β-diketone-type ligand and a novel bispyrazole ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin-Xiang; Luo, Yi-Ming; Chen, Zhe; Li, Jun; Tang, Rui-Ren

    2008-11-01

    A novel bis-β-diketone organic ligand, 1,1'-(2,6-bispyridyl)bis-3-( p-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione (L 1) and its derivatives, a novel bispyrazole ligand, 2,6-bis(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (L 2) were designed and synthesized and their complexes with Tb(III) ion were successfully prepared. The ligands and the corresponding metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and TG-DTA. Analysis of the IR spectra suggested that the lanthanide metal ion Tb(III) coordinated to the ligands via the nitrogen atom of the pyridine ring and the carbonyl oxygen atoms for ligand L 1 and the nitrogen atom of the pyrazole ring for ligand L 2. The fluorescence properties of the two complexes in solid state were investigated and it was discovered that the Tb(III) ions could be sensitized by both the ligand (L 1) and ligand (L 2) to some extent. In particular, the complex of ligand (L 2) is a better green luminescent material that could be used as a candidate material in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) since it could be much better sensitized by the ligand (L 2), and the fluorescence intensity of Tb(III) complex of L 2 are almost as twice strong as L 1's.

  9. Investigations into the synthesis and fluorescence properties of Tb(III) complexes of a novel bis-beta-diketone-type ligand and a novel bispyrazole ligand.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin-Xiang; Luo, Yi-Ming; Chen, Zhe; Li, Jun; Tang, Rui-Ren

    2008-11-15

    A novel bis-beta-diketone organic ligand, 1,1'-(2,6-bispyridyl)bis-3-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione (L1) and its derivatives, a novel bispyrazole ligand, 2,6-bis(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (L2) were designed and synthesized and their complexes with Tb(III) ion were successfully prepared. The ligands and the corresponding metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and TG-DTA. Analysis of the IR spectra suggested that the lanthanide metal ion Tb(III) coordinated to the ligands via the nitrogen atom of the pyridine ring and the carbonyl oxygen atoms for ligand L1 and the nitrogen atom of the pyrazole ring for ligand L2. The fluorescence properties of the two complexes in solid state were investigated and it was discovered that the Tb(III) ions could be sensitized by both the ligand (L1) and ligand (L2) to some extent. In particular, the complex of ligand (L2) is a better green luminescent material that could be used as a candidate material in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) since it could be much better sensitized by the ligand (L2), and the fluorescence intensity of Tb(III) complex of L2 are almost as twice strong as L1's.

  10. Effect of complexing ligands on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto the silica gel surface. 1: Adsorption of ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Jung, K.H.; Park, K.K.; Park, K.K.

    1995-04-01

    The adsorption of several ligands on silica gel was investigated in aqueous solutions. The ligands used were 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, 3,4-lutidine, 2-aminomethyl pyridine, 2-pyridine methanol, picolinic acid, salicylic acid, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid. The adsorption behaviors of these ligands were interpreted by means of three adsorption modes: ion exchange, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interaction. For 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, and 3,4-lutidine, the adsorption maxima appeared near their respective pK{sub a} values and were found to be due mainly to ion exchange, whereas the adsorption of these ligands at low pH was strongly attributed to hydrophobic interaction. The adsorption of 2-aminomethyl pyridine increased with increasing pH over the entire pH range investigated and was due mainly to ion exchange. Picolinic acid was adsorbed mainly by hydrogen bonding either via pyridine N atoms at low pH or via carboxylic O atoms at high pH. 2-Pyridine methanol was adsorbed by hydrophobic interaction at low pH and by hydrogen bonding at high pH. The adsorptions of salicylic and 5-sulfosalicylic acid were very small over the entire pH ranges investigated. For the adsorption mechanism, the Stern model was used to fit adsorption data.

  11. A sandwich-type triple-decker lanthanide complex with mixed phthalocyanine and Schiff base ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Li, Yu-Yang; Liu, Cai-Ming; Li, Yi-Zhi; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2013-08-21

    A new triple-decker dinuclear sandwich-type dysprosium complex based on both the phthalocyanine ligand and the tetradentate Schiff base ligand was synthesized, which is of interest for synthetic chemistry and also shows single-molecule magnetic behaviour.

  12. Deprotonation of C-alkyl groups of cationic N-heterocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Pruneda, Vanessa

    2012-04-21

    The C-alkyl groups of C-alkylpyrazinium-derived ligands have been selectively deprotonated by K[N(SiMe(3))(2)], through charge-controlled processes, to give neutral products that contain C-alkylidenepyrazine-derived ligands.

  13. Notch Ligand Endocytosis Generates Mechanical Pulling Force Dependent on Dynamin, Epsins and Actin

    PubMed Central

    Meloty-Kapella, Laurence; Shergill, Bhupinder; Kuon, Jane; Botvinick, Elliot; Weinmaster, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch signaling induced by cell surface ligands is critical to development and maintenance of many eukaryotic organisms. Notch and its ligands are integral membrane proteins that facilitate direct cell-cell interactions to activate Notch proteolysis and release the intracellular domain that directs Notch-specific cellular responses. Genetic studies suggest Notch ligands require endocytosis, ubiquitylation and epsin endocytic adaptors to activate signaling, yet the exact role ligand endocytosis serves remains unresolved. Here we characterize a molecularly distinct mode of clathrin-mediated endocytosis requiring ligand ubiquitylation, epsins and actin for ligand cells to activate signaling in Notch cells. Using a cell-bead optical tweezers system, we obtained evidence for cell-mediated mechanical force dependent on this distinct mode of ligand endocytosis. We propose mechanical pulling force produced by endocytosis of Notch-bound ligand drives conformational changes in Notch that permit activating proteolysis. PMID:22658936

  14. Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide ligands in transition-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Kukushkin, V.Yu.

    1985-10-01

    The experimental material on the reactions of coordinated halide ligands, as well as cyanide, azido, thiocyanato, and cyanato ligands, in transition-metal complexes has been generalized in this review.

  15. Secondary interactions or ligand scrambling? Subtle steric effects govern the iridium(I) coordination chemistry of phosphoramidite ligands.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Tina; Rüegger, Heinz; Mezzetti, Antonio

    2010-01-25

    The like and unlike isomers of phosphoramidite (P*) ligands are found to react differently with iridium(I), which is a key to explaining the apparently inconsistent results obtained by us and other research groups in a variety of catalytic reactions. Thus, the unlike diastereoisomer (aR,S,S)-[IrCl(cod)(1 a)] (2 a; cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, 1 a=(aR,S,S)-(1,1'-binaphthalene)-2,2'-diyl bis(1-phenylethyl)phosphoramidite) forms, upon chloride abstraction, the monosubstituted complex (aR,S,S)-[Ir(cod)(1,2-eta-1 a,kappaP)](+) (3 a), which contains a chelating P* ligand that features an eta(2) interaction between a dangling phenyl group and iridium. Under analogous conditions, the like analogue (aR,R,R)-1 a' gives the disubstituted species (aR,R,R)-[Ir(cod)(1 a',kappaP)(2)](+) (4 a') with monodentate P* ligands. The structure of 3 a was assessed by a combination of X-ray and NMR spectroscopic studies, which indicate that it is the configuration of the binaphthol moiety (and not that of the dangling benzyl N groups) that determines the configuration of the complex. The effect of the relative configuration of the P* ligand on its iridium(I) coordination chemistry is discussed in the context of our preliminary catalytic results and of apparently random results obtained by other groups in the iridium(I)-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of allylic acetates and in rhodium(I)-catalyzed asymmetric cycloaddition reactions. Further studies with the unlike ligand (aS,R,R)-(1,1'-binaphthalene)-2,2'-diyl bis{[1-(1-naphthalene-1-yl)ethyl]phosphoramidite} (1 b) showed a yet different coordination mode, that is, the eta(4)-arene-metal interaction in (aS,R,R)-[Ir(cod)(1,2,3,4-eta-1 b,kappaP)](+) (3 b).

  16. Shaping the cavity of the macrocyclic ligand in metallocalix[4]arenes: the role of the ligand sphere.

    PubMed

    Radius, U

    2001-12-17

    The coordination form of calix[4]arene ligands and therefore the cavity of the macrocyclic ligand can be controlled by other ligands in transition metal calix[4]arene complexes, if strong directing coligands such as oxo groups are used. This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of the d(0) transition metal complexes [Cax(OMe)(2)O(2)TiCl(2)] 1 (monoclinic, space group P2(1)/c, lattice constants a = 21.639(4), b = 20.152(3), c = 12.750(3) A, beta = 95.68(3), V = 5532.6(19) A(3)) and [Cax(OMe)(2)O(2)MoO(2)] 2 (monoclinic, space group P2/c, lattice constants a = 12.433(3), b = 16.348(3), c = 24.774(5) A, beta = 99.15(3), V = 4971.6(17) A(3)). Whereas in 1 the calix[4]arene ligand adopts an elliptically distorted cone conformation, the macrocyclic ligand binds in a paco-like conformation to the metal center of 2, in the solid state and in solution. This was predicted by density functional theory calculations on models of different isomers of 1 and 2: cis,cone-1',2', trans,cone-1',2', and cis,paco-1',2'. According to these calculations, the energetic difference of 72.9 kJ/mol between both cis-dioxomolybdenum compounds is quite pronounced in favor of the cis,paco isomer, and 28.0 kJ/mol for the titanium compounds in favor of the cis,cone isomer.

  17. Biotic ligand model does not predict the bioavailability of rare Earth elements in the presence of organic ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2015-02-17

    Due to their distinct physicochemical properties, rare earth elements (REEs) are critical to high-tech and clean-energy industries; however, their bioavailability is still largely unexplored. In this paper, the bioavailability of several REEs has been carefully examined for the freshwater alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the presence of organic ligands (L), the biouptake of REEs was much higher than that predicted by the biotic ligand model (BLM). Enhancement of the biouptake flux was observed for six ligands (metal = thulium) and six REEs (ligand = citric acid), indicating that this could be a common feature for these metals. In order to explore the mechanism for the enhanced uptake, Tm internalization was carefully evaluated. The Tm internalization flux (Jint) followed first-order (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics with a calculated maximum internalization flux (Jmax) of (1.1 ± 0.08) × 10(-14) mol · cm(-2) · s(-1) and an affinity constant for the reaction of the metal with the transport sites (KTm-R) of 10(7.1) M(-1). In the presence of citric acid, malic acid, or NTA, the Jint for Tm was more than 1 order of magnitude higher than that predicted by the BLM when algae were exposed to a constant 10(-9) M Tm(3+). The bioavailability of the metal complexes could not be explained by a piggyback internalization (through an anion channel) or the contribution of labile complexes. The enhanced biouptake was attributed to the formation of a ternary Tm complex {L-Tm-R} at the metal transport site. In the natural environment where organic ligands are ubiquitous, classic models are unlikely to predict the bioavailability of REEs to aquatic organisms.

  18. MCF-7aro/ERE, a novel cell line for rapid screening of aromatase inhibitors, ERalpha ligands and ERRalpha ligands.

    PubMed

    Lui, Ki; Tamura, Takaya; Mori, Taisuke; Zhou, Dujin; Chen, Shiuan

    2008-07-15

    We have previously generated a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7aro, which over-expresses aromatase and is also ER positive. Recently, this MCF-7aro cell line was stably transfected with a promoter reporter plasmid, pGL3-Luc, containing three repeats of estrogen responsive element (ERE). Experiments using MCF-7aro/ERE have demonstrated that it is a novel, non-radioactive screening system for aromatase inhibitors (AIs), ERalpha ligands and ERRalpha ligands. The screening is carried out in a 96-well plate format. To evaluate this system, the cells were cultured overnight in charcoal-dextran stripped FBS medium supplemented with 0.1 nM testosterone or 17beta-estradiol, and various concentrations of antiestrogens or AIs. We found that the luciferase activity was induced when the cells were cultured either in the presence of testosterone or 17beta-estradiol. Furthermore, a 50% decrease in luciferase activity could be achieved when the cells were cultured in the presence of testosterone together with letrozole, anastrozole, tamoxifen or fulvestrant (concentrations being 75 nM, 290 nM, 100 nM, and 5 nM, respectively), compared to the testosterone-only cultured cells. Using this assay system, we confirmed that 3(2'-chlorophenyl)-7-methoxy-4-phenylcoumarin is an agonist of ER. Furthermore, genestein has been shown to be a ligand of ERRalpha because its binding could be blocked by an ERRalpha inverse agonist, XCT790. These results indicate that MCF-7aro/ERE is a novel cell line for rapid screening of AIs, ERalpha ligands and ERRalpha ligands.

  19. Identification of Ligand Templates using Local Structure Alignment for Structure-based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    With a rapid increase in the number of high-resolution protein-ligand structures, the known protein-ligand structures can be used to gain insight into ligand-binding modes in a target protein. Based on the fact that the structurally similar binding sites share information about their ligands, we have developed a local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA (Graph-based Local Structure Alignment). In G-LoSA, the known protein-ligand binding-site structure library is searched to detect binding-site structures with similar geometry and physicochemical properties to a query binding-site structure regardless of sequence continuity and protein fold. Then, the ligands in the identified complexes are used as templates (i.e., template ligands) to predict/design a ligand for the target protein. The performance of G-LoSA is validated against 76 benchmark targets from the Astex diverse set. Using the currently available protein-ligand structure library, G-LoSA is able to identify a single template ligand (from a non-homologous protein complex) that is highly similar to the target ligand in more than half of the benchmark targets. In addition, our benchmark analyses show that an assembly of structural fragments from multiple template ligands with partial similarity to the target ligand can be used to design novel ligand structures specific to the target protein. This study clearly indicates that a template-based ligand modeling has potential for de novo ligand design and can be a complementary approach to the receptor structure based methods. PMID:22978550

  20. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because “each-atom-counts” toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted that may be compared with the results of high-level theoretical calculations. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well

  1. Ligand Promiscuity of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists and Antagonists Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soshilov, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can be activated by structurally diverse chemicals. To examine the mechanisms responsible for the promiscuity in AhR ligand binding, we determined the effects of mutations within the AhR ligand-binding domain (LBD) on the activity of diverse AhR ligands. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Ile319 of the mouse AhR and, to a lesser extent, Phe318 as residues involved in ligand-selective modulation of AhR transformation using a panel of 12 AhR ligands. These ligands could be categorized into four distinct structurally related groups based on their ability to activate AhR mutants at position 319 in vitro. The mutation I319K was selectively activated by FICZ and not by other examined ligands in vitro and in cell culture. F318L and F318A mutations resulted in the conversion of AhR agonists β-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively, into partial agonists/antagonists. Hsp90 binding to the AhR was decreased with several mutations and was inversely correlated with AhR ligand-binding promiscuity. Together, these data define overlapping amino acid residues within the AhR LBD involved in the selectivity of ligand binding, the agonist or antagonist mode of ligand binding, and hsp90 binding and provide insights into the ligand diversity of AhR activators. PMID:24591650

  2. Micro-flow synthesis and structural analysis of sterically crowded diimine ligands with five aryl rings

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Nobutake; Tannna, Akio; Konishi, Yohei; Takahashi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sterically crowded diimine ligands with five aryl rings were prepared in one step in good yields using a micro-flow technique. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed the detailed structure of the bulky ligands. The nickel complexes prepared from the ligands exerted high polymerization activity in the ethylene homopolymerization and copolymerization of ethylene with polar monomers. PMID:24367397

  3. Dynamic biochemical tissue analysis detects functional L-selectin ligands on colon cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Grady E.; Martin, Eric W.; Shirure, Venktesh S.; Malgor, Ramiro; Resto, Vicente A.; Goetz, Douglas J.; Burdick, Monica M.

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that L-selectin ligands presented on circulating tumor cells facilitate metastasis by binding L-selectin presented on leukocytes. Commonly used methods for detecting L-selectin ligands on tissues, e.g., immunostaining, are performed under static, no-flow conditions. However, such analysis does not assay for functional L-selectin ligands, specifically those ligands that promote adhesion under shear flow conditions. Recently our lab developed a method, termed dynamic biochemical tissue analysis (DBTA), to detect functional selectin ligands in situ by probing tissues with L-selectin-coated microspheres under hemodynamic flow conditions. In this investigation, DBTA was used to probe human colon tissues for L-selectin ligand activity. The detection of L-selectin ligands using DBTA was highly specific. Furthermore, DBTA reproducibly detected functional L-selectin ligands on diseased, e.g., cancerous or inflamed, tissues but not on noncancerous tissues. In addition, DBTA revealed a heterogeneous distribution of functional L-selectin ligands on colon cancer tissues. Most notably, detection of L-selectin ligands by immunostaining using HECA-452 antibody only partially correlated with functional L-selectin ligands detected by DBTA. In summation, the results of this study demonstrate that DBTA detects functional selectin ligands to provide a unique characterization of pathological tissue. PMID:28282455

  4. Importance of the pharmacological profile of the bound ligand in enrichment on nuclear receptors: toward the use of experimentally validated decoy ligands.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2014-10-27

    The evaluation of virtual ligand screening methods is of major importance to ensure their reliability. Taking into account the agonist/antagonist pharmacological profile should improve the quality of the benchmarking data sets since ligand binding can induce conformational changes in the nuclear receptor structure and such changes may vary according to the agonist/antagonist ligand profile. We indeed found that splitting the agonist and antagonist ligands into two separate data sets for a given nuclear receptor target significantly enhances the quality of the evaluation. The pharmacological profile of the ligand bound in the binding site of the target structure was also found to be an additional critical parameter. We also illustrate that active compound data sets for a given pharmacological activity can be used as a set of experimentally validated decoy ligands for another pharmacological activity to ensure a reliable and challenging evaluation of virtual screening methods.

  5. Impact of protein binding cavity volume (PCV) and ligand volume (LV) in rigid and flexible docking of protein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Saranya, N; Jeyakanthan, J; Selvaraj, S

    2012-12-15

    The importance of protein binding cavity volume (PCV) and ligand volume (LV) in rigid and flexible docking has been studied in 48 protein-ligand complexes belonging to eight protein families. In continuation of our earlier study on protein flexibility in relationship to PCV and LV, this study analyzes the importance of PCV and LV in the scoring and ranking of ligands in docking experiments. Crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes with varied PCV were chosen for docking ligands of varied volume in each protein family. Docking and scoring accuracy have been evaluated by self and cross docking of ligands to the given protein conformation. Effect of PCV and LV in rigid and flexible docking has been studied both in apo and holo proteins. Rigid docking has performed well when appropriate protein conformation is used. Selecting the proteins with appropriate PCV based on the LV information is suggested for better results in ensemble docking.

  6. Sigma and Pi Interactions of the Pyrrolic Ligand Sandwich-Like Lanthanide Phthalocyanines Determined from Magnetic Susceptibility and Ligand-Field Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-25

    ACCESSION NO. 11, TITLE (include Security Classification) UNCLASSIFIED: Sigma and Pi Interactions of the Pyrro- lic Ligand Sandwich-Like Lanthanide ...4135007---05 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 36 Sigma and Pi Interactions of the Pyrrolic Ligand Sandwich-Like Lanthanide Phthalocyanines Determined From Magnetic...Hill Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3290 Sigma and Pi Interactions of the Pyrrolic Ligand Sandwich-Like Lanthanide Phthalocyanines Determined From

  7. Computer simulation of supramolecular assembly by metal-ligand complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Chen, Chun-Chung; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2006-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were employed to study the supramolecular assembly of oligomers end-functionalized by ligands capable of complexation with metal ions. The properties of these metallo-supramolecular polymers strongly depend on the oligomer concentration, strength of complexation, and metal-to- ligand ratio. At high oligomer concentration the average molecular weight exhibits a maximum near the stoichiometric composition and decreases for higher or lower metal content. On the other hand, at low oligomer concentration the molecular weight shows a local minimum around the stoichiometric composition. This unusual behavior is attributed to the larger population of small rings around the stoichiometric composition, which make up a significant fraction of the overall molecular weight at low oligomer concentration. This effect is especially pronounced at low temperature, where the fraction of rings is higher. The fraction of chains and rings for different concentrations, temperatures and oligomer lengths were calculated and compared with experimental data.

  8. Secretory pathways generating immunosuppressive NKG2D ligands

    PubMed Central

    Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Suarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural Killer Group 2 member D (NKG2D) activating receptor, present on the surface of various immune cells, plays an important role in activating the anticancer immune response by their interaction with stress-inducible NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) on transformed cells. However, cancer cells have developed numerous mechanisms to evade the immune system via the downregulation of NKG2DL from the cell surface, including the release of NKG2DL from the cell surface in a soluble form. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in the production of soluble NKG2DL (sNKG2DL) and the potential therapeutic strategies aiming to block the release of these immunosuppressive ligands. Therapeutically enabling the NKG2D-NKG2DL interaction would promote immunorecognition of malignant cells, thus abrogating disease progression. PMID:25050215

  9. Human myeloma cells express the CD38 ligand CD31.

    PubMed

    Vallario, A; Chilosi, M; Adami, F; Montagna, L; Deaglio, S; Malavasi, F; Caligaris-Cappio, F

    1999-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) plasma cells (PC) are CD38+. A ligand for CD38 is the adhesion molecule CD31. By flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry we have investigated whether malignant PC co-express CD38 and CD31. All 68 patients studied were CD38+. 14/14 monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 39/39 plasmacytic MM patients co-expressed CD38 and CD31 at high density. Only 1/11 plasmablastic MM and 1/4 plasma cell leukaemias (PCL) expressed CD31. These data indicated that PC malignancies co-expressed high levels of both CD38 and its ligand CD31, with the exception of plasmablastic MM and PCL.

  10. Rare-Earth Metal Postmetallocene Catalysts with Chelating Amido Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Jenter, Jelena; Roesky, Peter W.

    This review deals with the synthesis and the catalytic application of noncyclopentadienyl complexes of the rare-earth elements. The main topics of the review are amido metal complexes with chelating bidentate ligands, which show the most similarities to cyclopentadienyl ligands. Benzamidinates and guanidinates will be reviewed in a separate contribution within this book. Beside the synthesis of the complexes, the broad potential of these compounds in homogeneous catalysis is demonstrated. Most of the reviewed catalytic transformations are either C-C multiple bond transformation such as the hydroamination and hydrosilylation or polymerization reaction of polar and nonpolar monomers. In this area, butadiene and isoprene, ethylene, as well as lactides and lactones were mostly used as monomers.

  11. Current Trends in Ligand Binding Real-Time Measurement Technologies.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Stephanie; Shih, Judy Y; Ware, Mark; O'Connor, Edward; Cameron, Mark J; Schwickart, Martin; Zhao, Xuemei; Regnstrom, Karin

    2017-03-20

    Numerous advances in ligand binding assay (LBA) real-time measurement technologies have been made within the last several years, ranging from the development of novel platforms to drive technology expansion to the adaptation of existing platforms to optimize performance and throughput. In this review, we have chosen to focus on technologies that provide increased value to two distinct segments of the LBA community. First, experimentally, by measuring real-time binding events, these technologies provide data that can be used to interrogate receptor/ligand binding interactions. While overall the platforms are not new, they have made significant advances in throughput, multiplexing, and/or sensitivity. Second, clinically, these point-of-care (POC) technologies provide instantaneous information which facilitates rapid treatment decisions.

  12. Tethering toxins and peptide ligands for modulation of neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez-Tallon, Inés; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    Tethering genetically encoded peptide toxins or ligands close to their point of activity at the cell plasma membrane provides a new approach to the study of cell networks and neuronal circuits, as it allows selective targeting of specific cell populations, enhances the working concentration of the ligand or blocker peptide, and permits the engineering of a large variety of t-peptides (e.g., including use of fluorescent markers, viral vectors and point mutation variants). This review describes the development of tethered toxins and peptides derived from the identification of the cell surface nAChR modulator lynx1, the existence of related endogenous cell surface modulators of nAChR and AMPA receptors, and the application of the t-toxin and t-neuropeptide technology to the dissection of neuronal circuits in metazoans. PMID:22119144

  13. Sulfonamido tripods: tuning redox potentials via ligand modifications

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nathanael; Ziller, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    A series of FeII–OH2 complexes were synthesized with ligands based on the tetradentate sulfonamido tripod N,N',N"-[2,2',2"-nitrilotris(ethane-2,1-diyl)]-tris-({R-Ph}-sulfonamido). These complexes differ by the substituent on the aryl rings and were fully characterized, including their molecular structures via X-ray diffraction methods. All the complexes were five-coordinate with trigonal bipyramidal geometry. A linear correlation was observed between the electronic effects of each ligand, given by the Hammett constants of the para-substituents, and the potential of the FeII/FeIII redox couple, which were determined using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the range of redox potentials for the complexes spanned approximately 160 mV. PMID:25419035

  14. Mesoporous organosilica nanotubes containing a chelating ligand in their walls

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao; Goto, Yasutomo; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji

    2014-11-01

    We report the synthesis of organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2′-bipyridine chelating ligands within their walls, employing a single-micelle-templating method. These nanotubes have an average pore diameter of 7.8 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. UV-vis absorption spectra and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations of immobilized nanotubes with an iridium complex on the bipyridine ligands showed that the 2,2′-bipyridine groups were homogeneously distributed in the benzene-silica walls. The iridium complex, thus, immobilized on the nanotubes exhibited efficient catalytic activity for water oxidation using Ce{sup 4+}, due to the ready access of reactants to the active sites in the nanotubes.

  15. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  16. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  17. A kinetic description of ligand binding to sperm whale myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Q H; Olson, J S; McKinnie, R E; Rohlfs, R J

    1986-08-05

    Nanosecond recombination time courses were measured by photolyzing O2, NO, CO, methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl, and tert-butyl isocyanide complexes of sperm whale myoglobin with a 30-ns laser pulse at pH 7, 20 degrees C. Absorbance was measured both during and after the excitation pulse and as a function of laser light intensity. The results were analyzed quantitatively in terms of a three-step reaction scheme, MbX in equilibrium B in equilibrium C in equilibrium Mb + X, where Mb is myoglobin, B represents a geminate state in which the ligand is present in the distal pocket but not covalently bound to the iron atom, and C, a state in which the ligand is still embedded in the protein but further away from the heme group. The fitted rate parameters were required to be consistent with the observed overall quantum yield, Q, which had been measured independently using much longer (approximately 0.5 ms) xenon flash pulses. Three major conclusions were derived from these analyses. First, the overall quantum yield of the ligand complex is determined primarily by the competition between the rate of iron-ligand bond formation from the initial photoproduct, kB----MbX, and the rate of migration away from state B, kB----C. For example, kB----C approximately equal to 30-100 microseconds-1 for all three gaseous ligands, whereas both Q and kB----MbX vary over 3 orders of magnitude (i.e. NO, Q = 0.001, kB----MbX approximately equal to 16,000 microseconds-1; O2, Q = 0.1, kB----MbX approximately equal to 500 microseconds-1; CO, Q = 1.0, kB----MbX approximately equal to 2 microseconds-1). Second, for NO, O2, and the isonitriles, the rate-limiting step in the overall association reaction starting from ligand in solution is the formation of state B. The rate constant for this process varies from 2 X 10(7) M-1 s-1 for the gaseous ligands to 0.02-1.4 X 10(5) M-1 s-1 for the isonitriles. In contrast, the B to MbX transition is limiting for CO binding. Third, for all the ligands except CO

  18. Bimetallic reactivity. On the use of oxadiazoles as binucleating ligands.

    PubMed

    Incarvito, C; Rheingold, A L; Qin, C J; Gavrilova, A L; Bosnich, B

    2001-03-12

    Two (1,3,4)-oxadiazole ligands have been prepared. In one case the oxadiazole ring is flanked by two o-aniline groups, and in the other case it is an extension of the first where the amines are condensed with 2-picolyl groups. A monometallic copper(II) complex of the former has been prepared, and its crystal structure was determined. A number of bimetallic copper(II), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) complexes of the di-deprotonated latter ligand were prepared and isolated. The crystal structure of the cobalt(II) complex bearing two acetate bridges is reported. The work demonstrates that the seldom-employed oxadiazole ring can be used effectively for generating bimetallic complexes.

  19. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments. However, these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone. Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell. These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs, ion channels, and transporters. Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression. Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation. Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites, and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon. PMID:23685953

  20. Genetics, genomics, and evolutionary biology of NKG2D ligands.

    PubMed

    Carapito, Raphael; Bahram, Seiamak

    2015-09-01

    Human and mouse NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) are absent or only poorly expressed by most normal cells but are upregulated by cell stress, hence, alerting the immune system in case of malignancy or infection. Although these ligands are numerous and highly variable (at genetic, genomic, structural, and biochemical levels), they all belong to the major histocompatibility complex class I gene superfamily and bind to a single, invariant, receptor: NKG2D. NKG2D (CD314) is an activating receptor expressed on NK cells and subsets of T cells that have a key role in the recognition and lysis of infected and tumor cells. Here, we review the molecular diversity of NKG2DLs, discuss the increasing appreciation of their roles in a variety of medical conditions, and propose several explanations for the evolutionary force(s) that seem to drive the multiplicity and diversity of NKG2DLs while maintaining their interaction with a single invariant receptor.

  1. Silver, Gold, Palladium Nanoparticles: Ligand Design, Synthesis and Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad

    Metal nanoparticles, especially gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), have been extensively studied due to their interesting optical properties and potential applications in emerging technologies like drug delivery, cancer therapy, catalysis, chemical and bio-sensing and microelectronics devices. Alkyl thiol ligands in the form of self assembled monolayers are often used to stabilize and functionalize the gold nanoparticles while other types of ligands have been rarely employed and the properties of AuNPs protected by different types of ligands have not been studied comprehensively and comparatively. This dissertation reports the first comparative studies on the thermal and chemical stability of AuNPs protected by alkyl thiolates, alkyl selenolates, dialkyl dithiophosphinates, and dialkyl dithiophosphates (Chapters 2 and 3). AuNPs protected by dialkyl dithiophosphinates and dialkyl dithiophosphates are unprecedented. All AuNPs were prepared from amine protected precursor AuNPs by ligand exchange to ensure similar size, size distribution, and chemical composition. They were extensively characterized by solution 1H-NMR and UV-VIS spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. For the first time, thermal stability was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) that provided more accurate decomposition temperatures and enthalpies, whereas chemical stability was tested as the availability of the gold surface towards etching with cyanide in different solvents. Surprisingly, alkyl selenolate protected AuNPs are thermally less stable than alkyl thiolate protected AuNPs despite their proposed stronger binding to the gold surface and a much more crystalline monolayer, which suggests that different decomposition mechanisms apply to alkyl thiolate and alkyl selenolate protected AuNPs. Dialkyl dithiophosphinates and dialkyl dithiophosphates protected AuNPs are thermally

  2. Life cycle management of critical ligand-binding reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Denise M; Theobald, Valerie

    2013-11-01

    Bioanalytical laboratories develop and validate ligand-binding assays (LBA) used to quantify the concentration of analytes of interest in various buffers and relevant biological matrices. The building blocks of LBA are reagents that recognize molecular and structural motifs on ligands, which are combined in various LBA formats to minimize biological matrix interferences and specifically detect and quantify the analyte of interest. The use of these LBA-requiring critical reagents, can span decades as programs mature to commercialization. Since critical reagents are generated mostly from biological systems, attention to their life cycle management, quality, characterization and sustainability are vital to the success of bioanalytical laboratories. Integrating de novo reagent generation, reagent biophysical characterization, LBA development, validation, and use, with reagent resupply processes leverages interdisciplinary activities and ensures smooth operations of a bioanalytical laboratory.

  3. Cancer therapy using natural ligands that target estrogen receptor beta

    PubMed Central

    Sareddy, Gangadhara R; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is one of the two key receptors (ERα, ERβ) that facilitate biological actions of 17β-estradiol (E2). ERβ is widely expressed in many tissues, and its expression is reduced or lost during progression of many tumors. ERβ facilitates estrogen signaling by both genomic (classical and non-classical) and extra-nuclear signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that ERβ functions as a tissue-specific tumor suppressor with anti-proliferative actions. Recent studies have identified a number of naturally available selective ERβ agonists. Targeting ERβ using its naturally available ligands is an attractive approach for treating and preventing cancers. This review presents the beneficial actions of ERβ signaling and clinical utility of several natural ERβ ligands as potential cancer therapy. PMID:26614454

  4. Rational design of a triple helix-specific intercalating ligand.

    PubMed

    Escudé, C; Nguyen, C H; Kukreti, S; Janin, Y; Sun, J S; Bisagni, E; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1998-03-31

    DNA triple helices offer new perspectives toward oligonucleotide-directed gene regulation. However, the poor stability of some of these structures might limit their use under physiological conditions. Specific ligands can intercalate into DNA triple helices and stabilize them. Molecular modeling and thermal denaturation experiments suggest that benzo[f]pyrido[3, 4-b]quinoxaline derivatives intercalate into triple helices by stacking preferentially with the Hoogsteen-paired bases. Based on this model, it was predicted that a benzo[f]quino[3,4-b]quinoxaline derivative, which possesses an additional aromatic ring, could engage additional stacking interactions with the pyrimidine strand of the Watson-Crick double helix upon binding of this pentacyclic ligand to a triplex structure. This compound was synthesized. Thermal denaturation experiments and inhibition of restriction enzyme cleavage show that this new compound can indeed stabilize triple helices with great efficiency and specificity and/or induce triple helix formation under physiological conditions.

  5. Hypocretin ligand deficiency in narcolepsy: recent basic and clinical insights.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Cayde; Okuro, Masashi; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Nishino, Seiji

    2010-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Both sporadic and familial forms exist in humans. Recently, the major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy was indicated, based on discovery, through animal study, of narcolepsy genes involved in the pathology of hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor. Hypocretin ligand deficiency is found in most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. This deficiency likely is the result of postnatal cell death of hypocretin neurons, and involvement of autoimmune mechanisms is suggested. Hypocretin deficiency also is found in symptomatic narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness with neurologic conditions, including immune-mediated neurologic disorders. These findings have significant clinical relevance and promote understanding of hypocretin cell death mechanisms. Already, discoveries in humans have led to a new diagnostic test for narcolepsy. Currently, hypocretin replacement therapy has emerged as a promising therapeutic option, and experiments using gene therapy and cell transplantation are in progress.

  6. Scintillation Proximity Radioimmunoassay Utilizing 125I-Labeled Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udenfriend, Sidney; Diekmann Gerber, Louise; Brink, Larry; Spector, Sydney

    1985-12-01

    A unique type of radioimmunoassay is described that does not require centrifugation or separation. Microbeads containing a fluorophor are covalently linked to antibody. When an 125I-labeled antigen is added it binds to the beads and, by its proximity, the emitted short-range electrons of the 125I excite the fluorophor in the beads. The light emitted can be measured in a standard scintillation counter. Addition of unlabeled antigen from tissue extracts displaces the labeled ligand and diminishes the fluorescent signal. Application of scintillation proximity immunoassay to tissue enkephalins, serum thyroxin, and urinary morphine is described. Applications of the principle to study the kinetics of interaction between receptors and ligands are discussed.

  7. Scintillation proximity radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-labeled ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Udenfriend, S.; Gerber, L.D.; Brink, L.; Spector, S.

    1985-12-01

    A unique type of radioimmunoassay is described that does not require centrifugation or separation. Microbeads containing a fluorophor are covalently linked to antibody. When an /sup 125/I-labeled antigen is added it binds to the beads and, by its proximity, the emitted short-range electrons of the /sup 125/I excite the fluorophor in the beads. The light emitted can be measured in a standard scintillation counter. Addition of unlabeled antigen from tissue extracts displaces the labeled ligand and diminishes the fluorescent signal. Application of scintillation proximity immunoassay to tissue enkephalins, serum thyroxin, and urinary morphine is described. Applications of the principle to study the kinetics of interaction between receptors and ligands are discussed.

  8. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  9. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  10. Probability description of ligand-receptor interactions. Evaluation of reliability of events with small and supersmall doses. I. Kinetics of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, K G; Varfolomeev, S D

    1999-09-01

    We have developed mathematical methods for describing ligand-receptor interactions (LRI) using Markov chains. Under some conditions, the mean value of ligand-receptor complexes obtained using Markov chains coincides with that obtained from the law of mass action. Using the calculated ratio of standard deviation to mean number of ligand-receptor complexes, we show that with small concentrations of ligand-receptor complexes LRI must be described using probability methods. Using data from the literature, we show that LRI description using the mass-action law under these conditions can cause significant errors in interpretation of experimental data.

  11. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  12. Affinity of An(VI) for N4-Tetradentate Donor Ligands: Complexation of the Actinyl(VI) Ions with N4-Tetradentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-05-01

    In this report the affinity of four N4-tetradentate ligands that incorporate the 2- methylpyridyl functionality with hexavalent actinides (AnO2+2 ) has been investigated in methanol solution. The ligands studied include N,N*-bis(2-methylpyridyl)diaminoethane (BPMDAE), N,N-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (BPMDAP), N,N*-bis(2-pyridylmethyl) piperazine (BPMPIP), and trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC). Conditional stability constants describing the strength of the interaction were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry. The log10K101 values for both U(VI) and Pu(VI) are comparable and show the same trend of stability with ligand structure. Dinuclear complexes are also indicated as being important. The log10K201 values for Pu(VI) complexation with the N4-ligands are identical for the four ligands (within experimental error), indicating that the structure of the ligand backbone has little effect on the stability of the (PuO2)2L2+ complex. The exception to this trend is the behavior of N,N*- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine (BPMPIP) with Pu(VI). This ligand displays a tendency to reduce Pu(VI) within the experimental time frame of 45 minutes. BPMPIP is the only ligand tested that contains tertiary amines in the ligand backbone. The decomposition of BPMPIP by Pu(VI) suggests a susceptibility of tertiary amines to oxidative degradation.

  13. Determination of mercury complexation in coastal and estuarine waters using competitive ligand exchange method.

    PubMed

    Han, Seunghee; Gill, Gary A

    2005-09-01

    While many studies have examined Hg(II) binding ligand in natural dissolved organic matter, determined ligand concentrations far exceed natural Hg(II) concentrations. This ligand class may not influence natural Hg(II) complexation, given the reverse relation between ligand concentration and metal-ligand binding strength. This study used a new competing ligand, thiosalicylic acid, in a competitive ligand exchange method in which water-toluene extraction was used to determine extremely strong Hg(II) binding sites in estuarine and coastal waters (dissolved [Hg] = 0.5-8 pM). Thiosalicylic acid competition lowered the detection limit of Hg(II) complexing ligand by 2 orders of magnitude from values found by previous studies; the determined Hg(II) complexing ligand ranged from 13 to 103 pM. The logarithmic conditional stability constants between Hg(II) and Hg(II) complexing ligand (Kcond' = [HgL]/([Hg2+][L']), [L'] = total [L] - [HgL]) ranged from 26.5 to 29.0. Applying the same method for chloride competition detected another class of ligand that is present from 0.5 to 9.6 nM with log conditional stability constants ranging from 23.1 to 24.4. A linear relationship was observed between the log conditional stability constant and log Hg(II) complexing ligand concentration, supporting the hypothesis that Hg(II) binding ligand should be characterized as a series or continuum of binding sites on natural dissolved organic matter. Calculating Hg(II) complexation using the conditional stability constants and ligand concentrations determined in this study indicates that >99% of the dissolved mercury is complexed by natural ligand associated with dissolved organic matter in estuarine and coastal waters of Galveston Bay, Texas.

  14. Training based on ligand efficiency improves prediction of bioactivities of ligands and drug target proteins in a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2013-10-28

    Machine learning methods based on ligand-protein interaction data in bioactivity databases are one of the current strategies for efficiently finding novel lead compounds as the first step in the drug discovery process. Although previous machine learning studies have succeeded in predicting novel ligand-protein interactions with high performance, all of the previous studies to date have been heavily dependent on the simple use of raw bioactivity data of ligand potencies measured by IC50, EC50, K(i), and K(d) deposited in databases. ChEMBL provides us with a unique opportunity to investigate whether a machine-learning-based classifier created by reflecting ligand efficiency other than the IC50, EC50, K(i), and Kd values can also offer high predictive performance. Here we report that classifiers created from training data based on ligand efficiency show higher performance than those from data based on IC50 or K(i) values. Utilizing GPCRSARfari and KinaseSARfari databases in ChEMBL, we created IC50- or K(i)-based training data and binding efficiency index (BEI) based training data then constructed classifiers using support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM classifiers from the BEI-based training data showed slightly higher area under curve (AUC), accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in the cross-validation tests. Application of the classifiers to the validation data demonstrated that the AUCs and specificities of the BEI-based classifiers dramatically increased in comparison with the IC50- or K(i)-based classifiers. The improvement of the predictive power by the BEI-based classifiers can be attributed to (i) the more separated distributions of positives and negatives, (ii) the higher diversity of negatives in the BEI-based training data in a feature space of SVMs, and (iii) a more balanced number of positives and negatives in the BEI-based training data. These results strongly suggest that training data based on ligand efficiency as well as data based on classical IC50

  15. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  16. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  17. Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    NUMBER Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0156 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...efficacy in tumor bearing mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer , immunotherapy, NKT cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...proposal have shown that mice bearing prostate cancers in the TRAMP model ( prostate specific expression on SV40 T antigen, Tag, oncogene) do not respond

  18. Unprecedented formation of novel phosphonodithioate ligands from diferrocenyldithiadiphosphetane disulfide.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Eva M; Crespo, Olga; Gimeno, M Concepción; Jones, Peter G; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-08-04

    The reaction of the phosphetane disulfide, FcP(S)S 2P(S)Fc ( 1) (Fc = (eta (5)-C 5H 5)Fe(eta (5)-C 5H 4)), the ferrocenyl analogue of the Lawesson reagent, with gold and palladium complexes leads to the unprecedented formation of phosphonodithioate ligands upon coordination to the metal centers. The reaction of 1 with gold complexes such as [AuCl(PR 3)] affords the species [Au{S 2P(OH)Fc}(PR 3)] (PR 3 = PPh 3 ( 2), PPh 2Me ( 3)), in which the phosphonodithioate ligand Fc(OH)PS 2 (-) has been formed. The same ligand is present in the compound [Au 2{S 2P(OH)Fc} 2].[N(PPh 3) 2]Cl ( 4), obtained by reaction of 1 with [N(PPh 3) 2][AuCl 2]. It crystallizes with one molecule of [N(PPh 3) 2]Cl, whereby complex 4 acts as an anion receptor and forms strong hydrogen bonds between the chloro and the hydroxyl groups. The reaction with palladium derivatives is different; two complexes, [Pd 2(S 4OP 2Fc 2) 2] ( 5) and [Pd 4Cl 4(S 4OP 2Fc 2) 2] ( 6), are obtained in molar ratio 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. In these complexes a new phosphonodithioate ligand is present and probably arises from the condensation of two molecules of Fc(OH)PS 2 (-). Complex 5 has also been characterized by X-ray methods.

  19. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands.

  20. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    DOEpatents

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  1. Analyzing protein-ligand interactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Meneses, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information on protein-ligand interactions that is inaccessible using other biophysical techniques. This chapter focuses on NMR-based approaches for extracting affinity and rate constants for weakly binding transient protein complexes with lifetimes of less than about a second. Several pulse sequences and analytical techniques are discussed, including line-shape simulations, spin-echo relaxation dispersion methods (CPMG), and magnetization exchange (EXSY) experiments.

  2. Ligand-free palladium-catalyzed cyanation of aryl halides.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Steven A; Zewge, Daniel; Chen, Cheng

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] A practical, ligand-free cyanation of aryl bromides that utilizes as little as 0.1 mol % Pd(OAc)(2) in combination with a nontoxic cyanide source, M(4)[Fe(CN)(6)] (M = K, Na), is described. The reactions are performed in DMAC at 120 degrees C and provide the corresponding aryl nitrile in 83-96% yield, typically in less than 5 h. TON values of up to 7100 were attained.

  3. [Endorphines--the endogenous ligands of opiate receptors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teschemacher, H

    1978-01-01

    The demonstration of opiate receptors in the nervous tissue of vertebrates in 1973 was the starting point of an intensive search for the endogenous ligands of these receptors. During the following years, several of such "edogenous opiates", called "endorphines", were isolated from various tissues of the mammalian organism. These are peptides which are able to elicit the same effects as do opiates. Possibly, they play a role in the reaction of the organism to stress.

  4. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christine K.

    2003-01-01

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before rearrangement can occur. Overall

  5. Biaryl Phosphine Ligands in Palladium-Catalyzed Amination

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed amination of aryl halides has undergone rapid development in the last 12 years. This has been largely driven by implementation of new classes of ligands. Biaryl phosphines have proven to provide especially active catalysts in this context. This review discusses the applications that these catalysts have found in C-N cross-coupling in heterocycle synthesis, pharmaceuticals, materials science and natural product synthesis. PMID:18663711

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  7. Pseudo-Mannosylated DC-SIGN Ligands as Immunomodulants.

    PubMed

    Berzi, Angela; Ordanini, Stefania; Joosten, Ben; Trabattoni, Daria; Cambi, Alessandra; Bernardi, Anna; Clerici, Mario

    2016-10-13

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin mainly expressed by DCs, mediates antigen uptake and can induce specific immune responses, depending on the ligand involved. Owing to these properties, DC-SIGN is an attracting target for approaches aimed at tailoring the immune response towards specific immunologic outcomes. A multivalent DC-SIGN ligand (Polyman26), containing at its core a fluorescent "rod-like" spacer and able to inhibit DC-SIGN mediated HIV infection in nanomolar concentration, has been recently developed by our group. We investigated the internalization pattern and the ability of Polyman26 to elicit innate immune responses. Results obtained by confocal microscopy indicate that Polyman26 is internalized by DCs via receptor- mediated endocytosis and is then routed to endolysosomal compartments, thus being presented together with MHC class II molecules, with important implications for the development of vaccines. Moreover, Polyman26 up-regulated the production of β-chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and TNFα) as well as the expression of TLR9 and CD40L. These results indicate that glycomimetic DC-SIGN ligands should be further investigated and suggest that these compounds could be used to differentially stimulate immune responses.

  8. Coupling of Ligands to the Liposome Surface by Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Spanedda, Maria Vittoria; De Giorgi, Marcella; Hassane, Fatouma Saïd; Schuber, Francis; Bourel-Bonnet, Line; Frisch, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Click chemistry represents a new bioconjugation strategy that can be used to conveniently attach various ligands to the surface of preformed liposomes. This efficient and chemoselective reaction involves a Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition which can be performed under mild experimental conditions in aqueous media. Here we describe the application of a model click reaction to the conjugation, in a single step, of unprotected α-1-thiomannosyl ligands, functionalized with an azide group, to liposomes containing a terminal alkyne-functionalized lipid anchor. Excellent coupling yields have been obtained in the presence of bathophenanthroline disulfonate, a water soluble copper-ion chelator, acting as a catalyst. No vesicle leakage is triggered by this conjugation reaction and the coupled mannose ligands are exposed at the surface of the liposomes. The major limitation of Cu(I)-catalyzed click reactions is that this conjugation is restricted to liposomes made of saturated (phospho)lipids. To circumvent that constraint, an example of alternative copper-free azide-alkyne click reaction has been developed. Molecular tools and results are presented here.

  9. GPCR drug discovery: novel ligands for CNS receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K

    2007-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface receptors in humans. They convey extracellular signals into the cell interior by activating intracellular processes such as heterotrimeric G protein-dependent signaling pathways. They are widely distributed in the nervous system, and mediate key physiological processes including cognition, mood, appetite, pain and synaptic transmission. With at least 30% of marketed drugs being GPCR modulators, they are a major therapeutic target in the pharmaceutical industry's drug discovery programs. This review will survey recently patented ligands for GPCRs implicated in CNS disorders, in particular the metabotropic glutamate, adenosine and cannabinoid receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors regulate signaling by glutamate, the major excitatory brain neurotransmitter, while adenosine is a ubiquitous neuromodulater mediating diverse physiological effects. Recent patents for ligands of these receptors include mGluR5 antagonists and adenosine A(1) receptor agonists. Cannabinoid receptors remain one of the most important GPCR drug discovery target due to the intense interest in CB(1) receptor antagonists for treating obesity and metabolic syndrome. Such small molecule ligands are the outcome of the continuing focus of many pharmaceutical companies to identify novel GPCR agonist, antagonist or allosteric modulators useful for CNS disorders, for which more effective drugs are eagerly awaited.

  10. Reversible cyclic peptide libraries for the discovery of affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Ward, Kevin Lawrence; Naik, Amith Dattatray; Kish, William Stanley; Blackburn, Robert Kevin; Carbonell, Ruben Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    A novel strategy is presented for the identification of cyclic peptide ligands from combinatorial libraries of reversible cyclic depsipeptides. A method for the solid-phase synthesis of individual cyclic depsipeptides and combinatorial libraries of these compounds is proposed, which employs lactic acid (Lact) and the dipeptide ester (Nα-Ac)-Ser(Ala)- as linkers for dilactonization. Upon alkaline treatment of the beads selected by screening a model library, the cyclic depsipeptides are linearized and released from the solid support to the liquid phase, to be sequenced via single-step tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The protocol presented for library synthesis provides for wide structural diversity. Two model sequences, VVWVVK and AAWAAR, were chosen to present different structural examples for depsipeptide libraries and demonstrate the process of sequence determination by mass spectrometry. Further, a case study using the IgG binding cyclic depsipeptide cyclo[(Nα-Ac)-S(A)-RWHYFK-Lact-E] is presented to demonstrate the process of library screening and sequence determination on the selected beads. Finally, a method is shown for synthesis of the irreversible cyclic peptide corresponding to the proposed depsipeptide structure, to make the ligand stable to the aqueous acid and alkaline conditions encountered in affinity chromatographic applications. The cyclic peptide ligand was synthesized on a poly(methacrylate) resin and used for chromatographic binding of the target IgG.

  11. The AXL Receptor is a Sensor of Ligand Spatial Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Zweemer, Annelien J.M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    The AXL receptor is a TAM (Tyro3, AXL, MerTK) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) important in physiological inflammatory processes such as blood clotting, viral infection, and innate immune-mediated cell clearance. Overexpression of the receptor in a number of solid tumors is increasingly appreciated as a key drug resistance and tumor dissemination mechanism. Although the ligand-receptor (Gas6-AXL) complex structure is known, literature reports on ligand-mediated signaling have provided conflicting conclusions regarding the influence of other factors such as phosphatidylserine binding, and a detailed, mechanistic picture of AXL activation has not emerged. Integrating quantitative experiments with mathematical modeling, we show here that AXL operates to sense local spatial heterogeneity in ligand concentration, a feature consistent with its physiological role in inflammatory cell responses. This effect arises as a result of an intricate reaction-diffusion interaction. Our results demonstrate that AXL functions distinctly from other RTK families, a vital insight for envisioned design of AXL-targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:26236777

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and antimicrobial studies of mixed ligands complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mahmoud, Nessma F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; El-Bindary, Ashraf A.

    2015-09-01

    An interesting series of mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal chloride with guaifenesin (GFS) in the presence of 2-aminoacetic acid (HGly) (1:1:1 molar ratio). The elemental analysis, magnetic moments, molar conductance, spectral (UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR and ESR) and thermal studies were used to characterize the isolated complexes. The molecular structure of GFS is optimized theoretically and the quantum chemical parameters are calculated. The IR showed that the ligand (GFS) acts as monobasic tridentate through the hydroxyl, phenoxy etheric and methoxy oxygen atoms and co-ligand (HGly) as monobasic bidentate through the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen atom and nitrogen atom of amino group. The molar conductivities showed that all the complexes are non-electrolytes except Cr(III) complex is electrolyte. Electronic and magnetic data proposed the octahedral structure for all complexes under investigation. ESR spectrum for Cu(II) revealed data which confirm the proposed structure. Antibacterial screening of the compounds were carried out in vitro on gram positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) bacteria and for in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans organism. However, some complexes showed more chemotherapeutic efficiency than the parent GFS drug. The complexes were also screened for their in vitro anticancer activity against the breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained showed that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity.

  13. Quinap and congeners: atropos PN ligands for asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Elena; Guiry, Patrick J; Connole, Kieran P T; Brown, John M

    2014-06-20

    Among the range of P,N-chelating ligands that have been employed in asymmetric catalysis, those relying on atropisomerism for the stability of individual enantiomers form a definable class. These APN (atropos P,N) ligands require a specific type of biaryl, with one component carrying a pendant phosphine unit, most commonly diaryl substituted, and the other bearing an sp(2)-nitrogen adjacent to the biaryl link. When substituents in the biaryl inhibit rotation about the linking bond, stable nonracemizing six-membered ring chelates can be formed. This Perspective relates the background to the initial synthesis in 1993 of Quinap, the original member of the series, and initial observations on its effectiveness in asymmetric catalysis. The current state of play in development of syntheses of this and other members of the APN ligand family is assessed, and their applications in asymmetric catalysis are presented. These include hydroboration and diboration of alkenes, 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, alkynylation of iminium salts in a three-component (A(3)) condensation, and conjugate additions of Cu acetylides.

  14. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  15. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Amrita B.; Han, Andrew W.; Mehta, Angad P.; Mok, Kenny C.; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P.; Taga, Michiko E.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism. PMID:26246619

  16. Beta-arrestin-biased ligands at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), the most common molecular targets of modern drug therapy, are critically regulated by beta-arrestins, which both inhibit classic G-protein signaling and initiate distinct beta-arrestin signaling. The interplay of G-protein and beta-arrestin signals largely determines the cellular consequences of 7TMR-targeted drugs. Until recently, a drug's efficacy for beta-arrestin recruitment was believed to be proportional to its efficacy for G-protein activities. This paradigm restricts 7TMR drug effects to a linear spectrum of responses, ranging from inhibition of all responses to stimulation of all responses. However, it is now clear that 'biased ligands' can selectively activate G-protein or beta-arrestin functions and thus elicit novel biological effects from even well-studied 7TMRs. Here, we discuss the current state of beta-arrestin-biased ligand research and the prospects for beta-arrestin bias as a therapeutic target. Consideration of ligand bias might have profound influences on the way scientists approach 7TMR-targeted drug discovery.

  17. Molecular modeling and ligand docking for Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Khuri, Natalia; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters are membrane proteins that transport solutes, such as ions, metabolites, peptides, and drugs, across biological membranes, using diverse energy coupling mechanisms. In human, there are 386 SLC transporters, many of which contribute to the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and/or can be targeted directly by therapeutics. Recent atomic structures of SLC transporters determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy have significantly expanded the applicability of structure-based prediction of SLC transporter ligands, by enabling both comparative modeling of additional SLC transporters and virtual screening of small molecules libraries against experimental structures as well as comparative models. In this review, we begin by describing computational tools, including sequence analysis, comparative modeling, and virtual screening, that are used to predict the structures and functions of membrane proteins such as SLC transporters. We then illustrate the applications of these tools to predicting ligand specificities of select SLC transporters, followed by experimental validation using uptake kinetic measurements and other assays. We conclude by discussing future directions in the discovery of the SLC transporter ligands. PMID:23578028

  18. Probing riboswitch-ligand interactions using thiamine pyrophosphate analogues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liuhong; Cressina, Elena; Dixon, Neil; Erixon, Karl; Agyei-Owusu, Kwasi; Micklefield, Jason; Smith, Alison G; Abell, Chris; Leeper, Finian J

    2012-08-14

    The Escherichia coli thiM riboswitch forms specific contacts with its natural ligand, thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP or thiamine diphosphate), allowing it to generate not only nanomolar binding affinity, but also a high degree of discrimination against similar small molecules. A range of synthetic TPP analogues have been used to probe each of the riboswitch-ligand interactions. The results show that the pyrimidine-sensing helix of thiM is exquisitely tuned to select for TPP by recognising the H-bonding donor and acceptors around its aminopyrimidine ring and also by forming π-stacking interactions that may be sensitive to the electronics of the ring. The central thiazolium ring of TPP appears to be more important for ligand recognition than previously thought. It may contribute to binding via long-range electrostatic interactions and/or by exerting an electron withdrawing effect on the pyrimidine ring, allowing its presence to be sensed indirectly and thereby allowing discrimination between thiamine (and its phosphate esters) and other aminopyrimidines found in vivo. The pyrophosphate moiety is essential for submicromolar binding affinity, but unexpectedly, it does not appear to be strictly necessary for modulation of gene expression.

  19. Pseudo-Mannosylated DC-SIGN Ligands as Immunomodulants

    PubMed Central

    Berzi, Angela; Ordanini, Stefania; Joosten, Ben; Trabattoni, Daria; Cambi, Alessandra; Bernardi, Anna; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin mainly expressed by DCs, mediates antigen uptake and can induce specific immune responses, depending on the ligand involved. Owing to these properties, DC-SIGN is an attracting target for approaches aimed at tailoring the immune response towards specific immunologic outcomes. A multivalent DC-SIGN ligand (Polyman26), containing at its core a fluorescent “rod-like” spacer and able to inhibit DC-SIGN mediated HIV infection in nanomolar concentration, has been recently developed by our group. We investigated the internalization pattern and the ability of Polyman26 to elicit innate immune responses. Results obtained by confocal microscopy indicate that Polyman26 is internalized by DCs via receptor- mediated endocytosis and is then routed to endolysosomal compartments, thus being presented together with MHC class II molecules, with important implications for the development of vaccines. Moreover, Polyman26 up-regulated the production of β-chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and TNFα) as well as the expression of TLR9 and CD40L. These results indicate that glycomimetic DC-SIGN ligands should be further investigated and suggest that these compounds could be used to differentially stimulate immune responses. PMID:27734954

  20. Ligand-Gated Ion Channels: Permeation and Activation1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Joseph W.; Barry, Peter H.

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are fast-responding channels in which the receptor, which binds the activating molecule (the ligand), and the ion channel are part of the same nanomolecular protein complex. This chapter will describe the properties and functions of the nicotinic acetylcholine LGIC superfamily, which play a critical role in the fast chemical transmission of electrical signals between nerve cells at synapses and between nerve and muscle cells at endplates. All the processing functions of the brain and the resulting behavioral output depend on chemical transmission across such neuronal interconnections. To describe the properties of the channels of this LGIC superfamily,we will mainly use two examples of this family of channels: the excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) channels. In the chemical transmission of electrical signals, the arrival of an electrical signal at the synaptic terminal of a nerve causes the release of a chemical signal—a neurotransmitter molecule (the ligand, also referred to as the agonist). The neurotransmitter rapidly diffuses across the very narrow 20-40 nm synaptic gap between the cells and binds to the LGIC receptors in the membrane of the target (postsynaptic) cell and generates a new electrical signal in that cell (e.g., Kandel et al., 2000). How this chemical signal is converted into an electrical one depends on the fundamental properties of LGICs and the ionic composition of the postsynaptic cell and its external solution.

  1. Gaussian mapping of chemical fragments in ligand binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Murcia, Marta; Constans, Pere; Pérez, Carlos; Ortiz, Angel R.

    2004-02-01

    We present a new approach to automatically define a quasi-optimal minimal set of pharmacophoric points mapping the interaction properties of a user-defined ligand binding site. The method is based on a fitting algorithm where a grid of sampled interaction energies of the target protein with small chemical fragments in the binding site is approximated by a linear expansion of Gaussian functions. A heuristic approximation selects from this expansion the smallest possible set of Gaussians required to describe the interaction properties of the binding site within a prespecified accuracy. We have evaluated the performance of the approach by comparing the computed Gaussians with the positions of aromatic sites found in experimental protein-ligand complexes. For a set of 53 complexes, good correspondence is found in general. At a 95% significance level, ˜65% of the predicted interaction points have an aromatic binding site within 1.5 Å. We then studied the utility of these points in docking using the program DOCK. Short docking times, with an average of ˜0.18 s per conformer, are obtained, while retaining, both for rigid and flexible docking, the ability to sample native-like binding modes for the ligand. An average 4-5-fold speed-up in docking times and a similar success rate is estimated with respect to the standard DOCK protocol. Abbreviations: RMSD - root mean square deviation; ASA - Atomic Shell Approximation; LSF - Least-Squares Fitting; 3D - three-dimensional; VDW - Van der Waals.

  2. Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Richard F.

    2013-06-30

    The goals of this project were to design new electrophilic metal alkyl complexes and to exploit these systems in fundamental studies of olefin polymerization and other important and new catalytic reactions. A key target reaction is insertion copolymerization of olefins and polar CH2=CHX vinyl monomers such as vinyl halides and vinyl ethers. During the period covered by this report we (i) investigated the properties of ortho-alkoxy-arylphosphine ligands in Ni-based olefin polymerization catalysts, (ii) studied the synthesis of double-end-capped polyethylene using group 4 metal catalysts that contain tris-pyrazolylborate ligands, (iii) explored the ethylene insertion reactivity of group 4 metal tris-pyrazolyl-borate complexes, (iv) showed that (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species undergo multiple insertion of silyl vinyl ethers, (v) synthesized and explored the reactivity of base-free Ni benzyl complexes that contain ortho-phosphino-arene sulfonate ligands, (vi) established the mechanism of the reaction of vinyl chloride with (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} catalysts, (vii) explored the role of cationic polymerization and insertion chemistry in the reactions of vinyl ethers with (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species, (viii) discovered a new class of self-assembled tetranuclear Pd catalysts that produce high molecular weight linear polyethylene and copolymerize ethylene and vinyl fluoride, and (ix) developed model systems that enabled investigation of cis-trans isomerization of {phosphine-sulfonate}Pd(II) complexes.

  3. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  4. MIPs are ancestral ligands for the sex peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joon; Bartalska, Katarina; Audsley, Neil; Yamanaka, Naoki; Yapici, Nilay; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Yong-Chul; Markovic, Milica; Isaac, Elwyn; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-04-06

    Upon mating, females of many animal species undergo dramatic changes in their behavior. In Drosophila melanogaster, postmating behaviors are triggered by sex peptide (SP), which is produced in the male seminal fluid and transferred to female during copulation. SP modulates female behaviors via sex peptide receptor (SPR) located in a small subset of internal sensory neurons that innervate the female uterus and project to the CNS. Although required for postmating responses only in these female sensory neurons, SPR is expressed broadly in the CNS of both sexes. Moreover, SPR is also encoded in the genomes of insects that lack obvious SP orthologs. These observations suggest that SPR may have additional ligands and functions. Here, we identify myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs) as a second family of SPR ligands that is conserved across a wide range of invertebrate species. MIPs are potent agonists for Drosophila, Aedes, and Aplysia SPRs in vitro, yet are unable to trigger postmating responses in vivo. In contrast to SP, MIPs are not produced in male reproductive organs, and are not required for postmating behaviors in Drosophila females. We conclude that MIPs are evolutionarily conserved ligands for SPR, which are likely to mediate functions other than the regulation of female reproductive behaviors.

  5. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  6. Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic amination using easily accessible metallocenyl P,N-ligands.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongwei; Xie, Fang; Wang, Yanlan; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liu, Delong; Zhang, Wanbin

    2015-04-14

    Compared to their C1-symmetric counterparts, planar chiral C2-symmetric metallocenyl P,N-ligands are efficient chiral ligands for Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic aminations, providing a number of amination products with high enantioselectivities. A non-C2-symmetric ferrocenyl P,N-ligand (a by-product obtained during the synthesis of the above C2-symmetric species) was also found to be an efficient ligand for asymmetric allylic aminations. A mixed ligand system consisting of both C2- and non-C2-symmetric ferrocene complexes was examined and showed high catalytic activity with the amination products being obtained with excellent enantioselectivities.

  7. From α4β2 Nicotinic Ligands to the Discovery of σ1 Receptor Ligands: Pharmacophore Analysis and Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the pharmacophoric elements required for σ1 and nicotinic ligands led to the identification of a potent and selective σ1 ligand (15). Compound 15 displayed high selectivity for the σ1 receptor (Ki, σ1 = 4.1 nM; Ki, σ2 = 1312 nM) with moderate binding affinity for the DAT (Ki = 373 nM) and NET (Ki = 203 nM) in the PDSP broad screening panel of common CNS neurotransmitter transporters and receptors. The key finding in this present work is that a subtle structural modification could be used as a tool to switch a ligand’s selectivity between nAChRs and sigma receptors. PMID:23641311

  8. Design and Formation of a Large, Tetrahedral, Metal-ligand Cluster Using 1,1'-Binaphthyl Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Biros, Shannon M.; Yeh, Robert M.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-03-13

    Many chemists have been fascinated with the development of discrete supramolecular structures that encapsulate guest molecules. These structures can be assembled through covalent or hydrogen bonds, electrostatic or metal-ligand interactions. These host structures have provided valuable insight into the forces involved in small molecule recognition. Our work has focused on the design and study of metal-ligand clusters of varying sizes. The naphthalene [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} cluster 1, shown in Figure 1, has demonstrated diastereoselective guest binding and chiral induction properties as well as the ability to catalyze reactions carried out inside the cavity in an enzyme-like manner. However, the size of the cavity (ca. 300-500 {angstrom}{sup 3}) has often limited the scope of substrates for these transformations.

  9. [Supercomputer investigation of the protein-ligand system low-energy minima].

    PubMed

    Oferkin, I V; Sulimov, A V; Katkova, E V; Kutov, D K; Grigoriev, F V; Kondakova, O A; Sulimov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculations and ligand positioning is strongly influenced by the choice of the docking target function. This work demonstrates the evaluation of the five different target functions used in docking: functions based on MMFF94 force field and functions based on PM7 quantum-chemical method accounting or without accounting the implicit solvent model (PCM, COSMO or SGB). For these purposes the ligand positions corresponding to the minima of the target function and the experimentally known ligand positions in the protein active site (crystal ligand positions) were compared. Each function was examined on the same test-set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. The new parallelized docking program FLM based on Monte Carlo search algorithm was developed to perform the comprehensive low-energy minima search and to calculate the protein-ligand binding energy. This study demonstrates that the docking target function based on the MMFF94 force field can be used to detect the crystal or near crystal positions of the ligand by the finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solvent accounting in the docking process for the accurate ligand positioning is also shown. The accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the correlation between the calculated and experimentally determined protein-ligand binding energies are improved when the MMFF94 force field is substituted by the new PM7 method with implicit solvent accounting.

  10. Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration process (MEUF) for removing copper from synthetic wastewater containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-Kun; Li, Chi-Wang; Lin, Ching-Yu

    2004-11-01

    The effects of the type and concentration of ligands on the removal of Cu by micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF) with the help of either anionic or cationic surfactants were investigated. The removal efficiency of copper by anionic surfactant-(SDS-) MEUF depends on the ligand-to-Cu ratio and the ligand-to-Cu complexation constant. At fixed ligand-to-Cu ratio, the Cu removal efficiency decreases in the order of citric acid>NTA>EDTA, which is the reverse order of Cu-ligand complexation constants for these ligands. Increasing SDS-ligand ratios from 12 to 60 at fixed ligand concentration did not improve copper removal efficiency. The cationic surfactant, CPC, enhances Cu removal efficiency in systems with condition of ligand-copper ratios higher than 1.0, where Cu removal is not very efficient using SDS-MEUF process. The Cu removal efficiency with CPC-MEUF depends on both the ligand-to-Cu ratio and the type of ligands.

  11. Discontinuum between a thiolate and a thiol ligand.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Danny G; Khan, Masood A; Ashby, Michael T

    2002-04-22

    The effect of H-bond donation to the thiolate ligand of (eta(5)-C(5)H(5))Fe(CO)(2)SR (1) to give H-bond adducts (1 small middle dotHX) and eventually protonation to give [(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))Fe(CO)(2)(HSR)](+) (1H(+)()) has been investigated experimentally and computationally. The electronic structures of 1(R = Me), several derivatives of 1(R = Me) small middle dotHX, and 1(R = Me)H(+)() have been investigated using DFT (density functional theory) computational methods. As previously suggested, these calculations indicate the HOMO of 1 is Fedpi-Sppi antibonding and largely sulfur in character. The calculations indicate the electronic structure of 1 is not altered markedly by H-bond donation to the S center, but protonation results in a reorganization of the electronic structure of 1H(+)() and a HOMO that is largely metal in character. The reduction of Fe-S distances upon protonation of 1(R = Ph) to give 1(R = Ph)H(+)() small middle dotBF(4)()(-)() (2.282(2) and 2.258(2) A, respectively), as determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, also indicates diminished Fedpi-Sppi antibonding. Using the carbonyl stretching frequencies as a gauge of the donor ability of the thiolate ligand, we conclude that H-bonding has a continuous effect on the donor properties of the thiolate ligand of 1 (i.e., is a function of the pK(a) of the H-bond donor). A discontinuous effect results when the pK(b) of 1 is reached and the complex is protonated. For our study of 1, the maximal effect of H-bonding is about 30% of protonation. Because the position of acid-base equilibrium depends on the relative basicities of the thiolate ligand and the conjugate base of the H-bond donor (and the relative heats of solvation of the acids and their conjugate bases), a true continuum of effects can be anticipated only for systems that are pK-matched in their given environments. Thus, when the conjugate base of the H-bond donor is a stronger base than the thiolate ligand (as in the present case), H

  12. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term “movable type”. Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the

  13. Titanium and niobium imido complexes stabilized by heteroscorpionate ligands.

    PubMed

    Otero, A; Fernández-Baeza, J; Antiñolo, A; Tejeda, J; Lara-Sánchez, A; Sánchez-Barba, L; Rodríguez, A M

    2004-12-07

    The reaction of [Ti(NR)Cl(2)(py)(3)](R = (t)Bu, p-tolyl, 2,6-C(6)H(3)(i)Pr(2)) with [{Li(bdmpza)(H(2)O)}(4)][bdmpza = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate] and [{Li(bdmpzdta)(H(2)O)}(4)][bdmpzdta = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)dithioacetate] affords the corresponding complexes [Ti(NR)Cl(kappa(3)-bdmpzx)(py)](x = a, R = (t)Bu 1, p-tolyl 2, 2,6-C(6)H(3)(i)Pr(2) 3; x = dta, R =(t)Bu 4, p-tolyl , 2,6-C(6)H(3)(i)Pr(2) 6), which are the first examples of imido Group 4 complexes stabilized by heteroscorpionate ligands. The solid-state X-ray crystal structure of 1 has been determined. The titanium centre is six-coordinate with three fac-sites occupied by the heteroscorpionate ligand and the remainder of the coordination sphere being completed by chloride, imido and pyridine ligands. The complexes are 1-6 fluxional at room temperature. The pyridine ortho- and meta-proton resonances show evidence of dynamic behaviour for this ligand and variable-temperature NMR studies were carried out in order to study their dynamic behaviour in solution. The complexes [Nb(NR)Cl(3)(py)(2)](R = (t)Bu, p-tolyl, 2,6-C(6)H(3)(i)Pr(2)) reacted with [{Li(bdmpza)(H(2)O)}(4)] and (Hbdmpze)[bdmpze = 2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)ethoxide], the latter with prior addition of (n)BuLi, to give the complexes [Nb(NR)Cl(2)(kappa(3)-bdmpzx)](x = a, R =(t)Bu 7, p-tolyl 8, 2,6-C(6)H(3)(i)Pr(2) 9; x = e, R = (t)Bu 10, p-tolyl 11, 2,6-C(6)H(3)(i)Pr(2)) 12 and these are the first examples of imido Group 5 complexes with heteroscorpionate ligands. The structures of these complexes have been determined by spectroscopic methods.

  14. Organic iron (III) complexing ligands during an iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takeda, Shigenobu; Nishioka, Jun; Obata, Hajime; Furuya, Ken; Johnson, William Keith; Wong, C. S.

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of iron (III) with natural organic ligands was investigated during a mesoscale iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific (SEEDS II). After the iron infusions, ligand concentrations increased rapidly with subsequent decreases. While the increases of ligands might have been partly influenced by amorphous iron colloids formation (12-29%), most in-situ increases were attributable to the <200 kDa fraction. Dilution of the fertilized patch may have contributed to the rapid decreases of the ligands. During the bloom decline, ligand concentration increased again, and the high concentrations persisted for 10 days. The conditional stability constant was not different between inside and outside of the fertilized patch. These results suggest that the chemical speciation of the released iron was strongly affected by formation of the ligands; the production of ligands observed during the bloom decline will strongly impact the iron cycle and bioavailability in the surface water.

  15. Evaluation of DNA/Ligand Interactions by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has enabled the detection and characterization of DNA/ligand complexes, including evaluation of both relative binding affinities and selectivities of DNA-interactive ligands. The noncovalent complexes that are transferred from the solution to the gas phase retain the signature of the native species, thus allowing the use of MS to screen DNA/ligand complexes, reveal the stoichiometries of the complexes, and provide insight into the nature of the interactions. Ligands that bind to DNA via metal-mediated modes and those that bind to unusual DNA structures, such as quadruplexes, are amenable to ESI. Chemical probe methods applied to DNA/ligand complexes with ESI-MS detection afford information about ligand-binding sites and conformational changes of DNA that occur upon ligand binding.

  16. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  17. EXAFS Studies of Some Copper(II) Mixed-Ligand Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S. K.; Katare, R. K.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2007-02-02

    X-ray K-absorption spectroscopic studies have been carried out on copper (II) mixed-ligand complexes with glutamic acid and aspartic acid as the primary ligands, where as water, pyridine, imidazole and benz-imidazole have been used as secondary ligands. Chemical shifts obtained from the X-ray absorption data have indicated that the glutamic acid complexes are more ionic as compared to their corresponding aspartic acid complexes having similar secondary ligands. Further, we have estimated the average metal-ligand bond distances from the from structure data. For the different complexes studied under the present investigation, the studies reveal that the bonding parameter {alpha}1 decreases with the increase in the percentage covalency of the metal-ligand bond. Thus, the bonding parameter {alpha}1 may be used for the estimation of percentage covalency of the metal-ligand bond in other similar complexes.

  18. Renovation of Optically Active Phenanthrolines as Powerful Chiral Ligands for Versatile Asymmetric Metal Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Yuki; Nishiyama, Hisao

    2016-12-01

    In the field of asymmetric synthesis, the development of new chiral ligands has been regarded as an attractive challenge for decades. Novel chiral ligands can often have a great impact on synthetic protocols. In this context, we are currently interested in the application of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) as an entirely new class of chiral ligand. To handle this issue, we designed a chiral phen ligand that provides the N,N,O-tridentate coordination of the phen moiety and an additional phenolic hydroxyl group. As phen possesses greater coordination ability with various ions, our chiral phen ligand would be valuable as one of the "privileged" chiral ligands applied to a broad range of metal catalysts and new reactions. This account summarizes the results of the application of the chiral phen ligand to various kinds of metal catalysis.

  19. Conversion of a monodentate amidinate-germylene ligand into chelating imine-germanate ligands (on mononuclear manganese complexes).

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Polo, Diego

    2014-08-18

    The unprecedented transformation of a terminal two-electron-donor amidinate-germylene ligand into a chelating three-electron-donor κ(2)-N,Ge-imine-germanate ligand has been achieved by treating the manganese amidinate-germylene complex [MnBr{Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (1; (i)Pr2bzam = N,N'-bis(isopropyl)benzamidinate) with LiMe or Ag[BF4]. In these reactions, which afford [Mn{κ(2)Ge,N-GeMe((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (2) and [Mn{κ(2)Ge,N-GeF((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (3), respectively, the anionic nucleophile, Me(-) or F(-), ends on the Ge atom while an arm of the amidinate fragment migrates from the Ge atom to the Mn atom. In contrast, the reaction of 1 with AgOTf (OTf = triflate) leads to [Mn(OTf){Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (4), which maintains intact the amidinate-germylene ligand. Complex 4 is very moisture-sensitive, leading to [Mn2{μ-κ(4)Ge2,O2-Ge2(t)Bu2(OH)2O}(CO)8] (5) and [(i)Pr2bzamH2]OTf (6) in wet solvents. In 5, a novel digermanate(II) ligand, [(t)Bu(OH)GeOGe(OH)(t)Bu](2-), doubly bridges two Mn(CO)4 units. The structures of 1-6 have been characterized by spectroscopic (IR, NMR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods.

  20. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP).

    PubMed

    Snyder, David A; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  1. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David A.; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  2. Two new metal-organic frameworks based on tetrazole-heterocyclic ligands accompanied by in situ ligand formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Xu, Jian; Li, Ai-Lin; Hu, Tong-Liang; Bu, Xian-He

    2017-03-07

    Based on the same in situ formed ligand, two new MOFs, namely {[Zn2(HL)2]·0.5DMF·H2O}n (1) and {[Cd2(HL)2]·1.5H2O}n (2) (H3L = 5-[(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)amino]isophthalic acid), have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR, PXRD, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. During the self-assembly process, the original ligand H2ATBDC (5-(5-amino-1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid) undergoes the Dimroth rearrangement to form a new ligand H3L, consequently contributing to the construction of the two new MOFs. Structural analysis reveals that both 1 and 2 possess a three-directional intersecting channel system and pts topology. The major structural difference between them is the metal coordination, which displays four- and six-coordinated modes in 1 and 2, respectively, and results in diverse channels and different stabilities. Moreover, the adsorption properties of 1a (i.e., the desolvated 1) have been studied, and the results show that 1a possesses moderate capability of gas sorption for N2, CO2, and CH4 gases, along with high selectivity ratios of 102 and 20 for CO2/N2 (15 : 85) and CO2/CH4 (50 : 50) at 273 K, respectively.

  3. Helix 8 of the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is essential for ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiong; Waxse, Bennett; Riquelme, Denise; Zhang, Jiabao; Aguilera, Greti

    2015-06-15

    Membrane association of estrogen receptors (ER) depends on cysteine palmitoylation and two leucines in the ligand binding domain (LBD), conserved in most steroid receptors. The role of this region, corresponding to helix 8 of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) LBD, on membrane association of GR was studied in 4B cells, expressing endogenous GR, and Cos-7 cells transfected EGFP-GR constructs. 4B cells preloaded with radiolabeled palmitic acid showed no radioactivity incorporation into immunoprecipitated GR. Moreover, mutation C683A (corresponding to ER palmitoylation site) did not affect corticosterone-induced membrane association of GR. Mutations L687-690A, L682A, E680G and K685G prevented membrane and also nuclear localization through reduced ligand binding. L687-690A mutation decreased association of GR with heat shock protein 90 and transcriptional activity, without overt effects on receptor protein stability. The data demonstrate that palmitoylation does not mediate membrane association of GR, but that the region 680-690 (helix 8) is critical for ligand binding and receptor function.

  4. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important

  5. DNA-interaction and in vitro antimicrobial studies of some mixed-ligand complexes of cobalt(II) with fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ciprofloxacin and some neutral bidentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Patel, M N; Chhasatia, M R; Gandhi, D S

    2009-05-15

    Six new mixed-ligand complexes of Co(II) with ciprofloxacin (Cip) and neutral bidentate ligands have been synthesized and characterized. Binding and cleavage of DNA with the complex were investigated using spectroscopic method, viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis techniques. Antibacterial activity has been assayed against two Gram((-ve)) and three Gram((+ve)) microorganisms using the doubling dilution technique.

  6. Ligand preference and orientation in b- and c-type heme-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fufezan, Christian; Zhang, Jun; Gunner, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Hemes are often incorporated into designed proteins. The importance of the heme ligand type and its orientation is still a matter of debate. Here, heme ligands and ligand orientation were investigated using a nonredundant (87 structures) and a redundant (1503 structures) set of structures to compare and contrast design features of natural b- and c-type heme-binding proteins. Histidine is the most common ligand. Marked differences in ligation motifs between b- and c-type hemes are higher occurrence of His-Met in c-type heme binding motifs (16.4% vs. 1.4%) and higher occurrence of exchangeable, small molecules in b-type heme binding motifs (67.6% vs. 9.9%). Histidine ligands that are part of the c-type CXXCH heme-binding motif show a distinct asymmetric distribution of orientation. They tend to point between either the heme propionates or between the NA and NB heme nitrogens. Molecular mechanics calculations show that this asymmetry is due to the bonded constraints of the covalent attachment between the heme and the protein. In contrast, the orientations of b-type hemes histidine ligands are found evenly distributed with no preference. Observed histidine heme ligand orientations show no dominating influence of electrostatic interactions between the heme propionates and the ligands. Furthermore, ligands in bis-His hemes are found more frequently perpendicular rather than parallel to each other. These correlations support energetic constraints on ligands that can be used in designing proteins. PMID:18491383

  7. Differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of protein–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Michael J; Busby, Scott A; Pascal, Bruce D; West, Graham M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Functional regulation of ligand-activated receptors is driven by alterations in the conformational dynamics of the protein upon ligand binding. Differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled with mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and sensitive approach for characterization of perturbations in conformational dynamics of proteins following ligand binding. While this technique is sensitive to detecting ligand interactions and alterations in receptor dynamics, it also can provide important mechanistic insights into ligand regulation. For example, HDX has been used to determine a novel mechanism of ligand activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ, perform detailed analyses of binding modes of ligands within the ligand-binding pocket of two estrogen receptor isoforms, providing insight into selectivity, and helped classify different types of estrogen receptor-α ligands by correlating their pharmacology with the way they interact with the receptor based solely on hierarchical clustering of receptor HDX signatures. Beyond small-molecule–receptor interactions, this technique has also been applied to study protein–protein complexes, such as mapping antibody–antigen interactions. In this article, we summarize the current state of the differential HDX approaches and the future outlook. We summarize how HDX analysis of protein–ligand interactions has had an impact on biology and drug discovery. PMID:21329427

  8. TGF-α ligands can substitute for the neuregulin Vein in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christina L; Manivannan, Sathiya N; Simcox, Amanda

    2014-11-01

    ErbB receptors, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr), are activated by EGF ligands to govern cell proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation. The different EGF-induced cell responses in development are regulated by deployment of multiple ligands. These inputs, however, engage only a limited number of intracellular pathways and are thought to elicit specific responses by regulating the amplitude or duration of the intracellular signal. The single Drosophila Egfr has four ligands: three of the TGF-α-type and a single neuregulin-like called vein (vn). Here, we used mutant combinations and gene replacement to determine the constraints of ligand specificity in development. Mutant analysis revealed extensive ligand redundancy in embryogenesis and wing development. Surprisingly, we found that the essential role of vn in development could be largely replaced by expression of any TGF-α ligand, including spitz (spi), in the endogenous vn pattern. vn mutants die as white undifferentiated pupae, but the rescued individuals showed global differentiation of adult body parts. Spi is more potent than Vn, and the best morphological rescue occurred when Spi expression was reduced to achieve an intracellular signaling level comparable to that produced by Vn. Our results show that the developmental repertoire of a strong ligand like Spi is flexible and at the appropriate level can emulate the activity of a weak ligand like Vn. These findings align with a model whereby cells respond similarly to an equivalent quantitative level of an intracellular signal generated by two distinct ligands regardless of ligand identity.

  9. Fluorescence‐ and bioluminescence‐based approaches to study GPCR ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A; White, Carl W; Nguyen, Kim; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Ligand binding is a vital component of any pharmacologist's toolbox and allows the detailed investigation of how a molecule binds to its receptor. These studies enable the experimental determination of binding affinity of labelled and unlabelled compounds through kinetic, saturation (Kd) and competition (Ki) binding assays. Traditionally, these studies have used molecules labelled with radioisotopes; however, more recently, fluorescent ligands have been developed for this purpose. This review will briefly cover receptor ligand binding theory and then discuss the use of fluorescent ligands with some of the different technologies currently employed to examine ligand binding. Fluorescent ligands can be used for direct measurement of receptor‐associated fluorescence using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry as well as in assays such as fluorescence polarization, where ligand binding is monitored by changes in the free rotation when a fluorescent ligand is bound to a receptor. Additionally, fluorescent ligands can act as donors or acceptors for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with the development of assays based on FRET and time‐resolved FRET (TR‐FRET). Finally, we have recently developed a novel bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) ligand binding assay utilizing a small (19 kDa), super‐bright luciferase subunit (NanoLuc) from a deep sea shrimp. In combination with fluorescent ligands, measurement of RET now provides an array of methodologies to study ligand binding. While each method has its own advantages and drawbacks, binding studies using fluorescent ligands are now a viable alternative to the use of radioligands. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein‐Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc PMID:26317175

  10. Complexation of heterocyclic ligands with DNA in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskii, S. F.; Bolotin, P. A.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Chernyshev, D. N.

    2008-03-01

    We have used spectrophotometry to study self-association and complexation with DNA by organic heterocyclic compounds in the acridine and phenothiazine series: proflavin, thionine, and methylene blue. Based on the experimental concentration dependences of the molar absorption coefficient of the molecules in an aqueous buffer solution (0.01 M NaCl, 0.01 M Na2EDTA, 0.01 M Tris, pH 7.4, T = 298 K), we have determined the equilibrium dimerization constants for the dyes and the DNA complexation parameters using the Scatchard and McGhee-von Hippel models. The observed increase in the cooperativity parameters as the dimerization constants of the ligands increase allowed us to hypothesize that the same interactions occur between dye molecules adsorbed on DNA as in their self-association. The equilibrium DNA-binding constants for the ligands, obtained using the McGhee-von Hippel cooperative model, are (20.9 ± 2.7)·103 M-1 for proflavin and (33.8 ± 4.1)·103 M-1 for thionine. Using the Scatchard model, taking into account intercalation and “external” binding of ligands with DNA, we determined the DNA complexation constants for methylene blue: (26.4 ± 4.6)·103 and (96 ± 17)·103 M-1 respectively. Based on analysis of the data obtained, we hypothesized that the predominant type of binding with DNA is intercalation binding in the case of proflavin and thionine, and “external” binding with the DNA surface in the case of methylene blue.

  11. Developing the family of picolinate ligands for Mn(2+) complexation.

    PubMed

    Forgács, Attila; Pujales-Paradela, Rosa; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Valencia, Laura; Esteban-Gómez, David; Botta, Mauro; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2017-01-31

    We have reported here a series of ligands containing pentadentate 6,6'-(azanediylbis(methylene))dipicolinic acid units that differ in the substituent present at the amine nitrogen atom (acetate: H3DPAAA; phenyl: H2DPAPhA; dodecyl: H2DPAC12A; 4-hexylphenyl: H2DPAC6PhA). The protonation constants of the hexadentate DPAAA(3-) and pentadentate DPAPhA(2-) ligands and the stability constants of their Mn(2+) complexes were determined using pH-potentiometry (25 °C, 0.15 M NaCl). The mono-hydrated [Mn(DPAAA)](-) complex (log KMnL = 13.19(5)) was found to be considerably more stable than the bis-hydrated [Mn(DPAPhA)] analogue (log KMnL = 9.55(1)). A detailed (1)H and (17)O NMR relaxometric study was carried out to determine the parameters that govern the proton relaxivities of these complexes. The [Mn(DPAC12A)] complex, which contains a dodecyl lipophilic chain, forms micelles in solution characterized by a critical micellar concentration (cmc) of 96(9) μM. The lipophilic [Mn(DPAC6PhA)] and [Mn(DPAC12A)] derivatives form rather strong adducts with Human Serum Albumin (HSA) with association constants of 7.1 ± 0.1 × 10(3) and 1.3 ± 0.4 × 10(5) M(-1), respectively. The X-ray structure of the complex {K(H2O)4}{[Mn(DPAAA)(H2O)]}2 shows that the Mn(2+) ion in [Mn(DPAAA)](-) is coordinated to the six donor atoms of the ligand, a coordinated water molecule completing the pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment.

  12. Oxytocin receptors: ligand binding, signalling and cholesterol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald; Reitz, Julian; Brauer, Sabine; Trossen, Conny

    2008-01-01

    The G protein coupled oxytocin receptor (OTR) reveals some specific molecular and physiological characteristics. Ligand-receptor interaction has been analysed by photoaffinity labelling, site-directed mutagenesis, the construction of receptor chimeras and molecular modelling. Major results of these studies will be summarized. The N-terminus of the OTR is mainly involved in agonist binding. Notably, antagonists that are derived from the ground structure of oxytocin, bind the receptor at distinct sites partly non-overlapping with the agonist binding site. OTRs are able to couple to different G proteins, with a subsequent stimulation of phospholipase C-beta isoforms. In dependence on G protein coupling, OTRs can transduce growth-inhibitory or proliferatory signals. Some evidence is provided that OTRs are also present in form of dimeric or oligomeric complexes at the cell surface. The affinity of the receptor for ligands is strongly dependent on the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) and cholesterol that both act like positive allosteric modulators. While the high-affinity state of the receptor for agonists requires divalent cations and cholesterol, the high-affinity state for antagonists is only dependent on a sufficient amount of cholesterol. Cholesterol affects ligand-binding affinity, receptor signalling and stability. Since the purification of the OTR has never been achieved, alternative methods to study the receptor in its native environment are necessary. Promising strategies for the site-specific labelling of the OTR will be presented. The employment of diverse reporter molecules introduced at different positions within the OTR might allow us in the near future to measure conformational changes of the receptor in its native lipid environment.

  13. Water versus acetonitrile coordination to uranyl. Effect of chloride ligands.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2012-02-06

    Optimizations at the BLYP and B3LYP levels are reported for the mixed uranyl chloro/water/acetonitrile complexes [UO(2)Cl(n)(H(2)O)(x)(MeCN)(5-n-x)](2-n) (n = 1-3) and [UO(2)Cl(n)(H(2)O)(x)(MeCN)(4-n-x)](2-n) (n = 2-4), in both the gas phase and a polarizable continuum modeling acetonitrile. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been performed for [UO(2)Cl(2)(H(2)O)(MeCN)(2)] in the gas phase and in a periodic box of liquid acetonitrile. According to population analyses and dipole moments evaluated from maximally localized Wannier function centers, uranium is less Lewis acidic in the neutral UO(2)Cl(2) than in the UO(2)(2+) moiety. In the gas phase the latter binds acetonitrile ligands more strongly than water, whereas in acetonitrile solution, the trend is reversed due to cooperative polarization effects. In the polarizable continuum the chloro complexes have a slight energetic preference for water over acetonitrile ligands, but several mixed complexes are so close in free energy ΔG that they should exist in equilibrium, in accord with previous interpretations of EXAFS data in solution. The binding strengths of the fifth neutral ligands decrease with increasing chloride content, to the extent that the trichlorides should be formulated as four-coordinate [UO(2)Cl(3)L](-) (L = H(2)O, MeCN). Limitations to their accuracy notwithstanding, density functional calculations can offer insights into the speciation of a complex uranyl system in solution, a key feature in the context of nuclear waste partitioning by complexant molecules.

  14. Fcγ receptors and ligands and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Sundgren, Nathan; Khera, Amit; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W

    2015-01-16

    Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) classically modulate intracellular signaling on binding of the Fc region of IgG in immune response cells. How FcγR and their ligands affect cardiovascular health and disease has been interrogated recently in both preclinical and clinical studies. The stimulation of activating FcγR in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and monocytes/macrophages causes a variety of cellular responses that may contribute to vascular disease pathogenesis. Stimulation of the lone inhibitory FγcR, FcγRIIB, also has adverse consequences in endothelial cells, antagonizing NO production and reparative mechanisms. In preclinical disease models, activating FcγRs promote atherosclerosis, whereas FcγRIIB is protective, and activating FcγRs also enhance thrombotic and nonthrombotic vascular occlusion. The FcγR ligand C-reactive protein (CRP) has undergone intense study. Although in rodents CRP does not affect atherosclerosis, it causes hypertension and insulin resistance and worsens myocardial infarction. Massive data have accumulated indicating an association between increases in circulating CRP and coronary heart disease in humans. However, Mendelian randomization studies reveal that CRP is not likely a disease mediator. CRP genetics and hypertension warrant further investigation. To date, studies of genetic variants of activating FcγRs are insufficient to implicate the receptors in coronary heart disease pathogenesis in humans. However, a link between FcγRIIB and human hypertension may be emerging. Further knowledge of the vascular biology of FcγR and their ligands will potentially enhance our understanding of cardiovascular disorders, particularly in patients whose greater predisposition for disease is not explained by traditional risk factors, such as individuals with autoimmune disorders.

  15. Ligand binding by recombinant domains from insect ecdysone receptors.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Johnson, W M; Pawlak-Skrzecz, A; Eaton, R E; Bliese, M; Howell, L; Hannan, G N; Hill, R J

    2007-06-01

    The ligand binding domains (LBDs) from the EcR and USP proteins of four insect pests (Lucilia cuprina, Myzus persicae, Bemisia tabaci, Helicoverpa armigera) were purified as recombinant heterodimers. The K(d) values for [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding by LBD heterodimers that included the hinge regions (i.e., DE/F heterodimers) ranged 0.7-2.5 nM, with K(i) values for ecdysteroid and dibenzoylhydrazine ligands ranging from 0.1 nM to >448 microM. The K(d) and K(i) values for a recombinant H. armigera LBD heterodimer that lacked D-regions (i.e., an E/F heterodimer) were approximately 4 times higher than those for its DE/F counterpart. Rate constants were estimated for the L. cuprina LBD heterodimer. A fluorescein-inokosterone conjugate (K(i)~40 nM) was used to develop a novel binding assay based on fluorescence polarization. This assay, which ranked the affinity of competitor ecdysteroids in the same order as the [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding assay, is well suited to high-throughput screening. Ponasterone A had a higher affinity than muristerone A for the recombinant hemipteran LBD heterodimers, whereas the reverse was true for the recombinant dipteran one. The same preference was observed when these ligands were tested as inducers of ecdysone receptor-controlled gene expression in transfected mammalian cells. The binding data obtained in vitro using recombinant LBD heterodimers reflects the ability of agonists to induce transgene expression in recombinant mammalian cells, and can also reflect their efficacy as larvicides.

  16. Polymer-pendant ligand chemistry. 1. Reactions of organoarsonic acids and arsenic acid with catechol ligands bonded to polystryene-divinylbenzene and regeneration of the ligand site by a simple hydrolysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.H.; Tannous, R.S.

    1985-12-18

    A novel method is reported for reactions of organoarsonic acids and arsenic acid, known to be present in oil shale and its pyrolysis products, with catechol ligands bonded to either 2% or 20% cross-linked methylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) resins. A previous study with catechol-bonded ligands on PS-DVB resins dealt with their reactions with metal ions in aqueous solution and showed a selectivity toward Hg/sup 2 +/ ions. As far as we have been able to determine, reactions of this polymer-supported ligand with organometallic compounds or inorganic anions have not been reported. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  17. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  18. FES kinase participates in KIT-ligand induced chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Voisset, Edwige; Lopez, Sophie; Chaix, Amandine; Vita, Marina; George, Coralie; Dubreuil, Patrice; De Sepulveda, Paulo

    2010-02-26

    FES is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase activated by several membrane receptors, originally identified as a viral oncogene product. We have recently identified FES as a crucial effector of oncogenic KIT mutant receptor. However, FES implication in wild-type KIT receptor function was not addressed. We report here that FES interacts with KIT and is phosphorylated following activation by its ligand SCF. Unlike in the context of oncogenic KIT mutant, FES is not involved in wild-type KIT proliferation signal, or in cell adhesion. Instead, FES is required for SCF-induced chemotaxis. In conclusion, FES kinase is a mediator of wild-type KIT signalling implicated in cell migration.

  19. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  20. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).