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Sample records for 4-day moving averages

  1. An improved moving average technical trading rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailias, Fotis; Thomakos, Dimitrios D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes a modified version of the widely used price and moving average cross-over trading strategies. The suggested approach (presented in its 'long only' version) is a combination of cross-over 'buy' signals and a dynamic threshold value which acts as a dynamic trailing stop. The trading behaviour and performance from this modified strategy are different from the standard approach with results showing that, on average, the proposed modification increases the cumulative return and the Sharpe ratio of the investor while exhibiting smaller maximum drawdown and smaller drawdown duration than the standard strategy.

  2. Detrending moving average algorithm: Frequency response and scaling performances.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Anna; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) over either time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent, and finite scale range behavior will be discussed. PMID:27415389

  3. Detrending moving average algorithm: Frequency response and scaling performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Anna; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The Detrending Moving Average (DMA) algorithm has been widely used in its several variants for characterizing long-range correlations of random signals and sets (one-dimensional sequences or high-dimensional arrays) over either time or space. In this paper, mainly based on analytical arguments, the scaling performances of the centered DMA, including higher-order ones, are investigated by means of a continuous time approximation and a frequency response approach. Our results are also confirmed by numerical tests. The study is carried out for higher-order DMA operating with moving average polynomials of different degree. In particular, detrending power degree, frequency response, asymptotic scaling, upper limit of the detectable scaling exponent, and finite scale range behavior will be discussed.

  4. Motion artifacts reduction from PPG using cyclic moving average filter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junyeon

    2014-01-01

    The photoplethysmogram (PPG) is an extremely useful medical diagnostic tool. However, PPG signals are highly susceptible to motion artifacts. In this paper, we propose a cyclic moving average filter that use similarity of Photoplethysmogram. This filtering method has the average value of each samples through separating the cycle of PPG signal. If there are some motion artifacts in continuous PPG signal, disjoin the signal based on cycle. And then, we made these signals to have same cycle by coordinating the number of sample. After arrange these cycles in 2 dimension, we put the average value of each samples from starting till now. So, we can eliminate the motion artifacts without damaged PPG signal. PMID:24704660

  5. Computational problems in autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C.; Goodarzi, S. M.; Oneill, W. D.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of the sampling interval and the selection of the order of the model in time series analysis are considered. Band limited (up to 15 Hz) random torque perturbations are applied to the human ankle joint. The applied torque input, the angular rotation output, and the electromyographic activity using surface electrodes from the extensor and flexor muscles of the ankle joint are recorded. Autoregressive moving average models are developed. A parameter constraining technique is applied to develop more reliable models. The asymptotic behavior of the system must be taken into account during parameter optimization to develop predictive models.

  6. MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION FOR PERIODIC AUTOREGRESSIVE MOVING AVERAGE MODELS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchia, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    A useful class of models for seasonal time series that cannot be filtered or standardized to achieve second-order stationarity is that of periodic autoregressive moving average (PARMA) models, which are extensions of ARMA models that allow periodic (seasonal) parameters. An approximation to the exact likelihood for Gaussian PARMA processes is developed, and a straightforward algorithm for its maximization is presented. The algorithm is tested on several periodic ARMA(1, 1) models through simulation studies and is compared to moment estimation via the seasonal Yule-Walker equations. Applicability of the technique is demonstrated through an analysis of a seasonal stream-flow series from the Rio Caroni River in Venezuela.

  7. Moving average rules as a source of market instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarella, Carl; He, Xue-Zhong; Hommes, Cars

    2006-10-01

    Despite the pervasiveness of the efficient markets paradigm in the academic finance literature, the use of various moving average (MA) trading rules remains popular with financial market practitioners. This paper proposes a stochastic dynamic financial market model in which demand for traded assets has both a fundamentalist and a chartist component. The chartist demand is governed by the difference between current price and a (long-run) MA. Our simulations show that the MA is a source of market instability, and the interaction of the MA and market noises can lead to the tendency for the market price to take long excursions away from the fundamental. The model reveals various market price phenomena, the coexistence of apparent market efficiency and a large chartist component, price resistance levels, long memory and skewness and kurtosis of returns.

  8. The Kernel Adaptive Autoregressive-Moving-Average Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Kan; Príncipe, José C

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel kernel adaptive recurrent filtering algorithm based on the autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) model, which is trained with recurrent stochastic gradient descent in the reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces. This kernelized recurrent system, the kernel adaptive ARMA (KAARMA) algorithm, brings together the theories of adaptive signal processing and recurrent neural networks (RNNs), extending the current theory of kernel adaptive filtering (KAF) using the representer theorem to include feedback. Compared with classical feedforward KAF methods, the KAARMA algorithm provides general nonlinear solutions for complex dynamical systems in a state-space representation, with a deferred teacher signal, by propagating forward the hidden states. We demonstrate its capabilities to provide exact solutions with compact structures by solving a set of benchmark nondeterministic polynomial-complete problems involving grammatical inference. Simulation results show that the KAARMA algorithm outperforms equivalent input-space recurrent architectures using first- and second-order RNNs, demonstrating its potential as an effective learning solution for the identification and synthesis of deterministic finite automata. PMID:25935049

  9. Application of the moving averaging technique in surplus production models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Qun

    2014-08-01

    Surplus production models are the simplest analytical methods effective for fish stock assessment and fisheries management. In this paper, eight surplus production estimators (three estimation procedures) were tested on Schaefer and Fox type simulated data in three simulated fisheries (declining, well-managed, and restoring fisheries) at two white noise levels. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to verify the utility of moving averaging (MA), which was an important technique for reducing the effect of noise in data in these models. The relative estimation error (REE) of maximum sustainable yield (MSY) was used as an indicator for the analysis, and one-way ANOVA was applied to test the significance of the REE calculated at four levels of MA. Simulation results suggested that increasing the value of MA could significantly improve the performance of the surplus production model (low REE) in all cases when the white noise level was low (coefficient of variation ( CV)=0.02). However, when the white noise level increased ( CV=0.25), adding the value of MA could still significantly enhance the performance of most models. Our results indicated that the best model performance occurred frequently when MA was equal to 3; however, some exceptions were observed when MA was higher.

  10. Effects of Polynomial Trends on Detrending Moving Average Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ying-Hui; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-07-01

    The detrending moving average (DMA) algorithm is one of the best performing methods to quantify the long-term correlations in nonstationary time series. As many long-term correlated time series in real systems contain various trends, we investigate the effects of polynomial trends on the scaling behaviors and the performances of three widely used DMA methods including backward algorithm (BDMA), centered algorithm (CDMA) and forward algorithm (FDMA). We derive a general framework for polynomial trends and obtain analytical results for constant shifts and linear trends. We find that the behavior of the CDMA method is not influenced by constant shifts. In contrast, linear trends cause a crossover in the CDMA fluctuation functions. We also find that constant shifts and linear trends cause crossovers in the fluctuation functions obtained from the BDMA and FDMA methods. When a crossover exists, the scaling behavior at small scales comes from the intrinsic time series while that at large scales is dominated by the constant shifts or linear trends. We also derive analytically the expressions of crossover scales and show that the crossover scale depends on the strength of the polynomial trends, the Hurst index, and in some cases (linear trends for BDMA and FDMA) the length of the time series. In all cases, the BDMA and the FDMA behave almost the same under the influence of constant shifts or linear trends. Extensive numerical experiments confirm excellently the analytical derivations. We conclude that the CDMA method outperforms the BDMA and FDMA methods in the presence of polynomial trends.

  11. Moving average optimization in digital terrain model generation based on test multibeam echosounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleika, Wojciech

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents a new method of digital terrain model (DTM) estimation based on modified moving average interpolation. There are many methods that can be employed in DTM creation, such as kriging, inverse distance weighting, nearest neighbour and moving average. The moving average method is not as precise as the others; hence, it is not commonly comprised in scientific work. Considering the high accuracy, the relatively low time costs, and the huge amount of measurement data collected by multibeam echosounder, however, the moving average method is definitely one of the most promising approaches. In this study, several variants of this method are analysed. An optimization of the moving average method is proposed based on a new module of selecting neighbouring points during the interpolation process—the "growing radius" approach. Tests experiments performed on various multibeam echosounder datasets demonstrate the high potential of this modified moving average method for improved DTM generation.

  12. Impulse Parameters Determination using the Moving Average Method for Digitally Measured Lightning Impulse Voltage Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Harada, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Kohei; Tsubouchi, Yoshifumi

    This paper clarifies an important fact that the time parameters evaluated from the mean curve obtained after applying moving average are identical to the ones deduced from the original lightning impulse voltage. Digital recording device is always associated with random thermal noise caused by semi-conductor components used in the pre-amplifier in the recorder. The fact makes it possible for us to get rid of random noise superposed on the measured impulse wave form by means of moving average method. Also using the finding, even jittery noisy records can be averaged to a smooth curve from which one can easily distil identical time parameters.

  13. Assessing the Efficacy of Adjustable Moving Averages Using ASEAN-5 Currencies.

    PubMed

    Chan Phooi M'ng, Jacinta; Zainudin, Rozaimah

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the trends in the exchange rate markets of the ASEAN-5 countries (Indonesia (IDR), Malaysia (MYR), the Philippines (PHP), Singapore (SGD), and Thailand (THB)) through the application of dynamic moving average trading systems. This research offers evidence of the usefulness of the time-varying volatility technical analysis indicator, Adjustable Moving Average (AMA') in deciphering trends in these ASEAN-5 exchange rate markets. This time-varying volatility factor, referred to as the Efficacy Ratio in this paper, is embedded in AMA'. The Efficacy Ratio adjusts the AMA' to the prevailing market conditions by avoiding whipsaws (losses due, in part, to acting on wrong trading signals, which generally occur when there is no general direction in the market) in range trading and by entering early into new trends in trend trading. The efficacy of AMA' is assessed against other popular moving-average rules. Based on the January 2005 to December 2014 dataset, our findings show that the moving averages and AMA' are superior to the passive buy-and-hold strategy. Specifically, AMA' outperforms the other models for the United States Dollar against PHP (USD/PHP) and USD/THB currency pairs. The results show that different length moving averages perform better in different periods for the five currencies. This is consistent with our hypothesis that a dynamic adjustable technical indicator is needed to cater for different periods in different markets. PMID:27574972

  14. Assessing the Efficacy of Adjustable Moving Averages Using ASEAN-5 Currencies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the trends in the exchange rate markets of the ASEAN-5 countries (Indonesia (IDR), Malaysia (MYR), the Philippines (PHP), Singapore (SGD), and Thailand (THB)) through the application of dynamic moving average trading systems. This research offers evidence of the usefulness of the time-varying volatility technical analysis indicator, Adjustable Moving Average (AMA′) in deciphering trends in these ASEAN-5 exchange rate markets. This time-varying volatility factor, referred to as the Efficacy Ratio in this paper, is embedded in AMA′. The Efficacy Ratio adjusts the AMA′ to the prevailing market conditions by avoiding whipsaws (losses due, in part, to acting on wrong trading signals, which generally occur when there is no general direction in the market) in range trading and by entering early into new trends in trend trading. The efficacy of AMA′ is assessed against other popular moving-average rules. Based on the January 2005 to December 2014 dataset, our findings show that the moving averages and AMA′ are superior to the passive buy-and-hold strategy. Specifically, AMA′ outperforms the other models for the United States Dollar against PHP (USD/PHP) and USD/THB currency pairs. The results show that different length moving averages perform better in different periods for the five currencies. This is consistent with our hypothesis that a dynamic adjustable technical indicator is needed to cater for different periods in different markets. PMID:27574972

  15. Violation of Homogeneity of Variance Assumption in the Integrated Moving Averages Time Series Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullickson, Arlen R.; And Others

    This study is an analysis of the robustness of the Box-Tiao integrated moving averages model for analysis of time series quasi experiments. One of the assumptions underlying the Box-Tiao model is that all N values of alpha subscript t come from the same population which has a variance sigma squared. The robustness was studied only in terms of…

  16. The Performance of Multilevel Growth Curve Models under an Autoregressive Moving Average Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Pituch, Keenan A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the robustness of multilevel linear growth curve modeling to misspecification of an autoregressive moving average process. As previous research has shown (J. Ferron, R. Dailey, & Q. Yi, 2002; O. Kwok, S. G. West, & S. B. Green, 2007; S. Sivo, X. Fan, & L. Witta, 2005), estimates of the fixed effects were unbiased, and Type I…

  17. MARD—A moving average rose diagram application for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Mark A.; Blenkinsop, Thomas G.

    2012-12-01

    MARD 1.0 is a computer program for generating smoothed rose diagrams by using a moving average, which is designed for use across the wide range of disciplines encompassed within the Earth Sciences. Available in MATLAB®, Microsoft® Excel and GNU Octave formats, the program is fully compatible with both Microsoft® Windows and Macintosh operating systems. Each version has been implemented in a user-friendly way that requires no prior experience in programming with the software. MARD conducts a moving average smoothing, a form of signal processing low-pass filter, upon the raw circular data according to a set of pre-defined conditions selected by the user. This form of signal processing filter smoothes the angular dataset, emphasising significant circular trends whilst reducing background noise. Customisable parameters include whether the data is uni- or bi-directional, the angular range (or aperture) over which the data is averaged, and whether an unweighted or weighted moving average is to be applied. In addition to the uni- and bi-directional options, the MATLAB® and Octave versions also possess a function for plotting 2-dimensional dips/pitches in a single, lower, hemisphere. The rose diagrams from each version are exportable as one of a selection of common graphical formats. Frequently employed statistical measures that determine the vector mean, mean resultant (or length), circular standard deviation and circular variance are also included. MARD's scope is demonstrated via its application to a variety of datasets within the Earth Sciences.

  18. Implications of Depth Determination from Second Moving Average Residual Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, K. S.; Kletetschka, G.

    2014-12-01

    Mars total magnetic data obtained by Mars Global Surveyor mission from 400 km altitude were processed using a second moving average method (SMAM) to estimate the depth of the buried sources. Five profiles were chosen across major magnetic areas. Each profile was subjected to a separation technique using the SMAM. Second moving average residual anomalies (SMARA) were obtained from magnetic data using filters of successive spacing. The depth estimate is monitored by the standard deviation of the depths determined from all SMARA for various value of the shape factor (SF) that includes dike, cylinder, and sphere. The standard deviation along with depth estimate is considered to be a new criterion for determining the correct depth and shape of the buried structures on Mars.

  19. Time series autoregressive integrated moving average modeling of test-day milk yields of dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Macciotta, N P; Cappio-Borlino, A; Pulina, G

    2000-05-01

    Monthly test-day milk yields of 1200 dairy Sarda ewes were analyzed by time-series methods. Autocorrelation functions were calculated for lactations within parity classes and altitude of location of flocks. Spectral analysis of the successions of data was developed by Fourier transformation, and different Box-Jenkins autoregressive integrated moving average models were fitted. The separation of deterministic and stochastic components highlighted the autoregressive feature of milk production pattern. The forecasting power of autoregressive integrated moving average models was tested by predicting total milk production for a standardized lactation length of 225 d from only a few test-day records. Results indicated a greater forecasting capacity in comparison with standard methods and suggested further development of time-series analysis for studying lactation curves with more sophisticated methods, such as wavelet decomposition and neural network models. PMID:10821585

  20. Fast algorithm for scaling analysis with higher-order detrending moving average method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Yutaka; Miki, Yuki; Shimatani, Satoshi; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Among scaling analysis methods based on the root-mean-square deviation from the estimated trend, it has been demonstrated that centered detrending moving average (DMA) analysis with a simple moving average has good performance when characterizing long-range correlation or fractal scaling behavior. Furthermore, higher-order DMA has also been proposed; it is shown to have better detrending capabilities, removing higher-order polynomial trends than original DMA. However, a straightforward implementation of higher-order DMA requires a very high computational cost, which would prevent practical use of this method. To solve this issue, in this study, we introduce a fast algorithm for higher-order DMA, which consists of two techniques: (1) parallel translation of moving averaging windows by a fixed interval; (2) recurrence formulas for the calculation of summations. Our algorithm can significantly reduce computational cost. Monte Carlo experiments show that the computational time of our algorithm is approximately proportional to the data length, although that of the conventional algorithm is proportional to the square of the data length. The efficiency of our algorithm is also shown by a systematic study of the performance of higher-order DMA, such as the range of detectable scaling exponents and detrending capability for removing polynomial trends. In addition, through the analysis of heart-rate variability time series, we discuss possible applications of higher-order DMA.

  1. A new lot inspection procedure based on exponentially weighted moving average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Muhammad; Azam, Muhammad; Jun, Chi-Hyuck

    2015-06-01

    In this manuscript a new variable sampling plan based on the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) statistic is proposed assuming that the quality characteristic follows the normal distribution. The plans are proposed when the standard deviation of the normal distribution is known or unknown. The plan parameters for both cases are determined such that the given producer's risk and consumer's risk are satisfied. The proposed plan includes the ordinary variable single sampling plan as a special case and its advantage over the single sampling plan is discussed in terms of the sample size. Extensive tables are provided for industrial use.

  2. PERIODIC AUTOREGRESSIVE-MOVING AVERAGE (PARMA) MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO WATER RESOURCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchia, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results involving correlation properties and parameter estimation for autogressive-moving average models with periodic parameters are presented. A multivariate representation of the PARMA model is used to derive parameter space restrictions and difference equations for the periodic autocorrelations. Close approximation to the likelihood function for Gaussian PARMA processes results in efficient maximum-likelihood estimation procedures. Terms in the Fourier expansion of the parameters are sequentially included, and a selection criterion is given for determining the optimal number of harmonics to be included. Application of the techniques is demonstrated through analysis of a monthly streamflow time series.

  3. Asymmetric multifractal detrending moving average analysis in time series of PM2.5 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Ni, Zhiwei; Ni, Liping; Li, Jingming; Zhou, Longfei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose the asymmetric multifractal detrending moving average analysis (A-MFDMA) method to explore the asymmetric correlation in non-stationary time series. The proposed method is applied to explore the asymmetric correlation of PM2.5 daily average concentration with uptrends or downtrends in China. In addition, shuffling and phase randomization procedures are applied to detect the sources of multifractality. The results show that existences of asymmetric correlations, and the asymmetric correlations are multifractal. Further, the multifractal scaling behavior in the Chinese PM2.5 is caused not only by long-range correlation but also by fat-tailed distribution, but the major source of multifractality is fat-tailed distribution.

  4. Compact and accurate linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving average model parameter estimation using laguerre functions.

    PubMed

    Chon, K H; Cohen, R J; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1997-01-01

    A linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving average (ARMA) identification algorithm is developed for modeling time series data. The algorithm uses Laguerre expansion of kernals (LEK) to estimate Volterra-Wiener kernals. However, instead of estimating linear and nonlinear system dynamics via moving average models, as is the case for the Volterra-Wiener analysis, we propose an ARMA model-based approach. The proposed algorithm is essentially the same as LEK, but this algorithm is extended to include past values of the output as well. Thus, all of the advantages associated with using the Laguerre function remain with our algorithm; but, by extending the algorithm to the linear and nonlinear ARMA model, a significant reduction in the number of Laguerre functions can be made, compared with the Volterra-Wiener approach. This translates into a more compact system representation and makes the physiological interpretation of higher order kernels easier. Furthermore, simulation results show better performance of the proposed approach in estimating the system dynamics than LEK in certain cases, and it remains effective in the presence of significant additive measurement noise. PMID:9236985

  5. Application of an autoregressive integrated moving average model for predicting injury mortality in Xiamen, China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yilan; Chen, Min; Chen, Guowei; Wu, Xiaoqing; Lin, Tianquan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injury is currently an increasing public health problem in China. Reducing the loss due to injuries has become a main priority of public health policies. Early warning of injury mortality based on surveillance information is essential for reducing or controlling the disease burden of injuries. We conducted this study to find the possibility of applying autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models to predict mortality from injuries in Xiamen. Method The monthly mortality data on injuries in Xiamen (1 January 2002 to 31 December 2013) were used to fit the ARIMA model with the conditional least-squares method. The values p, q and d in the ARIMA (p, d, q) model refer to the numbers of autoregressive lags, moving average lags and differences, respectively. The Ljung–Box test was used to measure the ‘white noise’ and residuals. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) between observed and fitted values was used to evaluate the predicted accuracy of the constructed models. Results A total of 8274 injury-related deaths in Xiamen were identified during the study period; the average annual mortality rate was 40.99/100 000 persons. Three models, ARIMA (0, 1, 1), ARIMA (4, 1, 0) and ARIMA (1, 1, (2)), passed the parameter (p<0.01) and residual (p>0.05) tests, with MAPE 11.91%, 11.96% and 11.90%, respectively. We chose ARIMA (0, 1, 1) as the optimum model, the MAPE value for which was similar to that of other models but with the fewest parameters. According to the model, there would be 54 persons dying from injuries each month in Xiamen in 2014. Conclusion The ARIMA (0, 1, 1) model could be applied to predict mortality from injuries in Xiamen. PMID:26656013

  6. Multifractal moving average analysis and test of multifractal model with tuned correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Aicko Y.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.

    2011-07-01

    We address two common major problems in the study of time series characterizing fluctuations in complex systems: multifractal analysis and multifractal modeling. Specifically, we introduce a multi-fractal centered moving average (MF-CMA) analysis, which is computationally easier but equivalently performing compared with the well-established multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) with linear detrending. In addition, we study in detail a generalized binomial multi-fractal model (GB-MFM) to conveniently and reliably generate multifractal surrogate data with arbitrary singularity strengths and arbitrary long-term persistence. We use the data generated by this model as well as realistic, by construction monofractal data series with crossovers and trends to test and compare the multifractal analysis methods and discuss finite-size effects as well as limitations due to spurious multifractality.

  7. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-09-12

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  8. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  9. Multifractal detrended moving average analysis of particle density functions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, Provash; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Singh, Gurmukh

    2016-05-01

    Fluctuations in particle density functions in 28Si+Ag(Br) collision at 14.5A GeV and 32S+Ag(Br) collision at 200A GeV are investigated using the multifractal detrended moving average (MFDMA) method. Multifractal parameters obtained from the data analysis are systematically compared with the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model simulation. It is found that the single particle density functions in both the experiments are multifractal in nature. Further, the degree of multifractality in the simulated event samples is almost equal to the corresponding empirical data. The results of this analysis differ significantly from those obtained from other conventional techniques of multifractal analysis previously used for the same sets of data.

  10. Detecting the start of an influenza outbreak using exponentially weighted moving average charts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses cause seasonal outbreaks in temperate climates, usually during winter and early spring, and are endemic in tropical climates. The severity and length of influenza outbreaks vary from year to year. Quick and reliable detection of the start of an outbreak is needed to promote public health measures. Methods We propose the use of an exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart of laboratory confirmed influenza counts to detect the start and end of influenza outbreaks. Results The chart is shown to provide timely signals in an example application with seven years of data from Victoria, Australia. Conclusions The EWMA control chart could be applied in other applications to quickly detect influenza outbreaks. PMID:20587013

  11. A Continuous Time Model for Interest Rate with Autoregressive and Moving Average Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benth, F. E.; Koekebakker, S.; Zakamouline, V.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we present a multi-factor continuous-time autoregressive moving-average (CARMA) model for the short and forward interest rates. This models is able to present a more adequate statistical description of the short and forward rate dynamics. We show that this is a tractable term structure model and provide closed-form solutions to bond and bond option prices, bond yields, and the forward rate volatility term structure. We demonstrate the capabilities of our model by calibrating it to market data and show that it can reproduce rather complex shapes of the empirical volatility term structure. In particular, a three-factor CARMA model can easily capture the dynamics of the level, slope, and curvature factors widely documented in term structure models.

  12. A new image segmentation method based on multifractal detrended moving average analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wen; Zou, Rui-biao; Wang, Fang; Su, Le

    2015-08-01

    In order to segment and delineate some regions of interest in an image, we propose a novel algorithm based on the multifractal detrended moving average analysis (MF-DMA). In this method, the generalized Hurst exponent h(q) is calculated for every pixel firstly and considered as the local feature of a surface. And then a multifractal detrended moving average spectrum (MF-DMS) D(h(q)) is defined by the idea of box-counting dimension method. Therefore, we call the new image segmentation method MF-DMS-based algorithm. The performance of the MF-DMS-based method is tested by two image segmentation experiments of rapeseed leaf image of potassium deficiency and magnesium deficiency under three cases, namely, backward (θ = 0), centered (θ = 0.5) and forward (θ = 1) with different q values. The comparison experiments are conducted between the MF-DMS method and other two multifractal segmentation methods, namely, the popular MFS-based and latest MF-DFS-based methods. The results show that our MF-DMS-based method is superior to the latter two methods. The best segmentation result for the rapeseed leaf image of potassium deficiency and magnesium deficiency is from the same parameter combination of θ = 0.5 and D(h(- 10)) when using the MF-DMS-based method. An interesting finding is that the D(h(- 10)) outperforms other parameters for both the MF-DMS-based method with centered case and MF-DFS-based algorithms. By comparing the multifractal nature between nutrient deficiency and non-nutrient deficiency areas determined by the segmentation results, an important finding is that the gray value's fluctuation in nutrient deficiency area is much severer than that in non-nutrient deficiency area.

  13. Simultaneous Field and R2* Mapping to Quantify Liver Iron Content Using Autoregressive Moving Average Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Loeffler, Ralf B.; Song, Ruitian; McCarville, Mary E.; Hankins, Jane S.; Hillenbrand, Claudia M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the use of a complex multi-gradient echo (mGRE) acquisition and an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for simultaneous susceptibility and R2* measurements for the assessment of liver iron content (LIC) in patients with iron overload. Materials and Methods Fifty MR exams with magnitude and phase mGRE images are processed using the ARMA model which provides fat-separated field maps, R2* maps, and T1-W imaging. The LIC is calculated by measuring the susceptibility between the liver and the right transverse abdominal muscle from the field maps. The relationship between LIC derived from susceptibility measurements and LIC from R2* measurements is determined using linear least squares regression analysis. Results LIC measured from R2* is highly correlated to the LIC from the susceptibility method (mg/g dry = 8.99 ± 0.15 × (mg Fe/ml of wet liver) −2.38 ± 0.29, R2=0.94). The field inhomogeneity in the liver is correlated with R2* (R2=0.85). Conclusion By using the ARMA model on complex mGRE images, both susceptibility and R2*-based LIC measurements can be made simultaneously. The susceptibility measurement can be used to help verify R2* measurements in the assessment of iron overload. PMID:22180325

  14. Modelling and analysis of turbulent datasets using Auto Regressive Moving Average processes

    SciTech Connect

    Faranda, Davide Dubrulle, Bérengère; Daviaud, François; Pons, Flavio Maria Emanuele; Saint-Michel, Brice; Herbert, Éric; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-10-15

    We introduce a novel way to extract information from turbulent datasets by applying an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) statistical analysis. Such analysis goes well beyond the analysis of the mean flow and of the fluctuations and links the behavior of the recorded time series to a discrete version of a stochastic differential equation which is able to describe the correlation structure in the dataset. We introduce a new index Υ that measures the difference between the resulting analysis and the Obukhov model of turbulence, the simplest stochastic model reproducing both Richardson law and the Kolmogorov spectrum. We test the method on datasets measured in a von Kármán swirling flow experiment. We found that the ARMA analysis is well correlated with spatial structures of the flow, and can discriminate between two different flows with comparable mean velocities, obtained by changing the forcing. Moreover, we show that the Υ is highest in regions where shear layer vortices are present, thereby establishing a link between deviations from the Kolmogorov model and coherent structures. These deviations are consistent with the ones observed by computing the Hurst exponents for the same time series. We show that some salient features of the analysis are preserved when considering global instead of local observables. Finally, we analyze flow configurations with multistability features where the ARMA technique is efficient in discriminating different stability branches of the system.

  15. Kalman-based autoregressive moving average modeling and inference for formant and antiformant tracking.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Daryush D; Rudoy, Daniel; Wolfe, Patrick J

    2012-09-01

    Vocal tract resonance characteristics in acoustic speech signals are classically tracked using frame-by-frame point estimates of formant frequencies followed by candidate selection and smoothing using dynamic programming methods that minimize ad hoc cost functions. The goal of the current work is to provide both point estimates and associated uncertainties of center frequencies and bandwidths in a statistically principled state-space framework. Extended Kalman (K) algorithms take advantage of a linearized mapping to infer formant and antiformant parameters from frame-based estimates of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) cepstral coefficients. Error analysis of KARMA, wavesurfer, and praat is accomplished in the all-pole case using a manually marked formant database and synthesized speech waveforms. KARMA formant tracks exhibit lower overall root-mean-square error relative to the two benchmark algorithms with the ability to modify parameters in a controlled manner to trade off bias and variance. Antiformant tracking performance of KARMA is illustrated using synthesized and spoken nasal phonemes. The simultaneous tracking of uncertainty levels enables practitioners to recognize time-varying confidence in parameters of interest and adjust algorithmic settings accordingly. PMID:22978900

  16. Modelling and analysis of turbulent datasets using Auto Regressive Moving Average processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faranda, Davide; Pons, Flavio Maria Emanuele; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Daviaud, François; Saint-Michel, Brice; Herbert, Éric; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a novel way to extract information from turbulent datasets by applying an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) statistical analysis. Such analysis goes well beyond the analysis of the mean flow and of the fluctuations and links the behavior of the recorded time series to a discrete version of a stochastic differential equation which is able to describe the correlation structure in the dataset. We introduce a new index Υ that measures the difference between the resulting analysis and the Obukhov model of turbulence, the simplest stochastic model reproducing both Richardson law and the Kolmogorov spectrum. We test the method on datasets measured in a von Kármán swirling flow experiment. We found that the ARMA analysis is well correlated with spatial structures of the flow, and can discriminate between two different flows with comparable mean velocities, obtained by changing the forcing. Moreover, we show that the Υ is highest in regions where shear layer vortices are present, thereby establishing a link between deviations from the Kolmogorov model and coherent structures. These deviations are consistent with the ones observed by computing the Hurst exponents for the same time series. We show that some salient features of the analysis are preserved when considering global instead of local observables. Finally, we analyze flow configurations with multistability features where the ARMA technique is efficient in discriminating different stability branches of the system.

  17. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia: time domain characterization using autoregressive moving average analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triedman, J. K.; Perrott, M. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Saul, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Fourier-based techniques are mathematically noncausal and are therefore limited in their application to feedback-containing systems, such as the cardiovascular system. In this study, a mathematically causal time domain technique, autoregressive moving average (ARMA) analysis, was used to parameterize the relations of respiration and arterial blood pressure to heart rate in eight humans before and during total cardiac autonomic blockade. Impulse-response curves thus generated showed the relation of respiration to heart rate to be characterized by an immediate increase in heart rate of 9.1 +/- 1.8 beats.min-1.l-1, followed by a transient mild decrease in heart rate to -1.2 +/- 0.5 beats.min-1.l-1 below baseline. The relation of blood pressure to heart rate was characterized by a slower decrease in heart rate of -0.5 +/- 0.1 beats.min-1.mmHg-1, followed by a gradual return to baseline. Both of these relations nearly disappeared after autonomic blockade, indicating autonomic mediation. Maximum values obtained from the respiration to heart rate impulse responses were also well correlated with frequency domain measures of high-frequency "vagal" heart rate control (r = 0.88). ARMA analysis may be useful as a time domain representation of autonomic heart rate control for cardiovascular modeling.

  18. Modal identification based on Gaussian continuous time autoregressive moving average model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiuli, Du; Fengquan, Wang

    2010-09-01

    A new time-domain modal identification method of the linear time-invariant system driven by the non-stationary Gaussian random force is presented in this paper. The proposed technique is based on the multivariate continuous time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) model. This method can identify physical parameters of a system from the response-only data. To do this, we first transform the structural dynamic equation into the CARMA model, and subsequently rewrite it in the state-space form. Second, we present the exact maximum likelihood estimators of parameters of the continuous time autoregressive (CAR) model by virtue of the Girsanov theorem, under the assumption that the uniformly modulated function is approximately equal to a constant matrix over a very short period of time. Then, based on the relation between the CAR model and the CARMA model, we present the exact maximum likelihood estimators of parameters of the CARMA model. Finally, the modal parameters are identified by the eigenvalue analysis method. Numerical results show that the method we introduced here not only has high precision and robustness, but also has very high computing efficiency. Therefore, it is suitable for real-time modal identification.

  19. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described.Methods: The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a γ-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion.Results: The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%–100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7–1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7–7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the γ-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%–23% for real-time tracking, and 10%–47% for no compensation

  20. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described. Methods: The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a {gamma}-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion. Results: The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%-100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7-1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7-7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the {gamma}-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%-23% for real-time tracking, and 10%-47% for no compensation

  1. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): average tumour trajectory for lung patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Shirato, Hiroki; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Jiang, Steve B.

    2003-03-01

    Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) is a new technique for treating mobile tumours under development at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) with the tumour motion induced by respiration. SMART is based on the concept of the average tumour trajectory (ATT) exhibited by a tumour during respiration. During the treatment simulation stage, tumour motion is measured and the ATT is derived. Then, the original IMRT MLC leaf sequence is modified using the ATT to compensate for tumour motion. During treatment, the tumour motion is monitored. The treatment starts when leaf motion and tumour motion are synchronized at a specific breathing phase. The treatment will halt when the tumour drifts away from the ATT and will resume when the synchronization between tumour motion and radiation beam is re-established. In this paper, we present a method to derive the ATT from measured tumour trajectory data. We also investigate the validity of the ATT concept for lung tumours during normal breathing. The lung tumour trajectory data were acquired during actual radiotherapy sessions using a real-time tumour-tracking system. SMART treatment is simulated by assuming that the radiation beam follows the derived ATT and the tumour follows the measured trajectory. In simulation, the treatment starts at exhale phase. The duty cycle of SMART delivery was calculated for various treatment times and gating thresholds, as well as for various exhale phases where the treatment begins. The simulation results show that in the case of free breathing, for 4 out of 11 lung datasets with tumour motion greater than 1 cm from peak to peak, the error in tumour tracking can be controlled to within a couple of millimetres while maintaining a reasonable delivery efficiency. That is to say, without any breath coaching/control, the ATT is a valid concept for some lung

  2. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  3. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz–McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (≤16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)≥5 for echo train lengths (ETLs)≥4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and∕or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with ≥4 echoes and for T2* (<1.0%) with ≥7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire ≤16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo and in vivo

  4. The Effect on Non-Normal Distributions on the Integrated Moving Average Model of Time-Series Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerann-George, Judith

    The Integrated Moving Average (IMA) model of time series, and the analysis of intervention effects based on it, assume random shocks which are normally distributed. To determine the robustness of the analysis to violations of this assumption, empirical sampling methods were employed. Samples were generated from three populations; normal,…

  5. Central blood pressure estimation by using N-point moving average method in the brachial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Rie; Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Honda, Takeharu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, a method of estimating the central systolic blood pressure (C-SBP) using an N-point moving average method in the radial or brachial artery waveform has been reported. Then, we investigated the relationship between the C-SBP estimated from the brachial artery pressure waveform using the N-point moving average method and the C-SBP measured invasively using a catheter. C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms using VaSera VS-1500 was calculated. This estimated C-SBP was compared with the invasively measured C-SBP within a few minutes. In 41 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (mean age: 65 years), invasively measured C-SBP was significantly lower than right cuff-based brachial BP (138.2 ± 26.3 vs 141.0 ± 24.9 mm Hg, difference -2.78 ± 1.36 mm Hg, P = 0.048). The cuff-based SBP was significantly higher than invasive measured C-SBP in subjects with younger than 60 years old. However, the estimated C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms and the invasively measured C-SBP did not significantly differ (137.8 ± 24.2 vs 138.2 ± 26.3 mm Hg, difference -0.49 ± 1.39, P = 0.73). N/6-point moving average method using the non-invasively acquired brachial artery waveform calibrated by the cuff-based brachial SBP was an accurate, convenient and useful method for estimating C-SBP. Thus, C-SBP can be estimated simply by applying a regular arm cuff, which is greatly feasible in the practical medicine. PMID:25693855

  6. Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) for Predicting Annual Maximum and Annual Maximum Moving-Average Concentrations of Atrazine in Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    Regression models were developed for predicting annual maximum and selected annual maximum moving-average concentrations of atrazine in streams using the Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) methodology developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The current effort builds on the original WARP models, which were based on the annual mean and selected percentiles of the annual frequency distribution of atrazine concentrations. Estimates of annual maximum and annual maximum moving-average concentrations for selected durations are needed to characterize the levels of atrazine and other pesticides for comparison to specific water-quality benchmarks for evaluation of potential concerns regarding human health or aquatic life. Separate regression models were derived for the annual maximum and annual maximum 21-day, 60-day, and 90-day moving-average concentrations. Development of the regression models used the same explanatory variables, transformations, model development data, model validation data, and regression methods as those used in the original development of WARP. The models accounted for 72 to 75 percent of the variability in the concentration statistics among the 112 sampling sites used for model development. Predicted concentration statistics from the four models were within a factor of 10 of the observed concentration statistics for most of the model development and validation sites. Overall, performance of the models for the development and validation sites supports the application of the WARP models for predicting annual maximum and selected annual maximum moving-average atrazine concentration in streams and provides a framework to interpret the predictions in terms of uncertainty. For streams with inadequate direct measurements of atrazine concentrations, the WARP model predictions for the annual maximum and the annual maximum moving-average atrazine concentrations can be used to characterize

  7. Successful Supercooled Liver Storage for 4 Days

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Tim A.; Bruinsma, Bote G.; Puts, Catheleyne F.; Saeidi, Nima; Usta, O. Berk; Uygun, Basak E.; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Toner, Mehmet; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2014-01-01

    The realization of long–term human organ preservation will have groundbreaking effects on the current practice of transplantation. Herein we present a novel technique based on sub–zero non–freezing tissue preservation and extracorporeal machine perfusion that allows transplantation of rat livers preserved for up to 4 days, thereby tripling the viable preservation duration. PMID:24973919

  8. Exponentially weighted moving average charts to compare observed and expected values for monitoring risk-adjusted hospital indicators.

    PubMed

    Cook, D A; Coory, M; Webster, R A

    2011-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To introduce a new type of risk-adjusted (RA) exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) chart and to compare it to a commonly used type of variable life adjusted display chart for analysis of patient outcomes. DATA Routine inpatient data on mortality following admission for acute myocardial infarction, from all public and private hospitals in Queensland, Australia. METHODS The RA-EWMA plots the EWMA of the observed and predicted values. Predicted values were obtained from a logistic regression model for all hospitals in Queensland. The EWMA of the predicted values is a moving centre line, reflecting current patient case mix at a particular hospital. Thresholds around this moving centre line provide a scale by which to assess the importance of trends in the EWMA of the observed values. RESULTS The RA-EWMA chart can be designed to have equivalent performance, in terms of average run lengths, as variable life adjusted display chart. The advantages of the RA-EWMA are that it communicates information about the current level of an indicator in a direct and understandable way, and it explicitly displays information about the current patient case mix. Also, because it is not reset, the RA-EWMA is a more natural chart to use in health, where it is exceedingly rare to stop or dramatically and abruptly alter a process of care. CONCLUSION The RA-EWMA chart is a direct and intuitive way to display information about an indicator while accounting for differences in case mix. PMID:21209145

  9. Gradient Artefact Correction and Evaluation of the EEG Recorded Simultaneously with fMRI Data Using Optimised Moving-Average.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José L; Wu, Yan; Besseling, René M H; Lamerichs, Rolf; Aarts, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, coregistered EEG-fMRI has emerged as a powerful tool for neurocognitive research and correlated studies, mainly because of the possibility of integrating the high temporal resolution of the EEG with the high spatial resolution of fMRI. However, additional work remains to be done in order to improve the quality of the EEG signal recorded simultaneously with fMRI data, in particular regarding the occurrence of the gradient artefact. We devised and presented in this paper a novel approach for gradient artefact correction based upon optimised moving-average filtering (OMA). OMA makes use of the iterative application of a moving-average filter, which allows estimation and cancellation of the gradient artefact by integration. Additionally, OMA is capable of performing the attenuation of the periodic artefact activity without accurate information about MRI triggers. By using our proposed approach, it is possible to achieve a better balance than the slice-average subtraction as performed by the established AAS method, regarding EEG signal preservation together with effective suppression of the gradient artefact. Since the stochastic nature of the EEG signal complicates the assessment of EEG preservation after application of the gradient artefact correction, we also propose a simple and effective method to account for it. PMID:27446943

  10. Gradient Artefact Correction and Evaluation of the EEG Recorded Simultaneously with fMRI Data Using Optimised Moving-Average

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Besseling, René M. H.; Lamerichs, Rolf; Aarts, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, coregistered EEG-fMRI has emerged as a powerful tool for neurocognitive research and correlated studies, mainly because of the possibility of integrating the high temporal resolution of the EEG with the high spatial resolution of fMRI. However, additional work remains to be done in order to improve the quality of the EEG signal recorded simultaneously with fMRI data, in particular regarding the occurrence of the gradient artefact. We devised and presented in this paper a novel approach for gradient artefact correction based upon optimised moving-average filtering (OMA). OMA makes use of the iterative application of a moving-average filter, which allows estimation and cancellation of the gradient artefact by integration. Additionally, OMA is capable of performing the attenuation of the periodic artefact activity without accurate information about MRI triggers. By using our proposed approach, it is possible to achieve a better balance than the slice-average subtraction as performed by the established AAS method, regarding EEG signal preservation together with effective suppression of the gradient artefact. Since the stochastic nature of the EEG signal complicates the assessment of EEG preservation after application of the gradient artefact correction, we also propose a simple and effective method to account for it. PMID:27446943

  11. A fixed-memory moving, expanding window for obtaining scatter corrections in X-ray CT and other stochastic averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.

    2015-11-01

    A simple algorithm for averaging a stochastic sequence of 1D arrays in a moving, expanding window is provided. The samples are grouped in bins which increase exponentially in size so that a constant fraction of the samples is retained at any point in the sequence. The algorithm is shown to have particular relevance for a class of Monte Carlo sampling problems which includes one characteristic of iterative reconstruction in computed tomography. The code is available in the CPC program library in both Fortran 95 and C and is also available in R through CRAN.

  12. Ergodicity testing using an analytical formula for a dynamical functional of alpha-stable autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Hanna; Janczura, Joanna; Weron, Aleksander

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study asymptotic behavior of a dynamical functional for an α -stable autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average (ARFIMA) process. We find an analytical formula for this important statistics and show its usefulness as a diagnostic tool for ergodic properties. The obtained results point to the very fast convergence of the dynamical functional and show that even for short trajectories one may obtain reliable conclusions on the ergodic properties of the ARFIMA process. Moreover we use the obtained theoretical results to illustrate how the dynamical functional statistics can be used in the verification of the proper model for an analysis of some biophysical experimental data.

  13. On the uniqueness of linear moving-average filters for the solar wind-auroral geomagnetic activity coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Klimas, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    The relation between the solar wind input to the magetosphere, VB(sub South), and the auroral geomagnetic index AL is modeled with two linear moving-average filtering methods: linear prediction filters and a driven harmonic oscillator in the form of an electric circuit. Although the response of the three-parameter oscillator is simpler than the filter's, the methods yield similar linear timescales and values of the prediction-observation correlation and the prediction Chi(exp 2). Further the filter responses obtained by the two methods are similar in their long-term features. In these aspects the circuit model is equivalent to linear prediction filtering. This poses the question of uniqueness and proper interpretation of detailed features of the filters such as response peaks. Finally, the variation of timescales and filter responses with the AL activity level is discussed.

  14. Measuring volatility persistence on rainfall records with the hybrid of autoregressive fractional integrated moving average (ARFIMA) - hidden Markov model (HMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Fadhilah; Kane, Ibrahim Lawal; Yusop, Zulkifli

    2015-02-01

    Precarious circumstances related to rainfall events can be due to very intense or persistence of rainfall over a long period of time. Such events may give rise to an exceedence of the capacity of sewer systems resulting to landslides or flooding. One of the conventional ways of measuring such risk associated with persistence in rain is done through studies of long term persistence and volatility persistence. This work investigates the persistence level of Kuantan daily rainfall using the hybrid of autoregressive fractional integrated moving average (ARFIMA) and hidden Markov model (HMM). The result shows that the rainfall variability period returns quickly to its usual variability level which may not have a lasting period of extreme wet, hence relatively stable rainfall behavior is observed in Kuantan rainfall. This will enhance the understanding of the process for the successful development and implementation of water resource tools to assess engineering and environmental problems such as flood control.

  15. The Use of an Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Model for Prediction of the Incidence of Dysentery in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei; Song, Wentao; Li, Jinping; Lu, Wu; Yu, Jiangang; Han, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to forecast the incidence of bacillary dysentery with a prediction model. We collected the annual and monthly laboratory data of confirmed cases from January 2004 to December 2014. In this study, we applied an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to forecast bacillary dysentery incidence in Jiangsu, China. The ARIMA (1, 1, 1) × (1, 1, 2)12 model fitted exactly with the number of cases during January 2004 to December 2014. The fitted model was then used to predict bacillary dysentery incidence during the period January to August 2015, and the number of cases fell within the model's CI for the predicted number of cases during January-August 2015. This study shows that the ARIMA model fits the fluctuations in bacillary dysentery frequency, and it can be used for future forecasting when applied to bacillary dysentery prevention and control. PMID:27106828

  16. Generalized Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Models for Count Data with Application to Malaria Time Series with Low Case Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Briët, Olivier J. T.; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H.; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Introduction With the renewed drive towards malaria elimination, there is a need for improved surveillance tools. While time series analysis is an important tool for surveillance, prediction and for measuring interventions’ impact, approximations by commonly used Gaussian methods are prone to inaccuracies when case counts are low. Therefore, statistical methods appropriate for count data are required, especially during “consolidation” and “pre-elimination” phases. Methods Generalized autoregressive moving average (GARMA) models were extended to generalized seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (GSARIMA) models for parsimonious observation-driven modelling of non Gaussian, non stationary and/or seasonal time series of count data. The models were applied to monthly malaria case time series in a district in Sri Lanka, where malaria has decreased dramatically in recent years. Results The malaria series showed long-term changes in the mean, unstable variance and seasonality. After fitting negative-binomial Bayesian models, both a GSARIMA and a GARIMA deterministic seasonality model were selected based on different criteria. Posterior predictive distributions indicated that negative-binomial models provided better predictions than Gaussian models, especially when counts were low. The G(S)ARIMA models were able to capture the autocorrelation in the series. Conclusions G(S)ARIMA models may be particularly useful in the drive towards malaria elimination, since episode count series are often seasonal and non-stationary, especially when control is increased. Although building and fitting GSARIMA models is laborious, they may provide more realistic prediction distributions than do Gaussian methods and may be more suitable when counts are low. PMID:23785448

  17. On the Relationship between Solar Wind Speed, Earthward-Directed Coronal Mass Ejections, Geomagnetic Activity, and the Sunspot Cycle Using 12-Month Moving Averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    For 1996 .2006 (cycle 23), 12-month moving averages of the aa geomagnetic index strongly correlate (r = 0.92) with 12-month moving averages of solar wind speed, and 12-month moving averages of the number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) (halo and partial halo events) strongly correlate (r = 0.87) with 12-month moving averages of sunspot number. In particular, the minimum (15.8, September/October 1997) and maximum (38.0, August 2003) values of the aa geomagnetic index occur simultaneously with the minimum (376 km/s) and maximum (547 km/s) solar wind speeds, both being strongly correlated with the following recurrent component (due to high-speed streams). The large peak of aa geomagnetic activity in cycle 23, the largest on record, spans the interval late 2002 to mid 2004 and is associated with a decreased number of halo and partial halo CMEs, whereas the smaller secondary peak of early 2005 seems to be associated with a slight rebound in the number of halo and partial halo CMEs. Based on the observed aaM during the declining portion of cycle 23, RM for cycle 24 is predicted to be larger than average, being about 168+/-60 (the 90% prediction interval), whereas based on the expected aam for cycle 24 (greater than or equal to 14.6), RM for cycle 24 should measure greater than or equal to 118+/-30, yielding an overlap of about 128+/-20.

  18. The 4-Day School Week. The Informed Educator Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donis-Keller, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This "Informed Educator" examines the use of a 4-day school week as a way to reduce expenses while using limited resources most effectively. Discussion focuses on various models of 4-day week schedules, what to do during the fifth day, and how 4-day school weeks affect extracurricular activities. Detailed discussion of financial savings, student…

  19. The 4-Day Wave as Observed from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Elson, L. S.; Fishbein, E. F.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The "4-day wave" is an eastward moving quasi-nondispersive feature with period near 4 days occurring near the winter polar stratopause. This paper presents evidence of the 4-day feature in Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature, geopotential height, and ozone data from the late southern winters of 1992 and 1993. Space-time spectral analyses reveal a double-peaked temperature structure consisting of one peak near the stratopause and another in the lower mesosphere, with an out-of-phase relationship between the two peaks. This double- peaked structure is reminiscent of recent three-dimensional barotropic/baroclinic instability model predictions and is observed here for the first time. The height variation of the 4-day ozone signal is shown to compare well with a linear advective-photochemical tracer model. Negative regions of quasigeostrophic potential vorticity (PV) gradient and positive Eliassen-Palm flux divergence are shown to occur, consistent with instability dynamics playing a role in wave forcing. Spectral analyses of PV derived from MLS geopotential height fields reveal a 4-day signal peaking near the polar stratopause. The three-dimensional structure of the 4-day wave resembles the potential vorticity "charge" concept, wherein a PV anomaly in the atmosphere (analogous to an electrical charge in a dielectric material) induces a geopotential field, a vertically oriented temperature dipole, and circulation about the vertical axis.

  20. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  1. Beyond long memory in heart rate variability: An approach based on fractionally integrated autoregressive moving average time series models with conditional heteroscedasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Argentina; Paula Rocha, Ana; Eduarda Silva, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) series exhibit long memory and time-varying conditional variance. This work considers the Fractionally Integrated AutoRegressive Moving Average (ARFIMA) models with Generalized AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroscedastic (GARCH) errors. ARFIMA-GARCH models may be used to capture and remove long memory and estimate the conditional volatility in 24 h HRV recordings. The ARFIMA-GARCH approach is applied to fifteen long term HRV series available at Physionet, leading to the discrimination among normal individuals, heart failure patients, and patients with atrial fibrillation.

  2. Distributed parameter system coupled ARMA expansion identification and adaptive parallel IIR filtering - A unified problem statement. [Auto Regressive Moving-Average

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Balas, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    A novel interconnection of distributed parameter system (DPS) identification and adaptive filtering is presented, which culminates in a common statement of coupled autoregressive, moving-average expansion or parallel infinite impulse response configuration adaptive parameterization. The common restricted complexity filter objectives are seen as similar to the reduced-order requirements of the DPS expansion description. The interconnection presents the possibility of an exchange of problem formulations and solution approaches not yet easily addressed in the common finite dimensional lumped-parameter system context. It is concluded that the shared problems raised are nevertheless many and difficult.

  3. A comparative study of two-dimensional multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and two-dimensional multifractal detrended moving average algorithm to estimate the multifractal spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Caiping; Zhang, Shunning; Xiong, Gang; Zhao, Huichang

    2016-07-01

    Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) and multifractal detrended moving average (MFDMA) algorithm have been established as two important methods to estimate the multifractal spectrum of the one-dimensional random fractal signal. They have been generalized to deal with two-dimensional and higher-dimensional fractal signals. This paper gives a brief introduction of the two-dimensional multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (2D-MFDFA) and two-dimensional multifractal detrended moving average (2D-MFDMA) algorithm, and a detailed description of the application of the two-dimensional fractal signal processing by using the two methods. By applying the 2D-MFDFA and 2D-MFDMA to the series generated from the two-dimensional multiplicative cascading process, we systematically do the comparative analysis to get the advantages, disadvantages and the applicabilities of the two algorithms for the first time from six aspects such as the similarities and differences of the algorithm models, the statistical accuracy, the sensitivities of the sample size, the selection of scaling range, the choice of the q-orders and the calculation amount. The results provide a valuable reference on how to choose the algorithm from 2D-MFDFA and 2D-MFDMA, and how to make the schemes of the parameter settings of the two algorithms when dealing with specific signals in practical applications.

  4. An Estimation of the Likelihood of Significant Eruptions During 2000-2009 Using Poisson Statistics on Two-Point Moving Averages of the Volcanic Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1750, the number of cataclysmic volcanic eruptions (volcanic explosivity index (VEI)>=4) per decade spans 2-11, with 96 percent located in the tropics and extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. A two-point moving average of the volcanic time series has higher values since the 1860's than before, being 8.00 in the 1910's (the highest value) and 6.50 in the 1980's, the highest since the 1910's peak. Because of the usual behavior of the first difference of the two-point moving averages, one infers that its value for the 1990's will measure approximately 6.50 +/- 1, implying that approximately 7 +/- 4 cataclysmic volcanic eruptions should be expected during the present decade (2000-2009). Because cataclysmic volcanic eruptions (especially those having VEI>=5) nearly always have been associated with short-term episodes of global cooling, the occurrence of even one might confuse our ability to assess the effects of global warming. Poisson probability distributions reveal that the probability of one or more events with a VEI>=4 within the next ten years is >99 percent. It is approximately 49 percent for an event with a VEI>=5, and 18 percent for an event with a VEI>=6. Hence, the likelihood that a climatically significant volcanic eruption will occur within the next ten years appears reasonably high.

  5. Using cone-beam CT projection images to estimate the average and complete trajectory of a fiducial marker moving with respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N.; Smith, W. L.; Quirk, S.; Kay, I.

    2010-12-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer often makes use of a static cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to localize a tumor that moves during the respiratory cycle. In this work, we developed an algorithm to estimate the average and complete trajectory of an implanted fiducial marker from the raw CBCT projection data. After labeling the CBCT projection images based on the breathing phase of the fiducial marker, the average trajectory was determined by backprojecting the fiducial position from images of similar phase. To approximate the complete trajectory, a 3D fiducial position is estimated from its position in each CBCT project image as the point on the source-image ray closest to the average position at the same phase. The algorithm was tested with computer simulations as well as phantom experiments using a gold seed implanted in a programmable phantom capable of variable motion. Simulation testing was done on 120 realistic breathing patterns, half of which contained hysteresis. The average trajectory was reconstructed with an average root mean square (rms) error of less than 0.1 mm in all three directions, and a maximum error of 0.5 mm. The complete trajectory reconstruction had a mean rms error of less than 0.2 mm, with a maximum error of 4.07 mm. The phantom study was conducted using five different respiratory patterns with the amplitudes of 1.3 and 2.6 cm programmed into the motion phantom. These complete trajectories were reconstructed with an average rms error of 0.4 mm. There is motion information present in the raw CBCT dataset that can be exploited with the use of an implanted fiducial marker to sub-millimeter accuracy. This algorithm could ultimately supply the internal motion of a lung tumor at the treatment unit from the same dataset currently used for patient setup.

  6. 2009 Summer 4-Day Work Week Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneivive, David V.; DeRose, Diego; Ligas, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the final evaluation of a condensed work schedule, the Summer 2009 4-Day Work Week (S4-DWW), adopted by The School Board of Broward County, Florida. The goal for the program was to close the entire district for 1 day each week to reduce utility costs. Except for a few cases, district schools and offices were closed on Fridays…

  7. Moving Average Convergence Divergence filter preprocessing for real-time event-related peak activity onset detection : application to fNIRS signals.

    PubMed

    Durantin, Gautier; Scannella, Sebastien; Gateau, Thibault; Delorme, Arnaud; Dehais, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Real-time solutions for noise reduction and signal processing represent a central challenge for the development of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI). In this paper, we introduce the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) filter, a tunable digital passband filter for online noise reduction and onset detection without preliminary learning phase, used in economic markets analysis. MACD performance was tested and benchmarked with other filters using data collected with functional Near Infrared Spectoscopy (fNIRS) during a digit sequence memorization task. This filter has a good performance on filtering and real-time peak activity onset detection, compared to other techniques. Therefore, MACD could be implemented for efficient BCI design using fNIRS. PMID:25570400

  8. The 78.4 day period of Cygnus XR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Caraveo, P.; Coe, M. J.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    A search for a 78.4 day modulation in the high energy X-ray flux observed with OSO-8 and in the U-band optical polarization is reported. It is suggested that if such a modulation does exist, it is more likely to be related to the rotation of the free modes of oscillation of the primary than to the existence of a third body in the system.

  9. Influence of the electric induction drag on the orbit of a charged satellite moving in the ionosphere (solution by the method of the average value)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The secular effects of the electric induction drag on the orbit of a charged satellite moving in the ionosphere are examined by the method of average values. The first solutions are obtained under the assumption of non-rotation of the Earth; the second solutions are obtained assuming rotation of the Earth. In the first case the semi-major axis exhibits secular variation, but the other orbital elements exhibit no secular variation. In the second case both semi-major axis and eccentricity exhibit secular variation, but the other orbital elements exhibit no secular variation. It can be shown that the semi-major axis is contracted due to the action of the electric induction drag if the satellite has enough charge in the ionosphere. The eccentricity is decreased gradually with time, but its variation is very small for the case of a rotating Earth. An example is presented in which the secular effects of the electric induction drag on the orbits of a charged satellite are calculated. The numerical results are given in Table 1 and a discussion of them is presented in Table 2.

  10. Hybrid Support Vector Regression and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Models Improved by Particle Swarm Optimization for Property Crime Rates Forecasting with Economic Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Alwee, Razana; Hj Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Sallehuddin, Roselina

    2013-01-01

    Crimes forecasting is an important area in the field of criminology. Linear models, such as regression and econometric models, are commonly applied in crime forecasting. However, in real crimes data, it is common that the data consists of both linear and nonlinear components. A single model may not be sufficient to identify all the characteristics of the data. The purpose of this study is to introduce a hybrid model that combines support vector regression (SVR) and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) to be applied in crime rates forecasting. SVR is very robust with small training data and high-dimensional problem. Meanwhile, ARIMA has the ability to model several types of time series. However, the accuracy of the SVR model depends on values of its parameters, while ARIMA is not robust to be applied to small data sets. Therefore, to overcome this problem, particle swarm optimization is used to estimate the parameters of the SVR and ARIMA models. The proposed hybrid model is used to forecast the property crime rates of the United State based on economic indicators. The experimental results show that the proposed hybrid model is able to produce more accurate forecasting results as compared to the individual models. PMID:23766729

  11. Application of the N-point moving average method for brachial pressure waveform-derived estimation of central aortic systolic pressure.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yuan-Ta; Cheng, Hao-Min; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Hu, Wei-Chih; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2014-04-01

    The N-point moving average (NPMA) is a mathematical low-pass filter that can smooth peaked noninvasively acquired radial pressure waveforms to estimate central aortic systolic pressure using a common denominator of N/4 (where N=the acquisition sampling frequency). The present study investigated whether the NPMA method can be applied to brachial pressure waveforms. In the derivation group, simultaneously recorded invasive high-fidelity brachial and central aortic pressure waveforms from 40 subjects were analyzed to identify the best common denominator. In the validation group, the NPMA method with the obtained common denominator was applied on noninvasive brachial pressure waveforms of 100 subjects. Validity was tested by comparing the noninvasive with the simultaneously recorded invasive central aortic systolic pressure. Noninvasive brachial pressure waveforms were calibrated to the cuff systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In the derivation study, an optimal denominator of N/6 was identified for NPMA to derive central aortic systolic pressure. The mean difference between the invasively/noninvasively estimated (N/6) and invasively measured central aortic systolic pressure was 0.1±3.5 and -0.6±7.6 mm Hg in the derivation and validation study, respectively. It satisfied the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation standard of 5±8 mm Hg. In conclusion, this method for estimating central aortic systolic pressure using either invasive or noninvasive brachial pressure waves requires a common denominator of N/6. By integrating the NPMA method into the ordinary oscillometric blood pressure determining process, convenient noninvasive central aortic systolic pressure values could be obtained with acceptable accuracy. PMID:24420554

  12. Application of a Combined Model with Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) and Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) in Forecasting Hepatitis Incidence in Heng County, China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Gao, Lian; Liang, Bingyu; Huang, Jiegang; Zang, Ning; Liao, Yanyan; Yu, Jun; Lai, Jingzhen; Qin, Fengxiang; Su, Jinming; Ye, Li; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis is a serious public health problem with increasing cases and property damage in Heng County. It is necessary to develop a model to predict the hepatitis epidemic that could be useful for preventing this disease. Methods The autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model and the generalized regression neural network (GRNN) model were used to fit the incidence data from the Heng County CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) from January 2005 to December 2012. Then, the ARIMA-GRNN hybrid model was developed. The incidence data from January 2013 to December 2013 were used to validate the models. Several parameters, including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square error (MSE), were used to compare the performance among the three models. Results The morbidity of hepatitis from Jan 2005 to Dec 2012 has seasonal variation and slightly rising trend. The ARIMA(0,1,2)(1,1,1)12 model was the most appropriate one with the residual test showing a white noise sequence. The smoothing factor of the basic GRNN model and the combined model was 1.8 and 0.07, respectively. The four parameters of the hybrid model were lower than those of the two single models in the validation. The parameters values of the GRNN model were the lowest in the fitting of the three models. Conclusions The hybrid ARIMA-GRNN model showed better hepatitis incidence forecasting in Heng County than the single ARIMA model and the basic GRNN model. It is a potential decision-supportive tool for controlling hepatitis in Heng County. PMID:27258555

  13. Age Differences in Big Five Behavior Averages and Variabilities Across the Adult Lifespan: Moving Beyond Retrospective, Global Summary Accounts of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Noftle, Erik E.; Fleeson, William

    2009-01-01

    In three intensive cross-sectional studies, age differences in behavior averages and variabilities were examined. Three questions were posed: Does variability differ among age groups? Does the sizable variability in young adulthood persist throughout the lifespan? Do past conclusions about trait development, based on trait questionnaires, hold up when actual behavior is examined? Three groups participated: younger adults (18-23 years), middle-aged adults (35-55 years), and older adults (65-81 years). In two experience-sampling studies, participants reported their current behavior multiple times per day for one or two week spans. In a third study, participants interacted in standardized laboratory activities on eight separate occasions. First, results revealed a sizable amount of intraindividual variability in behavior for all adult groups, with standard deviations ranging from about half a point to well over one point on 6-point scales. Second, older adults were most variable in Openness whereas younger adults were most variable in Agreeableness and Emotional Stability. Third, most specific patterns of maturation-related age differences in actual behavior were both more greatly pronounced and differently patterned than those revealed by the trait questionnaire method. When participants interacted in standardized situations, personality differences between younger adults and middle-aged adults were larger, and older adults exhibited a more positive personality profile than they exhibited in their everyday lives. PMID:20230131

  14. An Analysis of Workers' Attitudes Toward the 4-Day, 40-Hour Workweek.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Terry L.; Wijting, Jan P.

    Employees' attitudes toward a proposed 4-day, 40-hour workweek were examined relative to job and worker variables, expectations about the new workweek schedule, and job-aspect satisfactions. Employees classified by their sex, work shifts, wage schedules, and sex and work shifts differed significantly in their attitudes toward the 4-day, 40-hour…

  15. Dynamics of the 4-day wave in the Southern Hemisphere polar stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Randel, W.J. ); Lait, L.R. )

    1991-12-01

    Dynamics of the 4-day wave in the Southern Hemisphere polar stratosphere is investigated using horizontal wind and temperature data. These were derived from synoptic maps of satellite-measured brightness temperatures, which were generated using the fast Fourier synoptic mapping technique of Salby. Circulation statistics from these data are compared to those from the National Meteorological Center (NMC) operational stratospheric analyses, demonstrating improvements afforded by detailed treatment of asynoptic sampling effects. The 4-day wave is isolated using temporally filtered data. Several events of wave growth and decay are observed in the upper stratosphere during August 1980. Derived zonal-mean and eddy statistics suggest that the 4-day wave results from an instability of the zonal-mean flow near 55[degrees]-60[degrees]S, at and above 1 mb. Inspection of climatological data suggests the source of the instability to be the [open quotes]double-jet[close quotes] structure in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere (the subtropical mesospheric jet near 30[degrees]S and the high-latitude extension of the polar night jet near 70[degrees]S). Contribution of the 4-day wave to the general circulation of the stratosphere is discussed: one feature attributable to the 4-day wave is a region of positive EP flux divergence in the upper stratosphere near 50[degrees]-60[degrees]S. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Quaternion Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Cheng, Yang; Crassidis, John L.; Oshman, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    Many applications require an algorithm that averages quaternions in an optimal manner. For example, when combining the quaternion outputs of multiple star trackers having this output capability, it is desirable to properly average the quaternions without recomputing the attitude from the the raw star tracker data. Other applications requiring some sort of optimal quaternion averaging include particle filtering and multiple-model adaptive estimation, where weighted quaternions are used to determine the quaternion estimate. For spacecraft attitude estimation applications, derives an optimal averaging scheme to compute the average of a set of weighted attitude matrices using the singular value decomposition method. Focusing on a 4-dimensional quaternion Gaussian distribution on the unit hypersphere, provides an approach to computing the average quaternion by minimizing a quaternion cost function that is equivalent to the attitude matrix cost function Motivated by and extending its results, this Note derives an algorithm that deterniines an optimal average quaternion from a set of scalar- or matrix-weighted quaternions. Rirthermore, a sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the average quaternion, and the equivalence of the mininiization problem, stated herein, to maximum likelihood estimation, are shown.

  17. Analysis of the magnitude and frequency of the 4-day annual low flow and regression equations for estimating the 4-day, 3-year low-flow frequency at ungaged sites on unregulated streams in New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waltemeyer, Scott D.

    2002-01-01

    Two regression equations were developed for estimating the 4- day, 3-year (4Q3) low-flow frequency at ungaged sites on unregulated streams in New Mexico. The first, a statewide equation for estimating the 4Q3 low-flow frequency from drainage area and average basin mean winter precipitation, was developed from the data for 50 streamflow-gaging stations that had non-zero 4Q3 low-flow frequency. The 4Q3 low-flow frequency for the 50 gaging stations ranged from 0.08 to 18.7 cubic feet per second. For this statewide equation, the average standard error of estimate was 126 percent and the coefficient of determination was 0.48. The second, an equation for estimating the 4Q3 low-flow frequency in mountainous regions from drainage area, average basin mean winter precipitation, and average basin slope, was developed from the data for 40 gaging stations located above 7,500 feet in elevation. For this regression equation, the average standard error of estimate was 94 percent and the coefficient of determination was 0.66. A U.S. Geological Survey computer-program interface for a geographical information system (GIS), called the GIS Weasel, was used to determine basin and climatic characteristics for 84 gaging stations that were not affected by regulation. Mean monthly precipitation estimates from 1961 to 1990 were used in the GIS Weasel to compute the climatic characteristics of average basin winter precipitation and annual mean precipitation. The U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset, which currently consists of the 7.5-minute, 30-meter digital elevation model for each State, was used in the GIS Weasel to compute the basin characteristics of drainage area, average basin slope, average basin elevation, and average basin aspect. Basin and climatic characteristics that were statistically significant in the regression equation with the 4Q3 low-flow frequency were drainage area, which ranged from 1.62 to 5,900 square miles; average basin mean winter precipitation, which

  18. The value of the 4-day headdown bedrest model for screening countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Keil, L.; Ertl, A. C.; Wade, C. E.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Ohara, D.; Ludwig, D.

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the benefits of periodic exposure to the +G(z) vector as a countermeasure to the physiological responses to minus 6 degree head down bedrest (HDT), we considered a two-tiered approach: (a) to use 4 days HDT as a quick and inexpensive means of screening countermeasures, (b) to use a 60 day HDT to validate the most promising candidates. The approach and results of a 4 day study are described here. Methods: Nine males were admitted to our Human Research Facility for one ambulatory control day followed by 4 days HDT and were released on the next day after completion of a peak oxygen consumption test (VO(sub 2 peak)). A battery of tests was selected and standardized to evaluate the known early effects of HDT on plasma volume, early bone markers, orthostatic tolerance, physical performance, and fluid and electrolytes and their hormone regulation. Fluid sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake and output in the urine were monitored throughout. Plasma volume was determined with a modified Evans Blue method and orthostatic tolerance with a 60 degree head-up tilt test for 30 minutes - both of which were determined on the ambulatory control day and on day 4 of HDT. Immediately after completion of the tilt test subjects were returned to the minus 6 degree position until the next morning when a VO(sub 2 peak) (horizontal ergometer) was done. This was compared to a similar control test determined on 2 separate occasions before subject admission. Results: Four hours after going HDT produced significant decreases (p less than 0.05) in the circulating concentration of fluid and electrolyte regulating hormones. Plasma volume, orthostatic tolerance and VO(sub 2 peak) changed significantly after 4 days HDT. There was also the expected natriuresis on day 1 of HDT but no significant diuresis. The consistency of the pre-bedrest VO(sub 2 peak) tilt tests and plasma volumes was remarkable. Conclusions: The 4 day HDT model seems highly promising for screening a variety of

  19. A time-efficient reduction of fat mass in 4 days with exercise and caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; Ponce-González, J G; Pérez-Suárez, I; de la Calle Herrero, J; Holmberg, H-C

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether a fast reduction in fat mass can be achieved in 4 days by combining caloric restriction (CR: 3.2 kcal/kg body weight per day) with exercise (8-h walking + 45-min arm cranking per day) to induce an energy deficit of ∼5000 kcal/day, 15 overweight men underwent five experimental phases: pretest, exercise + CR for 4 days (WCR), control diet + reduced exercise for 3 days (DIET), and follow-up 4 weeks (POST1) and 1 year later (POST2). During WCR, the diet consisted solely of whey protein (n = 8) or sucrose (n = 7) (0.8 g/kg body weight per day). After WCR, DIET, POST1, and POST2, fat mass was reduced by a mean of 2.1, 2.8, 3.8, and 1.9 kg (P < 0.05), with two thirds of this loss from the trunk; and lean mass by 2.8, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.4 kg, respectively. After WCR, serum glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were reduced, and free fatty acid and cortisol increased. Serum leptin was reduced by 64%, 50%, and 33% following WCR, DIET, and POST1, respectively (P < 0.05). The effects were similar in both groups. In conclusion, a clinically relevant reduction in fat mass can be achieved in overweight men in just 4 days by combining prolonged exercise with CR. PMID:24602091

  20. Absence of a growth hormone effect on rat soleus atrophy during a 4-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bian; Roy, Roland R.; Navarro, Christine; Edgerton, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of a 4-day-long spaceflight on the size and the enzyme properties of soleus fibers of rats and the effects of exogenous growth hormone (GH) on the atrophic response of the soleus muscle were investigated in four groups of rats: (1) control, (2) control plus GH treatment, (3) flight, and (4) flight plus GH treatment. Results showed that the fiber size and the type of myosin heavy chain expressed fibers (but not the metabolic properties) of the soleus were affected by four days of weightlessness and that the effects were not ameliorated by the administration of growth hormone.

  1. The effects of three different mouth rinses in a 4-day supragingival plaque regrowth study

    PubMed Central

    Ulkur, Feyza; Arun, Tulin; Ozdemir, Fulya

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study compares the effects of three different mouth rinses with respect to reducing Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) colony counts on the teeth and tongue surfaces. Materials and Methods: In this study, comparison tests using the alcohol-free 0.1% chlorhexidine mouth rinse, alcohol-containing essential oil mouth rinse, and alcohol-free essential oil-containing mouth rinse were conducted. Patients were instructed to avoid mechanical cleaning with either a toothbrush or toothpick for 4 days. The first samples were collected from teeth surfaces and the dorsum of the tongue after a professional cleaning, and the second samples were collected after a 4-day plaque re-growth period. The supragingival plaque from the buccal surfaces of teeth #11, 14, 31, 34 as well as samples from the dorsum of the tongue, were assessed using the Dentocult® strips. Results: The Listerine® and Ondrohexidine® groups did not show any statistically significant differences between the values of the two samples (P = 0.734, P = 0.307). The MC® group and the control group showed significantly higher results than the first sample values. The effectiveness of the mouth rinses on S. mutans colony counts from the teeth surfaces were higher in the Listerine®, Ondrohexidine®, and Mouthwash Concentrate® groups. The difference between the first and second samples of the S. mutans colony counts from the tongue surface was found to be statistically significant, and S. mutans colony counts were higher than the first sample (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Alcohol and essential oil-containing Listerine® mouth rinse, alcohol-free Ondrohexidine®, alcohol-free essential oil-containing MC® mouth rinse had the same effect on S. mutans counts, higher than the 1% alcohol solution on teeth surface. They had the ability to maintain the S. mutans counts at the same level for 4 days in patients who did not perform any mechanical oral hygiene regimen. PMID:24926216

  2. The benefits of liposomes for chilling canine sperm for 4 days at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Belala, Redha; Delay, Juliette; Amirat, Lamia; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Le Guillou, Jocya; Anton, Marc; Schmitt, Eric; Thorin, Chantal; Michaud, Sandrine; Kaidi, Rachid; Tainturier, Daniel; Bencharif, Djemil

    2016-05-01

    This study comprises 3 experiments exploring the possible benefits and mechanism of action of liposomes for chilling (4°C) canine sperm over a period of 4 days. In the first experiment, 20 ejaculates collected from 5 Beagle dogs were chilled in an extender containing 6% low density lipoproteins (LDL) (Control), or one of 7 extenders containing different concentrations (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, 20%) of liposomes (LIPO). These ejaculates were chilled over 4 days and motility was assessed daily using a Hamilton Thorne analyzer (HTM-IVOS, 14.0). The 2% LIPO obtained the best results (p=0.038) after four days (72.55% motile spermatozoa and 31.4% progressive spermatozoa). In experiment 2, 10 ejaculates were collected from same 5 dogs and chilled in 6% LDL or 2% LIPO-based extenders. Sperm integrity characteristics were assessed prior to refrigeration and every 48h for four days (D0, D2, and D4). Acrosome integrity was assessed using the FITC-PSA test (Fluorescein IsoThiocyanate-Pisum Sativum Agglutinin), plasma membrane (PM) integrity using both the hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOSt) and SYBR14/Propidium Iodide test (SYBR14/PI), and DNA integrity using the Acridine-Orange test (AO). The 2% LIPO extender provided equivalent preservation of sperm integrity parameters to the reference extender (6% LDL). In experiment 3, a Langmuir-Blodgett trough was used to evaluate the mechanistic interactions between LDL, LIPO, prostatic fluid, and the canine spermatozoal membrane during chilling. Results indicate that LDL and LIPO interact differently with the biomimetic membrane. The most likely conclusion of these findings is that LDL and liposomes employ different protective mechanisms during the chilling (4°C) of canine spermatozoa. PMID:26952759

  3. Moving RNA moves RNA forward.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lina; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Wenqiang

    2013-10-01

    Cell communication affects all aspects of cell structure and behavior, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, division, and coordination of various physiological functions. The moving RNA in plants and mammalian cells indicates that nucleic acid could be one of the various types of messengers for cell communication. The microvesicle is a critical pathway that mediates RNA moving and keeps moving RNA stable in body fluids. When moving miRNA enters the target cell, it functions by altering the gene expression profile and significantly inhibiting mRNA translation in recipient cells. Thus, moving RNA may act as a long-range modulator during development, organogenesis, and tumor metastasis. PMID:24008386

  4. Statistics of time averaged atmospheric scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1994-02-01

    A formulation has been constructed to recover the statistics of the moving average of the scintillation Strehl from a discrete set of measurements. A program of airborne atmospheric propagation measurements was analyzed to find the correlation function of the relative intensity over displaced propagation paths. The variance in continuous moving averages of the relative intensity was then found in terms of the correlation functions. An empirical formulation of the variance of the continuous moving average of the scintillation Strehl has been constructed. The resulting characterization of the variance of the finite time averaged Strehl ratios is being used to assess the performance of an airborne laser system.

  5. Moving Minds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Terry; Hiett, Sandra; Marley, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores and examines a case study based at Ivy Bank Business and Enterprise College, The Imperial War Museum North, and Liverpool John Moores University. This collaboration took place from November 2004 until February 2005 culminating in an exhibition of children's artwork as part of the "Moving Minds" project at the IWM North. This…

  6. The 4-Day School Week: A Partial Solution to Today's Energy Crisis and Declining State Funding to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldhausen, Thomas

    As a partial solution to the energy crisis and to solve the problem of drastically rising operating costs coupled with less state support, in 1980-81 the Liberty School District (Spangle, Washington) implemented a 4-day school week comparable to the program used by Cimarron School District #3 in New Mexico. A survey conducted in 1975 by the…

  7. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  8. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Make time to move

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise - time to move; Weight loss - time to move; Obesity - time to move ... Getting regular exercise benefits your health in many ways: Strengthens your heart and lungs Lowers your risk for heart disease and ...

  10. Development and Testing of an Automated 4-Day Text Messaging Guidance as an Aid for Improving Colonoscopy Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Klare, Peter; Neu, Bruno; Schmid, Roland M; von Delius, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background In gastroenterology a sufficient colon cleansing improves adenoma detection rate and prevents the need for preterm repeat colonoscopies due to invalid preparation. It has been shown that patient education is of major importance for improvement of colon cleansing. Objective Objective of this study was to assess the function of an automated text messaging (short message service, SMS)–supported colonoscopy preparation starting 4 days before colonoscopy appointment. Methods After preevaluation to assess mobile phone usage in the patient population for relevance of this approach, a Web-based, automated SMS text messaging system was developed, following which a single-center feasibility study at a tertiary care center was performed. Patients scheduled for outpatient colonoscopy were invited to participate. Patients enrolled in the study group received automated information about dietary recommendations and bowel cleansing during colonoscopy preparation. Data of outpatient colonoscopies with regular preparation procedure were used for pair matching and served as control. Primary end point was feasibility of SMS text messaging support in colonoscopy preparation assessed as stable and satisfactory function of the system. Secondary end points were quality of bowel preparation according to the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) and patient satisfaction with SMS text messaging–provided information assessed by a questionnaire. Results Web-based SMS text messaging–supported colonoscopy preparation was successful and feasible in 19 of 20 patients. Mean (standard error of the mean, SEM) total BBPS score was slightly higher in the SMS group than in the control group (7.3, SEM 0.3 vs 6.4, SEM 0.2) and for each colonic region (left, transverse, and right colon). Patient satisfaction regarding SMS text messaging–based information was high. Conclusions Using SMS for colonoscopy preparation with 4 days’ guidance including dietary recommendation is a new approach

  11. Validity of a Self-Administered Food Frequency Questionnaire for Middle-Aged Urban Cancer Screenees: Comparison With 4-Day Weighed Dietary Records

    PubMed Central

    Takachi, Ribeka; Ishihara, Junko; Iwasaki, Motoki; Hosoi, Satoko; Ishii, Yuri; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sawada, Norie; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Background The validity of estimates of dietary intake calculated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) depends on the specific population. The 138-item FFQ used in the 5-year follow-up survey for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study was initially developed for and validated in rural residents. However, the validity of estimates based on this FFQ for urban residents, whose diet and lifestyle differ from those of rural residents, has not been clarified. We examined the validity of ranking individuals according to level of dietary consumption, as estimated by this FFQ, among an urban population in Japan. Methods Among 896 candidates randomly selected from examinees of cancer screening provided by the National Cancer Center, Japan, 144 participated in the study. In 2007–2008, at an average 2.7 years after cancer screening, participants were asked to respond to the questionnaire and to provide 4-day weighed diet records (4d-DRs) for use as the reference intake. Spearman correlation coefficients (CCs) between the FFQ and 4d-DR estimates were calculated, after correction for intraindividual variation of 4d-DRs. Results The median (range) deattenuated CC for men and women was 0.57 (0.23 to 0.89) and 0.47 (0.08 to 0.94), respectively, across 45 nutrients and 0.51 (0.10 to 0.98) and 0.51 (−0.36 to 0.88) for 43 food groups. Conclusions Although the FFQ was developed for a rural population, it provided reasonably valid measures of consumption for many nutrients and food groups in middle-aged screenees living in urban areas in Japan. PMID:21963789

  12. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    PubMed

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade. PMID:24416159

  13. Books Average Previous Decade of Economic Misery

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20th century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a ‘literary misery index’ derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade. PMID:24416159

  14. Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Sathishkumar

    Signature of 3-4 day planetary waves in the equatorial ionospheric F layer height and medium frequency radar winds over Tirunelveli (8.7oN) S. Sathishkumar1, R. Dhanya1, K. Emperumal1, D. Tiwari2, S. Gurubaran1 and A. Bhattacharyya2 1. Equatorial Geophysical Research Laboratory, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli, India 2. Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai, India Email: sathishmaths@gmail.com Abstract The equatorial atmosphere-ionosphere system has been studied theoretically and observationally in the past. In the equatorial atmosphere, oscillations with periods of 3-4 days are often observed in the medium frequency (MF) radar over Tirunelveli (8.7oN, 77.8oE, 1.34oN geomag. lat.). Earlier observations show the clear evidence that these waves can propagate from the stratosphere to ionosphere. A digital ionosonde has been providing useful information on several ionospheric parameters from the same site. Simultaneous observations of mesospheric winds using medium frequency radar and F-layer height (h'F) from ionosonde reveal that the 3-4 day wave was evident in both the component during the 01 June 2007 and 31 July 2007. The 3-4 day wave could have an important role in the day to day variability of the equatorial ionosphere evening uplift. Results from an extensive analysis that is being carried out in the direction of 3-4 day wave present in the ionosphere will be presented.

  15. Arithmetic averaging: A versatile technique for smoothing and trend removal

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    Arithmetic averaging is simple, stable, and can be very effective in attenuating the undesirable components in a complex signal, thereby providing smoothing or trend removal. An arithmetic average is easy to calculate. However, the resulting modifications to the data, in both the time and frequency domains, are not well understood by many experimentalists. This paper discusses the following aspects of averaging: (1) types of averages -- simple, cumulative, and moving; and (2) time and frequency domain effects of the averaging process.

  16. On the Berdichevsky average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rung-Arunwan, Tawat; Siripunvaraporn, Weerachai; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Through a large number of magnetotelluric (MT) observations conducted in a study area, one can obtain regional one-dimensional (1-D) features of the subsurface electrical conductivity structure simply by taking the geometric average of determinant invariants of observed impedances. This method was proposed by Berdichevsky and coworkers, which is based on the expectation that distortion effects due to near-surface electrical heterogeneities will be statistically smoothed out. A good estimation of a regional mean 1-D model is useful, especially in recent years, to be used as a priori (or a starting) model in 3-D inversion. However, the original theory was derived before the establishment of the present knowledge on galvanic distortion. This paper, therefore, reexamines the meaning of the Berdichevsky average by using the conventional formulation of galvanic distortion. A simple derivation shows that the determinant invariant of distorted impedance and its Berdichevsky average is always downward biased by the distortion parameters of shear and splitting. This means that the regional mean 1-D model obtained from the Berdichevsky average tends to be more conductive. As an alternative rotational invariant, the sum of the squared elements (ssq) invariant is found to be less affected by bias from distortion parameters; thus, we conclude that its geometric average would be more suitable for estimating the regional structure. We find that the combination of determinant and ssq invariants provides parameters useful in dealing with a set of distorted MT impedances.

  17. Averaging the inhomogeneous universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2012-03-01

    A basic assumption of modern cosmology is that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic on the largest observable scales. This greatly simplifies Einstein's general relativistic field equations applied at these large scales, and allows a straightforward comparison between theoretical models and observed data. However, Einstein's equations should ideally be imposed at length scales comparable to, say, the solar system, since this is where these equations have been tested. We know that at these scales the universe is highly inhomogeneous. It is therefore essential to perform an explicit averaging of the field equations in order to apply them at large scales. It has long been known that due to the nonlinear nature of Einstein's equations, any explicit averaging scheme will necessarily lead to corrections in the equations applied at large scales. Estimating the magnitude and behavior of these corrections is a challenging task, due to difficulties associated with defining averages in the context of general relativity (GR). It has recently become possible to estimate these effects in a rigorous manner, and we will review some of the averaging schemes that have been proposed in the literature. A tantalizing possibility explored by several authors is that the corrections due to averaging may in fact account for the apparent acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We will explore this idea, reviewing some of the work done in the literature to date. We will argue however, that this rather attractive idea is in fact not viable as a solution of the dark energy problem, when confronted with observational constraints.

  18. Failure of superoxide dismutase to limit size of myocardial infarction after 40 minutes of ischemia and 4 days of reperfusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Uraizee, A; Reimer, K A; Murry, C E; Jennings, R B

    1987-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as the superoxide anion (.O2-) have recently been implicated as important agents involved in causing cell death in the setting of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. When superoxide anion is involved in ischemic injury the administration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) may limit infarct size by reducing the level of superoxide anions in the myocardium. The study described herein was done to determine whether SOD could limit myocardial infarct size when infarcts were produced in dogs by a 40 min occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery followed by 4 days of reperfusion. The animals in the SOD treatment group received a 1 hr intra-atrial infusion of SOD, at a rate of 250 U/kg/min starting 15 min after occlusion and ending 35 min after reperfusion; control dogs received a saline infusion over the same time frame. Infarct size was determined histologically and expressed as a percentage of the anatomic area at risk (AAR). Infarct size was similar in the two groups, averaging 26.2 +/- 2.5% in the control group (n = 10) and 21.1 +/- 4.8% in the SOD group (n = 11) (p = .40). Hemodynamic variables were not statistically different in the two groups during the occlusion. The transmural mean collateral blood flow at 10 min into the 40 min occlusion was 0.13 +/- 0.02 ml/min/g in the controls and 0.17 +/- 0.03 ml/min/g in the SOD group (p = NS); moreover, SOD did not alter collateral blood flow. In control dogs, infarct size was inversely related to collateral blood flow; analysis of covariance showed that SOD did not shift this relationship. Thus, SOD did not limit infarct size in this study. The results of the current study are consistent with our previous study in which allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, did not limit infarct size in this same experimental preparation. The results suggest that superoxide anions that are accessible to the infused SOD are not a major cause of myocyte death caused by 40 min of severe ischemia followed by

  19. Covariant approximation averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Eigo; Arthur, Rudy; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in Nf=2 +1 lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  20. Average density in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnor, W.B.

    1987-05-01

    The Einstein-Straus (1945) vacuole is here used to represent a bound cluster of galaxies embedded in a standard pressure-free cosmological model, and the average density of the cluster is compared with the density of the surrounding cosmic fluid. The two are nearly but not quite equal, and the more condensed the cluster, the greater the difference. A theoretical consequence of the discrepancy between the two densities is discussed. 25 references.

  1. Moving and Being Moved: Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretchmar, R. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Uses philosophical writings, a novel about baseball, and a nonfiction work on rowing to analyze levels of meaning in physical activity, showing why three popular methods for enhancing meaning have not succeeded and may have moved some students away from deeper levels of meaning. The paper suggests that using hints taken from the three books could…

  2. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-08-11

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

  3. Extensive necrotising fasciitis in a 4-day-old neonate: a successful outcome from modern dressings, intensive care and early surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Shinichiro; Das Gupta, Romi; Leditschke, J Fred; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a fulminant and life-threatening soft tissue infection, which leads to vascular thrombosis and cutaneous ischemia. We present our experience with extensive necrotising fasciitis in a 4-day-old neonate and stress the importance of early diagnosis, modern dressings including negative pressure therapy, prompt surgical debridement and intensive care to improve the survival and cosmetic outcome of children with NF. PMID:18982332

  4. Plants on the Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Living things respond to a stimulus, which is a change in the surroundings. Some common stimuli are noises, smells, and things the people see or feel, such as a change in temperature. Animals often respond to a stimulus by moving. Because plants can't move around in the same way animals do, plants have to respond in a different way. Plants can…

  5. Moving? A Relocation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackliffe, Gary; Pearson, Nancy

    This guide answers questions for high school graduates moving away from home for the first time. The question and answer format begins with reasons for moving and offers ways of finding information about a new town before leaving, meeting people, and fighting homesickness and indecision. Practical advice is presented on money management and…

  6. 25 CFR 700.173 - Average net earnings of business or farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Average net earnings of business or farm. 700.173 Section... PROCEDURES Moving and Related Expenses, Temporary Emergency Moves § 700.173 Average net earnings of business or farm. (a) Computing net earnings. For purposes of this subpart, the average annual net earnings...

  7. Embodied affectivity: on moving and being moved

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Thomas; Koch, Sabine C.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research indicating that bodily sensation and behavior strongly influences one's emotional reaction toward certain situations or objects. On this background, a framework model of embodied affectivity1 is suggested: we regard emotions as resulting from the circular interaction between affective qualities or affordances in the environment and the subject's bodily resonance, be it in the form of sensations, postures, expressive movements or movement tendencies. Motion and emotion are thus intrinsically connected: one is moved by movement (perception; impression; affection2) and moved to move (action; expression; e-motion). Through its resonance, the body functions as a medium of emotional perception: it colors or charges self-experience and the environment with affective valences while it remains itself in the background of one's own awareness. This model is then applied to emotional social understanding or interaffectivity which is regarded as an intertwinement of two cycles of embodied affectivity, thus continuously modifying each partner's affective affordances and bodily resonance. We conclude with considerations of how embodied affectivity is altered in psychopathology and can be addressed in psychotherapy of the embodied self. PMID:24936191

  8. Embodied affectivity: on moving and being moved.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Thomas; Koch, Sabine C

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research indicating that bodily sensation and behavior strongly influences one's emotional reaction toward certain situations or objects. On this background, a framework model of embodied affectivity is suggested: we regard emotions as resulting from the circular interaction between affective qualities or affordances in the environment and the subject's bodily resonance, be it in the form of sensations, postures, expressive movements or movement tendencies. Motion and emotion are thus intrinsically connected: one is moved by movement (perception; impression; affection) and moved to move (action; expression; e-motion). Through its resonance, the body functions as a medium of emotional perception: it colors or charges self-experience and the environment with affective valences while it remains itself in the background of one's own awareness. This model is then applied to emotional social understanding or interaffectivity which is regarded as an intertwinement of two cycles of embodied affectivity, thus continuously modifying each partner's affective affordances and bodily resonance. We conclude with considerations of how embodied affectivity is altered in psychopathology and can be addressed in psychotherapy of the embodied self. PMID:24936191

  9. Hadley circulations for zonally averaged heating centered off the equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, Richard S.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    1988-01-01

    Consistent with observations, it is found that moving peak heating even 2 deg off the equator leads to profound asymmetries in the Hadley circulation, with the winter cell amplifying greatly and the summer cell becoming negligible. It is found that the annually averaged Hadley circulation is much larger than the circulation forced by the annually averaged heating.

  10. Online Dietary Intake Estimation: Reproducibility and Validity of the Food4Me Food Frequency Questionnaire Against a 4-Day Weighed Food Record

    PubMed Central

    Fallaize, Rosalind; Forster, Hannah; Macready, Anna L; Walsh, Marianne C; Mathers, John C; Brennan, Lorraine; Gibney, Eileen R; Gibney, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in nutritional assessment are continuing to embrace developments in computer technology. The online Food4Me food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was created as an electronic system for the collection of nutrient intake data. To ensure its accuracy in assessing both nutrient and food group intake, further validation against data obtained using a reliable, but independent, instrument and assessment of its reproducibility are required. Objective The aim was to assess the reproducibility and validity of the Food4Me FFQ against a 4-day weighed food record (WFR). Methods Reproducibility of the Food4Me FFQ was assessed using test-retest methodology by asking participants to complete the FFQ on 2 occasions 4 weeks apart. To assess the validity of the Food4Me FFQ against the 4-day WFR, half the participants were also asked to complete a 4-day WFR 1 week after the first administration of the Food4Me FFQ. Level of agreement between nutrient and food group intakes estimated by the repeated Food4Me FFQ and the Food4Me FFQ and 4-day WFR were evaluated using Bland-Altman methodology and classification into quartiles of daily intake. Crude unadjusted correlation coefficients were also calculated for nutrient and food group intakes. Results In total, 100 people participated in the assessment of reproducibility (mean age 32, SD 12 years), and 49 of these (mean age 27, SD 8 years) also took part in the assessment of validity. Crude unadjusted correlations for repeated Food4Me FFQ ranged from .65 (vitamin D) to .90 (alcohol). The mean cross-classification into “exact agreement plus adjacent” was 92% for both nutrient and food group intakes, and Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement for energy-adjusted macronutrient intakes. Agreement between the Food4Me FFQ and 4-day WFR varied, with crude unadjusted correlations ranging from .23 (vitamin D) to .65 (protein, % total energy) for nutrient intakes and .11 (soups, sauces and miscellaneous foods) to .73 (yogurts

  11. Moving target exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce L.; Grayson, Timothy P.

    1998-08-01

    The understanding of maneuvering forces is invaluable to the warfighter, as it enhances understanding of enemy force structure and disposition, provides cues to potential enemy actions, and expedites targeting of time critical targets. Airborne ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radars are a class of highly-effective, all-weather, wide-area senors that aid in the surveillance of these moving ground vehicles. Unfortunately conventional GMTI radars are incapable of identifying individual vehicles, and techniques for exploiting information imbedded within GMTI radar reports are limited. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Moving Target Exploitation (MTE) program is working to mitigate these deficiencies by developing, integrating, and evaluating a suite of automated and semi-automated technologies to classify moving targets and units, and to provide indications of their activities. These techniques include: aid in the interpretation of GMTI data to provide moving force structure analysis, automatic tracking of thousands of moving ground vehicles, 1-D target classification based upon high-range- resolution (HRR) radar profiles, and 2-D target classification based upon moving target imaging (MTIm) synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This paper shall present the MTE concept and motivation and provide an overview of results to date.

  12. Dissociating Averageness and Attractiveness: Attractive Faces Are Not Always Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.; Unger, Layla; Little, Anthony C.; Feinberg, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Although the averageness hypothesis of facial attractiveness proposes that the attractiveness of faces is mostly a consequence of their averageness, 1 study has shown that caricaturing highly attractive faces makes them mathematically less average but more attractive. Here the authors systematically test the averageness hypothesis in 5 experiments…

  13. [Anaphylactic shock lasting 4 days].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fariñas, P; González-Arévalo, A; Martínez-Hurtado, E D; Chacón, M; García del Valle, S

    2014-11-01

    We present a case of a 62 year-old male scheduled for radical cystectomy, who, ten minutes into the surgery, presented with severe hypotension, tachycardia and increased airway pressure. There was no response to the administration of vasoactive drugs such as, ephedrine, phenylephrine, dopamine and norepinephrine. After ruling out several causes, we evaluated the possibility of an anaphylactic reaction. Adrenaline was given, and the patient stabilized. An adrenaline infusion and mechanical ventilation was required for four days in the critical care unit. PMID:24246959

  14. The 4 Day School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dam, Ai

    2006-01-01

    Colorado law requires school districts to schedule 1080 hours per year of instructional time for secondary schools and 990 instructional hours for elementary schools. The 1080 hours equate to six hours per day for 180 days. The 990 hours equate to five and one-half hours per day. Up to 24 hours may be counted for parent-teacher conferences, staff…

  15. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to prevent accidents in the future. continue Diarrhea Diarrhea means you have to move your bowels often, ... eat or if you're taking certain medicines. Diarrhea also can happen when you don't wash ...

  16. Moving Objects Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jidong; Meng, Xiaofeng

    In moving objects applications, large numbers of locations can be sampled by sensors or GPS periodically, then sent from moving clients to the server and stored in a database. Therefore, continuously maintaining in a database the current locations of moving objects by using a tracking technique becomes very important. The key issue is minimizing the number of updates, while providing precise locations for query results. In this chapter, we will introduce some underlying location update methods. Then, we describe two location update strategies in detail, which can improve the performance. One is the proactive location update strategy, which predicts the movement of moving objects to lower the update frequency; the other is the group location update strategy, which groups the objects to minimize the total number of objects reporting their locations.

  17. Efficacy of a treatment with hCG 4 days after AI to reduce pregnancy losses in lactating dairy cows after synchronized ovulation.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Tenhagen, C; Thiele, G; Heuwieser, W; Tenhagen, B-A

    2010-06-01

    Content The objective of the study was to investigate whether a treatment with hCG 4 days after AI could reduce pregnancy losses in lactating dairy cows. Cows of a dairy herd presented to the veterinarian in a fixed reproductive management protocol were treated with an Ovsynch protocol if no corpus luteum (CL) could be palpated per rectum (Group OV). Cows with a CL received cloprostenol (0.15 mg). After 2 days, these cows were treated with buserelin (0.01 mg) and received timed AI 16-20 h later (Group PG). In both treatment protocols, cows were assigned to two groups to receive 2500 IU of hCG i.v. 4 days after AI or to serve as untreated controls (Groups OV-hCG, OV-Control, PG-hCG and PG-Control). Pregnancy diagnosis was carried out 27 days after AI via ultrasonography and 39 days after AI by rectal palpation. Pregnancy losses were defined as cows being pregnant on day 27 but not pregnant on day 39 after AI. Pregnancy rate (PR) by day 27 did not differ among the four groups (35.4, 35.0, 37.0 and 38.0% for Groups OV-hCG, OV-Control, PG-hCG and PG-Control, respectively). Pregnancy losses between day 27 and day 39 after AI were smaller in hCG treated animals in summer but not in autumn and spring. Pregnancy rate by day 39 after AI was higher in PG than in OV groups, but independent of hCG-treatment. In conclusion, treatment with hCG 4 days after AI did not significantly increase PR on 39 days after AI. A positive effect of hCG on pregnancy losses during the summer months warrants further investigation. PMID:19090829

  18. Moving in the Right Direction: Helping Children Cope with a Relocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Tricia

    2012-01-01

    According to national figures, 37.1 million people moved in 2009 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). In fact, the average American will move 11.7 times in their lifetime. Why are Americans moving so much? There are a variety of reasons. Regardless of the reason, moving is a common experience for children. If one looks at the developmental characteristics…

  19. Active ammonia transport and excretory nitrogen metabolism in the climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, during 4 days of emersion or 10 minutes of forced exercise on land.

    PubMed

    Tay, Yi L; Loong, Ai M; Hiong, Kum C; Lee, Shi J; Tng, Yvonne Y M; Wee, Nicklaus L J; Lee, Serene M L; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Wilson, Jonathan M; Ip, Yuen K

    2006-11-01

    The climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, inhabits large rivers, canals, stagnant water bodies, swamps and estuaries, where it can be confronted with aerial exposure during the dry season. This study aimed to examine nitrogen excretion and metabolism in this fish during 4 days of emersion. Contrary to previous reports, A. testudineus does not possess a functional hepatic ornithineurea cycle because no carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I or III activity was detected in its liver. It was ammonotelic in water, and did not detoxify ammonia through increased urea synthesis during the 4 days of emersion. Unlike many air-breathing fishes reported elsewhere, A. testudineus could uniquely excrete ammonia during emersion at a rate similar to or higher than that of the immersed control. In spite of the fact that emersion had no significant effect on the daily ammonia excretion rate, tissue ammonia content increased significantly in the experimental fish. Thus, it can be concluded that 4 days of emersion caused an increase in ammonia production in A. testudineus, and probably because of this, a transient increase in the glutamine content in the brain occurred. Because there was a significant increase in the total essential free amino acid in the experimental fish after 2 days of emersion, it can be deduced that increased ammonia production during emersion was a result of increased amino acid catabolism and protein degradation. Our results provide evidence for the first time that A. testudineus was able to continually excrete ammonia in water containing 12 mmol l(-1) NH4Cl. During emersion, active ammonia excretion apparently occurred across the branchial and cutaneous surfaces, and ammonia concentrations in water samples collected from these surfaces increased to 20 mmol l(-1). It is probable that the capacities of air-breathing and active ammonia excretion facilitated the utilization of amino acids by A. testudineus as an energy source to support locomotor activity during emersion

  20. Artificial gravity with ergometric exercise preserves the cardiac, but not cerebrovascular, functions during 4 days of head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Bin; Wang, Yong-Chun; Gao, Yuan; Geng, Jie; Wu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Fei; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning occurring in long-term spaceflight requires new strategies to counteract these adverse effects. We previously reported that a short-arm centrifuge produced artificial gravity (AG), together with ergometer, has an approving effect on promoting cardiovascular function. The current study sought to investigate whether the cardiac and cerebrovascular functions were maintained and improved using a strategy of AG combined with exercise training on cardiovascular function during 4-day head-down bed rest (HDBR). Twelve healthy male subjects were assigned to a control group (CONT, n=6) and an AG combined with ergometric exercise training group (CM, n=6). Simultaneously, cardiac pumping and systolic functions, cerebral blood flow were measured before, during, and after HDBR. The results showed that AG combined with ergometric exercise caused an increase trend of number of tolerance, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups. After 4-day HDBR in the CONT group, heart rate increased significantly (59±6 vs 66±7 beats/min), while stroke volume (98±12 vs 68±13 mL) and cardiac output (6±1 vs 4±1 L/min) decreased significantly (p<0.05). All subjects had similar drops on cerebral vascular function. Volume regulating hormone aldosterone increased in both groups (by 119.9% in CONT group and 112.8% in the CM group), but only in the CONT group there were a significant changes (p<0.05). Angiotensin II was significantly increased by 140.5% after 4-day HDBR in the CONT group (p<0.05), while no significant changes were observed in the CM group. These results indicated that artificial gravity with ergometric exercise successfully eliminated changes induced by simulated weightlessness in heart rate, volume regulating hormones, and cardiac pumping function and partially maintained cardiac systolic function. Hence, a daily 1h alternating +1.0 and +2.0 Gz with 40 W exercise training appear to be an effective

  1. Moving up in industry.

    PubMed

    Covell, Charlotte

    2016-01-23

    Charlotte Covell is commercial business manager at Virbac UK, a role that gives her responsibility for the company's sales to corporate practices, some buying groups and internet pharmacies. She began her career as a veterinary nurse, but moved into industry and now has a role in senior business management. PMID:26795866

  2. Let's Keep Moving!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obama, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    First Lady Michelle Obama lauds educators for following the lead of her Let's Move! program and taking action to curtail childhood obesity. The battle to make children healthier is being waged on a number of fronts by food companies, restaurants and schools. Progress has been made, she says, but more is needed.

  3. Who Moved the Lighthouse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, William A.

    1991-01-01

    Traces the early development of the National Council on Community Services, pointing to important changes in the focus of the council since 1968. Identifies major figures in the movement. Opposes the move toward a more stylized academic existence for community services designed to meet institutional rather than community needs. (DMM)

  4. Who Moved the Lighthouse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, William A.

    1982-01-01

    Traces the early development of the National Council on Community Services and Continuing Education from the creation of the National Council on Community Services in 1968. Opposes the move toward a more stylized academic existence for community services designed to meet institutional rather than community needs. (DMM)

  5. A Moving Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) mathematicians have discovered how certain insects can climb what to them are steep, slippery slopes in the water's surface without moving their limbs, and do it at high speed. Welcome to the world of the tiny creatures that live on the surface of ponds, lakes, and other standing bodies of water. For the…

  6. FREEDOM TO MOVE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARPENTER, ETHELOUISE; SHIPLEY, FERNE

    PLAY WHICH INVOLVES NATURAL MOVEMENT HELPS THE CHILD TO LEARN ABOUT THE PROPERTIES OF MATTER AND ABOUT HIMSELF. AN EXPANSIVE AND VERSATILE USE OF SPACE FOR LIVING INCREASES WITH EXPLORATION. FREEDOM TO MOVE IS INTELLECTUAL AND EMOTIONAL, AS WELL AS PHYSICAL. NEW EXPERIENCES ARISING OUT OF CURIOSITY AND INTERACTION WITH HIS OWN FAMILY AND OTHER…

  7. Making Images That Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The history of the moving image (the cinema) is well documented in books and on the Internet. This article offers a number of activities that can easily be carried out in a science class. They make use of the phenomenon of "Persistence of Vision." The activities presented herein demonstrate the functionality of the phenakistoscope, the…

  8. 25 CFR 700.173 - Average net earnings of business or farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Average net earnings of business or farm. 700.173 Section... PROCEDURES Moving and Related Expenses, Temporary Emergency Moves § 700.173 Average net earnings of business... a business or farm operation is one-half of its net earnings before Federal, State and local...

  9. Confirmation of Rubella within 4 Days of Rash Onset: Comparison of Rubella Virus RNA Detection in Oral Fluid with Immunoglobulin M Detection in Serum or Oral Fluid ▿

    PubMed Central

    Abernathy, Emily; Cabezas, Cesar; Sun, Hong; Zheng, Qi; Chen, Min-hsin; Castillo-Solorzano, Carlos; Ortiz, Ana Cecilia; Osores, Fernando; Oliveira, Lucia; Whittembury, Alvaro; Andrus, Jon K.; Helfand, Rita F.; Icenogle, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Rubella virus infection is typically diagnosed by the identification of rubella virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in serum, but approximately 50% of serum samples from rubella cases collected on the day of rash onset are negative for rubella virus-specific IgM. The ability to detect IgM in sera and oral fluids was compared with the ability to detect rubella virus RNA in oral fluids by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) by using paired samples taken within the first 4 days after rash onset from suspected rubella cases during an outbreak in Perú. Sera were tested for IgM by both indirect and capture enzyme immunoassays (EIAs), and oral fluids were tested for IgM by a capture EIA. Tests for IgM in serum were more sensitive for the confirmation of rubella than the test for IgM in oral fluid during the 4 days after rash onset. RT-PCR confirmed more suspected cases than serum IgM tests on days 1 and 2 after rash onset. The methods confirmed approximately the same number of cases on days 3 and 4 after rash onset. However, a few cases were detected by serum IgM tests but not by RT-PCR even on the day of rash onset. Nine RT-PCR-positive oral fluid specimens were shown to contain rubella virus sequences of genotype 1C. In summary, RT-PCR testing of oral fluid confirmed more rubella cases than IgM testing of either serum or oral fluid samples collected in the first 2 days after rash onset; the maximum number of confirmations of rubella cases was obtained by combining RT-PCR and serology testing. PMID:19005151

  10. Virtual Averaging Making Nonframe-Averaged Optical Coherence Tomography Images Comparable to Frame-Averaged Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Developing a novel image enhancement method so that nonframe-averaged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images become comparable to active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT images. Methods Twenty-one eyes of 21 healthy volunteers were scanned with noneye-tracking nonframe-averaged OCT device and active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT device. Virtual averaging was applied to nonframe-averaged images with voxel resampling and adding amplitude deviation with 15-time repetitions. Signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), and the distance between the end of visible nasal retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and the foveola were assessed to evaluate the image enhancement effect and retinal layer visibility. Retinal thicknesses before and after processing were also measured. Results All virtual-averaged nonframe-averaged images showed notable improvement and clear resemblance to active eye-tracking frame-averaged images. Signal-to-noise and CNR were significantly improved (SNR: 30.5 vs. 47.6 dB, CNR: 4.4 vs. 6.4 dB, original versus processed, P < 0.0001, paired t-test). The distance between the end of visible nasal RNFL and the foveola was significantly different before (681.4 vs. 446.5 μm, Cirrus versus Spectralis, P < 0.0001) but not after processing (442.9 vs. 446.5 μm, P = 0.76). Sectoral macular total retinal and circumpapillary RNFL thicknesses showed systematic differences between Cirrus and Spectralis that became not significant after processing. Conclusion The virtual averaging method successfully improved nontracking nonframe-averaged OCT image quality and made the images comparable to active eye-tracking frame-averaged OCT images. Translational Relevance Virtual averaging may enable detailed retinal structure studies on images acquired using a mixture of nonframe-averaged and frame-averaged OCT devices without concerning about systematic differences in both qualitative and quantitative aspects. PMID:26835180

  11. Averaging Models: Parameters Estimation with the R-Average Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidotto, G.; Massidda, D.; Noventa, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Functional Measurement approach, proposed within the theoretical framework of Information Integration Theory (Anderson, 1981, 1982), can be a useful multi-attribute analysis tool. Compared to the majority of statistical models, the averaging model can account for interaction effects without adding complexity. The R-Average method (Vidotto &…

  12. Detecting moving objects under a moving camera in complex environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genyuan; Yu, Qin; Yang, Sisi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Robust detection of moving objects in image sequences is an essential part of many vision applications. However, it is not easily achievable with a moving camera since the camera and moving objects motions are mixed together. In this paper we propose a method to detect moving objects under a moving camera. The camera ego-motion is compensated by the corresponding feature sets. The difference image between two consecutive images that ego-motion is compensated is transformed into a binary image using k-means algorithm. According to the clustering results, the region of interest where moving objects are likely to exist is searched by the projection approach. Then local threshold and contour filling methods are applied to detect the accurate moving objects. Experimental results on real image sequences demonstrate that our method can get intact moving objects in the case of a moving camera efficiently.

  13. Electrostatics of moving plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2013-07-15

    The stability of charge distribution over the surface of a conducting body in moving plasma is analyzed. Using a finite-width plate streamlined by a cold neutralized electron flow as an example, it is shown that an electrically neutral body can be unstable against the development of spontaneous polarization. The plasma parameters at which such instability takes place, as well as the frequency and growth rate of the fundamental mode of instability, are determined.

  14. Moving with the sun.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, N M; Hazlett, C; Hsieh, R; Lee, J C

    2001-05-01

    A global 24-hour telemedicine conference entitled, "Moving with the Sun" was successfully completed on June 30 and July 1 1997 between participants from Hong Kong and China, as well as with sixteen major international medical centres around the globe. In addition to celebrating the return of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China, the conference also signified the establishment of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Hong Kong as a bridge between Western countries and the PRC. PMID:11311663

  15. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  16. Time Series ARIMA Models of Undergraduate Grade Point Average.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bruce G.

    The Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) Models, often referred to as Box-Jenkins models, are regression methods for analyzing sequential dependent observations with large amounts of data. The Box-Jenkins approach, a three-stage procedure consisting of identification, estimation and diagnosis, was used to select the most appropriate…

  17. The Average of Rates and the Average Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Defines arithmetic, harmonic, and weighted harmonic means, and discusses their properties. Describes the application of these properties in problems involving fuel economy estimates and average rates of motion. Gives example problems and solutions. (CW)

  18. Nonuniform Video Size Reduction for Moving Objects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Moving objects of interest (MOOIs) in surveillance videos are detected and encapsulated by bounding boxes. Since moving objects are defined by temporal activities through the consecutive video frames, it is necessary to examine a group of frames (GoF) to detect the moving objects. To do that, the traces of moving objects in the GoF are quantified by forming a spatiotemporal gradient map (STGM) through the GoF. Each pixel value in the STGM corresponds to the maximum temporal gradient of the spatial gradients at the same pixel location for all frames in the GoF. Therefore, the STGM highlights boundaries of the MOOI in the GoF and the optimal bounding box encapsulating the MOOI can be determined as the local areas with the peak average STGM energy. Once an MOOI and its bounding box are identified, the inside and outside of it can be treated differently for object-aware size reduction. Our optimal encapsulation method for the MOOI in the surveillance videos makes it possible to recognize the moving objects even after the low bitrate video compressions. PMID:25258738

  19. Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4 day regimen): a review of its use in contraception, premenstrual dysphoric disorder and moderate acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Caroline; Wellington, Keri; Moen, Marit D; Robinson, Dean M

    2007-01-01

    Drospirenone 3mg with ethinylestradiol 20microg (Yaz) is a low-dose combined oral contraceptive (COC) administered in a regimen of 24 days of active tablets followed by a short hormone-free interval (4 days; 24/4 regimen). Drospirenone, unlike other synthetic progestogens used in COCs, is a 17alpha-spirolactone derivative and a 17alpha-spironolactone analogue with antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties. Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4) is approved in the US for the prevention of pregnancy in women, for the treatment of the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and for the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris in women who wish to use an oral contraceptive for contraception.Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4) provided 99% contraceptive protection over 1 year of treatment in two large studies. The same treatment regimen over three treatment cycles also significantly improved the emotional and physical symptoms associated with PMDD, and improved moderate acne vulgaris over six treatment cycles in double-blind trials. It was generally well tolerated, with adverse events generally typical of those experienced with other COCs and which were most likely to occur in the first few cycles. Clinical trials indicate that drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4) is a good long-term contraceptive option, and additionally offers relief of symptoms that characterise PMDD and has a favourable effect on moderate acne vulgaris. PMID:17683173

  20. The Averaging Problem in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-06-01

    This thesis deals with the averaging problem in cosmology, which has gained considerable interest in recent years, and is concerned with correction terms (after averaging inhomogeneities) that appear in the Einstein equations when working on the large scales appropriate for cosmology. It has been claimed in the literature that these terms may account for the phenomenon of dark energy which causes the late time universe to accelerate. We investigate the nature of these terms by using averaging schemes available in the literature and further developed to be applicable to the problem at hand. We show that the effect of these terms when calculated carefully, remains negligible and cannot explain the late time acceleration.

  1. GPS Moving Vehicle Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, O. J.; Reid, Wilson; Wright, James; Duffey, Christopher; Williams, Charles; Warren, Hugh; Zeh, Tom; Buisson, James

    1996-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the development of timing systems for remote locations, had a technical requirement for a Y code (SA/AS) Global Positioning System (GPS) precise time transfer receiver (TTR) which could be used both in a stationary mode or mobile mode. A contract was awarded to the Stanford Telecommunication Corporation (STEL) to build such a device. The Eastern Range (ER) als had a requirement for such a receiver and entered into the contract with NRL for the procurement of additional receivers. The Moving Vehicle Experiment (MVE) described in this paper is the first in situ test of the STEL Model 5401C Time Transfer System in both stationary and mobile operations. The primary objective of the MVE was to test the timing accuracy of the newly developed GPS TTR aboard a moving vessel. To accomplish this objective, a joint experiment was performed with personnel from NRL and the er at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) test range at Andros Island. Results and discussion of the test are presented in this paper.

  2. High average power pockels cell

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

  3. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPA’s MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  4. Chondrocyte Moves: clever strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Teresa I.

    2007-01-01

    Goals To review the literature on chondrocyte movements and to develop plausible hypothesis for further work. Design Chondrocyte movements are herein defined as translocations of the cell body. To set the stage for a discussion of chondrocyte moves, a brief overview of cell migration in other cell types is presented, including a discussion of the challenges that cells find when moving within tissues. Reports of isolated chondrocyte migration in vitro (isolated cell systems) and ex vivo (cartilage organ cultures) are then summarized, followed by a discussion of recent studies that infer chondrocyte movements in vivo. Results Investigators from different laboratories have observed chondrocyte motility in vitro. I became interested in the question of whether articular chondrocytes retained their phenotype during their migratory excursions. We devised a simple method to separate migratory and stationary chondrocytes and then showed that migratory chondrocytes synthesized collagen II but not I—consistent with a differentiated phenotype. Our time-lapse video microscopy studies showed that the cells displayed appropriate movement kinetics, albeit with low speed and directionality. Similarly, others have presented data consistent with slow movement of chondrocytes out of cartilage explants. It is important to decipher whether these in vitro movements reflect physiological states and if so, which events are simulated. Examples of in vivo studies that have inferred chondrocyte movements include those describing rotational or gliding movements of chondrocytes in the proliferative zone of the growth plate and its importance in the growth process; and the notion that chondrocytes move from the cartilage endplates to the nucleus pulposus in the spine of rabbits and rats during development. Such studies are consistent with the hypothesis that chondrocytes exhibit highly controlled and specialized movements during tissue growth and remodeling in vivo. On the other hand, the

  5. Comparative evaluation of anti-plaque efficacy of herbal and 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash in a 4-day plaque re-growth study

    PubMed Central

    Parwani, Simran R.; Parwani, Rajkumar N.; Chitnis, P. J.; Dadlani, Himanshu P.; Prasad, Sakur V. Sai

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash has earned eponym of gold standard to treat and/or prevent periodontal disease. However, it has been reported to have local side-effects on long-term use. To explore a herbal alternative, the present study was carried out with an aim to compare the anti-plaque efficacy of a herbal mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash and normal saline. Materials and Methods: It was an examiner-blinded, parallel designed clinical trial, in which 90 pre-clinical dental students with gingival index (GI) ≤1 were enrolled. To begin with, GI and plaque index (PI) were recorded. Then, baseline plaque scores were brought to zero by professionally cleaning the teeth with scaling and polishing. After that, randomized 3 groups were made (of 30 subjects each - after excluding the drop-outs) who were refrained from regular mechanical oral hygiene measures. Subjects were asked to swish with respective mouthwash (0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash, herbal mouthwash, or normal saline) as per therapeutic dose for 4 days. Then, GI and PI scores were re-evaluated on 5th day by the same investigator, and the differences were compared statistically by ANOVA and Student's ‘t’-test. Results and Observations: Least post-rinsing GI and PI scores were demonstrated with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash, followed by herbal mouthwash and highest scores with normal saline. The difference of post-rinsing PI scores between the chlorhexidine and herbal mouthwash groups was statistically non-significant, whereas this difference was significant between chlorhexidine and saline groups, and the difference between herbal and saline groups was non-significant. It was concluded that 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash remains the best anti-plaque agent. However, when socio-economic factor and/or side-effects of chlorhexidine need consideration, presently tested herbal mouthwash may be considered as a good alternative. PMID:23633777

  6. Discovery of a Millisecond Pulsar in the 5.4 day Binary 3FGL J1417.5-4402: Observing the Late Phase of Pulsar Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, F.; Reynolds, J. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Cordes, J. M.; Sarkissian, J.; Barr, E. D.; Ferrara, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    In a search of the unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 3FGL J1417.5-4402 with the Parkes radio telescope, we discovered PSR J1417-4402, a 2.66 ms pulsar having the same 5.4 day orbital period as the optical and X-ray binary identified by Strader et al. The existence of radio pulsations implies that the neutron star is currently not accreting. Substantial outflows from the companion render the radio pulsar undetectable for more than half of the orbit, and may contribute to the observed Hα emission. Our initial pulsar observations, together with the optically inferred orbit and inclination, imply a mass ratio of 0.171 ± 0.002, a companion mass of {M}2=0.33+/- 0.03 M⊙, and a neutron star mass in the range 1.77≤slant {M}1≤slant 2.13 M⊙. However, there remains a discrepancy between the distance of 4.4 kpc inferred from the optical properties of the companion and the smaller radio dispersion measure distance of 1.6 kpc. The smaller distance would reduce the inferred Roche-lobe filling factor, increase the inferred inclination angle, and decrease the masses. As a wide binary, PSR J1417-4402 differs from the radio-eclipsing black widow and redback pulsars being discovered in large numbers by Fermi. It is probably a system that began mass transfer onto the neutron star after the companion star left the main sequence. The companion should end its evolution as a He white dwarf in a 6-20 day orbit, i.e., as a typical binary millisecond pulsar companion.

  7. Moving particle composition analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A mass spectrometry apparatus for analyzing the composition of moving microscopic particles is introduced. The apparatus includes a capacitor with a front electrode upon which the particles impinge, a back electrode, and a solid dielectric sandwiched between the front and back electrodes. In one embodiment, the electrodes and dielectric are arcuately shaped as concentric peripheral segments of different spheres having a common center and different radii. The front electrode and dielectric together have a thickness such that an impinging particle can penetrate them. In a second embodiment, the capacitor has planar, parallel electrodes, in which case the ejected positive ions are deflected downstream of a planar grid by a pair of spaced, arcuate capacitor plates having a region between them through which the ejected ions travel.

  8. Moving Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Single neutral atoms are promising candidates for qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum information. We have built a set of optical tweezers for trapping and moving single Rubidium atoms. The tweezers are based on a far off-resonant dipole trapping laser focussed to a 1 μm spot with a single aspheric lens. We use a digital micromirror device (DMD) to generate dynamic holograms of the desired arrangement of traps. The DMD has a frame rate of 20 kHz which, when combined with fast algorithms, allows for rapid reconfiguration of the traps. We demonstrate trapping of up to 20 atoms in arbitrary arrangements, and the transport of a single-atom over a distance of 14 μm with continuous laser cooling, and 5 μm without. In the meantime, we are developing high-finesse fibre-tip cavities, which we plan to use to couple pairs of single atoms to form a quantum network.

  9. Hanford plots reactor move

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.

    1993-10-04

    Anxious to show skeptics some bang for the mounting cleanup bucks, the US Dept. of Energy has taken steps to get a large and visible project under way at its Hanford weapon plant-moving eight old nuclear reactors to permanent burial at an inland dump site. The effort, conservatively budgeted at $235 million, will be the eastern Washington site's largest [open quotes]D D[close quotes]-decontamination and decommissioning-project yet. Last month, DOE unveiled its final record of decision for the plants that spells out D D options-from doing nothing to immediate removal of entire reactor blocks. At issue are reactors built from 1943 to 1963 along the Columbia River. Defunct since 1971, they once produced plutonium.

  10. Moving belt metal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carl V.; Mendat, Deborah P.; Huynh, Toan B.

    2006-05-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has developed a prototype metal detection survey system that will increase the search speed of conventional technology while maintaining high sensitivity. Higher search speeds will reduce the time to clear roads of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IED) and to locate unexploded ordnance (UXO) at Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) sites, thus reducing remediation costs. The new survey sensor system is called the moving belt metal detector (MBMD) and operates by both increasing sensor speed over the ground while maintaining adequate sensor dwell time over the target for good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reducing motion-induced sensor noise. The MBMD uses an array of metal detection sensors mounted on a flexible belt similar to a tank track. The belt motion is synchronized with the forward survey speed so individual sensor elements remain stationary relative to the ground. A single pulsed transmitter coil is configured to provide a uniform magnetic field along the length of the receivers in ground contact. Individual time-domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) receivers are designed to sense a single time-gate measurement of the total metal content. Each sensor module consists of a receiver coil, amplifier, digitizing electronics and a low power UHF wireless transmitter. This paper presents the survey system design concepts and metal detection data from various targets at several survey speeds. Although the laboratory prototype is designed to demonstrate metal detection survey speeds up to 10 m/s, higher speeds are achievable with a larger sensor array. In addition, the concept can be adapted to work with other sensor technologies not previously considered for moving platforms.

  11. Vocal attractiveness increases by averaging.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Laetitia; Bestelmeyer, Patricia; Latinus, Marianne; Rouger, Julien; Charest, Ian; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Kawahara, Hideki; Belin, Pascal

    2010-01-26

    Vocal attractiveness has a profound influence on listeners-a bias known as the "what sounds beautiful is good" vocal attractiveness stereotype [1]-with tangible impact on a voice owner's success at mating, job applications, and/or elections. The prevailing view holds that attractive voices are those that signal desirable attributes in a potential mate [2-4]-e.g., lower pitch in male voices. However, this account does not explain our preferences in more general social contexts in which voices of both genders are evaluated. Here we show that averaging voices via auditory morphing [5] results in more attractive voices, irrespective of the speaker's or listener's gender. Moreover, we show that this phenomenon is largely explained by two independent by-products of averaging: a smoother voice texture (reduced aperiodicities) and a greater similarity in pitch and timbre with the average of all voices (reduced "distance to mean"). These results provide the first evidence for a phenomenon of vocal attractiveness increases by averaging, analogous to a well-established effect of facial averaging [6, 7]. They highlight prototype-based coding [8] as a central feature of voice perception, emphasizing the similarity in the mechanisms of face and voice perception. PMID:20129047

  12. Determining GPS average performance metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    Analytic and semi-analytic methods are used to show that users of the GPS constellation can expect performance variations based on their location. Specifically, performance is shown to be a function of both altitude and latitude. These results stem from the fact that the GPS constellation is itself non-uniform. For example, GPS satellites are over four times as likely to be directly over Tierra del Fuego than over Hawaii or Singapore. Inevitable performance variations due to user location occur for ground, sea, air and space GPS users. These performance variations can be studied in an average relative sense. A semi-analytic tool which symmetrically allocates GPS satellite latitude belt dwell times among longitude points is used to compute average performance metrics. These metrics include average number of GPS vehicles visible, relative average accuracies in the radial, intrack and crosstrack (or radial, north/south, east/west) directions, and relative average PDOP or GDOP. The tool can be quickly changed to incorporate various user antenna obscuration models and various GPS constellation designs. Among other applications, tool results can be used in studies to: predict locations and geometries of best/worst case performance, design GPS constellations, determine optimal user antenna location and understand performance trends among various users.

  13. Plans, Patterns, and Move Categories Guiding a Highly Selective Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippen, Gerhard

    In this paper we present our ideas for an Arimaa-playing program (also called a bot) that uses plans and pattern matching to guide a highly selective search. We restrict move generation to moves in certain move categories to reduce the number of moves considered by the bot significantly. Arimaa is a modern board game that can be played with a standard Chess set. However, the rules of the game are not at all like those of Chess. Furthermore, Arimaa was designed to be as simple and intuitive as possible for humans, yet challenging for computers. While all established Arimaa bots use alpha-beta search with a variety of pruning techniques and other heuristics ending in an extensive positional leaf node evaluation, our new bot, Rat, starts with a positional evaluation of the current position. Based on features found in the current position - supported by pattern matching using a directed position graph - our bot Rat decides which of a given set of plans to follow. The plan then dictates what types of moves can be chosen. This is another major difference from bots that generate "all" possible moves for a particular position. Rat is only allowed to generate moves that belong to certain categories. Leaf nodes are evaluated only by a straightforward material evaluation to help avoid moves that lose material. This highly selective search looks, on average, at only 5 moves out of 5,000 to over 40,000 possible moves in a middle game position.

  14. Evaluations of average level spacings

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, H.I.

    1980-01-01

    The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  15. On generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple numerical method for constructing the optimal (generalized) averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas which are the optimal stratified extensions of Gauss quadrature formulas. These extensions exist in many cases in which real positive Kronrod formulas do not exist. For the Jacobi weight functions w(x)equiv w^{(alpha,beta)}(x)D(1-x)^alpha(1+x)^beta ( alpha,beta>-1 ) we give a necessary and sufficient condition on the parameters alpha and beta such that the optimal averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas are internal.

  16. Polyhedral Painting with Group Averaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Frank A.; Tsao, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The technique of "group-averaging" produces colorings of a sphere that have the symmetries of various polyhedra. The concepts are accessible at the undergraduate level, without being well-known in typical courses on algebra or geometry. The material makes an excellent discovery project, especially for students with some background in…

  17. Averaged Electroencephalic Audiometry in Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, William E.; McCandless, Geary A.

    1971-01-01

    Normal, preterm, and high-risk infants were tested at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of age using averaged electroencephalic audiometry (AEA) to determine the usefulness of AEA as a measurement technique for assessing auditory acuity in infants, and to delineate some of the procedural and technical problems often encountered. (KW)

  18. Averaging inhomogeneous cosmologies - a dialogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, T.

    The averaging problem for inhomogeneous cosmologies is discussed in the form of a disputation between two cosmologists, one of them (RED) advocating the standard model, the other (GREEN) advancing some arguments against it. Technical explanations of these arguments as well as the conclusions of this debate are given by BLUE.

  19. Averaging inhomogenous cosmologies - a dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, T.

    The averaging problem for inhomogeneous cosmologies is discussed in the form of a disputation between two cosmologists, one of them (RED) advocating the standard model, the other (GREEN) advancing some arguments against it. Technical explanations of these arguments as well as the conclusions of this debate are given by BLUE.

  20. Averaging facial expression over time

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Jason; Harp, Tom; Whitney, David

    2010-01-01

    The visual system groups similar features, objects, and motion (e.g., Gestalt grouping). Recent work suggests that the computation underlying perceptual grouping may be one of summary statistical representation. Summary representation occurs for low-level features, such as size, motion, and position, and even for high level stimuli, including faces; for example, observers accurately perceive the average expression in a group of faces (J. Haberman & D. Whitney, 2007, 2009). The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize the time-course of this facial integration mechanism. In a series of three experiments, we measured observers’ abilities to recognize the average expression of a temporal sequence of distinct faces. Faces were presented in sets of 4, 12, or 20, at temporal frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 21.3 Hz. The results revealed that observers perceived the average expression in a temporal sequence of different faces as precisely as they perceived a single face presented repeatedly. The facial averaging was independent of temporal frequency or set size, but depended on the total duration of exposed faces, with a time constant of ~800 ms. These experiments provide evidence that the visual system is sensitive to the ensemble characteristics of complex objects presented over time. PMID:20053064

  1. Average Cost of Common Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Fred; Tweeten, Luther

    The paper shows costs of elementary and secondary schools applicable to Oklahoma rural areas, including the long-run average cost curve which indicates the minimum per student cost for educating various numbers of students and the application of the cost curves determining the optimum school district size. In a stratified sample, the school…

  2. Time series analysis to monitor and assess water resources: a moving average approach.

    PubMed

    Reghunath, Rajesh; Murthy, T R Sreedhara; Raghavan, B R

    2005-10-01

    An understanding of the behavior of the groundwater body and its long-term trends are essential for making any management decision in a given watershed. Geostatistical methods can effectively be used to derive the long-term trends of the groundwater body. Here an attempt has been made to find out the long-term trends of the water table fluctuations of a river basin through a time series approach. The method was found to be useful for demarcating the zones of discharge and of recharge of an aquifer. The recharge of the aquifer is attributed to the return flow from applied irrigation. In the study area, farmers mainly depend on borewells for water and water is pumped from the deep aquifer indiscriminately. The recharge of the shallow aquifer implies excessive pumping of the deep aquifer. Necessary steps have to be taken immediately at appropriate levels to control the irrational pumping of deep aquifer groundwater, which is needed as a future water source. The study emphasizes the use of geostatistics for the better management of water resources and sustainable development of the area. PMID:16240189

  3. Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) Modeling Method for Gyro Random Noise Using a Robust Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem in which the conventional ARMA modeling methods for gyro random noise require a large number of samples and converge slowly, an ARMA modeling method using a robust Kalman filtering is developed. The ARMA model parameters are employed as state arguments. Unknown time-varying estimators of observation noise are used to achieve the estimated mean and variance of the observation noise. Using the robust Kalman filtering, the ARMA model parameters are estimated accurately. The developed ARMA modeling method has the advantages of a rapid convergence and high accuracy. Thus, the required sample size is reduced. It can be applied to modeling applications for gyro random noise in which a fast and accurate ARMA modeling method is required. PMID:26437409

  4. Statistical clues to postoperative blood loss: moving averages applied to medical data.

    PubMed

    Hay, Karen L; Bull, Brian S

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of computerized databases, medical data has become easy to accumulate; however, effective use of this data continues to pose significant problems. In other circumstances, smoothing algorithms have been used to uncover non-obvious correlations, trends and relationships in noisy data. We have applied four such algorithms to a large dataset of postoperative blood replacement in cardiopulmonary bypass patients. When applied to this dataset, one of the algorithms proved surprisingly effective. It confirmed several previously observed correlations, and also provided an additional series of counterintuitive and apparently unrelated associations. These associations have been explored in an accompanying paper. PMID:19699664

  5. Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) Modeling Method for Gyro Random Noise Using a Robust Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem in which the conventional ARMA modeling methods for gyro random noise require a large number of samples and converge slowly, an ARMA modeling method using a robust Kalman filtering is developed. The ARMA model parameters are employed as state arguments. Unknown time-varying estimators of observation noise are used to achieve the estimated mean and variance of the observation noise. Using the robust Kalman filtering, the ARMA model parameters are estimated accurately. The developed ARMA modeling method has the advantages of a rapid convergence and high accuracy. Thus, the required sample size is reduced. It can be applied to modeling applications for gyro random noise in which a fast and accurate ARMA modeling method is required. PMID:26437409

  6. Exact averaging of laminar dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnakar, Ram R.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2011-02-01

    We use the Liapunov-Schmidt (LS) technique of bifurcation theory to derive a low-dimensional model for laminar dispersion of a nonreactive solute in a tube. The LS formalism leads to an exact averaged model, consisting of the governing equation for the cross-section averaged concentration, along with the initial and inlet conditions, to all orders in the transverse diffusion time. We use the averaged model to analyze the temporal evolution of the spatial moments of the solute and show that they do not have the centroid displacement or variance deficit predicted by the coarse-grained models derived by other methods. We also present a detailed analysis of the first three spatial moments for short and long times as a function of the radial Peclet number and identify three clearly defined time intervals for the evolution of the solute concentration profile. By examining the skewness in some detail, we show that the skewness increases initially, attains a maximum for time scales of the order of transverse diffusion time, and the solute concentration profile never attains the Gaussian shape at any finite time. Finally, we reason that there is a fundamental physical inconsistency in representing laminar (Taylor) dispersion phenomena using truncated averaged models in terms of a single cross-section averaged concentration and its large scale gradient. Our approach evaluates the dispersion flux using a local gradient between the dominant diffusive and convective modes. We present and analyze a truncated regularized hyperbolic model in terms of the cup-mixing concentration for the classical Taylor-Aris dispersion that has a larger domain of validity compared to the traditional parabolic model. By analyzing the temporal moments, we show that the hyperbolic model has no physical inconsistencies that are associated with the parabolic model and can describe the dispersion process to first order accuracy in the transverse diffusion time.

  7. Dust on the Move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06763 Dust on the Move

    This dust avalanche is located on the rim material of an unnamed crater to the east of Tikhonravov Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 15.0N, Longitude 43.1E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. ALS renewal moves forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, R. W.; Feinberg, B.; Hussain, Z.; Kirz, J.; Krebs, G. F.; Padmore, H. A.; Robin, D. S.; Robinson, A. L.

    2007-11-01

    As the result of an extensive long-term planning process involving all its stakeholders—management, staff, and users—the ALS has seen its future and is aggressively moving ahead to implement its vision for keeping the facility at the cutting edge for the next 2-3 decades. The evolving strategic plan now in place aims to renew the ALS so it can address a new generation of fundamental questions about size dependent and dimensional-confinement phenomena at the nanoscale; correlation and complexity in physical, biological, and environmental systems; and temporal evolution, assembly, dynamics and ultrafast phenomena. The renewal spans three areas: (1) increased staffing at beamlines to support the growing user community and safety professionals to keep an increasingly complex facility hazard free; (2) implementing advances in accelerator, insertion device, beamline, and detector technology that will make it possible for ALS users to address emerging grand scientific and technological challenges with incisive world-class tools; and (3) construction of a user support building and guest housing that will increase the safety and user friendliness of the ALS by providing users office, meeting, experiment staging, and laboratory space for their work and on-site accommodations at reasonable rates.

  9. Kinetic responses of Dunaliella in moving fluids.

    PubMed

    Chengala, Ahammed Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Troolin, Dan; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the kinetic behavior of Dunaliella primolecta (D. primolecta) subjected to controlled fluid flow under laboratory conditions. In situ velocities of D. primolecta were quantified by micron-resolution particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. Experiments were performed under a range of velocity gradients and corresponding energy dissipation levels at microscopic scales similar to the energy dissipation levels of natural aquatic ecosystems. An average swimming velocity of D. primolecta in a stagnant fluid was 41 microm/s without a preferential flow direction. In a moving fluid, the sample population velocities of D. primolecta follow a log-normal distribution. The variability of sample population velocities was maximal at the highest fluid flow velocity in the channel. Local fluid velocity gradients inhibited the accrual of D. primolecta by twofold 5 days after the initiation of the experiment in comparison to the non-moving fluid control experiment. PMID:20506336

  10. Averaging Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Iain A.; Robbers, Georg; Behrend, Juliane

    2009-04-01

    The cosmological backreaction arises when one directly averages the Einstein equations to recover an effective Robertson-Walker cosmology, rather than assuming a background a priori. While usually discussed in the context of dark energy, strictly speaking any cosmological model should be recovered from such a procedure. We apply the scalar spatial averaging formalism for the first time to linear Robertson-Walker universes containing matter, radiation and dark energy. The formalism employed is general and incorporates systems of multiple fluids with ease, allowing us to consider quantitatively the universe from deep radiation domination up to the present day in a natural, unified manner. Employing modified Boltzmann codes we evaluate numerically the discrepancies between the assumed and the averaged behaviour arising from the quadratic terms, finding the largest deviations for an Einstein-de Sitter universe, increasing rapidly with Hubble rate to a 0.01% effect for h = 0.701. For the ΛCDM concordance model, the backreaction is of the order of Ωeff0 approx 4 × 10-6, with those for dark energy models being within a factor of two or three. The impacts at recombination are of the order of 10-8 and those in deep radiation domination asymptote to a constant value. While the effective equations of state of the backreactions in Einstein-de Sitter, concordance and quintessence models are generally dust-like, a backreaction with an equation of state weff < -1/3 can be found for strongly phantom models.

  11. Efficient data association for move-stop-move target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyan, T.; McDonald, Mike; Kirubarajan, T.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient data association algorithm for tracking ground targets that perform move-stop-move maneuvers using ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar. A GMTI radar does not detect the targets whose radial velocity falls below a certain minimum detectable velocity. Hence, to avoid detection enemy targets deliberately stop for some time before moving again. When targets perform move-stop-move maneuvers, a missed detection of a target by the radar leads to an ambiguity as to whether it is because the target has stopped or due to the probability of detection being less than one. A solution to track move-stop-move target tracking is based on the variable structure interacting multiple model (VS-IMM) estimator in an ideal scenario (single target tracking with no false measurements) has been proposed. This solution did not consider the data association problem. Another solution, called two-dummy solution, considered the data association explicitly and proposed a solution based on the multiframe assignment algorithm. This solution is computationally expensive, especially when the scenario is complex (e.g., high target density) or when one wants to perform high dimensional assignment. In this paper, we propose an efficient multiframe assignment-based solution that considers the second dummy measurement as a real measurement than a dummy. The proposed algorithm builds a less complex assignment hypothesis tree, and, as a result, is more efficient in terms of computational resource requirement.

  12. Averaging Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Iain A.; Robbers, Georg; Behrend, Juliane E-mail: G.Robbers@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2009-04-15

    The cosmological backreaction arises when one directly averages the Einstein equations to recover an effective Robertson-Walker cosmology, rather than assuming a background a priori. While usually discussed in the context of dark energy, strictly speaking any cosmological model should be recovered from such a procedure. We apply the scalar spatial averaging formalism for the first time to linear Robertson-Walker universes containing matter, radiation and dark energy. The formalism employed is general and incorporates systems of multiple fluids with ease, allowing us to consider quantitatively the universe from deep radiation domination up to the present day in a natural, unified manner. Employing modified Boltzmann codes we evaluate numerically the discrepancies between the assumed and the averaged behaviour arising from the quadratic terms, finding the largest deviations for an Einstein-de Sitter universe, increasing rapidly with Hubble rate to a 0.01% effect for h = 0.701. For the {Lambda}CDM concordance model, the backreaction is of the order of {Omega}{sub eff}{sup 0} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, with those for dark energy models being within a factor of two or three. The impacts at recombination are of the order of 10{sup -8} and those in deep radiation domination asymptote to a constant value. While the effective equations of state of the backreactions in Einstein-de Sitter, concordance and quintessence models are generally dust-like, a backreaction with an equation of state w{sub eff} < -1/3 can be found for strongly phantom models.

  13. Ensemble averaging of acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanski, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program called Ensemble Averaging of Acoustic Data is documented. The program samples analog data, analyzes the data, and displays them in the time and frequency domains. Hard copies of the displays are the program's output. The documentation includes a description of the program and detailed user instructions for the program. This software was developed for use on the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel's Dynamic Analysis System consisting of a PDP-11/45 computer, two RK05 disk drives, a tektronix 611 keyboard/display terminal, and FPE-4 Fourier Processing Element, and an analog-to-digital converter.

  14. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  15. Track segment association for ground moving targets with evasive move-stop-move maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2010-04-01

    In a real tracking system, track breakages can occur due to highly maneuvering targets, low detection probability, or clutter. Previously, a track segment association approach (TSA) was developed for an airborne early warning (AEW) system to improve track continuity by"stitching" broken track segments pertaining to the same target. However, this technique cannot provide satisfactory association performance in tracking with a GMTI radar ground moving targets employing evasive move-stop-move maneuvers. To avoid detection by a GMTI radar, targets can deliberately stop for some time before moving again. Since a GMTI radar does not detect a target when the radial velocity (along the line-of-sight from the sensor) falls below a certain minimum detectable velocity (MDV), the move-stop-move maneuvers of the targets usually lead to broken tracks as a result. We present a new TSA technique which employs a dummy track to formulate a complete association. By using an IMM estimator with state-dependent mode transition probabilities (IMM-SDP) for track segment prediction (forward and backward), the proposed algorithm can effectively stitch both "regular" broken tracks and broken tracks due to targets' move-stop-move maneuvers. Comparisons are given to show the advantages of the proposed algorithm in broken tracks reduction and track continuity improvement.

  16. Possible Functional Moving Toes Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Lamichhane, Dronacharya; Shulman, Lisa; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Moving toes syndrome has been classically described as an organic movement disorder, on occasion related to peripheral nerve injuries. The association between nerve trauma and movement disorders has become a controversial topic, and the functional etiology of moving toes syndrome has recently been proposed. Case Report We describe two cases of moving toes syndrome with clinical features typically suggestive of a functional movement disorder. Discussion The presence of entrainability and distractibility in the described patients is an indication of attentional influences on their involuntary movements. However, it is possible that if there is a subcortical origin, the toe movements could be influenced by voluntary commands. PMID:27144090

  17. A freely-moving monkey treadmill model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Justin D.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Freifeld, Oren; Gao, Hua; Walker, Ross; Ryu, Stephen I.; Meng, Teresa H.; Murmann, Boris; Black, Michael J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Motor neuroscience and brain-machine interface (BMI) design is based on examining how the brain controls voluntary movement, typically by recording neural activity and behavior from animal models. Recording technologies used with these animal models have traditionally limited the range of behaviors that can be studied, and thus the generality of science and engineering research. We aim to design a freely-moving animal model using neural and behavioral recording technologies that do not constrain movement. Approach. We have established a freely-moving rhesus monkey model employing technology that transmits neural activity from an intracortical array using a head-mounted device and records behavior through computer vision using markerless motion capture. We demonstrate the flexibility and utility of this new monkey model, including the first recordings from motor cortex while rhesus monkeys walk quadrupedally on a treadmill. Main results. Using this monkey model, we show that multi-unit threshold-crossing neural activity encodes the phase of walking and that the average firing rate of the threshold crossings covaries with the speed of individual steps. On a population level, we find that neural state-space trajectories of walking at different speeds have similar rotational dynamics in some dimensions that evolve at the step rate of walking, yet robustly separate by speed in other state-space dimensions. Significance. Freely-moving animal models may allow neuroscientists to examine a wider range of behaviors and can provide a flexible experimental paradigm for examining the neural mechanisms that underlie movement generation across behaviors and environments. For BMIs, freely-moving animal models have the potential to aid prosthetic design by examining how neural encoding changes with posture, environment and other real-world context changes. Understanding this new realm of behavior in more naturalistic settings is essential for overall progress of basic

  18. Slow-moving vehicles in Swedish traffic.

    PubMed

    Pinzke, S; Lundqvist, P

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of accidents on Swedish roads involving slow-moving vehicles and to suggest ways of preventing such accidents. We analyzed accident data from a 5-year period (1992-1996) involving all types of farm vehicles as well as horses and horse-drawn vehicles. During each year of the period under investigation, slow-moving vehicles were involved in more than 250 traffic accidents on Swedish roads, and an average of 10 people were killed, 66 sustained serious injuries, and 192 sustained slight injuries. This was about 1.3% of all persons injured in traffic accidents in Sweden. The deaths and injuries mostly involved car drivers and passengers. Tractor drivers and unprotected road users (people walking or traveling by motorcycle, moped, or bicycle) also sustained serious injuries and deaths. Vehicles overtaking slow-moving vehicles from behind were the most common type of accident (30%), followed by turning accidents (27%), accidents at crossroads (26%), and with oncoming vehicles (17%). To strengthen the suggestions for improvement, a questionnaire was sent out to driving school teachers in Sweden. Subjects were asked about their experiences with farm vehicles on the roads and their suggestions for ways to increase traffic safety. Based on the accident data and the questionnaire responses, we developed several suggestions for reducing road accidents, including measures for making farm vehicles more visible, improvement of the training provided at driving schools, and information campaigns directed at drivers of farm vehicles and other road users. Further in-depth research is needed to analyze road accidents involving slow-moving vehicles and to test different intervention measures. PMID:15216651

  19. Mobile Launcher Moves for Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    In anticipation of launching NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket later in this decade, engineers wanted to check the mobile launcher, or ML, to see how it would behave moving atop a craw...

  20. Rehabilitation Counselor Certification: Moving Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jodi L.; Barros-Bailey, Mary; Chapman, Cindy; Nunez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification and presents recent changes and strategic goals for moving forward. Challenges and opportunities for the profession in relation to certification are also discussed. (Contains 3 tables.)

  1. Geodesic estimation for large deformation anatomical shape averaging and interpolation.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian; Gee, James C

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this research is to promote variational methods for anatomical averaging that operate within the space of the underlying image registration problem. This approach is effective when using the large deformation viscous framework, where linear averaging is not valid, or in the elastic case. The theory behind this novel atlas building algorithm is similar to the traditional pairwise registration problem, but with single image forces replaced by average forces. These group forces drive an average transport ordinary differential equation allowing one to estimate the geodesic that moves an image toward the mean shape configuration. This model gives large deformation atlases that are optimal with respect to the shape manifold as defined by the data and the image registration assumptions. We use the techniques in the large deformation context here, but they also pertain to small deformation atlas construction. Furthermore, a natural, inherently inverse consistent image registration is gained for free, as is a tool for constant arc length geodesic shape interpolation. The geodesic atlas creation algorithm is quantitatively compared to the Euclidean anatomical average to elucidate the need for optimized atlases. The procedures generate improved average representations of highly variable anatomy from distinct populations. PMID:15501083

  2. Moving Shadows, Moving Sun. Early Modem Sundials Restaging Miracles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Irrespective of geo- or heliocentric presuppositions, the functioning of sundials is based on the observation of moving shadows or light spots. Even though the cast shadow was often simply used to indicate the time, it could also remind the users of the ephemerality of earthly things or function as an index of planetary movements. This article examines the various ways in which early modem sundials visually interpret the moving shadow or light spot. The instruments address the shadow in inscriptions, integrate it into their design (e.g., in cruciform dials) or even manipulate its course (as in the so-called Horologium Ahaz). Both the crucifix and the Ahaz dials not only refer to astronomical miracles but actually restage them. Even though by means of the horologium it was not possible to explain the Old Testament miracle of the shadow moving backward, adepts were able to recreate it on a terrestrial scale. PMID:26495586

  3. Remote moving target indication assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to design and test key components of a sensor to be used on remotely piloted vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for the detection of moving vehicles in cluttered backgrounds. The proposed sensor uses modern large-array focal planes to provide multiple infrared observations of moving targets and capable on-board computers to integrate multiple observations to detect moving targets in background clutter. This combination reduces the size, weight, and cost of the sensor to levels that can be flown on many small unmanned platforms. This effort selected the actual components, integrated them into a test bed, tested the performance of the sensor against realistic generated scenes, and designed a proof-of-concept prototype.

  4. Move!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Bronwen

    Designed as a practical guide for teachers, this handbook presents ways of introducing drama and movement into secondary school curricula. A basic program for a movement class is offered, based on three objectives: one's own movement, secondary or underlying motives, and the balance of freedom and discipline. In the first section of the book,…

  5. SEEDS Moving Group Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, Michael

    2011-01-01

    I will summarize the current status of the SEEDS Moving Group category and describe the importance of this sub-sample for the entire SEEDS survey. This presentation will include analysis of the sensitivity for the Moving Groups with general a comparison to other the other sub-categories. I will discuss the future impact of the Subaru SCExAO system for these targets and the advantage of using a specialized integral field spectrograph. Finally, I will present the impact of a pupil grid mask in order to produce fiducial spots in the focal plane that can be used for both photometry and astrometry.

  6. Radiography of Chaotically Moving Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrik, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin

    2007-11-26

    Radiography of moving objects is an advanced problem when the dynamic range of acquired radiograms is restricted by a limited exposition time. Exposition time has to be short to avoid image blurring due to object moving. It is possible to increase the dynamic range by summing short time radiograms set when the periodical object movement is presented as in the case of heart beating for instance. On the other hand a non periodical movement can be studied using tools of X-ray Digital Image Correlation technique. Short time radiograms are fitted into corresponding positions and consequently summed for higher data statistics as it is presented in this work.

  7. Calibration of moving puncture simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, Bernd; González, José A.; Hannam, Mark; Husa, Sascha; Sperhake, Ulrich; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    We present single and binary black-hole simulations that follow the “moving-puncture” paradigm of simulating black-hole spacetimes without excision, and use “moving boxes” mesh refinement. Focusing on binary black-hole configurations where the simulations cover roughly two orbits, we address five major issues determining the quality of our results: numerical discretization error, finite extraction radius of the radiation signal, physical appropriateness of initial data, gauge choice, and computational performance. We also compare results we have obtained with the BAM code described here with the independent LEAN code.

  8. Hybrid Heat Capacity - Moving Slab Laser Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A

    2002-04-01

    A hybrid configuration of a heat capacity laser (HCL) and a moving slab laser (MSL) has been studied. Multiple volumes of solid-state laser material are sequentially diode-pumped and their energy extracted. When a volume reaches a maximum temperature after a ''sub-magazine depth'', it is moved out of the pumping region into a cooling region, and a new volume is introduced. The total magazine depth equals the submagazine depth times the number of volumes. The design parameters are chosen to provide high duty factor operation, resulting in effective use of the diode arrays. The concept significantly reduces diode array cost over conventional heat capacity lasers, and it is considered enabling for many potential applications. A conceptual design study of the hybrid configuration has been carried out. Three concepts were evaluated using CAD tools. The concepts are described and their relative merits discussed. Because of reduced disk size and diode cost, the hybrid concept may allow scaling to average powers on the order of 0.5 MW/module.

  9. Hurricane Irene on the Move

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from August 25, 2011, at 9:40 a.m. EDT to August 27 at 9:40 a.m. EDT. The animations show Hurricane Irene moving through the Bahamas and making land...

  10. Experimental Introduction to Moving Bodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lars Ostrup; Justesen, Uffe

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment--a marble rolling on a tilted desk--to introduce students to moving bodies. Makes difficult subjects such as measurement, calculus, modeling, and uncertainty easier to identify by putting them into a simple context. Discusses misconceptions, models, and measurements. (JRH)

  11. Planning for the Collection Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene S.

    When professional movers are hired to move a library collection, drawing up written specifications becomes the most important part of the planning process. Specifications explain exactly what needs to be done, form the basis for a legal contract, and provide the basis for determining the cost of the job. Precision is an important component of…

  12. Friction in a Moving Car

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an out-of-doors, partially unstructured experiment to determine the coefficient of friction for a moving car. Presents the equation which relates the coefficient of friction to initial velocity, distance, and time and gives sample computed values as a function of initial speed and tire pressure. (GS)

  13. Detecting Positioning Errors and Estimating Correct Positions by Moving Window

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ha Yoon; Lee, Jun Seok

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, improvements in smart mobile devices have led to new functionalities related to their embedded positioning abilities. Many related applications that use positioning data have been introduced and are widely being used. However, the positioning data acquired by such devices are prone to erroneous values caused by environmental factors. In this research, a detection algorithm is implemented to detect erroneous data over a continuous positioning data set with several options. Our algorithm is based on a moving window for speed values derived by consecutive positioning data. Both the moving average of the speed and standard deviation in a moving window compose a moving significant interval at a given time, which is utilized to detect erroneous positioning data along with other parameters by checking the newly obtained speed value. In order to fulfill the designated operation, we need to examine the physical parameters and also determine the parameters for the moving windows. Along with the detection of erroneous speed data, estimations of correct positioning are presented. The proposed algorithm first estimates the speed, and then the correct positions. In addition, it removes the effect of errors on the moving window statistics in order to maintain accuracy. Experimental verifications based on our algorithm are presented in various ways. We hope that our approach can help other researchers with regard to positioning applications and human mobility research. PMID:26624282

  14. The Effect of Direction on Cursor Moving Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ling-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Yung; Lu, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Ming-Chung; Chu, Chi-Nung

    2012-01-01

    There have been only few studies to substantiate the kinematic characteristics of cursor movement. In this study, a quantitative experimental research method was used to explore the effect of moving direction on the kinematics of cursor movement in 24 typical young persons using our previously developed computerized measuring program. The results of multiple one way repeated measures ANOVAs and post hoc LSD tests demonstrated that the moving direction had effects on average velocity, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. Moving leftward showed better efficiency than moving rightward, upward and downward from the kinematic evidences such as velocity, movement unit and time. Moreover, the unique pattern of the power spectral density (PSD) of velocity (strategy for power application) explained why the smoothness was still maintained while moving leftward even under an unstable situation with larger momentum. Moreover, the information from this cursor moving study can guide us to relocate the toolbars and icons in the window interface, especially for individuals with physical disabilities whose performances are easily interrupted while controlling the cursor in specific directions. PMID:22438745

  15. Detecting Positioning Errors and Estimating Correct Positions by Moving Window.

    PubMed

    Song, Ha Yoon; Lee, Jun Seok

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, improvements in smart mobile devices have led to new functionalities related to their embedded positioning abilities. Many related applications that use positioning data have been introduced and are widely being used. However, the positioning data acquired by such devices are prone to erroneous values caused by environmental factors. In this research, a detection algorithm is implemented to detect erroneous data over a continuous positioning data set with several options. Our algorithm is based on a moving window for speed values derived by consecutive positioning data. Both the moving average of the speed and standard deviation in a moving window compose a moving significant interval at a given time, which is utilized to detect erroneous positioning data along with other parameters by checking the newly obtained speed value. In order to fulfill the designated operation, we need to examine the physical parameters and also determine the parameters for the moving windows. Along with the detection of erroneous speed data, estimations of correct positioning are presented. The proposed algorithm first estimates the speed, and then the correct positions. In addition, it removes the effect of errors on the moving window statistics in order to maintain accuracy. Experimental verifications based on our algorithm are presented in various ways. We hope that our approach can help other researchers with regard to positioning applications and human mobility research. PMID:26624282

  16. Below-Average, Average, and Above-Average Readers Engage Different and Similar Brain Regions while Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molfese, Dennis L.; Key, Alexandra Fonaryova; Kelly, Spencer; Cunningham, Natalie; Terrell, Shona; Ferguson, Melissa; Molfese, Victoria J.; Bonebright, Terri

    2006-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 27 children (14 girls, 13 boys) who varied in their reading skill levels. Both behavior performance measures recorded during the ERP word classification task and the ERP responses themselves discriminated between children with above-average, average, and below-average reading skills. ERP…

  17. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  18. Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Emily L C; Ross, Andrew N; Portugal, Steven J

    2016-09-26

    One of the defining features of the aerial environment is its variability; air is almost never still. This has profound consequences for flying animals, affecting their flight stability, speed selection, energy expenditure and choice of flight path. All these factors have important implications for the ecology of flying animals, and the ecosystems they interact with, as well as providing bio-inspiration for the development of unmanned aerial vehicles. In this introduction, we touch on the factors that drive the variability in airflows, the scales of variability and the degree to which given airflows may be predictable. We then summarize how papers in this volume advance our understanding of the sensory, biomechanical, physiological and behavioural responses of animals to air flows. Overall, this provides insight into how flying animals can be so successful in this most fickle of environments.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528772

  19. A 4-Day Work Week That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kenneth; Timmerman, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Describes Navarro College's (Corsicana, TX) program to reduce kilowatt hour consumption through alternative energy sources and energy costs through transition to a four-day/40-hour work week. Presents results of studies of employee performance levels, community response, and the cost effectiveness of the program. Lists benefits for the student,…

  20. Spatiotemporal averaging of perceived brightness along an apparent motion trajectory.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takehiro; Beer, R Dirk; Krizay, Erin A; Macleod, Donald I A

    2011-01-01

    Objects are critical functional units for many aspects of visual perception and recognition. Many psychophysical experiments support the concept of an "object file" consisting of characteristics attributed to a single object on the basis of successive views of it, but there has been little evidence that object identity influences apparent brightness and color. In this study, we investigated whether the perceptual identification of successive flashed stimuli as views of a single moving object could affect brightness perception. Our target stimulus was composed of eight wedge-shaped sectors. The sectors were presented successively at different inter-flash intervals along an annular trajectory. At inter-flash intervals of around 100 ms, the impression was of a single moving object undergoing long-range apparent motion. By modulating the luminance between successive views, we measured the perception of luminance modulation along the trajectory of this long-range apparent motion. At the inter-flash intervals where the motion perception was strongest, the luminance difference was perceptually underestimated, and forced-choice luminance discrimination thresholds were elevated. Moreover, under such conditions, it became difficult for the observer to correctly associate or "bind" spatial positions and wedge luminances. These results indicate that the different luminances of wedges that were perceived as a single object were averaged along its apparent motion trajectory. The large spatial step size of our stimulus makes it unlikely that the results could be explained by averaging in a low-level mechanism that has a compact spatiotemporal receptive field (such as V1 and V2 neurons); higher level global motion or object mechanisms must be invoked to account for the averaging effect. The luminance averaging and the ambiguity of position-luminance "binding" suggest that the visual system may evade some of the costs of rapidly computing apparent brightness by adopting the

  1. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... averaging plan is in compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if...

  2. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... averaging plan is in compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if...

  3. RHIC BPM system average orbit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff,R.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Hulsart, R.; et al.

    2009-05-04

    RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system average orbit was originally calculated by averaging positions of 10000 consecutive turns for a single selected bunch. Known perturbations in RHIC particle trajectories, with multiple frequencies around 10 Hz, contribute to observed average orbit fluctuations. In 2006, the number of turns for average orbit calculations was made programmable; this was used to explore averaging over single periods near 10 Hz. Although this has provided an average orbit signal quality improvement, an average over many periods would further improve the accuracy of the measured closed orbit. A new continuous average orbit calculation was developed just prior to the 2009 RHIC run and was made operational in March 2009. This paper discusses the new algorithm and performance with beam.

  4. Spectral averaging techniques for Jacobi matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Rafael del; Martinez, Carmen; Schulz-Baldes, Hermann

    2008-02-15

    Spectral averaging techniques for one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operators are revisited and extended. In particular, simultaneous averaging over several parameters is discussed. Special focus is put on proving lower bounds on the density of the averaged spectral measures. These Wegner-type estimates are used to analyze stability properties for the spectral types of Jacobi matrices under local perturbations.

  5. Averaging and Adding in Children's Worth Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlottmann, Anne; Harman, Rachel M.; Paine, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Under the normative Expected Value (EV) model, multiple outcomes are additive, but in everyday worth judgement intuitive averaging prevails. Young children also use averaging in EV judgements, leading to a disordinal, crossover violation of utility when children average the part worths of simple gambles involving independent events (Schlottmann,…

  6. Moving belt radiator development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The ralative merits of Solid Belt (SBR), Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  7. The moving mesh code SHADOWFAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the moving mesh code SHADOWFAX, which can be used to evolve a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. The code is written in C++ and its source code is made available to the scientific community under the GNU Affero General Public Licence. We outline the algorithm and the design of our implementation, and demonstrate its validity through the results of a set of basic test problems, which are also part of the public version. We also compare SHADOWFAX with a number of other publicly available codes using different hydrodynamical integration schemes, illustrating the advantages and disadvantages of the moving mesh technique.

  8. Moved by a Rapid Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueter, C.

    2013-04-01

    Enticing by virtue of its predictability, historical utility, and spectacle, the transit of Venus is a niche event among astronomical phenomena. Though the value of a transit for scientific purposes is now diminished, the brief appearance of Venus silhouetted against the background of the Sun in 2004 moved the artistic community to celebrate the rare alignment. Artists of all ages combined old traditions with fresh technology to create a 21st-century tapestry of music, sculpture, paintings, glasswork, quilts, sky shows, and digital imagery. A full catalog of transit-related art generated over the centuries would feature the sampling of entries presented here and at the Moved by a Rapid Transit website.

  9. Effects of the applications of oil drip onto surface and of the use of a temperature of 35°C for 4 days on some physicochemical, microbiological and sensory characteristics of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Molinero, F; Arnau, J

    2014-10-01

    The effects of: a) applications of oil drip (from aged salted pork fat) onto dry-cured ham surface and b) application of a temperature of 35°C for 4days after 234days of processing (HTST treatment) were evaluated. The oil application reduced moisture, proteolysis and white film in semimembranosus, microbial counts in adductor and the intensity of hollow extent, toasted flavour, adhesiveness, pastiness (in semimembranosus) and chewiness (in semimembranosus and biceps femoris) and increased the intensity of nutty flavour (in both muscles), aged flavour, hardness, fibrousness and overall liking (in semimembranosus). The HTST did not affect any ham characteristics. PMID:24906185

  10. Averaging procedures for flow within vegetation canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, M. R.; Shaw, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Most one-dimensional models of flow within vegetation canopies are based on horizontally averaged flow variables. This paper formalizes the horizontal averaging operation. Two averaging schemes are considered: pure horizontal averaging at a single instant, and time averaging followed by horizontal averaging. These schemes produce different forms for the mean and turbulent kinetic energy balances, and especially for the ‘wake production’ term describing the transfer of energy from large-scale motion to wake turbulence by form drag. The differences are primarily due to the appearance, in the covariances produced by the second scheme, of dispersive components arising from the spatial correlation of time-averaged flow variables. The two schemes are shown to coincide if these dispersive fluxes vanish.

  11. Average rate of phenological changes in Poland according to climatic changes - evaluation and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatczak, K.; Walawender, J.

    2009-10-01

    The main objective of this study was evaluation and mapping of an average rate of phenological changes for example special plant s indicators as a result of climatic changes in Poland. Multi-year analysis clearly showed a tendency to earlier onset of spring events. The average advance of flowering/leafing was -1.4 days/decade and -2.4 days/1°C. Whereas the response of autumn phenophases was ambiguous. Phenological and climate data come from archives of the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management. Analysis covered the period of 1951-1992. The relation between temperature and date of phenophases was described with Pearson's linear regression model. Statistical significance of the model parameters was checked with Student's t-test at the following levels: 0.05, 0.01, and 0.001. The results were visualised on maps. ArcGIS 9.2 Geostatistical Analyst was used to examine the data and create prediction maps. Numerous tests were performed in order to find an appropriate method of spatial interpolation. Finally kriging was chosen as the most precise.

  12. Investigation of the moving structures in a coronal bright point

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Zongjun; Guo, Yang

    2014-10-10

    We have explored the moving structures in a coronal bright point (CBP) observed by the Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 March 5. This CBP event has a lifetime of ∼20 minutes and is bright with a curved shape along a magnetic loop connecting a pair of negative and positive fields. AIA imaging observations show that a lot of bright structures are moving intermittently along the loop legs toward the two footpoints from the CBP brightness core. Such moving bright structures are clearly seen at AIA 304 Å. In order to analyze their features, the CBP is cut along the motion direction with a curved slit which is wide enough to cover the bulk of the CBP. After integrating the flux along the slit width, we get the spacetime slices at nine AIA wavelengths. The oblique streaks starting from the edge of the CBP brightness core are identified as moving bright structures, especially on the derivative images of the brightness spacetime slices. They seem to originate from the same position near the loop top. We find that these oblique streaks are bi-directional, simultaneous, symmetrical, and periodic. The average speed is about 380 km s{sup –1}, and the period is typically between 80 and 100 s. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation shows the possibility that magnetic reconnection takes place during the CBP, and our findings indicate that these moving bright structures could be the observational outflows after magnetic reconnection in the CBP.

  13. Average-cost based robust structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of robust controllers for linear time invariant structural systems with parameterized uncertainty. The method involves minimizing quantities related to the quadratic cost (H2-norm) averaged over a set of systems described by real parameters such as natural frequencies and modal residues. Bounded average cost is shown to imply stability over the set of systems. Approximations for the exact average are derived and proposed as cost functionals. The properties of these approximate average cost functionals are established. The exact average and approximate average cost functionals are used to derive dynamic controllers which can provide stability robustness. The robustness properties of these controllers are demonstrated in illustrative numerical examples and tested in a simple SISO experiment on the MIT multi-point alignment testbed.

  14. Averaging of Backscatter Intensities in Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, John J.; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Low uncertainty measurements on pure element stable isotope pairs demonstrate that mass has no influence on the backscattering of electrons at typical electron microprobe energies. The traditional prediction of average backscatter intensities in compounds using elemental mass fractions is improperly grounded in mass and thus has no physical basis. We propose an alternative model to mass fraction averaging, based of the number of electrons or protons, termed “electron fraction,” which predicts backscatter yield better than mass fraction averaging.

  15. Neutron resonance averaging with filtered beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron resonance averaging using filtered beams from a reactor source has proven to be an effective nuclear structure tool within certain limitations. These limitations are imposed by the nature of the averaging process, which produces fluctuations in radiative intensities. The fluctuations have been studied quantitatively. Resonance averaging also gives us information about initial or capture state parameters, in particular the photon strength function. Suitable modifications of the filtered beams are suggested for the enhancement of non-resonant processes.

  16. Spatial limitations in averaging social cues.

    PubMed

    Florey, Joseph; Clifford, Colin W G; Dakin, Steven; Mareschal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The direction of social attention from groups provides stronger cueing than from an individual. It has previously been shown that both basic visual features such as size or orientation and more complex features such as face emotion and identity can be averaged across multiple elements. Here we used an equivalent noise procedure to compare observers' ability to average social cues with their averaging of a non-social cue. Estimates of observers' internal noise (uncertainty associated with processing any individual) and sample-size (the effective number of gaze-directions pooled) were derived by fitting equivalent noise functions to discrimination thresholds. We also used reverse correlation analysis to estimate the spatial distribution of samples used by participants. Averaging of head-rotation and cone-rotation was less noisy and more efficient than averaging of gaze direction, though presenting only the eye region of faces at a larger size improved gaze averaging performance. The reverse correlation analysis revealed greater sampling areas for head rotation compared to gaze. We attribute these differences in averaging between gaze and head cues to poorer visual processing of faces in the periphery. The similarity between head and cone averaging are examined within the framework of a general mechanism for averaging of object rotation. PMID:27573589

  17. Spectral and parametric averaging for integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tao; Serota, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze two theoretical approaches to ensemble averaging for integrable systems in quantum chaos, spectral averaging (SA) and parametric averaging (PA). For SA, we introduce a new procedure, namely, rescaled spectral averaging (RSA). Unlike traditional SA, it can describe the correlation function of spectral staircase (CFSS) and produce persistent oscillations of the interval level number variance (IV). PA while not as accurate as RSA for the CFSS and IV, can also produce persistent oscillations of the global level number variance (GV) and better describes saturation level rigidity as a function of the running energy. Overall, it is the most reliable method for a wide range of statistics.

  18. Spatial limitations in averaging social cues

    PubMed Central

    Florey, Joseph; Clifford, Colin W. G.; Dakin, Steven; Mareschal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The direction of social attention from groups provides stronger cueing than from an individual. It has previously been shown that both basic visual features such as size or orientation and more complex features such as face emotion and identity can be averaged across multiple elements. Here we used an equivalent noise procedure to compare observers’ ability to average social cues with their averaging of a non-social cue. Estimates of observers’ internal noise (uncertainty associated with processing any individual) and sample-size (the effective number of gaze-directions pooled) were derived by fitting equivalent noise functions to discrimination thresholds. We also used reverse correlation analysis to estimate the spatial distribution of samples used by participants. Averaging of head-rotation and cone-rotation was less noisy and more efficient than averaging of gaze direction, though presenting only the eye region of faces at a larger size improved gaze averaging performance. The reverse correlation analysis revealed greater sampling areas for head rotation compared to gaze. We attribute these differences in averaging between gaze and head cues to poorer visual processing of faces in the periphery. The similarity between head and cone averaging are examined within the framework of a general mechanism for averaging of object rotation. PMID:27573589

  19. An empirical investigation on the forecasting ability of mallows model averaging in a macro economic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yip Chee; Hock-Eam, Lim

    2012-09-01

    This paper investigates the forecasting ability of Mallows Model Averaging (MMA) by conducting an empirical analysis of five Asia countries, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and China's GDP growth rate. Results reveal that MMA has no noticeable differences in predictive ability compared to the general autoregressive fractional integrated moving average model (ARFIMA) and its predictive ability is sensitive to the effect of financial crisis. MMA could be an alternative forecasting method for samples without recent outliers such as financial crisis.

  20. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical

  1. Senior Living: Staying Positive and Moving Forward

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Feature: Senior Living Staying Positive and Moving Forward Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... Living / Long Distance Caregiving / Staying Positive and Moving Forward / Former WWII Fighter Pilot Finds New Home Near ...

  2. Preparing Your Child for a Move

    MedlinePlus

    ... certificate, and medical records. previous continue Moving With Teens It's common for teens to actively rebel against a move. Your teen has probably invested considerable energy in a particular ...

  3. Whatever Happened to the Average Student?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Mandated state testing, college entrance exams and their perceived need for higher and higher grade point averages have raised the anxiety levels felt by many of the average students. Too much focus is placed on state test scores and college entrance standards with not enough focus on the true level of the students. The author contends that…

  4. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... averaging. (a) General. The owner or operator of an existing potline or anode bake furnace in a State that... by total aluminum production. (c) Anode bake furnaces. The owner or operator may average TF emissions from anode bake furnaces and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 3 of this subpart...

  5. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... averaging. (a) General. The owner or operator of an existing potline or anode bake furnace in a State that... by total aluminum production. (c) Anode bake furnaces. The owner or operator may average TF emissions from anode bake furnaces and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 3 of this subpart...

  6. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emissions averaging. 76.11 Section 76.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General provisions. In lieu of complying with the...

  7. A note on generalized averaged Gaussian formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalevic, Miodrag

    2007-11-01

    We have recently proposed a very simple numerical method for constructing the averaged Gaussian quadrature formulas. These formulas exist in many more cases than the real positive Gauss?Kronrod formulas. In this note we try to answer whether the averaged Gaussian formulas are an adequate alternative to the corresponding Gauss?Kronrod quadrature formulas, to estimate the remainder term of a Gaussian rule.

  8. Determinants of College Grade Point Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Paul Dean

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 2: The Role of Class Difficulty in College Grade Point Averages. Grade Point Averages (GPAs) are widely used as a measure of college students' ability. Low GPAs can remove a students from eligibility for scholarships, and even continued enrollment at a university. However, GPAs are determined not only by student ability but also by…

  9. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator may average TF emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 1 of... operator also may average POM emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 2... limit in Table 1 of this subpart (for TF emissions) and/or Table 2 of this subpart (for POM...

  10. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator may average TF emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 1 of... operator also may average POM emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 2... limit in Table 1 of this subpart (for TF emissions) and/or Table 2 of this subpart (for POM...

  11. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operator may average TF emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 1 of... operator also may average POM emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 2... limit in Table 1 of this subpart (for TF emissions) and/or Table 2 of this subpart (for POM...

  12. Average Transmission Probability of a Random Stack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Yin; Miniatura, Christian; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2010-01-01

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower…

  13. New results on averaging theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, Murilo R.; Llibre, Jaume

    2016-08-01

    The usual averaging theory reduces the computation of some periodic solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations, to find the simple zeros of an associated averaged function. When one of these zeros is not simple, i.e., the Jacobian of the averaged function in it is zero, the classical averaging theory does not provide information about the periodic solution associated to a non-simple zero. Here we provide sufficient conditions in order that the averaging theory can be applied also to non-simple zeros for studying their associated periodic solutions. Additionally, we do two applications of this new result for studying the zero-Hopf bifurcation in the Lorenz system and in the Fitzhugh-Nagumo system.

  14. The Hubble rate in averaged cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Umeh, Obinna; Larena, Julien; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: julien.larena@gmail.com

    2011-03-01

    The calculation of the averaged Hubble expansion rate in an averaged perturbed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology leads to small corrections to the background value of the expansion rate, which could be important for measuring the Hubble constant from local observations. It also predicts an intrinsic variance associated with the finite scale of any measurement of H{sub 0}, the Hubble rate today. Both the mean Hubble rate and its variance depend on both the definition of the Hubble rate and the spatial surface on which the average is performed. We quantitatively study different definitions of the averaged Hubble rate encountered in the literature by consistently calculating the backreaction effect at second order in perturbation theory, and compare the results. We employ for the first time a recently developed gauge-invariant definition of an averaged scalar. We also discuss the variance of the Hubble rate for the different definitions.

  15. Short-Term Auditory Memory of Above-Average and Below-Average Grade Three Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruk, Joan Marie

    To determine if performance on short term auditory memory tasks is influenced by reading ability or sex differences, 62 third grade reading students (16 above average boys, 16 above average girls, 16 below average boys, and 14 below average girls) were administered four memory tests--memory for consonant names, memory for words, memory for…

  16. Construction and Validation of a Computer-Based Diagnostic Module on Average Velocity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andaloro, G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study designed to identify the various reasoning procedures used by students (n=229) in comparing the average velocities of two moving bodies; compare the differences among the procedures used by students at different school levels; and analyze the relationship between automatic and human diagnoses to identify diagnostic errors of the…

  17. Microscopic features of moving traffic jams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hiller, Andreas; Rehborn, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    Empirical and numerical microscopic features of moving traffic jams are presented. Based on a single vehicle data analysis, it is found that within wide moving jams, i.e., between the upstream and downstream jam fronts there is a complex microscopic spatiotemporal structure. This jam structure consists of alternations of regions in which traffic flow is interrupted and flow states of low speeds associated with “moving blanks” within the jam. Moving blanks within a wide moving jam resemble electron holes in the valence band of semiconductors: As the moving blanks that propagate upstream appear due to downstream vehicle motion within the jam, so appearance of electron holes moving with the electric field results from electron motion against the electric field in the valence band of semiconductors. Empirical features of moving blanks are found. Based on microscopic models in the context of the Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory, physical reasons for moving blanks emergence within wide moving jams are disclosed. Microscopic nonlinear effects of moving jam emergence, propagation, and dissolution as well as a diverse variety of hysteresis effects in freeway traffic associated with phase transitions and congested traffic propagation are numerically investigated. Microscopic structure of moving jam fronts is numerically studied and compared with empirical results.

  18. Clarifying the Relationship between Average Excesses and Average Effects of Allele Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Castro, José M; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    Fisher's concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance. PMID:22509178

  19. Acoustic power of a moving point source in a moving medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Sarris, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic power output of a moving point-mass source in an acoustic medium which is in uniform motion and infinite in extent is examined. The acoustic medium is considered to be a homogeneous fluid having both zero viscosity and zero thermal conductivity. Two expressions for the acoustic power output are obtained based on a different definition cited in the literature for the average energy-flux vector in an acoustic medium in uniform motion. The acoustic power output of the source is found by integrating the component of acoustic intensity vector in the radial direction over the surface of an infinitely long cylinder which is within the medium and encloses the line of motion of the source. One of the power expressions is found to give unreasonable results even though the flow is uniform.

  20. Validity of a Self-Administered Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Assessing Amino Acid Intake in Japan: Comparison With Intake From 4-Day Weighed Dietary Records and Plasma Levels

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Motoki; Ishihara, Junko; Takachi, Ribeka; Todoriki, Hidemi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Miyano, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Interest in the physiological roles of amino acids and their impact on health outcomes is substantial and growing. This interest has prompted assessment of the habitual intake of amino acids for use in epidemiologic studies and in clarifying the association between habitual intake and plasma levels of amino acids. Here, we investigated the validity of ranking individuals according to dietary amino acid intake as estimated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in comparison with intakes from dietary records (DRs) and plasma levels. Methods A total of 139 men and women selected from examinees of the cancer screening program at the Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Japan, provided 4-day weighed DRs, a semi-quantitative FFQ, and plasma samples. Plasma levels of amino acids were measured using the UF-Amino Station system. Results Spearman rank correlation coefficients of energy-adjusted intake of amino acids from the DR and FFQ ranged from 0.40 to 0.65 for men and from 0.35 to 0.46 for women. Correlation coefficients of energy-adjusted intake from the DR and plasma levels ranged from −0.40 to 0.25 for men and from −0.16 to 0.11 for women. Similarly, no significant positive correlation coefficients were observed between intake from the FFQ and plasma levels for either men or women. Conclusions We confirmed that this FFQ has moderate validity in estimating amino acid intake when 4-day weighed DRs are used as a reference method, suggesting that it is suitable for ranking individuals living in urban areas in Japan by amino acid intake. PMID:26277881

  1. Collision detection for moving polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Canny, J

    1986-02-01

    We consider the collision-detection problem for a three-dimensional solid object moving among polyhedral obstacles. The configuration space for this problem is six-dimensional, and the traditional representation of the space uses three translational parameters and three angles (typically Euler angles). The constraints between the object and obstacles then involve trigonometric functions. We show that a quaternion representation of rotation yields constraints which are purely algebraic in a seven-dimensional space. By simple manipulation, the constraints may be projected down into a six-dimensional space with no increase in complexity. The algebraic form of the constraints greatly simplifies computation of collision points, and allows us to derive an efficient exact intersection test for an object which is translating and rotating among obstacles. PMID:21869338

  2. Moving frames and prolongation algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential ideals generated by sets of 2-forms which can be written with constant coefficients in a canonical basis of 1-forms are considered. By setting up a Cartan-Ehresmann connection, in a fiber bundle over a base space in which the 2-forms live, one finds an incomplete Lie algebra of vector fields in the fields in the fibers. Conversely, given this algebra (a prolongation algebra), one can derive the differential ideal. The two constructs are thus dual, and analysis of either derives properties of both. Such systems arise in the classical differential geometry of moving frames. Examples of this are discussed, together with examples arising more recently: the Korteweg-de Vries and Harrison-Ernst systems.

  3. Light propagation in the averaged universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Samae; Schwarz, Dominik J. E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2014-10-01

    Cosmic structures determine how light propagates through the Universe and consequently must be taken into account in the interpretation of observations. In the standard cosmological model at the largest scales, such structures are either ignored or treated as small perturbations to an isotropic and homogeneous Universe. This isotropic and homogeneous model is commonly assumed to emerge from some averaging process at the largest scales. We assume that there exists an averaging procedure that preserves the causal structure of space-time. Based on that assumption, we study the effects of averaging the geometry of space-time and derive an averaged version of the null geodesic equation of motion. For the averaged geometry we then assume a flat Friedmann-Lemaître (FL) model and find that light propagation in this averaged FL model is not given by null geodesics of that model, but rather by a modified light propagation equation that contains an effective Hubble expansion rate, which differs from the Hubble rate of the averaged space-time.

  4. Physics of the spatially averaged snowmelt process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Federico E.; Kavvas, M. Levent

    1997-04-01

    It has been recognized that the snowmelt models developed in the past do not fully meet current prediction requirements. Part of the reason is that they do not account for the spatial variation in the dynamics of the spatially heterogeneous snowmelt process. Most of the current physics-based distributed snowmelt models utilize point-location-scale conservation equations which do not represent the spatially varying snowmelt dynamics over a grid area that surrounds a computational node. In this study, to account for the spatial heterogeneity of the snowmelt dynamics, areally averaged mass and energy conservation equations for the snowmelt process are developed. As a first step, energy and mass conservation equations that govern the snowmelt dynamics at a point location are averaged over the snowpack depth, resulting in depth averaged equations (DAE). In this averaging, it is assumed that the snowpack has two layers. Then, the point location DAE are averaged over the snowcover area. To develop the areally averaged equations of the snowmelt physics, we make the fundamental assumption that snowmelt process is spatially ergodic. The snow temperature and the snow density are considered as the stochastic variables. The areally averaged snowmelt equations are obtained in terms of their corresponding ensemble averages. Only the first two moments are considered. A numerical solution scheme (Runge-Kutta) is then applied to solve the resulting system of ordinary differential equations. This equation system is solved for the areal mean and areal variance of snow temperature and of snow density, for the areal mean of snowmelt, and for the areal covariance of snow temperature and snow density. The developed model is tested using Scott Valley (Siskiyou County, California) snowmelt and meteorological data. The performance of the model in simulating the observed areally averaged snowmelt is satisfactory.

  5. Cosmic Inhomogeneities and Averaged Cosmological Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-10-01

    If general relativity (GR) describes the expansion of the Universe, the observed cosmic acceleration implies the existence of a “dark energy.” However, while the Universe is on average homogeneous on large scales, it is inhomogeneous on smaller scales. While GR governs the dynamics of the inhomogeneous Universe, the averaged homogeneous Universe obeys modified Einstein equations. Can such modifications alone explain the acceleration? For a simple generic model with realistic initial conditions, we show the answer to be “no.” Averaging effects negligibly influence the cosmological dynamics.

  6. Average shape of transport-limited aggregates.

    PubMed

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z

    2005-08-12

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry. PMID:16196793

  7. Average Shape of Transport-Limited Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovitch, Benny; Choi, Jaehyuk; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2005-08-01

    We study the relation between stochastic and continuous transport-limited growth models. We derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for the average shape of stochastic aggregates, whose mean-field approximation is the corresponding continuous equation. Focusing on the advection-diffusion-limited aggregation (ADLA) model, we show that the average shape of the stochastic growth is similar, but not identical, to the corresponding continuous dynamics. Similar results should apply to DLA, thus explaining the known discrepancies between average DLA shapes and viscous fingers in a channel geometry.

  8. Nitrification in a vertically moving biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Healy, M G; Prendergast, J

    2006-05-01

    A laboratory continuous feed biofilm reactor, comprising a bulk fluid reactor, a biofilm plastic module, a feed tank, and pneumatic devices and controls, was operated for a total period of 257 days, including seeding time, to treat domestic-strength synthetic wastewater under increasing ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)--N) loading rates, ranging from 0.17+/-0.01 (0.71+/-0.06 gm(-2)d(-1)) to 0.70+/-0.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) (2.9+/-0.1 gm(-2)d(-1)). The biofilm plastic module was moved vertically in and out of the wastewater in continuous cycles. The maximum NH(4)(+)-N removal rate was reached during the maximum loading phase, when a NH(4)(+)--N loading rate of 0.70+/-0.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) (2.9+/-0.1 gm(-2)d(-1)) was applied to the system. During this loading period, the average NH(4)(+)--N removal rate was 0.30+/-0.10 kgm(-3)d(-1) (1.30+/-0.40 gm(-2)d(-1)). PMID:16182437

  9. The role of the harmonic vector average in motion integration

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Alan; Scarfe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The local speeds of object contours vary systematically with the cosine of the angle between the normal component of the local velocity and the global object motion direction. An array of Gabor elements whose speed changes with local spatial orientation in accordance with this pattern can appear to move as a single surface. The apparent direction of motion of plaids and Gabor arrays has variously been proposed to result from feature tracking, vector addition and vector averaging in addition to the geometrically correct global velocity as indicated by the intersection of constraints (IOC) solution. Here a new combination rule, the harmonic vector average (HVA), is introduced, as well as a new algorithm for computing the IOC solution. The vector sum can be discounted as an integration strategy as it increases with the number of elements. The vector average over local vectors that vary in direction always provides an underestimate of the true global speed. The HVA, however, provides the correct global speed and direction for an unbiased sample of local velocities with respect to the global motion direction, as is the case for a simple closed contour. The HVA over biased samples provides an aggregate velocity estimate that can still be combined through an IOC computation to give an accurate estimate of the global velocity, which is not true of the vector average. Psychophysical results for type II Gabor arrays show perceived direction and speed falls close to the IOC direction for Gabor arrays having a wide range of orientations but the IOC prediction fails as the mean orientation shifts away from the global motion direction and the orientation range narrows. In this case perceived velocity generally defaults to the HVA. PMID:24155716

  10. The role of the harmonic vector average in motion integration.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alan; Scarfe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The local speeds of object contours vary systematically with the cosine of the angle between the normal component of the local velocity and the global object motion direction. An array of Gabor elements whose speed changes with local spatial orientation in accordance with this pattern can appear to move as a single surface. The apparent direction of motion of plaids and Gabor arrays has variously been proposed to result from feature tracking, vector addition and vector averaging in addition to the geometrically correct global velocity as indicated by the intersection of constraints (IOC) solution. Here a new combination rule, the harmonic vector average (HVA), is introduced, as well as a new algorithm for computing the IOC solution. The vector sum can be discounted as an integration strategy as it increases with the number of elements. The vector average over local vectors that vary in direction always provides an underestimate of the true global speed. The HVA, however, provides the correct global speed and direction for an unbiased sample of local velocities with respect to the global motion direction, as is the case for a simple closed contour. The HVA over biased samples provides an aggregate velocity estimate that can still be combined through an IOC computation to give an accurate estimate of the global velocity, which is not true of the vector average. Psychophysical results for type II Gabor arrays show perceived direction and speed falls close to the IOC direction for Gabor arrays having a wide range of orientations but the IOC prediction fails as the mean orientation shifts away from the global motion direction and the orientation range narrows. In this case perceived velocity generally defaults to the HVA. PMID:24155716

  11. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if the following...

  12. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if the following...

  13. 40 CFR 91.204 - Averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... offset by positive credits from engine families below the applicable emission standard, as allowed under the provisions of this subpart. Averaging of credits in this manner is used to determine...

  14. Orbit-averaged implicit particle codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, B. I.; Freis, R. P.; Thomas, V.

    1982-03-01

    The merging of orbit-averaged particle code techniques with recently developed implicit methods to perform numerically stable and accurate particle simulations are reported. Implicitness and orbit averaging can extend the applicability of particle codes to the simulation of long time-scale plasma physics phenomena by relaxing time-step and statistical constraints. Difference equations for an electrostatic model are presented, and analyses of the numerical stability of each scheme are given. Simulation examples are presented for a one-dimensional electrostatic model. Schemes are constructed that are stable at large-time step, require fewer particles, and, hence, reduce input-output and memory requirements. Orbit averaging, however, in the unmagnetized electrostatic models tested so far is not as successful as in cases where there is a magnetic field. Methods are suggested in which orbit averaging should achieve more significant improvements in code efficiency.

  15. 40 CFR 89.204 - Averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... may use averaging to offset an emission exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by a NOX FEL... exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by an NMHC+;NOX FEL or a PM FEL above the applicable...

  16. 40 CFR 89.204 - Averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... may use averaging to offset an emission exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by a NOX FEL... exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by an NMHC+;NOX FEL or a PM FEL above the applicable...

  17. 40 CFR 89.204 - Averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... may use averaging to offset an emission exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by a NOX FEL... exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by an NMHC+;NOX FEL or a PM FEL above the applicable...

  18. 40 CFR 89.204 - Averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... may use averaging to offset an emission exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by a NOX FEL... exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by an NMHC+;NOX FEL or a PM FEL above the applicable...

  19. 40 CFR 89.204 - Averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... may use averaging to offset an emission exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by a NOX FEL... exceedance of a nonroad engine family caused by an NMHC+;NOX FEL or a PM FEL above the applicable...

  20. Total-pressure averaging in pulsating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a nonsteady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered with the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles.

  1. Stochastic Averaging of Duhem Hysteretic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YING, Z. G.; ZHU, W. Q.; NI, Y. Q.; KO, J. M.

    2002-06-01

    The response of Duhem hysteretic system to externally and/or parametrically non-white random excitations is investigated by using the stochastic averaging method. A class of integrable Duhem hysteresis models covering many existing hysteresis models is identified and the potential energy and dissipated energy of Duhem hysteretic component are determined. The Duhem hysteretic system under random excitations is replaced equivalently by a non-hysteretic non-linear random system. The averaged Ito's stochastic differential equation for the total energy is derived and the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation associated with the averaged Ito's equation is solved to yield stationary probability density of total energy, from which the statistics of system response can be evaluated. It is observed that the numerical results by using the stochastic averaging method is in good agreement with that from digital simulation.

  2. Geologic analysis of averaged magnetic satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, H. K.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate relative advantages and limitations for quantitative geologic analysis of magnetic satellite scalar anomalies derived from arithmetic averaging of orbital profiles within equal-angle or equal-area parallelograms, the anomaly averaging process was simulated by orbital profiles computed from spherical-earth crustal magnetic anomaly modeling experiments using Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration. The results indicate that averaging can provide reasonable values at satellite elevations, where contributing error factors within a given parallelogram include the elevation distribution of the data, and orbital noise and geomagnetic field attributes. Various inversion schemes including the use of equivalent point dipoles are also investigated as an alternative to arithmetic averaging. Although inversion can provide improved spherical grid anomaly estimates, these procedures are problematic in practice where computer scaling difficulties frequently arise due to a combination of factors including large source-to-observation distances ( 400 km), high geographic latitudes, and low geomagnetic field inclinations.

  3. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) cosmological measures

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2014-11-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmological constant.

  4. Total pressure averaging in pulsating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a non-steady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles. The experiments were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach number up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz.

  5. Monthly average polar sea-ice concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1995-01-01

    The data contained in this CD-ROM depict monthly averages of sea-ice concentration in the modern polar oceans. These averages were derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) instruments aboard satellites of the U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program from 1978 through 1992. The data are provided as 8-bit images using the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) developed by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

  6. Heuristic approach to capillary pressures averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Coca, B.P.

    1980-10-01

    Several methods are available to average capillary pressure curves. Among these are the J-curve and regression equations of the wetting-fluid saturation in porosity and permeability (capillary pressure held constant). While the regression equation seem completely empiric, the J-curve method seems to be theoretically sound due to its expression based on a relation between the average capillary radius and the permeability-porosity ratio. An analysis is given of each of these methods.

  7. Instrument to average 100 data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, G. B.; Birchenough, A. G.; Rice, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    An instrumentation system is currently under development which will measure many of the important parameters associated with the operation of an internal combustion engine. Some of these parameters include mass-fraction burn rate, ignition energy, and the indicated mean effective pressure. One of the characteristics of an internal combustion engine is the cycle-to-cycle variation of these parameters. A curve-averaging instrument has been produced which will generate the average curve, over 100 cycles, of any engine parameter. the average curve is described by 2048 discrete points which are displayed on an oscilloscope screen to facilitate recording and is available in real time. Input can be any parameter which is expressed as a + or - 10-volt signal. Operation of the curve-averaging instrument is defined between 100 and 6000 rpm. Provisions have also been made for averaging as many as four parameters simultaneously, with a subsequent decrease in resolution. This provides the means to correlate and perhaps interrelate the phenomena occurring in an internal combustion engine. This instrument has been used successfully on a 1975 Chevrolet V8 engine, and on a Continental 6-cylinder aircraft engine. While this instrument was designed for use on an internal combustion engine, with some modification it can be used to average any cyclically varying waveform.

  8. Neighborhood Self-Selection: The Role of Pre-Move Health Factors on the Built and Socioeconomic Environment

    PubMed Central

    James, Peter; Hart, Jaime E.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Feskanich, Diane; Laden, Francine; Subramanian, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Residential self-selection bias is a concern in studies of neighborhoods and health. This bias results from health behaviors predicting neighborhood choice. To quantify this bias, we examined associations between pre-move health factors (body mass index, walking, and total physical activity) and post-move neighborhood factors (County Sprawl Index, Census tract socioeconomic status (SES)) in the Nurses’ Health Study (n = 14,159 moves from 1986–2008). Individuals in the highest quartile of pre-move BMI (BMI > 28.4) compared to the lowest quartile (BMI < 22.5) moved to counties that averaged 2.57 points lower on the sprawl index (95% confidence interval −3.55, −1.59) indicating that individuals moved to less dense counties; however, no associations were observed for pre-move walking nor total physical activity. Individuals with higher pre-move BMI tended to move to Census tracts with lower median income and home values and higher levels of poverty. Analyses examining the change in neighborhood environments after a move demonstrated that healthy pre-move behaviors were associated with moves to worse socioeconomic environments. This type of self-selection would bias results downward, underestimating the true relationship between SES and physical activity. Generally, the magnitudes of associations between pre-move health factors and neighborhood measures were small and indicated that residential self-selection was not a major source of bias in analyses in this population. PMID:26457712

  9. Neighborhood Self-Selection: The Role of Pre-Move Health Factors on the Built and Socioeconomic Environment.

    PubMed

    James, Peter; Hart, Jaime E; Arcaya, Mariana C; Feskanich, Diane; Laden, Francine; Subramanian, S V

    2015-10-01

    Residential self-selection bias is a concern in studies of neighborhoods and health. This bias results from health behaviors predicting neighborhood choice. To quantify this bias, we examined associations between pre-move health factors (body mass index, walking, and total physical activity) and post-move neighborhood factors (County Sprawl Index, Census tract socioeconomic status (SES)) in the Nurses' Health Study (n = 14,159 moves from 1986-2008). Individuals in the highest quartile of pre-move BMI (BMI > 28.4) compared to the lowest quartile (BMI < 22.5) moved to counties that averaged 2.57 points lower on the sprawl index (95% confidence interval -3.55, -1.59) indicating that individuals moved to less dense counties; however, no associations were observed for pre-move walking nor total physical activity. Individuals with higher pre-move BMI tended to move to Census tracts with lower median income and home values and higher levels of poverty. Analyses examining the change in neighborhood environments after a move demonstrated that healthy pre-move behaviors were associated with moves to worse socioeconomic environments. This type of self-selection would bias results downward, underestimating the true relationship between SES and physical activity. Generally, the magnitudes of associations between pre-move health factors and neighborhood measures were small and indicated that residential self-selection was not a major source of bias in analyses in this population. PMID:26457712

  10. Method and apparatus for a combination moving bed thermal treatment reactor and moving bed filter

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, Phillip C.; Dunn, Jr., Kenneth J.

    2015-09-01

    A moving bed gasification/thermal treatment reactor includes a geometry in which moving bed reactor particles serve as both a moving bed filter and a heat carrier to provide thermal energy for thermal treatment reactions, such that the moving bed filter and the heat carrier are one and the same to remove solid particulates or droplets generated by thermal treatment processes or injected into the moving bed filter from other sources.

  11. Leadership in Moving Human Groups

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Margarete; Pritz, Johannes; Lange, Simon; Belz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    How is movement of individuals coordinated as a group? This is a fundamental question of social behaviour, encompassing phenomena such as bird flocking, fish schooling, and the innumerable activities in human groups that require people to synchronise their actions. We have developed an experimental paradigm, the HoneyComb computer-based multi-client game, to empirically investigate human movement coordination and leadership. Using economic games as a model, we set monetary incentives to motivate players on a virtual playfield to reach goals via players' movements. We asked whether (I) humans coordinate their movements when information is limited to an individual group member's observation of adjacent group member motion, (II) whether an informed group minority can lead an uninformed group majority to the minority's goal, and if so, (III) how this minority exerts its influence. We showed that in a human group – on the basis of movement alone – a minority can successfully lead a majority. Minorities lead successfully when (a) their members choose similar initial steps towards their goal field and (b) they are among the first in the whole group to make a move. Using our approach, we empirically demonstrate that the rules of swarming behaviour apply to humans. Even complex human behaviour, such as leadership and directed group movement, follow simple rules that are based on visual perception of local movement. PMID:24699264

  12. Flow visualization using moving textures

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Becker, B.

    1995-04-01

    An intuitive way to visualize a flow is to watch particles or textures move in the flow. In this paper, the authors show how texture mapping hardware can produce near-real-time texture motion, using a polygon grid, and one fixed texture. However, the authors make no attempt to indicate the flow direction in a still frame. As discussed here, any anisotropic stretching comes from the velocity gradient, not the velocity itself. The basic idea is to advect the texture by the flow field. In a cited paper, they gave an indication of the wind velocity by advecting the 3D texture coordinates on the polygon vertices of a cloudiness contour surface in a climate simulation. This was slow, because the 3D texture was rendered in software, and because advecting the texture was difficult for time-varying flows. In this paper, they replace the 3D textures by 2D texture maps compatible with hardware rendering, and give techniques for handling time-varying flows more efficiently. The next section gives their technique for the case of 2D steady flows, and the following one discusses the problems of texture distortion. Then they discuss the problems with extending method to time-varying flows, and two solutions. Next they develop compositing methods for visualizing 3D flows. The final section gives their results and conclusions.

  13. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  14. Leadership in moving human groups.

    PubMed

    Boos, Margarete; Pritz, Johannes; Lange, Simon; Belz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    How is movement of individuals coordinated as a group? This is a fundamental question of social behaviour, encompassing phenomena such as bird flocking, fish schooling, and the innumerable activities in human groups that require people to synchronise their actions. We have developed an experimental paradigm, the HoneyComb computer-based multi-client game, to empirically investigate human movement coordination and leadership. Using economic games as a model, we set monetary incentives to motivate players on a virtual playfield to reach goals via players' movements. We asked whether (I) humans coordinate their movements when information is limited to an individual group member's observation of adjacent group member motion, (II) whether an informed group minority can lead an uninformed group majority to the minority's goal, and if so, (III) how this minority exerts its influence. We showed that in a human group--on the basis of movement alone--a minority can successfully lead a majority. Minorities lead successfully when (a) their members choose similar initial steps towards their goal field and (b) they are among the first in the whole group to make a move. Using our approach, we empirically demonstrate that the rules of swarming behaviour apply to humans. Even complex human behaviour, such as leadership and directed group movement, follow simple rules that are based on visual perception of local movement. PMID:24699264

  15. [Visual illusions and moving horizon].

    PubMed

    Zhdan'ko, I M; Chulaevskiĭ, A O; Kovalenko, P A

    2012-09-01

    Results of psychological "additional investigation" of the crash of Boeing-737, "Aeroflot-Nord" on 14.09.2008 near Perm are presented. 37 pilots from the one of the leading airline companies sensed the attitude and rolling out the aircraft to the forward flight under the moving horizon with straight display of bank and tangage (view from the aircraft to the ground) in model conditions. 29 pilots (78.4%) made a mistake at determining the roll direction and tangage, they made a mistake at determining the roll direction 61 times (16.4%) and 44 times at determining the tangage direction, in other words they confused left and right bank and also nose-up and nose-down. Visual illusions of mobility of space and handling of ground (instead of aircraft) during the flight were revealed in pilots. These illusions may be the important cause of the following crashes. The necessity of "back" faultless display of bank in all aircrafts of civil aviation and development of computer complex for training of visual spatial orientation is proved. PMID:23156114

  16. Average luminosity distance in inhomogeneous universes

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Valentin

    2010-04-01

    Using numerical ray tracing, the paper studies how the average distance modulus in an inhomogeneous universe differs from its homogeneous counterpart. The averaging is over all directions from a fixed observer not over all possible observers (cosmic), thus is more directly applicable to our observations. In contrast to previous studies, the averaging is exact, non-perturbative, and includes all non-linear effects. The inhomogeneous universes are represented by Swiss-cheese models containing random and simple cubic lattices of mass-compensated voids. The Earth observer is in the homogeneous cheese which has an Einstein-de Sitter metric. For the first time, the averaging is widened to include the supernovas inside the voids by assuming the probability for supernova emission from any comoving volume is proportional to the rest mass in it. Voids aligned along a certain direction give rise to a distance modulus correction which increases with redshift and is caused by cumulative gravitational lensing. That correction is present even for small voids and depends on their density contrast, not on their radius. Averaging over all directions destroys the cumulative lensing correction even in a non-randomized simple cubic lattice of voids. At low redshifts, the average distance modulus correction does not vanish due to the peculiar velocities, despite the photon flux conservation argument. A formula for the maximal possible average correction as a function of redshift is derived and shown to be in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The formula applies to voids of any size that: (a)have approximately constant densities in their interior and walls; and (b)are not in a deep nonlinear regime. The average correction calculated in random and simple cubic void lattices is severely damped below the predicted maximal one after a single void diameter. That is traced to cancellations between the corrections from the fronts and backs of different voids. The results obtained

  17. Explicit cosmological coarse graining via spatial averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present matter density of the Universe, while highly inhomogeneous on small scales, displays approximate homogeneity on large scales. We propose that whereas it is justified to use the Friedmann Lemaître Robertson Walker (FLRW) line element (which describes an exactly homogeneous and isotropic universe) as a template to construct luminosity distances in order to compare observations with theory, the evolution of the scale factor in such a construction must be governed not by the standard Einstein equations for the FLRW metric, but by the modified Friedmann equations derived by Buchert (Gen Relat Gravit 32:105, 2000; 33:1381, 2001) in the context of spatial averaging in Cosmology. Furthermore, we argue that this scale factor, defined in the spatially averaged cosmology, will correspond to the effective FLRW metric provided the size of the averaging domain coincides with the scale at which cosmological homogeneity arises. This allows us, in principle, to compare predictions of a spatially averaged cosmology with observations, in the standard manner, for instance by computing the luminosity distance versus red-shift relation. The predictions of the spatially averaged cosmology would in general differ from standard FLRW cosmology, because the scale-factor now obeys the modified FLRW equations. This could help determine, by comparing with observations, whether or not cosmological inhomogeneities are an alternative explanation for the observed cosmic acceleration.

  18. A MOVING AVERAGE BAYESIAN MODEL FOR SPATIAL SURFACE AND COVERAGE PREDICTION FROM ENVIRONMENTAL POINT-SOURCE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the general problem of estimating at arbitrary locations the value of an unobserved quantity that varies over space, such as ozone concentration in air or nitrate concentrations in surface groundwater, on the basis of approximate measurements of the quantity ...

  19. Moving toward climate-informed agricultural decision support - can we use PRISM data for more than just monthly averages?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decision support systems/models for agriculture are varied in target application and complexity, ranging from simple worksheets to near real-time forecast systems requiring significant computational and manpower resources. Until recently, most such decision support systems have been constructed with...

  20. Noise reduction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transversal data using improved wavelet transform and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Li, Jiangtao; Wang, Yang; Deng, Shaogui

    2015-02-01

    NMR logging and core NMR signals acts as an effective way of pore structure evaluation and fluid discrimination, but it is greatly contaminated by noise for samples with low magnetic resonance intensity. Transversal relaxation time (T2) spectrum obtained by inversion of decay signals intrigued by Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence may deviate from the truth if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is imperfect. A method of combing the improved wavelet thresholding with the EWMA is proposed for noise reduction of decay data. The wavelet basis function and decomposition level are optimized in consideration of information entropy and white noise estimation firstly. Then a hybrid threshold function is developed to avoid drawbacks of hard and soft threshold functions. To achieve the best thresholding values of different levels, a nonlinear objective function based on SNR and mean square error (MSE) is constructed, transforming the problem to a task of finding optimal solutions. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to ensure the stability and global convergence. EWMA is carried out to eliminate unwanted peaks and sawtooths of the wavelet denoised signal. With validations of numerical simulations and experiments, it is demonstrated that the proposed approach can reduce the noise of T2 decay data perfectly.

  1. High Average Power Yb:YAG Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L E; Beach, R J; Payne, S A

    2001-05-23

    We are working on a composite thin-disk laser design that can be scaled as a source of high brightness laser power for tactical engagement and other high average power applications. The key component is a diffusion-bonded composite comprising a thin gain-medium and thicker cladding that is strikingly robust and resolves prior difficulties with high average power pumping/cooling and the rejection of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). In contrast to high power rods or slabs, the one-dimensional nature of the cooling geometry and the edge-pump geometry scale gracefully to very high average power. The crucial design ideas have been verified experimentally. Progress this last year included: extraction with high beam quality using a telescopic resonator, a heterogeneous thin film coating prescription that meets the unusual requirements demanded by this laser architecture, thermal management with our first generation cooler. Progress was also made in design of a second-generation laser.

  2. Attractors and Time Averages for Random Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Vitor

    2006-07-01

    Considering random noise in finite dimensional parameterized families of diffeomorphisms of a compact finite dimensional boundaryless manifold M, we show the existence of time averages for almost every orbit of each point of M, imposing mild conditions on the families. Moreover these averages are given by a finite number of physical absolutely continuous stationary probability measures. We use this result to deduce that situations with infinitely many sinks and Henon-like attractors are not stable under random perturbations, e.g., Newhouse's and Colli's phenomena in the generic unfolding of a quadratic homoclinic tangency by a one-parameter family of diffeomorphisms.

  3. The modulated average structure of mullite.

    PubMed

    Birkenstock, Johannes; Petříček, Václav; Pedersen, Bjoern; Schneider, Hartmut; Fischer, Reinhard X

    2015-06-01

    Homogeneous and inclusion-free single crystals of 2:1 mullite (Al(4.8)Si(1.2)O(9.6)) grown by the Czochralski technique were examined by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. The observed diffuse scattering together with the pattern of satellite reflections confirm previously published data and are thus inherent features of the mullite structure. The ideal composition was closely met as confirmed by microprobe analysis (Al(4.82 (3))Si(1.18 (1))O(9.59 (5))) and by average structure refinements. 8 (5) to 20 (13)% of the available Si was found in the T* position of the tetrahedra triclusters. The strong tendencey for disorder in mullite may be understood from considerations of hypothetical superstructures which would have to be n-fivefold with respect to the three-dimensional average unit cell of 2:1 mullite and n-fourfold in case of 3:2 mullite. In any of these the possible arrangements of the vacancies and of the tetrahedral units would inevitably be unfavorable. Three directions of incommensurate modulations were determined: q1 = [0.3137 (2) 0 ½], q2 = [0 0.4021 (5) 0.1834 (2)] and q3 = [0 0.4009 (5) -0.1834 (2)]. The one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystal structure associated with q1 was refined for the first time using the superspace approach. The modulation is dominated by harmonic occupational modulations of the atoms in the di- and the triclusters of the tetrahedral units in mullite. The modulation amplitudes are small and the harmonic character implies that the modulated structure still represents an average structure in the overall disordered arrangement of the vacancies and of the tetrahedral structural units. In other words, when projecting the local assemblies at the scale of a few tens of average mullite cells into cells determined by either one of the modulation vectors q1, q2 or q3 a weak average modulation results with slightly varying average occupation factors for the tetrahedral units. As a result, the real

  4. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  5. Average: the juxtaposition of procedure and context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jane; Chick, Helen; Callingham, Rosemary

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents recent data on the performance of 247 middle school students on questions concerning average in three contexts. Analysis includes considering levels of understanding linking definition and context, performance across contexts, the relative difficulty of tasks, and difference in performance for male and female students. The outcomes lead to a discussion of the expectations of the curriculum and its implementation, as well as assessment, in relation to students' skills in carrying out procedures and their understanding about the meaning of average in context.

  6. Mean Element Propagations Using Numerical Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term evolution characteristics (and stability) of an orbit are best characterized using a mean element propagation of the perturbed two body variational equations of motion. The averaging process eliminates short period terms leaving only secular and long period effects. In this study, a non-traditional approach is taken that averages the variational equations using adaptive numerical techniques and then numerically integrating the resulting EOMs. Doing this avoids the Fourier series expansions and truncations required by the traditional analytic methods. The resultant numerical techniques can be easily adapted to propagations at most solar system bodies.

  7. Range Imaging without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Range-imaging instruments of a type now under development are intended to generate the equivalent of three-dimensional images from measurements of the round-trip times of flight of laser pulses along known directions. These instruments could also provide information on characteristics of targets, including roughnesses and reflectivities of surfaces and optical densities of such semi-solid objects as trees and clouds. Unlike in prior range-imaging instruments based on times of flight along known directions, there would be no moving parts; aiming of the laser beams along the known directions would not be accomplished by mechanical scanning of mirrors, prisms, or other optical components. Instead, aiming would be accomplished by using solid-state devices to switch input and output beams along different fiber-optic paths. Because of the lack of moving parts, these instruments could be extraordinarily reliable, rugged, and long-lasting. An instrument of this type would include an optical transmitter that would send out a laser pulse along a chosen direction to a target. An optical receiver coaligned with the transmitter would measure the temporally varying intensity of laser light reflected from the target to determine the distance and surface characteristics of the target. The transmitter would be a combination of devices for generating precise directional laser illumination. It would include a pulsed laser, the output of which would be coupled into a fiber-optic cable with a fan-out and solid-state optical switches that would enable switching of the laser beam onto one or more optical fibers terminated at known locations in an array on a face at the focal plane of a telescope. The array would be imaged by the telescope onto the target space. The receiver optical system could share the aforementioned telescope with the transmitter or could include a separate telescope aimed in the same direction as that of the transmitting telescope. In either case, light reflected

  8. Imagine Moving Off the Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfrey, Priscilla R.

    2006-01-01

    Moving off the planet will be a defining moment of this century as landing on the Moon was in the last. For that to happen for humans to go where humans cannot go-- simulation is the sole solution. NASA supports simulation for life-cycle activities: design, analysis, test, checkout, operations, review and training. We contemplate time spans of a century and more, teams dispersed to different planets and the need for systems that endure or adapt as missions, teams and technology change. Without imagination such goals are impossible. But with imagination we can go outside our present perception of reality to think about and take action on what has been, is and, especially, what might be. Consciously maturing an imagined, possibly workable, idea through framing it to optimization to design, and building the product provides us with a new approach to innovation and simulation fidelity. We address options, analyze, test and make improvements in how we think and work. Each step includes increasingly exact information about costs, schedule, who will be needed, where, when and how. NASA i integrating such thinking into its Exploration Product Realization Hierarchy for simulation and analysis, test and verification, and stimulus response goals. Technically NASA follows a timeline of studies, analysis, definition, design, development and operations with concurrent documentation. We have matched this Product Realization Hierarchy with a continuum from image to realization that incorporates commitment, current and needed research and communication to ensure superior and creative problem solving as well as advances in simulation. One result is a new approach to collaborative systems. Another is a distributed observer network prototyped using game engine technology bringing advanced 3-D simulation of a simulation to the desktop enabling people to develop shared consensus of its meaning. Much of the value of simulation comes from developing in people their ability to make good

  9. Microscale hydrodynamics near moving contact lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garoff, Stephen; Chen, Q.; Rame, Enrique; Willson, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrodynamics governing the fluid motions on a microscopic scale near moving contact lines are different from those governing motion far from the contact line. We explore these unique hydrodynamics by detailed measurement of the shape of a fluid meniscus very close to a moving contact line. The validity of present models of the hydrodynamics near moving contact lines as well as the dynamic wetting characteristics of a family of polymer liquids are discussed.

  10. 40 CFR 86.449 - Averaging provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the new FEL. Manufacturers must test the motorcycles according to 40 CFR part 1051, subpart D...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles, General Provisions § 86.449 Averaging provisions. (a) This section describes...

  11. A Functional Measurement Study on Averaging Numerosity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tira, Michael D.; Tagliabue, Mariaelena; Vidotto, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    In two experiments, participants judged the average numerosity between two sequentially presented dot patterns to perform an approximate arithmetic task. In Experiment 1, the response was given on a 0-20 numerical scale (categorical scaling), and in Experiment 2, the response was given by the production of a dot pattern of the desired numerosity…

  12. Cryo-Electron Tomography and Subtomogram Averaging.

    PubMed

    Wan, W; Briggs, J A G

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) allows 3D volumes to be reconstructed from a set of 2D projection images of a tilted biological sample. It allows densities to be resolved in 3D that would otherwise overlap in 2D projection images. Cryo-ET can be applied to resolve structural features in complex native environments, such as within the cell. Analogous to single-particle reconstruction in cryo-electron microscopy, structures present in multiple copies within tomograms can be extracted, aligned, and averaged, thus increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and resolution. This reconstruction approach, termed subtomogram averaging, can be used to determine protein structures in situ. It can also be applied to facilitate more conventional 2D image analysis approaches. In this chapter, we provide an introduction to cryo-ET and subtomogram averaging. We describe the overall workflow, including tomographic data collection, preprocessing, tomogram reconstruction, subtomogram alignment and averaging, classification, and postprocessing. We consider theoretical issues and practical considerations for each step in the workflow, along with descriptions of recent methodological advances and remaining limitations. PMID:27572733

  13. Initial Conditions in the Averaging Cognitive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noventa, S.; Massidda, D.; Vidotto, G.

    2010-01-01

    The initial state parameters s[subscript 0] and w[subscript 0] are intricate issues of the averaging cognitive models in Information Integration Theory. Usually they are defined as a measure of prior information (Anderson, 1981; 1982) but there are no general rules to deal with them. In fact, there is no agreement as to their treatment except in…

  14. Averaging on Earth-Crossing Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronchi, G. F.; Milani, A.

    The orbits of planet-crossing asteroids (and comets) can undergo close approaches and collisions with some major planet. This introduces a singularity in the N-body Hamiltonian, and the averaging of the equations of motion, traditionally used to compute secular perturbations, is undefined. We show that it is possible to define in a rigorous way some generalised averaged equations of motion, in such a way that the generalised solutions are unique and piecewise smooth. This is obtained, both in the planar and in the three-dimensional case, by means of the method of extraction of the singularities by Kantorovich. The modified distance used to approximate the singularity is the one used by Wetherill in his method to compute probability of collision. Some examples of averaged dynamics have been computed; a systematic exploration of the averaged phase space to locate the secular resonances should be the next step. `Alice sighed wearily. ``I think you might do something better with the time'' she said, ``than waste it asking riddles with no answers'' (Alice in Wonderland, L. Carroll)

  15. Averaging models for linear piezostructural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kurdila, A. J.; Stepanyan, V.; Inman, D. J.; Vignola, J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we consider a linear piezoelectric structure which employs a fast-switched, capacitively shunted subsystem to yield a tunable vibration absorber or energy harvester. The dynamics of the system is modeled as a hybrid system, where the switching law is considered as a control input and the ambient vibration is regarded as an external disturbance. It is shown that under mild assumptions of existence and uniqueness of the solution of this hybrid system, averaging theory can be applied, provided that the original system dynamics is periodic. The resulting averaged system is controlled by the duty cycle of a driven pulse-width modulated signal. The response of the averaged system approximates the performance of the original fast-switched linear piezoelectric system. It is analytically shown that the averaging approximation can be used to predict the electromechanically coupled system modal response as a function of the duty cycle of the input switching signal. This prediction is experimentally validated for the system consisting of a piezoelectric bimorph connected to an electromagnetic exciter. Experimental results show that the analytical predictions are observed in practice over a fixed "effective range" of switching frequencies. The same experiments show that the response of the switched system is insensitive to an increase in switching frequency above the effective frequency range.

  16. A Measure of the Average Intercorrelation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Edward P.

    1975-01-01

    Bounds are obtained for a coefficient proposed by Kaiser as a measure of average correlation and the coefficient is given an interpretation in the context of reliability theory. It is suggested that the root-mean-square intercorrelation may be a more appropriate measure of degree of relationships among a group of variables. (Author)

  17. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  18. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  19. Reformulation of Ensemble Averages via Coordinate Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Andrew J; Moustafa, Sabry G; Lin, Weisong; Weinstein, Steven J; Kofke, David A

    2016-04-12

    A general framework is established for reformulation of the ensemble averages commonly encountered in statistical mechanics. This "mapped-averaging" scheme allows approximate theoretical results that have been derived from statistical mechanics to be reintroduced into the underlying formalism, yielding new ensemble averages that represent exactly the error in the theory. The result represents a distinct alternative to perturbation theory for methodically employing tractable systems as a starting point for describing complex systems. Molecular simulation is shown to provide one appealing route to exploit this advance. Calculation of the reformulated averages by molecular simulation can proceed without contamination by noise produced by behavior that has already been captured by the approximate theory. Consequently, accurate and precise values of properties can be obtained while using less computational effort, in favorable cases, many orders of magnitude less. The treatment is demonstrated using three examples: (1) calculation of the heat capacity of an embedded-atom model of iron, (2) calculation of the dielectric constant of the Stockmayer model of dipolar molecules, and (3) calculation of the pressure of a Lennard-Jones fluid. It is observed that improvement in computational efficiency is related to the appropriateness of the underlying theory for the condition being simulated; the accuracy of the result is however not impacted by this. The framework opens many avenues for further development, both as a means to improve simulation methodology and as a new basis to develop theories for thermophysical properties. PMID:26950263

  20. Bayesian Model Averaging for Propensity Score Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David; Chen, Jianshen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Bayesian model averaging in the propensity score context. Previous research on Bayesian propensity score analysis does not take into account model uncertainty. In this regard, an internally consistent Bayesian framework for model building and estimation must also account for model uncertainty. The…

  1. 40 CFR 86.449 - Averaging provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the new FEL. Manufacturers must test the motorcycles according to 40 CFR part 1051, subpart D...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles, General Provisions § 86.449 Averaging provisions. (a) This section describes...

  2. Average configuration of the induced venus magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Spence, H.E.; Russell, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the interaction of the solar wind flow with Venus and describe the morphology of magnetic field line draping in the Venus magnetotail. In particular, we describe the importance of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) X-component in controlling the configuration of field draping in this induced magnetotail, and using the results of a recently developed technique, we examine the average magnetic configuration of this magnetotail. The derived J x B forces must balance the average, steady state acceleration of, and pressure gradients in, the tail plasma. From this relation the average tail plasma velocity, lobe and current sheet densities, and average ion temperature have been derived. In this study we extend these results by making a connection between the derived consistent plasma flow speed and density, and the observational energy/charge range and sensitivity of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer, and demonstrate that if the tail is principally composed of O/sup +/, the bulk of the plasma should not be observable much of the time that the PVO is within the tail. Finally, we examine the importance of solar wind slowing upstream of the obstacle and its implications for the temperature of pick-up planetary ions, compare the derived ion temperatures with their theoretical maximum values, and discuss the implications of this process for comets and AMPTE-type releases.

  3. World average top-quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes a talk given at the Top2008 Workshop at La Biodola, Isola d Elba, Italy. The status of the world average top-quark mass is discussed. Some comments about the challanges facing the experiments in order to further improve the precision are offered.

  4. Why Johnny Can Be Average Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturrock, Alan

    1997-01-01

    During a (hypothetical) phone interview with a university researcher, an elementary principal reminisced about a lifetime of reading groups with unmemorable names, medium-paced math problems, patchworked social studies/science lessons, and totally "average" IQ and batting scores. The researcher hung up at the mention of bell-curved assembly lines…

  5. Orbit Averaging in Perturbed Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2015-11-01

    The orbital period is typically much shorter than the time scale for dynamical evolution of large-scale structures in planetary rings. This large separation in time scales motivates the derivation of reduced models by averaging the equations of motion over the local orbit period (Borderies et al. 1985, Shu et al. 1985). A more systematic procedure for carrying out the orbit averaging is to use Lie transform perturbation theory to remove the dependence on the fast angle variable from the problem order-by-order in epsilon, where the small parameter epsilon is proportional to the fractional radial distance from exact resonance. This powerful technique has been developed and refined over the past thirty years in the context of gyrokinetic theory in plasma physics (Brizard and Hahm, Rev. Mod. Phys. 79, 2007). When the Lie transform method is applied to resonantly forced rings near a mean motion resonance with a satellite, the resulting orbit-averaged equations contain the nonlinear terms found previously, but also contain additional nonlinear self-gravity terms of the same order that were missed by Borderies et al. and by Shu et al. The additional terms result from the fact that the self-consistent gravitational potential of the perturbed rings modifies the orbit-averaging transformation at nonlinear order. These additional terms are the gravitational analog of electrostatic ponderomotive forces caused by large amplitude waves in plasma physics. The revised orbit-averaged equations are shown to modify the behavior of nonlinear density waves in planetary rings compared to the previously published theory. This reserach was supported by NASA's Outer Planets Reserach program.

  6. Steering electrons on moving pathways.

    PubMed

    Beratan, David N; Skourtis, Spiros S; Balabin, Ilya A; Balaeff, Alexander; Keinan, Shahar; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Xiao, Dequan

    2009-10-20

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions provide a nexus among chemistry, biochemistry, and physics. These reactions underpin the "power plants" and "power grids" of bioenergetics, and they challenge us to understand how evolution manipulates structure to control ET kinetics. Ball-and-stick models for the machinery of electron transfer, however, fail to capture the rich electronic and nuclear dynamics of ET molecules: these static representations disguise, for example, the range of thermally accessible molecular conformations. The influence of structural fluctuations on electron-transfer kinetics is amplified by the exponential decay of electron tunneling probabilities with distance, as well as the delicate interference among coupling pathways. Fluctuations in the surrounding medium can also switch transport between coherent and incoherent ET mechanisms--and may gate ET so that its kinetics is limited by conformational interconversion times, rather than by the intrinsic ET time scale. Moreover, preparation of a charge-polarized donor state or of a donor state with linear or angular momentum can have profound dynamical and kinetic consequences. In this Account, we establish a vocabulary to describe how the conformational ensemble and the prepared donor state influence ET kinetics in macromolecules. This framework is helping to unravel the richness of functional biological ET pathways, which have evolved within fluctuating macromolecular structures. The conceptual framework for describing nonadiabatic ET seems disarmingly simple: compute the ensemble-averaged (mean-squared) donor-acceptor (DA) tunneling interaction, , and the Franck-Condon weighted density of states, rho(FC), to describe the rate, (2pi/variant Planck's over 2pi)rho(FC). Modern descriptions of the thermally averaged electronic coupling and of the Franck-Condon factor establish a useful predictive framework in biology, chemistry, and nanoscience. Describing the influence of geometric and

  7. Novel Simulated moving bed technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue University

    2003-12-30

    Cellulose and hemicellulose from plants and other biomass can be hydrolyzed to produce sugars (i.e. glucose and xylose). Once these sugars are separated from other impurities, they can serve as feedstock in fermentation to produce ethanol (as fuels), lactic acid, or other valuable chemicals. The need for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass has become abundantly clear over the last decade. However, the cost of producing fermentable sugars from biomass hydrolyzate using existing technology is relatively high and has been a major obstacle. The objective of this project is to develop an efficient and economical simulated moving bed (SMB) process to recover fermentable sugars from biomass hydrolyzate. Sulfuric acid can hydrolyze the cellulose and hemicellulose in biomass to sugars, but this process can generate byproducts such as acetic acid, and can lead to further degradation of the xylose to furfural and glucose to hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Also, lignin and other compounds in the biomass will degrade to various phenolic compounds. If the concentrations of these compounds exceed certain threshold levels, they will be toxic to the downstream fermentation, and will severely limit the usefulness of the derived sugars. Standard post-hydrolysis processing involves neutralization of sulfuric acid, usually with lime (calcium hydroxide). A study by Wooley et al.showed that the limed hydrolyzate gave a low ethanol yield in fermentation test (20% of theoretical yield compared to 77% of theoretical yield from fermentation of pure sugars). They showed that instead of adding lime, an ion exclusion chromatography process could be used to remove acids, as well as to isolate the sugars from the biomass hydrolyzate. In this project, we investigated the feasibility of developing an economical SMB process based on (1) a polymeric adsorbent, Dowex99, which was used by Wooley et al., (2) a second polymeric adsorbent, poly-4-vinyl pyridine (or PVP in short, Reilly

  8. On Your Mark, Get Set, Move!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Sydney

    2007-01-01

    Moving a library collection is no easy feat. The librarian will need time, energy, and plenty of help to accomplish this enormous job. Although seldom easy or painless, the job can be simplified if the librarian and her staff plan carefully, prepare the collection, and organize the move. This article describes the planning, preparation and…

  9. Three "Moves" in Enactivist Research: A Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmt, Elaine; Kieren, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the authors reflect on the contents of this current issue of ZDM and ask why focus an entire issue on enactivism as a research methodology in mathematics education. In their synthesis of the papers they distinguish and explicate what they observe as three moves in the enactivist research discussed. The first move (and the one that…

  10. Fixing the Shadows While Moving the Gnomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    It is a common practice to fix a vertical gnomon and study the moving shadow cast by it. This shows our local solar time and gives us a hint regarding the season in which we perform the observation. The moving shadow can also tell us our latitude with high precision. In this paper we propose to exchange the roles and while keeping the shadows…

  11. Theses "Discussion" Sections: A Structural Move Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Khakbaz, Nafiseh

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed at finding the probable differences between the move structure of Iranian MA graduates' thesis discussion subgenres and those of their non-Iranian counterparts, on the one hand, and those of journal paper authors, on the other. It also aimed at identifying the moves that are considered obligatory, conventional, or optional…

  12. 39 CFR 777.23 - Moving expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moving expenses. 777.23 Section 777.23 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE SPECIAL REGULATIONS RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AND REAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION POLICIES Uniform Relocation Assistance § 777.23 Moving expenses. (a) Eligibility. (1) Residential displaced persons are entitled to...

  13. Temperature Distribution in a Uniformly Moving Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Joseph D.; Petrov, Nikola P.

    2009-01-01

    We apply several physical ideas to determine the steady temperature distribution in a medium moving with uniform velocity between two infinite parallel plates. We compute it in the coordinate frame moving with the medium by integration over the "past" to account for the influence of an infinite set of instantaneous point sources of heat in past…

  14. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  15. Lidar uncertainty and beam averaging correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giyanani, A.; Bierbooms, W.; van Bussel, G.

    2015-05-01

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric variables with the use of Lidar is a relatively new technology field for wind resource assessment in wind energy. A review of the draft version of an international guideline (CD IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2) used for wind energy purposes is performed and some extra atmospheric variables are taken into account for proper representation of the site. A measurement campaign with two Leosphere vertical scanning WindCube Lidars and metmast measurements is used for comparison of the uncertainty in wind speed measurements using the CD IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2. The comparison revealed higher but realistic uncertainties. A simple model for Lidar beam averaging correction is demonstrated for understanding deviation in the measurements. It can be further applied for beam averaging uncertainty calculations in flat and complex terrain.

  16. Rigid shape matching by segmentation averaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Oliensis, John

    2010-04-01

    We use segmentations to match images by shape. The new matching technique does not require point-to-point edge correspondence and is robust to small shape variations and spatial shifts. To address the unreliability of segmentations computed bottom-up, we give a closed form approximation to an average over all segmentations. Our method has many extensions, yielding new algorithms for tracking, object detection, segmentation, and edge-preserving smoothing. For segmentation, instead of a maximum a posteriori approach, we compute the "central" segmentation minimizing the average distance to all segmentations of an image. For smoothing, instead of smoothing images based on local structures, we smooth based on the global optimal image structures. Our methods for segmentation, smoothing, and object detection perform competitively, and we also show promising results in shape-based tracking. PMID:20224119

  17. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.

    2013-11-07

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today’s CEBAF polarized source operating at ∼ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  18. Apparent and average accelerations of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Andersson, Lars E-mail: larsa@math.miami.edu

    2008-10-15

    In this paper we consider the relation between the volume deceleration parameter obtained within the Buchert averaging scheme and the deceleration parameter derived from supernova observation. This work was motivated by recent findings that showed that there are models which despite having {Lambda} = 0 have volume deceleration parameter q{sup vol}<0. This opens the possibility that back-reaction and averaging effects may be used as an interesting alternative explanation to the dark energy phenomenon. We have calculated q{sup vol} in some Lemaitre-Tolman models. For those models which are chosen to be realistic and which fit the supernova data, we find that q{sup vol}>0, while those models which we have been able to find which exhibit q{sup vol}<0 turn out to be unrealistic. This indicates that care must be exercised in relating the deceleration parameter to observations.

  19. Emissions averaging top option for HON compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, S. )

    1993-05-01

    In one of its first major rule-setting directives under the CAA Amendments, EPA recently proposed tough new emissions controls for nearly two-thirds of the commercial chemical substances produced by the synthetic organic chemical manufacturing industry (SOCMI). However, the Hazardous Organic National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (HON) also affects several non-SOCMI processes. The author discusses proposed compliance deadlines, emissions averaging, and basic operating and administrative requirements.

  20. The Average Velocity in a Queue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frette, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    A number of cars drive along a narrow road that does not allow overtaking. Each driver has a certain maximum speed at which he or she will drive if alone on the road. As a result of slower cars ahead, many cars are forced to drive at speeds lower than their maximum ones. The average velocity in the queue offers a non-trivial example of a mean…

  1. Stochastic Games with Average Payoff Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, M. K.; Bagchi, A.

    1998-11-15

    We study two-person stochastic games on a Polish state and compact action spaces and with average payoff criterion under a certain ergodicity condition. For the zero-sum game we establish the existence of a value and stationary optimal strategies for both players. For the nonzero-sum case the existence of Nash equilibrium in stationary strategies is established under certain separability conditions.

  2. Average Annual Rainfall over the Globe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric recycling of water is a very important phenomenon on the globe because it not only refreshes the water but it also redistributes it over land and oceans/rivers/lakes throughout the globe. This is made possible by the solar energy intercepted by the Earth. The half of the globe facing the Sun, on the average, intercepts 1.74 ×…

  3. Representation of average drop sizes in sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Lee G.

    1987-06-01

    Procedures are presented for processing drop-size measurements to obtain average drop sizes that represent overall spray characteristics. These procedures are not currently in general use, but they would represent an improvement over current practice. Clear distinctions are made between processing data for spatial- and temporal-type measurements. The conversion between spatial and temporal measurements is discussed. The application of these procedures is demonstrated by processing measurements of the same spray by two different types of instruments.

  4. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  5. Digital Averaging Phasemeter for Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Donald; Spero, Robert; Shaklan, Stuart; Halverson, Peter; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    A digital averaging phasemeter has been built for measuring the difference between the phases of the unknown and reference heterodyne signals in a heterodyne laser interferometer. This phasemeter performs well enough to enable interferometric measurements of distance with accuracy of the order of 100 pm and with the ability to track distance as it changes at a speed of as much as 50 cm/s. This phasemeter is unique in that it is a single, integral system capable of performing three major functions that, heretofore, have been performed by separate systems: (1) measurement of the fractional-cycle phase difference, (2) counting of multiple cycles of phase change, and (3) averaging of phase measurements over multiple cycles for improved resolution. This phasemeter also offers the advantage of making repeated measurements at a high rate: the phase is measured on every heterodyne cycle. Thus, for example, in measuring the relative phase of two signals having a heterodyne frequency of 10 kHz, the phasemeter would accumulate 10,000 measurements per second. At this high measurement rate, an accurate average phase determination can be made more quickly than is possible at a lower rate.

  6. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  7. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin. PMID:16078866

  8. Viewpoint: observations on scaled average bioequivalence.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Scott D; Jones, Byron

    2012-01-01

    The two one-sided test procedure (TOST) has been used for average bioequivalence testing since 1992 and is required when marketing new formulations of an approved drug. TOST is known to require comparatively large numbers of subjects to demonstrate bioequivalence for highly variable drugs, defined as those drugs having intra-subject coefficients of variation greater than 30%. However, TOST has been shown to protect public health when multiple generic formulations enter the marketplace following patent expiration. Recently, scaled average bioequivalence (SABE) has been proposed as an alternative statistical analysis procedure for such products by multiple regulatory agencies. SABE testing requires that a three-period partial replicate cross-over or full replicate cross-over design be used. Following a brief summary of SABE analysis methods applied to existing data, we will consider three statistical ramifications of the proposed additional decision rules and the potential impact of implementation of scaled average bioequivalence in the marketplace using simulation. It is found that a constraint being applied is biased, that bias may also result from the common problem of missing data and that the SABE methods allow for much greater changes in exposure when generic-generic switching occurs in the marketplace. PMID:22162308

  9. Moving Matters: The Causal Effect of Moving Schools on Student Performance. Working Paper #01-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Stiefel, Leanna; Cordes, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of existing research on mobility indicates that students do worse in the year of a school move. This research, however, has been unsuccessful in isolating the causal effects of mobility and often fails to distinguish the heterogeneous impacts of moves, conflating structural moves (mandated by a school's terminal grade) and…

  10. Improving Reading Abilities of Average and Below Average Readers through Peer Tutoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galezio, Marne; And Others

    A program was designed to improve the progress of average and below average readers in a first-grade, a second-grade, and a sixth-grade classroom in a multicultural, multi-social economic district located in a three-county area northwest of Chicago, Illinois. Classroom teachers noted that students were having difficulty making adequate progress in…

  11. Parents' Reactions to Finding Out That Their Children Have Average or above Average IQ Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks, Jean; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Parents of 41 children who had been given an individually-administered intelligence test were contacted 19 months after testing. Parents of average IQ children were less accurate in their memory of test results. Children with above average IQ experienced extremely low frequencies of sibling rivalry, conceit or pressure. (Author/HLM)

  12. Exoplanet Caught on the Move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    For the first time, astronomers have been able to directly follow the motion of an exoplanet as it moves from one side of its host star to the other. The planet has the smallest orbit so far of all directly imaged exoplanets, lying almost as close to its parent star as Saturn is to the Sun. Scientists believe that it may have formed in a similar way to the giant planets in the Solar System. Because the star is so young, this discovery proves that gas giant planets can form within discs in only a few million years, a short time in cosmic terms. Only 12 million years old, or less than three-thousandths of the age of the Sun, Beta Pictoris is 75% more massive than our parent star. It is located about 60 light-years away towards the constellation of Pictor (the Painter) and is one of the best-known examples of a star surrounded by a dusty debris disc [1]. Earlier observations showed a warp of the disc, a secondary inclined disc and comets falling onto the star. "Those were indirect, but tell-tale signs that strongly suggested the presence of a massive planet, and our new observations now definitively prove this," says team leader Anne-Marie Lagrange. "Because the star is so young, our results prove that giant planets can form in discs in time-spans as short as a few million years." Recent observations have shown that discs around young stars disperse within a few million years, and that giant planet formation must occur faster than previously thought. Beta Pictoris is now clear proof that this is indeed possible. The team used the NAOS-CONICA instrument (or NACO [2]), mounted on one of the 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), to study the immediate surroundings of Beta Pictoris in 2003, 2008 and 2009. In 2003 a faint source inside the disc was seen (eso0842), but it was not possible to exclude the remote possibility that it was a background star. In new images taken in 2008 and spring 2009 the source had disappeared! The most recent

  13. Sediment response to moving rainstorms: laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2009-04-01

    The soil material transported by surface runoff is an important factor, for example, in water quality management, environmental decision making, urban management and ecosystems sustainability. This study aims at contributing to increased understanding of water erosion factors and processes. The main objective is to quantify experimentally the soil loss caused by both non-moving and moving rainstorms. The importance of storm movement, due to the combined effect of wind and rain, on surface flows has long been recognised, at scales ranging from headwater scales to larger catchment basins. All these processes (rainfall, wind, runoff, soil erosion) involved are germane for investigation at different scales. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out using several soil flumes and a movable sprinkling-type rainfall simulator. To simulate moving rainstorms, the rainfall simulator was moved upstream and downstream over the soil surface at different speeds. During runoff events overland flow and sediment transport were measured in order to determine hydrographs and sediment production over time. The size distribution of the eroded material is governed by the capacity of the flowing water to transport it. Granulometric curves obtained through conventional hand sieving and optical spectrophotometer method (material below 0.250 mm) were constructed. Distinct hydrologic responses for storms moving upstream and downstream were identified. Soil loss by sheet erosion caused by downstream moving rainstorms was higher than that caused by identical upstream moving rainfall storms or non-moving storms. The results also show that storm movement, affecting spatial and temporal distributions of rainfall, has a marked influence on the granulometric characteristics of sediments transported by overland flow during the runoff event. Storms moving downslope are the most potentially hazardous in terms of erosion.

  14. A Green's function quantum average atom model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Starrett, Charles Edward

    2015-05-21

    A quantum average atom model is reformulated using Green's functions. This allows integrals along the real energy axis to be deformed into the complex plane. The advantage being that sharp features such as resonances and bound states are broadened by a Lorentzian with a half-width chosen for numerical convenience. An implementation of this method therefore avoids numerically challenging resonance tracking and the search for weakly bound states, without changing the physical content or results of the model. A straightforward implementation results in up to a factor of 5 speed-up relative to an optimized orbital based code.

  15. Average shape of fluctuations for subdiffusive walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuste, S. B.; Acedo, L.

    2004-03-01

    We study the average shape of fluctuations for subdiffusive processes, i.e., processes with uncorrelated increments but where the waiting time distribution has a broad power-law tail. This shape is obtained analytically by means of a fractional diffusion approach. We find that, in contrast with processes where the waiting time between increments has finite variance, the fluctuation shape is no longer a semicircle: it tends to adopt a tablelike form as the subdiffusive character of the process increases. The theoretical predictions are compared with numerical simulation results.

  16. The averaging method in applied problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenikov, E. A.

    1986-04-01

    The totality of methods, allowing to research complicated non-linear oscillating systems, named in the literature "averaging method" has been given. THe author is describing the constructive part of this method, or a concrete form and corresponding algorithms, on mathematical models, sufficiently general , but built on concrete problems. The style of the book is that the reader interested in the Technics and algorithms of the asymptotic theory of the ordinary differential equations, could solve individually such problems. For specialists in the area of applied mathematics and mechanics.

  17. Auto-exploratory average reward reinforcement learning

    SciTech Connect

    Ok, DoKyeong; Tadepalli, P.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a model-based average reward Reinforcement Learning method called H-learning and compare it with its discounted counterpart, Adaptive Real-Time Dynamic Programming, in a simulated robot scheduling task. We also introduce an extension to H-learning, which automatically explores the unexplored parts of the state space, while always choosing greedy actions with respect to the current value function. We show that this {open_quotes}Auto-exploratory H-learning{close_quotes} performs better than the original H-learning under previously studied exploration methods such as random, recency-based, or counter-based exploration.

  18. Properties of train traffic flow in a moving block system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Zeng, Jun-Wei; Qian, Yong-Sheng; Li, Wen-Jun; Yang, Fang; Jia, Xin-Xin

    2012-07-01

    The development direction of railways is toward the improvement of capacity and service quality, where the service quality includes safety, schedule, high speed, and comfort. In light of the existing cellular automaton models, in this paper, we develop a model to analyze the mixed running processes of trains with maximal speeds of 500 km/h and 350 km/h respectively in the moving block system. In the proposed model, we establish some sound rules to control the running processes of a train, where the rules include the departure rules in the intermediate stations, the overtaking rules, and the conditions of speed limitation for a train stopping at a station or passing through a station. With the consideration of the mixed ratio and the distance between two adjacent stations, the properties of the train traffic flow (including capacity and average speed) are simulated. The numerical results show that the interactions among different trains will affect the capacity, and a proper increase of the spatial distance between two adjacent stations can enhance the capacity and the average speed under the moving block.

  19. Exoplanet Caught on the Move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    For the first time, astronomers have been able to directly follow the motion of an exoplanet as it moves from one side of its host star to the other. The planet has the smallest orbit so far of all directly imaged exoplanets, lying almost as close to its parent star as Saturn is to the Sun. Scientists believe that it may have formed in a similar way to the giant planets in the Solar System. Because the star is so young, this discovery proves that gas giant planets can form within discs in only a few million years, a short time in cosmic terms. Only 12 million years old, or less than three-thousandths of the age of the Sun, Beta Pictoris is 75% more massive than our parent star. It is located about 60 light-years away towards the constellation of Pictor (the Painter) and is one of the best-known examples of a star surrounded by a dusty debris disc [1]. Earlier observations showed a warp of the disc, a secondary inclined disc and comets falling onto the star. "Those were indirect, but tell-tale signs that strongly suggested the presence of a massive planet, and our new observations now definitively prove this," says team leader Anne-Marie Lagrange. "Because the star is so young, our results prove that giant planets can form in discs in time-spans as short as a few million years." Recent observations have shown that discs around young stars disperse within a few million years, and that giant planet formation must occur faster than previously thought. Beta Pictoris is now clear proof that this is indeed possible. The team used the NAOS-CONICA instrument (or NACO [2]), mounted on one of the 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), to study the immediate surroundings of Beta Pictoris in 2003, 2008 and 2009. In 2003 a faint source inside the disc was seen (eso0842), but it was not possible to exclude the remote possibility that it was a background star. In new images taken in 2008 and spring 2009 the source had disappeared! The most recent

  20. Average observational quantities in the timescape cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, David L.

    2009-12-15

    We examine the properties of a recently proposed observationally viable alternative to homogeneous cosmology with smooth dark energy, the timescape cosmology. In the timescape model cosmic acceleration is realized as an apparent effect related to the calibration of clocks and rods of observers in bound systems relative to volume-average observers in an inhomogeneous geometry in ordinary general relativity. The model is based on an exact solution to a Buchert average of the Einstein equations with backreaction. The present paper examines a number of observational tests which will enable the timescape model to be distinguished from homogeneous cosmologies with a cosmological constant or other smooth dark energy, in current and future generations of dark energy experiments. Predictions are presented for comoving distance measures; H(z); the equivalent of the dark energy equation of state, w(z); the Om(z) measure of Sahni, Shafieloo, and Starobinsky; the Alcock-Paczynski test; the baryon acoustic oscillation measure, D{sub V}; the inhomogeneity test of Clarkson, Bassett, and Lu; and the time drift of cosmological redshifts. Where possible, the predictions are compared to recent independent studies of similar measures in homogeneous cosmologies with dark energy. Three separate tests with indications of results in possible tension with the {lambda}CDM model are found to be consistent with the expectations of the timescape cosmology.

  1. MACHINE PROTECTION FOR HIGH AVERAGE CURRENT LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Kevin; Allison, Trent; Evans, Richard; Coleman, James; Grippo, Albert

    2003-05-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high current accelerators. The Jefferson Lab FEL [1,2] has multiple electron beam paths and many different types of diagnostic insertion devices. The MPS [3] needs to monitor both the status of these devices and the magnet settings which define the beam path. The matrix of these devices and beam paths are programmed into gate arrays, the output of the matrix is an allowable maximum average power limit. This power limit is enforced by the drive laser for the photocathode gun. The Beam Loss Monitors (BLMs), RF status, and laser safety system status are also inputs to the control matrix. There are 8 Machine Modes (electron path) and 8 Beam Modes (average power limits) that define the safe operating limits for the FEL. Combinations outside of this matrix are unsafe and the beam is inhibited. The power limits range from no beam to 2 megawatts of electron beam power.

  2. Climatology of globally averaged thermospheric mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, J. T.; Picone, J. M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a climatological analysis of daily globally averaged density data, derived from orbit data and covering the years 1967-2007, along with an empirical Global Average Mass Density Model (GAMDM) that encapsulates the 1986-2007 data. The model represents density as a function of the F10.7 solar radio flux index, the day of year, and the Kp geomagnetic activity index. We discuss in detail the dependence of the data on each of the input variables, and demonstrate that all of the terms in the model represent consistent variations in both the 1986-2007 data (on which the model is based) and the independent 1967-1985 data. We also analyze the uncertainty in the results, and quantify how the variance in the data is apportioned among the model terms. We investigate the annual and semiannual variations of the data and quantify the amplitude, height dependence, solar cycle dependence, and interannual variability of these oscillatory modes. The auxiliary material includes Fortran 90 code for evaluating GAMDM.

  3. Global atmospheric circulation statistics: Four year averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M. F.; Geller, M. A.; Nash, E. R.; Gelman, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    Four year averages of the monthly mean global structure of the general circulation of the atmosphere are presented in the form of latitude-altitude, time-altitude, and time-latitude cross sections. The numerical values are given in tables. Basic parameters utilized include daily global maps of temperature and geopotential height for 18 pressure levels between 1000 and 0.4 mb for the period December 1, 1978 through November 30, 1982 supplied by NOAA/NMC. Geopotential heights and geostrophic winds are constructed using hydrostatic and geostrophic formulae. Meridional and vertical velocities are calculated using thermodynamic and continuity equations. Fields presented in this report are zonally averaged temperature, zonal, meridional, and vertical winds, and amplitude of the planetary waves in geopotential height with zonal wave numbers 1-3. The northward fluxes of sensible heat and eastward momentum by the standing and transient eddies along with their wavenumber decomposition and Eliassen-Palm flux propagation vectors and divergences by the standing and transient eddies along with their wavenumber decomposition are also given. Large interhemispheric differences and year-to-year variations are found to originate in the changes in the planetary wave activity.

  4. Detecting and tracking small moving target in infrared image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong-lei; Huang, Geng-hua; Wang, Hai-wei; Shu, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, infrared imaging systems play important roles in the field of civil and military. Especially small infrared target detecting and recognizing is one of the most widely use. The capability of target-detection algorithm is an important index of the system. This paper presents a novel algorithm for detecting a small moving target in infrared (IR) image sequences and finding its mass center, and recording the target moving track. In the target searching and recognizing algorithm of infrared image sequences, infrared image sequence is broken into frames, filtered by spatial filter algorithm, which helped to reduce granular noise. We use the Canny algorithm factor to find the edge of the target, and the result of detecting target edge is process by ecological open-loop filter method, including erosion and dilation algorithm with a same scale. Then, the candidate targets are recognized and saved temporarily. In order to get the mass centers of the candidate targets, the valid area of the candidate targets is defined by different weight valves, and then the mass centers are calculated by weighted average algorithm, and record per frame. After got several frames mass centers of the candidate targets, we get rid of the non-target mass centers by frame difference algorithm, and get the real mass center of the small moving infrared target. If the background is observed for enough time, the effect of frame difference algorithm is more efficiency. Finally, the moving track of the target is found out. The infrared (IR) image sequences used here are obtained through an IR camera in the laboratory, which uses a 288*384 silicon infrared image sensor produced by ULIS company. The methods referred above are realized and simulated on compute with Matlab. Theory analysis and experiments prove the method is reasonable and efficient.

  5. Characterizing The Nearest Young Moving Groups Through High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Kyle; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed method for characterizing the nearest young moving groups via high resolution spectroscopy. This method has three diagnostics which classify a moving group: (1) Chemical Homogeneity, (2) Kinematic Traceback, and (3) Isochrone Fitting. We have applied this technique on 10 F- and G-type stars from the AB Doradus Moving Group (ABD) and found 8 stars share similar metal abundances with an average abundance for ABD of <[M/H]> = -0.03 ± 0.06; of the two outliers, one is metal rich and the other metal poor. Seven stars follow a common traceback and share a common origin around 125 Myr. One of the outlying traceback stars diverges around 90-100 Myr, and is the same star which is metal rich. Eight stars fall along the same isochrone of 100 Myr, which is synonymous with the main sequence. We further evaluated this technique on 5 members of the newly discovered Octans-Near Moving Group (ONMG). Two of these were listed as possible members with the other three being probable members. There is a large spread in the metal abundance with <[M/H]> = -0.17 ± 0.1 and no core group of stars that define the cluster in abundance space. ONMG is also enigmatic because several age indicators (e.g. lithium abundance, surface gravities, activity) indicate a much younger cluster; however, the traceback age shows these stars were closest around 150 Myr (though this age should be taken very lightly) and 4 of the 5 stars fall on the main sequence. We therefore conclude that while these stars do share present day velocities and positions, the group is not well defined in abundance, origin, or age, and should be concidered with caution.

  6. 39 CFR 777.23 - Moving expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... payment is limited to the pro rata value for the remaining useful life of any existing license, permit, or..., fees and permits when not paid as part of the moving expenses. (viii) Feasibility surveys, soil...

  7. 39 CFR 777.23 - Moving expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... payment is limited to the pro rata value for the remaining useful life of any existing license, permit, or..., fees and permits when not paid as part of the moving expenses. (viii) Feasibility surveys, soil...

  8. 39 CFR 777.23 - Moving expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... payment is limited to the pro rata value for the remaining useful life of any existing license, permit, or..., fees and permits when not paid as part of the moving expenses. (viii) Feasibility surveys, soil...

  9. Expedition 30 Soyuz Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Dec. 19, the Soyuz TMA-03M spacecraft and its booster were moved to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final preparations before launch to the International Space Statio...

  10. Entropic destruction of a moving heavy quarkonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Tabatabaei, Seyed Kamal

    2016-07-01

    Recently it has been shown that the peak of the quarkonium entropy at the deconfinement transition is related to the emergent entropic force which destructs the quarkonium. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we consider dissociation of a moving heavy quarkonium by entropic force. For larger distance of quark and antiquark, the entropy of moving quarkonium increases, monotonically. We find that the entropic force destructs the moving quarkonium easier than the static case. By considering the Maxwell charge, we study the effect of the medium on the destruction of heavy quarkonium. It is shown that the quarkonium dissociates easier in the medium. Our results imply that the quarkonium dissociates easier when it moves orthogonal to the plasma wind rather than parallel.

  11. Being moved: linguistic representation and conceptual structure

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnast, Milena; Wagner, Valentin; Wassiliwizky, Eugen; Jacobsen, Thomas; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the organization of the semantic field and the conceptual structure of moving experiences by investigating German-language expressions referring to the emotional state of being moved. We used present and past participles of eight psychological verbs as primes in a free word-association task, as these grammatical forms place their conceptual focus on the eliciting situation and on the felt emotional state, respectively. By applying a taxonomy of basic knowledge types and computing the Cognitive Salience Index, we identified joy and sadness as key emotional ingredients of being moved, and significant life events and art experiences as main elicitors of this emotional state. Metric multidimensional scaling analyses of the semantic field revealed that the core terms designate a cluster of emotional states characterized by low degrees of arousal and slightly positive valence, the latter due to a nearly balanced representation of positive and negative elements in the conceptual structure of being moved. PMID:25404924

  12. Universal transloader moves delicate equipment without stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbour, J. R.; Kessler, P. N.

    1966-01-01

    Transloader moves delicate or heavy items over irregular surfaces without transmitting stress to the load. The loader is supported on three pivot points which produce a wrap free base. The base is supported by an artificial four-wheel frame.

  13. Acoustics of a Nonhomogeneous Moving Medium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, D I

    1956-01-01

    Theoretical basis of the acoustics of a moving nonhomogeneous medium is considered in this report. Experiments that illustrate or confirm some of the theoretical explanation or derivation of these acoustics are also included.

  14. Monkeys Move Robotic Wheelchairs with Their Thoughts

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157593.html Monkeys Move Robotic Wheelchairs With Their Thoughts Scientists say technology might ... made it possible for monkeys to operate a robotic wheelchair using only the monkey's thoughts say the ...

  15. Tropical Storm Debby Moves into Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of...

  16. Anomalous energetics and dynamics of moving vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    Motivated by the general problem of moving topological defects in an otherwise ordered state and specifically, by the anomalous dynamics observed in vortex-antivortex annihilation and coarsening experiments in freely-suspended smectic-C films, I study the deformation, energetics and dynamics of moving vortices in an overdamped xy-model and show that their properties are significantly and qualitatively modified by the motion. Supported by NSF through DMR-1001240, MRSEC DMR-0820579, and by Simons Investigator award from Simons Foundation.

  17. Anomalous Energetics and Dynamics of Moving Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the general problem of moving topological defects in an otherwise ordered state and specifically, by the anomalous dynamics observed in vortex-antivortex annihilation and coarsening experiments in freely suspended smectic-C films, I study the deformation, energetics, and dynamics of moving vortices in an overdamped X Y model and show that their properties are significantly and qualitatively modified by the motion.

  18. Anomalous Energetics and Dynamics of Moving Vortices.

    PubMed

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2015-12-11

    Motivated by the general problem of moving topological defects in an otherwise ordered state and specifically, by the anomalous dynamics observed in vortex-antivortex annihilation and coarsening experiments in freely suspended smectic-C films, I study the deformation, energetics, and dynamics of moving vortices in an overdamped XY model and show that their properties are significantly and qualitatively modified by the motion. PMID:26705656

  19. Towards a Psychological Construct of Being Moved

    PubMed Central

    Menninghaus, Winfried; Wagner, Valentin; Hanich, Julian; Wassiliwizky, Eugen; Kuehnast, Milena; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The emotional state of being moved, though frequently referred to in both classical rhetoric and current language use, is far from established as a well-defined psychological construct. In a series of three studies, we investigated eliciting scenarios, emotional ingredients, appraisal patterns, feeling qualities, and the affective signature of being moved and related emotional states. The great majority of the eliciting scenarios can be assigned to significant relationship and critical life events (especially death, birth, marriage, separation, and reunion). Sadness and joy turned out to be the two preeminent emotions involved in episodes of being moved. Both the sad and the joyful variants of being moved showed a coactivation of positive and negative affect and can thus be ranked among the mixed emotions. Moreover, being moved, while featuring only low-to-mid arousal levels, was experienced as an emotional state of high intensity; this applied to responses to fictional artworks no less than to own-life and other real, but media-represented, events. The most distinctive findings regarding cognitive appraisal dimensions were very low ratings for causation of the event by oneself and for having the power to change its outcome, along with very high ratings for appraisals of compatibility with social norms and self-ideals. Putting together the characteristics identified and discussed throughout the three studies, the paper ends with a sketch of a psychological construct of being moved. PMID:26042816

  20. Average Gait Differential Image Based Human Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinyan; Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The difference between adjacent frames of human walking contains useful information for human gait identification. Based on the previous idea a silhouettes difference based human gait recognition method named as average gait differential image (AGDI) is proposed in this paper. The AGDI is generated by the accumulation of the silhouettes difference between adjacent frames. The advantage of this method lies in that as a feature image it can preserve both the kinetic and static information of walking. Comparing to gait energy image (GEI), AGDI is more fit to representation the variation of silhouettes during walking. Two-dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA) is used to extract features from the AGDI. Experiments on CASIA dataset show that AGDI has better identification and verification performance than GEI. Comparing to PCA, 2DPCA is a more efficient and less memory storage consumption feature extraction method in gait based recognition. PMID:24895648

  1. Quetelet, the average man and medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Caponi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Using two books by Adolphe Quetelet, I analyze his theory of the 'average man', which associates biological and social normality with the frequency with which certain characteristics appear in a population. The books are Sur l'homme et le développement de ses facultés and Du systeme social et des lois qui le régissent. Both reveal that Quetelet's ideas are permeated by explanatory strategies drawn from physics and astronomy, and also by discursive strategies drawn from theology and religion. The stability of the mean as opposed to the dispersion of individual characteristics and events provided the basis for the use of statistics in social sciences and medicine. PMID:23970171

  2. Average power laser experiment (APLE) design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rodenburg, R. E.; Dowell, D. H.; Greegor, R. B.; Kennedy, R. C.; Romero, J. B.; Siciliano, J. A.; Tong, K.-O.; Vetter, A. M.; Adamski, J. L.; Pistoresi, D. J.; Shoffstall, D. R.; Quimby, D. C.

    1992-07-01

    We describe the details and the design requirements for the 100 kW CW radio frequency free electron laser at 10 μm to be built at Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Division in Seattle with the collaboration of Los Alamos National Laboratory. APLE is a single-accelerator master-oscillator and power-amplifier (SAMOPA) device. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate a fully operational RF-FEL at 10 μm with an average power of 100 kW. The approach and wavelength were chosen on the basis of maximum cost effectiveness, including utilization of existing hardware and reasonable risk, and potential for future applications. Current plans call for an initial oscillator power demonstration in the fall of 1994 and full SAMOPA operation by December 1995.

  3. Asymmetric network connectivity using weighted harmonic averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Mahadevan, L.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a non-metric measure of the "closeness" felt between two nodes in an undirected, weighted graph using a simple weighted harmonic average of connectivity, that is a real-valued Generalized Erdös Number (GEN). While our measure is developed with a collaborative network in mind, the approach can be of use in a variety of artificial and real-world networks. We are able to distinguish between network topologies that standard distance metrics view as identical, and use our measure to study some simple analytically tractable networks. We show how this might be used to look at asymmetry in authorship networks such as those that inspired the integer Erdös numbers in mathematical coauthorships. We also show the utility of our approach to devise a ratings scheme that we apply to the data from the NetFlix prize, and find a significant improvement using our method over a baseline.

  4. Average deployments versus missile and defender parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    This report evaluates the average number of reentry vehicles (RVs) that could be deployed successfully as a function of missile burn time, RV deployment times, and the number of space-based interceptors (SBIs) in defensive constellations. Leakage estimates of boost-phase kinetic-energy defenses as functions of launch parameters and defensive constellation size agree with integral predictions of near-exact calculations for constellation sizing. The calculations discussed here test more detailed aspects of the interaction. They indicate that SBIs can efficiently remove about 50% of the RVs from a heavy missile attack. The next 30% can removed with two-fold less effectiveness. The next 10% could double constellation sizes. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Average prime-pair counting formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Jaap; Riele, Herman Te

    2010-04-01

    Taking r>0 , let π_{2r}(x) denote the number of prime pairs (p, p+2r) with p≤ x . The prime-pair conjecture of Hardy and Littlewood (1923) asserts that π_{2r}(x)˜ 2C_{2r} {li}_2(x) with an explicit constant C_{2r}>0 . There seems to be no good conjecture for the remainders ω_{2r}(x)=π_{2r}(x)- 2C_{2r} {li}_2(x) that corresponds to Riemann's formula for π(x)-{li}(x) . However, there is a heuristic approximate formula for averages of the remainders ω_{2r}(x) which is supported by numerical results.

  6. The balanced survivor average causal effect.

    PubMed

    Greene, Tom; Joffe, Marshall; Hu, Bo; Li, Liang; Boucher, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis of longitudinal outcomes is often complicated by the absence of observable values in patients who die prior to their scheduled measurement. In such cases, the longitudinal data are said to be "truncated by death" to emphasize that the longitudinal measurements are not simply missing, but are undefined after death. Recently, the truncation by death problem has been investigated using the framework of principal stratification to define the target estimand as the survivor average causal effect (SACE), which in the context of a two-group randomized clinical trial is the mean difference in the longitudinal outcome between the treatment and control groups for the principal stratum of always-survivors. The SACE is not identified without untestable assumptions. These assumptions have often been formulated in terms of a monotonicity constraint requiring that the treatment does not reduce survival in any patient, in conjunction with assumed values for mean differences in the longitudinal outcome between certain principal strata. In this paper, we introduce an alternative estimand, the balanced-SACE, which is defined as the average causal effect on the longitudinal outcome in a particular subset of the always-survivors that is balanced with respect to the potential survival times under the treatment and control. We propose a simple estimator of the balanced-SACE that compares the longitudinal outcomes between equivalent fractions of the longest surviving patients between the treatment and control groups and does not require a monotonicity assumption. We provide expressions for the large sample bias of the estimator, along with sensitivity analyses and strategies to minimize this bias. We consider statistical inference under a bootstrap resampling procedure. PMID:23658214

  7. Averaged implicit hydrodynamic model of semiflexible filaments.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Preethi L; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a method to incorporate hydrodynamic interaction in a model of semiflexible filament dynamics. Hydrodynamic screening and other hydrodynamic interaction effects lead to nonuniform drag along even a rigid filament, and cause bending fluctuations in semiflexible filaments, in addition to the nonuniform Brownian forces. We develop our hydrodynamics model from a string-of-beads idealization of filaments, and capture hydrodynamic interaction by Stokes superposition of the solvent flow around beads. However, instead of the commonly used first-order Stokes superposition, we do an equivalent of infinite-order superposition by solving for the true relative velocity or hydrodynamic velocity of the beads implicitly. We also avoid the computational cost of the string-of-beads idealization by assuming a single normal, parallel and angular hydrodynamic velocity over sections of beads, excluding the beads at the filament ends. We do not include the end beads in the averaging and solve for them separately instead, in order to better resolve the drag profiles along the filament. A large part of the hydrodynamic drag is typically concentrated at the filament ends. The averaged implicit hydrodynamics methods can be easily incorporated into a string-of-rods idealization of semiflexible filaments that was developed earlier by the authors. The earlier model was used to solve the Brownian dynamics of semiflexible filaments, but without hydrodynamic interactions incorporated. We validate our current model at each stage of development, and reproduce experimental observations on the mean-squared displacement of fluctuating actin filaments . We also show how hydrodynamic interaction confines a fluctuating actin filament between two stationary lateral filaments. Finally, preliminary examinations suggest that a large part of the observed velocity in the interior segments of a fluctuating filament can be attributed to induced solvent flow or hydrodynamic screening. PMID:20365783

  8. The entropy in finite N-unit nonextensive systems: The normal average and q-average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the Tsallis entropy in finite N-unit nonextensive systems by using the multivariate q-Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDFs) derived by the maximum entropy methods with the normal average and the q-average (q: the entropic index). The Tsallis entropy obtained by the q-average has an exponential N dependence: Sq(N)/N≃e(1-q)NS1(1) for large N (≫1/(1-q)>0). In contrast, the Tsallis entropy obtained by the normal average is given by Sq(N)/N≃[1/(q-1)N] for large N (≫1/(q -1)>0). N dependences of the Tsallis entropy obtained by the q- and normal averages are generally quite different, although both results are in fairly good agreement for |q -1|≪1.0. The validity of the factorization approximation (FA) to PDFs, which has been commonly adopted in the literature, has been examined. We have calculated correlations defined by Cm=⟨(δxiδxj)m⟩-⟨(δxi)m⟩⟨(δxj)m⟩ for i ≠j where δxi=xi-⟨xi⟩, and the bracket ⟨ṡ⟩ stands for the normal and q-averages. The first-order correlation (m =1) expresses the intrinsic correlation and higher-order correlations with m ≥2 include nonextensivity-induced correlation, whose physical origin is elucidated in the superstatistics.

  9. A comparison of moving object detection methods for real-time moving object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Aditya; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    Moving object detection has a wide variety of applications from traffic monitoring, site monitoring, automatic theft identification, face detection to military surveillance. Many methods have been developed across the globe for moving object detection, but it is very difficult to find one which can work globally in all situations and with different types of videos. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate existing moving object detection methods which can be implemented in software on a desktop or laptop, for real time object detection. There are several moving object detection methods noted in the literature, but few of them are suitable for real time moving object detection. Most of the methods which provide for real time movement are further limited by the number of objects and the scene complexity. This paper evaluates the four most commonly used moving object detection methods as background subtraction technique, Gaussian mixture model, wavelet based and optical flow based methods. The work is based on evaluation of these four moving object detection methods using two (2) different sets of cameras and two (2) different scenes. The moving object detection methods have been implemented using MatLab and results are compared based on completeness of detected objects, noise, light change sensitivity, processing time etc. After comparison, it is observed that optical flow based method took least processing time and successfully detected boundary of moving objects which also implies that it can be implemented for real-time moving object detection.

  10. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.

  11. Flux-Averaged and Volume-Averaged Concentrations in Continuum Approaches to Solute Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    1984-07-01

    Transformations between volume-averaged pore fluid concentrations and flux-averaged concentrations are presented which show that both modes of concentration obey convective-dispersive transport equations of identical mathematical form for nonreactive solutes. The pertinent boundary conditions for the two modes, however, do not transform identically. Solutions of the convection-dispersion equation for a semi-infinite system during steady flow subject to a first-type inlet boundary condition is shown to yield flux concentrations, while solutions subject to a third-type boundary condition yield volume-averaged concentrations. These solutions may be applied with reasonable impunity to finite as well as semi-infinite media if back mixing at the exit is precluded. Implications of the distinction between resident and flux concentrations to laboratory and field studies of solute transport are discussed. It is suggested that perceived limitations of the convection-dispersion model for media with large variations in pore water velocities may in certain cases be attributable to a failure to distinguish between volume-averaged and flux-averaged concentrations.

  12. Optimizing Average Precision Using Weakly Supervised Data.

    PubMed

    Behl, Aseem; Mohapatra, Pritish; Jawahar, C V; Kumar, M Pawan

    2015-12-01

    Many tasks in computer vision, such as action classification and object detection, require us to rank a set of samples according to their relevance to a particular visual category. The performance of such tasks is often measured in terms of the average precision (ap). Yet it is common practice to employ the support vector machine ( svm) classifier, which optimizes a surrogate 0-1 loss. The popularity of svmcan be attributed to its empirical performance. Specifically, in fully supervised settings, svm tends to provide similar accuracy to ap-svm, which directly optimizes an ap-based loss. However, we hypothesize that in the significantly more challenging and practically useful setting of weakly supervised learning, it becomes crucial to optimize the right accuracy measure. In order to test this hypothesis, we propose a novel latent ap-svm that minimizes a carefully designed upper bound on the ap-based loss function over weakly supervised samples. Using publicly available datasets, we demonstrate the advantage of our approach over standard loss-based learning frameworks on three challenging problems: action classification, character recognition and object detection. PMID:26539857

  13. Calculating Free Energies Using Average Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darve, Eric; Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new, general formula that connects the derivatives of the free energy along the selected, generalized coordinates of the system with the instantaneous force acting on these coordinates is derived. The instantaneous force is defined as the force acting on the coordinate of interest so that when it is subtracted from the equations of motion the acceleration along this coordinate is zero. The formula applies to simulations in which the selected coordinates are either unconstrained or constrained to fixed values. It is shown that in the latter case the formula reduces to the expression previously derived by den Otter and Briels. If simulations are carried out without constraining the coordinates of interest, the formula leads to a new method for calculating the free energy changes along these coordinates. This method is tested in two examples - rotation around the C-C bond of 1,2-dichloroethane immersed in water and transfer of fluoromethane across the water-hexane interface. The calculated free energies are compared with those obtained by two commonly used methods. One of them relies on determining the probability density function of finding the system at different values of the selected coordinate and the other requires calculating the average force at discrete locations along this coordinate in a series of constrained simulations. The free energies calculated by these three methods are in excellent agreement. The relative advantages of each method are discussed.

  14. Average oxidation state of carbon in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The formal oxidation state of carbon atoms in organic molecules depends on the covalent structure. In proteins, the average oxidation state of carbon (ZC) can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formula. To investigate oxidation–reduction (redox) patterns, groups of proteins from different subcellular locations and phylogenetic groups were selected for comparison. Extracellular proteins of yeast have a relatively high oxidation state of carbon, corresponding with oxidizing conditions outside of the cell. However, an inverse relationship between ZC and redox potential occurs between the endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm. This trend provides support for the hypothesis that protein transport and turnover are ultimately coupled to the maintenance of different glutathione redox potentials in subcellular compartments. There are broad changes in ZC in whole-genome protein compositions in microbes from different environments, and in Rubisco homologues, lower ZC tends to occur in organisms with higher optimal growth temperature. Energetic costs calculated from thermodynamic models are consistent with the notion that thermophilic organisms exhibit molecular adaptation to not only high temperature but also the reducing nature of many hydrothermal fluids. Further characterization of the material requirements of protein metabolism in terms of the chemical conditions of cells and environments may help to reveal other linkages among biochemical processes with implications for changes on evolutionary time scales. PMID:25165594

  15. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1957-08-20

    An electromagnetic device for moving an object in a linear path by increments is described. The device is specifically adapted for moving a neutron absorbing control rod into and out of the core of a reactor and consists essentially of an extension member made of magnetic material connected to one end of the control rod and mechanically flexible to grip the walls of a sleeve member when flexed, a magnetic sleeve member coaxial with and slidable between limit stops along the flexible extension, electromagnetic coils substantially centrally located with respect to the flexible extension to flex the extension member into gripping engagement with the sleeve member when ener gized, moving electromagnets at each end of the sleeve to attract the sleeve when energized, and a second gripping electromagnet positioned along the flexible extension at a distance from the previously mentioned electromagnets for gripping the extension member when energized. In use, the second gripping electromagnet is deenergized, the first gripping electromagnet is energized to fix the extension member in the sleeve, and one of the moving electromagnets is energized to attract the sleeve member toward it, thereby moving the control rod.

  16. Moving Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yucong

    There has been a vast increase in applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in civilian domains. To operate in the civilian airspace, a UAV must be able to sense and avoid both static and moving obstacles for flight safety. While indoor and low-altitude environments are mainly occupied by static obstacles, risks in space of higher altitude primarily come from moving obstacles such as other aircraft or flying vehicles in the airspace. Therefore, the ability to avoid moving obstacles becomes a necessity for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Towards enabling a UAV to autonomously sense and avoid moving obstacles, this thesis makes the following contributions. Initially, an image-based reactive motion planner is developed for a quadrotor to avoid a fast approaching obstacle. Furthermore, A Dubin's curve based geometry method is developed as a global path planner for a fixed-wing UAV to avoid collisions with aircraft. The image-based method is unable to produce an optimal path and the geometry method uses a simplified UAV model. To compensate these two disadvantages, a series of algorithms built upon the Closed-Loop Rapid Exploratory Random Tree are developed as global path planners to generate collision avoidance paths in real time. The algorithms are validated in Software-In-the-Loop (SITL) and Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulations using a fixed-wing UAV model and in real flight experiments using quadrotors. It is observed that the algorithm enables a UAV to avoid moving obstacles approaching to it with different directions and speeds.

  17. Maxwell Equations for Slow-Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the Minkowski equations obtained on the basis of theory of relativity are used to describe electromagnetic fields in moving media. But important electromagnetic processes run under non-relativistic conditions of slow-moving media. Therefore, one should carry out its description in terms of classical mechanics. Hertz derived electrodynamic equations for moving media within the frame of classical mechanics on the basis of the Maxwell theory. His equations disagree with the experimental data concerned with the moving dielectrics. In the paper, a way of description of electromagnetic fields in slow-moving media on the basis of the Maxwell theory within the frame of classical mechanics is offered by combining the Hertz approach and the experimental data concerned with the movement of dielectrics in electromagnetic fields. Received Maxwell equations lack asymmetry in the description of the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor and conform to known experimental data. Comparative analysis of the Minkowski and Maxwell models is carried out.

  18. Analysis of grain boundary dynamics using event detection and cumulative averaging.

    PubMed

    Gautam, A; Ophus, C; Lançon, F; Denes, P; Dahmen, U

    2015-04-01

    To analyze extended time series of high resolution images, we have employed automated frame-by-frame comparisons that are able to detect dynamic changes in the structure of a grain boundary in Au. Using cumulative averaging of images between events allowed high resolution measurements of the atomic relaxation in the interface with sufficient accuracy for comparison with atomistic models. Cumulative averaging was also used to observe the structural rearrangement of atomic columns at a moving step in the grain boundary. The technique of analyzing changing features in high resolution images by averaging between incidents can be used to deconvolute stochastic events that occur at random intervals and on time scales well beyond that accessible to single-shot imaging. PMID:25498139

  19. Motion planning for multiple moving objects

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.K.

    1995-05-01

    We present a motion planner for multiple moving objects in two dimensions. The search for collision-free paths is performed in the composite configuration space of all the moving objects to guarantee a solution, and the efficiency of our planner is demonstrated with examples. Our motion planner can be characterized with a hierarchical, multi-resolution search of the configuration space along with a generate-and-test paradigm for solution paths. Because of the high dimensionality of the composite configuration space, our planner is most useful for cases with a small number of moving objects. Some of the potential applications are navigation of several mobile robots, and planning part motions for a multi-handed assembly operation.

  20. A Note on Trapping Moving Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Hsiao C.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of stationary configurations of point vortices, also known as vortex equilibrium, has received considerable attention in recent years. By observing numerical results, it is found that a "counterpart" of this system also exists, in which moving vortices may be "trapped" by an inlet-like device to form a stationary pattern with no translational motion. After an intuitive explanation for the process, vortex trajectory maps based on numerical results are presented. These maps exhibit two stationary points under the present conditions, which are the focal points of vortex trajectories. A vortex upstream of these points, if within a certain offset range, will move towards these points spontaneously and be captured there. This proposed device is also capable of trapping spinning vortex pairs and triads. It is possible to impose a uniform stream at infinity, as long as the flow field is still dominated by the moving vortices.

  1. Detecting slow moving targets in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Perlovsky, Leonid; Mutz, Chris W.; Schindler, John

    2004-08-01

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) radars can detect slow-moving targets if their velocities are high enough to produce distinguishable Doppler frequencies. However, no reliable technique is currently available to detect targets that fall below the minimum detectable velocity (MDV) of GMTI radars. In synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, detection of moving targets is difficult because of target smear due to motion, which could make low-RCS targets fall below stationary ground clutter. Several techniques for SAR imaging of moving targets have been discussed in the literature. These techniques require sufficient signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and adequate MDV for pre-detection. Other techniques require complex changes in hardware. Extracting the maximum information from SAR image data is possible using adaptive, model-based approaches. However, these approaches lead to computational complexity, which exceeds current processing power for more than a single object in an image. This combinatorial complexity is due to the need for having to consider a large number of combinations between multiple target models and the data, while estimating unknown parameters of the target models. We are developing a technique for detecting slow-moving targets in SAR images with low signal-to-clutter ratio, without minimal velocity requirements, and without combinatorial complexity. This paper briefly summarizes the difficulties related to current model-based detection algorithms. A new concept, dynamic logic, is introduced along with an algorithm suitable for the detection of very slow-moving targets in SAR images. This new mathematical technique is inspired by the analysis of biological systems, like the human brain, which combines conceptual understanding with emotional evaluation and overcomes the combinatorial complexity of model-based techniques.

  2. Optimal estimation of the diffusion coefficient from non-averaged and averaged noisy magnitude data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Anders

    2007-08-01

    The magnitude operation changes the signal distribution in MRI images from Gaussian to Rician. This introduces a bias that must be taken into account when estimating the apparent diffusion coefficient. Several estimators are known in the literature. In the present paper, two novel schemes are proposed. Both are based on simple least squares fitting of the measured signal, either to the median (MD) or to the maximum probability (MP) value of the Probability Density Function (PDF). Fitting to the mean (MN) or a high signal-to-noise ratio approximation to the mean (HS) is also possible. Special attention is paid to the case of averaged magnitude images. The PDF, which cannot be expressed in closed form, is analyzed numerically. A scheme for performing maximum likelihood (ML) estimation from averaged magnitude images is proposed. The performance of several estimators is evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We focus on typical clinical situations, where the number of acquisitions is limited. For non-averaged data the optimal choice is found to be MP or HS, whereas uncorrected schemes and the power image (PI) method should be avoided. For averaged data MD and ML perform equally well, whereas uncorrected schemes and HS are inadequate. MD provides easier implementation and higher computational efficiency than ML. Unbiased estimation of the diffusion coefficient allows high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and may therefore help solving the problem of crossing fibers encountered in white matter tractography.

  3. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  4. Noninterferometric topography measurements of fast moving surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinhasi, Shirly Vinikman; Eliezer, Shalom; Glam, Benny; Appelbaum, Gabi; Bakshi, Lior

    2011-08-01

    The topography of moving surfaces is recovered by noninterferometric measurements. The phase reconstruction is derived by measuring the intensities of a backscattered pulsed laser light and solving the transport intensity equation (TIE). The TIE is solved by expanding the phase into a series of Zernike polynomials, leading to a set of appropriate algebraic equations. This technique, which enables us to make a direct connection between experiments and the TIE, has been successfully tested in gas gun experiments. In particular, the topographies of a moving projectile and the free surface of a shocked target were recovered. PMID:21811317

  5. Real-time detection of moving objects from moving vehicles using dense stereo and optical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Matthies, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic scene perception is very important for autonomous vehicles operating around other moving vehicles and humans. Most work on real-time object tracking from moving platforms has used sparse features or assumed flat scene structures. We have recently extended a real-time, dense stereo system to include real-time, dense optical flow, enabling more comprehensive dynamic scene analysis. We describe algorithms to robustly estimate 6-DOF robot egomotion in the presence of moving objects using dense flow and dense stereo. We then use dense stereo and egomotion estimates to identity other moving objects while the robot itself is moving. We present results showing accurate egomotion estimation and detection of moving people and vehicles under general 6-DOF motion of the robot and independently moving objects. The system runs at 18.3 Hz on a 1.4 GHz Pentium M laptop, computing 160x120 disparity maps and optical flow fields, egomotion, and moving object segmentation. We believe this is a significant step toward general unconstrained dynamic scene analysis for mobile robots, as well as for improved position estimation where GPS is unavailable.

  6. Real-time detection of moving objects from moving vehicles using dense stereo and optical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Matthies, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic scene perception is very important for autonomous vehicles operating around other moving vehicles and humans. Most work on real-time object tracking from moving platforms has used sparse features or assumed flat scene structures. We have recently extended a real-time, dense stereo system to include realtime, dense optical flow, enabling more comprehensive dynamic scene analysis. We describe algorithms to robustly estimate 6-DOF robot egomotion in the presence of moving objects using dense flow and dense stereo. We then use dense stereo and egomotion estimates to identify & other moving objects while the robot itself is moving. We present results showing accurate egomotion estimation and detection of moving people and vehicles under general 6-DOF motion of the robot and independently moving objects. The system runs at 18.3 Hz on a 1.4 GHz Pentium M laptop, computing 160x120 disparity maps and optical flow fields, egomotion, and moving object segmentation. We believe this is a significant step toward general unconstrained dynamic scene analysis for mobile robots, as well as for improved position estimation where GPS is unavailable.

  7. Real-time Detection of Moving Objects from Moving Vehicles Using Dense Stereo and Optical Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Matthies, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic scene perception is very important for autonomous vehicles operating around other moving vehicles and humans. Most work on real-time object tracking from moving platforms has used sparse features or assumed flat scene structures. We have recently extended a real-time. dense stereo system to include realtime. dense optical flow, enabling more comprehensive dynamic scene analysis. We describe algorithms to robustly estimate 6-DOF robot egomotion in the presence of moving objects using dense flow and dense stereo. We then use dense stereo and egomotion estimates to identify other moving objects while the robot itself is moving. We present results showing accurate egomotion estimation and detection of moving people and vehicles under general 6DOF motion of the robot and independently moving objects. The system runs at 18.3 Hz on a 1.4 GHz Pentium M laptop. computing 160x120 disparity maps and optical flow fields, egomotion, and moving object segmentation. We believe this is a significant step toward general unconstrained dynamic scene analysis for mobile robots, as well as for improved position estimation where GPS is unavailable.

  8. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  9. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  10. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  11. Motion of a Moving Elastic Beam Carrying a Moving MASS—ANALYSIS and Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, S.; YOUM, Y.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, vibrational motion of an elastic beam fixed on a moving cart and carrying a moving mass is investigated. The equations of motion of the beam-mass-cart system are derived and the coupled dynamic equations are solved by the unconstrained modal analysis. In modal analysis, the exact normal mode solutions corresponding to the eigenfrequencies for each position of the moving mass and the ratios of the weight of the beam-mass-cart system are used. Proper transformation of time solutions between the normal modes for a position and those for the next position of the moving mass is also considered. Numerical simulations are carried out to obtain open-loop responses of the system in tracking pre-designed paths of the moving mass. The simulation results show that the model predicts the dynamic behavior of the beam-mass-cart system well. Experiments are carried out to show the validity of the proposed analytical method.

  12. The effect of monocular depth cues on the detection of moving objects by moving observers.

    PubMed

    Royden, Constance S; Parsons, Daniel; Travatello, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    An observer moving through the world must be able to identify and locate moving objects in the scene. In principle, one could accomplish this task by detecting object images moving at a different angle or speed than the images of other items in the optic flow field. While angle of motion provides an unambiguous cue that an object is moving relative to other items in the scene, a difference in speed could be due to a difference in the depth of the objects and thus is an ambiguous cue. We tested whether the addition of information about the distance of objects from the observer, in the form of monocular depth cues, aided detection of moving objects. We found that thresholds for detection of object motion decreased as we increased the number of depth cues available to the observer. PMID:27264029

  13. Use of moving interference fringes for holographic recording onto a moving storage medium.

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, H; Yamamoto, M

    1993-07-10

    We describe a feasibility study of a multiplexed holographic recording method onto a moving storage medium by using moving interference fringes caused by diffracted light beams that are generated from an acousto-optic deflector (AOD). The AOD, driven by amplitude-modulated electric signals, generates several diffracted beams with different frequencies because of Doppler shifting by AOD driving-frequency components. The interference between the beams results in a nonstationary light intensity distribution, i.e., a moving interference fringe. Its velocity is reduced by an image-reduction optical system, and the storage medium is moved at the same velocity as the fringe motion at the image-formation point. This compensates for a reduction of visibility with the movement of the medium, so a holographic recording onto a moving medium can be achieved. In addition, angular multiplexing is achieved by switching the AOD driving frequencies. PMID:20829997

  14. Stochastic homogenization of interfaces moving with changing sign velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciomaga, Adina; Souganidis, Panagiotis E.; Tran, Hung V.

    2015-02-01

    We are interested in the averaging behavior of interfaces moving in stationary ergodic environments with oscillatory normal velocity which changes sign. The problem can be reformulated as the homogenization of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with a positively homogeneous of degree one non-coercive Hamiltonian. The periodic setting was studied earlier by Cardaliaguet, Lions and Souganidis (2009) [16]. Here we concentrate in the random media and show that the solutions of the oscillatory Hamilton-Jacobi equation converge in L∞-weak ⋆ to a linear combination of the initial datum and the solutions of several initial value problems with deterministic effective Hamiltonian(s), determined by the properties of the random media.

  15. Dynamics of slow-moving landslides from permanent scatterer analysis.

    PubMed

    Hilley, George E; Bürgmann, Roland; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio; Rocca, Fabio

    2004-06-25

    High-resolution interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) permanent scatterer data allow us to resolve the rates and variations in the rates of slow-moving landslides. Satellite-to-ground distances (range changes) on landslides increase at rates of 5 to 7 millimeters per year, indicating average downslope sliding velocities from 27 to 38 millimeters per year. Time-series analysis shows that displacement occurs mainly during the high-precipitation season; during the 1997-1998 El Niño event, rates of range change increased to as much as 11 millimeters per year. The observed nonlinear relationship of creep and precipitation rates suggests that increased pore fluid pressures within the shallow subsurface may initiate and accelerate these features. Changes in the slope of a hill resulting from increases in the pore pressure and lithostatic stress gradients may then lead to landslides. PMID:15218146

  16. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  17. Characterization of a small moving-magnet electrodynamic linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Garrett, Steven

    2005-10-01

    The mechanical and electrodynamic parameters of a small, potentially inexpensive, moving-magnet electrodynamic linear motor are determined experimentally. Employing the formalism introduced by Wakeland, these parameters are used to predict the electromechanical efficiency of the motor. The transduction coefficient, Bl, was observed to be a function of position. But as shown in the paper, the variation in Bl with position has a smaller effect on the driver's output power because Bl is largest around the equilibrium position, where the piston velocity is also largest. By mechanical colinear joining of the armatures of two such motors, an electrodynamic load (dynamometer) is created to measure the efficiency as a function of energy dissipated in the dynamometer. The measured efficiencies are shown to be in good agreement with the predictions if a position-averaged effective transduction coefficient is introduced. Based on these results, this linear motor is judged to be an attractive power source in small electrically driven thermoacoustic refrigerator applications.

  18. Waste tyre pyrolysis: modelling of a moving bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Aylón, E; Fernández-Colino, A; Murillo, R; Grasa, G; Navarro, M V; García, T; Mastral, A M

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a new model for waste tyre pyrolysis in a moving bed reactor. This model comprises three different sub-models: a kinetic sub-model that predicts solid conversion in terms of reaction time and temperature, a heat transfer sub-model that calculates the temperature profile inside the particle and the energy flux from the surroundings to the tyre particles and, finally, a hydrodynamic model that predicts the solid flow pattern inside the reactor. These three sub-models have been integrated in order to develop a comprehensive reactor model. Experimental results were obtained in a continuous moving bed reactor and used to validate model predictions, with good approximation achieved between the experimental and simulated results. In addition, a parametric study of the model was carried out, which showed that tyre particle heating is clearly faster than average particle residence time inside the reactor. Therefore, this fast particle heating together with fast reaction kinetics enables total solid conversion to be achieved in this system in accordance with the predictive model. PMID:20510597

  19. Magnetic multipole redirector of moving plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Crow, James T.; Mowrer, Gary R.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for redirecting moving plasma streams using a multiple array of magnetic field generators (e.g., permanent magnets or current bearing wires). Alternate rows of the array have opposite magnetic field directions. A fine wire mesh may be employed to focus as well as redirect the plasma.

  20. Electromagnetic Force on a Moving Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L.; Missevitch, Oleg V.; Yarman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the force acting on a moving dipole due to an external electromagnetic field and show that the expression derived in Vekstein (1997 "Eur. J. Phys." 18 113) is erroneous and suggest the correct equation for the description of this force. We also discuss the physical meaning of the relativistic transformation of current for a closed…

  1. Bacterial Chemotaxis with a Moving Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominick, Corey

    2015-03-01

    Most chemotaxis studies so far have been conducted in a quiescent fluid with a well-defined chemical gradient. Such experiments may be appropriate for studying enteric bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, but the environment it provides is very different from that typically encountered by marine bacteria. Herein we describe an experiment in which marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticusis subject to stimulation by a small moving target. A micropipette of the tip size <1 ?m is used to slowly release a chemoattractant, serine, at different concentrations. The pipette is made to move with different patterns and speeds, ranging from 0 to 100 ?m/s; the latter is about twice the bacterial swimming speed. We found that if the pipette is moved slowly, with 1/4 of bacterial swimming speed, cells accumulate near the tip region but when it is moved with speed greater than 1/2 the bacterial swimming speed, cells trail behind the pipette over a large distance. The behaviors observed in V. alginolyticusare significantly different from E. coli, suggesting that the former is a better chemotaxer in a changing environment.

  2. Supportive Discourse Moves in Persian Requests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Allami, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study designed to investigate the types of supportive discourse moves employed by Persian speakers in their Requestive Speech Acts. 372 respondents took a Discourse Completion Test (DCT) with six scenarios ranging from formal to informal degrees of Perceived Situational Seriousness, and returned 2232 Requestive…

  3. Optimizing replica exchange moves for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-11-01

    We sketch the statistical physics framework of the replica exchange technique when applied to molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we draw attention to generalized move sets that allow a variety of optimizations as well as new applications of the method. PMID:18233794

  4. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  5. On the Move: Children in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Yaffa F.; Cherry, Jane W.

    This monograph focuses on children who must move to a new school and new surroundings because their family, for whatever reason, is relocating. It notes that the impact of mobility on families has practical implications for public schools and that schools with a large number of mobile students have a responsibility to establish structured programs…

  6. What Moves Me to Act. I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert

    In this speech, the author expresses concern for the child who does not seem able to perform. The author states that there is an orderly acquisition of sensations, skills, and/or patterns that we move through in the process of learning, and that the acquisition of more advanced skills is predicted on the assumption that earlier sensations, skills,…

  7. Strategic Game Moves Mediate Implicit Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Elizabeth; Baker, Ryan S.; Asbell-Clarke, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Educational games have the potential to be innovative forms of learning assessment, by allowing us to not just study their knowledge but the process that takes students to that knowledge. This paper examines the mediating role of players' moves in digital games on changes in their pre-post classroom measures of implicit science learning. We…

  8. Home Visiting: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boller, Kimberly; Strong, Debra A.; Daro, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Recent large federal investments in services for pregnant women and young children will fuel the expansion of home visiting services across the U.S. The authors summarize the history of home visiting and describe trends toward evidence-based and national program models. Moving to an integrated system requires supports for implementation with…

  9. Finding Funds to Move Summer Learning Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Summer learning loss creates a permanent drag on the US education system. With the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) developed "Moving Summer Learning Forward: A Strategic Roadmap for Funding in Tough Times" to provide out-of-school time programs, school districts,…

  10. Moving toward Gender Equality: Issues and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Examines society's orientation toward a dominator model of interaction and discusses it within the context of history. Articulates conscious choices counselors can make to move toward a more equitable and humanistic style of interpersonal interaction. Concludes that vital struggle between dominance and partnership is struggle for both men and…

  11. Developing Reading Comprehension with Moving Image Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine, Fiona; Shields, Robin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a small-scale exploratory study that investigated how moving-image narratives might enable children to develop transferable reading comprehension strategies. Using short, animated, narrative films, 28 primary-aged children engaged in a 10-week programme that included the explicit instruction of comprehension…

  12. What Moves Me to Act? II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Clare

    This speaker contends that many learning problems can be prevented, or at least lessened, by early intervention. This knowledge is what moves her to act. She describes how, while tutoring bright but nonachieving children in reading, she realized that it was the opportunities she provided the children for visual-motor perceptual training that were…

  13. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain young…

  14. Panel Moves toward "Next Generation" Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    As part of a national effort to produce "next generation" science standards for K-12 education, a panel of experts convened by the National Research Council (NRC) has issued a draft of a conceptual framework designed to guide the standards and "move science education toward a more coherent vision." One key goal of the effort is to focus science…

  15. Moving, Moving, Moving About.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pounds, Elenore T.; Tillotson, Joan S.

    The topic of this book is movement education. The book encourages children to explore and use such basic movements as walking, running, jumping, hopping, bending, and stretching. The children are asked to do the various movements in as many ways as possible. Poems about jumping, hopping, and dancing are included to encourage the children to move…

  16. Determining average path length and average trapping time on generalized dual dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Guan, Jihong

    2015-03-01

    Dendrimer has wide number of important applications in various fields. In some cases during transport or diffusion process, it transforms into its dual structure named Husimi cactus. In this paper, we study the structure properties and trapping problem on a family of generalized dual dendrimer with arbitrary coordination numbers. We first calculate exactly the average path length (APL) of the networks. The APL increases logarithmically with the network size, indicating that the networks exhibit a small-world effect. Then we determine the average trapping time (ATT) of the trapping process in two cases, i.e., the trap placed on a central node and the trap is uniformly distributed in all the nodes of the network. In both case, we obtain explicit solutions of ATT and show how they vary with the networks size. Besides, we also discuss the influence of the coordination number on trapping efficiency.

  17. Instantaneous, phase-averaged, and time-averaged pressure from particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kat, Roeland

    2015-11-01

    Recent work on pressure determination using velocity data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) resulted in approaches that allow for instantaneous and volumetric pressure determination. However, applying these approaches is not always feasible (e.g. due to resolution, access, or other constraints) or desired. In those cases pressure determination approaches using phase-averaged or time-averaged velocity provide an alternative. To assess the performance of these different pressure determination approaches against one another, they are applied to a single data set and their results are compared with each other and with surface pressure measurements. For this assessment, the data set of a flow around a square cylinder (de Kat & van Oudheusden, 2012, Exp. Fluids 52:1089-1106) is used. RdK is supported by a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship.

  18. 40 CFR 80.67 - Compliance on average.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance on average. 80.67 Section...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.67 Compliance on average. The requirements... with one or more of the requirements of § 80.41 is determined on average (“averaged gasoline”)....

  19. 20 CFR 226.62 - Computing average monthly compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computing average monthly compensation. 226... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Years of Service and Average Monthly Compensation § 226.62 Computing average monthly compensation. The employee's average monthly compensation...

  20. 20 CFR 226.62 - Computing average monthly compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computing average monthly compensation. 226... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Years of Service and Average Monthly Compensation § 226.62 Computing average monthly compensation. The employee's average monthly compensation...

  1. 20 CFR 226.62 - Computing average monthly compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Computing average monthly compensation. 226.62... COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Years of Service and Average Monthly Compensation § 226.62 Computing average monthly compensation. The employee's average monthly compensation is...

  2. 20 CFR 226.62 - Computing average monthly compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Computing average monthly compensation. 226.62... COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Years of Service and Average Monthly Compensation § 226.62 Computing average monthly compensation. The employee's average monthly compensation is...

  3. 20 CFR 226.62 - Computing average monthly compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computing average monthly compensation. 226... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Years of Service and Average Monthly Compensation § 226.62 Computing average monthly compensation. The employee's average monthly compensation...

  4. Modeling and simulation of dust behaviors behind a moving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingfang

    Simulation of physically realistic complex dust behaviors is a difficult and attractive problem in computer graphics. A fast, interactive and visually convincing model of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles is very useful in computer simulation, training, education, art, advertising, and entertainment. In my dissertation, an experimental interactive system has been implemented for the simulation of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles. The system includes physically-based models, particle systems, rendering engines and graphical user interface (GUI). I have employed several vehicle models including tanks, cars, and jeeps to test and simulate in different scenarios and conditions. Calm weather, winding condition, vehicle turning left or right, and vehicle simulation controlled by users from the GUI are all included. I have also tested the factors which play against the physical behaviors and graphics appearances of the dust particles through GUI or off-line scripts. The simulations are done on a Silicon Graphics Octane station. The animation of dust behaviors is achieved by physically-based modeling and simulation. The flow around a moving vehicle is modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. I implement a primitive variable and pressure-correction approach to solve the three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes equations in a volume covering the moving vehicle. An alternating- direction implicit (ADI) method is used for the solution of the momentum equations, with a successive-over- relaxation (SOR) method for the solution of the Poisson pressure equation. Boundary conditions are defined and simplified according to their dynamic properties. The dust particle dynamics is modeled using particle systems, statistics, and procedure modeling techniques. Graphics and real-time simulation techniques, such as dynamics synchronization, motion blur, blending, and clipping have been employed in the rendering to achieve realistic appearing dust

  5. Moving to a New Town. A Relocation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackliffe, Gary, Ed.; Pearson, Nancy, Ed.

    Designed to help those who must consider relocating to secure employment, this relocation guide provides answers to a number of questions pertaining to moving, money management, and adjusting to a new community. Various aspects of deciding to move are covered, including reasons for moving, thinking of a move as permanent, feelings of homesickness,…

  6. Move Sequences in Graduate Research Paper Introductions and Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrunio, Marilu Rañosa

    2012-01-01

    Graduate students submit academic papers at the end of the term as part of their coursework. Such papers contain introduction moves which may be troublesome and conclusion moves which may contain sub-moves not really required. This paper is aimed at assessing what particular moves are employed in the introduction and conclusion sections of 21…

  7. The bi-directional moving structures in a coronal bright point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Ning, Zongjun; Su, Yingna

    2016-09-01

    We report the bi-directional moving structures in a coronal bright point (CBP) on 2015 July 14. It is observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This CBP has a lifetime of ˜10 minutes, and a curved shape. The observations show that many bright structures are moving intermittently outward from the CBP brightness core. Such moving structures are clearly seen at AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, 211 Å, 131 Å, 94 Å, 335 Å and 304 Å, slit-jaw (SJI) 1330 Å and 1400 Å. In order to analyze these moving structures, the CBP is cut along the moving direction with a curved slit from the AIA and SJI images. Then we can obtain the time-distance slices, including the intensity and intensity-derivative diagrams, from which, the moving structures are recognized as the oblique streaks, and they are characterized by the bi-direction, simultaneity, symmetry, and periodicity. The average speed is around 300 km s^{-1}, while the typically period is ˜90 s. All these features (including the bi-directional flows and their periodicity) can be detected simultaneously at all the 9 wavelengths. This CBP takes place at the site between a small pair of magnetic polarities. High time resolution observations show that they are moving close to each other during its lifetime. These facts support the magnetic reconnection model of the CBP and the bi-directional moving structures could be the observational outflows after the reconnection. Therefore, they can be as the direct observation evidence of the magnetic reconnection.

  8. Chess-playing epilepsy: a case report with video-EEG and back averaging.

    PubMed

    Mann, M W; Gueguen, B; Guillou, S; Debrand, E; Soufflet, C

    2004-12-01

    A patient suffering from juvenile myoclonic epilepsy experienced myoclonic jerks, fairly regularly, while playing chess. The myoclonus appeared particularly when he had to plan his strategy, to choose between two solutions or while raising the arm to move a chess figure. Video-EEG-polygraphy was performed, with back averaging of the myoclonus registered during a chess match and during neuropsychological testing with Kohs cubes. The EEG spike wave complexes were localised in the fronto-central region. [Published with video sequences]. PMID:15634627

  9. On multiscale moving contact line theory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaofan; Fan, Houfu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a multiscale moving contact line (MMCL) theory is presented and employed to simulate liquid droplet spreading and capillary motion. The proposed MMCL theory combines a coarse-grained adhesive contact model with a fluid interface membrane theory, so that it can couple molecular scale adhesive interaction and surface tension with hydrodynamics of microscale flow. By doing so, the intermolecular force, the van der Waals or double layer force, separates and levitates the liquid droplet from the supporting solid substrate, which avoids the shear stress singularity caused by the no-slip condition in conventional hydrodynamics theory of moving contact line. Thus, the MMCL allows the difference of the surface energies and surface stresses to drive droplet spreading naturally. To validate the proposed MMCL theory, we have employed it to simulate droplet spreading over various elastic substrates. The numerical simulation results obtained by using MMCL are in good agreement with the molecular dynamics results reported in the literature. PMID:26345090

  10. Moving Frames for Heart Fiber Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Piuze, Emmanuel; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2015-01-01

    The method of moving frames provides powerful geometrical tools for the analysis of smoothly varying frame fields. However, in the face of missing measurements, a reconstruction problem arises, one that is largely unexplored for 3D frame fields. Here we consider the particular example of reconstructing impaired cardiac diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data. We combine moving frame analysis with a diffusion inpainting scheme that incorporates rule-based priors. In contrast to previous reconstruction methods, this new approach uses comprehensive differential descriptors for cardiac fibers, and is able to fully recover their orientation. We demonstrate the superior performance of this approach in terms of error of fit when compared to alternate methods. We anticipate that these tools could find application in clinical settings, where damaged heart tissue needs to be replaced or repaired, and for generating dense fiber volumes in electromechanical modelling of the heart. PMID:26221700

  11. Segmentation of moving object in complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Yang; Wang, Jingru; Zhang, Qiheng

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a new automatic image segmentation method for segmenting moving object in complex environment by combining the motion information with edge information. We propose an adaptive optical flow method based on the Horn-Schunck algorithm to estimate the optical flow field. Our method puts different smoothness constraints on different directions and optical flow constraint is used according to the gradient magnitude. Canny edge detector can obtain the most edge information but miss some pixels. In order to restore these missing pixels the edge has a growing based on the continuity of optical flow field. Next, by remaining the block that has the longest edge could delete the noise in the background, and then the last segmentation result is obtained. The experimental result demonstrates that this method can segment the moving object in complex environment precisely.

  12. Real time moving scene holographic camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A holographic motion picture camera system producing resolution of front surface detail is described. The system utilizes a beam of coherent light and means for dividing the beam into a reference beam for direct transmission to a conventional movie camera and two reflection signal beams for transmission to the movie camera by reflection from the front side of a moving scene. The system is arranged so that critical parts of the system are positioned on the foci of a pair of interrelated, mathematically derived ellipses. The camera has the theoretical capability of producing motion picture holograms of projectiles moving at speeds as high as 900,000 cm/sec (about 21,450 mph).

  13. Moving and handling: reducing risk through assessment.

    PubMed

    Warren, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Manual handling injuries can occur almost anywhere in a healthcare environment, and most staff perform a variety of moving and handling tasks every day. Heavy lifting, awkward posture, and previous or existing injury can increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. A healthcare professional's involvement in moving and handling is more widespread than it might appear, and their actions and understanding of techniques, legislation and guidelines have a direct effect on patient care. Every situation that involves the handling, or partial handling, of a person presents varying levels of risk to the patient and the carer. Maintaining a good level of patient mobility and independence is an essential part of care delivery and can reduce the risk of long-term physical and psychological effects. Delivery of care should focus on the individual's capacity, not their incapacity, to ensure that they are treated with dignity and respect. PMID:27275915

  14. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  15. Moving mass trim control system design

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Robinett, R.D.; Sturgis, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a moving mass trim control system for maneuvering axisymmetric reentry vehicles. The moving mass trim controller is composed of three equal masses that are independently positioned in order to deliver a desired center of mass position. For a slowly spinning reentry vehicle, the mass offset creates a trim angle-of-attack to generate modest flight path corrections. The control system must maintain the desired position of each mass in the face of large disturbances. A novel algorithm for determining the desired mass positions is developed in conjunction with a preliminary controller design. The controller design is based on classical frequency domain techniques where a bound on the disturbance magnitude is used to formulate the disturbance rejection problem. Simulation results for the controller are presented for a typical reentry vehicle.

  16. A Luneburg lens in moving coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The reflection of light rays by a reference microsatellite of new design, which moves with a velocity of 7500 m/s along a near-Earth orbit with a radius of 835 km, is calculated. The microsatellite is a bilayer Luneburg lens with an outer radius of 85 mm. The process of propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a Luneburg lens is analyzed for the first time with the effects of electrodynamics of moving media and optical glass dispersion taken into account. It is demonstrated that the lens motion leads to additional deflection and mixing of rays with various angles of incidence. The obtained results allow one to improve the accuracy of determination of satellite coordinates and open up new opportunities for tests of the theory of relativity and electrodynamics.

  17. Magnetic levitation system for moving objects

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1998-03-03

    Repelling magnetic forces are produced by the interaction of a flux-concentrated magnetic field (produced by permanent magnets or electromagnets) with an inductively loaded closed electric circuit. When one such element moves with respect to the other, a current is induced in the circuit. This current then interacts back on the field to produce a repelling force. These repelling magnetic forces are applied to magnetically levitate a moving object such as a train car. The power required to levitate a train of such cars is drawn from the motional energy of the train itself, and typically represents only a percent or two of the several megawatts of power required to overcome aerodynamic drag at high speeds. 7 figs.

  18. Magnetic levitation system for moving objects

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1998-01-01

    Repelling magnetic forces are produced by the interaction of a flux-concentrated magnetic field (produced by permanent magnets or electromagnets) with an inductively loaded closed electric circuit. When one such element moves with respect to the other, a current is induced in the circuit. This current then interacts back on the field to produce a repelling force. These repelling magnetic forces are applied to magnetically levitate a moving object such as a train car. The power required to levitate a train of such cars is drawn from the motional energy of the train itself, and typically represents only a percent or two of the several megawatts of power required to overcome aerodynamic drag at high speeds.

  19. 77 FR 16566 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Let's Move Museums, Let's Move...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... service that are targeted at fighting childhood obesity. The information will be used to provide... Museums, Let's Move Gardens collection was published in the Federal Register on November 16, 2011 (FR...

  20. Love waves excited by a moving source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    The study analyzes the characteristics of surface Love waves excited by the moment of an oscillating torsional force with a point of action that moves uniformly and rectilinearly along the free flat boundary of a medium having the structure of a "layer on a half-space." The azimuthal-angular distribution of the amplitude and Doppler shift in frequency of the wave modes is studied as a function of the motion velocity of a vibrating source and the parameters of the medium.

  1. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    SciTech Connect

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-06-25

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  2. Nonholonomic feedback control among moving obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Stephen Gregory

    A feedback controller is developed for navigating a nonholonomic vehicle in an area with multiple stationary and possibly moving obstacles. Among other applications the developed algorithms can be used for automatic parking of a passenger car in a parking lot with complex configuration or a ground robot in cluttered environment. Several approaches are explored which combine nonholonomic systems control based on sliding modes and potential field methods.

  3. The structure of a moving vortex lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.W.; Crabtree, G.W.; Kaper, H.G.; Leaf, G.K.; Levine, D.M.; Vinokur, V.M.; Koshelev, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations show a new mechanism for plastic motion of a driven vortex lattice in a clean superconductor. The mechanism, which involves the creation of a defect superstructure, is intrinsic to the moving vortex lattice and is independent of bulk pinning. Other structural features found in the solutions include a reorientation of the vortex lattice and a gradual healing of lattice defects under the influence of a transport current.

  4. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  5. Culture as a Moving Symbolic Border.

    PubMed

    Simão, Lívia Mathias

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose the notion of culture as a symbolic moving border. Departing from both, Boesch's (1991) concept of culture as a symbolic field of action, and Herbst's (1995) co-genetic logic, I will discuss the dynamics of self-other relationships in terms of their potentiality as sources of movement in culture. A brief analysis of an empirical material is given in illustrative character of the ideas here exposed. PMID:26245862

  6. Predictive models for moving contact line flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Modeling flows with moving contact lines poses the formidable challenge that the usual assumptions of Newtonian fluid and no-slip condition give rise to a well-known singularity. This singularity prevents one from satisfying the contact angle condition to compute the shape of the fluid-fluid interface, a crucial calculation without which design parameters such as the pressure drop needed to move an immiscible 2-fluid system through a solid matrix cannot be evaluated. Some progress has been made for low Capillary number spreading flows. Combining experimental measurements of fluid-fluid interfaces very near the moving contact line with an analytical expression for the interface shape, we can determine a parameter that forms a boundary condition for the macroscopic interface shape when Ca much les than l. This parameter, which plays the role of an "apparent" or macroscopic dynamic contact angle, is shown by the theory to depend on the system geometry through the macroscopic length scale. This theoretically established dependence on geometry allows this parameter to be "transferable" from the geometry of the measurement to any other geometry involving the same material system. Unfortunately this prediction of the theory cannot be tested on Earth.

  7. Photometer for tracking a moving light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A photometer that tracks a path of a moving light source with little or no motion of the photometer components. The system includes a non-moving, truncated paraboloid of revolution, having a paraboloid axis, a paraboloid axis, a small entrance aperture, a larger exit aperture and a light-reflecting inner surface, that receives and reflects light in a direction substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis. The system also includes a light processing filter to receive and process the redirected light, and to issue the processed, redirected light as processed light, and an array of light receiving elements, at least one of which receives and measures an associated intensity of a portion of the processed light. The system tracks a light source moving along a path and produces a corresponding curvilinear image of the light source path on the array of light receiving elements. Undesired light wavelengths from the light source may be removed by coating a selected portion of the reflecting inner surface or another light receiving surface with a coating that absorbs incident light in the undesired wavelength range.

  8. Moving source localization using seismic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Stafsudd, Jing Z.; Hudson, Ralph E.; Yao, Kung; Taciroglu, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Accurate localization of a seismic source in a near-field scenario where the distances between sensors and the source are less than a few wavelengths of the generated signal has shown to be a challenging task. Conventional localization algorithms often prove to be ineffective, as near-field seismic signals exhibit characteristics different from the well-studied far-field signals. The current work is aimed at the employment of a seismic sensor array for the localization and tracking of a near-field wideband moving source. In this paper, the mathematical derivation of a novel DOA estimation algorithm-dubbed the Modified Kirlin Method-has been presented in details. The estimated DOAs are then combined using a least-squares optimization method for source localization. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated in a field experiment to track a moving truck. We also compare the DOA estimation and source localization results of the proposed method with those of two other existing methods originally developed for localization of a stationary wideband source; Covariance Matrix Analysis and the Surface Wave Analysis. Our results indicate that both the Surface Wave Analysis and the Modified Kirlin Methods are effective in locating and tracking a moving truck.

  9. Efficient detection of small moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peter L.

    1989-07-01

    A signal processing problem encountered with many sensor systems having a wide field-of-view is detection of small, unresolved objects moving in a straight line amid stationary clutter. The wide field-of-view combined with the need to accurately pinpoint object positions imply that these sensors must have hundreds of thousands of samples in their output. To process this amount of data in a timely fashion, computationally efficient algorithms are a necessity. In this report, a computationally efficient set of algorithms is described for detecting satellites, meteorites, and other moving objects using data from an optical telescope charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane in the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Demonstration Surveillance System (DSS). The trade-off of reduced detection sensitivity for lower computational cost in the algorithm is quantitatively discussed. Major techniques employed are: (1) sample normalization by temporal mean and standard deviation to suppress clutter; (2) maximum value projection to reduce the dimensionality of the data; (3) a two-stage matched filter detector which first nominates and then confirms signal candidates; and (4) two-dimensional binary velocity filtering. The techniques should have practical application to other wide field-of-view sensors where moving object detection is important.

  10. Moving wall, continuous flow electronphoresis apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrophoresis devices and more particularly to a moving wall, continuous flow device in which an electrophoresis chamber is angularly positionable with respect to the direction of moving belt walls. A frame with an electrophoresis chamber is rotatably supported between two synchronously driven belt walls. This allows the chamber to be angularly positionable with respect to the direction of belt travel, which compensates for electroosmotic flow within the electrophoresis chamber. Injection of a buffer solution via an opening and a homogenous sample stream via another opening is performed at the end of a chamber, and collection of buffer and the fractionated species particles is done by a conventional collection array at an opposite end of the chamber. Belts are driven at a rate which exactly matches the flow of buffer and sample through the chamber, which entrains the buffer to behave as a rigid electrophoretic medium, eliminating flow distortions (Poiseuille effect). Additionally, belt material for each belt is stored at one end of the device and is taken up by drive wheels at an opposite end. The novelty of this invention particularly lies in the electrophoresis chamber being angularly positionable between two moving belt walls in order to compensate for electroosmotic flow. Additionally, new belt material is continuously exposed within the chamber, minimizing flow distortion due to contamination of the belt material by the sample.

  11. [Continuous ECG recording for freely moving patients].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Liu, Shengyang; Chen, Jianfang; Zhang, Genxuan; Tsau, Young

    2013-04-01

    As more and more people are becoming aged in China and many of them tend to suffer from chronic cardiac problems, the long-term dynamic cardiac monitoring for freely moving patients becomes essential. A new design for continuous ECG recording on the freely moving patients at home and/or at work is proposed here. It is miniature in size, using digital technologies of the low gain amplifier, the high resolution analog to digital converter and the real-time digital filter that features > 100dB input signal dynamic range (ISDR), > 100dB common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR), and < 5microV (RMS) internal noise. The device works continuously more than 24 hours with a pair of AAA batteries, and is capable of storing the recorded data into a storage card. The preliminary tests showed that the P-QRS-T waveforms were captured and displayed smoothly in resting, walking, and activities, making the device useful in monitoring and analyzing for the patients on the move. PMID:23858751

  12. Scaling of average weighted shortest path and average receiving time on weighted expanded Koch networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zikai; Hou, Baoyu; Zhang, Hongjuan; Jin, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Deterministic network models have been attractive media for discussing dynamical processes' dependence on network structural features. On the other hand, the heterogeneity of weights affect dynamical processes taking place on networks. In this paper, we present a family of weighted expanded Koch networks based on Koch networks. They originate from a r-polygon, and each node of current generation produces m r-polygons including the node and whose weighted edges are scaled by factor w in subsequent evolutionary step. We derive closed-form expressions for average weighted shortest path length (AWSP). In large network, AWSP stays bounded with network order growing (0 < w < 1). Then, we focus on a special random walks and trapping issue on the networks. In more detail, we calculate exactly the average receiving time (ART). ART exhibits a sub-linear dependence on network order (0 < w < 1), which implies that nontrivial weighted expanded Koch networks are more efficient than un-weighted expanded Koch networks in receiving information. Besides, efficiency of receiving information at hub nodes is also dependent on parameters m and r. These findings may pave the way for controlling information transportation on general weighted networks.

  13. Recent Enhancements To The FUN3D Flow Solver For Moving-Mesh Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T,; Thomas, James L.

    2009-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids has been extended to handle general mesh movement involving rigid, deforming, and overset meshes. Mesh deformation is achieved through analogy to elastic media by solving the linear elasticity equations. A general method for specifying the motion of moving bodies within the mesh has been implemented that allows for inherited motion through parent-child relationships, enabling simulations involving multiple moving bodies. Several example calculations are shown to illustrate the range of potential applications. For problems in which an isolated body is rotating with a fixed rate, a noninertial reference-frame formulation is available. An example calculation for a tilt-wing rotor is used to demonstrate that the time-dependent moving grid and noninertial formulations produce the same results in the limit of zero time-step size.

  14. Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this contract was to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Desired properties to be enhanced for moving-bed sorbent materials are: (1) high chemical reactivity (sulfur absorption rate and total sulfur capacity), (2) high mechanical strength (pellet crush strength and attrition resistance), and (3) suitable pellet morphology (e.g., pellet size, shape, surface area, and average specific pore volume). In addition, it is desired to maintain the sorbent properties over extended cyclic use in moving- bed systems.

  15. Radiative transfer in moving media : basic mathematical methods for radiative transfer in spherically symmetrical moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, K. K., Wilson, S. J.

    The advancement of observational techniques over the years has led to the discovery of a large number of stars exhibiting complex spectral structures, thus necessitating the search for new techniques and methods to study radiative transfer in such stars with moving envelopes. This led to the introduction of the concept of "photon escape probability" and the wisdom of expressing the transfer equations in "comoving frames" (CMF). Radiative transfer problems in spherically moving media form a branch of mathematical physics which uses mathematics of a very distinctive kind. Radiative Transfer in Moving Media records the basic mathematical methodologies, both analytical and numerical, developed for solving radiation transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving media, in the consideration of macroscopic velocity fields only. Part I contains the basic notions of radiation-matter interaction in participating media and constructs the relevant transfer equations to be solved in the subsequent chapters. Part II considers the basic mathematical methods for solving the transfer problems in extensive moving atmospheres when it is observed in the lab frame. Part III introduces the analytical and numerical methods for solving radiative transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving atmospheres when expressed in the comoving frame. This book is addressed to graduate students and researchers in Astrophysics, in particular to those studying radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres.

  16. An Empirical Study of Block Matching Techniques for the Detection of Moving Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Love, N S; Kamath, C

    2006-01-09

    The basis of surveillance, event detection, and tracking applications is the detection of moving objects in complex scenes. Complex scenes are difficult to analyze because of camera noise and lighting conditions. Currently, moving objects are detected primarily using background subtraction. We analyze block matching as an alternative for detecting moving objects. Block matching has been extensively utilized in compression algorithms for motion estimation. Besides detection of moving objects, block matching also provides motion vectors (location of motion) which can aide in tracking objects. Block matching techniques consist of three main components: block determination, search methods, and matching criteria. We compare various options for each of the components with moving object detection as the performance goal. Publicly available sequences of several different traffic and weather conditions are used to evaluate the techniques. A coherence metric and the average magnitude of object motion vector error are used to evaluate block determination approaches and search methods. To compare the matching criteria we use precision-recall curves to evaluate the performance of motion detection. We present an empirical study of the block matching techniques using these metrics of performance as well as process timing. We found the hierarchical block determination approach has an overall higher coherence of object motion vectors than the simple block determination approach, but with a significant increase in process timing. The average magnitude of object motion vector for the search methods evaluated were comparable, with the cross search method having a better coherence of object motion vectors. Overall the three step search (TSS) detects more moving objects than the cross and 2D-logarithmic search methods. And the mean square difference (MSD) matching criterion has the best precision-recall as well as process timing when using zero motion biasing.

  17. Stochastic simulation and forecasting of hourly average wind speed sequences in Jamaica

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.R.; Chen, A.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Stochastic simulation and forecast models of hourly average wind speeds are presented in this paper. The models take into account several basic features of wind speed data including autocorrelation, non-Gaussian distribution, and diurnal nonstationarity. The positive correlation between consecutive wind speed observations is taken into account by fitting an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) process to wind speed data which were transformed to make their distribution approximately Gaussian and standardized to remove diurnal nonstationarity. Based on three years of data, separate models were obtained for the months of June, July, and August. Tests were performed to verify the adequacy of the models and comparisons were made between generated and real series and between forecasted and real series to check if the wind speed behavior was faithfully reproduced. Good results were obtained.

  18. Does poor health predict moving, move quality, and desire to move?: A study examining neighborhood selection in US adolescents and adults

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Erin C.; Winning, Ashley; Zaika, Natalya; Subramanian, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, very little research has considered the role of health on shaping characteristics of the neighborhood, including mobility patterns. We explored whether individual health status is one of the characteristics that shape and constrain where individuals live. Methods Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examined whether 16 health indicators (e.g., health behaviors, symptoms, overall status) predicted moving, move quality, and desire to move. Results 3.8% of adolescents (n=490) reported a move in the past year. In the unadjusted models, 10 health indicators were associated with moving; the magnitude of association for these health indicators was similar to socio-demographic characteristics. Seven of these health-moving associations persisted after adjusting for covariates. Health indicators were also associated with moving quality, with a greater number of past year health problems in the child being associated with moving to lower income neighborhood and parent disability or poor health being associated with moving to a higher income neighborhood. Almost every poor health status indicator was associated with a greater desire to move, even after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion Findings suggest health status influences moving. Prior health status must therefore be considered when interpreting results from neighborhood effects studies. PMID:25282124

  19. Cost averaging techniques for robust control of flexible structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on cost averaging techniques for robust control of flexible structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: modeling of parameterized systems; average cost analysis; reduction of parameterized systems; and static and dynamic controller synthesis.

  20. The Spin Move: A Reliable and Cost-Effective Gowning Technique for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Derek H.; Adib, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Operating room efficiency (ORE) and utilization are considered one of the most crucial components of quality improvement in every hospital. We introduced a new gowning technique that could optimize ORE. The Spin Move quickly and efficiently wraps a surgical gown around the surgeon's body. This saves the operative time expended through the traditional gowning techniques. In the Spin Move, while the surgeon is approaching the scrub nurse, he or she uses the left heel as the fulcrum. The torque, which is generated by twisting the right leg around the left leg, helps the surgeon to close the gown as quickly and safely as possible. From 2003 to 2012, the Spin Move was performed in 1,725 consecutive procedures with no complication. The estimated average time was 5.3 and 7.8 seconds for the Spin Move and traditional gowning, respectively. The estimated time saving for the senior author during this period was 71.875 minutes. Approximately 20,000 orthopaedic surgeons practice in the United States. If this technique had been used, 23,958 hours could have been saved. The money saving could have been $14,374,800.00 (23,958 hours × $600/operating room hour) during the past 10 years. The Spin Move is easy to perform and reproducible. It saves operating room time and increases ORE. PMID:26052490

  1. Sample Size Bias in Judgments of Perceptual Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Paul C.; Kimura, Nicole M.; Smith, Andrew R.; Marshall, Lindsay D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people exhibit a sample size bias when judging the average of a set of stimuli on a single dimension. The more stimuli there are in the set, the greater people judge the average to be. This effect has been demonstrated reliably for judgments of the average likelihood that groups of people will experience negative,…

  2. Averaging in SU(2) open quantum random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Ampadu

    2014-03-01

    We study the average position and the symmetry of the distribution in the SU(2) open quantum random walk (OQRW). We show that the average position in the central limit theorem (CLT) is non-uniform compared with the average position in the non-CLT. The symmetry of distribution is shown to be even in the CLT.

  3. 76 FR 57081 - Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... of Prisons Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates in Fiscal Year 2010 was $28,284. The average annual cost to confine an inmate in a Community Corrections...

  4. 78 FR 16711 - Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... of Prisons Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates in Fiscal Year 2011 was $28,893.40. The average annual cost to confine an inmate in a Community...

  5. 76 FR 6161 - Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... of Prisons Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates in Fiscal Year 2009 was $25,251. The average annual cost to confine an inmate in a Community Corrections...

  6. 47 CFR 1.959 - Computation of average terrain elevation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Radial average terrain elevation is calculated as the average of the elevation along a straight line path... radial path extends over foreign territory or water, such portion must not be included in the computation of average elevation unless the radial path again passes over United States land between 16 and...

  7. 7 CFR 760.640 - National average market price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National average market price. 760.640 Section 760.640....640 National average market price. (a) The Deputy Administrator will establish the National Average Market Price (NAMP) using the best sources available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator,...

  8. 7 CFR 760.640 - National average market price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National average market price. 760.640 Section 760.640....640 National average market price. (a) The Deputy Administrator will establish the National Average Market Price (NAMP) using the best sources available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator,...

  9. 7 CFR 760.640 - National average market price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National average market price. 760.640 Section 760.640....640 National average market price. (a) The Deputy Administrator will establish the National Average Market Price (NAMP) using the best sources available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator,...

  10. 7 CFR 760.640 - National average market price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National average market price. 760.640 Section 760.640....640 National average market price. (a) The Deputy Administrator will establish the National Average Market Price (NAMP) using the best sources available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator,...

  11. 7 CFR 760.640 - National average market price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National average market price. 760.640 Section 760.640....640 National average market price. (a) The Deputy Administrator will establish the National Average Market Price (NAMP) using the best sources available, as determined by the Deputy Administrator,...

  12. 20 CFR 404.221 - Computing your average monthly wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computing your average monthly wage. 404.221... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Average-Monthly-Wage Method of Computing Primary Insurance Amounts § 404.221 Computing your average monthly wage. (a) General. Under the...

  13. 20 CFR 404.221 - Computing your average monthly wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computing your average monthly wage. 404.221... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Average-Monthly-Wage Method of Computing Primary Insurance Amounts § 404.221 Computing your average monthly wage. (a) General. Under the...

  14. 20 CFR 404.221 - Computing your average monthly wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computing your average monthly wage. 404.221... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Average-Monthly-Wage Method of Computing Primary Insurance Amounts § 404.221 Computing your average monthly wage. (a) General. Under the...

  15. 20 CFR 404.221 - Computing your average monthly wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computing your average monthly wage. 404.221... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Average-Monthly-Wage Method of Computing Primary Insurance Amounts § 404.221 Computing your average monthly wage. (a) General. Under the...

  16. 20 CFR 404.221 - Computing your average monthly wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computing your average monthly wage. 404.221... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Average-Monthly-Wage Method of Computing Primary Insurance Amounts § 404.221 Computing your average monthly wage. (a) General. Under the...

  17. 27 CFR 19.37 - Average effective tax rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Average effective tax rate... effective tax rate. (a) The proprietor may establish an average effective tax rate for any eligible... recompute the average effective tax rate so as to include only the immediately preceding 6-month period....

  18. Estimation of the path-averaged atmospheric refractive index structure constant from time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Santasri; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2015-05-01

    A time-lapse imaging experiment was conducted to monitor the effects of the atmosphere over some period of time. A tripod-mounted digital camera captured images of a distant building every minute. Correlation techniques were used to calculate the position shifts between the images. Two factors causing shifts between the images are: atmospheric turbulence, causing the images to move randomly and quickly, plus changes in the average refractive index gradient along the path which cause the images to move vertically, more slowly and perhaps in noticeable correlation with solar heating and other weather conditions. A technique for estimating the path-averaged C 2n from the random component of the image motion is presented here. The technique uses a derived set of weighting functions that depend on the size of the imaging aperture and the patch size in the image whose motion is being tracked. Since this technique is phase based, it can be applied to strong turbulence paths where traditional irradiance based techniques suffer from saturation effects.

  19. Birefringence in time-dependent moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shirong; Zhang, Ruoyang; Zhai, Yanwang; Wei, Jianye; Zhao, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in one- and two-dimensional time-dependent moving media is investigated in this paper. We identify another origin of linear birefringence caused by the component of the flow perpendicular to the wave vector. Previously, birefringence is induced by applying external electric and magnetic fields to non-crystalline material. Here it is shown that the time-varying velocity field also contributes to such a phenomenon. Our results indicate that the parallel component, time-dependent or not, will not yield birefringence. Furthermore, the time-dependent flow also results in a frequency shift. One-dimensional simulation is conducted to demonstrate these effects.

  20. Shadowfax: Moving mesh hydrodynamical integration code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert

    2016-05-01

    Shadowfax simulates galaxy evolution. Written in object-oriented modular C++, it evolves a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. For the hydrodynamical integration, it makes use of a (co-) moving Lagrangian mesh. The code has a 2D and 3D version, contains utility programs to generate initial conditions and visualize simulation snapshots, and its input/output is compatible with a number of other simulation codes, e.g. Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) and GIZMO (ascl:1410.003).

  1. Computing Proton Dose to Irregularly Moving Targets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, and 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  2. Russian Soyuz Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle, which carried the first resident crew to the International Space Station, moves toward the launch pad at the Baikonur complex in Kazakhstan. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960' until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.

  3. Future perspectives: Moving towards NCL treatments.

    PubMed

    Cotman, Susan L; Mole, Sara E; Kohan, Romina

    2015-10-01

    Clinicians, basic researchers, representatives from pharma and families from around the world met in Cordoba, Argentina in October, 2014 to discuss recent research progress at the 14th International Congress on Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCLs; Batten disease), a group of clinically overlapping fatal, inherited lysosomal disorders with primarily neurodegenerative symptoms. This brief review article will provide perspectives on the anticipated future directions of NCL basic and clinical research as we move towards improved diagnosis, care and treatment of NCL patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease). PMID:25857620

  4. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  5. Computing proton dose to irregularly moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Shackleford, James A.; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods: The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results: A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, 95.7% with 3 cm drift in the

  6. Compressor Has No Moving Macroscopic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max

    1995-01-01

    Compressor containing no moving macroscopic parts functions by alternating piston and valve actions of successive beds of magnetic particles. Fabricated easily because no need for precisely fitting parts rotating or sliding on each other. Also no need for lubricant fluid contaminating fluid to be compressed. Compressor operates continuously, eliminating troublesome on/off cycling of other compressors, and decreasing consumption of energy. Phased cells push fluid from bottom to top, adding increments of pressure. Each cell contains magnetic powder particles loose when electromagnet coil deenergized, but tightly packed when coil energized.

  7. Fast bilateral filtering using recursive moving sum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Masaki; Ikebe, Masayuki; Shimoyama, Sohsuke; Motohisa, Junichi

    We propose a constant-time algorithm for a bilateral filter. Bilateral filter can be converted into the operation of three-dimensional (3D) convolution. By using recursive moving sum, we can reduce the number of calculations needed to construct a pseudo-Gaussian filter. Applying one-dimensional Gaussian filter to the 3D convolution, we achieved a constant-time bilateral filter. We used a 3-GHz CPU without SIMD instructions, or multi-thread operations. We confirmed our proposed bilateral filter to be processed in constant time. In practical conditions, high PSNR values over 40 dB are obtained.

  8. Tests to Help Plan Opportunity Moves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Rover engineers check how a test rover moves in material chosen to simulate some difficult Mars driving conditions. The scene is inside the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. These tests in early May 2005 were designed to help plan the best way for the rover Opportunity to drive off of a soft-sand dune that the rover dug itself into the previous week. The mixture of sandy and powdery material brought in for these specific tests matched the way the soil underneath Opportunity caked onto wheels, filling the spaces between the cleats on the wheels.

  9. Computational cameras for moving iris recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, Scott; Venkatesha, Sharath

    2015-05-01

    Iris-based biometric identification is increasingly used for facility access and other security applications. Like all methods that exploit visual information, however, iris systems are limited by the quality of captured images. Optical defocus due to a small depth of field (DOF) is one such challenge, as is the acquisition of sharply-focused iris images from subjects in motion. This manuscript describes the application of computational motion-deblurring cameras to the problem of moving iris capture, from the underlying theory to system considerations and performance data.

  10. Light scattering from a moving atom.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2012-12-01

    In this work, scattering of an incident electric field from a moving atom is reexamined classically in two steps: the time-dependent current density created by the field inside the atom is first calculated under the electric-dipole approximation, and is then used to calculate the field scattered from the atom. Unlike the conventional frame-hopping method, the present method does not need to treat the Doppler effect as an effect separated from the scattering process, and it derives instead of simply uses the Doppler effect. PMID:23455906

  11. A Trajectory and Orientation Reconstruction Method for Moving Objects Based on a Moving Monocular Camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Shang, Yang; Zhang, Xiaohu; Yu, Wenxian

    2015-01-01

    We propose a monocular trajectory intersection method to solve the problem that a monocular moving camera cannot be used for three-dimensional reconstruction of a moving object point. The necessary and sufficient condition of when this method has the unique solution is provided. An extended application of the method is to not only achieve the reconstruction of the 3D trajectory, but also to capture the orientation of the moving object, which would not be obtained by PnP problem methods due to lack of features. It is a breakthrough improvement that develops the intersection measurement from the traditional “point intersection” to “trajectory intersection” in videometrics. The trajectory of the object point can be obtained by using only linear equations without any initial value or iteration; the orientation of the object with poor conditions can also be calculated. The required condition for the existence of definite solution of this method is derived from equivalence relations of the orders of the moving trajectory equations of the object, which specifies the applicable conditions of the method. Simulation and experimental results show that it not only applies to objects moving along a straight line, or a conic and another simple trajectory, but also provides good result for more complicated trajectories, making it widely applicable. PMID:25760053

  12. Robust Morphological Averages in Three Dimensions for Anatomical Atlas Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Jorge; Bloch, Isabelle; Schmitt, Francis

    2004-09-01

    We present original methods for obtaining robust, anatomical shape-based averages of features of the human head anatomy from a normal population. Our goals are computerized atlas construction with representative anatomical features and morphopometry for specific populations. A method for true-morphological averaging is proposed, consisting of a suitable blend of shape-related information for N objects to obtain a progressive average. It is made robust by penalizing, in a morphological sense, the contributions of features less similar to the current average. Morphological error and similarity, as well as penalization, are based on the same paradigm as the morphological averaging.

  13. Calculating High Speed Centrifugal Compressor Performance from Averaged Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Fangyuan; Fleming, Ryan; Key, Nicole L.

    2012-12-01

    To improve the understanding of high performance centrifugal compressors found in modern aircraft engines, the aerodynamics through these machines must be experimentally studied. To accurately capture the complex flow phenomena through these devices, research facilities that can accurately simulate these flows are necessary. One such facility has been recently developed, and it is used in this paper to explore the effects of averaging total pressure and total temperature measurements to calculate compressor performance. Different averaging techniques (including area averaging, mass averaging, and work averaging) have been applied to the data. Results show that there is a negligible difference in both the calculated total pressure ratio and efficiency for the different techniques employed. However, the uncertainty in the performance parameters calculated with the different averaging techniques is significantly different, with area averaging providing the least uncertainty.

  14. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  15. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  16. Standleg Moving Granular Bed Filter development program

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1992-11-01

    The design, fabrication, and installation of the cold flow test facility has been completed. The SMGBF test facility shown in Figure 2 consists of a solids feed hopper, a transparent test vessel, a screw conveyor, a 55-gal drum for solids storage, a dust feeder, a baghouse filter, and the associated instrumentation for flow and pressure control and measurement. The standleg is 11-in ID by 3-ft long, and also transparent to facilitate observation. The crushed acrylic particles of characteristics shown in Table 1 are used as the bed media. The bed particles were selected, by maintaining the particle size while reducing the particle density, to simulate the minimum fluidization velocity expected under high-temperature, high-pressure conditions. By maintaining the particle size, the bed effectively simulates the bed packing and voidage in the moving bed which is directly related to the efficiency of particulate removal and pressure drop characteristics. The test facility performed as designed and no particular difficulties were encountered. The baseline data on pressure profiles across the stationary and the moving granular beds were obtained for gas face velocities up to 6 ft/s, higher than the minimum fluidization velocity of the bed material (5 ft/s), and no visible fluidization was observed at the base of the standleg. This confirms the operational feasibility of the compact SMGBF design.

  17. Standleg Moving Granular Bed Filter development program

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and installation of the cold flow test facility has been completed. The SMGBF test facility shown in Figure 2 consists of a solids feed hopper, a transparent test vessel, a screw conveyor, a 55-gal drum for solids storage, a dust feeder, a baghouse filter, and the associated instrumentation for flow and pressure control and measurement. The standleg is 11-in ID by 3-ft long, and also transparent to facilitate observation. The crushed acrylic particles of characteristics shown in Table 1 are used as the bed media. The bed particles were selected, by maintaining the particle size while reducing the particle density, to simulate the minimum fluidization velocity expected under high-temperature, high-pressure conditions. By maintaining the particle size, the bed effectively simulates the bed packing and voidage in the moving bed which is directly related to the efficiency of particulate removal and pressure drop characteristics. The test facility performed as designed and no particular difficulties were encountered. The baseline data on pressure profiles across the stationary and the moving granular beds were obtained for gas face velocities up to 6 ft/s, higher than the minimum fluidization velocity of the bed material (5 ft/s), and no visible fluidization was observed at the base of the standleg. This confirms the operational feasibility of the compact SMGBF design.

  18. Focusing on moving targets through scattering samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Edward Haojiang; Ruan, Haowen; Yang, Changhuei; Judkewitz, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Focusing light through scattering media has been a longstanding goal of biomedical optics. While wavefront shaping and optical time-reversal techniques can in principle be used to focus light across scattering media, achieving this within a scattering medium with a noninvasive and efficient reference beacon, or guide star, remains an important challenge. Here, we show optical time-reversal focusing using a new technique termed Time Reversal by Analysis of Changing wavefronts from Kinetic targets (TRACK). By taking the difference between time-varying scattering fields caused by a moving object and applying optical time reversal, light can be focused back to the location previously occupied by the object. We demonstrate this approach with discretely moved objects as well as with particles in an aqueous flow, and obtain a focal peak-to-background strength of 204 in our demonstration experiments. We further demonstrate that the generated focus can be used to noninvasively count particles in a flow-cytometry configuration—even when the particles are hidden behind a strong diffuser. By achieving optical time reversal and focusing noninvasively without any external guide stars, using just the intrinsic characteristics of the sample, this work paves the way to a range of scattering media imaging applications, including underwater and atmospheric focusing as well as noninvasive in vivo flow cytometry. PMID:25621302

  19. Preparation for Moving a Rock on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander enlarged a trench beside a rock called 'Headless' during the mission's 115th Martian day (Sept. 20, 2008) in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image later that afternoon, showing the enlarged trench and the rock.

    The robotic arm successfully moved the rock two days later.

    The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been.

    Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape. The trench, called 'Neverland,' was excavated to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep near the rock. The ground surface between the rock and the lip of the trench slopes downward about 3 degrees toward the trench.

    This image was taken at about 4:35 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The view is to the north northeast of the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Deciphering Interactions in Moving Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gautrais, Jacques; Ginelli, Francesco; Fournier, Richard; Blanco, Stéphane; Soria, Marc; Chaté, Hugues; Theraulaz, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Collective motion phenomena in large groups of social organisms have long fascinated the observer, especially in cases, such as bird flocks or fish schools, where large-scale highly coordinated actions emerge in the absence of obvious leaders. However, the mechanisms involved in this self-organized behavior are still poorly understood, because the individual-level interactions underlying them remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the power of a bottom-up methodology to build models for animal group motion from data gathered at the individual scale. Using video tracks of fish shoal in a tank, we show how a careful, incremental analysis at the local scale allows for the determination of the stimulus/response function governing an individual's moving decisions. We find in particular that both positional and orientational effects are present, act upon the fish turning speed, and depend on the swimming speed, yielding a novel schooling model whose parameters are all estimated from data. Our approach also leads to identify a density-dependent effect that results in a behavioral change for the largest groups considered. This suggests that, in confined environment, the behavioral state of fish and their reaction patterns change with group size. We debate the applicability, beyond the particular case studied here, of this novel framework for deciphering interactions in moving animal groups. PMID:23028277